WorldWideScience

Sample records for lessons materials needed

  1. Material science lesson from the biological photosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Lee, Jun Ho; Ha, Heonjin; Im, Sang Won; Nam, Ki Tae

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by photosynthesis, artificial systems for a sustainable energy supply are being designed. Each sequential energy conversion process from light to biomass in natural photosynthesis is a valuable model for an energy collection, transport and conversion system. Notwithstanding the numerous lessons of nature that provide inspiration for new developments, the features of natural photosynthesis need to be reengineered to meet man's demands. This review describes recent strategies toward adapting key lessons from natural photosynthesis to artificial systems. We focus on the underlying material science in photosynthesis that combines photosystems as pivotal functional materials and a range of materials into an integrated system. Finally, a perspective on the future development of photosynthesis mimetic energy systems is proposed.

  2. Composite Materials: An Educational Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Snide, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the need to incorporate the concepts and applications of advanced composite materials into existing chemical engineering programs. Discussed are the justification for, and implementation of topics including transport phenomena, kinetics and reactor design, unit operations, and product and process design. (CW)

  3. Biomimicry as a route to new materials: what kinds of lessons are useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Emily J; Klumb, Lisa; Koobatian, Maxwell; Viney, Christopher

    2009-04-28

    We consider the attributes of a successful engineered material, acknowledging the contributions of composition and processing to properties and performance. We recognize the potential for relevant lessons to be learned from nature, at the same time conceding both the limitations of such lessons and our need to be selective. We then give some detailed attention to the molecular biomimicry of filamentous phage, the process biomimicry of silk and the structure biomimicry of hippopotamus 'sweat', in each case noting that the type of lesson now being learned is not the same as the potential lesson that originally motivated the study.

  4. Integrating UNESCO ICT-Based Instructional Materials in Chemistry Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLIE P. NACARIO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effectiveness of the lessons in Chemistry integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional material on the achievement of Chemistry students at Central Bicol State University of Agriculture. It aimed to identify lessons that may be developed integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials, determine the effect of the developed lessons using the material on: conceptual understanding; science process skills; and attitude towards chemistry and gather insights from the experiences of the students and teacher. The study used the single group pretest and posttest experimental design. Descriptive, quantitative and qualitative techniques were also utilized. Quantitative data were taken from the pretest-posttest results on the Test on Conceptual Understanding, Science Process Skills and Chemistry Attitudinaire. Qualitative data were drawn from the experts’ assessment of the developed lessons and research instruments, and the insights of students and teacher. The developed lessons integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials were Atomic Model and Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, Chemical Bonding, and Balancing Chemical Equation. These lessons increased the conceptual understanding of the students by topic and skill from very low mastery to average mastery level. The students have slightly improved along the different science process skills. After teaching the lessons, the students’ attitude also improved. The students became more motivated and interested in Chemistry and the lessons were student centered and entailed teacher’s competence and flexibility in computer use.

  5. Applying cinematic materials at geography lessons with suggestopedic educational technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вікторія Салімон

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the use of cinematic materials, especially materials from feature films as one of the best means to assimilate the information on the lessons with suggestopedic educational technology. Scientific research of this method including on geography  essons, have been analyzed. Modern pupils study, learn and grow under the influence of communication technologies, so they require a rapid response and adaptation to modern conditions, as well as other interests, a special motivation in training. Feature films, like nothing else, captivates the modern youth, so there is an opportunity to use the screen art for educational purposes and effect of the suggestopedic influence allows pupils to perceive a large amount of information. The use of cinematic materials with suggestopedic educational technology on geography lessons belongs to audiovisual learning tools, giving the opportunity to acquire different modern motivating knowledge. After analyzing suggestive teaching methods, the results of these methods application have been presented, the essence of cinematic materials use as audiovisual learning tools, especially materials from feature films, on suggestopedic lessons and feasibility of their use in the educational process have been described. The authors propose to focus on artistic learning tools or means of art, as a special type of vacated (released stimulating didactical art, that reveals the spare capacity in education and improves memorization and understanding of the studied material when using cinematic materials on geography lessons with suggestopedic educational technology. Methodical recommendations for the suggestopedic lesson using cinematic materials for the topic «Major relief forms of dry land of the Earth. Mountains» in the general geographic course have been suggested.

  6. An Assessment of Need for Instructional Professional Development for Middle School Science Teachers Using Interactive Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Amanda

    Numerous studies on the impact of interactive lessons on student learning have been conducted, but there has been a lack of professional development (PD) programs at a middle school focusing on ways to incorporate interactive lessons into the science classroom setting. The purpose of this case study was to examine the instructional practices of science teachers to determine whether the need for an interactive lessons approach to teaching students exists. This qualitative case study focused on teachers' perceptions and pedagogy to determine whether the need to use interactive lessons to meet the needs of all students is present. The research question focused on identifying current practices and determining whether a need for interactive lessons is present. Qualitative data were gathered from science teachers at the school through interviews, lesson plans, and observations, all of which were subsequently coded using an interpretative analysis. The results indicated the need for a professional development (PD) program centered on interactive science lessons. Upon completion of the qualitative study, a detailed PD program has been proposed to increase the instructional practices of science teachers to incorporate interactive lessons within the science classroom. Implications for positive social change include improved teaching strategies and lessons that are more student-centered resulting in better understanding and comprehension, as well as performance on state-mandated tests.

  7. Object Lessons: Thinking about Material Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This article describes why art educators might consider studying material forms from everyday life, presents suggestions for exploring them in an art classroom, and includes an example to illustrate teaching about an object of material culture. The author presents reasons for studying material culture in the art classroom and offers suggestions…

  8. Lessons learned by southern states in transportation of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report has been prepared under a cooperative agreement with DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and is a summary of the lessons learned by southern states regarding the transportation of radioactive materials including High-Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). Sources used in this publication include interviews of state radiological health and public safety officials that are members of the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) Advisory Committee on Radioactive Materials Transportation, as well as the Board's Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transportation Working Group. Other sources include letters written by the above mentioned committees concerning various aspects of DOE shipment campaigns

  9. Meeting Local Needs in Materials Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Al-Mahrooqi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Textbooks are viewed as an essential tool in ELT. Despite the abundance of commercial textbooks, very few of them seem to meet the local needs of students and teachers in a certain context, owing to certain pitfalls in the materials. When a program adopts a certain commercial textbook the teachers soon realize that they have to supplement the materials to bridge the gap between what these materials offer and the local needs. Sometimes the supplementation yields greater volumes of materials than the book itself, causing teachers and learners to lose focus. An added complexity is the fact that there are always new, more attractive titles in the market, leaving the program in a dilemma of whether to keep their old, well supplemented textbooks or to replace them with new ones and start another cycle of supplementation. The ideal solution is for a program to produce its own teaching materials. However, writing quality local materials that can compete with commercial ones can be a real challenge. It requires clear vision, creativity, commitment and team work.

  10. Nuclear data needs for material analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Gabor L.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear data for material analysis using neutron-based methods are examined. Besides a critical review of the available data, emphasis is given to emerging application areas and new experimental techniques. Neutron scattering and reaction data, as well as decay data for delayed and prompt gamma activation analysis are all discussed in detail. Conclusions are formed concerning the need of new measurement, calculation, evaluation and dissemination activities. (author)

  11. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m 3 versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m 3 ), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.)

  12. Do We Need Separate Space Theory: The Lessons of History

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marheine, Fred

    2001-01-01

    .... Professionals throughout the Department of Defense and other branches of the US government have long debated the need to produce separate space theory or whether a modified version of air theory...

  13. NASA Composite Materials Development: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Pipes, R. Byron; Johnston, Norman

    2009-01-01

    Composite materials have emerged as the materials of choice for increasing the performance and reducing the weight and cost of military, general aviation, and transport aircraft and space launch vehicles. Major advancements have been made in the ability to design, fabricate, and analyze large complex aerospace structures. The recent efforts by Boeing and Airbus to incorporate composite into primary load carrying structures of large commercial transports and to certify the airworthiness of these structures is evidence of the significant advancements made in understanding and use of these materials in real world aircraft. NASA has been engaged in research on composites since the late 1960 s and has worked to address many development issues with these materials in an effort to ensure safety, improve performance, and improve affordability of air travel for the public good. This research has ranged from synthesis of advanced resin chemistries to development of mathematical analyses tools to reliably predict the response of built-up structures under combined load conditions. The lessons learned from this research are highlighted with specific examples to illustrate the problems encountered and solutions to these problems. Examples include specific technologies related to environmental effects, processing science, fabrication technologies, nondestructive inspection, damage tolerance, micromechanics, structural mechanics, and residual life prediction. The current state of the technology is reviewed and key issues requiring additional research identified. Also, grand challenges to be solved for expanded use of composites in aero structures are identified.

  14. Lessons learnt regarding climate service needs for local government

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murambadoro, Miriam D

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available in the province; Droughts Strong winds Flash floods Thunderstorms Disease outbreaks e.g. diarrhoea Hailstorm High temperatures Drying Changes in land cover Shifts in rainfall season resulting in late rains Frost Increased health risks area – mosquitos, malaria... and other diseases Participants identified the following to be the things they need the most to respond effectively to climate change in Limpopo; • Access to funding at national and international level to implement projects • Improved information...

  15. Lessons learned from material management at Vandellos-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albarran, J.L. Santiago

    2003-01-01

    Declassification Container ' by means of a gamma spectrometry measuring system. On the basis of the experience this paper will describe the lessons learned in material management in Vandellos-I, in the areas of: - Organisation and planning; - Important role of logistics; - Capacity of the different storage areas; - Conservatism of the clearance process; - Cost/effort of Clearance process; - Recycle / Reuse; - Management and traceability of information

  16. Implementing drought early warning systems: policy lessons and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Ana; Werner, Micha; Maia, Rodrigo; Garrote, Luis; Nyabeze, Washington

    2014-05-01

    Drought forecasting and Warning provides the potential of reducing impacts to society due to drought events. The implementation of effective drought forecasting and warning, however, requires not only science to support reliable forecasting, but also adequate policy and societal response. Here we propose a protocol to develop drought forecasting and early warning based in the international cooperation of African and European institutions in the DEWFORA project (EC, 7th Framework Programme). The protocol includes four major phases that address the scientific knowledge and the social capacity to use the knowledge: (a) What is the science available? Evaluating how signs of impending drought can be detected and predicted, defining risk levels, and analysing of the signs of drought in an integrated vulnerability approach. (b) What are the societal capacities? In this the institutional framework that enables policy development is evaluated. The protocol gathers information on vulnerability and pending hazard in advance so that early warnings can be declared at sufficient lead time and drought mitigation planning can be implemented at an early stage. (c) How can science be translated into policy? Linking science indicators into the actions/interventions that society needs to implement, and evaluating how policy is implemented. Key limitations to planning for drought are the social capacities to implement early warning systems. Vulnerability assessment contributes to identify these limitations and therefore provides crucial information to policy development. Based on the assessment of vulnerability we suggest thresholds for management actions to respond to drought forecasts and link predictive indicators to relevant potential mitigation strategies. Vulnerability assessment is crucial to identify relief, coping and management responses that contribute to a more resilient society. (d) How can society benefit from the forecast? Evaluating how information is provided to

  17. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10 6 MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials

  18. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10/sup 6/ MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials.

  19. Materials aspects of world energy needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Plenary session papers presented by participants from both developed and developing countries contributed to the information base on materials and energy outlook, international cooperation, economic aspects, and environmental considerations and established the theme for the subsequent workshop sessions. Workshops on ten major aspects of materials-energy interrelationships provided the opportunity of open and informal discussion of critical issues in each area and the development of reasonable consensus on problems and potential solutions. A separate abstract for each of the 10 plenary-session papers, the 10 workshop reports, and the 4 selected papers will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). The brief issue summaries (preprints) will appear individually (total of 75) only in the DOE Energy Data Base.

  20. Fire Management Lessons Learned From the Cerro Grande (Los Alamos) Fire and Actions Needed to Reduce Fire Risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Barry

    2000-01-01

    We are here today to discuss two related issues, lessons learned from the recent Cerro Grande fire, and, on a broader note, actions needed to mitigate current hazardous forest conditions in the interior West...

  1. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials.

  2. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials

  3. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderson, Norris; Alexander, Catherine; Merzbacher, Celia; Chernicoff, William; Middendorf, Paul; Beck, Nancy; Chow, Flora; Poster, Dianne; Danello, Mary Ann; Barrera, Enriqueta

    2006-01-01

    ...) research and information needs related to understanding and management of potential risks of engineered nanoscale materials that may be used, for example, in commercial or consumer products, medical...

  4. Meeting the regulatory information needs of users of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDurmon, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    The use of radioactive materials is one of the most regulated areas of research. Researchers face ever increasing regulatory requirements and issues involving the disposal of radioactive material, while meeting the demands of higher productivity. Radiation safety programs must maximize regulatory compliance, minimize barriers, provide services and solutions, and effectively communicate with users of radioactive materials. This talk will discuss methods by which a radiation safety program can meet the needs of both the research staff and regulatory compliance staff

  5. Meeting the regulatory information needs of users of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDurmon, G.W. [American Cyanamid Company, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The use of radioactive materials is one of the most regulated areas of research. Researchers face ever increasing regulatory requirements and issues involving the disposal of radioactive material, while meeting the demands of higher productivity. Radiation safety programs must maximize regulatory compliance, minimize barriers, provide services and solutions, and effectively communicate with users of radioactive materials. This talk will discuss methods by which a radiation safety program can meet the needs of both the research staff and regulatory compliance staff.

  6. VVER operational safety improvements: lessons learnt from European co-operation and future research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdera, F.; Vasa, I.; Zd'arek, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper summarises involvement of Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) in the areas which are directly related to Reactor Operational Safety and Plant Life Management, it also gives an idea how results of the research projects can be used to enhance safety of VVER reactors. These issues are for many years subject of a wide international co-operation effort, covered by such programmes as PHARE, OECD/NEA TACIS, 5th Framework Programme. Nuclear Research Institute participated in the majority of these programmes and projects, which allowed us to evaluate benefits (especially for VVER reactors) of the projects already finalised or running, as well as to formulate so-called 'future research needs', which possibly may be pursued within 6th Framework Programme. The paper highlights the main features of some projects our Institute was and is involved in, emphasising the most important results, expectations and future needs. It also very briefly, deals with some general and particular lessons learnt within these projects and their application to VVER reactors, especially as to their safety improvement. The paper also mentions VVER-focused projects and activities, co-ordinated by the OECD, which should enable to extend multilateral contacts already existing between organisations of the EU countries to include organisations from Russia, USA, Japan and possibly some other countries

  7. Object Lessons: Material Culture on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mires, Charlene

    2001-01-01

    Describes the content of a course on material culture for undergraduate students that was separated into two sections: (1) first students read books and analyzed artifacts; and (2) then the class explored the Centennial Exhibition held in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) in 1876, applying material culture methods and constructing a Web site from their…

  8. Bioinspired self-healing materials: lessons from nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaldi, Joseph C

    2018-01-01

    Healing is an intrinsic ability in the incredibly biodiverse populations of the plant and animal kingdoms created through evolution. Plants and animals approach healing in similar ways but with unique pathways, such as damage containment in plants or clotting in animals. After analyzing the examples of healing and defense mechanisms found in living nature, eight prevalent mechanisms were identified: reversible muscle control, clotting, cellular response, layering, protective surfaces, vascular networks or capsules, exposure, and replenishable functional coatings. Then the relationship between these mechanisms, nature’s best (evolutionary) methods of mitigating and healing damage, and existing technology in self-healing materials are described. The goals of this top-level overview are to provide a framework for relating the behavior seen in living nature to bioinspired materials, act as a resource to addressing the limitations/problems with existing materials, and open up new avenues of insight and research into self-healing materials. PMID:29600152

  9. Assessment of research needs for wind turbine rotor materials technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    1991-01-01

    ... on Assessment of Research Needs for Wind Turbine Rotor Materials Technology Energy Engineering Board Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1991 Copyrightthe true use are Please breaks Page inserted. accidentally typesetting been have may original the from errors not...

  10. Polymer materials basic research needs for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknight, W.J.; Baer, E.; Nelson, R.D. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    The larger field covered in the workshop consists of (1) synthesis and characterization, (2) physical chemistry, (3) physics, and (4) engineering. Polymeric materials are properly regarded as new materials in their own right, not as replacements for existing materials. As such they need to be studied to understand the properties which are unique to them by virtue of their particular molecular structures. Technological applications will rationally follow from such studies. It is the objective of this report to point out basic research needs in polymer materials related to energy. The development of sophisticated instrumentation makes the task of molecular characterization possible on a level hitherto unattainable. Many of these instruments because of their size and complexity must of necessity be located at the DOE National Laboratories. The importance of personnel trained in the polymer field located at these facilities is emphasized. In the past there has been relatively little concerted polymer research within the energy community. This report attempts to describe the present situation and point out some needs and future research directions. (GHT)

  11. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center

  12. Specialized equipment needs for the transportation of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condrey, D.; Lambert, M.

    1998-01-01

    To ensure the safe and reliable transportation of radioactive materials and components, from both the front and back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, a transport management company needs three key elements: specialized knowledge, training and specialized equipment. These three elements result, in part, from national and international regulations which require specialized handling of all radioactive shipments. While the reasons behind the first two elements are readily apparent, the role of specialized equipment is often not considered until too late shipment process even though it plays an integral part of any radioactive material transport. This paper will describe the specialized equipment needed to transport three of the major commodities comprising the bulk of international nuclear transports: natural uranium (UF6), low enriched uranium (UF6) and fresh nuclear fuel. (authors)

  13. Operation Iraqi Freedom: DOD Should Apply Lessons Learned Concerning the Need for Security over Conventional Munitions Storage Sites to Future Operations Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Agostino, Davi M

    2007-01-01

    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is releasing a report today on lessons learned concerning the need for security over conventional munitions storage sites that provides the basis for this testimony...

  14. Need for organic reference materials in marine science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, D.E.

    1988-12-01

    The reference materials (RMs) available for organic trace analysis (OTA) and the development programmes of the RM producers are reviewed. The need for a wider range of determinants, matrices and classes of RMs, particularly the more widespread use of laboratory RMs (LRMs) is discussed. Additional certified RMs should include phenolic surfactant degradation products, chlorophenolics from the wood and paper industries, and organobromines from fire retardants. RMs as molecular markers of geogenic, pyrogenic and biogenic sources; chlorophylls and xanthophylls as a measure of marine productivity and natural shellfish toxins are proposed.

  15. Alternative routes for highway shipments of radioactive materials and lessons learned from state designations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    Pursuant to the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Department of Transportation (DOT) has promulgated a comprehensive set of regulations regarding the highway transportation of high-level radioactive materials. These regulations, under docket numbers HM-164 and HM-164A, establish interstate highways as the preferred routes for the transportation of radioactive materials within and through the states. The regulations also provide a methodology by which a state may select altemative routes. First, the state must establish a ''state routing agency'', defined as an entity authorized to use the state legal process to impose routing requirements on carriers of radioactive material (49 CFR 171.8). Once identified, the state routing agency must select routes in accordance with DOTs Guidelines for Selecting Preferred Highway Routes for Large Quantity Shipments of Radioactive Materials or an equivalent routing analysis. Adjoining states and localities should be consulted on the impact of proposed alternative routes as a prerequisite of final route selection. Lastly, the states must provide written notice to DOT of any alternative route designation before the routes are deemed effective. The purpose of this report is to discuss the ''lessons learned'' by the five states within the southern region that have designated alternative or preferred routes under the regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) established for the transportation of radioactive materials. The document was prepared by reviewing applicable federal laws and regulations, examining state reports and documents and contacting state officials and routing agencies involved in making routing decisions. In undertaking this project, the Southern States Energy Board hopes to reveal the process used by states that have designated alternative routes and thereby share their experiences (i.e., lessons learned) with other southern states that have yet to make designations

  16. Protecting nuclear material and facilities: Is a new approach needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.; Bunn, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The main reason why national physical protection (PP) systems for nuclear and other radioactive material need to be strengthened further is that, after the attacks on the US on 11 September 2001, the threat of dangerous, suicidal radiological and nuclear terrorism can no longer be excluded as a possibility. Existing PP systems were not designed to deal with the threat of suicidal terrorists having the numbers, skills, training, and resources available to the commandos attacking on 11 September. Moreover, there are no mandatory international standards for domestic PP systems for nuclear or radioactive material, and this has produced great variation in protection provided from country to country. IAEA recommended standards, while useful, were not designed with the new terrorist threat in mind. Moreover, they are often not followed in practice. The result is inadequate protection against the new form of terrorism in most countries. The Director General of the IAEA expressed a similar view after 11 September, but achieving a consensus to amend the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) to require specific standards of protection for different amounts and kinds of nuclear material used or stored domestically (not in international transport) has been impossible in the year since 11 September. In the case of radiological materials, a new effort to provide required international standards for protection against the new form of terrorism has not begun. In the summer of 2001, leaders of the G-8 countries agreed to a Global Partnership to prevent the new terrorists from acquiring nuclear and radiological as well as other materials related to weapons of mass destruction. Perhaps in part because of the failure to date to achieve agreement on an effective amendment to the CPPNM, the first principle of this partnership is to strengthen 'multilateral treaties and other instruments whose aim is to prevent the proliferation or illicit

  17. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems

  18. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)

  19. Needs study of polymer materials concrete constructions; Behovsstudie av polymera material i betongkonstruktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomfeldt, Thomas; Bergsjoe, Petter

    2013-02-15

    Polymeric materials are frequently used in concrete constructions at hydro and nuclear power facilities. They are most commonly used as expansion joints, seals, lead-thought's, coatings and as additives in cement or mortar. Polymeric materials in concrete constructions are difficult to evaluate, since they are often located within the concrete construction. In some cases the materials have been in place for over 30 years. In addition, these materials are also used to a great extent e.g. as protective coating on all concrete in a nuclear power plant or as several kilometres of joints. Replacing these materials is difficult, time consuming and very costly. That is why it is of great importance to evaluate their actual status and life-time expectancy with the largest possible precision. This report summarises the research needs in nuclear and hydro power regarding polymers in concrete constructions. During the project information has been gathered through inspections, interviews and surveys, to obtain the clearest possible picture of which polymeric components that have a need of in-depth research. In this project the nuclear power plants Oskarshamn (O1, O2 and O3), Forsmark (F2) and Ringhals (R1, R2 and R3) were visited. In the field of hydro power the concrete laboratory of Vattenfall R and D in Aalvkarleby and the hydro power plants of Aalvkarleby and Olidan were visited. The studies indicate that there are different needs for hydro and nuclear power. The survey showed that hydro-power facilities have a greater interest in joints. The nuclear power plants are more interested in components that are related to either the plant's security or if the component could lead to high future maintenance costs.

  20. Changes over swim lessons in parents' perceptions of children's supervision needs in drowning risk situations: "His swimming has improved so now he can keep himself safe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Sandomierski, Megan; Spence, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine how children's participation in swim lessons impacts parents' appraisals of children's drowning risk and need for supervision. Parents with 2-5-year old children enrolled in community swim lessons completed the same survey measures up to 4 times over an 8-month period. Multilevel regression analyses examining temporal relationships between parents' perceptions of their child's swim ability, supervision needs around water, and children's ability to keep themselves safe in drowning risk situations revealed that as children progressed through swim lessons, parents' perceptions of their child's swim ability and their belief that children are capable of keeping themselves safe around water increased. Further, the relation between parents' perceptions of swim ability and judgments of children's supervision needs was mediated through parents' judgment about their child's ability to secure their own safety near water. As parents perceive their child to be accumulating swim skills, they increasingly believe that children are capable of keeping themselves from drowning, and as a result, that less active parent supervision of their child is necessary. Implications of these findings for intervention efforts to counter this unwelcome way of thinking that may arise through continued participation in swim lessons are discussed. Incorporating a parent-focused component into children's learn-to-swim programs to promote more realistic appraisals of children's supervision needs and drowning risks may further enhance the positive benefits that swim lessons have for children's safety.

  1. Structural integrity for DEMO: An opportunity to close the gap from materials science to engineering needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porton, M., E-mail: michael.porton@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wynne, B.P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Bamber, R.; Hardie, C.D.; Kalsey, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Key shortfalls in the current approaches to verification of structural integrity are outlined. • Case studies for high integrity applications in other demanding environments are examined. • Relevant lessons are drawn from fission and space for the design stage and through service life. • Future efforts are suggested to align materials and engineering for DEMO structural integrity. - Abstract: It is clear that fusion demonstration devices offer unique challenges due to the myriad, interacting material degradation effects and the numerous, conflicting requirements that must be addressed in order for in-vessel components to deliver satisfactory performance over the required lifetime. The link between mechanical engineering and materials science is pivotal to assure the timely realisation and exploitation of successful fusion power. A key aspect of this link is the verification of structural integrity, achieved at the design stage via structural design criteria against which designs are judged to be sufficiently resilient (or not) to failure, for a given set of loading conditions and desired lifetime. As various demonstration power plant designs progress through their current conceptual design phases, this paper seeks to highlight key shortfalls in this vital link between engineering needs and materials science, offering a perspective on where future attention can be prioritised to maximise impact. Firstly, issues in applying existing structural design criteria to demonstration power plant designs are identified. Whilst fusion offers particular challenges, there are significant insights to be gained from attempts to address such issues for high performance, high integrity applications in other demanding environments. Therefore case studies from beyond fusion are discussed. These offer examples where similar shortfalls have been successfully addressed, via approaches at the design stage and through service lifetime in order to deliver significant

  2. PENGUASAAN KONSEP DAN KEMAMPUAN BERTANYA SISWA PADA MATERI HUKUM NEWTON MELALUI PEMBELAJARAN INQUIRY LESSON DENGAN STRATEGI LBQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfiyah Nur Jannah

    2016-03-01

    Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui penguasaan konsep dan kemampuan bertanya siswa pada materi hukum Newton dalam pembelajaran inquiry lesson dengan strategi LBQ, serta mengetahui respons siswa terhadap pembelajaran inquiry lesson dengan strategi LBQ. Jenis penelitian ini adalah Mixed Methods desain embedded experimental dengan subjek 36 siswa kelas X MIA 6 SMA Negeri 1 Krian. Analisis kuantitatif dilakukan untuk mengetahui data penguasaan konsep siswa dan data respons siswa terhadap pembelajaran. Analisis kualitatif dilakukan untuk mengetahui kemampuan bertanya siswa dan respons siswa terhadap pembelajaran. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: siswa mampu mencapai indikator tertinggi pencapaian konsep yaitu level C6 dan sebagian besar siswa SMA memiliki penguasaan konsep pada level C5, kemampuan bertanya siswa meningkat pada setiap pertemuan dimana siswa menjadi lebih percaya diri untuk menyampaikan pertanyaan maupun pendapat saat mengikuti pengajaran fisika, dan siswa memberikan respons positif sebesar 65,28% terhadap pembelajaran inquiry lesson dengan strategi LBQ.

  3. Transport of radioactive materials: the need for radiation protection programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masinza, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    The increase in the use of radioactive materials worldwide requires that these materials be moved from production sites to the end user or in the case of radioactive waste, from the waste generator to the repository. Tens of millions of packages containing radioactive material are consigned for transport each year throughout the world. The amount of radioactive material in these packages varies from negligible quantities in shipments of consumer products to very large quantities of shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel. Transport is the main way in which the radioactive materials being moved get into the public domain. The public is generally unaware of the lurking danger when transporting these hazardous goods. Thus radiation protection programmes are important to assure the public of the certainty of their safety during conveyance of these materials. Radioactive material is transported by land (road and rail), inland waterways, sea/ocean and air. These modes of transport are regulated by international 'modal' regulations. The international community has formulated controls to reduce the number of accidents and mitigate their consequences should they happen. When accidents involving the transport of radioactive material occur, it could result in injury, loss of life and pollution of the environment. In order to ensure the safety of people, property and the environment, national and international transport regulations have been developed. The appropriate authorities in each state utilise them to control the transport of radioactive material. Stringent measures are required in these regulations to ensure adequate containment, shielding and the prevention of criticality in all spheres of transport, i.e. routine, minor incidents and accident conditions. Despite the extensive application of these stringent safety controls, transport accidents involving packages containing radioactive material have occurred and will continue to occur. When a transport accident occurs, it

  4. High purity materials as targets for radioisotope production: Needs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lity of high purity target materials, natural or enriched, are crucial for any successful radioisotope pro- gramme. Selection ... and blockages detection in buried pipelines are rendered ..... from reputed international suppliers with analysis report.

  5. What Needs to be Changed based on Lessons Learned from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramova, V. N.

    2016-01-01

    aspect, cognitive and operational structures and formalized notation about personnel regulation activity. The researches have shown that individual psychological data of Chernobyl NPP personnel, which could be a direct cause of wrong actions and lead to the accident, were not differ from another nuclear power plant personnel ones. Analysis of psychological aspects of Chernobyl accident and investigation of plant personnel motivation changes in the accident consequences elimination environment confirm the necessity to develop concept of careful relation to worker. It is necessary to develop psychological support methodology to form human capital both in two aspects: professional personality formation and human resource management. The history asks the following questions: have the Chernobyl lessons been learned? Are our contemporaries and next generation ready to provide safety in the nuclear power plants? The terrorist attacks, military actions in the states who have nuclear power plants makes more complex problem of nuclear power plant, all mankind safety. (author)

  6. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Lesson with Interdisciplinary Connections for Middle-Level Music Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Mary Frances; Terry, Cynthia

    This lesson begins with a very brief biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lesson identifies its educational objectives; addresses National Standards for Music Education; lists materials needed; details six step-by-step classroom procedures for lesson implementation; and provides curriculum connections for language arts, visual art, physical…

  7. Desire to bargain and negotiation success: Lessons about the need to negotiate from six hydropower disputes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkardt, N.; Lamb, B.L.; Taylor, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    The authors investigated the notion that successful licensing negotiations require that all parties to the dispute must have a desire to bargain. This desire is most likely to be present when the dispute exhibits ripeness and each party believes a bargained solution is the most cost-effective way to resolve differences. Structured interviews of participants in six Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hydropower licensing consultations were conducted to determine the level of need to negotiate for each party. The findings indicate that a need to negotiate is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for success. Several factors were associated with a need to negotiate: a weak BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement); a salient issue; participants' sense of efficacy; a sense of inevitability; professional roles encouraging negotiation; and disputes about facts as opposed to disputes about values. Participants' need to negotiate fluctuated throughout the process and intensified when questions were ripe: i.e., critical issues were debated or the regulatory process required action

  8. Meeting Students' Needs on the Titanic: Lessons Learned While Closing a Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Kathryn L.

    In March 1991, the Regents of the University of Minnesota voted to close the two-year campus at Waseca (UMW) campus effective June 1992. Student needs were the overriding factor in administrative decision making during the final year. It was necessary to continue current services in a "normal," if modified, fashion, while at the same…

  9. Are parents just treading water? The impact of participation in swim lessons on parents' judgments of children's drowning risk, swimming ability, and supervision needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, Barbara A; Sandomierski, Megan; Schwebel, David C; Hagel, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of child mortality globally. Strategies that have been suggested to reduce pediatric drowning risk include increased parental awareness of children's swimming ability and drowning risk, improved adult supervision of child swimmers, and providing swim lessons to children. This study explored how parents' beliefs relevant to children's drowning risk, perception of children's swimming ability, and judgments of supervision needs changed as children aged two through 5 years accumulated experience in swim lessons, and compared a parent group who received regular, detailed feedback about their child's swim skills with one that did not. Parents completed questionnaire measures near the beginning and end of a series of 10 weekly swim lessons. Results revealed that parental accuracy in judging children's swimming abilities remained relatively poor even though it improved from the beginning to the end of the swim lessons. Supervision needs were underestimated and did not vary with program or change over the course of swim lessons. Children's ability to keep themselves from drowning was overestimated and did not change over lessons or vary with program; parents believed that children could save themselves from drowning by the age of 6.21 years. Parents who had experienced a close call for drowning showed greater awareness of children's drowning risk and endorsed more watchful and proximal supervision. Results suggest that expanding learn-to-swim programs to include a parent-focused component that provides detailed tracking of swim skills and delivers messaging targeting perceptions of children's drowning risk and supervision needs may serve to maximize the drowning protection afforded by these programs. Delivering messaging in the form of 'close-call' drowning stories may prove especially effective to impact parents' supervision practices in drowning risk situations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Activity Theory to Examine How Teachers' Lesson Plans Meet Students' Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhik, Estella Williams; Chizhik, Alexander Williams

    2018-01-01

    How is lesson planning useful? This research study used Cultural Historical Activity Theory and intersubjectivity to answer this questions. This research explored to what extent teacher candidates' lesson plans (i.e., alignment among objectives, assessment, and instruction), and analyses of assessment data mediate their thinking about students'…

  11. Needs for disaster medicine: lessons from the field of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushizawa, Hiroto; Foxwell, Alice Ruth; Bice, Steven; Matsui, Tamano; Ueki, Yutaka; Tosaka, Naoki; Shoko, Tomohisa; Aiboshi, Junichi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake, which occurred in Tohoku, Japan on 11 March 2011, was followed by a devastating tsunami and damage to nuclear power plants that resulted in radiation leakage. The medical care, equipment and communication needs of four Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMAT) during four missions are discussed. DMATs are medically trained mobile teams used in the acute phase of disasters. The DMATs conducted four missions in devastated areas from the day of the earthquake to day 10. The first and second missions were to triage, resuscitate and treat trauma victims in Tokyo and Miyagi, respectively. The third mission was to conduct emergency medicine and primary care in Iwate. The fourth was to assist with the evacuation and screening of inpatients with radiation exposure in Fukushima. Triage, resuscitation and trauma expertise and equipment were required in Missions 1 and 2. Emergency medicine in hospitals and primary care in first-aid stations and evacuation areas were required for Mission 3. In Mission 4, the DMAT assisted with evacuation by ambulances and buses and screened people for radiation exposure. Only land phones and transceivers were available for Missions 1 to 3 although they were ineffective for urgent purposes. These DMAT missions showed that there are new needs for DMATs in primary care, radiation screening and evacuation after the acute phase of a disaster. Alternative methods for communication infrastructure post-disaster need to be investigated with telecommunication experts.

  12. Needs for disaster medicine: lessons from the field of the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Shoko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem: The Great East Japan Earthquake, which occurred in Tohoku, Japan on 11 March 2011, was followed by a devastating tsunami and damage to nuclear power plants that resulted in radiation leakage. Context: The medical care, equipment and communication needs of four Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMAT during four missions are discussed. DMATs are medically trained mobile teams used in the acute phase of disasters. Action: The DMATs conducted four missions in devastated areas from the day of the earthquake to day 10. The first and second missions were to triage, resuscitate and treat trauma victims in Tokyo and Miyagi, respectively. The third mission was to conduct emergency medicine and primary care in Iwate. The fourth was to assist with the evacuation and screening of inpatients with radiation exposure in Fukushima. Outcome: Triage, resuscitation and trauma expertise and equipment were required in Missions 1 and 2. Emergency medicine in hospitals and primary care in first-aid stations and evacuation areas were required for Mission 3. In Mission 4, the DMAT assisted with evacuation by ambulances and buses and screened people for radiation exposure. Only land phones and transceivers were available for Missions 1 to 3 although they were ineffective for urgent purposes. Discussion: These DMAT missions showed that there are new needs for DMATs in primary care, radiation screening and evacuation after the acute phase of a disaster. Alternative methods for communication infrastructure post-disaster need to be investigated with telecommunication experts.

  13. Oxide growth and exfoliation of materials in steam tubing. Lesson 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry; Bursik, Albert

    2011-04-15

    University 101 courses are typically designed to help incoming first-year undergraduate students to adjust to the university, develop a better understanding of the college environment, and acquire essential academic success skills. Why are we offering a special Boiler and HRSG Tube Failures PPChem 101? The answer is simple, yet very conclusive: - There is a lack of knowledge on the identification of tube failure mechanisms and for the implementation of adequate counteractions in many power plants, particularly at industrial power and steam generators. - There is a lack of knowledge to prevent repeat tube failures. The vast majority of BTF/HTF have been, and continue to be, repeat failures. It is hoped that the information about the failure mechanisms of BTF supplied in this course will help to put plant engineers and chemists on the right track. The major goal of this course is the avoidance of repeat BTF. This ninth lesson is focused on Oxide Growth and Exfoliation of Materials in Steam Tubing. (orig.)

  14. Hygiene on maternity units: lessons from a needs assessment in Bangladesh and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Cross

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the proportion of deliveries in health institutions increases in low- and middle-income countries, so do the challenges of maintaining standards of hygiene and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs in mothers and babies. Adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH and infection prevention and control (IPC in these settings should be seen as integral parts of the broader domain of quality care. Assessment approaches are needed which capture standards for both WASH and IPC, and so inform quality improvement processes. Design: A needs assessment was conducted in seven maternity units in Gujarat, India, and eight in Dhaka Division, Bangladesh in 2014. The WASH & CLEAN study developed and applied a suite of tools – a ‘walkthrough checklist’ which included the collection of swab samples, a facility needs assessment tool and document review, and qualitative interviews with staff and recently delivered women – to establish the state of hygiene as measured by visual cleanliness and the presence of potential pathogens, and individual and contextual determinants or drivers. Results: No clear relationship was found between visually assessed cleanliness and the presence of pathogens; findings from qualitative interviews and the facility questionnaire found inadequacies in IPC training for healthcare providers and no formal training at all for ward cleaners. Lack of written policies and protocols, and poor monitoring and supervision also contributed to suboptimal IPC standards. Conclusions: Visual assessment of cleanliness and hygiene is an inadequate marker for ‘safety’ in terms of the presence of potential pathogens and associated risk of infection. Routine environmental screening of high-risk touch sites using simple microbiology could improve detection and control of pathogens. IPC training for both healthcare providers and ward cleaners represents an important opportunity for quality improvement. This should

  15. Hygiene on maternity units: lessons from a needs assessment in Bangladesh and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Suzanne; Afsana, Kaosar; Banu, Morsheda; Mavalankar, Dileep; Morrison, Emma; Rahman, Atiya; Roy, Tapash; Saxena, Deepak; Vora, Kranti; Graham, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Background As the proportion of deliveries in health institutions increases in low- and middle-income countries, so do the challenges of maintaining standards of hygiene and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) in mothers and babies. Adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and infection prevention and control (IPC) in these settings should be seen as integral parts of the broader domain of quality care. Assessment approaches are needed which capture standards for both WASH and IPC, and so inform quality improvement processes. Design A needs assessment was conducted in seven maternity units in Gujarat, India, and eight in Dhaka Division, Bangladesh in 2014. The WASH & CLEAN study developed and applied a suite of tools – a ‘walkthrough checklist’ which included the collection of swab samples, a facility needs assessment tool and document review, and qualitative interviews with staff and recently delivered women – to establish the state of hygiene as measured by visual cleanliness and the presence of potential pathogens, and individual and contextual determinants or drivers. Results No clear relationship was found between visually assessed cleanliness and the presence of pathogens; findings from qualitative interviews and the facility questionnaire found inadequacies in IPC training for healthcare providers and no formal training at all for ward cleaners. Lack of written policies and protocols, and poor monitoring and supervision also contributed to suboptimal IPC standards. Conclusions Visual assessment of cleanliness and hygiene is an inadequate marker for ‘safety’ in terms of the presence of potential pathogens and associated risk of infection. Routine environmental screening of high-risk touch sites using simple microbiology could improve detection and control of pathogens. IPC training for both healthcare providers and ward cleaners represents an important opportunity for quality improvement. This should occur in conjunction with

  16. Basic research needs and opportunities on interfaces in solar materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Gottschall, R. J. [eds.

    1981-04-01

    The workshop on research needs and recommended research programs on interfaces in solar energy conversion devices was held June 30-July 3, 1980. The papers deal mainly with solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces, sometimes involving multilayer solid-solid interfaces. They deal mainly with instrumental techniques of studying these interfaces so they can be optimized, so they can be fabricated with quality control and so changes with time can be forecast. The latter is required because a long lifetime (20 yrs is suggested) is necessary for economic reasons. Fifteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  17. Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors

  18. Can REDD+ Reconcile Local Priorities and Needs with Global Mitigation Benefits? Lessons from Angai Forest, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmeli Mustalahti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scope of the reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD mechanism has broadened REDD+ to accommodate different country interests such as natural forests, protected areas, as well as forests under community-based management. In Tanzania the REDD+ mechanism is still under development and pilot projects are at an early stage. In this paper, we seek to understand how local priorities and needs could be met in REDD+ implementation and how these expectations match with global mitigation benefits. We examine the local priorities and needs in the use of land and forest resources in the Angai Villages Land Forest Reserve (AVLFR in the Liwale District of Lindi Region in Tanzania. Primary data was collected in two villages, Mihumo and Lilombe, using semistructured key informant interviews and participatory rural appraisal methods. In addition, the key informant interviews were conducted with other village, district, and national level actors, as well as international donors. Findings show that in the two communities REDD+ is seen as something new and is generating new expectations among communities. However, the Angai villagers highlight three key priorities that have yet to be integrated into the design of REDD+: water scarcity, rural development, and food security. At the local level improved forest governance and sustainable management of forest resources have been identified as one way to achieve livelihood diversification. Although the national goals of REDD+ include poverty reduction, these goals are not necessarily conducive to the goals of these communities. There exist both structural and cultural limits to the ability of the Angai villages to implement these goals and to improve forestry governance. Given the vulnerability to current and future climate variability and change it will be important to consider how the AVLFR will be managed and for whose benefit?

  19. Nuclear material security needs in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, N.H.; Avens, L.R.; Leonard, L.E.

    2006-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001 there has been a fundamental transition in the way we view radiological sources and devices in our environment. Ionizing Radiological Sources, (IRSs) which serve a multitude of important medical, industrial and research needs in our modern society, were not so long ago viewed as common place in an industrialized society, only of concern to health and the environment if control is lost accidentally. But, 9/11 taught that those bent on indiscriminant terror are capable of taking the most common place elements of our advanced technology and turning them into effective weapons of mass destruction. And radiological sources quickly became the object of concern as a potentially disruptive threat to out national security

  20. Lessons learned from the development and manufacture of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials for the space shuttle orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banas, R. P.; Elgin, D. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Nickel, K. N.; Gzowski, E. R.; Aguiler, L.

    1983-01-01

    Three ceramic, reusable surface insulation materials and two borosilicate glass coatings were used in the fabrication of tiles for the Space Shuttle orbiters. Approximately 77,000 tiles were made from these materials for the first three orbiters, Columbia, Challenger, and Discovery. Lessons learned in the development, scale up to production and manufacturing phases of these materials will benefit future production of ceramic reusable surface insulation materials. Processing of raw materials into tile blanks and coating slurries; programming and machining of tiles using numerical controlled milling machines; preparing and spraying tiles with the two coatings; and controlling material shrinkage during the high temperature (2100-2275 F) coating glazing cycles are among the topics discussed.

