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Sample records for lessons assess students

  1. Assessment of Understanding: Student Teachers' Preparation, Implementation and Reflection of a Lesson Plan for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhler, Martin Vogt

    2017-05-01

    Research finds that student teachers often fail to make observable instructional goals, without which a secure bridge between instruction and assessment is precluded. This is one reason that recent reports state that teacher education needs to become better at helping student teachers to develop their thinking about and skills in assessing pupils' learning. Currently in Europe, the Lesson Study method and the Content Representation tool, which both have a specific focus on assessment, have started to address this problem. This article describes and discusses an intervention in which Lesson Study was used in combination with Content Representation in student teachers' field practice. Empirical materials from one group of student teachers were analyzed to illustrate how the student teachers worked with assessment during the planning of a lesson, how they implemented it in a research lesson, and how they used the gathered observations to make claims about assessment aims. The findings suggest that the student teachers placed greater emphasis on assessment through the intervention. However, it is also found that more attention should have been dedicated to the planning phase and that the group did not manage to keep a research focus throughout the Lesson Study process. This suggests that it properly would be beneficial with several planning sessions prior to the research lesson, as well as having an expert teacher leading the Lesson Study.

  2. Lessons Learned about Assessment from Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in College and Career Ready Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Heritage, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The new large-scale assessments rolled out by consortia and states are designed to measure student achievement of rigorous college- and career-ready (CCR) standards. Recent surveys of teachers in several states indicate that students with disabilities adjusted well to the new assessments, and liked many of their features, but that there also are…

  3. Fifteen years of portfolio assessment of dental hygiene student competency: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Bray, Kimberly Krust; Austin, Kylie J

    2014-10-01

    Adoption of portfolio assessment in the educational environment is gaining attention as a means to incorporate self-assessment into the curriculum and to use evidence to support learning outcomes and to demonstrate competency. Portfolios provide a medium for students to demonstrate and document their personal and professional growth across the curriculum. The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the drivers for portfolio education, the benefits to both students and program faculty/administrators, the barriers associated with portfolio use, and suggested solutions that have been determined through several years of "lessons learned." The University of Missouri Kansas City School of Dentistry, Division of Dental Hygiene department has been utilizing portfolio assessment for over 15 years and has collected data related to portfolio performance since 2001. Results from correlational statistics calculated on the 312 dental hygiene students that graduated from 2001 to 2013 demonstrate a positive and significant relationship between portfolio performance and overall GPA as well as portfolio performance and NBDHE scores. Copyright © 2014 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  4. MODIFICATION OF STUDENT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AS A CONDITION OF MOTIVATION INCREASING FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Revenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is the rationale for the changes assessment criteria student performance in physical education on the basis of individualtypological variants of age development.The main task of PE lessons is formation of steady need for systematic occupations by physical exercises. However, there is an obvious tendency of interest decrease of school students to occupations by physical culture and their extremely low physical activity that is reflected on health of younger generation. The common unified requirements for control standards don't promote development of motivation to occupations by physical culture of considerable part of school students. The obligatory accounting of specific features of age development is necessary for optimization of the organization of physical training.Methods. Motor abilities of school students are studied based on the measurements of the strength, strength endurance, speed and power abilities, speed, and aerobic endurance. The general physical development of each student is calculated by transferring the absolute values of the test points in the program «Presidential race». Dynamics of general physical development is calculated by comparing the indicators of physical development at the beginning and the end of the school year.The study of mental abilities of 8, 10, and 11th grade pupils is carried out by R. Amthauer tests adopted by L. A. Yasukova, and the study of mental abilities of 6th grade students is carried out by intellectual test (GIT. Typological peculiarities of manifestation of the nervous system properties – the power of the nervous system, mobility of excitation and inhibition, the balance on the «external» and «internal» balance sheets are investigated with the use of arbitrary motor methodologies proposed by E. P. Ilyin.Results. It is experimentally established that during adolescence there is a mismatch in time of the dynamics peaks of motor abilities and intelligence. So, the

  5. Assessing the Efficacy of a School Health Education Advocacy Lesson with College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Michele; Chaney, Beth H.; Birch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The researchers evaluated the efficacy of an advocacy lesson to assess change in intentions to advocate for school health education. This study also measured changes in participants' understanding the importance of school health education and perceived effectiveness in applying advocacy skills. Methods: A convenience sample of college…