  1. A review of stairway falls and stair negotiation: Lessons learned and future needs to reduce injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jesse V

    2016-09-01

    Stairways are a common location for falls, and they result in a disproportionate risk of death or severe injury. Stairway falls are a significant problem across the lifespan and are often coincident with risky behaviors during stair use. The mechanics of successful stair negotiation for healthy young and older adults have been well described. These studies imply that current stair design does not offer an optimal universal design to meet the needs of older adults or people with health conditions. In addition, impaired stair negotiation associates with more than impaired strength, including functional impairments of cognitive load, sensory function and central motor coordination. Identification of behavioral strategies or stairway environments that assist or hinder recovery from a loss of balance on stairs remains incomplete. Therefore, future studies should investigate the mechanisms of balance recovery on stairs as well as the effectiveness of environmental interventions to mitigate stairway falls and injuries. Potential areas for evaluation may include modifying stair dimensions, surfaces, handrails, visual cues, and removing distractors of attention. Studies should also evaluate combinatorial interventions on person-related factors, such as behavioral interventions to decrease risky behaviors during stair use as well as interventions on cognitive, sensory, and motor functions relevant to stair use. Moreover, future studies should take advantage of new technologies to record stair use outside the laboratory in order to identify people or locations at risk for stairway falls. Such studies would inform the potential for broad-spectrum programs that decrease the risk of stairway falls and injuries. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear education and training related issues: Needs and lessons learned in national and international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubomir, Sklenka

    2010-01-01

    The paper is focused on nuclear education and training at research reactors and universities. Lack of experts and high educated and skilled professionals in nuclear engineering in the world caused by fast aging of the NPPs and research reactors staff and expected ''nuclear renaissance'' brings a new needs to the universities and research reactors. During the last few years some new trends in nuclear education became visible. Customers expect high quality nuclear education in wide range of knowledge and the complex services, which forces universities and research reactors to bring new challenges in the domain of education and training. State-of-the-art experimental equipment and methodologies specifically developed for the education, networking and dose cooperation between universities and research reactors at national and international levels, and sharing the experimental facilities are the trends which can be noticed today all over the world. Research reactors are suitable for education of students at all academic levels (BSc, MSc and PhD) not only in nuclear engineering, but also in various non-nuclear engineering studies (power engineering, electrical engineering, natural sciences, medical sciences, physical sciences, etc.). An effective way on how to provide the education and training at the research reactor should be started by evaluation of the initial students' background and then adaptation of the educational methodology to that level. Networking and closer co-operation between universities at national and international level in nuclear education started in late nineties in Europe and within a few years several networks were establish. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) as an European regional network with more than 40 European universities was inspiration for creating national networks in Europe (e.g. Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, etc.) and Non-European regional networks (Asia, North America, etc.). Research reactors play an important role in all

  3. Particulate matter, air quality and climate: lessons learned and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzzi, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K.; Decesari, S.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Facchini, M. C.; Fowler, D.; Koren, I.; Langford, B.; Lohmann, U.; Nemitz, E.; Pandis, S.; Riipinen, I.; Rudich, Y.; Schaap, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Spracklen, D. V.; Vignati, E.; Wild, M.; Williams, M.; Gilardoni, S.

    2015-07-01

    The literature on atmospheric particulate matter (PM), or atmospheric aerosol, has increased enormously over the last 2 decades and amounts now to some 1500-2000 papers per year in the refereed literature. This is in part due to the enormous advances in measurement technologies, which have allowed for an increasingly accurate understanding of the chemical composition and of the physical properties of atmospheric particles and of their processes in the atmosphere. The growing scientific interest in atmospheric aerosol particles is due to their high importance for environmental policy. In fact, particulate matter constitutes one of the most challenging problems both for air quality and for climate change policies. In this context, this paper reviews the most recent results within the atmospheric aerosol sciences and the policy needs, which have driven much of the increase in monitoring and mechanistic research over the last 2 decades. The synthesis reveals many new processes and developments in the science underpinning climate-aerosol interactions and effects of PM on human health and the environment. However, while airborne particulate matter is responsible for globally important influences on premature human mortality, we still do not know the relative importance of the different chemical components of PM for these effects. Likewise, the magnitude of the overall effects of PM on climate remains highly uncertain. Despite the uncertainty there are many things that could be done to mitigate local and global problems of atmospheric PM. Recent analyses have shown that reducing black carbon (BC) emissions, using known control measures, would reduce global warming and delay the time when anthropogenic effects on global temperature would exceed 2 °C. Likewise, cost-effective control measures on ammonia, an important agricultural precursor gas for secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA), would reduce regional eutrophication and PM concentrations in large areas of Europe, China

  4. Patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma need a personalized management: A lesson from clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Edoardo Giovanni; Bucci, Laura; Garuti, Francesca; Brunacci, Matteo; Lenzi, Barbara; Valente, Matteo; Caturelli, Eugenio; Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Piscaglia, Fabio; Virdone, Roberto; Felder, Martina; Ciccarese, Francesca; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Sacco, Rodolfo; Svegliati Baroni, Gianluca; Farinati, Fabio; Rapaccini, Gian Lodovico; Olivani, Andrea; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Di Marco, Maria; Morisco, Filomena; Zoli, Marco; Masotto, Alberto; Borzio, Franco; Benvegnù, Luisa; Marra, Fabio; Colecchia, Antonio; Nardone, Gerardo; Bernardi, Mauro; Trevisani, Franco

    2018-05-01

    The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) advanced stage (BCLC C) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) includes a heterogeneous population, where sorafenib alone is the recommended treatment. In this study, our aim was to assess treatment and overall survival (OS) of BCLC C patients subclassified according to clinical features (performance status [PS], macrovascular invasion [MVI], extrahepatic spread [EHS] or MVI + EHS) determining their allocation to this stage. From the Italian Liver Cancer database, we analyzed 835 consecutive BCLC C patients diagnosed between 2008 and 2014. Patients were subclassified as: PS1 alone (n = 385; 46.1%), PS2 alone (n = 146; 17.5%), MVI (n = 224; 26.8%), EHS (n = 51; 6.1%), and MVI + EHS (n = 29; 3.5%). MVI, EHS, and MVI + EHS patients had larger and multifocal/massive HCCs and higher alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels than PS1 and PS2 patients. Median OS significantly declined from PS1 (38.6 months) to PS2 (22.3 months), EHS (11.2 months), MVI (8.2 months), and MVI + EHS (3.1 months; P < 0.001). Among MVI patients, OS was longer in those with peripheral than with central (portal trunk) MVI (11.2 vs. 7.1 months; P = 0.005). The most frequent treatments were: curative approaches in PS1 (39.7%), supportive therapy in PS2 (41.8%), sorafenib in MVI (39.3%) and EHS (37.3%), and best supportive care in MVI + EHS patients (51.7%). Independent prognostic factors were: Model for End-stage Liver Disease score, Child-Pugh class, ascites, platelet count, albumin, tumor size, MVI, EHS, AFP levels, and treatment type. BCLC C stage does not identify patients homogeneous enough to be allocated to a single stage. PS1 alone is not sufficient to include a patient into this stage. The remaining patients should be subclassified according to PS and tumor features, and new patient-tailored therapeutic indications are needed. (Hepatology 2018;67:1784-1796). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. Tailoring an educational program on the AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators to meet stakeholder needs: lessons learned in the VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Marlena H; Rivard, Peter E; Shwartz, Michael; Borzecki, Ann; Yaksic, Enzo; Stolzmann, Kelly; Zubkoff, Lisa; Rosen, Amy K

    2018-02-14

    program were positive. Conducting a formative evaluation was a highly important process in program development. The useful information that we collected through the interviews and surveys allowed us to tailor the program to stakeholders' needs and interests. Our experiences, particularly with the formative evaluation process, yielded valuable lessons that can guide others when developing and implementing similar educational programs.

  6. [Economics] Introductory Lesson (Begin Day One). Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Roland

    This introductory lesson on teaching economics concepts contains sections on the following: purpose; objectives; time; materials needed; and step-by-step classroom procedures. The focus is on the economic problem of scarcity and opportunity costs. Attached is an original skit, "There's no such thing as a free lunch," and a chart that…

  7. Moroccan Arabic Technical Lessons for Rehab./Special Ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtatou, Mohamed, Ed.

    The instructional materials in Moroccan Arabic are designed to meet the language needs of Peace Corps volunteers working in rehabilitation and special education in Morocco. The lessons are almost entirely in Arabic, and include vocabulary lists with both technical and everyday language pertaining to disabilities. Lesson topics include singing, the…

  8. The Paper Airplane Challenge: A Market Economy Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Kimberly

    This lesson plan features a classroom simulation that helps students understand the characteristics of a market economic system. The lesson plan states a purpose; cites student objectives; suggests a time duration; lists materials needed; and details a step-by-step teaching procedure. The "Paper Airplane Challenge" handout is attached. (BT)

  9. Effect of Need for Approval and Situational Variables on the Viewing of Erotic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Neil M.

    1976-01-01

    The role of social desirability on willingness to view erotic materials under conditions of implicit approval and disapproval was studied. Low need-for-approval subjects were more influenced by situational cues than high need-for-approval subjects. (NG)

  10. Mapping training needs for dissemination and implementation research: lessons from a synthesis of existing D&I research training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David A; Proctor, Enola K; Brownson, Ross C; Straus, Sharon E

    2017-09-01

    With recent growth in the field of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, multiple training programs have been developed to build capacity, including summer training institutes, graduate courses, degree programs, workshops, and conferences. While opportunities for D&I research training have expanded, course organizers acknowledge that available slots are insufficient to meet demand within the scientific and practitioner community. In addition, individual programs have struggled to best fit various needs of trainees, sometimes splitting coursework between specific D&I content and more introductory grant writing material. This article, stemming from a 2013 NIH workshop, reviews experiences across multiple training programs to align training needs, career stage and role, and availability of programs. We briefly review D&I needs and opportunities by career stage and role, discuss variations among existing training programs in format, mentoring relationships, and other characteristics, identify challenges of mapping needs of trainees to programs, and present recommendations for future D&I research training.

  11. Biocompatibility of biomaterials - Lessons learned and considerations for the design of novel materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-04-01

    Biocompatibility of dental materials has gained increasing interest during recent decades. Meanwhile, legal regulations and standard test procedures are available to evaluate biocompatibility. Herein, these developments will be exemplarily outlined and some considerations for the development of novel materials will be provided. Different aspects including test selection, release of substances, barriers, tissue healing, antibacterial substances, nanoparticles and environmental aspects will be covered. The provided information is mainly based on a review of the relevant literature in international peer reviewed journals, on regulatory documents and on ISO standards. Today, a structured and systematic approach for demonstrating biocompatibility from both a scientific and regulatory point of view is based on a clinical risk assessment in an early stage of material development. This includes the analysis of eluted substances and relevant barriers like dentin or epithelium. ISO standards 14971, 10993, and 7405 specify the modes for clinical risk assessment, test selection and test performance. In contact with breached tissues, materials must not impair the healing process. Antibacterial effects should be based on timely controllable substances or on repellant surfaces. Nanoparticles are produced by intraoral grinding irrespective of the content of nanoparticles in the material, but apparently at low concentrations. Concerns regarding environmental aspects of mercury from amalgam can be met by amalgam separating devices. The status for other materials (e.g. bisphenol-A in resin composites) needs to be evaluated. Finally, the public interest for biocompatibility issues calls for a suitable strategy of risk communication. A wise use of the new tools, especially the clinical risk assessment should aim at preventing the patients, professionals and the environment from harm but should not block the development of novel materials. However, biocompatibility must always be

  12. Near term and long term materials issues and development needs for plasma interactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma interactive components (PICs), including the first wall, limiter blades, divertor collector plates, halo scrapers, and RF launchers, are exposed to high particle fluxes that can result in high sputtering erosion rates and high heat fluxes. In addition, the materials in reactors are exposed to high neutron fluxes which will degrade the bulk properties. This severe environment will limit the materials and designs which can be used in fusion devices. In order to provide a reasonable degree of confidence that plasma interactive components will operate successfully, a comprehensive development program is needed. Materials research and development plays a key role in the successful development of PICs. The range of operating conditions along with a summary of the major issues for materials development is described. The areas covered include plasma/materials interactions, erosion/redeposition, baseline materials properties, fabrication, and irradiation damage effects. Candidate materials and materials development needs in the near term and long term are identified

  13. Perceived Views of Language Teachers on the Use of Needs Analysis in ESP Materials Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi; Salih, Abdel Rahman Abdalla

    2013-01-01

    Needs analysis is generally believed to be important in ESP/EAP context because it enables practitioners and materials writers to find out about their real learners' needs. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate EFL teachers' beliefs and views about need analysis use and practices, specifically in the ESP/EAP tertiary context of the…

  14. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liby, Alan L [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  15. Classroom Management and Lesson Planning(4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Lesson PlanningTask 1As teachers,we all need to plan our lessons before we teach.Make a list of things that you think need tobe included in a lesson plan.Then compare and discuss your list with another teacher.Also think about reasonswhy we need to plan our lessons.

  16. Classroom Management and Lesson Planning(4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lesson Planning Task 1 As teachers,we all need to plan our lessons before we teach.Make a list of things that you think need to be included in a lesson plan.Then compare and discuss your list with another teacher.Also think about reasons why we need to plan our lessons.

  17. PENERAPAN PEMBELAJARAN KOOPERATIF TIPE NUMBERED HEADS TOGETHER (NHT PADA MATERI GERAK PARABOLA DAN GERAK MELINGKAR MELALUI KEGIATAN LESSON STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wari Prastiti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan aktivitas belajar fisika  materi gerak parabola dan gerak melingkar siswa kelas XI IPA1SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015 dengan penerapan pembelajaran kooperatif tipe Numbered Heads Together (NHT melalui kegiatan Lesson Study. Metode penelitian yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (PTK yang dilaksanakan dalam dua siklus. Setiap siklus diawali dengan tahap plan kemudian dilanjutkan do dan see/refleksi. Subyek penelitian adalah siswa kelas XI IPA1SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015. Data diperoleh melalui observasi menggunakan lembar observasi aktivitas belajar dan dianalisis secara deskriptif kualitatif. Berdasarkan hasil penelitan dapat disimpulkan bahwa penerapan pembelajaran kooperatif tipe NHT dapat meningkatkan aktivitas belajar siswa XI IPA1 SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015 . Hal ini terlihat dari hasil siklus I dan siklus II terjadi peningkatan aktivitas belajar pada tiap indikator aktivitas belajar yang ditentukan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan aktivitas belajar fisika  materi gerak parabola dan gerak melingkar siswa kelas XI IPA1SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015 dengan penerapan pembelajaran kooperatif tipe Numbered Heads Together (NHT melalui kegiatan Lesson Study. Metode penelitian yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (PTK yang dilaksanakan dalam dua siklus. Setiap siklus diawali dengan tahap plan kemudian dilanjutkan do dan see/refleksi. Subyek penelitian adalah siswa kelas XI IPA1SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015. Data diperoleh melalui observasi menggunakan lembar observasi aktivitas belajar dan dianalisis secara deskriptif kualitatif. Berdasarkan hasil penelitan dapat disimpulkan bahwa penerapan pembelajaran kooperatif tipe NHT dapat meningkatkan aktivitas belajar siswa XI IPA1 SMA Negeri 5 Metro Tahun Pelajaran 2014/2015 . Hal ini terlihat dari hasil siklus

  18. The history of a lesson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Vedby

    2003-01-01

    and emphasises the need to study the history of lessons rather than the lessons of history. This approach shows that Munich is the end point of a constitutive history that begins in the failure of the Versailles treaty to create a durable European order following the First World War. The Munich lesson is thus......The article investigates the concept of lessons in IR. By means of a constructivist critique of the 'lessons literature', the article analyses one of the most important of IR lessons: that of Munich. Examining how the Munich lesson came about, the article shows the praxeological nature of lessons...... one element of the lesson of Versailles, which is a praxeology that defines how the West is to make peace, and against whom peace must be defended. The lesson of Versailles has been, at least in part, constitutive of the outbreak of the Cold War, and it continues to define the Western conception...

  19. 'Low-activation' fusion materials development and related nuclear data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cierjacks, S.

    1990-01-01

    So-called ''low-activation'' materials are presently considered as an important means of improving the safety characteristics of future DT fusion reactors. Essential benefits are expected in various problem areas ranging from operation considerations to aspects of decommissioning and waste disposal. Present programs on ''low-activation'' materials development depend strongly on reliable activity calculations for a wide range of technologically important materials. The related nuclear data requirements and important needs for more and improved nuclear data are discussed. (author). 32 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Diffraction Studies from Minerals to Organics - Lessons Learned from Materials Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitfield, Pamela S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In many regards the study of materials and minerals by powder diffraction techniques are complimentary, with techniques honed in one field equally applicable to the other. As a long-time materials researcher many of the examples are of techniques developed for materials analysis applied to minerals. However in a couple of cases the study of new minerals was the initiation into techniques later used in materials-based studies. Hopefully they will show that the study of new minerals structures can provide opportunities to add new methodologies and approaches to future problems. In keeping with the AXAA many of the examples have an Australian connection, the materials ranging from organics to battery materials.

  1. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  2. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: General considerations and data needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Purdy, C M [U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (United States)

    1977-07-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. (author)

  3. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: general considerations and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Purdy, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel

  4. Uncovering Design Principles of Intermediate Filaments, a Self-Assembling Biomaterial: Lessons in Nanoscale Materials Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, David H

    2007-01-01

    .... Such proteins may be harnessed for military purposes (eg. protective self-healing materials or nanoscale scaffolds) if one had a better understanding of how molecular structure determines material properties. In this final progress report, we summarize our studies on these systems.

  5. Compassionate care provision: an immense need during the refugee crisis. Lessons learned from a European capacity-building project.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechili E.A.; Angelaki, A.; Petelos, E.; Sifaki-Pistolla, D.; Chatzea, V.E.; Dowrick, C.; Hoffmann, K.; Jirovsky, E.; Pavlick, D.R.; Dückers, M.; Rurik, I.; Muijsenbergh, M. van den; Loenen, T. van; Ajdukovic, D.; Bakic, H.; Lionis, C.

    2018-01-01

    Background The refugee crisis has resulted in massive waves of migration towards Europe. Besides sufficient and appropriate healthcare services, these vulnerable populations need kindness, respect, acceptance, empathy, and attention to basic needs. Healthcare professionals ought to have a

  6. Use and Misuse of Material Transfer Agreements: Lessons in Proportionality from Research, Repositories, and Litigation

    OpenAIRE

    Bubela, Tania; Guebert, Jenilee; Mishra, Amrita

    2015-01-01

    Material transfer agreements exist to facilitate the exchange of materials and associated data between researchers as well as to protect the interests of the researchers and their institutions. But this dual mandate can be a source of frustration for researchers, creating administrative burdens and slowing down collaborations. We argue here that in most cases in pre-competitive research, a simple agreement would suffice; the more complex agreements and mechanisms for their negotiation should ...

  7. NEED ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING ESP MATERIALS FOR MEDICAL RECORD STUDENTS IN APIKES CITRA MEDIKA SURAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beta Setiawati

    2016-06-01

    and quantitative methods. The outcomesof this study showed the real necessities of students in learning English to prepare their future at the field of medical record and health information. Findings of the need analysis demonstrate that all four of the language skills were necessary for their academic studies and their target career. There are certain topics related to English for medical record such as medical record staff’ duties, ethical and legal issues in medical record, Hospital statistics, Medical record filling system, Health information system, and so on. Accordingly, this study proposes new ESP materials based on the stakeholders’ needs.It is suggested that textbook or handout of English for Medical Record will be made based on the Need Analysis by ESP designers and ESP lecturers involve actively recognizing the progressive needs of medical record students.

  8. Towards socio-material approaches in simulation-based education: lessons from complexity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara; Dahlgren, Madeleine Abrandt

    2015-04-01

    Review studies of simulation-based education (SBE) consistently point out that theory-driven research is lacking. The literature to date is dominated by discourses of fidelity and authenticity - creating the 'real' - with a strong focus on the developing of clinical procedural skills. Little of this writing incorporates the theory and research proliferating in professional studies more broadly, which show how professional learning is embodied, relational and situated in social - material relations. A key concern for medical educators concerns how to better prepare students for the unpredictable and dynamic ambiguity of professional practice; this has stimulated the movement towards socio-material theories in education that address precisely this question. Among the various socio-material theories that are informing new developments in professional education, complexity theory has been of particular importance for medical educators interested in updating current practices. This paper outlines key elements of complexity theory, illustrated with examples from empirical study, to argue its particular relevance for improving SBE. Complexity theory can make visible important material dynamics, and their problematic consequences, that are not often noticed in simulated experiences in medical training. It also offers conceptual tools that can be put to practical use. This paper focuses on concepts of emergence, attunement, disturbance and experimentation. These suggest useful new approaches for designing simulated settings and scenarios, and for effective pedagogies before, during and following simulation sessions. Socio-material approaches such as complexity theory are spreading through research and practice in many aspects of professional education across disciplines. Here, we argue for the transformative potential of complexity theory in medical education using simulation as our focus. Complexity tools open questions about the socio-material contradictions inherent in

  9. Lesson Planning the Kodaly Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshkoff, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the contribution of Zoltan Kodaly to music lesson planning. Emphasizes preparation, presentation, and practice as the three important strategies in teaching concepts and skills to be included in a lesson plan. Includes a sample lesson plan covering a semester and advice on choosing song material. (DK)

  10. New classes of tough composite materials-Lessons from natural rigid biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Box 352120, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-2120 (United States)]. E-mail: gmayer@u.washington.edu

    2006-09-15

    The structures and properties of a new class of composite materials, containing a predominantly high volume fraction ceramic or glass phase, combined with minor organic (adhesive) phases, have been studied. These composites have unusual combinations of mechanical properties, such as stiffness, strength, and toughness. They are based on the architecture of a rigid natural material, the nacre structure, such as those found in the shells of the abalone Haliotis rufescens, and those of other mollusk shells. The mechanisms underlying these properties have also been studied. Analogs (utilizing high-performance engineering materials), that mimic many of the mechanisms underlying those superior combinations of properties, have been built. The results of the foregoing investigations are discussed. It was found that the toughness of segmented composite beams which have high volume fractions of ceramic (89 v / o) exceeded those of continuous layered beams, as well as the monolithic ceramic (alumina) on which they are based.

  11. New classes of tough composite materials-Lessons from natural rigid biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The structures and properties of a new class of composite materials, containing a predominantly high volume fraction ceramic or glass phase, combined with minor organic (adhesive) phases, have been studied. These composites have unusual combinations of mechanical properties, such as stiffness, strength, and toughness. They are based on the architecture of a rigid natural material, the nacre structure, such as those found in the shells of the abalone Haliotis rufescens, and those of other mollusk shells. The mechanisms underlying these properties have also been studied. Analogs (utilizing high-performance engineering materials), that mimic many of the mechanisms underlying those superior combinations of properties, have been built. The results of the foregoing investigations are discussed. It was found that the toughness of segmented composite beams which have high volume fractions of ceramic (89 v / o) exceeded those of continuous layered beams, as well as the monolithic ceramic (alumina) on which they are based

  12. Use and misuse of material transfer agreements: lessons in proportionality from research, repositories, and litigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Bubela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Material transfer agreements exist to facilitate the exchange of materials and associated data between researchers as well as to protect the interests of the researchers and their institutions. But this dual mandate can be a source of frustration for researchers, creating administrative burdens and slowing down collaborations. We argue here that in most cases in pre-competitive research, a simple agreement would suffice; the more complex agreements and mechanisms for their negotiation should be reserved for cases where the risks posed to the institution and the potential commercial value of the research reagents is high.

  13. Use and misuse of material transfer agreements: lessons in proportionality from research, repositories, and litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubela, Tania; Guebert, Jenilee; Mishra, Amrita

    2015-02-01

    Material transfer agreements exist to facilitate the exchange of materials and associated data between researchers as well as to protect the interests of the researchers and their institutions. But this dual mandate can be a source of frustration for researchers, creating administrative burdens and slowing down collaborations. We argue here that in most cases in pre-competitive research, a simple agreement would suffice; the more complex agreements and mechanisms for their negotiation should be reserved for cases where the risks posed to the institution and the potential commercial value of the research reagents is high.

  14. When materials become critical : lessons from the 2010 rare earth crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprecher, B.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation is the culmination of over four years research on the rare earth element neodymium in the context of the 2010 REE crisis. Neodymium is a generally recognized ‘critical’ material with a relevant application in the form of NdFeB magnets, both for sustainable energy technologies as

  15. Revising the Depreciation and Investment Credit Lessons for Farm Management and Supervised Occupational Experience for Use in Missouri Programs of Vocational Agriculture. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Norman; And Others

    This project developed four lessons that reflect the 1981 tax laws as they relate to the use of investment credit and depreciation in farm accounting systems. Project staff reviewed tax laws and related materials and identified four lessons in farm management and supervised occupational experience that needed revision. Materials were then…

  16. 50th Anniversary Celebration: 46th Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference on Advances and Needs in Multi-Spectral Transparent Materials Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sands, James M; McCauley, James W

    2008-01-01

    ... technology issues of critical importance to the U.S. Army community. The 46th Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference continued this tradition with a focus on Advances and Needs in Multi-Spectral Transparent Materials Technology...

  17. The Formation of Elementary Schoolchildren's Cognitive Needs at the Lessons of the Russian Language by Means of Subjectivization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakulina, Galina A.; Vakhrusheva, Liudmila N.; Shelygina, Olga B.; Savinova, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to present of an innovative type of exercises in the Russian language, referred to as the complex intellectual-linguistic. The novelty of these exercises is: a) in an unusual arrangement of linguistic material which creates an educational research situation; b) in giving non-traditional tasks, aimed at simultaneously…

  18. Perceived Case Management Needs and Service Preferences of Frequent Emergency Department Users: Lessons Learned in a Large Urban Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Deborah; Poremski, Daniel; Wise-Harris, Deborah; Pauly, Daniel; Leszcz, Molyn; Wasylenki, Donald; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the service needs and preferences of frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions concerns who participated in a brief intensive case management intervention. We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 20 frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions challenges, 13 service providers involved in the delivery of a brief case management intervention, and a focus group with intervention case managers. Thematic analysis was used to explore perceived service user profiles, service needs and preferences of care. Service users experienced complex health and social needs and social isolation, while exhibiting resilience and the desire to contribute. They described multiple instances of stigmatization in interactions with healthcare professionals. Components of the brief intensive case management intervention perceived to be helpful included system navigation, advocacy, intermediation, and practical needs assistance. Frequent service users valued relational responsiveness, a non-judgmental stance, and a recovery orientation in case managers. Interventions for frequent service users in mental health may be enhanced by focusing on the engagement of formal and informal social supports, practical needs assistance, system navigation, advocacy and intermediation, and attention to the recovery goals of service users.

  19. Perceived Case Management Needs and Service Preferences of Frequent Emergency Department Users: Lessons Learned in a Large Urban Centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Kahan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the service needs and preferences of frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions concerns who participated in a brief intensive case management intervention.We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with 20 frequent emergency department users with mental health and addictions challenges, 13 service providers involved in the delivery of a brief case management intervention, and a focus group with intervention case managers. Thematic analysis was used to explore perceived service user profiles, service needs and preferences of care.Service users experienced complex health and social needs and social isolation, while exhibiting resilience and the desire to contribute. They described multiple instances of stigmatization in interactions with healthcare professionals. Components of the brief intensive case management intervention perceived to be helpful included system navigation, advocacy, intermediation, and practical needs assistance. Frequent service users valued relational responsiveness, a non-judgmental stance, and a recovery orientation in case managers.Interventions for frequent service users in mental health may be enhanced by focusing on the engagement of formal and informal social supports, practical needs assistance, system navigation, advocacy and intermediation, and attention to the recovery goals of service users.

  20. Nanoscale reference materials for environmental, health and safety measurements: needs, gaps and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Hackley, Vincent A; Roebben, Gert; Ehara, Kensei; Hankin, Steve; Postek, Michael T; Lynch, Iseult; Fu, Wei-En; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2013-12-01

    The authors critically reviewed published lists of nano-objects and their physico-chemical properties deemed important for risk assessment and discussed metrological challenges associated with the development of nanoscale reference materials (RMs). Five lists were identified that contained 25 (classes of) nano-objects; only four (gold, silicon dioxide, silver, titanium dioxide) appeared on all lists. Twenty-three properties were identified for characterisation; only (specific) surface area appeared on all lists. The key themes that emerged from this review were: 1) various groups have prioritised nano-objects for development as "candidate RMs" with limited consensus; 2) a lack of harmonised terminology hinders accurate description of many nano-object properties; 3) many properties identified for characterisation are ill-defined or qualitative and hence are not metrologically traceable; 4) standardised protocols are critically needed for characterisation of nano-objects as delivered in relevant media and as administered to toxicological models; 5) the measurement processes being used to characterise a nano-object must be understood because instruments may measure a given sample in a different way; 6) appropriate RMs should be used for both accurate instrument calibration and for more general testing purposes (e.g., protocol validation); 7) there is a need to clarify that where RMs are not available, if "(representative) test materials" that lack reference or certified values may be useful for toxicology testing and 8) there is a need for consensus building within the nanotechnology and environmental, health and safety communities to prioritise RM needs and better define the required properties and (physical or chemical) forms of the candidate materials.

  1. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 1: Summary of exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    In a September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton announced a new nonproliferation and export control policy that established a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The new policy proposed that the US undertake a comprehensive approach to the growing accumulation of fissile material. One of the key elements was for the US to support a special nuclear materials (SNM) multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards. This policy is often referred to as the President's Cutoff Initiative or the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). Because both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and foreign reprocessing facilities similar to PUREX will likely to be inspected under a FMCT, the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Negotiations and Analysis Division (DOE/NN-41) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to perform an information gathering exercise, the PUREX Exercise, using the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. PUREX is a former production reactor fuel reprocessing plant currently undergoing a transition to a ''decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) ready'' mode. The PUREX Exercise was conducted March 29--30, 1994, to examine aspects of the imposition of several possible cutoff regimes and to study verification of non-production of SNM for nuclear weapons purposes or outside of safeguards. A follow-up activity to further examine various additional verification regimes was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on May 10, 1994

  2. The Pink Lesson Plan: Addressing the Emotional Needs of Gay and Lesbian Students in Canadian Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The history of civil rights in Canada illustrates a growing trend by the government to support the physical, emotional, mental, legal, and financial needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered citizens. However, the education system presents a slightly different climate. Despite numerous policies and initiatives, gay and lesbian students…

  3. Implementing a Public Health Approach to Addressing Mental Health Needs in a University Setting: Lessons and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcover, Jason; Mays, Sally; McCarthy, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The mental health needs of college students are placing increasing demands on counseling center resources, and traditional outreach efforts may be outdated or incomplete. The public health model provides an approach for reaching more students, decreasing stigma, and addressing mental health concerns before they reach crisis levels. Implementing a…

  4. A Lesson of Lost Political Capital in Public Higher Education: Leadership Challenges in a Time of Needed Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Mark; Jacobson, Rod

    2012-01-01

    All higher education institutions are struggling with a rapidly changing market and financial landscape. Here is a management-centered analysis of what happened when a college president, recognizing the need to make a radical adaptation to those changes, tried moving a campus community to a new organizational model, without collegial consensus,…

  5. THE NEED FOR A NEW JOINING TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CLOSURE WELDING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL GR; HILL BE; GRANT GJ

    2008-01-01

    One of the activities associated with cleanup throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is packaging radioactive materials into storage containers. Much of this work will be performed in high-radiation environments requiring fully remote operations, for which existing, proven systems do not currently exist. These conditions demand a process that is capable of producing acceptable (defect-free) welds on a consistent basis; the need to perform weld repair, under fully-remote operations, can be extremely costly and time consuming. Current closure welding technology (fusion welding) is not well suited for this application and will present risk to cleanup cost and schedule. To address this risk, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), are proposing that a new and emerging joining technology, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), be considered for this work. FSW technology has been demonstrated in other industries (aerospace and marine) to produce near flaw-free welds on a consistent basis. FSW is judged capable of providing the needed performance for fully-remote closure welding of containers for radioactive materials for the following reasons: FSW is a solid-state process; material is not melted. As such, FSW does not produce the type of defects associated with fusion welding, e.g., solidification-induced porosity, cracking, distortion due to weld shrinkage, and residual stress. In addition, because FSW is a low-heat input process, material properties (mechanical, corrosion and environmental) are preserved and not degraded as can occur with 'high-heat' fusion welding processes. When compared to fusion processes, FSW produces extremely high weld quality. FSW is performed using machine-tool technology. The equipment is simple and robust and well-suited for high radiation, fully-remote operations compared to the relatively complex equipment associated with the fusion-welding processes. Additionally, for standard wall thicknesses of radioactive materials

  6. Needs Analysis of the English Writing Skill as the Base to Design the Learning Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenri Ampa Andi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research used a descriptive method. It was aimed at identifying students’ learning needs for the English writing skill as the base for designing the learning materials. Writing skill covered the analysis of the types of paragraph, types of text, the components of writing and paragraph development. The subjects of the research were the fourth semester students that consisted of 330 students. The samples were taken 15 % randomly, so the number of samples was 50 students. The research used a questionnaire as the instrument to get responses from the students about their learning needs. The results showed that the learning needs for the writing skills coped with the types of paragraph development, the types of text, and components of writing skill. The types of paragraph development included the ways by definition (79.7%, classification (67.0%, listing (59.3%, cause effect (47.7%, example (47.3%, and comparison (45.7%. The types of text consisted of description (66.0%, news items (59.7%, narration (58.7%, discussion (56.7%, recount (57.0%, and exposition (50.7%. The components of writing skill contained structure (79.6%, vocabulary (79.4%, content (62.0%, organisation (53.6% and mechanic (34.0%. The implication of the findings would be the base of teaching and learning process, especially in designing the learning materials for the English writing skill.

  7. Integrating care for older people with complex needs: key insights and lessons from a seven-country cross-case analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodchis, Walter P; Dixon, Anna; Anderson, Geoff M; Goodwin, Nick

    2015-01-01

    To address the challenges of caring for a growing number of older people with a mix of both health problems and functional impairment, programmes in different countries have different approaches to integrating health and social service supports. The goal of this analysis is to identify important lessons for policy makers and service providers to enable better design, implementation and spread of successful integrated care models. This paper provides a structured cross-case synthesis of seven integrated care programmes in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, the UK and the USA. All seven programmes involved bottom-up innovation driven by local needs and included: (1) a single point of entry, (2) holistic care assessments, (3) comprehensive care planning, (4) care co-ordination and (5) a well-connected provider network. The process of achieving successful integration involves collaboration and, although the specific types of collaboration varied considerably across the seven case studies, all involved a care coordinator or case manager. Most programmes were not systematically evaluated but the two with formal external evaluations showed benefit and have been expanded. Case managers or care coordinators who support patient-centred collaborative care are key to successful integration in all our cases as are policies that provide funds and support for local initiatives that allow for bottom-up innovation. However, more robust and systematic evaluation of these initiatives is needed to clarify the 'business case' for integrated health and social care and to ensure successful generalization of local successes.

  8. To better know the biological behaviour of future nuclear materials: a need to maintain a good level of protection against ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.; Metivier, H.

    2007-01-01

    An important program of research, called 'Generation IV' is currently developed at an international level to prepare the launching of reactors for the future. Its objective is to satisfy the growing needs in electric power within the framework for a sustainable development. One of the major aspects of this program is the search and the development for new nuclear materials containing fissile/fertile isotopes. Unfortunately, one realizes today that for many compounds considered to be used to manufacture these materials, there are no radio-toxicologic data, allowing to the occupational physicist to evaluate the real risk in the event of contaminations and to prescribe adapted therapeutic de-corporation. An emergency revival of 'workplace' studies, where are or will be handled these compounds or materials is mandatory. The lesson of the past showed that the prevision in radioprotection was rather difficult and that an experimental validation of the behaviour of hazardous heavy elements both in vitro and in vivo was necessary. (authors)

  9. When and Why Does Materialism Relate to Employees’ Attitudes and Well-being: The Mediational Role of Need Satisfaction and Need Frustration

    OpenAIRE

    Unanue, Wenceslao; Rempel, Konrad; Gómez, Marcos E.; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Materialistic values may be detrimental for people’s well-being. However, we know little about why (i.e., explaining mechanisms) and when (i.e., boundary conditions) this is the case. Although low satisfaction of the psychological needs is said to play a key role in this process, a recent meta-analysis indicates that the explaining power of need satisfaction is limited and suggests that need frustration may be more important. Moreover, although materialism may be detrimental in...

  10. Developing Materials Processing to Performance Modeling Capabilities and the Need for Exascale Computing Architectures (and Beyond)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schraad, Mark William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Physics and Engineering Models; Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Advanced Simulation and Computing

    2016-09-06

    Additive Manufacturing techniques are presenting the Department of Energy and the NNSA Laboratories with new opportunities to consider novel component production and repair processes, and to manufacture materials with tailored response and optimized performance characteristics. Additive Manufacturing technologies already are being applied to primary NNSA mission areas, including Nuclear Weapons. These mission areas are adapting to these new manufacturing methods, because of potential advantages, such as smaller manufacturing footprints, reduced needs for specialized tooling, an ability to embed sensing, novel part repair options, an ability to accommodate complex geometries, and lighter weight materials. To realize the full potential of Additive Manufacturing as a game-changing technology for the NNSA’s national security missions; however, significant progress must be made in several key technical areas. In addition to advances in engineering design, process optimization and automation, and accelerated feedstock design and manufacture, significant progress must be made in modeling and simulation. First and foremost, a more mature understanding of the process-structure-property-performance relationships must be developed. Because Additive Manufacturing processes change the nature of a material’s structure below the engineering scale, new models are required to predict materials response across the spectrum of relevant length scales, from the atomistic to the continuum. New diagnostics will be required to characterize materials response across these scales. And not just models, but advanced algorithms, next-generation codes, and advanced computer architectures will be required to complement the associated modeling activities. Based on preliminary work in each of these areas, a strong argument for the need for Exascale computing architectures can be made, if a legitimate predictive capability is to be developed.

  11. Advanced Rankine and Brayton cycle power systems: Materials needs and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Guentert, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual advanced potassium Rankine and closed Brayton power conversion cycles offer the potential for improved efficiency over steam systems through higher operating temperatures. However, for utility service of at least 100,000 hours, materials technology advances will be needed for such high temperature systems. Improved alloys and surface protection must be developed and demonstrated to resist coal combustion gases as well as potassium corrosion or helium surface degradation at high temperatures. Extensions in fabrication technology are necessary to produce large components of high temperature alloys. Long time property data must be obtained under environments of interest to assure high component reliability.

  12. Advanced Rankine and Brayton cycle power systems - Materials needs and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Guentert, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual advanced potassium Rankine and closed Brayton power conversion cycles offer the potential for improved efficiency over steam systems through higher operating temperatures. However, for utility service of at least 100,000 hours, materials technology advances will be needed for such high temperature systems. Improved alloys and surface protection must be developed and demonstrated to resist coal combustion gases as well as potassium corrosion or helium surface degradation at high temperatures. Extensions in fabrication technology are necessary to produce large components of high temperature alloys. Long-time property data must be obtained under environments of interest to assure high component reliability.

  13. The Capacity Building programmes of GITEWS – visions, goals, lessons learned, and re-iterated needs and demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schlurmann

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It was envisioned that the framework of the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS should achieve an integral architecture and overarching technical design of an end-to-end tsunami early warning system (TEWS. In order to achieve this ambitious goal on a national and local level, a tailored set of capacity building measures has been started and implemented. The programme was meant and designed to meet requirements and urgent needs considering awareness raising campaigns, technical trainings and higher level education programs. These components have been integrated as complementary modules in order to ensure facilitating the early warning system to be operated, maintained and improved, and that institutions and people in coastal areas will respond adequately and timely in case of future tsunamis. Remarkable progress has been accomplished as well as programs and campaigns are being implemented in regard to a sustainable capacity development conducted by national institutions in Indonesia. Yet, local administrative and preparedness efforts on the Indonesian coastlines are still underdeveloped. This stems from the fact of missing links towards sustainable coastal zone management schemes on a broad local level. Yet, the demand and urgent need for an adequate and integrated disaster risk reduction and management addressing also other hazards in the region of interest is (still substantial. Given the tragic loss of life and severe damages resulting from the December 2004 tsunami and recent series of severe earthquakes, the need for urgent mitigating action in the imperilled coastal regions of Sumatra and Java remains extremely high. The conceptual Capacity Building framework, its anticipated goals in the beginning of the project and, lately, the finally achieved objectives are promising. A significant contribution for mainstreaming scientific approaches and transfer methodological disaster risk reduction attempts towards other regions

  14. When and Why Does Materialism Relate to Employees' Attitudes and Well-being: The Mediational Role of Need Satisfaction and Need Frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unanue, Wenceslao; Rempel, Konrad; Gómez, Marcos E; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Materialistic values may be detrimental for people's well-being. However, we know little about why (i.e., explaining mechanisms) and when (i.e., boundary conditions) this is the case. Although low satisfaction of the psychological needs is said to play a key role in this process, a recent meta-analysis indicates that the explaining power of need satisfaction is limited and suggests that need frustration may be more important. Moreover, although materialism may be detrimental in some life domains, studies in materialistic contexts such as work are lacking, particularly in the non-Western world. In response, we put need frustration to the fore and examine both need satisfaction and frustration as the underlying processes in the relation between materialism and employee attitudes and well-being in two Latin-American countries. The Chilean sample ( N = 742) shows that materialism at work is associated with less positive (work satisfaction and engagement) and more negative (burnout and turnover intentions) outcomes, even when controlling for workers' income. Notably, need frustration explained the detrimental effects of materialism alongside need satisfaction in a unique manner, showing that it is essential to distinguish both constructs. Results were replicated in Paraguay ( N = 518) using different positive (organizational commitment and meaning at work) and negative (negative emotions and job insecurity) outcomes, adding to the generalizability of our results across samples of different nations.

  15. When and Why Does Materialism Relate to Employees’ Attitudes and Well-being: The Mediational Role of Need Satisfaction and Need Frustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenceslao Unanue

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Materialistic values may be detrimental for people’s well-being. However, we know little about why (i.e., explaining mechanisms and when (i.e., boundary conditions this is the case. Although low satisfaction of the psychological needs is said to play a key role in this process, a recent meta-analysis indicates that the explaining power of need satisfaction is limited and suggests that need frustration may be more important. Moreover, although materialism may be detrimental in some life domains, studies in materialistic contexts such as work are lacking, particularly in the non-Western world. In response, we put need frustration to the fore and examine both need satisfaction and frustration as the underlying processes in the relation between materialism and employee attitudes and well-being in two Latin–American countries. The Chilean sample (N = 742 shows that materialism at work is associated with less positive (work satisfaction and engagement and more negative (burnout and turnover intentions outcomes, even when controlling for workers’ income. Notably, need frustration explained the detrimental effects of materialism alongside need satisfaction in a unique manner, showing that it is essential to distinguish both constructs. Results were replicated in Paraguay (N = 518 using different positive (organizational commitment and meaning at work and negative (negative emotions and job insecurity outcomes, adding to the generalizability of our results across samples of different nations.

  16. When and Why Does Materialism Relate to Employees’ Attitudes and Well-being: The Mediational Role of Need Satisfaction and Need Frustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unanue, Wenceslao; Rempel, Konrad; Gómez, Marcos E.; Van den Broeck, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Materialistic values may be detrimental for people’s well-being. However, we know little about why (i.e., explaining mechanisms) and when (i.e., boundary conditions) this is the case. Although low satisfaction of the psychological needs is said to play a key role in this process, a recent meta-analysis indicates that the explaining power of need satisfaction is limited and suggests that need frustration may be more important. Moreover, although materialism may be detrimental in some life domains, studies in materialistic contexts such as work are lacking, particularly in the non-Western world. In response, we put need frustration to the fore and examine both need satisfaction and frustration as the underlying processes in the relation between materialism and employee attitudes and well-being in two Latin–American countries. The Chilean sample (N = 742) shows that materialism at work is associated with less positive (work satisfaction and engagement) and more negative (burnout and turnover intentions) outcomes, even when controlling for workers’ income. Notably, need frustration explained the detrimental effects of materialism alongside need satisfaction in a unique manner, showing that it is essential to distinguish both constructs. Results were replicated in Paraguay (N = 518) using different positive (organizational commitment and meaning at work) and negative (negative emotions and job insecurity) outcomes, adding to the generalizability of our results across samples of different nations. PMID:29066992

  17. Teaching medicine and allied disciplines in the 21st century--lessons from Ireland on the continuing need for reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Tim

    2005-01-01

    This article identifies the imperatives behind the need to move away from teaching based on the transmission of a lot of facts to teaching that enables students to become lifelong learners. It reminds us that the over-riding goal is an education process that maximizes the ability of teachers to teach well and of students to learn effectively. It argues that the necessary reform process can only be successful if the three components of an education programme--the curriculum, teaching strategies and assessment--are reformed simultaneously to ensure that each is designed to produce more effective teaching and learning. It points to the literature that tells us what we know about factors affecting student behaviour and, in particular, notes the crucial factor of student perception of the requirement of the assessment regime. It recommends that Biggs' model of constructive alignment is used as the organizing principle of continuing reform

  18. Communities needs, values, and representations of the world: lessons learned from Greenland's and Senegal's ARTisticc's study sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baztan, J.; Vanderlinden, J. P.; Cordier, M.; Da Cunha, C.; Gaye, N.; Huctin, J. M.; Kane, A.; Quensiere, J.; Remvikos, Y.; Seck, A.

    2016-12-01

    The cultural dimensions of climate change impacts and adaptation have been increasingly examined in recent years through various disciplinary lenses, exposing a clear need for mainstream natural sciences to address the question of how to incorporate the values of communities facing global changes into their work. With this in mind, the work presented here addresses three main questions: (i) Do community members consider available scientific data and findings credible? Answering this question provides insight into whether available scientific knowledge expresses causal links that are mobilized by affected communities. (ii) Do community members consider available scientific data and findings salient? Answering this question provides insight into whether available scientific knowledge focuses on phenomena that those in affected communities think should receive attention. (iii) Do community members consider available scientific data and findings legitimate? Answering this question provides insight into whether available scientific knowledge expresses what is good, tolerable, and/or acceptable for affected communities. These three questions delve into the ways in which adaptation requires affected individuals and communities to adopt attitudes by integrating/woven from potentially conflicting evidence, relevance, and/or normative claims. These questions also shed light on the links between mainstream sciences and studied affected communities. The research presented here focuses on 2 communities: (i) Uummannaq, an island of 12km2 in a fjord, located along the middle of Greenland's west coast and (ii) Joal-Fadiouth & M'bour area in the wester African's coast, few Km south of Dakar, Senegal. This communication shares the results from field work experiences from ARTiticc's interdisciplinary approach to identifying the needs, values, and representations of the world of the communities, and how to fit these elements into mainstream sciences in order to bridge gaps between

  19. EDF, a utility and its own needs in the field of transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouin, P.; Mignot, E.; Hoang, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    As one of the most important producers of nuclear electricity in the world, EDF is concerned by all the aspects of the transport of nuclear materials and more particularly by those related to the nuclear fuel cycle. EDF is not itself a specialist in this field and most of the transports along the nuclear fuel cycle is done for their own account by their usual partners such as COGEMA or TRANSNUCLEAIRE. Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, they have generally used for these transports casks that already exist on the market and which were well suited to their needs. Nevertheless, new and specific needs appeared during the progress of their nuclear program and have lead them to: study and build new casks or packages, use existing casks for new purposes, develop a device for the measurement of fuel assemblies burn up, develop a software to optimize the evacuation of irradiated fuel for reprocessing. The purpose of this paper is to describe these realization but as a preliminary, they will present briefly the importance of the transport of nuclear materials for EDF

  20. Special purpose materials: an assessment of needs and the role of these materials in the national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.E.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Davis, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The scope of activities of the Task Group on Special Purpose Materials includes those materials requirements not specifically addressed by the other OFE materials task groups. These materials can be organized according to seven broad materials applications or functions which appear to be generic to all magnetically confined fusion reactor concepts. These are breeding materials, coolants, materials for tritium service, graphite and silicon carbide, electrical insulators and ceramics, heat-sink materials, and magnet materials. The present paper describes the importance of each of these areas of materials technology, outlines major problems or areas of uncertainty, and reviews past and current contributions to our state of understanding as it may relate to fusion power applications

  1. The ecotoxicity of graphene family materials: current status, knowledge gaps and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka Maria; Olszyna, Andrzej Roman

    2015-01-01

    Recently, graphene family materials (GFMs) have been introduced among all fields of science and still get numerous attention. Also, the applicability of these materials in many areas makes them very attractive. GFMs have attracted both academic and industrial interest as they can produce a dramatic improvement in materials properties at very low filler content. The aim of this review is to identify, summarize, and present the first available information on the influence of GFMs on soil and water environment as well as identify the knowledge gaps and indicate the directions for the next generation of the original scientific investigations. The paper also presents our first preliminary impact assessment and potential pathways of GFMs distribution in the environment. We used as an example the reduced graphene oxide/Al 2 O 3 nanocomposite (RGO/Al 2 O 3 ) that has been previously designed and synthesized by us. Authors believe that further work should focus on improvement of characterization methodology applicable for ecotoxicity analyses and possible interactions between GFMs and different living ecosystems. Consequently, the potential impact of graphene and its derivatives on environmental health is a matter of academic interest. However, potential hazards sufficient for risk assessment and concerned with GFMs usage in consumer products first need to be investigated and identified. Further research should focus on gathering knowledge on GFMs properties for life cycle analyses, which still poses a great challenge for scientists

  2. The ecotoxicity of graphene family materials: current status, knowledge gaps and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka Maria, E-mail: agsolgala@gmail.com; Olszyna, Andrzej Roman, E-mail: aolszyna@meil.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Recently, graphene family materials (GFMs) have been introduced among all fields of science and still get numerous attention. Also, the applicability of these materials in many areas makes them very attractive. GFMs have attracted both academic and industrial interest as they can produce a dramatic improvement in materials properties at very low filler content. The aim of this review is to identify, summarize, and present the first available information on the influence of GFMs on soil and water environment as well as identify the knowledge gaps and indicate the directions for the next generation of the original scientific investigations. The paper also presents our first preliminary impact assessment and potential pathways of GFMs distribution in the environment. We used as an example the reduced graphene oxide/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite (RGO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that has been previously designed and synthesized by us. Authors believe that further work should focus on improvement of characterization methodology applicable for ecotoxicity analyses and possible interactions between GFMs and different living ecosystems. Consequently, the potential impact of graphene and its derivatives on environmental health is a matter of academic interest. However, potential hazards sufficient for risk assessment and concerned with GFMs usage in consumer products first need to be investigated and identified. Further research should focus on gathering knowledge on GFMs properties for life cycle analyses, which still poses a great challenge for scientists.

  3. Materialism and well-being among Chinese college students: the mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongjie; Yao, Meilin; Yan, Wenfan

    2014-10-01

    Based on self-determination theory, this study explored the potential mediating role of basic psychological need satisfaction in the relationship between materialism and well-being among Chinese college students. The results showed that basic psychological need satisfaction partially mediated the relationship between materialism and life satisfaction and fully mediated the relationships among materialism and emotional well-being, subjective vitality, and self-actualization. The findings indicated the importance of considering both subjective and psychological well-being and the interpretative power of basic psychological need satisfaction and Chinese culture in the flow from materialism to well-being. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. We Need More Focus On Pre-Disaster Preparedness: Early Lessons Learned From Recent Earthquakes in Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Shaghaghi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor-in-ChiefTwo strong earthquakes with the magnitude of 6.4 and 6.3 at a depth of 9.9 km that rattled Iran’s northwest region within 60 km of Tabriz, the capital city of East Azerbaijan province on August 11, 2012 caused extensive damage in about 1000 villages, killed at least 258 and injured 1380 people. The quakes most severely affected villages close to three impacted towns in the disaster area; Varzegan, Ahar and Heris. Some of the villages were hit are in remote areas with limited access to transport routes.Within early hours aftermath of the twin devastating incidents ordinary people and those who had relatives in the affected area rushed towards the region to salvage victims mainly by their own cars. Independent groups such as small units from armed forces were also sent to the region to support rescue operation. Some of the survivors meanwhile, tried to transfer severely injured survivors to nearby hospitals and even to the central hospital in Tabriz using public transportation facilities e.g. taxis, vans or any vehicle available at the time. All these unplanned efforts created traffic jams on the roads leading to the disaster area and delayed rescue operation by trained staff.Now after the earthquakes that rumbled through the disaster area, about 36,000 quake-stricken people were given shelter and are being provided with their basic needs in makeshift camps. Humanitarian aids are reaching affected zone from all over the country and internationally but there are inadequacies in proper distribution of food stuff and equipments among the survivors. Piles of water bottles in front of tents which left in the heat under the sunshine, clothes and canned foods which were distributed by volunteers and are more than current needs of the victims are observable in the disaster area. This is while, lack of sufficient supply of drinking water, canned foods and portable washrooms were reported by the authorities in the first days after the

  5. Connecting Systems Model Design to Decision-Maker and Stakeholder Needs: Lessons from Louisiana's Coastal Master Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, J. R.; Johnson, D.

    2017-12-01

    Louisiana's Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast is a 50-year plan designed to reduce flood risk and minimize land loss while allowing for the continued provision of economic and ecosystem services from this critical coastal region. Conceived in 2007 in response to hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, the master plan is updated on a five-year planning cycle by the state's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA). Under the plan's middle-of-the-road (Medium) environmental scenario, the master plan is projected to reduce expected annual damage from storm surge flooding by approximately 65% relative to a future without action: from 5.3 billion to 2.2 billion in 2040, and from 12.1 billion to 3.7 billion in 2065. The Coastal Louisiana Risk Assessment model (CLARA) is used to estimate the risk reduction impacts of projects that have been considered for implementation as part of the plan. Evaluation of projects involves estimation of cost effectiveness in multiple future time periods and under a range of environmental uncertainties (e.g., the rates of sea level rise and land subsidence, changes in future hurricane intensity and frequency), operational uncertainties (e.g., system fragility), and economic uncertainties (e.g., patterns of population change and asset exposure). Between the 2012 and 2017 planning cycles, many improvements were made to the CLARA model. These included changes to the model's spatial resolution and definition of policy-relevant spatial units, an improved treatment of parametric uncertainty and uncertainty propagation between model components, the addition of a module to consider critical infrastructure exposure, and a new population growth model. CPRA also developed new scenarios for analysis in 2017 that were responsive to new scientific literature and to accommodate a new approach to modeling coastal morphology. In this talk, we discuss how CLARA has evolved over the 2012 and 2017 planning cycles in response to the needs

  6. Oxidation of carbon based material for innovative energy systems (HTR, fusion reactor): status and further needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H.K.; Latge, Ch.; Dumesnil, J.; Veltkamp, A.C.; Grabon, V.; Beech, D.; Buckthorpe, D.; Dominguez, T.; Krussenberg, A.K.; Wu, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Following an overview on kinetics of carbon/gas reactions, status and further needs in selected safety relevant fields of graphite oxidation in high temperature reactors (HTRs) and fusion reactors are outlined. Kinetics was detected due to the presence of such elements as severe air ingress, lack of experimental data on Boudouard reaction and a similar lack of data in the field of advanced oxidation. The development of coatings which protect against oxidation should focus on stability under neutron irradiation and on the general feasibility of coatings on HTR pebble fuel graphite. Oxidation under normal operation of direct cycle HTR requires examinations of gas atmospheres and of catalytic effects. Advanced carbon materials like CFCs and mixed materials should be developed and tested with respect to their oxidation resistance in a common HTR/fusion task. In an interim HTR, fuel storage radiolytic oxidation under normal operation and thermal oxidation in accidents have to be considered. Plans for future work in these fields are described. (authors)

  7. Future research needs on material interaction and relocation in LMFR safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper firstly classify the principles in the reactor safety area in future liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) in order to clarify fundamental objectives of the reactor safety research. Further reduction of the occurrence frequency and also reduction of the consequences of core disruptive accidents should be recognized as the fundamental objectives. Secondary objectives and key R and D issues are developed under these fundamental objectives. This structure of the objectives and R and D issues is proposed as a fundamental framework of the safety researches aiming at development of commercialized large-scale LMFRs. Secondly, we will summarize future experimental research needs in the reactor safety area referring to the fundamental framework mentioned above. Our interest is focused rather on in-pile experiments. Finally, another objective is proposed, that is how to reduce or eliminate the recriticality event by design, utilizing the current knowledge on material motion and interaction which has been accumulated thus far. In this report, we will show an basic approach by means of discharging fuel out of the core. We also propose a measure for discharging fuel to eliminate the recriticality concerns. Experimental needs are also addressed. (author)

  8. When and Why Does Materialism Relate to Employees’ Attitudes and Well-being: The Mediational Role of Need Satisfaction and Need Frustration

    OpenAIRE

    Wenceslao Unanue; Konrad Rempel; Marcos E. Gómez; Anja Van den Broeck; Anja Van den Broeck

    2017-01-01

    Materialistic values may be detrimental for people’s well-being. However, we know little about why (i.e., explaining mechanisms) and when (i.e., boundary conditions) this is the case. Although low satisfaction of the psychological needs is said to play a key role in this process, a recent meta-analysis indicates that the explaining power of need satisfaction is limited and suggests that need frustration may be more important. Moreover, although materialism may be detrimental in some life doma...

  9. Infection as a Background to Safety: Source Material for Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, H. V.

    1986-01-01

    Offers selections from papers which illustrate accidents, epidemics, and bad practices which could be used as background material for lessons on laboratory safety. Advocates the need for instruction on pathogenicity and infectivity. (ML)

  10. Medical faculty members' attitude on lesson planning Semnan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masomeh Saberian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lesson planning has a distinct role in enhancing education quality, as well as maintaining the friendly and dynamic atmosphere of the academic environment and increasing student's initiatives for achieving better educational attainments. Lesson planning is a process for defining the goals, understanding the needs, and specifying available tools and possible limitations. Lesson planning is a written description of this process, which shows the materials, the route, the time, and the place of instructions, as well as a method for evaluating students. Purpose: to identify the attitudes of Semnan University of Medical Sciences (SUMS on lesson planning. Methods: Fifty-three faculty members of the SUMS participated in this study. A questionnaire was used, which contained 8 demographic questions, and 24 r questions for identification the faculty members' attitude. Questionnaires were distributed among the faculty members in sealed envelopes, without denoting their names. The questionnaires were gathered after being completed. Results were analyzed by calculating the mean, standard deviation, absolute and relative frequencies, and using Chi-square and Fischer exact test at the level of 5%. Results: II was shown that 88% of faculty members favoured lesson planning before the beginning of the semester. But they found lesson planning a difficult task, because of their heavy workload. Of the faculty members, 60.4% organized their teaching classes according to a designed lesson plan, and believed that it did affect the quality of their teaching, but 49.1% disagreed with distributing the designed lesson plan among the students. Discussion: Although professor favoured lesson planning and find it necessary to work according to such a plan, workload and lack of knowledge are defined as two main obstacles in doing so. It is believed that by decreasing the professor's workload and provision of lesson planning workshops, these problems could be solved

  11. Developing Needs Analysis Based-Reading Comprehension Learning Materials: A Study on the Indonesian Language Study Program Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to describe the need of development of 'Reading Comprehension' teaching materials to students and lecturers of Indonesian Language and Literature Education Department, Gorontalo. This research is included in the research and development to develop educational products in the form of teaching materials. Mixed research design was used in this study to explore the data needs of the development of reading materials learning. Quantitative data was obtained from the responses of 36 respondents and 2 lecturers of the Reading subjects on the questionnaire needs analysis and questionnaire of teaching material analysis that is being used today. Likert Scale was used in questionnaire of needs analysis seen from 7 aspects, namely: content of teaching material, reading strategy, text type, text genre, text topic, learning activity, and evaluation of learning (81 items and questionnaire of teaching material analysis that was being used that amounted to 5 aspects, namely: the content of teaching materials, organization of teaching materials, language, layout, and completeness of teaching material support (31 items. Qualitative data were obtained from open questions about the experiences of students and lecturers in reading learning in the same questionnaire, as well as content analysis of the material being used. The results showed that the requirement of development of teaching materials, students and lecturers assessed 63 items (77.78% in the required category, and 18 items (22.22% with the required categories. Then, the teaching materials currently in use still lack the aspects of the content, the text type, the text genre, the text topic, and the evaluation of each learning unit. Details of the results obtained 4 items (12.90% as low category, 22 items (70.97% as enough category, and 5 items (16.13% as high category.

  12. Management of Excess Material in the Navys Real Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Commands, that originally purchased the material from the command’s operational and maintenance fund. A flowchart of the RRAM material management process...streamlines business operations for financial and supply chain management . 22 SECNAVINST 4440.33A. The Navy retained excess material stored in 10 of...No. DODIG-2017-043 J A N U A R Y 2 3 , 2 0 1 7 Management of Excess Material in the Navy’s Real-Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities

  13. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  14. Innovative Resources Based on ICTs and Authentic Materials to Improve EFL Students' Communicative Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Otero, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Our global society and our current communication needs have put a strain on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teaching, since common resources such as textbooks may fail to adapt to the needs and interests of our students. The present action research study aims at identifying EFL students' communicative needs and developing their oral skills…

  15. Working material. IAEA seismic safety of nuclear power plants. International workshop on lessons learned from strong earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The International Workshop on Lessons Learned from Strong Earthquake was held at Kashiwazaki civic plaza, Kashiwazaki, Niigata-prefecture, Japan, for three days in June 2008. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP (KK-NPP) is located in the city of Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, and owned and operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Ltd. (TEPCO). After it experienced the Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake in July 2007, IAEA dispatched experts' missions twice and held technical discussions with TEPCO. Through such activities, the IAEA secretariat and experts obtained up-dated information of plant integrity, geological and seismological evaluation and developments of the consultation in the regulatory framework of Japan. Some of the information has been shared with the member states through the reports on findings and lessons learned from the missions to Japan. The international workshop was held to discuss and share the information of lessons learned from strong earthquakes in member states' nuclear installations. It provided the opportunity for participants from abroad to share the information of the recent earthquake and experience in Japan and to visit KK-NPP. And for experts in Japan, the workshop provided the opportunity to share the international approach on seismic-safety-related measures and experiences. The workshop was organised by the IAEA as a part of an extra budgetary project, in cooperation with OECD/NEA, hosted by Japanese organisations including Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC), and Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES). The number of the workshop participants was 70 experts from outside Japan, 27 countries and 2 international organisations, 154 Japanese experts and 81 audience and media personnel, totalling to 305 participants. The three-day workshop was open to the media including the site visit, and covered by NHK (the nation's public broadcasting corporation) and nation-wide and local television

  16. Teachers and Science Curriculum Materials: Where We Are and Where We Need to Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth A.; Janssen, Fred J. J. M.; Van Driel, Jan H.

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum materials serve as a key conceptual tool for science teachers, and better understanding how science teachers use these tools could help to improve both curriculum design and theory related to teacher learning and decision-making. The authors review the literature on teachers and science curriculum materials. The review is organised…

  17. International measures needed to protect metal recycling facilities from radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, M.; Wiener, R.

    1999-01-01

    In almost every major city and region of every country, there is a recycling facility that is designed to process or consume scrap metal. These same countries will probably have widespread applications of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment. This material and equipment will have metal as a primary component of its housing or instrumentation. It is this metal that will cause these sources of radioactivity, when lost, stolen or mishandled, to be taken to a metal recycling facility to be sold for the value of the metal. This is the problem that has faced scrap recycling facilities for many years. The recycling industry has spent millions of dollars for installation of radiation monitors and training in identification of radioactive material. It has expended millions more for the disposal of radioactive material that has mistakenly entered these facilities. Action must be taken to prevent this material from entering the conventional recycling process. There are more than 2,300 known incidents of radioactive material found in recycled metal scrap. Worldwide, more than 50 smeltings of radioactive sources have been confirmed. Seven fatal accidents involving uncontrolled radioactive material have also been documented. Hazardous exposures to radioactive material have plagued not just the workers at metal recycling facilities. The families of these workers, including their children, have been exposed to potentially harmful levels of radioactivity. The threat from this material does not stop there. Radioactive material that is not caught at recycling facilities can be melted and the radioactivity has been found in construction materials used to build homes, as well as shovels, fencing material, and furniture offered for sale to the general public. The time has come for the international community to address the issue of the uncontrolled sources of radioactive material. The following are the key points that must be addressed. (i) Identification of sources

  18. Refining MARGINS Mini-Lessons Using Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, E. A.; Manduca, C. A.; McDaris, J. R.; Lee, S.

    2009-12-01

    One of the challenges that we face in developing teaching materials or activities from research findings is testing the materials to determine that they work as intended. Traditionally faculty develop material for their own class, notice what worked and didn’t, and improve them the next year. However, as we move to a community process of creating and sharing teaching materials, a community-based process for testing materials is appropriate. The MARGINS project has piloted such a process for testing teaching materials and activities developed as part of its mini-lesson project (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/index.html). Building on prior work developing mechanisms for community review of teaching resources (e.g. Kastens, 2002; Hancock and Manduca, 2005; Mayhew and Hall, 2007), the MARGINS evaluation team developed a structured classroom observation protocol. The goals of field testing are to a) gather structured, consistent feedback for the lesson authors based on classroom use; b) guide reviewers of these lessons to reflect on research-based educational practice as a framework for their comments; c) collect information on the data and observations that the reviewer used to underpin their review; d) determine which mini-lessons are ready to be made widely available on the website. The protocol guides faculty observations on why they used the activity, the effectiveness of the activity in their classroom, the success of the activity in leading to the desired learning, and what other faculty need to successfully use the activity. Available online (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/protocol.html), the protocol can be downloaded and completed during instruction with the activity. In order to encourage review of mini-lessons using the protocol, a workshop focused on review and revision of activities was held in May 2009. In preparation for the workshop, 13 of the 28 participants chose to field test a mini-lesson prior to the workshop and reported that they found this

  19. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2001-01-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  20. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  1. Report for MaRIE Drivers Workshop on needs for energetic material's studies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Paul Elliott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Energetic materials (i.e. explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics) have complex mesoscale features that influence their dynamic response. Direct measurement of the complex mechanical, thermal, and chemical response of energetic materials is critical for improving computational models and enabling predictive capabilities. Many of the physical phenomena of interest in energetic materials cover time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. Examples include chemical interactions in the reaction zone, the distribution and evolution of temperature fields, mesoscale deformation in heterogeneous systems, and phase transitions. This is particularly true for spontaneous phenomena, like thermal cook-off. The ability for MaRIE to capture multiple length scales and stochastic phenomena can significantly advance our understanding of energetic materials and yield more realistic, predictive models.

  2. Need to increase public awareness of the safety of radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    There are two aspects to the problem of the public perception of radioactive materials transport: the first is a lack of knowledge on the part of the public about the facts, and the second is the distorted presentation by the media. These two problems are obviously interrelated - the more unaware the public is of the actual safety of radioactive materials transport, the more it is likely to be influenced, and frightened, by inaccurate reporting. The obvious question is, what can we as an industry do to educate the public and to facilitate more neutral reporting about the facts involving radioactive materials transport. This question is answered by describing an excellent example of a situation where the industry acted cohesively and effectively to respond to fallacious allegations concerning the safety of the transportation of radioactive materials

  3. Robust Engineered Thermal Control Material Systems for Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Prometheus Needs, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — identified needs for the thermal control and ESD functions of the Prometheus Program's hardware for the heat rejection system for the planned nuclear system. These...

  4. Mandatory special or dedicated trains for radioactive materials shipments evidence shows they're not needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, L.S.; Garrison, R.F.; Harmon, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The rejection of mandatory special or dedicated trains by all responsible Federal agencies for transportation of radioactive materials in shielded casks has a long history. Working with the railroads and the National Academy of Sciences, the ICC adopted standards for transporting radioactive materials in regular freight trains in the mid 1940's. The standards rested primarily on ensuring the integrity of the radioactive materials packaging. AEC, then NRC and DOT, followed the ICC lead, supplementing the licensing rules for casks with a series of performance or stress tests. At no time did these agencies require special trains or special routing for rail casks. Mandatory special trains have too many disadvantages without any proven safety benefit to be worth their high cost to the shipper. The ICC, in a series of litigated cases, found that given the strength of the casks, mandatory special trains were wasteful transportation and an unreasonable railroad practice

  5. Hospital materials managers need to be aware of actions that constitute legal acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R

    1990-12-01

    A hospital invited bids for building materials for a hospital construction project. A supplier submitted a bid which asked the hospital to sign and return a trade association form contract. The hospital didn't return the form but used the supplier's bid as part of the general contract for the entire project and notified the supplier and the general contractor. Later, the supplier submitted a higher bid for the same material contending that the hospital hadn't accepted the first bid as they hadn't followed the instructions. The hospital materials manager feels that the bid was properly accepted. In this dialogue, Dr. Decker reviews the legal issues involved in the different ways of accepting an offer.

  6. Single access laparoscopic cholecystectomy: technique without the need for special materials and with better ergonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Lameirão Pinto

    Full Text Available The authors describe a surgical technique which allows, without increasing costs, to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy with a single incision, without using specific materials and with better surgical ergonomics. The technique consists of a longitudinal umbilical incision, navel detachment, use of a permanent 10mm trocar and two clamps directly and bilaterally through the aponeurosis without the use of 5mm trocars, transcutaneous gallbladder repair with straight needle cotton suture, ligation with unabsorbable suture and umbilical incision for the specimen extraction. The presented technique enables the procedure with conventional and permanent materials, improving surgical ergonomics, with safety and aesthetic advantages.

  7. Corn Production. A Unit for Teachers of Vocational Agriculture. Production Agriculture Curriculum Materials Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Clyde, Jr.

    Designed to provide instructional materials for use by vocational agriculture teachers, this unit contains nine lessons based upon competencies needed to maximize profits in corn production. The lessons cover opportunities for growing corn; seed selection; seedbed preparation; planting methods and practices; fertilizer rates and application;…

  8. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE): Overview, Accomplishments and Future Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Pippin, Gary; Jenkins, Philip P.; Walters, Robert J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Palusinski, Iwona; Lorentzen, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Materials and devices used on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to environmental threats that can cause degradation in material properties, possibly threatening spacecraft mission success. These threats include: atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, charged particle radiation, temperature extremes and thermal cycling, micrometeoroid and debris impacts, and contamination. Space environmental threats vary greatly based on spacecraft materials, thicknesses and stress levels, and the mission environment and duration. For more than a decade the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) has enabled the study of the long duration environmental durability of spacecraft materials in the LEO environment. The overall objective of MISSE is to test the stability and durability of materials and devices in the space environment in order to gain valuable knowledge on the performance of materials in space, as well as to enable lifetime predictions of new materials that may be used in future space flight. MISSE is a series of materials flight experiments, which are attached to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Individual experiments were loaded onto suitcase-like trays, called Passive Experiment Containers (PECs). The PECs were transported to the ISS in the Space Shuttle cargo bay and attached to, and removed from, the ISS during extravehicular activities (EVAs). The PECs were retrieved after one or more years of space exposure and returned to Earth enabling post-flight experiment evaluation. MISSE is a multi-organization project with participants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense (DoD), industry and academia. MISSE has provided a platform for environmental durability studies for thousands of samples and numerous devices, and it has produced many tangible impacts. Ten PECs (and one smaller tray) have been flown, representing MISSE 1 through MISSE

  9. The need for a greater commitment to america region to prevent denials of shipments of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallaupoma, Mario; Schwela, Ulric

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used worldwide in a wide range of applications in industry health care, industrial applications, manufacturing materials, exploration and technological development, as well as basic scientific research. The ability to use such radioactive material in these sectors depends on both its safe transport within a country and between different countries, for developed and developing countries can have access to this technology, in a timely manner and in conditions economically acceptable. In this paper the issue of denials and restraints of shipment of radioactive material and the need for greater commitment that Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must assume to facilitate the transport of radioactive materials for the benefit of society is analyzed

  10. Harmonization of monographic standards is needed to ensure the quality of Chinese medicinal materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sandy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article provides an overview on the regulations of Chinese medicinal materials (CMMs in various countries and regions. Harmonization of CMM monographs would provide standards for the quality control of CMM products and play an important role in the modernization and globalization of Chinese medicine. A harmonized regulatory system would improve the quality of CMMs thereby ensuring the safety of the products and assisting Chinese medicine practitioners in their practice. The fast growing demand worldwide for traditional medicines calls for harmonized monographic standards to safeguard the safety and quality of CMM products.

  11. Examples of reference material data needed for LBB analysis derived from WGCS-EC-DGXI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrequin, P.; Houssin, B.; Guinovart, J.

    1997-04-01

    Mechanical data collected through the sponsorship of the Activity Group 3 <<Materials>> of the Working Group Codes and Standards of DG XI European Commission are pointed out to illustrate their potential use for Leak Before Break analyses. Most of the tensile, fatigue, creep and fracture toughness data have been generated for stainless steels, mainly on modified type 316 L (N), selected for the Super Phoenix LMFBR. Trends for ongoing programs and future works on C-Mn and MnNiMo low alloy steels are provided.

  12. Modern engines need friction bearing from modern materials; Moderne Motoren benoetigen Gleitlager aus modernen Werkstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M. [KS Gleitlager GmbH, St. Leon-Rot (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    The encreasing performance of Otto and Diesel engines leads to an increase of the cylinder pressures and, therefore, to higher loading of the engine bearings. It is necessary to recognise the future requirements especially for main and con rod bearings of the engines in order to be able to accurately develop and to launch the appropriate bearing materials respectively material combinations into series. Thereby, the functional security of the bearings meeting a complex requirement profile has priority. It is, however, just as important to offer the customer an optimal cost and advantage ratio. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei Otto- und Dieselmotoren nahmen in den letzten Jahren die Zylinderdruecke immer mehr zu. Von 1986 bis zum Jahr 2000 wird die Gaskraft bei Pkw-Dieselmotoren um 30% von 120 auf 160 bar steigen, bei Ottomotoren betraegt der Zuwachs ebenfalls 30% von 60 auf 80 bar. Die spezifische Lagerbelastung wird sich im gleichen Zeitraum aehnlich entwickeln. Das hat direkten Einfluss auf die Belastung der Haupt- und Pleuellager und somit auch auf die Werkstoff-Entwicklung. Dieser Beitrag zeigt die wichtigsten Entwicklungen der KS Gleitlager GmbH auf. (orig.)

  13. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  14. Western and WWER materials investigations - past lessons, present achievements and future trends for fuel rod cladding and fuel assembly structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives a detailed overview of Western and WWER materials used in nuclear fuel manufacturing industry. The status of technical experience with regard to design, fabrication and particular in-pile behavior is described and compared for material of major importance for PWR and WWER fuel. In particular Zr-base alloys for cladding tubes, spacer grids and guide thimbles are considered. In addition spacer spring materials are also discussed. The paper shows that during the last decade a considerable diversification of different Zr materials occurred in Western PWR fuel, while for WWER fuel the focus is still on the classical Zr1%Nb material. Corrosion and hydrogen uptake as well as the dimensional behavior (creep and growth) of all presently relevant Zr-based materials is described in detail. For spacer springs Zr-based and Ni-based materials are considered. For this application spring force relaxation is the most important issue. The paper shows that the focus of consideration is typically different for PWR and WWER fuel materials. While for PWR fuel mainly corrosion and hydrogen uptake is most important and design limiting, for WWER fuel the focus of interests is with mechanical strength. The main reason for this significant difference is that the corrosive environment is typically different for PWR and WWER cores

  15. The need and approach for characterization - U.S. air force perspectives on materials state awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrin, John C.; Lindgren, Eric A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper expands on the objective and motivation for NDE-based characterization and includes a discussion of the current approach using model-assisted inversion being pursued within the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). This includes a discussion of the multiple model-based methods that can be used, including physics-based models, deep machine learning, and heuristic approaches. The benefits and drawbacks of each method is reviewed and the potential to integrate multiple methods is discussed. Initial successes are included to highlight the ability to obtain quantitative values of damage. Additional steps remaining to realize this capability with statistical metrics of accuracy are discussed, and how these results can be used to enable probabilistic life management are addressed. The outcome of this initiative will realize the long-term desired capability of NDE methods to provide quantitative characterization to accelerate certification of new materials and enhance life management of engineered systems.

  16. Readability of American online patient education materials in urologic oncology: a need for simple communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E; Raynor, Mathew C; Woods, Michael E; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B

    2015-02-01

    To determine the readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic Web sites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney, and testicular cancers. Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney, and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Urology Care Foundation, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Kidney Cancer Association, and Testicular Cancer Resource Center. Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed on the basis of cancer type, Web site, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Web sites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific Web sites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the Urology Care Foundation Web site for bladder and prostate cancer and the Kidney Cancer Association and Testicular Cancer Resource Center for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied on the basis of the disease and Web site. Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources is necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development, Implementation, and Assessment of Climate Curricular Materials for Introductory Undergraduates: Lessons Learned from the InTeGrate Project's Climate of Change Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B.; Fadem, C. M.; Shellito, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Designing climate change curricular materials suitable for wide adoption across institutions and academic disciplines (including those outside of the geosciences) requires collaboration among faculty at different types of institutions and consideration of a variety of student populations, learning styles, and course formats. The Interdisciplinary Teaching of Geoscience for a Sustainable Future (InTeGrate) project, an NSF STEP Center program, provides opportunities for faculty to develop 2-3 week teaching modules to engage students in understanding the intersections between geoscience topics and societal issues. From 2012-2014, a team of 3 faculty from a liberal arts college, comprehensive university, and community college developed, implemented, assessed, and revised a 2-3 week module for introductory undergraduates entitled "Climate of change: interactions and feedbacks between water, air, and ice". The module uses authentic atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere data from several regions to illustrate how climate impacts human societies and that the climate system has interacting components complicated by feedbacks, uncertainties, and human behavioral decisions. Students also consider past and present human adaptations to climate fluctuations. The module was piloted in introductory geology, meteorology, and oceanography courses during the 2012-2013 academic year, during which time formative and summative assessments were administered and used to modify the curricular materials. We will provide an overview of the module's content, instructional strategies involved in implementing the module, and methods of formative and summative assessment. We will also report on lessons learned during the development, piloting, revision, and publishing process, the importance of fostering partnerships between faculty from different institution types, and design approaches that promote widespread adoption of climate curricular materials.

  18. Incidents in transport of radioactive materials for civil use: IRSN draws lessons from events reported between 1999 and 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Some 900,000 packages of radioactive materials for civil use are transported each year in France. The great majority of these shipments involve radioactive materials used in the fields of medicine, pharmaceuticals, industry or property. Transport of radioactive materials linked to the nuclear fuel cycle actually represents only 15% of transport. A great variety of material is transported, differing in weight (from a few grams to tens of tons), form, activity and packaging. The associated risks are also different: radioactive contamination, external exposure to ionising radiation, chemical risk etc. In its role of technical support to safety and radioprotection authorities, IRSN's mission is to assess the design, manufacturing, testing and use of packaging and transport systems. The Institute is also involved in the management and analysis of events that occur during transport of radioactive materials. To assist with this, the IRSN manages a database which lists reported deviations, anomalies, incidents and accidents (known in a generic way as 'events') relating to transport. With an aim of reduction of the risks related to transport, the feedback resulting from the thorough analysis of the notified events is capitalized by IRSN, just as the feedback of the assessments of the safety analysis reports of the various package designs. Based on these feedbacks, IRSN proposes axes of improvement relating to package designs and transport operations, and regulatory evolutions, as well as priority topics for the inspections carried out by the French Nuclear safety authority (ASN). The IRSN has carried out a transversal analysis of all events in transport of radioactive materials that occurred in France from 1999 to 2007 as listed in its database (i.e. 901 events). For each event, some 70 parameters have been recorded from the analysis of the notifications and reports of the events, transmitted by the operators (type of event, type of package, level on the INES scale). This

  19. Improvement of equipment needed for the detection and characterization of nuclear material and radioactive samples at borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlt, R.; Kovar, A.; Swoboda, M.; Beck, P.; Duftschmid, K.E.; Lewis, W.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear radiation measurement instruments and devices for the detection and characterisation of nuclear material and radioactive isotopes at borders play a decisive role in the set of technical measures needed to deal with the problem of illicit trafficking. Therefore the availability of a range of devices with adequate performance at affordable prices is essential. The needed equipment can be classified into the following categories: Detection equipment (border monitors and radiation pagers); Hand held devices for neutron/gamma source search and in-field characterisation of radiation sources by customs inspectors; NDA (non-destructive assay) instruments for in-depth investigation of a seized item by experts either in the field or under laboratory conditions. Instruments and techniques, which use destructive assay methods, are not considered in this paper. The most recent overview on the performance of such instruments is given in the Final Report of ITRAP (Illicit Trafficking Radiation Detection Assessment Program). According to the findings of ITRAP, although in all above mentioned categories equipment is commercially available, deficiencies and shortcomings were identified. In this paper we describe our effort in addressing some of the most essential equipment problems, identified in ITRAP - the sensitivity of border monitors with respect to the detection of nuclear material and the performance and usability of hand held and portable devices needed for in-field characterisation of seized items by customs inspectors

  20. Assessment of Understanding: Student Teachers' Preparation, Implementation and Reflection of a Lesson Plan for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhler, Martin Vogt

    2017-05-01

    Research finds that student teachers often fail to make observable instructional goals, without which a secure bridge between instruction and assessment is precluded. This is one reason that recent reports state that teacher education needs to become better at helping student teachers to develop their thinking about and skills in assessing pupils' learning. Currently in Europe, the Lesson Study method and the Content Representation tool, which both have a specific focus on assessment, have started to address this problem. This article describes and discusses an intervention in which Lesson Study was used in combination with Content Representation in student teachers' field practice. Empirical materials from one group of student teachers were analyzed to illustrate how the student teachers worked with assessment during the planning of a lesson, how they implemented it in a research lesson, and how they used the gathered observations to make claims about assessment aims. The findings suggest that the student teachers placed greater emphasis on assessment through the intervention. However, it is also found that more attention should have been dedicated to the planning phase and that the group did not manage to keep a research focus throughout the Lesson Study process. This suggests that it properly would be beneficial with several planning sessions prior to the research lesson, as well as having an expert teacher leading the Lesson Study.

  1. Lessons learned from the tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. Summarized herein are the composite conclusions and lessons developed in the course of four conceptual tokamak power-plant designs. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances in both physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advances in materials are also needed for the exploitation of environmental advantages otherwise inherent in fusion power

  2. Overview of recycling technologies for decommissioned materials. Lessons learned during the dismantling of a small PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Emond, O.; Ponnet, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: SCK CEN is dismantling its 11 MWe PWR reactor. The reactor was shutdown in 1987 after 25 years of operation and the dismantling started in 1990. For the management of the low radioactive materials, we apply a strategy promoting the minimisation of the production of radioactive waste and hence the maximisation of the production of recycled materials while keeping the costs as low as possible. The recycled materials are either reused in the non- nuclear industry as raw materials (metal scrap industry or building industry for the concrete) or recycled in the nuclear industry for specific applications (reuse of metals for fabrication of shielding, potential reuse of concrete for production of 'radioactive mortar'). The clearance of radioactive materials and their reuse require the strict respect of procedures and specifications. In our case, the Health Physics department under supervision of the Competent Authority establishes the procedures. This procedure is still a case by case practice but the legislation in Belgium is progressively put in place. For the recycling in the nuclear industry, we must respect the specifications of the end-user. Up to now, we have recycled low radioactive metals for the fabrication of shielding in the USA, so we had to respect the specifications of the melting facility and to obtain the authorisations for the transport abroad and for the transfer of property. Besides the radioactive waste route, we are using several evacuation routes for the dismantled materials: Evacuation of the cleared metals (iron, stainless steel, copper, electric motors...) to a local scrap dealer; Evacuation of metals to the Studsvik melting facility situated in Sweden: after clearance by the Swedish Authority, the non radioactive materials are sent to a local scrap dealer and the secondary radioactive waste is sent back to Belgium and conditioned by Belgoprocess. This technology further decontaminates the metals and allows performing an accurate

  3. Safety of the Transport of Radioactive Materials for Civilian Use in France. Lessons learned by IRSN from analysis of significant events reported in 2012 and 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Every two years since 2008, IRSN has published in a report the lessons learnt from its analysis of significant events involving the transport of radioactive materials for civilian purposes in France. Each year in France, some 770,000 shipments of radioactive materials for civilian use are done by road, railway, inland waterway, sea and air. For 2012 and 2013, the report did not find evidence of degradation compared with previous years, particularly for industrial activities in the nuclear power industry, which raise the most significant safety issues. Since 1999, approximately a hundred events are reported each year, which represents, on average, one event per 10,000 packages transported. IRSN notes that none of the events that occurred over the two years had an impact on public health or environmental protection. Events involving a defect in the closure of spent fuel shipping packages and deviations concerning the content of the packages, which had increased in 2010 and 2011, are now down. It would seem to confirm that the organizational measures implemented by those sending the packages have had a positive impact. Previous trends which brought to light failures in the preparation of packages and their handling, in particular in the medical sector, have been confirmed. Even if most of the packages concerned contain low levels of radioactivity, recurrence of these events confirms the value of implementing appropriate preventive actions on the part of the companies involved. Lastly, descriptions of several typical events that occurred in 2012 and 2013 provide illustrations of the analyses that were performed on actual cases

  4. Characterization of post-disaster environmental management for Hazardous Materials Incidents: Lessons learnt from the Tianjin warehouse explosion, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Duan, Huabo; Zuo, Jian; Song, MingWei; Zhang, Yukui; Yang, Bo; Niu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Hazardous Materials Incidents (HMIs) have attracted a growing public concern worldwide. The health risks and environmental implications associated with HMIs are almost invariably severe, and underscore the urgency for sound management. Hazardous Materials Explosion incidents (HMEIs) belong to a category of extremely serious HMIs. Existing studies placed focuses predominately on the promptness and efficiency of emergency responses to HMIs and HMEIs. By contrast, post-disaster environmental management has been largely overlooked. Very few studies attempted to examine the post-disaster environmental management plan particularly its effectiveness and sufficiency. In the event of the Tianjin warehouse explosion (TWE), apart from the immediate emergency response, the post-disaster environmental management systems (P-EMSs) have been reported to be effective and sufficient in dealing with the environmental concerns. Therefore, this study aims to critically investigate the P-EMSs for the TWE, and consequently to propose a framework and procedures for P-EMSs in general for HMIs, particularly for HMEIs. These findings provide a useful reference to develop P-EMSs for HMIs in the future, not only in China but also other countries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Satisfactory throat-hit is needed to switch from tobacco to e-cigarettes: a lesson from an e-liquid blind test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Dautzenberg

    2016-04-01

    The present data justify the need to further develop e-cigarettes so that an optimal OTH is identified quickly. Further research is needed to confirm the above results in other populations and to assess the specific influence of flavour on throat hit.

  6. The Needs for Multicultural Knowledge in Instructional Material on Theme 7 "Beautiful Diversity in My Country" Grade 4th Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifatul Jannah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of research consist of the following (1 to know need analysis of Curriculum 2013 instructional materials in elementary school (2 to develop instructional material based on multicultural values.The study employs descriptive qualitative method which the data are collected by interview,  observation, and document analysis.The observation and interview results about instructional materials of Curriculum 2013 in some elementary school in Surakarta consist of the following (1 teachers need additional materials in order to deliver suitable material of Curriculum2013 for students. (2 teachers get difficulties in selecting suitable additional material. (3 teachers need additional material which can develop students good characters by adding Indonesian multicultural knowledge in all subjects. By enriching and developing multicultural values for students so it can be integrated in instructional materials such as tolerance, nationalism, and spirit of unity in diversities.

  7. Evaluating the Bulk Lorentz Factors of Outflow Material: Lessons Learned from the Extremely Energetic Outburst GRB 160625B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Shuai; Liang, Yun-Feng; Jin, Zhi-Ping; He, Hao-Ning; Liao, Neng-Hui; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming, E-mail: liangyf@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2017-02-10

    GRB 160625B is an extremely bright outburst with well-monitored afterglow emission. The geometry-corrected energy is high, up to ∼5.2 × 10{sup 52} erg or even ∼8 × 10{sup 52} erg, rendering it the most energetic GRB prompt emission recorded so far. We analyzed the time-resolved spectra of the prompt emission and found that in some intervals there were likely thermal-radiation components and the high energy emission was characterized by significant cutoff. The bulk Lorentz factors of the outflow material are estimated accordingly. We found out that the Lorentz factors derived in the thermal-radiation model are consistent with the luminosity-Lorentz factor correlation found in other bursts, as well as in GRB 090902B for the time-resolved thermal-radiation components, while the spectral cutoff model yields much lower Lorentz factors that are in tension with the constraints set by the electron pair Compton scattering process. We then suggest that these spectral cutoffs are more likely related to the particle acceleration process and that one should be careful in estimating the Lorentz factors if the spectrum cuts at a rather low energy (e.g., ∼tens of MeV). The nature of the central engine has also been discussed, and a stellar-mass black hole is favored.

  8. Achieving transparency in carbon labelling for construction materialsLessons from current assessment standards and carbon labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Peng; Low, Sui Pheng; Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of international GHG standards is reviewed. • The evolution of international carbon labelling schemes is reviewed. • The transparency requirements in carbon labelling schemes are revealed. • Key recommendations are provided to improve transparency in carbon labelling. - Abstract: The construction industry is one of the largest sources of carbon emissions. Manufacturing of raw materials, such as cement, steel and aluminium, is energy intensive and has considerable impact on carbon emissions level. Due to the rising recognition of global climate change, the industry is under pressure to reduce carbon emissions. Carbon labelling schemes are therefore developed as meaningful yardsticks to measure and compare carbon emissions. Carbon labelling schemes can help switch consumer-purchasing habits to low-carbon alternatives. However, such switch is dependent on a transparent scheme. The principle of transparency is highlighted in all international greenhouse gas (GHG) standards, including the newly published ISO 14067: Carbon footprint of products – requirements and guidelines for quantification and communication. However, there are few studies which systematically investigate the transparency requirements in carbon labelling schemes. A comparison of five established carbon labelling schemes, namely the Singapore Green Labelling Scheme, the CarbonFree (the U.S.), the CO 2 Measured Label and the Reducing CO 2 Label (UK), the CarbonCounted (Canada), and the Hong Kong Carbon Labelling Scheme is therefore conducted to identify and investigate the transparency requirements. The results suggest that the design of current carbon labels have transparency issues relating but not limited to the use of a single sign to represent the comprehensiveness of the carbon footprint. These transparency issues are partially caused by the flexibility given to select system boundary in the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to measure GHG emissions. The

  9. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, Philippe; Klohn, Axel Max; Zesiger, Véronique; Freigburghaus, Franziska; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele

    2009-08-24

    The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy.The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists.Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents.A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and coordinated responses through specific intervention projects.

  10. Developing a health and human rights training program for french speaking Africa: lessons learned, from needs assessment to a pilot program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freigburghaus Franziska

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of human rights education has widely been recognized as one of the strategies for their protection and promotion of health. Yet training programs have not always taken into account neither local needs, nor public health relevance, nor pedagogical efficacy. The objectives of our study were to assess, in a participative way, educational needs in the field of health and human rights among potential trainees in six French-speaking African countries and to test the feasibility of a training program through a pilot test. Ultimately the project aims to implement a health and human rights training program most appropriate to the African context. Methods Needs assessment was done according to four approaches: Revue of available data on health and human rights in the targeted countries; Country visits by one of the authors meeting key institutions; Focus group discussions with key-informants in each country; A questionnaire-based study targeting health professionals and human rights activists. Pilot training program: an interactive e-learning pilot program was developed integrating training needs expressed by partner institutions and potential trainees. Results Needs assessment showed high public health and human rights challenges that the target countries have to face. It also showed precise demands of partner institutions in regard to a health and human rights training program. It further allowed defining training objectives and core competencies useful to potential employers and future students as well as specific training contents. A pilot program allowed testing the motivation of students, the feasibility of an interactive educational approach and identifying potential difficulties. Conclusion In combining various approaches our study was able to show that training needs concentrate around tools allowing the identification of basic human rights violations in the health system, the analysis of their causes and

  11. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  12. Balancing the need to rapidly scale-up and improve clinical outcomes in antiretroviral programmes in developing countries: lessons from an Indian programmatic cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Peter; Beyers, Nulda; Fidler, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) is highly effective reducing mortality and AIDS-related morbidity in HIV-infected people and at preventing transmission of HIV between individuals. The article reviewed for this commentary reported on data from an Indian ART cohort that showed low median baseline CD4 counts and high rates of mortality and loss to follow-up. Programme implementers in developing regions need to balance the need for rapid scale-up and simultaneous improvement in clinical outcomes. Challenges outlined support HIV treatment strategies that combine improved HIV diagnosis, linkage to care and provision of ART with a strong community-based component. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Sharing skills and needs between providers and users of climate information to create climate services: lessons from the Northern Adriatic case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Giannini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The need to cope with the expected impacts of climate change on socio-ecological systems calls for a closer dialogue between climate scientists and the community of climate information users. We describe an interactive process designed to bridge this gap by establishing a two-way communication, based on mutual learning. We analyse the need of climate information for the integrated assessment of climate change impacts on the coastal zone of the Northern Adriatic Sea, which is considered to be particularly vulnerable to several climate-related phenomena, e.g. heavy rainfall events, pluvial flood, and sea level rise, causing potentially high damage to coastal ecosystems and urban areas (e.g. acqua alta in the Venice Lagoon. A participatory process was designed engaging representatives from both the scientific and local stakeholders communities, and facilitated by a boundary organization, embodied by the Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change. End-users of climate information (e.g. decision makers belonging to public institutions were selected among representatives of those public institutions having a specific mandate for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, and engaged to identify their needs. During the early stages of the interaction process, several priorities were identified, including: (1 data to support land-use planning, (2 data with greater resolution and longer time series, (3 data on climate impacts and risks, (4 precipitation patterns to improve irrigation, (5 sea level rise and tides, (6 climate variations and extreme events, (7 seasonal trend for tidal waves, and (8 hydraulic risk. Three climate products were developed to address these needs: (1 short-term projections of sea level rise; (2 seasonal predictions of extreme rainfall events; (3 long-term regional projections of climate extremes (including heat waves, dry spells and heavy rainfall events. Additionally, two risk products were developed: 4 sea level rise

  14. FROM NEEDS ANALYSIS TO DESIGNING ACADEMIC WRITING MATERIALS FOR DIPLOMA STUDENTS OF MARA UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY (UITM, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Chiuh @ Noemi

    2015-12-01

    instructors and students confirmed this. The findings from the needs analysis are then used as the basis for developing academic writing materials to complement the existing English courses in UiTM.

  15. Lessons from Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazari Alves, R.

    2000-01-01

    The lessons learned from the radiological accident of Goiania in 1987 derived from the observations from the Regulatory Agency which was in charge of the decontamination tasks may be consolidated into four classes: Preventive Actions, characterised as those that aim to minimise the probability of occurrence of a radiological accident; Minimisation of time between the moment of the accident occurrence and the beginning of intervention, in case a radiological accident does occur, despite all preventive measures; Intervention, which is correlated to the type of installation, its geographical location, the social classes involved and their contamination vectors; and Follow up, for which well established rules to allow continuing monitoring of the victims and rebuilding of homes are necessary. The greatest lesson of all was the need for integration of the professionals involved, from all organizations. (author)

  16. Does One Need a 4.5 K Screen in Cryostats of Superconducting Accelerator Devices Operating in Superfluid Helium? Lessons from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Ph; Tavian, L

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large proj...

  17. The urgent need for universally applicable simple screening procedures and diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus – lessons from projects funded by the World Diabetes Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian de Courten

    2012-07-01

    the fasting state, time consuming nature of the tests, intolerance to high glucose load due to nausea, need for repeat tests, issues with scarcity of test consumables and lack of equipment making some procedures impossible to follow. Conclusion: Though an international consensus on screening and diagnosis for GDM is welcome, it should ensure that the recommendations take into account feasibility and applicability in low resource settings to ensure wider usage. We need to move away from purely academic discussions focusing on sensitivity and specificity to also include what can actually be done at the basic care level.

  18. Evaluation of Need and Location for a Thermogravimetric Analyzer in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIS, H.T.

    2000-01-01

    This plan provides an analysis for locating a TGA to support PFP Thermal Stabilization processes. The scope of this document is to evaluate the need for, and location for, installation of a TGA system as a supplement to the SFE equipment for moisture measurement in pure oxides. A location assessment for the SFE equipment was previously performed (HNF 1999). Based on that assessment, co-location of the TGA system with the SFE system is the preferred option. This would enable thermally stabilized material to be analyzed for residual moisture by either the TGA system or SFE system or both This evaluation considers glovebox locations in the PFP 234-52 Building Analytical Laboratory or operating areas for the installation of the TGA system and it's supporting equipment. This evaluation considers using existing gloveboxes along with an alternative of adding a new glovebox to existing process lines. The location evaluation criteria focuses mainly on glovebox size, with qualitative consideration of relative cost and schedule impacts associated with system implementation, radiological control, and interaction with other laboratory operations and processes. In addition, the possible co-location of a TGA furnace system with the SFE system was considered

  19. Does one need a 4.5 K screen in cryostats of superconducting accelerator devices operating in superfluid helium? lessons from the LHL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Philippe; Parma, Vittorio; Tavian, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Superfluid helium is increasingly used as a coolant for superconducting devices in particle accelerators: the lower temperature enhances the performance of superconductors in high-field magnets and reduces BCS losses in RF acceleration cavities, while the excellent transport properties of superfluid helium can be put to work in efficient distributed cooling systems. The thermodynamic penalty of operating at lower temperature however requires careful management of the heat loads, achieved inter alia through proper design and construction of the cryostats. A recurrent question appears to be that of the need and practical feasibility of an additional screen cooled by normal helium at around 4.5 K surrounding the cold mass at about 2 K, in such cryostats equipped with a standard 80 K screen. We introduce the issue in terms of first principles applied to the configuration of the cryostats, discuss technical constraints and economical limitations, and illustrate the argumentation with examples taken from large projects confronted with this issue, i.e. CEBAF, SPL, ESS, LHC, TESLA, European X-FEL, ILC.

  20. For Sale: Your Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The last several years has seen an increasingly popular trend of teachers buying and selling their lesson plans and other self-created classroom materials in online marketplaces. The leader in this space is a website called Teachers Pay Teachers, which boasts 3.8 million active users. In this article, the author examines why these sites became…

  1. Children of War. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities in which students read, analyze, and discuss excerpts from children's war diaries; and create a storyboard for a public service announcement on children's rights in wartime. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, extension activities, excerpts of children's war diaries, suggested readings, and web…

  2. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  3. Experimental Garden Plots for Botany Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodnicheva, V. V.; Vasil'eva, E. I.

    1976-01-01

    Discussion of the botany lessons used at two schools points out the need for fifth and sixth grade students to be taught the principles of plant life through observations made at an experimental garden plot at the school. (ND)

  4. Natural radioactive materials. We need/we use them; Natuerliche radioaktive Stoffe. Wir (ge-)brauchen sie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaus Flesch [Saechsisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Landwirtschaft und Geologie, Dresden (Germany). Strahlenschutz; Gellermann, Rainer [Nuclear Control and Consulting GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Heuel-Fabianek, Burkhard [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); and others

    2017-04-01

    The articles in this edition present a small excerpt in the field of natural radioactive materials amongst others in the building industries, in the medical field or in scientific research. Due to the new radiation protection law, the natural occuring radioactive materials become more important to protect the general public.

  5. Needs in Research and Development on materials for the gas coolant nuclear system: HTR/VHTR and GFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billot, Ph.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation takes stock on the materials for high temperature reactors HTR (850 C), very high temperature VHTR(>1000 C) and fast neutrons high temperature GGF(850 C). It concerns the welding materials for the vessel, Ni-based superalloys for gas turbines, coatings, graphite, ceramics and corrosion studies. (A.L.B.)

  6. Models, Databases, and Simulation Tools Needed for the Realization of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering. Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Materials Science and Technology 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M. (Editor); Wong, Terry T. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    Topics covered include: An Annotative Review of Multiscale Modeling and its Application to Scales Inherent in the Field of ICME; and A Multiscale, Nonlinear, Modeling Framework Enabling the Design and Analysis of Composite Materials and Structures.

  7. Lessons learned from a rigorous peer-review process for building the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness (CLEAN) collection of high-quality digital teaching materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Ledley, T. S.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Buhr, S. M.; Manduca, C. A.; Niepold, F.; Fox, S.; Howell, C. D.; Lynds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    The topic of climate change permeates all aspects of our society: the news, household debates, scientific conferences, etc. To provide students with accurate information about climate science and energy awareness, educators require scientifically and pedagogically robust teaching materials. To address this need, the NSF-funded Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Pathway has assembled a new peer-reviewed digital collection as part of the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) featuring teaching materials centered on climate and energy science for grades 6 through 16. The scope and framework of the collection is defined by the Essential Principles of Climate Science (CCSP 2009) and a set of energy awareness principles developed in the project. The collection provides trustworthy teaching materials on these socially relevant topics and prepares students to become responsible decision-makers. While a peer-review process is desirable for curriculum developer as well as collection builder to ensure quality, its implementation is non-trivial. We have designed a rigorous and transparent peer-review process for the CLEAN collection, and our experiences provide general guidelines that can be used to judge the quality of digital teaching materials across disciplines. Our multi-stage review process ensures that only resources with teaching goals relevant to developing climate literacy and energy awareness are considered. Each relevant resource is reviewed by two individuals to assess the i) scientific accuracy, ii) pedagogic effectiveness, and iii) usability/technical quality. A science review by an expert ensures the scientific quality and accuracy. Resources that pass all review steps are forwarded to a review panel of educators and scientists who make a final decision regarding inclusion of the materials in the CLEAN collection. Results from the first panel review show that about 20% (~100) of the resources that were initially considered for inclusion

  8. NECSA'S Need to Establish a Nuclear Forensics Specific NDA Facility for On-Site Categorization of Seized Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshielo, P.; Mogafe, R.

    2015-01-01

    The increase of nuclear material that are out of regulatory control is becoming a serious concern and threat and thereby continuously seeking urgent interventions and counteractions from the international community aspiring effective control over all nuclear material and peaceful uses of nuclear technologies globally. In South Africa the nuclear forensics initiative approach and its execution have been adopted, established and managed by the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA) to support the country's nuclear safeguards system and nuclear security investigations plan to fight against the illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials. On this nuclear forensics initiative approach adopted by Necsa, the development and later execution of a Non-Destructive Analyses (NDA) facility capability for quick categorization of any seized nuclear material by law-enforcement agencies is currently envisaged as a critical initiative to comprehend nuclear forensics Laboratory analytical or characterization techniques. The main objective for this NDA facility is planned to be used for performing nuclear material screening process for material categorization purposes to generate information and results which will be open to law enforcement agencies for prosecution processes and also for the safeguards reporting to the IAEA (ITDB). The NDA technique is therefore found to be a critical tool needed at NECSA as an Early-Checking-Point or first-line material check point for all seized nuclear materials in determining some characteristics of the materials and collection of data without having to destroy or changing the morphology of the material. (author)

  9. Examination of the Teaching Skills for Reading Scientific Materials Needed by Science Teachers by Comparing In-Service and Prospective Science Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    山根, 嵩史; 中條, 和光

    2016-01-01

    We examined the teaching skills for reading scientific materials needed by science teachers. We compared the views of teaching skills for reading scientific materials of science teachers both in service and in training. The result of text mining for free description of the teaching skills of both groups showed that, whereas trainee teachers emphasized language ability as a teaching skill (for example, the ability to image the contents of a text), current teachers emphasized teaching the curri...

  10. Research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Research needs were identified during working sessions for several potential separation options. These options include sequestering agents, solvent extraction, membranes, solid sorbents, novel approaches, organic separation and destruction methods, and radiation and chemical stability of separation materials

  11. Kick-off research coordination meeting of the IAEA coordinated research project on analyses of, and lessons learned from the operational experience with fast reactor equipment and systems. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The specific objectives of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analyses of, and Lessons Learned from the Operational Experience with Fast Reactor Equipment and Systems are to - Preserve the feedback from commissioning, operation, and decommissioning experience of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors; - Enable easy access to the information from this feedback; - Produce lessons-learned/synthesis reports from the commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors. To achieve these objectives, the CRP participants will retrieve, assess and archive all the documentation and information relevant to feedback from commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of sodium cooled fast reactors. The archiving step may include conversion of the documents in electronic form and the preparation of electronic databases organized along scientific/technical topics and reactors. Then, the CRP will work on the critical review, assessment, and systematization of the available data, and will publish synthesis reports, including the appropriate recommendations from the 'lessons learned'. It is important to stress that these generalization efforts are crucial in view of the generational change occurring now: preserving the knowledge and experience of the generation who participated in the initial development work of sodium cooled fast reactors and is now retiring, and ultimately ensuring the systematic use of the operational feedback in the form of a 'lessons learned' approach, is essential since it was in the early stage of the studies that the key decisions and design choices were made. To accomplish the lessons-learned and synthesising work requires for as many as possible of the highly skilled specialists and pioneers in the sodium cooled fast reactor research and development area to be actively involved in the CRP. Thus, the first stage of the CRP will address feedback from operational experience with regard to

  12. To Think, to Feel, to Have: The Effects of Need for Cognition, Hedonism and Materialism on Impulse Buying Tendencies in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Lins

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, teenagers are likely to engage in consumerism given the influence of the media and their peers. Consumer behavior is often irrational, as shown by research on impulse buying. Impulse buying tendency (IBT is characterized by hedonic shopping motivation, materialism and need for cognition (NC. We hypothesize (1 that hedonism mediates the relationship between materialism and IBT; (2 a negative correlation between NC and IBT; (3 that NC moderates the relationship between hedonism and IBT, as well as between materialism and IBT. We will collect data from six countries with participants being adolescents 13–18 years old.

  13. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  14. A Model of Research Paper Writing Instructional Materials for Academic Writing Course: "Needs & Documents Analysis and Model Design"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghufron, M. Ali; Saleh, Mursid; Warsono; Sofwan, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a model of instructional materials for Academic Writing Course focusing on research paper writing. The model was designed based on the Curriculum at the English Education Study Program, Faculty of Language and Art Education of IKIP PGRI Bojonegoro, East Java, Indonesia. This model was developed in order to improve…

  15. Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Phelan BNS, MSc, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The public health nurses’ scope of practice explicitly includes child protection within their role, which places them in a prime position to identify child protection concerns. This role compliments that of other professions and voluntary agenices who work with children. Public health nurses are in a privileged position as they form a relationship with the child’s parent(s/guardian(s and are able to see the child in its own environment, which many professionals cannot. Child protection in Ireland, while influenced by other countries, has progressed through a distinct pathway that streamlined protocols and procedures. However, despite the above serious failures have occurred in the Irish system, and inquiries over the past 20 years persistently present similar contributing factors, namely, the lack of standardized and comprehensive service responses. Moreover, poor practice is compounded by the lack of recognition of the various interactional processes taking place within and between the different agencies of child protection, leading to psychological barriers in communication. This article will explore the lessons learned for public health nurses practice in safeguarding children in the Republic of Ireland.

  16. Materialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Biochar-based functional materials in the purification of agricultural wastewater: Fabrication, application and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongning; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Hongli; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Jiachao; Yang, Yuan; Guo, Jiajun; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu

    2018-04-01

    Nowadays, agricultural contamination is becoming more and more serious due to the rapid growth of agricultural industry, which discharged antibiotics, pesticides or toxic metals into farmlands. A large number of researchers have applied biochar-based functional materials to the treatment of agricultural wastewater contamination. Meanwhile, biochar has also proved to be a very promising and effective technology in water purification field due to its various beneficial properties (e.g., cost effective, high specific surface area, and surface reactive groups). The focus of this review is to highlight the fabrication methods and application of biochar-based functional materials with the removal of different agricultural contaminants, and discuss the underlying mechanisms. However, the application of biochar-based functional materials is currently under its infancy, with the main hindrance is identified as the gap between laboratory scale and field application, immaturity of engineered biochar production technologies, and lack of quality standards. In order to fill these knowledge gaps, more efforts should be made to pay for the relevant research in future studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Knitting Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pamela

    1987-01-01

    Based on Jean-Francois Millet's 1869 painting, "The Knitting Lesson," this lesson's goal is to introduce students in grades seven through nine to genre (everyday life) painting the nineteenth century. The lesson is also designed to show that some aspects of genre may be timeless. (BSR)

  19. High Torque Density Transverse Flux Machine without the Need to Use SMC Material for 3D Flux Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new transverse flux permanent magnet machine. In a normal transverse flux machine, complicated 3-D flux paths often exist. Such 3-D flux paths would require the use of soft magnetic composites material instead of laminations for construction of the machine stator. In the new...... machine topology proposed in this paper, by advantageously utilizing the magnetic flux path provided by an additional rotor, use of laminations that allow 2-D flux paths only will be sufficient to accomplish the required 3-D flux paths. The machine also has a high torque density and is therefore...

  20. Factors Influencing Science Content Accuracy in Elementary Inquiry Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Barbara L.; Sullivan-Watts, Barbara; Shim, Minsuk K.; Young, Betty; Pockalny, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Elementary teachers face increasing demands to engage children in authentic science process and argument while simultaneously preparing them with knowledge of science facts, vocabulary, and concepts. This reform is particularly challenging due to concerns that elementary teachers lack adequate science background to teach science accurately. This study examined 81 in-classroom inquiry science lessons for preservice education majors and their cooperating teachers to determine the accuracy of the science content delivered in elementary classrooms. Our results showed that 74 % of experienced teachers and 50 % of student teachers presented science lessons with greater than 90 % accuracy. Eleven of the 81 lessons (9 preservice, 2 cooperating teachers) failed to deliver accurate science content to the class. Science content accuracy was highly correlated with the use of kit-based resources supported with professional development, a preference for teaching science, and grade level. There was no correlation between the accuracy of science content and some common measures of teacher content knowledge (i.e., number of college science courses, science grades, or scores on a general science content test). Our study concluded that when provided with high quality curricular materials and targeted professional development, elementary teachers learn needed science content and present it accurately to their students.

  1. Emission and transmission tomography systems to be developed for the future needs of Jules Horowitz material testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiluoto, Petri [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)], E-mail: petri.kotiluoto@vtt.fi; Wasastjerna, Frej; Kekki, Tommi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Sipilae, Heikki; Banzuzi, Kukka [Oxford Instruments Analytical Oy, Nihtisillankuja 5, P.O.Box 85, FI-02631 Espoo (Finland); Kinnunen, Petri; Heikinheimo, Liisa [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2009-08-01

    The new 100 MW Jules Horowitz material testing reactor will be built in Cadarache, France. It will support, for instance, research on new types of innovative nuclear fuel. As a Finnish in-kind contribution, 3D emission and transmission tomography equipment will be delivered for both the reactor and the active component storage pool. The image reconstruction of activities inside the used nuclear fuel will be based on gamma spectrometry measurements. A new type of underwater digital X-ray linear detector array is under development for transmission imaging, based on GaAs and direct conversion of X-rays into an electrical signal. A shared collimator will be used for both emission and transmission measurements. Some preliminary design has been performed. For the current design, the expected gamma spectrometric response of a typical high-purity germanium detector has been simulated with MCNP for minimum and maximum source activities (specified by CEA) to be measured in future.

  2. Lessons learned bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T'he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel

  3. International seminar on the safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors: material presented at the international seminar 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This seminar on international, national and bilateral cooperation programmes on the safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors was held in Tokyo, Japan (1997) and hosted by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the Science and Technology Agency (STA) of Japan. More than 70 participants attended the seminar. Represented were experts from OECD/NEA member countries and Russia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the ISTC, the INSC and the Russian INSC. Eighteen papers were presented in five sessions. The seminar was structured around four main areas of cooperation: cooperative programmes of the OECD/NEA, programmes of international organisations, bi-lateral programmes, and national programmes of OECD/NEA member countries having reactors of the VVER type. General conclusions, followed by specific technical conclusions are included

  4. PLATO Esperanto Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Judith

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of types of Esperanto materials available on PLATO--a general overview section, a picture introduction, lessons that accompany a textbook, vocabulary drills, crossword puzzles, dictation drills, reading practice, and a concentration game. The general overview lesson gives a comprehensive summary of the history and…

  5. Materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  6. Righting Your Future: LRE Lesson Plans for Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRADLE: Center for Research and Development in Law-Related Education, Winston-Salem, NC.

    A compilation of more than 50 lesson plans on law related education, these materials were written by middle school and high school teachers from around the United States. The lessons cover a broad range of topics including "DNA Fingerprints and the Constitutional Right to Privacy"; "Censorship and Book Banning in Public Schools"; "The Death…

  7. The need for a greater commitment to america region to prevent denials of shipments of radioactive materials; La necesidad de un mayor compromiso en la region America para prevenir los rechazos de expediciones de material radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallaupoma, Mario, E-mail: mmallaupoma@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru); Schwela, Ulric, E-mail: tech@tanb.org [Tantalum-Niobiom International Study Center (TIC), Lasne (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive sources are used worldwide in a wide range of applications in industry health care, industrial applications, manufacturing materials, exploration and technological development, as well as basic scientific research. The ability to use such radioactive material in these sectors depends on both its safe transport within a country and between different countries, for developed and developing countries can have access to this technology, in a timely manner and in conditions economically acceptable. In this paper the issue of denials and restraints of shipment of radioactive material and the need for greater commitment that Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must assume to facilitate the transport of radioactive materials for the benefit of society is analyzed.

  8. Lessons learned in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenough, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews aspects of the history of radiology with the goal of identifying lessons learned, particularly in the area of radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. It is pointed out that since the days of Roentgen there has been a need not only to control and quantify the amount of radiation reaching the patient but also to optimize the imaging process to offer the greatest diagnostic benefit within allowable levels of patient dose. To this end, in diagnostic radiology, one finds the development of better films, X rays tubes, grids, screens and processing techniques, while in fluoroscopy, one sees the increased luminance of calcium tungstate. In interventional radiology, one finds an improvement in catheterization techniques and contrast agents. In nuclear medicine, the development of tracer techniques into modern cameras and isotopes such as technetium can be followed. In radiotherapy, one sees the early superficial X rays and radium sources gradually replaced with radon seeds, supervoltage, 60 Co and today's linear accelerators. Along with the incredible advances in imaging and therapeutic technologies comes the growing realization of the potential danger of radiation and the need to protect the patient (as well as physicians, ancillary personnel and the general population) from unnecessary radiation. The important lesson learned is that we must walk a tightrope, balancing the benefits and risks of any technology utilizing radiation to produce the greatest benefits at the lowest acceptable risk. The alternative techniques using non-ionizing radiation will have to be considered as part of the general armamentarium for medical imaging whenever radiation consequences are unacceptable. (author)

  9. How the University of Texas system responded to the need for interim storage of low-level radioactive waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    Faced with the prospect of being unable to permanently dispose of low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) generated from teaching, research, and patient care activities, component institutions of the University of Texas System worked collaboratively to create a dedicated interim storage facility to be used until a permanent disposal facility became available. Located in a remote section of West Texas, the University of Texas System Interim Storage Facility (UTSISF) was licensed and put into operation in 1993, and since then has provided safe and secure interim storage for up to 350 drums of dry solid LLRW at any given time. Interim storage capability provided needed relief to component institutions, whose on-site waste facilities could have possibly become overburdened. Experiences gained from the licensing and operation of the site are described, and as a new permanent LLRW disposal facility emerges in Texas, a potential new role for the storage facility as a surge capacity storage site in times of natural disasters and emergencies is also discussed.

  10. Performance of buffer material under radiation and thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shuaiwei; Yang Zhongtian; Liu Wei

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite is generally selected as backfill and buffer material for repositories in the world. Radiation and heat release is the intrinsic properties of high level radioactive waste. This paper made a preliminary research on foreign literature about performance of the engineering barrier material under radiation and at higher temperatures (e. g. above 100℃). As our current research is just budding in this area, we need to draw lessons from foreign experience and methods. (authors)

  11. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Predictive Factors of Need for Embolic Material Conversion of Gelatin Sponge Particles to N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Yukichi; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Ando, Tomohiro; Noda, Yoshifumi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kotoku, Junichi; Furui, Shigeru; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo identify predictive factors for embolic material conversion to N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) after failed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using gelatin sponge (GS).Materials and MethodsInstitutional review board approval was obtained. We retrospectively studied 62 consecutive women with primary PPH who underwent TAE between January 2006 and March 2015. Five of them were excluded for the following: cardiopulmonary arrest at arrival (n = 1), uterine inversion (n = 1), and hysterectomy after TAE (n = 3). Remaining 57 women (age range, 21–43 years; mean, 32.6 years) comprised study population. TAE was initially performed using GS in all cases and then converted to NBCA after two embolizations using GS with persistent hemodynamic instability or vaginal bleeding. The patients’ background, uterine height, vital signs, laboratory tests, disseminated intravascular coagulation score, and details of procedure were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors related to embolic material conversion.ResultsTechnical success rate was 100%. Fourteen patients (25%) needed embolic material conversion to NBCA. Univariate analysis showed that uterine height, systolic blood pressure (sBP), and hemoglobin level were significantly related to embolic material conversion to NBCA (P = 0.029, 0.030, and 0.042). Logistic regression analysis showed that uterine height (odds ratio, 1.37; P = 0.025) and sBP (odds ratio, 0.96; P = 0.003) were associated with embolic material conversion to NBCA.ConclusionUterine height and sBP can be predictive factors for embolic material conversion to NBCA for the treatment of PPH.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, Case Control Study

  12. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Predictive Factors of Need for Embolic Material Conversion of Gelatin Sponge Particles to N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanahashi, Yukichi; Goshima, Satoshi, E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kondo, Hiroshi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ando, Tomohiro; Noda, Yoshifumi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kotoku, Junichi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Medical Technology (Japan); Furui, Shigeru [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo identify predictive factors for embolic material conversion to N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) after failed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using gelatin sponge (GS).Materials and MethodsInstitutional review board approval was obtained. We retrospectively studied 62 consecutive women with primary PPH who underwent TAE between January 2006 and March 2015. Five of them were excluded for the following: cardiopulmonary arrest at arrival (n = 1), uterine inversion (n = 1), and hysterectomy after TAE (n = 3). Remaining 57 women (age range, 21–43 years; mean, 32.6 years) comprised study population. TAE was initially performed using GS in all cases and then converted to NBCA after two embolizations using GS with persistent hemodynamic instability or vaginal bleeding. The patients’ background, uterine height, vital signs, laboratory tests, disseminated intravascular coagulation score, and details of procedure were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors related to embolic material conversion.ResultsTechnical success rate was 100%. Fourteen patients (25%) needed embolic material conversion to NBCA. Univariate analysis showed that uterine height, systolic blood pressure (sBP), and hemoglobin level were significantly related to embolic material conversion to NBCA (P = 0.029, 0.030, and 0.042). Logistic regression analysis showed that uterine height (odds ratio, 1.37; P = 0.025) and sBP (odds ratio, 0.96; P = 0.003) were associated with embolic material conversion to NBCA.ConclusionUterine height and sBP can be predictive factors for embolic material conversion to NBCA for the treatment of PPH.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, Case Control Study.

  13. Life Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Pearl

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, Stig Lanesskog, associate dean for the MBA program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, challenged a group of his students to venture beyond classroom polemics and into the lives of people in need. Lanesskog took them to South Dakota's Pine Ridge Reservation, a culturally rich and economically devastated area with…

  14. Lessons learned

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ing methods suggests that working with traditional knowledge providers can extend the reach of climate information to ... be accompanied by decision aids and complementary information, updated over the season. Farmers need ... decision-making tools. Making high quality, reliable data accessible builds trust in users and ...

  15. Noncombatant Evacuation Operations: Department of State’s Lessons Learned Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    means for utilizing the lessons learned, in some form of rehearsal or exercise, will 4 make the lessons learned meaningful. A lesson should only...required by DOS policy. The Department agreed with the recommendations to establish certain procedures to address the need to constantly 44 update...doctrine.31 Futch also explained that CALL is constantly seeking to expand training and educational efforts about the lessons learned process and

  16. Meeting of Energy Needs During the Period of Raw Materials Insufficiency in the 21st Century (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia and Slovakia cooperation - draft of project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.; Apostolov, T.; Petrov, B.; Chwaszcewski, S.; Andrzejewski, K.; Subbotin, S.; Tsibulskij, V.; Darilek, P.; Zajac, R.; Breza, J.

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of the work is to give into the mutual harmony long term planning of nuclear energy (contemporary power station has supposed lifetime 70 years and will need at least ten years from the decision to full realization) with the possibility of raw materials supply during the whole lifetime. But situation is not so uniquely directed only to nuclear energy - classical sources (coal, gas and oil) are supposed to be exhausted surely in this century (coal could be regionally dependent) and specially Europe will be practically net consumer of energy raw materials. Ways to stabilize market could be production of hydrogen and use of U238 and Th232 in the new reactors. But developments needed to influence practical industrial demand is about 30 years to be able to start to build up industrial new type nuclear power-stations and money of the order of several billion dollars. At the same time political unification has consequence on local raw material resources, which could hardly be interpreted only as the local or national ownership. Their price could sharply rise and there will be pressure to use it not only for energy production, but also as the chemical raw material. Moreover it is expected that in the half of this century the price of natural uranium will be limiting factor for the contemporary PWR reactors use and that there will be necessary to start fast breeders or use thorium fuel to cover demands. Last estimations about the oil peaking and its consequences are included. Armenia, Lithuania and Ukraine representatives expressed will to join the project. Common will is expressed in the presentation to try to understand commonly the future development and to find common solution to the future challenges (Authors)

  17. A Blended Approach to Learning: Added Value and Lessons Learnt from Students' Use of Computer-Based Materials for Neurological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alison; Ramsay, Jill; Lindfield, Helen; Couperthwaite, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines BSc Physiotherapy students' experiences of developing their neurological observational and analytical skills using a blend of traditional classroom activities and computer-based materials at the University of Birmingham. New teaching and learning resources were developed and supported in the School of Health Sciences using Web…

  18. Managing Mathematics: How Does Classroom Management Affect the Maintenance of High Cognitive Demand Tasks during Lessons with Standards-Based Instructional Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriteau Phaire, Candace

    2013-01-01

    The teaching and learning of mathematics has been the subject of debate for over 30 years and the most recent reform efforts are in response to concerns regarding the mathematical competence of students in the United States (Ball, Hill, & Bass, 2005; Battista, 1994; Cavanagh, 2008). Standards-based Instructional Materials (SBIM) allows…

  19. Teaching about Modern Germany: Instructional Materials for the Social Studies Classroom. Correlation Charts Indicating Content and Skills Addressed by Each Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethe House, New York, NY.

    This instructional booklet for the social studies classroom is a companion to a series about modern day Germany. The materials describe the documents in the series and present correlation charts for content and skills: (1) "A Kid Like Me across the Sea"; (2) "Communities and Regions"; (3) "Overview of Germany"; (4)…

  20. Lesson study i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Der beskrives et japansk lesson study forløb, og det diskuteres i hvilket omfang, de gode japanske erfaringer kan overføres til dansk matematikundervisning.......Der beskrives et japansk lesson study forløb, og det diskuteres i hvilket omfang, de gode japanske erfaringer kan overføres til dansk matematikundervisning....

  1. "Frankenstein." [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melanie

    Based on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that active readers interpret a novel (its characters, plot, setting, and theme) in different ways; and the great literature can be and has been adapted in many ways over time. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  2. Regionalization: A Story Map Lesson on Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Deborah

    2018-01-01

    This lesson introduces the concept of regionalization and types of regions. After a brief introductory activity, students explore a story map to learn the material. The teacher can project the story map on a screen for all students to follow or students may work individually on computers. Working individually will allow students to set their own…

  3. Listening Skills. Instructor/Lesson Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Carol; And Others

    This instructor/lesson guide provides instructional materials for a 4-hour course in listening skills in the workplace. Stated objectives are to help students to become more effective listeners, to assist students in obtaining an understanding of how effective they are as listeners, and to assist students in identifying bad listening habits. Two…

  4. Report to the Congress on the need for, and the feasibility of, establishing a security agency within the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    In response to the Congressional mandate Section 204(b)-(2) (C) of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, the Director of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has assessed the need for and the feasibility of establishing a security agency within that office for the performance of safeguards functions. The study assessed guard force effectiveness, and addressed public policy, administrative and legal issues. The study concluded that creation of a special security force within NRC would not result in a higher degree of guard force effectiveness than can be achieved through the use of private guards who have been properly trained and certified. Disparate gun laws in various states, it concluded, restrict arms possessed by both private and federal guards and private and federal transportation guards would require legislation authorizing them to bear the necessary weapons to protect nuclear material in transit. The role of reaction forces was also addressed and it was concluded that primary reliance at fixed sites should be placed on onsite protection systems; for material in transit, on invulnerability of vehicles and containers and on guard forces accompanying shipments

  5. Lessons Learned from a Consultation Process Overseas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Soto, César

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary I discuss three international school consultation experiences, highlighting aspects that serve as lessons for professional development and the implementation of effective and helpful strategies that meet the needs of children and youth in school systems. Relationships developed and maintained between the consulting teams and the…

  6. Legal aspects of the control and repression of illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Is there a need for an international convention?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, Scott

    2012-01-01

    It is generally recognised that illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials is a serious problem, and one that must be tackled with a comprehensive response involving national governments as well as a number of intergovernmental organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA notes that 1 773 incidents were reported to its Illicit Trafficking Database, or ITDB, between January 1993 and December 2009, and that 351 of these involved '... unauthorized possession and related criminal activities' such as '... illegal possession, movement or attempts to illegally trade in or use nuclear material or radioactive sources'. The IAEA adds that 222 more incidents were confirmed between July 2009 and June 2010 and concludes that: - the availability of unsecured nuclear and other radioactive material persists; - effective border control measures help to detect illicit trafficking, although effective control is not uniformly implemented at all international border points; and - individuals and groups are prepared to engage in trafficking this material. A disturbing trend is trafficking in particularly sensitive regions of the world, such as in countries that were formerly a part of the former Soviet Union. In November 2010, Georgian officials seized four individuals allegedly trying to sell cesium-137, which though fairly common can be used to make a radiological dispersion device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb'. This closely followed a court case in Georgia involving Armenian nationals who had attempted to sell weapon-grade plutonium. More recently, in June 2011, Moldovan police arrested six individuals suspected of trafficking in uranium-235. In view of the problem, this paper considers whether an international convention specifically targeting illicit trafficking is needed or not. The paper does not go conceptually beyond the legal aspects of controlling and repressing illicit trafficking; rather, it will look at whether the existing

  7. Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, A.D.; Blair, S.

    2006-01-01

    LLNL turned in 5 Declaration Line Items (DLI's) in 2006. Of these, one was declared completed. We made some changes to streamline our process from 2005, used less money, time and fewer team members. This report is a description of what changes we made in 2006 and what we learned. Many of our core review team had changed from last year, including our Laboratory Director, the Facility safety and security representatives, our Division Leader, and the OPSEC Committee Chair. We were able to hand out an AP Manual to some of them, and briefed all newcomers to the AP process. We first went to the OPSEC Committee and explained what the Additional Protocol process would be for 2006 and solicited their help in locating declarable projects. We utilized the 'three questions' from the AP meeting last year. LLNL has no single place to locate all projects at the laboratory. We talked to Resource Managers and key Managers in the Energy and Environment Directorate and in the Nonproliferation Homeland and International Security Directorate to find applicable projects. We also talked to the Principal Investigators who had projects last year. We reviewed a list of CRADA's and LDRD projects given to us by the Laboratory Site Office. Talking to the PI's proved difficult because of vacation or travel schedules. We were never able to locate one PI in town. Fortunately, collateral information allowed us to screen out his project. We had no problems in downloading new versions of the DWA and DDA. It was helpful for both Steve Blair and Arden Dougan to have write privileges. During the time we were working on the project, we had to tag-team the work to allow for travel and vacation schedules. We had some difficulty locating an 'activities block' in the software. This was mentioned as something we needed to fix from our 2005 declaration. Evidently the Activities Block has been removed from the current version of the software. We also had trouble finding the DLI Detail Report, which we included

  8. Creating more effective health plan quality reports for consumers: lessons from a synthesis of qualitative testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Kojetin, L D; McCormack, L A; Jaël, E F; Sangl, J A; Garfinkel, S A

    2001-07-01

    Social marketing techniques such as consumer testing have only recently been applied to develop effective consumer health insurance information. This article discusses lessons learned from consumer testing to create consumer plan choice materials. Data were collected from 268 publicly and privately insured consumers in three studies between 1994 and 1999. Iterative testing and revisions were conducted to design seven booklets to help Medicaid, Medicare, and employed consumers choose a health plan. Standardized protocols were used in 11 focus groups and 182 interviews to examine the content, comprehension, navigation, and utility of the booklets. A method is suggested to help consumers narrow their plan choices by breaking down the process into smaller decisions using a set of guided worksheets. Implementing these lessons is challenging and not often done well. This article gives examples of evidence-based approaches to address cognitive barriers that designers of consumer health insurance information can adapt to their needs.

  9. Lessons learned from the Tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances relative to present understanding in physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advanced tokamak plasmas configured in the second-stability regime that achieve both high β and bootstrap fractions near unity through strong profile control offer high promise in this regard

  10. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned

  11. Transport safety and struggle against malevolent acts: a synergy to be developed - Protecting transports against malevolent acts, Synergies between security and safety: lessons learned from the IAEA international conference, Role of the IRSN transport operational level in the field of safety, Transparency and secret in the field of nuclear material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riac, Christian; Flory, Denis; Loiseau, Olivier; Mermaz, Frederic; Demolins, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The first article proposes an interview with the chief of the security department within the French ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transports and Housing who comments his missions and his relationships with the ASN and the French Home Office for the protection and control of nuclear materials. A second article discusses the lessons learned from an IAEA international conference about the relationship between the approaches to security and to safety. The third article briefly describes the role of the IRSN transport operational level in the field of safety. The last article discusses how opposite notions like transparency and secret are managed in the case of nuclear material transport

  12. Conception and initial experiences with the information system for materials in need of control - ISUS; Konzeption und erste Erfahrungen mit dem Informations-System-Ueberwachungsbeduerftige Stoffe - ISUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narz, T.

    1997-12-31

    This article presents an information systems for the control of hazardous materials in enterprises. Experiences in the sectors occupational safety, hazardous materials, waste management are described. (SR)

  13. Lessons learned in CMAM implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, Nicky; Brown, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    -going. Despite the need to adapt protocols and approaches to each specific context, there is a need for a common research agenda and sharing of what works and does not. Concerted efforts have been made to improve information-sharing and to draw on lessons learned to advance technical and organisational challenges. However many health workers have limited access to quality information due to barriers such as internet access and language. For example, one recent initiative identified less than 10% of resources are available in French, despite high caseloads of acute malnutrition in francophone West Africa. Key actions to address challenges in information-sharing include: -Improve availability of and access to translated information -Increase use of social media, e-learning and audio-visual materials for extended reach and use of information -Stimulate interactive dialogue and sharing between practitioners for improved problem solving and learning -Strengthen the collaboration between complementary initiatives. In one decade significant advances in the adaptation and implementation of community-based management of acute malnutrition approach have been made in various contexts, but challenges to quality service delivery, scale-up and sustainability remain. It is time to draw on what we know to support scale-up and have equitable access to treatment to the millions of children who still remain outside of existing services. (author)

  14. Lessons from the Fukushima nuclear power accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatamura, Yotaro

    2013-01-01

    Through the investigation of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Accident as the chairman of the related Government's Committee, many things had been considered. Essence of the accident could be not only what occurred in the Fukushima nuclear power station, but also dispersed radioactive materials forced many residents to move and not to be returned. Such events as indication errors of water level meter occurring in severe accident could no be thought and remote mechanical operation of valves under high radiation environment were not prepared. Contamination by radioactive clouds caused the evacuation of residents for a long period. Lessons learned from the accident were described such as; (1) the verification of the road to failure connecting selected accident sequence and road to success with another supposed choice, (2) considering what might occur and then what should be needed on the contrary, (3) nuclear power, if should be continued, should be used with the premise of its hazards, and (4) advise to nuclear engineer for adequate information dissemination and technical explanation to the public and keeping nuclear technologies alive. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Psychosocial Rehabilitation: Some Lessons Learned From Natural Disaster in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Alipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disasters have adverse impacts on different aspects of human life. Psychosocial Rehabilitation is one of the fields which is usually overshadowed and ignored by physical rehabilitation or its importance does not receive proper attention. This research attempts to study some lessons learned from Psychosocial Rehabilitation based on disaster experiences in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study has a conventional qualitative content analysis design. The participants of study were 15 people with direct experience of earthquake and 12 experts in this field. The study sample was selected by purposeful sampling method and the data were collected by semi-structured interviews. Results: Lack of a suitable system to deliver Psychosocial Rehabilitation, challenge in establishing balance between short-term and long-term social and mental needs, lack of mental and social experts, inefficiency in using social capital and capacities are the most important lessons learned in this field. Conclusion: Lack of awareness of mental and social problems of affected people after disaster is one of the most important barriers in successful and stable rehabilitation. Psychosocial Rehabilitation requires a suitable structure and planning for all stages of disaster management.

  16. The application of micro-lesson in optics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Suzhen; Mao, Xuefeng; Lu, Yongle; Wang, Yan; Luo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve students' ability on self-study, this paper discusses the application of micro-lesson as a supplementary way in the course of optics teaching. Both geometric optics and wave optics require a lot of demos, fortunately, micro-lesson just meets this requirement. Nowadays, college education focuses on quality education, so the new nurture scheme of most universities shortened the class hours. However, the development of students and the social needs also require students to have a solid foundation. The effective way to solve this contradiction is to improve the efficiency of classroom teaching and provide the repeatable learning form, micro-lesson.

  17. Management options for implementing a basic and applied research program responsive to CS technology base needs. Task VIII. Review existing CS materials R and D programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-28

    Possibilities for setting up a basic and applied research program that would be responsive to the Conservation and Solar energy base needs are considered with emphasis on the area of materials research. Several organizational arrangements for the implementation of this basic and applied research program are described and analyzed. The key functions of the system such as resources allocation, and program coordination and management follow from two fundamental characteristics: assignment of lead responsibility (CS and the Office of Energy Research, ER); and nature of the organizational chain-of-command. Three options are categorized in terms of these two characteristics and discussed in detail. The first option retains lead responsibility in ER, with CS personnel exercising sign-off authority and filling the coordination role. Option 2 places lead responsibility with CS program office management, and utilizes the existing chain-of-command, but adds a Basic and Applied Research Division to each program office. Option 3 also places lead responsibility with CS, but within a new Office of Basic and Applied Research, which would include a Research Coordinator to manage interactions with ER, and Research Managers for each CS program area. (MCW)

  18. Review of information on the radiation chemistry of materials around waste canisters in salt and assessment of the need for additional experimental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenks, G.H.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    The brines, vapors, and salts precipitated from the brines will be exposed to gamma rays and to elevated temperatures in the regions close to a waste package in the salt. Accordingly, they will be subject to changes in composition brought about by reactions induced by the radiations and heat. This report reviews the status of information on the radiation chemistry of brines, gases, and solids which might be present around a waste package in salt and to assess the need for additional laboratory investigations on the radiation chemistry of these materials. The basic aspects of the radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions, including concentrated salt solutions, were reviewed briefly and found to be substantially unchanged from those presented in Jenks's 1972 review of radiolysis and hydrolysis in salt-mine brines. Some additional information pertaining to the radiolytic yields and reactions in brine solutions has become available since the previous review, and this information will be useful in the eventual, complete elucidation of the radiation chemistry of the salt-mine brines. 53 references.

  19. Breathing Life into Engineering: A Lesson Study Life Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Maria; Yang, Li-Ling; Briggs, May; Hession, Alicia; Koussa, Anita; Wagoner, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A fifth grade life science lesson was implemented through a lesson study approach in two fifth grade classrooms. The research lesson was designed by a team of four elementary school teachers with the goal of emphasizing engineering practices consistent with the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) (Achieve Inc. 2013). The fifth…

  20. Emergency preparedness lessons from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.

    1987-09-01

    Emergency preparedness at nuclear power plants in the US has been considerably enhanced since the Three Mile Island accident. The Chernobyl accident has provided valuable data that can be used to evaluate the merit of some of these enhancements and to determine the need for additional improvements. For example, the USSR intervention levels of 25 rem and 75 rem for evacuation are contrasted with US Environmental Protection Agency protective action guides. The manner in which 135,000 persons were evacuated from the 30-km zone around Chernobyl is constrasted with typical US evacuation plans. Meteorological conditions and particulate deposition patterns were studied to infer characteristics of the radioactive plume from Chernobyl. Typical plume monitoring techniques are examined in light of lessons learned by the Soviets about plume behavior. This review has indicated a need for additional improvements in utility and government emergency plans, procedures, equipment, and training. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  1. Overview of lessons learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Federline, M.; Duncan, A.

    2004-01-01

    During the Tarragona International Seminar the participating high-level specialists had very open and fruitful discussion concerning strategic decommissioning issues. The lessons learnt and possible solutions for future work issues can be found below. Although there appears to be a trend towards early dismantling, there seemed to be general agreement that technical solutions support a wide variety of safe decommissioning approaches. Thus, in terms of decommissioning strategy, it appears that no one size fits all. A flexible regulatory approach is needed in order to recognize the changing operational risks and physical conditions of facilities with time, and to optimise their dismantling. The NEA has released a comprehensive study on decommissioning strategies and costs that indicates world-wide progress. According to this report, over 50% of countries with nuclear facilities have a framework of decommissioning requirements and 60% have defined radioactive waste clearance levels. Up to about 70% of the costs of D and D are attributable to dismantling and waste management. The provisions for safety of the D and D process are closely linked to the availability of the necessary funds as and when required. A number of common factors were defined for successful implementation of decommissioning strategies: i.e. safety, technical feasibility of decommissioning options, risk-informed progression of D and D activities as project proceeds, maintenance of competency and corporate memory throughout project, waste management and disposal capability, financing that suits the scope of the project, a well-defined risk-informed and performance-based regulatory process, and establishment of effective communication with local and regional governments and key stakeholders, particularly personnel, at the earliest opportunity before decommissioning. (author)

  2. Lessons for Teaching Art Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    This collection of lessons is meant to be a practical guide to help teachers engage children in art criticism. The lessons generally follow a similar format. Most suggest an age group but may be modified for use with younger or older students. Several authors suggest variations and extensions for lessons that include studio activities. A broad…

  3. Thematic network on the analysis of thorium and its isotopes in workplace materials. Interim report on current research activity and future research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.; Rosen, P.; White, M.

    1999-12-01

    The task of Work Package 1 (WP 1) of the EC Thematic Network 'The analysis of thorium and its isotopes in workplace materials' was to prepare an 'Inventory of current research activities in participating member states concerning thorium analysis in the workplace and environment'. The specific objective of WP 1 was 'to identify common research areas and co-ordinate activity for better management of resources'. This was to be achieved by carrying out a survey of network and national laboratories to establish the extent of current and proposed research activity in the field, evaluation of survey by network members, and production of a report containing results and conclusions. A preliminary literature review revealed that the majority of thorium analysis is carried out by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) or a radiochemical technique, alpha counting and neutron activation being the most popular. In many instances there is a preconcentration or separation step, which usually involves an ion exchange column to isolate the thorium and remove the majority of the matrix. Papers concerned with the application of ICP-MS were found to feature prominently amongst recent publications, which is not surprising, as the technique is fairly newly established. Thorium was most commonly measured in geological matrixes, including soil and ores. On the basis of the results of the literature review and survey of research activity, the Network identified two key areas of priority for further research: sample preparation methods for thorium analysis; and traceable standards and certified reference materials for thorium analysis. The Network considered how best to distribute the results to interested parties to facilitate links between laboratories with common research areas, and decided that: at this stage, the findings should simply be published in the form of this interim report, which is freely available to all interested parties; the Network should continue to

  4. The Effects of a Computer-Assisted Teaching Material, Designed According to the ASSURE Instructional Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, on Students' Achievement Levels in a Mathematics Lesson and Their Resulting Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, Hilal; Karamete, Aysen; Okçu, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects that computer-assisted instruction had on students' attitudes toward a mathematics lesson and toward learning mathematics with computer-assisted instruction. The computer software we used was based on the ASSURE Instructional Systems Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, and the software was designed to teach…

  5. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  6. Lessons learnt by US nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, W.

    2007-01-01

    Transparency means to communicate to the constituents openly and honestly, as soon as appear credible information. The author deals the subject in four fold: experience in the United States that have taught how not to communicate about nuclear energy; the successfully apply of these lessons learned to subsequent events; the need for transparency reaffirmed by more recent events; ongoing efforts by the United States industry to strengthen the core principles of transparency. (A.L.B.)

  7. Brothers Grimm. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Grimm's fairy tales, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that fairy tales connect them to earlier generations, help them think about present situations, that magic figures prominently in fairy tales, and that fairy tales can inspire readers to create original works of art. The main activity in the…

  8. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  9. Phagocytosis: history's lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Manish; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-01-01

    The assimilation of lessons from the past is an essential component of education for scientists of tomorrow. These lessons are not easy to find. History books on science are few and usually highly dramatized and biographies of scientists tend to exaggerate the pomp of scientific discovery. Both underplay the hard and laborious work that is integral to any scientific pursuit. Here we illustrate one such example. A century ago, the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to two scientists: Ilya Metchnikoff, a Russian zoologist, for the discovery ofphagocytosis-a cell-mediated ingestion ofmicrobes; and Paul Ehrlich, a distinguished physician-scientist, for discovering a highly antigen-specific serum-derived antibody-based immune defense. These two diametrically opposing views of the host-pathogen interaction set the stage for a strife that led to seminal advancements in immunology. Mirrored in this journey are important lessons for scientists today--ubiquitously as applicable to modern scientific life as they were a century ago. This commentaryhighlights these lessons--a fitting centenary to a well-deserved recognition.

  10. Recycling Lesson Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaz, Abeer Ali

    2013-01-01

    This lesson plan designed for grade 2 students has the goal of teaching students about the environmental practice of recycling. Children will learn language words related to recycling such as: "we can recycle"/"we can't recycle" and how to avoid littering with such words as: "recycle paper" and/or "don't throw…

  11. Smart Consumer Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey Consortium for Consumer Education, Newark.

    Lesson plans are provided for use with different populations of pre-K through senior high school students in four different areas of consumer education. Eight units in advertising are included: A First Look at Ads (pre-K-Grade 3), Don't Judge a Book by Its Cover (Grades 1-3), Fatal Distraction (Junior High), Package Labeling (Junior High), Product…

  12. SEL/Project Language. Level II, Kindergarten, Volume II (Lessons 17-32).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ann E.; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains the Southeastern Education Laboratory/Project Language Lessons 17-32 stressing listening, speaking, and reading readiness for disadvantaged kindergarten children. The lessons are designed to be used in the SEL's mobile preschool units or as readiness materials for kindergarten. The major emphasis of this intervention…

  13. Energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    The author first discusses the various concepts and definitions associated with energy needs, and then the difference between actual needs and energy needs by distinguishing personal needs, needs of the productive sector, energetic needs and services. In the next part, he discusses how energy needs are assessed. He discusses the relationship between energy needs and energy consumption, how energy consumptions can be analysed and interpreted. He comments how energy needs can be assessed and analysed in time and in space. He notices and explains why economy and climate are the main causes of spatial differences for energy needs per habitant, and comments the evolution of energy consumption over long periods

  14. Health communication: lessons from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, A V

    1981-01-01

    In discussing the lessons learned from research in the area of health communication, focus is on basic strategic issues; the scope of health communications in terms of audience, information, education and motivation approaces and India's satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE). Health communication is the process by which a health idea is transferred from a source, such as a primary health center, to a receiver, community, with the intention of changing the community's behavior. This involves the formulation of specific strategies for the conduct of health and family welfare communication. In the processs of health communication, it has been a common practice in India as well as in other developing countries to depend upon a plethora of communication media. Yet, despite maximum utilization of the mass media and interpersonal channels of communication, questions remain about the efficacy of the system in bringing about change. Thus, the need to draw upon lessons from research becomes obvious. Communication effectiveness researches have concentrated on 3 basic strategic issues: the question of physical reception of messages by the audience; interpretation or understanding of messages on the part of the audience in accordance with the intention of the communicator; and effectiveness of communication on the cognitive, affective and behavioral dimensions of the audience. Innumberable researches in communication have provided several lessons which have expanded the scope of health communication. This expansion can be observed in terms of audiences reached, information disseminated, education undertaken, and motivation provided. Research has identified several distinct groups to whom specific health messages have to be addressed. These include government and political elites, health and family welfare program administrators, and the medical profession and clinical staff. Information on health needs to include both the concept of health and the pertinent ideas

  15. Alternative Energy Lessons in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Julie

    2010-05-01

    In Scotland the new science curriculum for pupils aged 12 to 15 shall include the following outcomes: "Using my knowledge and understanding, I can express an informed view on a national or global environmental issue;" "I have participated in constructing a model to harness a renewable source of energy and can investigate how to optimise the output;" and "I can discuss why it is important to me and to the future of the world that alternatives to fossil fuels are developed." There will be an emphasis on creating lessons that will nurture responsible citizens, improve pupil engagement and allow students to develop their team working skills. To help teachers plan lessons to address this, the Scottish Schools Equipment Research Centre and Edinburgh University made teaching materials on four renewable energy resources. This poster describes how their suggested activities on solar cells, wind turbines, hydroelectric power stations and wave power were used in science lessons with twelve year old students. After an initial class discussion based on issues related to climate change and diminishing fossil fuel supplies, a workshop activity was carried out in three stages. The students were issued with a fact sheet about one of four imaginary islands (Skisdale, Cloudy Island, Surfsville and Sun City) and they were asked to work in teams to choose the most suitable method of generating electricity for their island. Issues such as costs, where it will be sited and environmental implications were considered. They were then asked to conduct practical activities by constructing and testing models for these forms of renewable energy. To conclude, they presented their proposal to the rest of the class with reasoned explanations. The kits used in the lessons can be purchased from Anderson Scientific (sales@andersonscientific.co.uk). The solar cells were simply connected to a voltmeter. The wind and hydroelectric groups used the same basic equipment. This was made using a small water

  16. Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckirdy, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

  17. The Effects of a Computer-Assisted Teaching Material, Designed According to the ASSURE Instructional Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, on Students’ Achievement Levels in a Mathematics Lesson and Their Resulting Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Hilal Karakış; Ayşen Karamete; Aydın Okçu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects that computer-assisted instruction had on students’ attitudes toward a mathematics lesson and toward learning mathematics with computer-assisted instruction. The computer software we used was based on the ASSURE Instructional Systems Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, and the software was designed to teach fractions to fourth-grade students. The skill levels of these students were gauged before and after receiving the computer-assisted instruction. We str...

  18. Making Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Explicit: A Lesson Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, there is a need for pedagogical tools that help teachers develop essential pedagogical content knowledge and practices to meet the mathematical education needs of a growing culturally and linguistically diverse student population. In this article, we introduce an innovative lesson analysis tool that focuses on integrating…

  19. Case Study of Lessons Learned from the Operation of the Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, D.; Omberg, R.; Grandy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The lessons learned approach being followed at the Fast Flux Test Facility is to have domain experts in each subject area develop a short write-up or report on each lesson learned. Each lesson learned write-up is on the order of 4–6 pages. Longer reports can be developed as needed. Each lessons learned summary discusses the problem and the resolution method employed to address the problem, and also tries to capture the essential “tacit knowledge” associated with each topic in a focused manner. All lessons learned write-ups are supported by more detailed documents. For example, references of more detailed reports are generally included, where available. Topics are selected as those most likely to apply to future design or operating problems. This lessons learned approach has been successful in capturing essential tacit knowledge about key events in FFTF history and providing a context for interpreting the existing data and references. (author

  20. WHC significant lessons learned 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, J.C.

    1997-12-12

    A lesson learned as defined in DOE-STD-7501-95, Development of DOE Lessons Learned Programs, is: A ``good work practice`` or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat applications or an adverse work practice or experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence. The key word in both parts of this definition is ``shared``. This document was published to share a wide variety of recent Hanford experiences with other DOE sites. It also provides a valuable tool to be used in new employee and continuing training programs at Hanford facilities and at other DOE locations. This manual is divided into sections to facilitate extracting appropriate subject material when developing training modules. Many of the bulletins could be categorized into more than one section, however, so examination of other related sections is encouraged.

  1. Learning about the Numerator and Denominator in Teacher-Designed Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Angelika; Runesson, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns pupils' experience of unit and non-unit fractions of a discrete quantity during specially designed lessons. The aim was to explore pupils' understanding of operations such as "b/c of a" in lessons where the teachers were aware of some pupils' difficulties beforehand and what needed special attention.…

  2. Educating for Freedom and Responsibility: Lessons From the First Amendment Schools Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The First Amendment Schools project holds rich lessons in how to change school cultures into "laboratories of democracy"--as well as in how to increase the odds of success for any school reform effort. School reform programs of any sort need to make sure to build in sustainability, to provide ways to spread their lessons beyond the…

  3. Developing teachers’ self-efficacy and adaptive teaching behaviour through lesson study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Tijmen; Goei, Sui Lin; de Vries, Siebrich; van Veen, Klaas

    Teachers are expected to address a broad range of diverse pupil needs but do not always feel capable or lack the skills to meet these high expectations. The professional development approach Lesson Study may address this. Therefore, this study examines whether participating in Lesson Study

  4. Research Needs and Challenges from Science to Decision Support. Lesson Learnt from the Development of the International Reference Life Cycle Data System (ILCD Recommendations for Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Sala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental implications of the whole supply-chain of products, both goods and services, their use, and waste management, i.e., their entire life cycle from “cradle to grave” have to be considered to achieve more sustainable production and consumption patterns. Progress toward environmental sustainability requires enhancing the methodologies for quantitative, integrated environmental assessment and promoting the use of these methodologies in different domains. In the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA of products, in recent years, several methodologies have been developed for Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA. The Joint Research Center of the European Commission (EC-JRC led a “science to decision support” process which resulted in the International Reference Life Cycle Data System (ILCD Handbook, providing guidelines to the decision and application of methods for LCIA. The Handbook is the result of a comprehensive process of evaluation and selection of existing methods based on a set of scientific and stakeholder acceptance criteria and involving review and consultation by experts, advisory groups and the public. In this study, we report the main features of the ILCD LCIA recommendation development highlighting relevant issues emerged from this “from science to decision support” process in terms of research needs and challenges for LCIA. Comprehensiveness of the assessment, as well as acceptability and applicability of the scientific developments by the stakeholders, are key elements for the design of new methods and to guarantee the mainstreaming of the sustainability concept.

  5. Procedures for the accounting and control of nuclear materials in large research centres, as related to the needs of international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotte, U.; Bueker, H.; Stein, G.

    1976-07-01

    In signatory states of the Non-Proliferation Treaty nuclear material is subject to the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The IAEA safeguards concept intended for nuclear material has, so far, been predominantly applied to nuclear facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle. It is the aim of this report to consider the applicability of these control measures to a nuclear research centre. The report refers to the concrete example of the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre (KFA). The particular features of a nuclear research centre and the handling of nuclear material in the KFA are described. A review is given of the various licence areas and permitted handling quantities as well as of the inventories and flow of nuclear material. The concept of a control system for a nuclear research centre satisfying the operator's requirements, national requirement and international obligations at the same time is developed along these lines. The essential characteristic of the concept is a far-reaching clarity of the distribution of nuclear material items within the Nuclear Research Centre. The clarity desired will be achieved by means of an integrated accountancy system processing all necessary data with the aid of a central computer and remote terminals. The availability of information is based on differentiated material acountancy in conjunction with adequate measurement of nuclear material data. In the case of the KFA two groups are formed by research reactors and critical assemblies. Research institutes and central departments the permitted handling quantities of which do not exceed 5 eff.kg constitute a further group. Two further groups are formed for cases where the permitted handling quantities are above or below 1 eff.kg. The report shows the safeguards measures that can be applied in certain circumstances and conditions in a nuclear research centre

  6. TMI-2 lessons have been learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the more detailed papers which are presented in this session titled ''Advanced Light Water Reactors -- 15 Years After TMI.'' Many of the advances in the design, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants are the direct result of applying lessons learned from the 1979 TMI-2 accident. The authors believe the ''reality awakening'' which occurred following the accident should never be forgotten. Thus, this paper briefly reviews the TMI-2 accident and identifies the broad lessons learned following the accident. Then it describes briefly some indicators which show the very impressive improvements in nuclear power plant performance that have occurred over the past 10-15 years. This sets the stage for Dr. Ransom's paper which shows the continuing need for nuclear power, Dr. Beckjord's paper which describes the ''final'' TMI-2 research project and the subsequent papers which focus on advanced light water reactor developments

  7. Influences of Multimedia Lesson Contents On Effective Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Yavuz Ozdemir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the information era that we experience today, there is a rapid change in the methods, techniques and materials used for education and teaching. The usage of information and communication technology-assisted teaching materials are becoming more commonplace. Parallel to these developments, the Ministry of National Education took steps to develop IT substructures of all schools in the country and implemented many projects. The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not the multimedia lesson content used by teachers affect effective learning. This study is a qualitative study, conducted with 45 teachers working in primary schools during the 2011-2012 academic year. According to the study findings, participants believe that using multimedia lesson content during lectures increases student motivation, makes students more curious and interested, and think that using multimedia lesson content has positive effects.

  8. HEALTH NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Radulovic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human needs are of great interest to different scientific fields: sociology, anthropology, psychology, medicine, economy… Malinowski, Maslow, Adler and From have largely contributed to studying the needs. While trying to define the need concept, not only one definition is acceptable. In psychology, need is defined as a lack or disorder, i.e. the necessity to dislodge this lack. It was Maslow who gave the fullest classification and explanation of human needs. If we start from the fact that need represents the lack or deficit of something, in this context health needs would indicate the lack of health, and the measurement of health needs would be the same as the measurement of health. Therefore, almost all human needs can be enumerated as health needs, i.e. those which, after being satisfied, can lead to physical, psychical and social welfare. According to WHO, health needs can be defined as scientifically settled evasions from health which require preventive, curative and probably regulative and eradicative measurements. According to the medical method used by the health service while regarding the needs, the emphasis is on morbidity, mortality, incidence, prevalence, inability, etc. Usually, when we have very low level of health culture, and the responsibility for personal health is in most of the cases unacceptable, for the health service user the curative services will have priority over preventive ones. The measurement of health needs is a complex task. The needs can be regarded through medical documentation and by perception of the needs by people in the community.

  9. Report to the Congress on the need for, and the feasibility of, establishing a security agency within the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    The Executive Summary of a report written in response to the Congressional mandate Section 204(b)-(2) (c) of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, by the Director of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is given. It summarizes the main report, which assessed guard force effectiveness, and addressed public policy, administration and legal issues

  10. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  11. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will {open_quotes}help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.{close_quotes} Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers.

  12. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will open-quotes help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.close quotes Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers

  13. Best Practices and Lessons Learned In LANL Approaches to Transportation Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drypolcher, Katherine Carr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Presentation includes slides on Physical Protection of Material in Transit; Graded Approach for Implementation Controls; Security Requirements; LANL Lessons Learned; Shipping Violation; Unmonitored Shipment; Foreign shipment; and the Conclusion.

  14. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1985, Part -4, decontamination and treatment of solid radioactive materials for the needs of RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Vukovic, Z.; Blagojevic, R.; Kostadinovic, A.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the activity of the decontamination and treatment team for the needs of the RA reactor, its equipment, working conditions, methods for decontamination, means of decontamination, type and quantity of decontaminated surfaces, number of decontaminated objects, quantity of collected radioactive solid wastes, their packaging, transport to the storage place and topography od radiation field in the storage during 1985 [sr

  15. The need for a public information program to promote understanding of the validity of the safety of IAEA transport regulations for shipment of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, M.

    2004-01-01

    It is important to convey basic knowledge that demonstrates to the general public and public officials that transport of radioactive materials is safe. Data, analysis, and testing for certification in member states of the IAEA as well as experience with packages involved in accidents demonstrate the margin of safety when radioactive material material is transported. In addition, the experience of TranSAS activity has shown it to be an effective and transparent means to the public people for Member States to demonstrate their commitment to the safe transport of RAM. Therefore, in the future, the IAEA must continue and expand its public efforts to make the public aware of the very high certainty of safe transport that is the consequence of following the regulations. I would like to ask IAEA to have the transportation specialist groups designated by each Member State. These transportation specialist groups, working with the IAEA transport regulations in each country, should have as a central activity an information program that conveys the margin of safety inherent in the IAEA transport regulations. Finally I would like to ask IAEA to produce a program relating to public perception of RAM transport for the public throughout the world. And also I would like to ask IAEA to send the transportation specialist groups to Member States and many concerned countries to explain and demonstrate the adequacy of the IAEA Regulations

  16. The need for a public information program to promote understanding of the validity of the safety of IAEA transport regulations for shipment of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    It is important to convey basic knowledge that demonstrates to the general public and public officials that transport of radioactive materials is safe. Data, analysis, and testing for certification in member states of the IAEA as well as experience with packages involved in accidents demonstrate the margin of safety when radioactive material material is transported. In addition, the experience of TranSAS activity has shown it to be an effective and transparent means to the public people for Member States to demonstrate their commitment to the safe transport of RAM. Therefore, in the future, the IAEA must continue and expand its public efforts to make the public aware of the very high certainty of safe transport that is the consequence of following the regulations. I would like to ask IAEA to have the transportation specialist groups designated by each Member State. These transportation specialist groups, working with the IAEA transport regulations in each country, should have as a central activity an information program that conveys the margin of safety inherent in the IAEA transport regulations. Finally I would like to ask IAEA to produce a program relating to public perception of RAM transport for the public throughout the world. And also I would like to ask IAEA to send the transportation specialist groups to Member States and many concerned countries to explain and demonstrate the adequacy of the IAEA Regulations.

  17. Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident

  18. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    accompanied by and were an integral part of sweeping ``culture changes,`` the story of the lessons learned during the PUREX Deactivation Project are worth recounting. Foremost among the lessons is recognizing the benefits of ``right to left`` project planning. A deactivation project must start by identifying its end points, then make every task, budget, and organizational decision based on reaching those end points. Along with this key lesson is the knowledge that project planning and scheduling should be tied directly to costing, and the project status should be checked often (more often than needed to meet mandated reporting requirements) to reflect real-time work. People working on a successful project should never be guessing about its schedule or living with a paper schedule that does not represent the actual state of work. Other salient lessons were learned in the PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project that support these guiding principles. They include recognizing the value of independent review, teamwork, and reengineering concepts; the need and value of cooperation between the DOE, its contractors, regulators, and stakeholders; and the essential nature of early and ongoing communication. Managing a successful project also requires being willing to take a fresh look at safety requirements and to apply them in a streamlined and sensible manner to deactivating facilities; draw on the enormous value of resident knowledge acquired by people over years and sometimes decades of working in old plants; and recognize the value of bringing in outside expertise for certain specialized tasks.This approach makes possible discovering the savings that can come when many creative options are pursued persistently and the wisdom of leaving some decisions to the future. The essential job of a deactivation project is to place a facility in a safe, stable, low-maintenance mode, for an interim period. Specific end points are identified to recognize and document this state. Keeping the limited

  19. Lessons learnt on recruitment and fieldwork from a pilot European human biomonitoring survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiddicke, Ulrike; Becker, Kerstin; Schwedler, Gerda

    2015-01-01

    , training of interviewers in all issues of recruitment, fieldwork and sampling through information material and training sessions is crucial. A survey involving many European countries needs time for preparation and conduct. Materials for quality control prepared for all steps of recruitment, fieldwork...... biomonitoring (HBM) survey which came into action as the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). Seventeen European countries conducted a survey with harmonized instruments for, inter alia, recruitment, fieldwork and sampling......, in autumn/winter 2011/2012. Based on the countries' experiences of conducting the pilot study, following lessons learnt were compiled: the harmonized fieldwork instruments (basic questionnaire, urine and hair sampling) turned out to be very valuable for future HBM surveys on the European scale. A school...

  20. Masterwork Art Lesson: Kandinsky Watercolors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LiPira, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students which also can be used with other grade levels. Explains that the artwork of Wassily Kandinsky served as inspiration for this lesson. Explains that the students learned about abstract art and used watercolors to create their own paintings in the style of Kandinsky. (CMK)

  1. Bead Game Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Ken

    This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to participate in the three basic economic systems (market, command, and tradition). By working in each of the systems, students will internalize the fundamental values present in each system and will gain insights into the basic advantages and disadvantages of each system. The lesson plan provides…

  2. Simple and Practical Efficiency Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Van

    2018-01-01

    The derivation of conditions necessary for Pareto efficient production and exchange is a lesson frequently showcased in microeconomic theory textbooks. Traditional delivery of this lesson is, however, limited in its scope of application and can be unnecessarily convoluted. The author shows that the universe of application is greatly expanded and a…

  3. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  4. Lesson Study and History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Anne-Lise; Kesler Lund, Alisa

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of a group of fifth-grade teachers who used lesson study, a teacher-driven form of professional development, to teach history in a project supported by a Teaching American History Grant. The project addressed the following questions: What does a lesson study cycle for history education look like? What…

  5. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 3, The Arithmetic of Scientific Notation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the third lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide. An introductory description is given for scientific notation methods. The subject content is provided in scrambled form, and the use of matrix transparencies is required for students to control their learning process.…

  6. Enhancing mathematics teachers' quality through Lesson Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomibao, Laila S

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency and effectivity of the learning experience is dependent on the teacher quality, thus, enhancing teacher's quality is vital in improving the students learning outcome. Since, the usual top-down one-shot cascading model practice for teachers' professional development in Philippines has been observed to have much information dilution, and the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization demanded the need to develop mathematics teachers' quality standards through the Southeast Asia Regional Standards for Mathematics Teachers (SEARS-MT), thus, an intensive, ongoing professional development model should be provided to teachers. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of Lesson Study on Bulua National High School mathematics teachers' quality level in terms of SEARS-MT dimensions. A mixed method of quantitative-qualitative research design was employed. Results of the analysis revealed that Lesson Study effectively enhanced mathematics teachers' quality and promoted teachers professional development. Teachers positively perceived Lesson Study to be beneficial for them to become a better mathematics teacher.

  7. Managing Post-Disaster Needs Assessments (PDNA)

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Brett

    2010-01-01

    This knowledge note provides an overview of the post-disaster assessment process, extracting lessons learned in the East Asia Pacific Region (EAP) and presenting best practices from recent assessments. The note explains the Post-Disaster Needs Assessment (PDNA) methodology, and outlines: (i) the assessment triggers, (ii) key steps in assessment planning, and (iii) dos and don'ts in assessm...

  8. Why the Government Needs a Little History Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The decision by ex-Secretary of State for Education Michael Gove to send his daughter to a state school caused much press comment and was discussed in a widely read article by Gove's spouse, the "Daily Mail" columnist Sarah Vine. In this piece, Vine praised non selective state education, drawing on her own personal experience and that of…

  9. Do Lessons in Nature Boost Subsequent Classroom Engagement? Refueling Students in Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo

    2018-01-01

    afterward, lessons in nature may actually leave students more able to engage in the next lesson, even as students are also learning the material at hand. Such “refueling in flight” argues for including more lessons in nature in formal education.

  10. Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

  11. Particles, processes and materials for modern energy needs: Development of a DOE-EPSCoR project in Puerto Rico. Final report for September 30, 1997 - August 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Brad R.

    2000-09-29

    Twenty-eight (28) faculty researchers focused on High Energy Particle Physics, Novel Thin Film Materials for Optoelectronic Applications, and Catalytic Processes for Energy Sources and Environmental Detoxification to address problems cited as priorities by the DOE and local agencies. The High Energy Particle Physics cluster has DOE-competitive funding, and the number of cluster investigators who have competitive mainstream funding has increased from 2 to 13 since the inception of the program. In this reporting period, 8 postdoctorals, 38 graduate studnets, and 23 undergraduates were involved in DOE projects, and 191 publications and 238 presentations were generated. The UPR-Arecibo Integrated Science Multi-Use Laboratory provided workshops and other activities that directly impacted 360 teachers and 600 students and indirectly impacted over 25,000 through the enhancement of teachers' skills and knowledge.

  12. The e-Learning Needs Analysis in Graduate Programs of Universitas Negeri Makassar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhikmah Hasyim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop learning materials and tutorial videos e-learning for students of PPs UNM. Accurately, this research will produce learning materials, video tutorials, and scholarly articles. Product development refers to the ADDIE model (Analysis-Design-Develop-Implement-Evaluate developed by Reiser and Mollenda in 1990. The research subject is graduate PPs UNM and the data gathering methods are documentation, interview, questionnaire, and tests, then analyzed by the descriptive qualitative method. In the first stage of research conducted analysis, i.e., identifying characteristics or profiles of prospective participants learn, identify gaps, and the identification of needs. The result shows, 1 characteristic of participants, i.e., in the range 25-35 years adult category, the respondent's gender dominated by women and respondents are dominated by kindergarten teacher/PAUD until lecturer, and they have a very high motivation to learn the program; 2 Some gap identify based on question form given to the respondents, i.e., they strongly agree with the application of e-learning-based lesson at school and University, but abilities and skills related to the program is still very limited; and 3 needed learning materials in the form of video tutorials that can help them to learn independently and master the lesson of e-learning based program.

  13. Formative assessment in teacher talk during lesson studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, Nicolette; Goei, Sui Lin; Akkerman, Sanne F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the extent of systematic examination of students’ educational (support) needs by teachers participating in lesson study (LS) meetings within a framework of formative assessment (FA). Design/methodology/approach: The study took place in the context of

  14. Caregiving with Respect: Important Lessons from the Pikler Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahin, Elsa

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the lessons she and her colleagues had learned when they went to the Pikler Institute in Budapest, Hungary. The Pikler Institute is a residential nursery founded by Dr. Emmi Pikler in 1946. In order to improve the quality of children's relationship with adults, they need to feel that: (1) he/she belongs; (2)…

  15. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    toolkit that teachers can use in classrooms with minimal training. The kit will come with lesson plans, including background material, key points, questions and answers, possible homework assignments and references. It will include instructions and worksheets for students as well as the materials needed for each module. A pre- and posttest will be administered to test the awareness and understanding of the principles introduced in through the modules. This interactive session will offer the opportunity to for attendees to participate in some of the modules that have been developed to provide experiential demonstration of ergonomics principles. Attendees will experience ergonomics in action and be able to evaluate the applicability of the process in their own area in the world of ergonomics. The session will consist of 20 minutes introduction, 40 minutes working with the toolkit, finally another 30 minutes for questions or discussion for a total time of 90 minutes.

  16. Information Needs/Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    A user's interaction with a DL is often initiated as the result of the user experiencing an information need of some kind. Aspects of that experience and how it might affect the user's interactions with the DL are discussed in this module. In addition, users continuously make decisions about and evaluations of the materials retrieved from a DL, relative to their information needs. Relevance judgments, and their relationship to the user's information needs, are discussed in this module. Draft

  17. Lessons, open questions, and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grupe D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We summarize some of the highlights of this workshop, the first of its kind dedicated to observing and modeling the tidal disruption of stars by black holes in the centers of galaxies (or star clusters. We review the lessons learned from recent observations and from theory and identify outstanding questions and areas where more theoretical and observational work is needed. We also consider upcoming observing facilities that can be used to study tidal disruption events and speculate what these new facilities may contribute to the field.

  18. St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction

  19. Assessing the Needs of Adults for Continuing Education: A Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donald E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the needs assessment studies described in this journal issue. Concludes that (1) lessons from completed needs assessments can help continuing education practitioners plan and conduct future studies, and (2) a rational, need-reduction, decision-making approach can improve continuing education programs. (CT)

  20. Science and Sandy: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established a Task Force to '...ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future.' The author was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was not always at the forefront of this process. This talk describes the author's experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on organizing scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. This includes a description of federal activity supporting Sandy recovery efforts, the role of the Task Force, and lessons learned from developing a science support function within the Task Force.

  1. The need and necessity for the M/S Sigyns advanced communication and navigation systems, adapted for marine transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefson, J.; Gustafsson, B.; Dybeck, P.

    1989-01-01

    As far back as 1978, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, decided to design and develop an integrated marine transport system, ISTS, a system that would meet the transportation needs of the Swedish nuclear power plants for the present and for the future, a system that would satisfy all the requirements and expectations that the principals, public authorities and the general public could have in respect of SKB. The system as conceived was at that time, and is still today, unique. Despite the fact that the highest safety standards were applied, it was completed, though not entirely finalized, in 1982. Pending completion of the central interim storage facility for spent fuel, CLAB, some shipments were sent during the years 1983-1984 to the reprocessing plant at La Hague in France, but from the summer of 1985, when CLAB was ready for operation, the fuel shipments have mainly been to Swedish facilities. Since the final repository for low- and intermediate-level waste was commissioned in the spring of 1988, the entire transportation system has been finished and operation. The ISTS consists of a specially designed ship, M/S SIgyn, ten transport casks for spent fuel, two casks for core components and five terminal vehicles for local transport at CLAB, reactor sites and SFR. Specially designed containers are used for the transport of reactor waste from the reactor sites to SFR. The ISTS is now in routine operation with about 30 trips with M/S Sigyn every year. On the average, 15 of these are used for fuel and the rest for ILW container shipments

  2. HYPNOTEACHING IN HISTORY LESSON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Budianto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Hypnoteaching in History Lesson. Historical learning is a science that can’t be separated in educating the younger generation. Through this lesson, teachers in secondary schools can provide the foundation of nationality through important events in the study of the social sciences. Many of the problems that occur in learning history, such as the boring and make sleepy. Everyone must have heard the term hypnosis, hypnotism, or hypnotherapy. Each person must also have a different view or understanding when hearing these terms. Hypnoteaching is one of the learning methods by using the art of communicating to influence learners. Hypnoteaching is a combination of five teaching-learning methods such as quantum learning, accelerate learning, power teaching, neuro-linguistic programming (NLP and hypnosis. Hypnoteaching can be done using informal hypnosis as well as formal hypnosis. Informal hypnosis is also called indirect hypnosis ie teachers can naturally make the Critical Area learners become no longer critical, through a very persuasive communication pattern. Here's what the teacher can do in Informal hypnosis: (1 get attention; (2 establishing Themes; (3 presenting the structure and regulations; (4 building relationships. If the learners are already comfortable and interested, the next step is to do a formal hypnosis before the lesson begins. Here are the steps that must be done: (1 Induction; (2 Deepening; (3 Deep level test; (4 Suggestion, and; (5 Termination.   Keywords: Historical learning, hypnoteaching, hypnosis, hypnotism, hypnotherapy, history Abstrak: Hipnoteaching dalam Pembelajaran Sejarah. Pelajaran sejarah tidak bisa dihilangkan dalam mendidik para generasi muda. Melalui pembelajaran ini, guru pada sekolah menengah pertama dapat memberikan pondasi rasa nasionalisme melalui peristiwa peristiwa penting dalam pelajaran ilmu pengetahuan social. Masalah yang sering muncul pada pembelajaran ini adalah kebosanan siswa dan

  3. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  4. lessons from tuberous sclerosis complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intellectual disability, autism, specific learning disorders) and mental health disorders (e.g. depression, psychosis and anxiety disorders). The first lesson, therefore, is ... of an adolescent with TSC, facial angiofibromas and a presumed fat-poor ...

  5. Lessons of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingridge, D.

    1984-01-01

    In an earlier article the author has argued that the turbulent history of nuclear power in Britain and the USA stems from the technology itself, and has little to do with the very different institutional arrangements made for the new technology in the two countries. Nuclear plant has various features which make its planning extraordinarily difficult. Its long lead time, large unit size, capital intensity and dependence on complex infrastructure combine to ensure that mistakes are likely to be made in planning the technology and that what mistakes do occur are expensive. This article aims to expand on the earlier one in two ways; by looking at the apparent success of the French nuclear programme which seems to run counter to the thesis of the earlier article, and by trying to draw lessons from the earlier analysis for the breeder reactor. (author)

  6. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human↔ nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  7. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Miller, Michele [Navarro Research and Engineering

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  8. Energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxey, M.N.

    1982-06-01

    There seems to be a trend towards expecting energy conservation to be a panacea for the world's ills. In fact, a global perspective on energy needs shows that more, not less, energy is needed and technological innovation in energy sources is essential in order to meet the needs of more than just the developed countries. Energy-intensive technology is the amplification of our natural resources rather than their depletion. A fundamental bioethical principle must be established if we are to analyze and organize scientific evidence about hazards from currently feasible energy resources, and separate genuine from counterfeit claims to credibility. In particular, public fears about radiation hazards and radioactive waste disposal are influenced too much by rhetorical cleverness and forensic skills of a vociferous minority. Potential hazard management is ethically equitable only if it is proportioned to actual basic harm that can be identified and reduced by expenditures of human effort, time and money

  9. Lessons learned from accidents investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Bello, P. [Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT), Mexico City (Mexico); Croft, J. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Glenn, J

    1997-12-31

    Accidents from three main practices: medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the described accidents are approached by subjects covering: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  10. Lessons learned from accident investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Bello, P.; Croft, J.R.; Glenn, J.

    1998-01-01

    Accidents in three main practices - medical applications, industrial radiography and industrial irradiators - are used to illustrate some common causes of accidents and the main lessons to be learned from them. A brief description of some of these accidents is given. Lessons learned from the accidents described are approached bearing in mind: safety culture, quality assurance, human factors, good engineering practice, defence in depth, security of sources, safety assessment and monitoring and verification compliance. (author)

  11. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

    2006-12-01

    How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER) and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6) developed during a year and a half (about 330h ), several lessons (minimodules) dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a) Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b) teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c) a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d) the formation of a community of practice; and (e) acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  12. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bagno

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6 developed during a year and a half (about 330 h , several lessons (minimodules dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d the formation of a community of practice; and (e acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  13. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Sheva Eylon

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6 developed during a year and a half (about 330h, several lessons (minimodules dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d the formation of a community of practice; and (e acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  14. Need theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Need theory of happiness is linked to affect theory, which holds that happiness is a reflection of how well we feel generally. In this view, we do not "calculate" happiness but rather "infer" it, the typical heuristic being "I feel good most of the time, hence

  15. Lessons on corporate "sustainability" disclosure from Deepwater Horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sanford

    2011-01-01

    The BP oil spill highlighted shortcomings of current financial and sustainability reporting standards and practice. "Integrated reporting" aims to combine financial and social/environmental information into a single annual corporate report. But without more stringent standards, integrated reports would neglect substantial risks and, as BP's sustainability reports demonstrate, create false impressions of good practice.To be of value, integration must: 1. Require timely disclosure of enforcement notices, orders and allegations issued by regulators. 2. Require disclosure of credible scientific reports and concerns indicative of potentially catastrophic risks of a company's products and activities, regardless of scientific uncertainty. 3. Require review and disclosures of a firm's safety culture. 4. Require disclosure of any facts or circumstances needed to ensure that the management's self-portrait of its sustainability strategies, goals and progress is not materially misleading.In conducting its misleading reporting, BP largely followed Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines. GRI is soliciting input, beginning in summer 2011, on how to revise those guidelines. Since GRI may prove a leading source for sustainability disclosure rules in integrating reporting, lessons learned from the BP experience must be applied to the next GRI revisions.

  16. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Rogers, D.J.; Wightman, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US's effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support

  17. Using Selective Redundancy and Testing to Optimize Learning from Multimedia Lessons

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Carole Leigh

    2014-01-01

    Multimedia learning refers to learning from a combination of words and images. In the present dissertation, a multimedia lesson is defined as an animated, narrated educational video that depicts a scientific process--a format of instructional material becoming increasingly common in online, hybrid, and traditional classrooms. The overarching goal of the present research was to investigate how to optimize learning from multimedia lessons using two related theories of multimedia learning (the...

  18. Deburring: technical capabilities and cost-effective approaches, Lessons 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-06-01

    This ten lesson text on deburring is designed to provide engineers and production supervisors with an overall understanding of deburring economics and current capabilities. The material included describes economics, side effects, process selection techniques, product design influences, standards, plantwide approaches, burr formation, and prevention. Deburring methods described include barrel, centrifugal barrel, vibratory, spindle, manual, electrochemical, electropolish, brush, abrasive jet, abrasive flow, water jet, thermal energy, and mechanized mechanical. Lessons 3 and 4 describe product design influences and burr prevention and minimization respectively.

  19. NDT with the structural weld overlay program. Recent field experience and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rishel, R.; Lenz, H.; Turley, G.; Newton, B.

    2007-01-01

    Structural weld overlay (SWOL) has become a predominant mitigation technique within the Alloy 600 program. For the pressurizer nozzles, MRP-139 requires volumetric examination by year end 2007. Many nozzles are un-inspectable due to geometry and material limitations that preclude interrogation of the required examination volume. SWOL therefore is the mitigation technique which overcomes these limitations. SWOL of the pressurizer nozzles has been a challenge for all the vendors. Alloy 52 has proven to be difficult to weld under field conditions. The NDT technique chosen to demonstrate the integrity of the overlay needs to be adapted to the specific repair process and nozzle geometry. The purpose of this paper will be to present Westinghouse's integrated approach for SWOL with the focus on the NDT aspects. Topics will include main repair process steps, NDT qualification, recent field experience and lessons learned. (author)

  20. Sustaining Lesson Study: Resources and Factors that Support and Constrain Mathematics Teachers' Ability to Continue After the Grant Ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druken, Bridget Kinsella

    Lesson study, a teacher-led vehicle for inquiring into teacher practice through creating, enacting, and reflecting on collaboratively designed research lessons, has been shown to improve mathematics teacher practice in the United States, such as improving knowledge about mathematics, changing teacher practice, and developing communities of teachers. Though it has been described as a sustainable form of professional development, little research exists on what might support teachers in continuing to engage in lesson study after a grant ends. This qualitative and multi-case study investigates the sustainability of lesson study as mathematics teachers engage in a district scale-up lesson study professional experience after participating in a three-year California Mathematics Science Partnership (CaMSP) grant to improve algebraic instruction. To do so, I first provide a description of material (e.g. curricular materials and time), human (attending district trainings and interacting with mathematics coaches), and social (qualities like trust, shared values, common goals, and expectations developed through relationships with others) resources present in the context of two school districts as reported by participants. I then describe practices of lesson study reported to have continued. I also report on teachers' conceptions of what it means to engage in lesson study. I conclude by describing how these results suggest factors that supported and constrained teachers' in continuing lesson study. To accomplish this work, I used qualitative methods of grounded theory informed by a modified sustainability framework on interview, survey, and case study data about teachers, principals, and Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs). Four cases were selected to show the varying levels of lesson study practices that continued past the conclusion of the grant. Analyses reveal varying levels of integration, linkage, and synergy among both formally and informally arranged groups of

  1. Lessons learnt from WLCG service deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiers, J D

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises the main lessons learnt from deploying WLCG production services, with a focus on Reliability, Scalability, Accountability, which lead to both manageability and usability. Each topic is analysed in turn. Techniques for zero-user-visible downtime for the main service interventions are described, together with pathological cases that need special treatment. The requirements in terms of scalability are analysed, calling for as much robustness and automation in the service as possible. The different aspects of accountability - which covers measuring/tracking/logging/monitoring what is going on - and has gone on - is examined, with the goal of attaining a manageable service. Finally, a simple analogy is drawn with the Web in terms of usability - what do we need to achieve to cross the chasm from small-scale adoption to ubiquity?

  2. Health lessons learned from the recent earthquakes and Tsunami in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ville de Goyet, Claudele

    2007-01-01

    The evaluations following the Tsunami that affected 12 countries (December 2004) and the earthquakes in Bam, Iran (2003), and in Pakistan (2005) offered valuable lessons for public health preparedness against all types of risks (natural, complex, or technological) in all countries (regardless their level of development). The lessons learned, needs assessments, effectiveness of external life-saving assistance, disease surveillance and control, as well as donations management, were reviewed. Although hundreds of surveys or studies were conducted, the needs assessments were partial and uncoordinated. The findings often were not shared by individual agencies. The evaluations in each of the three disasters point to some additional issues: 1. Foreign mobile hospitals rarely arrived in time for immediate trauma care. Existing international guidelines for the use of field hospitals often were ignored and must be updated and promoted. Local and neighboring facilities are best at providing immediate, life-saving care; 2. Occassionally, the risk of epidemics was grossly overestimated by the agencies and the mass media. Surveillance and improved routine control programs work without resorting to costly, improvised immunization campaigns of doubtless value. Improving or re-establishing water and sanitation must be the first priority; 3. Health donations were not always appropriate, nor did they follow the World Health Organization guidelines. The costly destruction of inappropriate donations was a recurrent problem; and 4. Medical volunteers from within the affected country were abounding, but did not benefit from the external logistical and material support. The international community should provide logistical and material support before sending expatriate teams that are unfamiliar with the area and its alth problems. Investing in the preparedness of the national health services and communities should become a priority for disaster-prone countries and those assisting them in

  3. Supporting teachers' technology integration in lesson plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Noortje

    2017-01-01

    Lesson planning offers rich opportunities for teachers to consider and implement technology in the classroom. This dissertation investigated the design and effectiveness of supplementary information to assist pre-service teachers during the lesson planning process. Based on the Technological,

  4. Value pricing pilot program : lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    This "Lessons Learned Report" provides a summary of projects sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Congestion and Value Pricing Pilot Programs from 1991 through 2006 and draws lessons from a sample of projects with the richest an...

  5. TEACHER NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part-time teacher of primary English needed from 1st December 2002 to teach English National Curriculum (KS2) and NLS to mother tongue or good second language English-speakers aged 7-10. 4 hours contact time per week, team planning, marking and meetings. Candidates should be English mother tongue qualified teachers, confident, flexible classroom practitioners and team players. For further details and how to apply: engnat@hotmail.com or 04 50 40 82 66. Apply as soon as possible, and in any case before November 20th. English National Programme - Lycée International, Ferney-Voltaire

  6. Interdisciplinary Student/Teacher Materials in Energy, the Environment, and the Economy: 6, The Energy We Use, Grade 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Lenore; And Others

    This instructional unit contains a set of nine lessons on energy for grade one. Each lesson contains complete teacher and student materials. Reading skills and language experiences are reinforced in each activity. The lessons cover such topics as energy from food, energy from the sun, fossil fuels, the wind, moving water, and energy conservation.…

  7. Lessons Learned from ISS Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Forty years of human spaceflight activities are now culminating in the International Space Station program (ISS). The ISS involves fifteen nations, working together to create a permanently occupied orbital facility that will support scientific and potentially, commercial endeavours. The assembly of the ISS is scheduled to be completed later in this decade, after which it will be operated for at least ten years. At the strategic level, such a complex international project is highly dependent on the fifteen Partners' respective internal politics and foreign policies. On the operational level, Partners still have certain difficulties in issuing and agreeing to common technical procedures. As with almost all aspects of International Space Station cooperation, the Partners are going through a constant learning process, where they have to deal with complex political, legal and operational differences. Intergovernmental Agreement and the Memoranda of Understanding, the instruments forming the legal backbone of the International Space Station cooperation, are still lacking a fair number of arrangements that need to be created for completing and operating the Station. The whole endeavour is also a constant learning process at the operational level, as astronauts, cosmonauts, engineers and technicians on the ground with different cultural and educational backgrounds, learn to work together. One recent Space Shuttle mission to the Station showed the importance of standardising even trivial system components such as packaging labels, as it took the astronauts half a day more than planned to correctly unpack the equipment. This paper will provide a synthesis of some of the main lessons learned during the first few years of International Space Station's lifetime. Important political, legal and operational issues will be addressed and combined. This analysis will provide some guidelines and recommendations for future international space projects, such as an international human

  8. Lessons from Fukushima - February 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris-Suzuki, Tessa; Boilley, David; McNeill, David; Gundersen, Arnie; Beranek, Jan; Blomme, Brian; Hanaoka, Wakao; Schulz, Nina; Stensil, Shawn-Patrick; Teule, Rianne; Tumer, Aslihan; McCann, Christine; Otani, Nanako; Hirsch, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It has been almost 12 months since the Fukushima nuclear disaster began. Although the Great East Japan earthquake and the following tsunami triggered it, the key causes of the nuclear accident lie in the institutional failures of political influence and industry-led regulation. It was a failure of human institutions to acknowledge real reactor risks, a failure to establish and enforce appropriate nuclear safety standards and a failure to ultimately protect the public and the environment. This report, commissioned by Greenpeace International, addresses what lessons can be taken away from this catastrophe. The one-year memorial of the Fukushima accident offers a unique opportunity to ask ourselves what the tragedy - which is far from being over for hundreds of thousands of Japanese people - has taught us. And it also raises the question, are we prepared to learn? There are broader issues and essential questions that still deserve our attention: - How it is possible that - despite all assurances - a major nuclear accident on the scale of the Chernobyl disaster of 1986 happened again, in one of the world's most industrially advanced countries? - Why did emergency and evacuation plans not work to protect people from excessive exposure to the radioactive fallout and resulting contamination? Why is the government still failing to better protect its citizens from radiation one year later? - Why are the over 100,000 people who suffer the most from the impacts of the nuclear accident still not receiving adequate financial and social support to help them rebuild their homes, lives and communities? These are the fundamental questions that we need to ask to be able to learn from the Fukushima nuclear disaster. This report looks into them and draws some important conclusions: 1. The Fukushima nuclear accident marks the end of the 'nuclear safety' paradigm. 2. The Fukushima nuclear accident exposes the deep and systemic failure of the very institutions that are supposed to

  9. TEACHERS NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English Language Programme of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire has two teaching posts available for la rentrée 2001. 1. Part-time teacher of Primary-level English Candidates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree and teaching qualification. The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system. Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée. Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team. Induction & training are offered. 2. Part-time teacher of Secondary-level history-geography Candididates for the post need to be mother-tongue English speakers. They should have a relevant degree in history or geography and also a strong interest in the other subject. They should have a relevant teaching qualification and be confident classroom practioners. For more information on either of these posts please contact the school office on 04.50.40.82...

  10. Lessons from independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptfuhrer, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The recent history of Oryx provides invaluable lessons for those who plan future energy strategies, relates the author of this paper. When Oryx became an independent oil and gas company, its reserves were declining, its stock was selling below asset values, and the price of oil seemed stuck below $15 per barrel. The message from Oryx management to Oryx employees was: We are in charge of our own destiny. We are about to create our own future. Oryx had developed a new, positive corporate culture and the corporate credit required for growth. This paper points to two basic principles that have guided the metamorphosis in Oryx's performance. The first objective was to improve operational efficiency and to identify the right performance indicators to measure this improvement. It states that the most critical performance indicator for an exploration and production company must be replacement and expansion of reserves at a competitive replacement cost. Oryx has cut its finding costs from $12 to $5 per barrel, while the BP acquisition provided proven reserves at a cost of only $4 per barrel. Another performance indicator measures Oryx's standing in the financial markets

  11. Patient safety: lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagian, James P.

    2006-01-01

    The traditional approach to patient safety in health care has ranged from reticence to outward denial of serious flaws. This undermines the otherwise remarkable advances in technology and information that have characterized the specialty of medical practice. In addition, lessons learned in industries outside health care, such as in aviation, provide opportunities for improvements that successfully reduce mishaps and errors while maintaining a standard of excellence. This is precisely the call in medicine prompted by the 1999 Institute of Medicine report ''To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System.'' However, to effect these changes, key components of a successful safety system must include: (1) communication, (2) a shift from a posture of reliance on human infallibility (hence ''shame and blame'') to checklists that recognize the contribution of the system and account for human limitations, and (3) a cultivation of non-punitive open and/or de-identified/anonymous reporting of safety concerns, including close calls, in addition to adverse events. (orig.)

  12. What Happens at the Lesson Start?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloviita, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Transitional periods, such as lesson starts, are necessary steps from one activity to another, but they also compete with time for actual learning. The aim of the present study was to replicate a previous pilot study on lesson starts and explore possible disturbances. In total, 130 lesson starts in Finnish basic education in grades 1-9 were…

  13. Preservation and Implementation of Decommissioning Lessons Learned in the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Rafael L.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past several years, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has actively worked to capture and preserve lessons learned from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. More recently, NRC has involved industry groups, the Organization of Agreement States (OAS), and the Department of Energy (DOE) in the effort to develop approaches to capture, preserve and disseminate decommissioning lessons learned. This paper discusses the accomplishments of the working group, some lessons learned by the NRC in the recent past, and how NRC will incorporate these lessons learned into its regulatory framework. This should help ensure that the design and operation of current and future nuclear facilities will result in less environmental impact and more efficient decommissioning. In summary, the NRC will continue capturing today's experience in decommissioning so that future facilities can take advantage of lessons learned from today's decommissioning projects. NRC, both individually and collectively with industry groups, OAS, and DOE, is aggressively working on the preservation and implementation of decommissioning lessons learned. The joint effort has helped to ensure the lessons from the whole spectrum of decommissioning facilities (i.e., reactor, fuel cycle, and material facilities) are better understood, thus maximizing the amount of knowledge and best practices obtained from decommissioning activities. Anticipated regulatory activities at the NRC will make sure that the knowledge gained from today's decommissioning projects is preserved and implemented to benefit the nuclear facilities that will decommission in the future

  14. Lessons Learned from Environmental Remediation Programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-03-15

    Several remediation projects have been developed to date, and experience with these projects has been accumulated. Lessons learned span from non-technical to technical aspects, and need to be shared with those who are beginning or are facing the challenge to implement environmental remediation works. This publication reviews some of these lessons. The key role of policy and strategies at the national level in framing the conditions in which remediation projects are to be developed and decisions made is emphasized. Following policy matters, this publication pays attention to the importance of social aspects and the requirement for fairness in decisions to be made, something that can only be achieved with the involvement of a broad range of interested parties in the decision making process. The publication also reviews the funding of remediation projects, planning, contracting, cost estimates and procurement, and issues related to long term stewardship. Lessons learned regarding technical aspects of remediation projects are reviewed. Techniques such as the application of cover systems and soil remediation (electrokinetics, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and solidification and stabilization techniques) are analysed with respect to performance and cost. After discussing soil remediation, the publication covers issues associated with water treatment, where techniques such as ‘pump and treat’ and the application of permeable barriers are reviewed. Subsequently, there is a section dedicated to reviewing briefly the lessons learned in the remediation of uranium mining and processing sites. Many of these sites throughout the world have become orphaned, and are waiting for remediation. The publication notes that little progress has been made in the management of some of these sites, particularly in the understanding of associated environmental and health risks, and the ability to apply prediction to future environmental and health standards. The publication concludes

  15. Lessons Learned from Environmental Remediation Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Several remediation projects have been developed to date, and experience with these projects has been accumulated. Lessons learned span from non-technical to technical aspects, and need to be shared with those who are beginning or are facing the challenge to implement environmental remediation works. This publication reviews some of these lessons. The key role of policy and strategies at the national level in framing the conditions in which remediation projects are to be developed and decisions made is emphasized. Following policy matters, this publication pays attention to the importance of social aspects and the requirement for fairness in decisions to be made, something that can only be achieved with the involvement of a broad range of interested parties in the decision making process. The publication also reviews the funding of remediation projects, planning, contracting, cost estimates and procurement, and issues related to long term stewardship. Lessons learned regarding technical aspects of remediation projects are reviewed. Techniques such as the application of cover systems and soil remediation (electrokinetics, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and solidification and stabilization techniques) are analysed with respect to performance and cost. After discussing soil remediation, the publication covers issues associated with water treatment, where techniques such as ‘pump and treat’ and the application of permeable barriers are reviewed. Subsequently, there is a section dedicated to reviewing briefly the lessons learned in the remediation of uranium mining and processing sites. Many of these sites throughout the world have become orphaned, and are waiting for remediation. The publication notes that little progress has been made in the management of some of these sites, particularly in the understanding of associated environmental and health risks, and the ability to apply prediction to future environmental and health standards. The publication concludes

  16. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  17. CLIL in physics lessons at grammar school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefančínová, Iveta; Valovičová, Ľubomíra

    2017-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is one of the most outstanding approaches in foreign language teaching. This teaching method has promising prospects for the future of modern education as teaching subject and foreign languages are combined to offer a better preparation for life in Europe, especially when the mobility is becoming a highly significant factor of everyday life. We realized a project called Foreign languages in popularizing science at grammar school. Within the project five teachers with approbation subjects of English, French, German and Physics attended the methodological courses abroad. The teachers applied the gained experience in teaching and linking science teaching with the teaching of foreign languages. Outputs of the project (e.g. English-German-French-Slovak glossary of natural science terminology, student activity sheets, videos with natural science orientation in a foreign language, physical experiments in foreign languages, multimedia fairy tales with natural contents, posters of some scientists) are prepared for the CLIL-oriented lessons. We collected data of the questionnaire for students concerning attitude towards CLIL. The questionnaire for teachers showed data about the attitude, experience, and needs of teachers employing CLIL in their lessons.

  18. Governing nanobiotechnology: lessons from agricultural biotechnology regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Robbin S.

    2011-01-01

    This article uses lessons from biotechnology to help inform the design of oversight for nanobiotechnology. Those lessons suggest the following: first, oversight needs to be broadly defined, encompassing not just regulatory findings around safety and efficacy, but also public understanding and acceptance of the technology and its products. Second, the intensity of scrutiny and review should reflect not just risks but also perceptions of risk. Finally, a global marketplace argues for uniform standards or commercially practical solutions to differences in standards. One way of designing oversight to achieve these purposes is to think about it in three phases—precaution, prudence, and promotion. Precaution comes early in the technology or product’s development and reflects real and perceived uncertainties. Prudence governs when risks and hazards have been identified, containment approaches established, and benefits broadly defined. Transparency and public participation rise to the fore. The promotional phase moves toward shaping public understanding and acceptance and involves marketing issues rather than safety ones. This flexible, three-phase approach to oversight would have avoided some of the early regulatory problems with agricultural biotechnology. It also would have led to a more risk-adjusted pathway to regulatory approval. Furthermore, it would avoid some of the arbitrary, disruptive marketing issues that have arisen.

  19. Designing Innovative Lessons Plans to Support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) issued earlier in 2013 provide the opportunity to enhance pre-college curricula through a new focus on the ';Big Ideas' in Science, more attention to reading and writing skills needed for college and career readiness, and incorporation of engineering and technology. We introduce a set of lesson plans about scientific ocean drilling which can serve as a exemplars for developing curricula to meet NGSS approaches. Designed for middle and high school students, these can also be utilized in undergraduate courses. Development of these lessons was supported through a grant from the Deep Earth Academy of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership. They will be disseminated through websites of the Deep Earth Academy (http://www.oceanleadership.org/education/deep-earth-academy/) and Earth2Class Workshops for Teachers (http://www.earth2class.org), as well as through workshops at science education conferences sponsored by the National Earth Science Teachers Association (www.nestanet.org) and other organizations. Topics include 'Downhole Logging,' 'Age of the Ocean Floors,' 'Tales of the Resolution,' and 'Continental Shelf Sediments and Climate Change Patterns.' 'Downhole Logging' focuses on the engineering and technology utilized to obtain more information about sediments and rocks cored by the JOIDES Resolution scientific drilling vessel. 'Age of the Ocean Floor' incorporates the GeoMap App visualization tools (http://www.geomapapp.org/) to compare sea bottom materials in various parts of the world. 'Tales of the Resolution' is a series of ';graphic novels' created to describe the scientific discoveries, refitting of the JOIDES Resolution, and variety of careers available in the marine sciences (http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/BRG/outreach/media/tales/). The fourth lesson focuses on discoveries made during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 313, which investigated patterns in the sediments beneath the continental shelf off New

  20. Lessons of nuclear robot history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oomichi, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    Severe accidents occurred at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station stirred up people's great expectation of nuclear robot's deployment. However unexpected nuclear disaster, especially rupture of reactor building caused by core meltdown and hydrogen explosion, made it quite difficult to introduce nuclear robot under high radiation environment to cease accidents and dispose damaged reactor. Robotics Society of Japan (RSJ) set up committee to look back upon lessons learned from 50 year's past experience of nuclear robot development and summarized 'Lessons of nuclear robot history', which was shown on the home page website of RSJ. This article outlined it with personal comment. History of nuclear robot developed for inspection and maintenance at normal operation and for specific required response at nuclear accidents was reviewed with many examples at home and abroad for TMI, Chernobyl and JCO accidents. Present state of Fukushima accident response robot's introduction and development was also described with some comments on nuclear robot development from academia based on lessons. (T. Tanaka)

  1. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  2. Effects of Infographics on Students Achievement and Attitude towards Geography Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Geography is a very comprehensive field of study with many subjects to study topics. Using a wide range of materials in the teaching of this course can this lesson be made effective and permanent because we do not have chances to observe natural phenomena. Therefore, in geography education materials natural environment is to be brought to class by…

  3. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Teacher Study Guides Used in Conjunction with Educational Television Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Lynne Schafer

    One of three different types of study guide materials was given to teachers whose classes watched televised music lessons. One guide provided a description of the program content, suggested activities to be performed before and after the program, and other supplementary material; a second guide provided only a description of the program content;…

  4. Protecting the source. Securing nuclear material and strong radiation sources. New threats of terrorism are prompting the need for swift action to better secure nuclear material and strong radiation sources. Are measures already in place enough? The Stanford-Salzburg initiative suggests not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.; Bunn, G.

    2003-01-01

    At a time of growing concern over threats of terrorism, the security of nuclear and radioactive material is an urgent and serious issue. Working with a range of partners, the IAEA has put into place a multi-faceted Action Plan to help countries upgrade their capabilities. But more needs to be done to counter new types of threats. One particular area that needs to be strengthened is the physical protection of nuclear and radioactive material. The attacks of 11 September 2001 opened our eyes to i he urgent need to strengthen national physical protection (PP) practices for nuclear and other radioactive material. The principle that highly radioactive material will protect itself does not apply to the newest generation of terrorists. Existing PP systems were not designed to deal with the threat of suicidal terrorists commanding the numbers, skills, training, and resources available to those who carried out the attacks in the US. Moreover, because there are no mandatory international standards for domestic PP systems for nuclear or radioactive material, protection measures vary greatly from country to country. The IAEA recommended standards (Inference/225/Rev. 4) were not designed with the new terrorist threats in mind and national practices often fall short of even these recommendations. The result is inadequate protection against the new form of terrorism. Few argue the point that national physical protection practices for nuclear and other radioactive material need to be strengthened. This article summarizes a Stanford-Salzburg plan developed by experts from Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, (USA) and revised at the EU-Physical Protection NUMAT Conference in September 2002 in Salzburg, Austria. It includes six recommended elements to consider in addition to what the IAEA is now doing to improve PP practices around the world: Establish a global list of physical protection priorities; Create a multilateral security cooperation

  5. Lessons drawn from serious accidents in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosciusko-Morizet, F.; Tanguy, P.

    1981-01-01

    Taking a number of serious accidents considered to be particularly representative (Windscale, Enrico Fermi, Lucens, Browns Ferry, Three Mile Island and Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux), the paper analyses the conclusions reached in subsequent enquiries and the lessons drawn from them by the responsible authorities. While design problems sometimes come to light, it is much more generally operational safety - problems related to instructions, the training of operators, the man/machine relationship - which appears to be inadequate. The organization of relations between the different partners - builders, operators and safety bodies - likewise gives rise to some observations. Certain measures should be pursued on a broader scale in order to improve our ability to prevent serious accidents: (i) incidents important from the standpoint of safety must be identified; (ii) these incidents must be brought to the knowledge of all partners concerned, in all interested countries; (iii) the lessons drawn from them must be exchanged and compared; and (iv) the lessons must be made generally available in a directly usable form (i.e. as design modifications, changes in instructions and so on). Particular attention must be given to the problems of countries which are embarking on nuclear programmes and which, with a small number of installations, need direct and permanent access to all the lessons drawn from the operation of a large power station park, and must be able to call upon the assistance of teams from outside in the event of an accident. (author)

  6. Putting Gino's lesson to work: Actor-network theory, enacted humanity, and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Thomas; Gibson, Barbara E

    2016-02-01

    This article argues that rehabilitation enacts a particular understanding of "the human" throughout therapeutic assessment and treatment. Following Michel Callon and Vololona Rabeharisoa's "Gino's Lesson on Humanity," we suggest that this is not simply a top-down process, but is cultivated in the application and response to biomedical frameworks of human ability, competence, and responsibility. The emergence of the human is at once a materially contingent, moral, and interpersonal process. We begin the article by outlining the basics of the actor-network theory that underpins "Gino's Lesson on Humanity." Next, we elucidate its central thesis regarding how disabled personhood emerges through actor-network interactions. Section "Learning Gino's lesson" draws on two autobiographical examples, examining the emergence of humanity through rehabilitation, particularly assessment measures and the responses to them. We conclude by thinking about how rehabilitation and actor-network theory might take this lesson on humanity seriously. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes

  8. Computerized structural mechanics for 1990's: Advanced aircraft needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, A. V.; Backman, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    The needs for computerized structural mechanics (CSM) as seen from the standpoint of the aircraft industry are discussed. These needs are projected into the 1990's with special focus on the new advanced materials. Preliminary design/analysis, research, and detail design/analysis are identified as major areas. The role of local/global analyses in these different areas is discussed. The lessons learned in the past are used as a basis for the design of a CSM framework that could modify and consolidate existing technology and include future developments in a rational and useful way. A philosophy is stated, and a set of analyses needs driven by the emerging advanced composites is enumerated. The roles of NASA, the universities, and the industry are identified. Finally, a set of rational research targets is recommended based on both the new types of computers and the increased complexity the industry faces. Computerized structural mechanics should be more than new methods in structural mechanics and numerical analyses. It should be a set of engineering applications software products that combines innovations in structural mechanics, numerical analysis, data processing, search and display features, and recent hardware advances and is organized in a framework that directly supports the design process.

  9. Lessons learned related to packaging and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallen, C.

    1995-01-01

    The use of lessons learned as a tool for learning from past experiences is well established, especially by many organizations within the nuclear industry. Every person has, at some time, used the principles of lessons learned to adopt good work practices based on their own experiences or the experiences of others. Lessons learned can also help to avoid the recurrence of adverse practices, which is often an area that most lessons-learned programs tend to focus on. This paper will discuss how lessons learned relate to packaging and transportation issues and events experienced at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. It will also discuss the role performed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety's Office of Operating Experience Analysis and Feedback in disseminating lessons learned and operating experience feedback to the DOE complex. The central concept of lessons learned is that any organization should be able to learn from its own experiences and events. In addition, organizations should implement methodologies to scan external environments for lessons learned, to analyze and determine the relevance of lessons learned, and to bring about the necessary changes learned from these experiences. With increased concerns toward facility safety, the importance of utilizing the lessons-learned principles and the establishment of lessons-learned programs can not be overstated

  10. How Can We Make Computing Lessons More Inclusive?

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton , Chris

    2017-01-01

    Part 3: Computer Science Education and Its Future Focus and Development; International audience; Whilst there is a substantial body of research that shows how Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) can support schools and teachers to make their classrooms more inclusive, there is a need for more evidence describing how best to ensure that the teaching of computing itself is inclusive. This paper reports on a literature review of inclusive education in school computing lessons. It ...

  11. Social Networking Sites and Addiction: Ten Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Kuss, Daria J.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Online social networking sites (SNSs) have gained increasing popularity in the last decade, with individuals engaging in SNSs to connect with others who share similar interests. The perceived need to be online may result in compulsive use of SNSs, which in extreme cases may result in symptoms and consequences traditionally associated with substance-related addictions. In order to present new insights into online social networking and addiction, in this paper, 10 lessons learned concerning onl...

  12. Field observations and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  13. Lessons learned in crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper will explore lessons learned following a series of natural and man-made disasters affecting the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and/or its subsidiaries. The company employs a team of certified continuity professionals who are charged with overseeing resilience on behalf of the enterprise and leading recovery activities wherever and whenever necessary.

  14. "Pride and Prejudice". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that classics are those pieces of literature that continue to be popular long after they were written; classics tend to have universal themes; and Austen's writing has been updated and dramatized and, most likely, will…

  15. Machiavelli's "The Prince." [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Machiavelli's book "The Prince," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Machiavelli's enumeration of leadership qualities for a prince has always been controversial; and that leaders and followers may differ in what they identify as the qualities of a good leader. The main activity of the lesson…

  16. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erp, J.B. van [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report).

  17. Lessons from The Little Prince

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Mika

    2005-01-01

    To children, The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (1943) may be a mystical story about a traveler among planets. For adults, the story can be appreciated for the lessons it teaches us about what it is like to be a child--and how children may perceive the world of adults. And, for science educators, particularly, The Little Prince…

  18. Basic safety principles: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, J.B. van

    1997-01-01

    The presentation reviews the following issues: basic safety principles and lessons learned; some conclusions from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; some recommendations from the Kemeny report on the accident at TMI; conclusions and recommendations from the Rogovin report on the accident on TMI; instrumentation deficiencies (from Rogovin report)

  19. The 'Amistad' Case. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.

    Teaching about the Amistad case provides correlations to the National Standards for History, and Civics and Government. An overview of the events of 1839 is given in this lesson plan. Seven student activities include reading and using primary source documents, writing journal articles, viewing the movie "Amistad," and giving…

  20. Evaluating Eyewitness Reports [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This lesson offers students experience in making historical meaning from eyewitness accounts that present a range of different perspectives. Students begin with a case study in working with alternative reports of a single event: the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. First, they compare two newspaper reports on the fire, then two memoirs of the fire…

  1. Lessons in Contingent, Recursive Humility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagle, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that critical work in teacher education should begin with teacher educators turning a critical eye on their own practices. The author uses Lesko's conception of contingent, recursive growth and change to analyze a lesson he observed as part of a phenomenological study aimed at understanding more about what it is…

  2. The Great Gatsby. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Ken

    Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that adapting part of a novel into a dramatic reading makes students more intimate with the author's intentions and craft; and that a part of a novel may lend itself to various oral interpretations. The main activity…

  3. Charismatic Leaders: A Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Focusing upon Franklin D. Roosevelt and Adolf Hitler, these lessons for high school students in U.S. or world history courses deal with what charismatic leadership is, what circumstances and personality factors generate charismatic movements, and the role, results, and dangers of charismatic leadership. (RM)

  4. Multimedia Principle in Teaching Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari Jabbour, Khayrazad

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia learning principle occurs when we create mental representations from combining text and relevant graphics into lessons. This article discusses the learning advantages that result from adding multimedia learning principle into instructions; and how to select graphics that support learning. There is a balance that instructional designers…

  5. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  6. Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage Structures and Thermal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    The Ares 1 Upper Stage was part of the vehicle intended to succeed the Space Shuttle as the United States manned spaceflight vehicle. Although the Upper Stage project was cancelled, there were many lessons learned that are applicable to future vehicle design. Lessons learned that are briefly detailed in this Technical Memorandum are for specific technical areas such as tank design, common bulkhead design, thrust oscillation, control of flight and slosh loads, purge and hazardous gas system. In addition, lessons learned from a systems engineering and vehicle integration perspective are also included, such as computer aided design and engineering, scheduling, and data management. The need for detailed systems engineering in the early stages of a project is emphasized throughout this report. The intent is that future projects will be able to apply these lessons learned to keep costs down, schedules brief, and deliver products that perform to the expectations of their customers.

  7. Lessons learned from failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le May, I.

    2006-01-01

    Failure analysis can be a very useful tool to designers and operators of plant and equipment. It is not simply something that is done for lawyers and insurance companies, but is a tool from which lessons can be learned and by means of which the 'breed' can be improved. In this presentation, several failure investigations that have contributed to understanding will be presented. Specifically, the following cases will be discussed: 1) A fire at a refinery that occurred in a desulphurization unit. 2) The failure of a pipeline before it was even put into operation. 3) Failures in locomotive axles that took place during winter operation. The refinery fire was initially blamed on defective Type 321 seamless stainless steel tubing, but there were conflicting views between 'experts' involved as to the mechanism of failure and the writer was called upon to make an in-depth study. This showed that there were a variety of failure mechanism involved, including high temperature fracture, environmentally-induced cracking and possible manufacturing defects. The unraveling of the failure sequence is described and illustrated. The failure of an oil transmission was discovered when the line was pressure tested some months after it had been installed and before it was put into service. Repairs were made and failure occurred in another place upon the next pressure test being conducted. After several more repairs had been made the line was abandoned and a lawsuit was commenced on the basis that the steel was defective. An investigation disclosed that the material was sensitive to embrittlement and the causes of this were determined. As a result, changes were made in the microstructural control of the product to avoid similar problems in future. A series of axle failures occurred in diesel electric locomotives during winter. An investigation was made to determine the nature of the failures which were not by classical fatigue, nor did they correspond to published illustrations of Cu

  8. From the School Newsroom to the Courtroom. Lessons on the Hazelwood Case and Free Expression Policy Making in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Warren; And Others

    The purpose of this lesson packet is to raise issues about student rights of free expression in public schools. Included are preparatory reading material and two classroom simulation activities. The lessons are based on the U.S. Supreme Court case of Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier, in which a Missouri high school principal and school district were sued by…

  9. Topical Session on Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    At its second meeting, in Paris, 5-7 December 2001, the WPDD held two topical sessions on the D and D Safety Case and on the Management of Materials from D and D, respectively. This report documents the topical session on the management of materials. Presentations during the topical session covered key aspects of the management of materials and meant to provide an exchange of information and experience, including: Experience and lessons learnt from VLLW and non-radioactive material management in Spain and Germany with special attention to recycling (How specific solutions came about? Are there 'generic' examples for wider adoption?); Risk assessment of recycling and non-recycling: a CPD study; Waste acceptance issues within different national contexts (What constraints are there on the waste receiving body and what flexibility can the latter have? What constraints does this impose on D and D implementers? What about wastes are without current solution? What needs to be done? What about large items and 'difficult' waste in general?); Radiological characterisation of materials during decommissioning, particularly difficult situations - large volumes, large items,.. wastes, heterogeneous streams (What examples of established practice? What are the approaches or aspects that set the regulatory requirements? How can the flow rates be large but the answers acceptable? How much is needed to be known for later action, e. g., disposal, release, protection of worker, etc.); Radiological characterisation of buildings as they stand, in order to allow conventional demolition (What are strategies for optimisation of characterisation? How much needs to be known to take action later? e.g. for storage, disposal, release, cost estimation and ALARA? What needs to be done in advance and after decommissioning/dismantling?). At the end of each presentation time was allotted for discussion of the paper. Integral to the Topical Session was a facilitated plenary discussion on the topical

  10. Important lessons to be learnt from 'Daimler'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2014-01-01

    ” (hinreichende Wahrscheinlichkeit). Disclosure should take place when there is a “realistic prospect” (tatsächlich erwartet werden kann) that the future event will occur. Intermediate steps (Zwischenschritte) can in themselves be stock relevant. Third, under German law, as well as under US law, it is natural...... to be able to sue the quoted company itself on grounds of misleading or delayed stock announcements. Other countries, including Denmark, are gradually coming to a similar state of law, however without statutory law to guide investors. The lesson for the EU should be that common rules are needed in this field...... implemented the market abuse directive, it must have trusted the German version of it (like countries often do). However, this version demanded too high a probability that a stock relevant event would occur, and German legislation was based on the German version of the directive. The Court compared...

  11. Digital control for nuclear reactors - lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.; Aviles, B.N.; Lanning, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons learned during the course of the now decade-old MIT program on the digital control of nuclear reactors are enumerated. Relative to controller structure, these include the importance of a separate safety system, the need for signal validation, the role of supervisory algorithms, the significance of command validation, and the relevance of automated reasoning. Relative to controller implementation, these include the value of nodal methods to the creation of real-time reactor physics and thermal hydraulic models, the advantages to be gained from the use of real-time system models, and the importance of a multi-tiered structure to the simultaneous achievement of supervisory, global, and local control. Block diagrams are presented of proposed controllers and selected experimental and simulation-study results are shown. In addition, a history is given of the MIT program on reactor digital control

  12. Secrecy vs. the need for ecological information: challenges to environmental activism in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, T

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies the lessons learned from the Nikitin case study in Russia. The Nikitin case involves the analysis of sources of radioactive contamination in several Russian counties and in the Russian Northern Fleet. Norway was interested in the issue due to proximity to the storage sites. The issue involved national security and environmental protection. It was learned that mixing national security issues with environmental issues offers dangerous and multiple challenges. Environmental groups must build relationships with a wide audience. International security policy must include the issues of globalization of trade and the spread of environmental problems into the global commons (oceans and atmosphere). The risk of an environmentally dangerous accident as a consequence of Cold War activities is greater than the risk of nuclear war. Secrecy in military affairs is not justified when there is inadequate storage of nuclear weapons and contaminated materials. In Russia, the concern is great due to their economic transition and shortages of funds for even the most basic needs, which excludes nuclear waste clean up. The Bellona Foundation studied the extent of nuclear pollution from military nuclear reactors in the Kola peninsula of northwest Russia, in 1994 and 1996. Russian security police arrested one of the report authors for alleged national security violations. A valuable lesson learned was that local Russian environmental groups needed international support. The military nuclear complex poses an enormous hazard. Limiting inspections is an unacceptable national security risk. The new Russian law on state secrets is too broad.

  13. Lessons Learned from Independent Technical Reviews of U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Landfills/Disposal Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, V.; Gupta, D.C.; Smegal, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned from a series of independent technical reviews (ITRs) of waste management operations conducted at existing and proposed low-level radioactive waste landfills/disposal facilities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The evaluated waste disposal programs include those at Hanford, Idaho, Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge, Portsmouth, Paducah, and the Nevada Test Site. Based on these evaluations, cost-effective lessons learned were identified to improve reliability and effectiveness of DOE on-site disposal facilities. Key recommendations covered a wide range of issues, including the following: complex-wide applied research effort is needed to evaluate settlement behavior of DOE wastes and how they may affect cover performance; there is a need for unbiased assessment of relevance of liners for different climates and wastes to evaluate where and when liners should be used; there is a need to develop information to demonstrate attenuation capability of modern liner materials and to understand the attenuation capability of liners during performance assessment; a review of historical data on demolition volumes and logistics from past DOE projects can provide valuable insight that can be helpful in planning capacity of future on-site disposal facilities; and operating procedures need to be reviewed and updated on a regular basis so that procedures remain consistent with changes in requirements and take advantage of improvements in technology. The complex-wide independent reviews have assisted DOE sites in considering lessons learned regarding common technical, regulatory, and management issues. Facility management and their operating contractors have begun implementing the applicable recommendations within the context of the DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. (authors)

  14. The attitudes of classroom teacher candidates towards physical education lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül Tekkurşun Demir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is aimed to determine the attitudes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade classroom teacher candidates towards the physical education lesson according to various variables. Material and Methods: For the current study, the screening method, one of the quantitative research models, was used. The research consists of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade, totally164 university students, 106 (%64,6 females, 58 (%35,4 males, attending Uşak University, Classroom Teaching Program in 2016-2017 academic year. The first-grade students were not included in this research, because the physical education and play teaching lessons are given to classroom student candidates in the second-grade at Uşak University, Classroom Teaching Program. “Personal information form" and “Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Classroom Teacher Candidates" were used as data collection tools. Before analysis, the data were evaluated using the values of Skewness and Skewness (normal distribution of the data and Levene (equality of variance tests. In the analysis of the data; frequency, arithmetic mean, standard deviation; t-test, ANOVA and Pearson Correlation test were used. Results: When examined the total score of the teacher candidates obtained from Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Classroom Teacher Candidates and age variable by the Pearson Moment Correlation analysis, it was found that there was a statistically significant negative relationship between the received scores at low level. It was determined that the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates towards the physical education lessons did not show any significant difference according to the gender variable, but there was a significant difference when examined their class levels. While no significant difference was found in the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates, who played and did not play sports in their past life, towards physical education lessons, no significant difference was found

  15. UNLEARNED LESSONS OF CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А Н Данилов

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the complex geopolitical situation in the global world at the end of the second decade of the 21st century as determined by the consequences of the collapse of the Soviet Union and by the new world order. The author seeks to answer the questions who will define the current geopolitical situation, whose aims it will reflect, what will become the basis of new geopolitical realities, the basis of moral solidarity of humankind, and the spiritual basis of future civilizations. The new challenges give rise to a desperate struggle for different scenarios for building a happy life. Moreover, it is not clear which ideal of the future world will be widely supported as a development guideline. The recognition as such of the standard of living and development of the strongest ones becomes a real threat to the new civilization for it leads to the loss of national interests of sovereign states, and to the loss of an independent future. Today, there is an active search for new theories and concepts that will adequately explain con-temporary global processes. In this thematic context, the author identifies main lessons not learned by the world political elites. The first lesson: new states are not born in an empty place, their common history is a great advantage ensuring prospects for the further development of interstate cooperation. The second lesson: the widespread falsification of history has a negative impact on national, cultural and social-group identity in transforming societies. The third lesson: after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the post-war balance of power was destroyed together with the system of checks and balances in world politics (a bipolar model of the world. The fourth lesson: under radical social transformations, the moral system of the population devaluates with numerous crisis consequences.

  16. Composite material dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  17. The 2015 Nepal earthquake disaster: lessons learned one year on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M L; Lee, A C K; Cartwright, C; Marahatta, S; Karki, J; Simkhada, P

    2017-04-01

    The 2015 earthquake in Nepal killed over 8000 people, injured more than 21,000 and displaced a further 2 million. One year later, a national workshop was organized with various Nepali stakeholders involved in the response to the earthquake. The workshop provided participants an opportunity to reflect on their experiences and sought to learn lessons from the disaster. One hundred and thirty-five participants took part and most had been directly involved in the earthquake response. They included representatives from the Ministry of Health, local and national government, the armed forces, non-governmental organizations, health practitioners, academics, and community representatives. Participants were divided into seven focus groups based around the following topics: water, sanitation and hygiene, hospital services, health and nutrition, education, shelter, policy and community. Facilitated group discussions were conducted in Nepalese and the key emerging themes are presented. Participants described a range of issues encountered, some specific to their area of expertize but also more general issues. These included logistics and supply chain challenges, leadership and coordination difficulties, impacts of the media as well as cultural beliefs on population behaviour post-disaster. Lessons identified included the need for community involvement at all stages of disaster response and preparedness, as well as the development of local leadership capabilities and community resilience. A 'disconnect' between disaster management policy and responses was observed, which may result in ineffective, poorly planned disaster response. Finding time and opportunity to reflect on and identify lessons from disaster response can be difficult but are fundamental to improving future disaster preparedness. The Nepal Earthquake National Workshop offered participants the space to do this. It garnered an overwhelming sense of wanting to do things better, of the need for a Nepal-centric approach

  18. DEVELOPING DIGITAL ENGLISH GRAMMAR MATERIALS FOR THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Santi Widiati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available English has become the tool for communication among the people across countries, and schools are competing to provide English for the students as early as possible. There are plenty ready-to-use digital English modules in the market today; however, they are not relevant with the English syllabus of the primary or secondary schools. The teaching is focused on the four skills directed for communication. As such, grammar is not presented as a part of the English lessons; but only when needed to support the four skills. The absence of systematic design of English grammar lesson makes their grammar mastery weak. To fix this, the writers develop grammar materials for the secondary school, specifically for the tenth graders. Young people love working with computers or other kinds of modern gadgets, so the materials developed in this research are in the digital form, both usable by teachers at school and by students independently via the Internet. Based on the needs assessment executed in high schools in Surabaya, Sidoarjo, and Malang, the researchers have obtained the inputs about the grammar topics needed and the types of exercises preferred by the students. Articulate Storyline 2 software is used to develop the materials supported by animation and voice recording. Each module covers the objectives, description, exercises equipped with feedbacks, and quizzes with scores to measure the achievement of the objectives.

  19. Of 'other' materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    within the ‘new materiality’ literature in philosophy as well as in cultural theory. Important lessons are drawn in from across different positions such as non-representational theory, the nonhuman turn, Object-Oriented-Ontology to mention a few. It is argued that to create the necessary materially......In this article, the notion of materialities is rearticulated as an important field for the future of mobilities research. We focus on the intersection between situational mobilities research and design/architecture. The vocabulary and material imaginary developed within the latter are an important...... sensitive imaginary, mobilities research should be looking to architecture and design, as well as it may profit from engaging with these new materially sensitive thinkers. The article ends with some concrete themes for future research inspired by these intersections and identifies ‘material pragmatism...

  20. Teaching Norwegian to Beginners: Six Principles to Guide Lesson Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krulatz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching a foreign language is no simple task. There are several factors to consider, from curriculum design, to material selection and lesson implementation, to assessment. The challenge, however, is even greater, if you are teaching a less commonly taught language such as Norwegian – a language spoken by fewer than six million native speakers, used almost exclusively in one country, and with a limited number of available pedagogical materials. Under such circumstances, the task of preparing high quality communicative lessons is immense, even for an experienced language instructor. The goal of this article is to present how a successful language lesson can be developed even if one is using a textbook that does not foster communicative competence. As an example, I am using a unit from a Norwegian textbook for beginners: På vei, often used in Norwegian as a second language course for adults in Norway. The lesson focuses on routines and times of the day, and it concludes with the students comparing and contrasting their daily routines with a partner. Prior to this lesson, students have learned to provide basic information about themselves (where they come from, what languages they speak, what they do for work, expressions for greetings and goodbyes, basic verbs relating to daily activities such as ‘snakker’ (to speak, ‘kjører’ (to drive, ‘kjøpper’ (to buy, ‘jobber’ (to work, ‘leser’ (to read, ‘scriver’ (to write, ordinal numerals, meals, some food items, some basic prepositions and locations, words for family members, and subject and object pronouns for all persons. If you were to closely follow the textbook in teaching this unit, you would begin by teaching the students how to tell time, then briefly go over some verbs to express daily routines, listen to and read a text titled ‘Jeg står opp klokka seks,’ a narrative about Monica’s day (Monica is one of the characters in the book, and finally ask the students

  1. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D.; Instituto Militar de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  2. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D., E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jlopes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rogeriog@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mara@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: zielithome@gmail.com [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  3. Preservation and Conservation of Library and Archival Materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preservation and Conservation of Library and Archival Materials: Lessons From Thomas Mofolo Library of the National University of Lesotho. ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  4. Exploring Material Culture in the Barrenlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachren, Zabe

    2012-01-01

    Although the author loves winter camping and holds the Inuit culture in great regard, thinking about material culture in a northern landscape referred to as barren constitutes a daunting lesson. She wondered, when a landscape is barren is it possible at all for someone to find material, make useful items and survive? So it was she joined the Mara…

  5. The safety of radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.Ch.

    1997-01-01

    Five accidents in radioactive materials transport have been studied; One transport accident by road, one by ship, one by rail, and the two last in handling materials from ships in Cherbourg port and Le Havre port. All these accidents were without any important consequences in term of radiation protection, but they were sources of lessons to improve the safety. (N.C.)

  6. Ebola: Lessons learned

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pains.[19] Viable virus seems capable of surviving in protected sites including aqueous humor, the testes and the fetoplacental unit.[20-22]. The implications for further transmission and the ongoing health needs of survivors are therefore of great concern. Ebola will not be eradicated by science alone. Finally, this outbreak ...

  7. Lessons from Skateboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagor, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes what motivates skateboarders to master their sport. Elements include the need to feel competent, to belong, to feel useful, to feel potent, and to feel optimistic. Argues that that teachers can use same motivation elements to improve the learning performance of alienated students. (PKP)

  8. The individual teacher in lesson study collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skott, Charlotte Krog; Møller, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    used in lesson study research. Design/methodology/approach The authors use collective case studies. By being participant observers the authors provide detailed descriptions of two selected teachers’ lived experiences of lesson study collaboration. In addition to gain first-hand insights, the authors...... in the participation of each of the two teachers during a two-year lesson study project. By comparing these shifts the authors identify significant conditions for their individual learning. Research limitations/implications Although the study is small scale, both the insights into the different ways in which teachers...... participated and the theoretical insights might be valuable for other lesson study research approaches. Practical implications This paper provides valuable insights into conditions that might influence teachers’ participation in lesson study activities, especially in cultures with little experience of lesson...

  9. Nutrition Knowledge and Training Needs in the School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna Marie

    The nutrition environment in schools can influence the risk for childhood overweight and obesity, which in turn can have life-long implications for risk of chronic disease. This dissertation aimed to examine the nutrition environment in primary public schools in California with regards to the amount of nutrition education provided in the classroom, the nutrition knowledge of teachers, and the training needs of school nutrition personnel. In order to determine nutrition knowledge of teachers, a valid and reliable questionnaire was developed to assess knowledge. The systematic process involved cognitive interviews, a mail-based pretest that utilized a random sample of addresses in California, and validity and reliability testing in a sample of university students. Results indicated that the questionnaire had adequate construct validity, internal consistency reliability, and test-retest reliability. Following the validation of the knowledge questionnaire, it was used in a study of public school teachers in California to determine the relationship between demographic and classroom characteristics and nutrition knowledge, in addition to barriers to nutrition education and resources used to plan nutrition lessons. Nutrition knowledge was not found to be associated with teaching nutrition in the classroom, however it was associated with gender, identifying as Hispanic or Latino, and grade level grouping taught. The most common barriers to nutrition education were time, and unrelated subject matter. The most commonly used resources to plan nutrition lessons were Dairy Council of California educational materials. The school nutrition program was the second area of the school nutrition environment to be examined, and the primary focus was to determine the perceived training needs of California school nutrition personnel. Respondents indicated a need for training in topics related to: program management; the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; nutrition, health and

  10. Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ross A

    2015-03-01

    Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Designing Reading Materials for the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at UIN Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Yusnita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to design reading materials for the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, UIN Syarif HIdayatullah Jakarta, due to the absence of such specific materials in the market. To produce satisfactory teaching materials, the researcher did some steps i.e. doing needs analysis, reviewing the principles of materials design and reading strategies, designing course framework, designing syllabus, designing the reading materials, and implementing the sample lessons. The needs analysis was intended to find out what the students needed and to find out the subjects the students learned from the institution in order to produce adequate reading materials. Based on the needs analysis, the researcher then identified the global aims of the course, thereby, the writer designed course framework. This course framework contained general points of reading themes and topics, information of classroom activities that followed up reading, the length of study session, the number of the course meetings, and the number of participants. The course framework became the basis to write the syllabus. Finally the syllabus became the basis for designing reading materials.

  12. Targeting women or transforming institutions? Policy lessons from NGO anti-poverty efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeer, N

    1995-05-01

    Some research has found that the extent of gender-based discrimination in market-based institutions and unfair advantages within domestic and market institutions meant women were less successful in translating education and work into income and purchasing power. Anti-poverty programs functioned without specifically addressing the implications for women and children. Women-in-development efforts attempted to compensate for prior deficiencies by promotion of income generation schemes for women. In this article, the suggestion is made for policy makers to design projects with goals, objectives, and strategies that are clear, consistent, and well-informed about gender. Efforts should be made to avoid debates about women-only versus integrated projects. The experiences of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the South Asian context offer lessons in good policy efforts to address all forms of marginalization. The definition of women's needs must be provided by women themselves; openness and flexibility are recommended. Participatory approaches serve the aims of needs identification, involvement in democratic processes, and awareness of constraints on women's use of resources. In credit lending, constraints were overcome by compensating for the absence of material collateral, guaranteeing physical access, simplifying procedures, and subsidizing access rather than interest rates. Underlying structural conditions that reinforce inequalities by gender are in need of change. Empowerment of women would assure that marginalization would not occur.

  13. Pedagogy and second language learning: Lessons learned from Intensive French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Netten

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Through research and classroom observation undertaken while conceptualizing and implementing the Intensive French program in Canada, many new insights were gained into the development of communication skills in a classroom situation. Five lessons learned about the development of spontaneous oral communication are presented in this article: the ineffectiveness of core French in primary school; the minimum number of intensive hours necessary to develop spontaneous oral communication; the need to develop implicit competence rather than explicit knowledge; the distinction between accuracy as knowledge and accuracy as skill; and the importance of teaching strategies focusing on language use. These lessons have implications for our understanding of how oral competence in an L2 develops and for the improvement of communicative language pedagogy.

  14. Lessons from the History of Ivermectin and Other Antiparasitic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, William C

    2016-01-01

    The twentieth century's arsenal of chemical anthelmintics brought manifold improvement in human health and, more abundantly, in animal health. The benefits were not only in health per se but also in agricultural economics, livestock management, and the overall production of food and fiber to support expanding human populations. Nevertheless, there remains (due in large part to drug resistance and paucity of available vaccines) a great need for new means of controlling disease caused by parasitic worms. Prudence should persuade us to look to our past for lessons that might help in our quest for new drugs. The lessons suggested here derive from the history of ivermectin and other anthelmintics. They deal with the means of finding substances with useful antiparasitic activity and with alternative approaches to drug discovery.

  15. QA lessons learned for parameter control from the WIPP Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of lessons learned from experiences on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WJPP) Project in implementation of quality assurance controls surrounding inputs for performance assessment analysis. Since the performance assessment (PA) process is inherent in compliance determination for any waste repository, these lessons-learned are intended to be useful to investigators, analysts, and Quality Assurance (QA) practitioners working on high level waste disposal projects. On the WIPP Project, PA analyses for regulatory-compliance determination utilized several inter-related computer programs (codes) that mathematically modeled phenomena such as radionuclide release, retardation, and transport. The input information for those codes are the parameters that are the subject of this paper. Parameters were maintained in a computer database, which was then queried electronically by the PA codes whenever input was needed as the analyses were run

  16. MODIS Science Algorithms and Data Systems Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Robert E.; Ridgway, Bill L.; Patt, Fred S.; Masuoka, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    For almost 10 years, standard global products from NASA's Earth Observing System s (EOS) two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors are being used world-wide for earth science research and applications. This paper discusses the lessons learned in developing the science algorithms and the data systems needed to produce these high quality data products for the earth sciences community. Strong science team leadership and communication, an evolvable and scalable data system, and central coordination of QA and validation activities enabled the data system to grow by two orders of magnitude from the initial at-launch system to the current system able to reprocess data from both the Terra and Aqua missions in less than a year. Many of the lessons learned from MODIS are already being applied to follow-on missions.

  17. Safety of the Transport of Radioactive Materials for Civilian Use in France. Lessons learned by IRSN from analysis of significant events reported in 2014 and 2015. Mission report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    IRSN publishes its report on the safety of transport of radioactive materials for civilian use in France for the years 2014 and 2015. It is based on an overall review of the significant events that occurred during this period during transport operations in France by road, railway, inland waterway, sea and air of 980 000 parcels loaded with radioactive substances. In 2014 and 2015, respectively 139 and 122 events were reported, which is about one event reported for 7,500 packages carried. While these figures are up significantly compared to 2013 (93 reported events, or 1 in 10,000 packages carried), IRSN believes that this trend should not however be interpreted as a deterioration of the safety level of the transport of radioactive materials. Indeed, it is largely explained by better detection of events relevant to safety by the actors concerned and therefore their declaration to the authorities. None of these events had significant radiological consequences for the workers, the population or the environment. As part of progress made, IRSN notes a sharp decrease, in 2015, in the number of damage of packages intended for medical activities during their handling in airport areas. This decrease is linked to awareness actions conducted for airlines companies and staff involved in the handling of packages. Finally, three themes must be the subject of particular vigilance of the actors concerned and of corrective actions: - Compliance with the requirements for the transport of gamma radiography devices, in particular those associated with the locking of the source; events related to the transport of gamma radiography devices appeared as remarkable events over the period (3 level 1 events and 1 level 2 events); - The tie-down of packages on their means of transport, given the risks of fall of the package during transport, as well as tie-down of the objects in their transport container; - The operations of filling and closing of drums containing uranium ore in order to

  18. The Employed Neurosurgeon: Essential Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzil, Deborah L; Zusman, Edie E

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgeons are highly specialized surgeons whose pride is mastery of the complexity of form and function that is the nervous system and then knowing when and how these require surgical intervention. Following years of arduous postgraduate education, neurosurgeons enter the world of practice that is not only daunting in its intricacies of regulations, mandates, and unknown business practices, but also changing at a meteoric pace. Overwhelmingly, graduating residents and fellows are choosing to practice as employed physicians, a trend that is new in its magnitude and also changed because of the rapid evolution of large health systems. Case studies of challenges other employed surgical specialists have faced can provide critical and important education for any neurosurgeon in this arena. As with the lessons of all case studies, the teachings are remarkably universal, but how those lessons apply to an individual's specific situation will require personalized adaptation. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  19. USING LITERATURE IN GEOGRAPHY LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA HOBAI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Including in a novel information about relief, climate, vegetation, fauna and various aspects of socio-economic life can make literature a real source of geographical information. Using realistic literary works in Geography lessons has multiple benefits, which are not limited only to geographical knowledge. In this paper there are some fragments from literature, suggestions of activities about how to integrate the fragments during Geography lessons and the results of these activities. The activities are from fifth to twelfth grade, passing through a first example of water pollution resulting from a Hercules labour, through the lyricism of the aurora borealis description, through the dramatic life of a refugee from Darfur, through the Dobrudgea winter landscape, through the grey urban landscape of Bucharest in the 90s and so on. Students were put into learning situations that stimulated their creativity, developed communication competencies and enriched their general knowledge.

  20. Lessons learned and advice from Vietnam war nurses: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannell-Desch, Elizabeth A

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe guidance for nurses today from the lessons learned by nurses who served in the Vietnam War. There is little research focusing on nurses' experiences in the Vietnam War. Lessons learned and subsequent advice from nurses who served in Vietnam may be helpful to those serving in current and future wars. A Husserlian phenomenological approach was taken, using interviews with a purposive sample of Registered Nurses who were female, and had served in the United States of America armed forces in Vietnam during the war. Seven theme clusters described the lesson learned and guidance offered by the Vietnam War nurses: advice about journaling, training, caring for yourself, use of support systems, talking about your experiences, understanding the mission, and lack of preparation for war. Much can be learned from the lessons learned and advice given by Vietnam War nurses. These lessons stress that nurses need to take a pro-active role in preparing themselves for deployment to a war zone, and that institutional training for war needs to be intensive and realistic. The environmental, cultural, technological, clinical and psychosocial demands of war nursing need to be comprehensively addressed before nurses deploy to a war.

  1. Integrating self-regulated learning and discovery learning into English lesson plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayukti Ni Kadek Heny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of learner-centeredness has been embedded in the National Curriculum of Indonesia, 2013 Curriculum. However, most of the teachers seem to be hardly acquainted with the concept of Self-Regulated Learning (SRL and discovery learning in the lesson planning. Considering the phenomenon, this study intends to explore the concept of Self-Regulated Learning in the lesson plan of English subject for a tenth-grade level by employing a qualitative design with data obtained from a teacher-made lesson plan and a semi-structured interview. The researcher used content analysis to analyze the lesson plan. Meanwhile, the qualitative data from interview result were preceded through a coding sheet and transcribed modified figure. The findings revealed an integration of SRL cyclical phase and discovery learning in the teacher-made lesson plan. Based on the discussion, the results need to be applied in a considerably large context, in order to see thoroughly dynamic integration between Self-Regulated Learning model, lesson planning and the concept of learner autonomy.

  2. Improving the redistribution of the security lessons in healthcare: An evaluation of the Generic Security Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Johnson, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The recurrence of past security breaches in healthcare showed that lessons had not been effectively learned across different healthcare organisations. Recent studies have identified the need to improve learning from incidents and to share security knowledge to prevent future attacks. Generic Security Templates (GSTs) have been proposed to facilitate this knowledge transfer. The objective of this paper is to evaluate whether potential users in healthcare organisations can exploit the GST technique to share lessons learned from security incidents. We conducted a series of case studies to evaluate GSTs. In particular, we used a GST for a security incident in the US Veterans' Affairs Administration to explore whether security lessons could be applied in a very different Chinese healthcare organisation. The results showed that Chinese security professional accepted the use of GSTs and that cyber security lessons could be transferred to a Chinese healthcare organisation using this approach. The users also identified the weaknesses and strengths of GSTs, providing suggestions for future improvements. Generic Security Templates can be used to redistribute lessons learned from security incidents. Sharing cyber security lessons helps organisations consider their own practices and assess whether applicable security standards address concerns raised in previous breaches in other countries. The experience gained from this study provides the basis for future work in conducting similar studies in other healthcare organisations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lessons learned at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, K.L.; Page, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) used several innovative strategies and technologies in conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) activities for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) Operable Unit (OU) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These innovations helped to cost-effectively characterize the 270-ha (670-acre), 23.3-km (14.5-mile) floodplain and to obtain a 400-parts per million (ppm) cleanup level for mercury in soil. Lessons learned during the project involve management, investigation, and risk assessment strategies and techniques. Management lessons learned include (a) how to handle the large OU, (b) how to effectively involve the community in decisions, and (c) how to select a remedy that incorporates the needs of many involved agencies. Investigation lessons learned include (a) how to design an effective sampling strategy for the site, (b) how to cost-effectively analyze a large number of samples, and (c) which of several treatment technologies is best-suited to the site. Risk assessment lessons learned include (a) how to determine an appropriate cleanup level for human health and the environment, (b) how to quantify uncertainty in the human health risk assessment, (c) how to reconcile different solubilities of different mercury species, and (d) how to best conduct the ecological risk assessment. Other CERCLA sites can benefit from lessons learned during this project whether still in the investigative stage or further along in the process. Applying these lessons can substantially reduce costs and make more efficient use of Superfund resources

  4. Essentials for emergency care: Lessons from an inventory assessment of an emergency centre in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Marfo Osei

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Beyond pointing out specific material resource deficiencies at the Surgical Medical Emergency (SME centre, our inventory assessment indicated a need to develop better implementation strategies for infection control policies, to collaborate with other departments on coordination of patient care, and to set a research agenda to develop emergency and acute care protocols that are both effective and sustainable in our setting. Equipment and supplies are essential elements of emergency preparedness that must be both available and ‘ready-to-hand’. Consequently, key factors in determining readiness to provide quality emergency care include supply-chain, healthcare financing, functionality of systems, and a coordinated institutional vision. Lessons learnt may be useful for others facing similar challenges to emergency medicine development.

  5. Lesson 6. Picture unsharpness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikirdin, Eh.G.

    1999-01-01

    Lecture concerning the picture sharpness in biomedical radiography is presented. Notion of picture sharpness and visual acuity as an analyser of picture sharpness is specified. Attention is paid to the POX-curve as a statistical method for assessment of visual acuity. Conceptions of the sensitivity of using X-ray image visualization system together with specificity and accuracy are considered. Among indices of sharp parameters of visualization system the resolution, resolving power, picture unsharpness are discussed. It is shown that gradation and sharp characteristics of the image closely correlate that need an attention in practice to factors determining them [ru

  6. Material Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna; Boer, Laurens; Tsaknaki, Vasiliki

    2017-01-01

    . Consequently we ask what the practice of programming and giving form to such materials would be like? How would we be able to familiarize ourselves with the dynamics of these materials and their different combinations of cause and effect? Which tools would we need and what would they look like? Will we program......, and color, but additionally being capable of sensing, actuating, and computing. Indeed, computers will not be things in and by themselves, but embedded into the materials that make up our surroundings. This also means that the way we interact with computers and the way we program them, will change...... these computational composites through external computers and then transfer the code them, or will the programming happen closer to the materials? In this feature we outline a new research program that floats between imagined futures and the development of a material programming practice....

  7. Designing a lessons learned model to improve the success of new product development in project oriented organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, project-based organizations need to utilize intellectual capital and knowledge to become leader in their business activities. The new approach to use knowledge based skills from one side and development of the new complicated products from the other side have increased the need for designing a lessons learned model. The purpose of this paper is to design a lessons learned model to improve the success of new product development for project oriented organizations. The study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among 56 experts who were well informed about various techniques of new product development and lessons learned. Cronbach alphas for all components of the survey were well above the desirable level. The results of the survey have indicated that there were positive and meaningful relationships between lessons learned components and the success of the new product development.

  8. Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Carl H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Caton, Melanie C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Marcinkoski, Jason [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2017-09-26

    The purpose of this report is to document lessons learned in the installation of the hydrogen fueling station at the National Park Service Brentwood site in Washington, D.C., to help further the deployment of hydrogen infrastructure required to support hydrogen and other fuel cell technologies. Hydrogen fueling is the most difficult infrastructure component to build and permit. Hydrogen fueling can include augmenting hydrogen fueling capability to existing conventional fuel fueling stations as well as building brand new hydrogen fueling stations. This report was produced as part of the Brentwood Lessons Learned project. The project consisted of transplanting an existing modular hydrogen fueling station from Connecticut to the National Park Service Brentwood site. This relocation required design and construction at the Brentwood site to accommodate the existing station design as well as installation and validation of the updated station. One of the most important lessons learned was that simply moving an existing modular station to an operating site was not necessarily straight-forward - performing the relocation required significant effort and cost. The station has to function at the selected operating site and this functionality requires a power supply, building supports connecting to an existing alarm system, electrical grounding and lighting, providing nitrogen for purging, and providing deionized water if an electrolyzer is part of the station package. Most importantly, the station has to fit into the existing site both spatially and operationally and not disrupt existing operations at the site. All of this coordination and integration requires logistical planning and project management. The idea that a hydrogen fueling station can be simply dropped onto a site and made immediately operational is generally not realistic. Other important lessons learned include that delineating the boundaries of the multiple jurisdictions that have authority over a project for

  9. IMPROVING LECTURERS’ PAEDAGOGIC COMPETENCE THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF LESSON STUDY IN FACULTY OF TEACHER TRAINING AND EDUCATION OF PAKUAN UNIVERSITY, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Sarimanah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at improving the lecturers of Faculty of Teacher Training and Education of Pakuan University paedagogic competence through the implementation of lesson study which covers learning management competence including developing chapter design and lesson design, media making, teaching and learning, evaluation, post evaluation follow-up and learning supervision. This research involves four study program. The method used in this research is qualitative descriptive. The data are collected through documentation, observation, interview and questionnaire. The data are analyzed descriptively to investigate the improvement of the lecturers’ paedagogic competence in teaching through the implementation of lesson study. Lesson study has been implemented for two years in Indonesian and Literature Education Study Program, English Education Study Program, Biology Education Study Program, and Primary Education Study Program. The findings show that there is an improvement of the lecturers paedagogic competence in developing chapter design and lesson design, developing material and designing media for learning (plan stage; running the lesson (do stage; and observing the lesson as well as evaluating and reflecting it (see stage. Besides, it is found the lecturers develop learning innovation to create students’ active learning. The colleagality among the lecturers is also develop well through the implementation of lesson study. The questionnaire result also shows that the implementation of lesson study can make the student become autonomous learners.

  10. Implementation of lesson study in physics teaching by group of teachers in Solok West Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurnetti, Y.

    2018-04-01

    This article based of collaborative classroom action research with science teachers group or MGMP at Solok West Sumatera; based on their willingness to implementation of lesson study by this group. The study started by discussing some problems according to the implementation of the lesson study, establishing the teaching materials, developing learning tools, defining the model teachers, conducting classroom activities, and reflecting by discussions. The preparation of this study includes some learning material according to temperature and heat; the observation form that led by observer teachers; teachers’s model impression and open questionnaire implementation of lesson study that applied to the students and teachers. This research got some information about the strengths and weaknesses of learning using lesson study from the students involved. To conclude, the implementation of lesson study should be able to support the principle of collaborative in learning. The challenge of this study is how to make a condition to gather some teachers in one school at a certain time because they have the schedule at their own school.

  11. A Planetary Geophysicist Does EPO: Lessons Learned Along the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    My "day job" is numerical modeling of the interiors of the terrestrial planets, but I have also done EPO projects for the last 17 years while at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. These range from single, hour long talks in classrooms or astronomy clubs, to week-long summer workshops for teachers and librarians, and even semester-long programs, along with a number of curriculum development projects. EPO projects are a great way to help develop both the next generation of scientists and, more importantly, of scientifically literate citizens and taxpayers. Here are a few lessons learned along the way in the school of hard knocks. (1) An engaging delivery style is even more important in EPO presentations than it is in college lectures or conference presentations. Emphasize a few key concepts rather than numerous facts, and keep the jargon out. Good analogies can go a long way towards explaining a concept to any age group. I teach the role of size in planetary cooling by first asking students how long it takes to cook food of various sizes (a hamburger, roast beef, turkey). (2) If you will be working with a group of students for more than one class period, classroom friendly activities strengthen the learning process. Such activities do not need to be elaborate - when teaching about the Moon, I sometimes assign students to take their parents outside at night and show them how to find lava flows on the Moon. Teachers usually need to have classroom activities that are aligned to state or national teaching standards. Fortunately, many effective, standards-aligned activities already exist, so you don't need to reinvent the wheel. For a useful listing of planetary science and astronomy activities, see the LPI website www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/ (3) Although EPO work can be personally rewarding, it is not always well rewarded in a professional context, and it can be difficult to find the time and financial resources to sustain major projects. We sometimes use a

  12. Lessons Learned From Community-Based Approaches to Sodium Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby PhD, Jan L.; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S.; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. Design A multiple case study design was used. Setting This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Subjects Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. Analysis The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semi structured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Results Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. Conclusion The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption. PMID:24575726

  13. Lessons learned from community-based approaches to sodium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby, Jan L; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2015-01-01

    This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. A multiple case study design was used. This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semistructured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption.

  14. Lessons for the new CMS innovation center from the Medicare health support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Michael S; Foote, Sandra M; Krakauer, Randall; Mattingly, Patrick H

    2010-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act establishes a new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The center is intended to enhance the CMS's role in promoting much-needed improvements in payment and service delivery. Lessons from the Medicare Health Support Program, a chronic care pilot program that ran between 2005 and 2008, illustrate the value of drawing on experience in planning for the center and future pilot programs. The lessons include the importance of strong leadership; collaboration and flexibility to foster innovation; receptivity of beneficiaries to care management; and the need for timely data on patients' status. The lessons also highlight pitfalls to be avoided in planning future pilot programs, such as flawed strategies for selecting populations to target when testing payment and service delivery reforms.

  15. The impact of curricula and lesson planning in the teaching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlinda Lika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lesson planning is at the core of teaching. It allows teachers to create an orientation path in the process of teaching, taking into consideration, many elements such as, students’ styles of learning, previous knowledge, types of intelligences, interests etc. Effective curricula plans are characterized by principles of coherence, flexibility, integration of knowledge etc. Effective lesson plans strongly rely on previous information gathered through different forms of assessment, and provide inclusive opportunities for every student. This paper will show how planning affects teaching and the quality of learning. First, a review of the literature will represent the importance of flexible planning and incorporation of differentiated elements of planning that ensure inclusive opportunities of learning for all students. Second, there will be a detailed analysis of findings taken by 25 full school inspections practices on the field of “lesson planning”. This part of the study will specify the planning difficulties the teachers face and how this affects the process of teaching and learning. Third, benefits of lesson plans that rely on good assessment practices and integrate differentiated instruction according to students' needs will be discussed as ways of helping teachers adjust lesson plans to overcome their planning difficulties. Findings indicate that teachers design lesson plans that do not rely on good assessment practices. Lesson plans are not flexible enough to respond and satisfy the needs of all categories of students, impacting that way the quality of instruction and learning. The paper will serve teachers to review their planning approaches and integrate elements of differentiated instruction as an organic part of the process, responding to traits and uniqueness students represent.

  16. Restructuring patient flow logistics around patient care needs: implications and practicalities from three critical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Stefano; Barbieri, Marta; Lega, Federico

    2009-06-01

    To make hospitals more patient-centered it is necessary to intervene on patient flow logistics. The study analyzes three innovative redesign projects implemented at three Italian hospitals. The three hospitals have reorganized patient flow logistics around patient care needs using, as proxies, the expected length of stay and the level of nursing assistance. In order to do this, they have extensively revised their logistical configuration changing: (1) the organization of wards, (2) the hospital's physical lay-out, (3) the capacity planning system, and (4) the organizational roles supporting the patient flow management. The study describes the changes implemented as well as the results achieved and draws some general lessons that provide useful hints for those other hospitals involved in such type of redesign projects. The paper ends by discussing some policy implications. In fact, the results achieved in the three cases investigated provide interesting material for further discussion on clinical, operational, and economic issues.

  17. Lessons for the control of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, T H

    1987-11-15

    A balanced perspective that places acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the context of the social needs of a global society is needed to overcome the hysteria and stigmatizing that presently surrounds this public health issue. The migration of poor, rural, sexually active young people to urban centers in the Third World has clearly played a role in the dissemination of AIDS and other infectious diseases. It is necessary, however, to examine the major cause of such population movement--private enterprise. Migrant workers are used to perform menial jobs in the urban labor force. Another cause of population movements is war and political repression. The fact that young people are becoming increasingly mobile has serious implications for the control of AIDS, and this phenomenon cannot be addressed without looking at its causes. Similarly, the disproportionate mortality of minorities- -seen in the AIDS epidemic as well--calls for discrimination. To prevent and control AIDS, the 1st step is to increase understanding of its natural history and epidemiology. Then, lessons must be learned from successful public health programs rooted in a primary health care system, including the Expanded Program on Immunization and oral rehydration campaigns. Although funds should not be diverted from such programs to combat AIDS, their logistic structure should be studied. Above all, however, it must be kept in mind that the constructive influence of health education will be thwarted as long as social inequities remain.

  18. Children's Satisfaction with Private Music Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife, Nora A.; Shnek, Zachary M.; Lauby, Jennifer L.; Lapidus, Leah Blumberg

    2001-01-01

    Determines the language children use to express their feelings of satisfaction with private music lessons. Offers a list of statements from children about private music lessons to be used to assess those feelings. Discusses the effects of age, gender, and musical instruments on satisfaction for music educators. Includes references. (DAJ)

  19. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the second in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subjects areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior, art, music, and…

  20. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the first in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the kindergarten level: arithmetic concepts, number concepts, reading readiness, vocabulary, language, listening, social behavior,…

  1. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the third in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary grade level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning, problem solving, social behavior,…

  2. Pacemaker Primary Curriculum; Lesson Book Level D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorothea M.; Ross, Sheila A.

    This lesson book, which is the last in a four-level program for young children with learning difficulties, describes the purpose of and equipment and procedures for teaching lessons in the following subject areas on the primary level: arithmetic, reading, vocabulary, spelling, printing, listening, planning and problem solving, social behavior,…

  3. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  4. Leadership in American Indian Communities: Winter Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metoyer, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Winter lessons, or stories told in the winter, were one of the ways in which tribal elders instructed and directed young men and women in the proper ways to assume leadership responsibilities. Winter lessons stressed the appropriate relationship between the leader and the community. The intent was to remember the power and purpose of that…

  5. Professor's Page: Do Demonstration Lessons Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Doug

    2011-01-01

    As part of a large research and professional development project funded by the Catholic Education Office Melbourne (CEOM), called "Contemporary Teaching and Learning of Mathematics," the ACU team has been leading demonstration lessons. There is certainly not universal agreement on the worth of demonstration lessons in the mathematics…

  6. Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the process of a human space flight conjunction assessment and lessons learned from the more than twelve years of International Space Station (ISS) operations. Also, the application of these lessons learned to a recent ISS conjunction assessment with object 84180 on July 16, 2009 is also presented.

  7. Apart from Language, What? Reflections on the Content of the Language Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    "Am I a girl?" This question from a long-ago English class (quoted by Kennedy, 1983) illustrates what was once considered suitable practice for language learners. Over the decades, ideas for the content of a language lesson have reflected developing theories of second language learning and teaching. This essay draws on materials,…

  8. Probability Lessons at Hancock School, Lexington; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Lyn

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. Presented are plans for teaching 23 probability lessons in the elementary grades at Hancock School, Lexington, Massachusetts. The discovery approach was utilized by the…

  9. Inequality Lessons at Adams School, Lexington; Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics Feasibility Study No. 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, B.

    These materials were written with the aim of reflecting the thinking of The Cambridge Conference on School Mathematics (CCSM) regarding the goals and objectives for school mathematics. Presented are plans for teaching 15 inequality lessons for above average first grade students. The discovery approach is utilized by the teacher in order to involve…

  10. Lecciones de Quechua. Primer Nivel, Segundo Nivel (Quechua Lessons. First Level, Second Level).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Joaquin; And Others

    The two volumes comprising this text represent the beginning and intermediate levels of a course in the Quechua language for speakers of Spanish. Based on the "Audio Lingual Materials" format, the ten lessons in the the first volume generally contain: (1) a short dialog and a supplementary vocabulary section or adapted dialog which…

  11. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  12. Keep It Simple: A Lesson in Linking Teens to Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Alexandra; Avellino, Lia; Chilcoat, Deborah; Schlanger, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The "Keep It Simple" package, which includes a short animated film (available online for streaming or download), a lesson plan, and supporting materials, was designed to be used with adolescents ages 15-19 to empower them to seek sexual and reproductive health care, and emphasize the availability of long-acting reversible contraception…

  13. Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, Michele

    2008-01-01

    With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community

  14. Physically active academic lessons in elementary children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, John B; Jowers, Esbelle M

    2011-06-01

    Although schools are an ideal location to conduct interventions that target children, the emphasis on standardized testing makes it difficult to implement interventions that do not directly support academic instruction. In response, physically active academic lessons have been developed as a strategy to increase physical activity while also addressing core educational goals. Texas I-CAN! is one incarnation of this approach. We will review the on-going research on the impact of these active lessons on: teacher implementation, child step count, child attention control, and academic performance. The collected studies support the impact of physically active academic lessons on each area of interest. If these data can be replicated, it suggests that teachers might find these lessons of benefit to their primary role as educators, which should ease dissemination of these and other physically active lessons in elementary schools. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Five Geobrowsing Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, D. G.; Daniels, J.; Tyagi, I.

    2007-12-01

    Virtual globes such as Google Earth or NASA World Wind may be used as is, without KML coding or inclusion of three-dimensional models, to design effective learning experiences. With KML coding and Collada modeling, sophisticated learning objects may be developed. Five examples are presented for interactive demonstration, covering a range of student levels of ability: (i) "Wait, Don't Tell Me!" Students predict locations on the globe given Lat / Lon or UTM data and then confirm their judgments using "Fly to" (ii) "Where on Earth?" Students search for features on the virtual globe given images, data, and/or models. (iii) "Tsunami!" Students react to modeled real-time data feeds and decide whether to issue an natural hazard alert. (iv) "To the Rescue!" Students estimate food, water, and housing needs resulting from a natural disater and plan rescue and relief operations. (v) "Just Map It!" Students overlay their own field data on the virtual terrain and create solid models of geological structures.

  16. Argentina: no lesson learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, Celia; Waitzkin, Howard

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the political, ideological, social, and economic processes by which the Argentinean economy was transformed, the structural consequences, and the policies responsible for dismantling the welfare state. The health care system reform during the 1990s was an important component in accomplishing the last objective. Analyses of the policies adopted after the crisis of 2001 reveal that, despite the discourse against international financial institutions, President Nestor Kirchner, elected in 2002, followed the same approach by accepting and applying the second generation of health reforms recommended by the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank with additional pressure from the World Trade Organization and several free trade agreements. This "new reform" furthered business opportunities for multinational corporations while further shrinking the state administration's role in supplying health, education, and other social services to people who need them more than ever. Social movements have emerged that are developing alternative projects and showing that, when the base is solidarity, "another world is possible."

  17. A Relevant Lesson: Hitler Goes to the Mall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, David

    2003-01-01

    A "Motivation" eliciting the "Aim" of each lesson initiates each lesson in the orthodox "developmental lesson-plan" that has dominated classroom instruction in NYC public schools for at least the past half-century. An action-research study of 38 lesson-plans (over 5 each from 5 teachers) drawn from student-teaching…

  18. Improving Mathematics Teaching as Deliberate Practice through Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongjin; Prince, Kyle M.; Barlow, Angela T.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how a ninth grade teacher improved an Algebra I lesson through a lesson study approach. We used multiple data sources to investigate the improvement of the lesson towards student-centered mathematics instruction, perceived benefits of the teacher, and factors associated with the improvement of teaching. The lesson group…

  19. Lessons from Jerusalem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, Z

    1993-01-01

    The Gihon spring can no longer meet Jerusalem's water needs due to population growth. It provides just a small amount of water to an Arab community near Jerusalem called Silwan. 3 pipelines carry water to Jerusalem from coastal and mountain aquifers whose water tables are falling. A 4th pipeline is being built. Nevertheless, Jerusalem has been able to reduce water use, e.g. water use was lower in 1991 than in 1983, even though its population grew 25%. An engineer from the Department of Water attributed the reduced water use to conservation. The 1987 drought reduced the water in one of the city's main water sources, the Sea of Galilee, to very low levels. City authorities first responded by physically improving the water system, e.g., repairing system blow out valves and reducing water pressure where it was more than 60 m pressure. Next, the department distributed pamphlets on how to adjust household toilets to use less water per flush. The schools replaced all toilets with the new dual system. The city advertised water conservation in newspapers and buses. The department clamped down on industries and businesses using a disproportionate 23% of all water. In 1987. these efforts reduced water consumption 8-10%. A temporary law banned irrigation during the day when evaporation is greatest. The city charged residents more money for water used for gardening. Some residents have switched from grass laws to less thirsty local vegetation. The newness and efficiency of Jerusalem's pumping system and the commitment to replacing leaky pipes also contributes to the city's success. Jerusalem loses only about 10% of its water to leaks while other cities lose 40-60% of its water to leaks. Currently, the department partially subsidizes water-saving kits to be distributed to all households at a cost less than $4. 20% of households now use these kits. The department hopes to add another 40% of households. This holy city could be a water conservation model for all people.

  20. Chernobyl: lessons of the decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to a drastic increase the incidents of thyroid cancer in children living at territories contaminated with radionuclides. The incidents of hemoblastoses which are etiologically closely related to radiation did not change after the incident. The lessons of the decade that passed since the accident necessitate measures aimed at alleviation of the medical consequences of the accident which are to be implemented for many years. The program of such measures should be based on a strictly scientific evaluation of each factor, that will be conductive to a most adequate state financing of this work [ru

  1. Southwest Airlines: lessons in loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Southwest Airlines continues to garner accolades in the areas of customer service, workforce management, and profitability. Since both the health care and airlines industries deal with a service rather than a product, the customer experience depends on the people who deliver that experience. Employees' commitment or "loyalty" to their customers, their employer, and their work translates into millions of dollars of revenue. What employee wants to work for "the worst employer in town?" Nine loyalty lessons from Southwest can be carried over to the health care setting for the benefit of employees and patients.

  2. Existing facilities and past practices: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.; Tonkay, D.W.; Owens, K.

    2000-01-01

    Article 12 of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention) requires parties to the Joint Convention to review the safety of existing radioactive waste management facilities 'to ensure that, if necessary, all reasonably practicable improvements are made to upgrade the safety of such a facility'. Also required is a review of the results of past practices to determine 'whether any intervention is needed for reasons of radiation protection' and to consider whether the benefits of the intervention or remediation are sufficient, with regard to the costs and the impact on workers, the public and the environment. This paper discusses the experience of the United States Department of Energy in terms of the lessons learned from operating radioactive waste management facilities and from undertaking intervention or remedial action, and from decision making in an international context. Overarching safety principles are discussed, including integrating safety into all work practices and minimizing the generation of waste. Safety review lessons learned with existing facilities are discussed with respect to: applying new requirements to old facilities, taking a life-cycle perspective of waste management, improving high level waste facility management, and blending current and past practices with respect to the process used to arrive at decisions for intervention. Special emphasis is placed on the need to provide for early and substantive input from the involved regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, and those citizens and groups with an interest in the decisions. Examples of intervention decisions are discussed, including examples taken from uranium mill tailings operations, from cleanup of a former uranium processing plant site, from evaluation of pre-1970 buried 'transuranic waste' sites, and from decommissioning or closure of high level waste storage tanks. The paper concludes that on the

  3. Creating comics in physics lessons: an educational practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Evonir; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results from an intervention program with 119 students during physics and astronomy lessons. This program has taken place in the public school "Colônia dos Pescadores" in the City of Caraguatatuba, State of São Paulo. The goal is to show the importance and possibility of learning with support materials, either in the classroom or at home,created by the learners themselves. The results show that students can demonstrate their creativity while building up their own knowledge related to Astronomy as they are able to produce comic strips about the theme afterwards.

  4. Incorporating climate change and technology into the science classroom: Lessons from my year as a GK-12 Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    the science class. Armed with a projector, donated and refurbished computers, and occasional use of the Smartboard, we developed curriculum using interactive powerpoints, and lessons involving graduate student research and guest speakers, geolocation, online research and word processing. Most lessons began with a question about climate or geophysical properties. This was followed by a hands-on experiment, demonstration, independent research, or opportunity to design and execute an experiment using given materials. The synthesis portion of the lesson incorporated technology to either type up a report to be posted online, gather elements for a poster or presentation, or complete an interactive quiz. By the end of the year students became proficient with word processing, internet research, and Smartboard use. Pre- and post-tests found a significant improvement in student knowledge about climate change and climate-related issues. Preparing students to address next generation challenges does not stop at teaching students about climate change; rather, we need to teach them the skills they need to succeed in a scientific or policy-oriented field. For most students, especially at this school, accepting the reality of climate change requires personal experience, research, and a confidence in the scientific process that only comes from practicing it directly.

  5. Object lessons: notes on geometry in Norman Allison Calkins’ textbook (Brazil, end of nineteenth century, beginning of twentieth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Magalhães Gomes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary object lessons, by Norman Allison Calkins, ranslated by Rui Barbosa, a book that was widely disseminated in Brazil during the final years of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, presents object teaching as a general method to be used in every subject or primary school. This article analyses Calkins’ book according to its presentation of mathematical content, focusing particularly on geometry lessons. It also iscusses five features of the approach adopted by Calkins: the presentation of plane geometry before geometry in space, the several materials necessary to the teaching of geometry, the drawing lessons associated with the lessons on shape, the sequence of presentation of the contents and the relations between geometry teaching and children’s pleasure and curiosity. Comments about the utilization and circulation of Calkins’ manual in geometry teaching in Brazil are also provided.

  6. Can lessons designed with Gestalt laws of visual perception improve students' understanding of the phases of the moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistisen, Michele

    There has been limited success teaching elementary students about the phases of the moon using diagrams, personal observations, and manipulatives. One possible reason for this is that instruction has failed to apply Gestalt principles of perceptual organization to the lesson materials. To see if fourth grade students' understanding could be improved, four lessons were designed and taught using the Gestalt laws of Figure-Ground, Symmetry, and Similarity. Students (n = 54) who were taught lessons applying the Gestalt principles scored 12% higher on an assessment than students (n = 51) who only were taught lessons using the traditional methods. Though scores showed significant improvement, it is recommended to follow the American Association for the Advancement of Science guidelines and wait until 9th grade to instruct students about the phases.

  7. Developing Pre-Service Teachers' Capacity in Teaching Science with Technology through Microteaching Lesson Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, George; Xu, Judy; Martinovic, Dragana

    2017-01-01

    In order to effectively use technology in teaching, teacher candidates need to develop technology related pedagogical content knowledge through being engaged in a process of discussion, modeling, practice, and reflection. Based on the examination of teacher candidates' lesson plan assignments, observations of their microteaching performance, and…

  8. Control of the cassava mealybug in Africa: lessons from a biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Control of the cassava mealybug in Africa: lessons from a biological control project. ... Such studies are needed in order to attribute the observed effects to various causes and to advance the science of biological control. ( 4) It is concluded that biological control is the basis ofiPM but cannot usually be manipulated by the ...

  9. Classrooms with Growing Room. Playing Smart: Enrichment in the Home. Lessons without Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Lannie

    Three papers by the same author address: (1) educational methods for gifted children in the regular classroom; (2) principles of enriching the gifted child's development in the home; and (3) modifying lessons to optimally challenge gifted students. The first paper is titled, "Classrooms with Growing Room." It stresses the need for gifted children…

  10. ICT AND MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES: LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AND TRAINING NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Davies

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is divided into two main sections. The first section considers why technology has not lived up to its expectations in bringing about improvements in language learning. Many learning opportunities are offered by new technologies but they are not fully exploited, mainly owing to the lack of relevant training offered to teachers. In addition, with the advent of the Web, there is a disturbing trend towards removing the teacher from the learning process - which is simply not acceptable. The second section of the article looks at a website that offers a considerable volume of ICT training materials or language teachers, namely the ICT4LT website: http://www.ict4lt.org. The author examines the aims behind the site as a whole and the pattern of site visits, discussing the key issues and drawing conclusions based on an analysis of the pattern of visits to different modules of the site. Some important lessons have been learned regarding the type of training that teachers appear to need, for example: the continued interest in multimedia and the high demand for introductory courses. It is also evident that Web traffic is predominantly one-way and confined to certain sectors of the world, indicating that much more has to be done in order to stimulate discussion and to make the Web accessible to underserved regions of the world.

  11. Main Findings: Lessons to be Learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This section summarizes the main lessons to be learnt from the workshop: 1 - Workshop Methodology: This method of work has proven to be successful. Participants appreciated the high level of interaction with the other colleagues, especially in view of the variety of expertise that was represented at the workshop. The method also affords the participants the opportunity to learn about the status of waste management in the host country, and to come into contact with the main actors. Conversely, the method also affords the host country programme added visibility at the international level. 2 - National Regulations and International Guidance and Bases for Criteria and Regulatory Judgement: There is reasonable consensus amongst national regulations on fundamental regulatory objectives, but much less agreement on the most appropriate criteria. Consensus is nationally and internationally hampered by the lack of common definition of concepts and terms. International guidance is interpreted in different ways in each country. International guidance is rather difficult to interpret, understand and apply. It is important that stakeholders understand the bases for regulatory judgements. 3 - Optimisation: The fundamental goals of optimisation need to be clarified. Optimisation of long-term vs. short-term safety remains problematic. The process of performing optimisation is more important than the numerical or scientific result. A transparent, stepwise and iterative process of decision making is essential for optimisation. The basic, broad rules for decision making and involvement of stakeholders need to be defined in advance. 4 - Technical Indicators for Safe Performance: The relative importance of different safety indicators varies with timescale. There is still much to be done before reaching consensus on the relative importance of different time frames. More discussion is needed on time cut-offs for regulatory compliance. More discussion on the meaning and applicability of

  12. Intergenerational Lessons and 'Fabulous Stories'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewenson, Sandra B; Welch, Cathryne A; Hassmiller, Susan B

    2015-10-01

    While directing the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, Susan B. Hassmiller, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's senior adviser for nursing, realized the value that nursing history could bring to the campaign. She decided to interview her mother, Jacqueline J. Wouwenberg, a 1947 graduate of the Bellevue Hospital School of Nursing, in order to better understand and contextualize changes that had occurred in the nursing profession during the 20th century. In collaboration with nurse historians Cathryne A. Welch and Sandra B. Lewenson, Hassmiller participated in interviewing her mother and was also interviewed herself. The stories that emerged revealed a great deal: each woman had found that nursing had given them countless opportunities that reflected the time periods in which they lived. Wouwenberg's experiences, transmitted to Hassmiller through words and actions, also served as important lessons for her daughter. This article shares five lessons: be independent and courageous, know that nursing has no bounds, follow your passion, honor diversity, and give back. It also asks readers to reflect on the relevance of nurses' work from one generation to the next..

  13. Lessons Learned for Decommissioning Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Wook; Kim, Young-gook; Kim, Hee-keun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the U.S. nuclear industrial's some key lessons learned especially for decommissioning planning based on which well informed decommissioning planning can be carried out. For a successful decommissioning, it is crucial to carry out a well-organized decommissioning planning before the decommissioning starts. This paper discussed four key factors which should be decided or considered carefully during the decommissioning planning period with introduction of related decommissioning lessons learned of U.S. nuclear industry. Those factors which have been discussed in this paper include the end state of a site, the overall decommissioning strategy, the management of the spent fuels, and the spent fuel pool island. Among them, the end state of a site should be decided first as it directs the whole decommissioning processes. Then, decisions on the overall decommissioning strategy (DECON vs. SAFSTOR) and the management of the spent fuels (wet vs. dry) should follow. Finally, the spent fuel pool island should be given due consideration because its implementation will result in much cost saving. Hopefully, the results of this paper would provide useful inputs to performing the decommissioning planing for the Kori unit 1

  14. Needs in Research and Development on materials for the gas coolant nuclear system: HTR/VHTR and GFR; Besoins en R et D sur les materiaux pour les systemes nucleaires a caloporteur gaz: HTR/VHTR et GFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billot, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dir. du Developpement et de l' Innovation Nucleares (DEN/DDIN), 91 - Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    This presentation takes stock on the materials for high temperature reactors HTR (850 C), very high temperature VHTR(>1000 C) and fast neutrons high temperature GGF(850 C). It concerns the welding materials for the vessel, Ni-based superalloys for gas turbines, coatings, graphite, ceramics and corrosion studies. (A.L.B.)

  15. Health Care Consumerism: Lessons My 401(k) Plan Taught Me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Allen T

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the U.S. health care system are here. As we think about how individuals will pay for health care--while actively employed and while retired--our experiences with 401(k) plans provide some valuable lessons. In order to support employees in this new health care world--a challenge arguably more daunting than the 401(k) challenge we faced 20 years ago--some very different types of support are needed. Employers should consider providing their employees with the resources to manage health care changes.

  16. Science and Technology awareness for preschool children: Practical lessons and experiences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available the “success” = enjoyed the class. Before each lesson started each child were asked to choose a face on the paper and write his/her name below their choice. The choices were: Are you happy, tired sick or sad? After each lesson the children had... to try again, are not happy with the first attempt etc.) • Observations can be captured by making use of drawings of the results of an experiment or of what they built. At first they might not want to because it is a skill that they still need...

  17. Moving Forward with Lessons Learned About Long-term Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, Elizabeth; Dalton, John

    2006-01-01

    A range of lessons have been identified from previous attempts to implement long term radioactive waste management policy in the UK and internationally. Many of these relate to the way the decision-making process is undertaken and the fact that there needs to be an open, transparent process that enables continuous stakeholder involvement. Nirex believes that using the SEA and EIA frameworks will help to incorporate the lessons learned into the future decision-making process relating to long-term radioactive waste management

  18. Moving Forward with Lessons Learned About Long-term Radioactive Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atherton, Elizabeth; Dalton, John [UK Nirex Ltd., Harwell (United Kingdom)

    2006-09-15

    A range of lessons have been identified from previous attempts to implement long term radioactive waste management policy in the UK and internationally. Many of these relate to the way the decision-making process is undertaken and the fact that there needs to be an open, transparent process that enables continuous stakeholder involvement. Nirex believes that using the SEA and EIA frameworks will help to incorporate the lessons learned into the future decision-making process relating to long-term radioactive waste management.

  19. THE ROLE OF REVIEW MATERIAL IN CONTINUOUS PROGRAMMING WITH TEACHING MACHINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FERSTER, C.B.

    STUDENTS WERE PRESENTED 61 LESSONS BY MEANS OF SEMIAUTOMATIC TEACHING MACHINES. LESSONS WERE ARRANGED SO THAT EACH PARTICIPATING STUDENT STUDIED PART OF THE COURSE MATERIAL WITH A SINGLE REPETITION AND PART WITHOUT REPETITION. DATA WERE OBTAINED FROM TWO TESTS SHOWING TEACHING-MACHINE RESULTS AND ONE FINAL COURSE EXAMINATION. NO SIGNIFICANT…

  20. Teaching about Contemporary Germany: Instructional Materials for the Social Studies Classroom. Correlation Charts, Content and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Glen

    This manual contains a description of each of the instructional kits for teaching about Germany offered by the Goethe Institute. Each kit contains lessons plans, handouts, worksheets, color transparencies, and other support materials. This teaching packet provides information regarding the "best fit" of each lesson in the instructional…

  1. Adapting Features from the SIOP Component: Lesson Delivery to English Lessons in a Colombian Public School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rativa Murillo Hollman Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite some school efforts to offer students the best second language learning, English language lessons are often taught with an overuse of the mother tongue. Hence, an action research project was conducted in order to discover how to adapt some features of the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP component: Lesson delivery, for the teaching of English in sixth grade at a public school in Bogotá, Colombia. Data collection included observation checklists, field notes, surveys and artifacts. The findings demonstrated that the overuse of Spanish–the students’ mother tongue–was reduced when in addition to implementing the lesson delivery component, the teacher developed vocabulary activities. Finally, it was suggested that teachers have SIOP training for teaching content andto focus more on students needs.A pesar de algunos esfuerzos para ofrecer a los estudiantes un mejor aprendizaje de una segunda lengua, a menudo se recurre al uso excesivo de la lengua materna en las clases de inglés. Con el objetivo de hallar la forma de adaptar algunas características del componente del protocolo deobservación SIOP para la instrucción ‘Sheltered’: Desarrollo de clase, para la enseñanza de inglés en grado séptimo, se realiz�� un proyecto de investigación acción en un colegio público en Bogotá, Colombia. En la recolección de datos se emplearon formatos de observación, notas de campo,cuestionarios y evidencias documentales. Los resultados demostraron que el uso excesivo de español –la lengua materna de los estudiantes– se redujo porque además de la implementación del componente Desarrollo de clase, se llevaron a cabo actividades de vocabulario. Con esta investigación se sugiere que los profesores adquieran conocimientos acerca del citado modelo para la enseñanza de contenidos, y que se enfoquen más en las necesidades de los estudiantes.

  2. Media advocacy: lessons from community experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, D H; Wright, P A

    1996-01-01

    Media advocacy is the strategic use of mass media and community organizing as a resource for advancing a social or public policy initiative. Across the United States, communities are using media advocacy to promote healthier public policies and environments. The U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention commissioned numerous case studies of media advocacy on alcohol and tobacco issues in a diverse array of communities, including efforts in African-American and Latino communities or using computer-based electronic communication systems. The paper describes these efforts briefly, and summarizes lessons learned, including: media advocacy can lead to larger victories when used as a complement to community organizing in the context of a larger strategic vision for policy change; like policy advocacy, media advocacy is best done in the context of clear long-term goals; conscious framing, guiding the choice of spokespeople, visuals, and messages, can alter media coverage and public debate of health policies; advocates need to respect the media but also remember that they have power in relation to the media; and media advocacy is often controversial and not suited to every situation. The case studies show that media advocacy is a potent tool for public health workers, making an important contribution to campaigns to promote healthier public policies.

  3. Marketing healthcare: lessons for smaller hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, N R

    2000-02-01

    Recently, I have noted ubiquitous trends that lead me to conclude that we are on the brink of a fundamental change in the structure of healthcare delivery. Hospitals are changing. The hospital, that enduring and pervasive organization, which for decades has delivered the vast majority of acute care services is being re-conceptualized. Administrators and executives in today's hospitals are beginning to recognize the disaffection of constituents and the necessity to change from placing their own agenda or that of their profession over the needs of the customer. A lesson that is increasingly being heeded, particularly by the leading hospitals, is that a belief in one's own importance or a feeling of invulnerability represents an anachronistic stance. No hospital today can afford to retain a view that it is more important than the patients it serves, or that it is invulnerable. The external pressures are already clear--the actors, factors and forces in the external environment are forcing hospitals to re-evaluate efficiency, effectiveness and delivery arrangements. The rise to prominence of the outcomes movement is part of this trend. The present study was an attempt to assess the practices and trends in the modern smaller hospitals as a part of their strategy to match the competitive pressures.

  4. Value-Based Requirements Traceability: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egyed, Alexander; Grünbacher, Paul; Heindl, Matthias; Biffl, Stefan

    Traceability from requirements to code is mandated by numerous software development standards. These standards, however, are not explicit about the appropriate level of quality of trace links. From a technical perspective, trace quality should meet the needs of the intended trace utilizations. Unfortunately, long-term trace utilizations are typically unknown at the time of trace acquisition which represents a dilemma for many companies. This chapter suggests ways to balance the cost and benefits of requirements traceability. We present data from three case studies demonstrating that trace acquisition requires broad coverage but can tolerate imprecision. With this trade-off our lessons learned suggest a traceability strategy that (1) provides trace links more quickly, (2) refines trace links according to user-defined value considerations, and (3) supports the later refinement of trace links in case the initial value consideration has changed over time. The scope of our work considers the entire life cycle of traceability instead of just the creation of trace links.

  5. Lessons learned in NEPA public involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.D.; Glore, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    'In recent years Uncle Sam has been asking citizens for their help in improving the environment. The government is learning that with public input it can better prioritize environmental problems and more effectively direct limited funding.' The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), like many other government regulations, is a 'living law.' Although there are agency and Council guidelines, it is practical application, based on past practices and case law that refines the Act's broad concepts. The specifics of how to meet requirements are constantly being honed and melded to fit the unique situational needs of an agency, a project, or a public. This fluidity presents a challenge for stakeholder involvement activities. Communication practioners and project managers may have room for creativity and customized approaches, but they also find less than clear direction on what it takes to successfully avoid challenges of non-compliance. Because of the continuing uncertainty on how to involve the public meaningfully, it is vital to share important lessons learned from NEPA projects. The following practical suggestions are derived primarily from experiences with the Department of Energy's first ever complex-wide and site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS)-the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS (SNF ampersand INEL EIS)

  6. Interdisciplinary Climate Change Curriculum Materials based on the Next Generation Science Standards and The Earth Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A.; Robertson, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2012, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies' reported that one of the major issues associated with the development of climate change curriculum was the lack of interdisciplinary materials that also promoted a correlation between science standards and content. Therefore, in order to respond to this need, our group has developed an interdisciplinary climate change curriculum that has had as its fundamental basis the alignment with the guidelines presented by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the ones presented by the international document entitled The Earth Charter. In this regards, while the alignment with NGSS disciplinary core ideas, cross-concepts and students' expectations intended to fulfill the need for the development of climate change curriculum activities that were directly associated with the appropriate set of NGSS guidelines, the alignment with The Earth Charter document intended to reinforce the need the for the integration of sociological, philosophical and intercultural analysis of the theme 'climate change'. Additionally, our curriculum was also developed as part of a collaborative project between climate scientists and engineers, who are responsible for the development of a Regional Arctic Simulation Model (RASM). Hence, another important curriculum constituent was the feedback, suggestions and reviews provided by these professionals, who have also contributed to these pedagogical materials' scientific accuracy by facilitating the integration of datasets and visualizations developed by RASM. Furthermore, our group has developed a climate change curriculum for two types of audience: high school and early undergraduate students. Each curriculum unit is divided into modules and each module contains a set of lesson plans. The topics selected to compose each unit and module were designated according to the surveys conducted with scientists and engineers involved with the development of the climate change

  7. Safety Requirements / Design Criteria for SFR. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yllera, Javier

    2013-01-01

    After the Fukushima event (March 2011) the IAEA has started an action to review and revise, if necessary, all Safety Standards to take into consideration the lessons learned from the accident. The Safety Standards that need to be revised have been identified. A Prioritization Approach has been established: The first priority is to review safety guides applicable for NPPs and spent fuel storage with focus on the measures for the prevention and mitigation of severe accident due to external hazards - ● Regulatory framework, Safety assessment, Management system, Radiation protection and Emergency Preparedness and response; ● Sitting, Design, Operation of NPPs ● Decommissioning and Waste Management. Original sources for lessons learned: IAE fact Finding Mission, Japan´s report to the Ministerial Conference, INSAG Report, etc. Later, other lesson sources considered

  8. Lessons Learned in Pilot Testing Specialty Consultations to Benefit Individuals with Lower Limb Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elnitsky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Telerehabilitation technologies enable the delivery of rehabilitation services from providers to people with disabilities as well as specialty care consultations. This article discusses the barriers experienced when planning and pilot testing a telerehabilitation multi-site specialty consultation for specialists in their medical centers, and the lessons learned. The barriers included integration and participation, coordination across organizational units, and privacy and information security. Lessons learned included the need for collaboration across multiple departments, telerehabilitation equipment back-ups, and anonymous and private communication protocols. Despite delays resulting from coordination at multiple levels of a national organization, we developed a program plan and successfully implemented a pilot test of the southeast region program.  Specialty consultation using telerehabilitation delivery methods requires identifying provider preferences for technological features. Lessons learned could inform development of outpatient telerehabilitation for patients with amputations and studies of patients and providers involved in telerehabilitation.

  9. Safety considerations for graphene: lessons learnt from carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy, Cyrill; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-03-19

    Many consider carbon nanomaterials the poster children of nanotechnology, attracting immense scientific interest from many disciplines and offering tremendous potential in a diverse range of applications due to their extraordinary properties. Graphene is the youngest in the family of carbon nanomaterials. Its isolation, description, and mass fabrication has followed that of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. Graphene's development and its adoption by many industries will increase unintended or intentional human exposure, creating the need to determine its safety profile. In this Account, we compare the lessons learned from the development of carbon nanotubes with what is known about graphene, based on our own investigations and those of others. Despite both being carbon-based, nanotubes and graphene are two very distinct nanomaterials. We consider the key physicochemical characteristics (structure, surface, colloidal properties) for graphene and carbon nanotubes at three different physiological levels: cellular, tissue, and whole body. We summarize the evidence for health effects of both materials at all three levels. Overall, graphene and its derivatives are characterized by a lower aspect ratio, larger surface area, and better dispersibility in most solvents compared to carbon nanotubes. Dimensions, surface chemistry, and impurities are equally important for graphene and carbon nanotubes in determining both mechanistic (aggregation, cellular processes, biodistribution, and degradation kinetics) and toxicological outcomes. Colloidal dispersions of individual graphene sheets (or graphene oxide and other derivatives) can easily be engineered without metallic impurities, with high stability and less aggregation. Very importantly, graphene nanostructures are not fiber-shaped. These features theoretically offer significant advantages in terms of safety over inhomogeneous dispersions of fiber-shaped carbon nanotubes. However, studies that directly compare graphene with

  10. Calibration Lessons Learned from Hyperion Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casement, S.; Ho, K.; Sandor-Leahy, S.; Biggar, S.; Czapla-Myers, J.; McCorkel, J.; Thome, K.

    2009-12-01

    The use of hyperspectral imagers to provide climate-quality data sets, such as those expected from the solar reflective sensor on the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), requires stringent radiometric calibration requirements. These stringent requirements have been nearly met with broadband radiometers such as CERES, but high resolution spectrometers pose additional challenges. A review of the calibration processes for past space-based HSIs provide guidance on the calibration processes that will be needed for future sensors. In November 2000, the Earth Observer-1 (EO-1) platform was launched onboard a Boeing Delta II launch vehicle. The primary purpose of the EO-1 mission was to provide a technological testbed for spaceborne components. The platform has three sensors onboard, of which, the hyperspectral imager (HSI) Hyperion, is discussed here. The Hyperion sensor at the time had no comparable sensor in earth orbit, being the first grating-based, hyperspectral, civilian sensor in earth orbit. Ground and on-orbit calibration procedures including all cross-calibration activities have achieved an estimated instrument absolute radiometric error of 2.9% in the Visible channel (0.4 - 1.0 microns) and 3.4% in the shortwave infrared (SWIR, 0.9 - 2.5 microns) channel (EO-1/Hyperion Early Orbit Checkout Report Part II On-Orbit Performance Verification and Calibration). This paper describes the key components of the Hyperion calibration process that are applicable to future HSI missions. The pre-launch methods relied on then newly-developed, detector-based methods. Subsequent vicarious methods including cross-calibration with other sensors and the reflectance-based method showed significant differences from the prelaunch calibration. Such a difference demonstrated the importance of the vicarious methods as well as pointing to areas for improvement in the prelaunch methods. We also identify areas where lessons learned from Hyperion regarding

  11. Lessons from Vesta and Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Jaumann, R.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Nathues, A.; Prettyman, T.; Capria, M. T.; Pieters, C.; McFadden, L.; Ammannito, E.; Sykes, M. V.; McCord, T. B.; Zuber, M.; Smith, D.; Hoffman, M.; Scully, J. E. C.; Buczkowski, D.

    2014-04-01

    When first discovered, the bodies in the asteroid belt were considered the missing planet(s) between Mars and Jupiter. When their small size and large number become realized, they were deemed to be minor planets and then asteroids. They soon were considered to be simply airless bodies, consisting mostly of rocky material, some having iron cores. When Dawn reached Vesta, this picture was initially largely reinforced by the extensive southern basin and the battered northern hemisphere. A more accurate picture arises, using the color filters of the Framing Camera, in coordination with the nearinfrared spectrometer, revealing a diverse surface with different minerals and processes affecting regions on the surface in various ways. The variegated light and dark material and varying thermal properties indicate a complex surface. The water (OH) content of the surface is far from uniform. Examinations of the floors of Marcia and Cornelia revealed pits, and their crater walls have possibly water-carved gullies. The parent craters appear to have been formed in a wet surface, possibly ice melted in the crater-forming event. Figure 1 shows the latest mosaic of the vestan surface with the currently approved names for the surface features. It had been expected that olivine would be excavated in the southern basin but it was not to be found there. Surprisingly, patches of olivine-rich material were discovered in the north. Doubts arose as to whether a magma ocean hypothesis applies to Vesta, in spite of quantifying the mass of its core, and new ways to explain Vesta's petrogenesis were developed. Closer examination of the surface suggested more interesting scenarios, possible excavation of early volcanic materials, odd craters that seemed impossible to form with simple impacts, and a long ribbon of material stretching diagonally across the surface, possibly originating in the Marcia ejecta blanket. The relative youth of some of these features (ca 50 Ma) suggest Vesta has had

  12. Materials accounting software for evaluation of inventory differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.R.; Hafer, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    As a consequence of facility efforts to better understand inventory differences (IDs) and the desire to comply with related regulatory requirements, propagation of uncertainties has received much attention in recent years. This paper reviews several issues regarding software for ID evaluation. Some of these issues are generic (e.g., the importance of identifying individual measured values and individual special nuclear material items by name and the generality needed to handle a wide variety of accounting problems) and others are facility-specific (e.g., interfacing the facility's database to a variance propagation engine and subsequent uses of that engine). In this paper the history of a Los Alamos engine, MAWST, is briefly reviewed and some of the lessons learned during its development are described. Major hurdles to implementation do not involve shortcomings in software or in statistical theory

  13. Lessons learned from the decommissioning of NORM facility in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontol, Khairuddin M.; Omar, Muhamat; Ahmad, Syed H.S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Malaysia Decommissioning of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) facility in Malaysia will run into unforeseeable complications and difficulties if there is no proper planning. The Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) plays important role in guiding and assisting the operator/contractor in this NORM decommissioning project. A local Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) processing plant located in the northern region of peninsular Malaysia had ceased its operations and decided to decommission and remediate its site for the final release of the site. The remediated site is earmarked as an industrial site. During its operations, monazites are processed for rare earth elements such as cerium and lanthanum. It's plant capable of processing monazite to produce rare earth chloride and rare earth carbonate. The main by-product of monazite processing is the radioactive cake containing primarily thorium hydroxide. Operation of the monazite processing plant started in early eighties and terminated in early nineties. The decommissioning of the plant site started in late 2003 and completed its decommissioning and remediation works in early 2006. This paper described the lesson learned by Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in conducting third party independent audit for the decommissioning of the NORM contaminated facility. By continuously reviewing the lessons learned, mistakes and/or inefficiencies in this plant decommissioning project, hopefully will result in a smoother, less costly and more productive future decommissioning works on NORM facilities in Malaysia. (author)

  14. Lessons learned by southern states in designating alternative routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the ''lessons learned'' by the five states within the southem region that have designated alternative or preferred routes under the regulations of the Department of Transportation (DOT) established for the transportation of radioactive materials. The document was prepared by reviewing applicable federal laws and regulations, examining state reports and documents and contacting state officials and routing agencies involved in making routing decisions. In undertaking this project, the Southern States Energy Board hopes to reveal the process used by states that have designated alternative routes and thereby share their experiences (i.e., lessons learned) with other southern states that have yet to make designations. Under DOT regulations (49 CFR 177.826), carriers of highway route controlled quantities of radioactive materials (which include spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste) must use preferred routes selected to reduce time in transit. Such preferred routes consist of (1) an interstate system highway with use of an interstate system bypass or beltway around cities when available, and (2) alternate routes selected by a ''state routing agency.''

  15. Lessons from Fukushima for Improving the Safety of Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    The March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant has revealed serious vulnerabilities in the design, operation and regulation of nuclear power plants. While some aspects of the accident were plant- and site-specific, others have implications that are broadly applicable to the current generation of nuclear plants in operation around the world. Although many of the details of the accident progression and public health consequences are still unclear, there are a number of lessons that can already be drawn. The accident demonstrated the need at nuclear plants for robust, highly reliable backup power sources capable of functioning for many days in the event of a complete loss of primary off-site and on-site electrical power. It highlighted the importance of detailed planning for severe accident management that realistically evaluates the capabilities of personnel to carry out mitigation operations under extremely hazardous conditions. It showed how emergency plans rooted in the assumption that only one reactor at a multi-unit site would be likely to experience a crisis fail miserably in the event of an accident affecting multiple reactor units simultaneously. It revealed that alternate water injection following a severe accident could be needed for weeks or months, generating large volumes of contaminated water that must be contained. And it reinforced the grim lesson of Chernobyl: that a nuclear reactor accident could lead to widespread radioactive contamination with profound implications for public health, the economy and the environment. While many nations have re-examined their policies regarding nuclear power safety in the months following the accident, it remains to be seen to what extent the world will take the lessons of Fukushima seriously and make meaningful changes in time to avert another, and potentially even worse, nuclear catastrophe.

  16. Lessons of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.; Xavier, A.M.; Heilbron, P.F.L.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of the lessons teamed from the radiological accident of Goiania, actions are described which a nuclear regulatory body should undertake while responding to an accident of this nature. (author)

  17. Why Gallipoli Matters: Interpreting Different Lessons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, John

    2003-01-01

    ...? Divergent views from the lessons of Gallipoli campaign are the result of three differing operational approaches to strategic considerations that Britain and the Unites States faced in the l92Os and l93Os...

  18. Energy deregulation: lessons from the American experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiam, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of US energy regulation, considers some of the important issues arising from the US experience and finally, suggests some lessons which Australia might draw from the US deregulation of energy industries. 5 refs

  19. Planning geometry lessons with learning platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborg, Andreas Lindenskov

    mathematics teachers’ joint planning of a lesson in geometry with a learning platform called Meebook is analyzed using the instrumental approach. It is concluded that the interface in Meebook orients the teachers work toward what the students should do rather than what they should learn, although the latter......This paper investigates how mathematics teachers plan lessons with a recently implemented Danish learning platform designed to support teachers in planning lessons in line with a recent objective-oriented curriculum. Drawing on data from observations of and interviews with teachers, three...... is a key intention behind the implementation of the platform. It is also concluded that when the teachers succeed in using learning objectives actively in their planning, the objectives support the teachers in designing lessons that correspond with their intentions. The paper concludes with a discussion...

  20. Lessons from World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Scales Avery

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of World War I is reviewed, starting with a discussion of the development of nationalist movements in Europe. It is pointed out that the global disaster started with a seemingly small operation by Austria, which escalated uncontrollably into an all-destroying conflagration. A striking feature of the war was that none of the people who started it had any idea of what it would be like. Technology had changed the character of war, but old patterns of thought remained in place. We also examine the roots of the war in industrial and colonial competition, and in an arms race. Finally, parallels with current events, and the important lessons for today’s world are discussed.

  1. WPPSS debacle: explanations and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Principal explanations for the WPPSS events to date can be more or less satisfactorily derived. Five explanations appear to dominate: (1) the long and previously successful history of public power in the Pacific Northwest; (2) overoptimism by architect/engineers and consulting engineers about construction costs and construction durations; (3) laxness by bond counsel in scrutinizing and disclosing potential legal impediments to the various transactions involved; (4) WPPSS easy access to capital markets, combined with naivete in those markets; and (5) the inability of WPPSS to manage and oversee the construction process. This paper explains the specific reasons for, and the importance of, each of these five explanations for the WPPSS debacle. It then develops lessons and conclusions for the future which can be derived from this debacle. 12 references

  2. Lessons learned from external hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinador, Miguel; Zerger, Benoit [European Commisison Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Ramos, Manuel Martin [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Brussels (Belgium). Nuclear Safety and Security Coordination; Wattrelos, Didier [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maqua, Michael [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents a study performed by the European Clearinghouse of the Joint Research Centre on Operational Experience for nuclear power plants in cooperation with IRSN and GRS covering events reported by nuclear power plants in relation to external hazards. It summarizes the review of 235 event reports from 3 different databases. The events were grouped in 9 categories according to the nature of the external hazard involved, and the specific lessons learned and recommendations that can be derived from each of these categories are presented. Additional 'cross-cutting' recommendations covering several or all the external hazards considered are also discussed. These recommendations can be useful in preventing this type of events from happening again or in limiting their consequences. The study was launched in 2010 and therefore it does not cover the Fukushima event. This paper presents the main findings and recommendations raised by this study. (orig.)

  3. Lessons learned: wrong intraocular lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Oliver D; Banta, James T; Chen, Teresa C; Pritzker, Scott; Schachat, Andrew P

    2012-10-01

    To report cases involving the placement of the wrong intraocular lens (IOL) at the time of cataract surgery where human error occurred. Retrospective small case series, convenience sample. Seven surgical cases. Institutional review of errors committed and subsequent improvements to clinical protocols. Lessons learned and changes in procedures adapted. The pathways to a wrong IOL are many but largely reflect some combination of poor surgical team communication, transcription error, lack of preoperative clarity in surgical planning or failure to match the patient, and IOL calculation sheet with 2 unique identifiers. Safety in surgery involving IOLs is enhanced both by strict procedures, such as an IOL-specific "time-out," and the fostering of a surgical team culture in which all members are encouraged to voice questions and concerns. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Design, Discovery and Growth of Novel Materials For Basic Research: An Urgent U.S. Need Report on the DOE/BES Workshop: “Future Directions of Design, Discovery and Growth of Single Crystals for Basic Research”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfield, Paul [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-10-10

    The design, discovery and growth of novel materials, especially in single crystal form, represents a national core competency that is essential for scientific progress and long-term economic growth. Indeed, many of the major discoveries of condensed matter science during the last fifty years have been made possible by the discovery of new materials. Recently revealed phenomena such as high Tc superconductivity and the quantum Hall effect, for example, represent new states of matter that emerge from the collective behavior of large numbers of electronic, magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. Such materials challenge our fundamental understanding of matter and provide novel materials functionality. New materials also lie at the core of many new and existing technologies, such as semiconductor electronics, solid state lasers, radiation detectors, compact disk storage, both cellular and optical communications, solar cells, fuel cells and catalysts. Such materials further hold the promise for new technologies ranging from efficient indoor and traffic lighting, to multi-component data storage, integrated bioelectronic sensors, and thermoelectric power generation. Single crystals are often required to achieve a materials’ full functionality as well as to completely elucidate its properties. A Department-of-Energy-sponsored workshop was held on Oct. 10-12, 2003 in Ames, Iowa with the purpose of assessing the state of novel materials and crystal growth in the U.S. Leaders of broad areas of synthesis and condensed matter science reviewed present U.S. strengths, levels of support, and competition from abroad. The principal finding of the workshop is that the current U.S. infrastructure and personnel levels are insufficient to meet the growing demand for high quality, specialized samples, and to maintain international competitiveness in an area vital to the nation’s condensed matter science enterprise. We further risk being unable to fully exploit the nation’s world

  5. Chinese Lessons from Other Peoples’ Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    as the lessons “not learned” or not adopted, the so-called “ dogs that do not bark.” While it may be difficult to parse real lessons learned from...under the barrel of the Type 95 5.8mm assault rifle. There is no muzzle brake or flash suppressor fitted and it is fed from a box magazine that

  6. Sea materials experimental plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This Seal Materials Performance Test Plan describes the plan for testing materials that will be used to seal a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The need for sealing and backfilling the repository and the use of various sealing materials are described. The seal materials include mined salt backfills, cementitious bulkheads and plugs, and earthen backfills. The laboratory testing program for characterizing the behavior and performance of these materials is described. This report includes plans for screening materials, evaluating candidate materials to be tested, and testing a representative set of materials

  7. With Interest It Comes To...Unconscionable Clauses in Sales Contracts. A Student's Lesson Plan [and] A Teacher's Lesson Plan [and] A Lawyer's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Estelle; And Others

    One of a series of secondary level teaching units presenting case studies with pro and con analysis of particular legal problems, the document presents a student's lesson plan, a teacher's lesson plan, and a lawyer's lesson plan on unconscionable clauses in sales contracts. The unit acquaints students with the operation of sales contracts and…

  8. Analysing the Integration of Engineering in Science Lessons with the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Karen; Daugherty, Jenny L.; Custer, Rodney L.; Ross, Julia M.

    2017-01-01

    Science teachers are being called on to incorporate engineering practices into their classrooms. This study explores whether the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric, a new rubric designed to target best practices in engineering education, could be used to evaluate the extent to which engineering is infused into online science lessons. Eighty lessons…

  9. Beautiful Beads: A Lesson in Making Beads with Friendly Clay. AMACO[R] Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harriet; Gamble, David

    This lesson resource includes a brief summary of the history of bead making and historic fascination with beads as adornment. A focus on design elements, color theory, craftsmanship, and technical skill in bead making is encouraged. The plan includes lesson goals and objectives; background preparation; a glossary of terms; a list of supplies; and…

  10. A Lesson about the Circular Flow. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Janet

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate grade level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subjects; instructional objectives; time…

  11. Generating Local Needs through Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    á Rogvi, Sofie; Juul, Annegrete; Langstrup, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The rhetoric of need is commonplace in discourses of technology and innovation, as well as in global health. Users are said to have a need for innovative technology, and citizens in resource-poor regions to have a need for improved healthcare. In this article we follow a global health technology....... With this focus on the interrelations among technological innovation, local needs, and comparisons across global distances, we aim to contribute to critical discussions of the prospects of traveling technologies for global health, as well as drawing attention to the recipient’s agency in (re)shaping the capacity......—more specifically, a piece of software for monitoring diabetes quality—from Denmark, where it was developed, to Jakarta, Indonesia, where it was introduced in 2012–13. Using ethnographic material, we show how the need for a specific technology is constituted through the very process of moving a technology from one...

  12. Material characterization models and test methods for historic building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tessa Kvist; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele; Møller, Eva B.

    2017-01-01

    Predictions of long term hygrothermal performance can be assessed by dynamic hygrothermal simulations, in which material parameters are crucial input. Material parameters for especially historic materials are often unknown; therefore, there is a need to determine important parameters, and simple...

  13. Experience and lessons learnt from clearance in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Clearance is an important corner-stone of waste management in nuclear installations in Germany. It has been practised successfully for around two decades. The importance of clearance can also be judged from the fact that it has been included detailedly in the new German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Currently, there are 19 NPPs and a number of fuel cycle installations in operation in Germany. The main waste quantities, however, arise from the dismantling of NPPs and fuel cycle installations which are currently in decommissioning. As most of the decommissioning projects are targeted for early dismantling instead of safe enclosure, there is already considerable experience with the application of clearance procedures and verification of clearance levels. The German waste management strategy is governed by two options: Clearance of the material (after decontamination and release measurement). After clearance, the material is no longer regarded as radioactive in a legal sense. Final disposal of the material as radioactive waste in a deep geological repository (no near-surface disposal facilities exist or are planned in Germany). A deep geological repository is planned to be operable around 2030. Stefan Thierfeldt described German clearance requirements and lessons learned from their application to decommissioning of power reactors. The great majority of the waste was in fact recycled, although the costs were dominated by the small fraction that had to be disposed of as radioactive waste. Among the lessons learned from the German experience were some revealing insights into the public perception of both clearance and of recycling of material from decommissioning of a nuclear installation

  14. Boosting innovation in the water sector--the role and lessons learned from collaborative projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, H; Coelho, S T; Feliciano, J F; Matos, R

    2015-01-01

    A key worldwide challenge in most sectors is to boost the effective adoption of innovation, as underpinned by the new European Union research programme Horizon 2020, which focuses on increasing innovation in Europe from 2014 to 2020. This is particularly relevant in the water sector, often perceived as conservative and averse to change. This paper discusses the role that collaborative knowledge-transfer projects can play in effectively rolling out R&D in the water industry. LNEC (Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil) has designed a structured model based on a phased programme and a network of utilities and researchers. The paper presents the core principles, the rationale, the model and methods used, and the theoretical background, as well as the project's impact, outcomes and products. The discussion highlights the lessons learnt and provides a formal analysis of the advantages of focusing on middle management as an effective entry point, even if innovation is needed across the organization. Making training materials, guidelines, use cases, data and software publicly available after the project's end has proven to have a decisive multiplying effect. The paper also argues in favour of the collaborative model as a basis for R&D sustainability, and details on-going and planned developments.

  15. Public Access to Digital Material; A Call to Researchers: Digital Libraries Need Collaboration across Disciplines; Greenstone: Open-Source Digital Library Software; Retrieval Issues for the Colorado Digitization Project's Heritage Database; Report on the 5th European Conference on Digital Libraries, ECDL 2001; Report on the First Joint Conference on Digital Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Brewster; Prelinger, Rick; Jackson, Mary E.; Boyack, Kevin W.; Wylie, Brian N.; Davidson, George S.; Witten, Ian H.; Bainbridge, David; Boddie, Stefan J.; Garrison, William A.; Cunningham, Sally Jo; Borgman, Christine L.; Hessel, Heather

    2001-01-01

    These six articles discuss various issues relating to digital libraries. Highlights include public access to digital materials; intellectual property concerns; the need for collaboration across disciplines; Greenstone software for construction and presentation of digital information collections; the Colorado Digitization Project; and conferences…

  16. Looking within and beyond the community: lessons learned by researching, theorising and acting to address urban poverty and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, Darrin; Chamberlain, Kerry; Tankel, Yadena; Groot, Shiloh

    2014-01-01

    Urban poverty and health inequalities are inextricably intertwined. By working in partnership with service providers and communities to address urban poverty, we can enhance the wellness of people in need. This article reflects on lessons learned from the Family100 project that explores the everyday lives, frustrations and dilemmas faced by 100 families living in poverty in Auckland. Lessons learned support the need to bring the experiences and lived realities of families to the fore in public deliberations about community and societal responses to urban poverty and health inequality.

  17. Analysing the integration of engineering in science lessons with the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Karen; Daugherty, Jenny L.; Custer, Rodney L.; Ross, Julia M.

    2017-09-01

    Science teachers are being called on to incorporate engineering practices into their classrooms. This study explores whether the Engineering-Infused Lesson Rubric, a new rubric designed to target best practices in engineering education, could be used to evaluate the extent to which engineering is infused into online science lessons. Eighty lessons were selected at random from three online repositories, and coded with the rubric. Overall results documented the strengths of existing lessons, as well as many components that teachers might strengthen. In addition, a subset of characteristics was found to distinguish lessons with the highest level of engineering infusion. Findings are discussed in relation to the potential of the rubric to help teachers use research evidence-informed practice generally, and in relation to the new content demands of the U.S. Next Generation Science Standards, in particular.

  18. The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: lessons and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Edwin B.

    1970-01-01

    subsidence was superimposed on regional tectonic subsidence to heighten the flooding damage. Ground and surface waters were measurably affected by the earthquake, not only in Alaska but throughout the world. Expectably, local geologic conditions largely controlled the extent of structural damage, whether caused directly by seismic vibrations or by secondary effects such as those just described. Intensity was greatest in areas underlain by thick saturated unconsolidated deposits, least on indurated bedrock or permanently frozen ground, and intermediate on coarse well-drained gravel, on morainal deposits, or on moderately indurated sedimentary rocks. Local and even regional geology also controlled the distribution and extent of the earthquake's effects on hydrologic systems. In the conterminous United States, for example, seiches in wells and bodies of surface water were controlled by geologic structures of regional dimension. Devastating as the earthquake was, it had many long-term beneficial effects. Many of these were socioeconomic or engineering in nature; others were of scientific value. Much new and corroborative basic geologic and hydrologic information was accumulated in the course of the earthquake studies, and many new or improved investigative techniques were developed. Chief among these, perhaps, were the recognition that lakes can be used as giant tiltmeters, the refinement of methods for measuring land-level changes by observing displacements of barnacles and other sessile organisms, and the relating of hydrology to seismology by worldwide study of hydroseisms in surface-water bodies and in wells. The geologic and hydrologic lessons learned from studies of the Alaska earthquake also lead directly to better definition of the research needed to further our understanding of earthquakes and of how to avoid or lessen the effects of future ones. Research is needed on the origins and mechanisms of earthquakes, on crustal structure, and on the generation of tsunamis and

  19. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C Thompson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. Methods: The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Results: Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Conclusion: Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their

  20. Improving cardiovascular outcomes among Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from research for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sandra C; Haynes, Emma; Woods, John A; Bessarab, Dawn C; Dimer, Lynette A; Wood, Marianne M; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Hamilton, Sandra J; Katzenellenbogen, Judith M

    2016-01-01

    The Aboriginal people of Australia have much poorer health and social indicators and a substantial life expectancy gap compared to other Australians, with premature cardiovascular disease a major contributor to poorer health. This article draws on research undertaken to examine cardiovascular disparities and focuses on ways in which primary care practitioners can contribute to reducing cardiovascular disparities and improving Aboriginal health. The overall research utilised mixed methods and included data analysis, interviews and group processes which included Aboriginal people, service providers and policymakers. Workshop discussions to identify barriers and what works were recorded by notes and on whiteboards, then distilled and circulated to participants and other stakeholders to refine and validate information. Additional engagement occurred through circulation of draft material and further discussions. This report distils the lessons for primary care practitioners to improve outcomes through management that is attentive to the needs of Aboriginal people. Aspects of primordial, primary and secondary prevention are identified, with practical strategies for intervention summarised. The premature onset and high incidence of Aboriginal cardiovascular disease make prevention imperative and require that primary care practitioners understand and work to address the social underpinnings of poor health. Doctors are well placed to reinforce the importance of healthy lifestyle at all visits to involve the family and to reduce barriers which impede early care seeking. Ensuring better information for Aboriginal patients and better integrated care for patients who frequently have complex needs and multi-morbidities will also improve care outcomes. Primary care practitioners have an important role in improving Aboriginal cardiovascular care outcomes. It is essential that they recognise the special needs of their Aboriginal patients and work at multiple levels both outside and