  6. Lessons Learned about Instruction from Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in College and Career Ready Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Margaret; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2016-01-01

    The new large-scale assessments rolled out by consortia and states are designed to measure student achievement of rigorous college- and career-ready (CCR) standards. Recent surveys of teachers in several states indicate that students with disabilities like many features of the new assessments, but that there also are challenges. This Brief was…

  7. Mining the student assessment data: Lessons drawn from a small scale case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pechenizkiy, M.; Calders, T.G.K.; Vasilyeva, E.; De Bra, P.M.E.; Baker, de R.S.J.; Barnes, T.; Beck, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe an educational data mining (EDM) case study based on the data collected during the online assessment of students who were able to immediately receive tailored and elaborated feedback (EF) after answering each of the questions in the test. Our main interest as domain experts

  8. Using Desktop Publishing in an Editing Class--The Lessons Learned and Students' Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Marty; Zimmerman, Don

    1992-01-01

    Reports students' perceptions of learning desktop publishing (DTP) systems. Finds that (1) students learned the foundations of DTP in under 60 hours of hands-on experience; (2) the incremental introduction of DTP functions and practice sessions before assignments were the most effective teaching strategy; and (3) use of DTP encouraged nonartistic…

  9. Lessons Learned from PISA: A Systematic Review of Peer-Reviewed Articles on the Programme for International Student Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfenbeck, Therese N.; Lenkeit, Jenny; El Masri, Yasmine; Cantrell, Kate; Ryan, Jeanne; Baird, Jo-Anne

    2018-01-01

    International large-scale assessments are on the rise, with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) seen by many as having strategic prominence in education policy debates. The present article reviews PISA-related English-language peer-reviewed articles from the programme's first cycle in 2000 to its most current in 2015. Five…

  10. Human Spaceflight Conjunction Assessment: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the process of a human space flight conjunction assessment and lessons learned from the more than twelve years of International Space Station (ISS) operations. Also, the application of these lessons learned to a recent ISS conjunction assessment with object 84180 on July 16, 2009 is also presented.

  11. Co-Creation Learning Procedures: Comparing Interactive Language Lessons for Deaf and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Naotsune; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Tomita, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses co-creation learning procedures of second language lessons for deaf students, and sign language lessons by a deaf lecturer. The analyses focus on the learning procedure and resulting assessment, considering the disability. Through questionnaires ICT-based co-creative learning technologies are effective and efficient and promote spontaneous learning motivation goals.

  12. A written language intervention for at-risk second grade students: a randomized controlled trial of the process assessment of the learner lesson plans in a tier 2 response-to-intervention (RtI) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R; Costa, Lara-Jeane C; McBee, Matthew; Anderson, Kathleen L; Yerby, Donna Carlson; Childress, Amy; Knuth, Sean B

    2013-04-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, 205 students were followed from grades 1 to 3 with a focus on changes in their writing trajectories following an evidence-based intervention during the spring of second grade. Students were identified as being at-risk (n=138), and then randomized into treatment (n=68) versus business-as-usual conditions (n=70). A typical group also was included (n=67). The writing intervention comprised Lesson Sets 4 and 7 from the Process Assessment of the Learner (PAL), and was conducted via small groups (three to six students) twice a week for 12 weeks in accordance with a response-to-intervention Tier 2 model. The primary outcome was the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II Written Expression Scale. Results indicated modest support for the PAL lesson plans, with an accelerated rate of growth in writing skills following treatment. There were no significant moderator effects, although there was evidence that the most globally impaired students demonstrated a more rapid rate of growth following treatment. These findings suggest the need for ongoing examination of evidence-based treatments in writing for young elementary students.

  13. Using Activity Theory to Examine How Teachers' Lesson Plans Meet Students' Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhik, Estella Williams; Chizhik, Alexander Williams

    2018-01-01

    How is lesson planning useful? This research study used Cultural Historical Activity Theory and intersubjectivity to answer this questions. This research explored to what extent teacher candidates' lesson plans (i.e., alignment among objectives, assessment, and instruction), and analyses of assessment data mediate their thinking about students'…

  14. Training Sessional Academic Staff to Provide Quality Feedback on University Students' Assessment: Lessons from a Faculty of Law Learning and Teaching Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kelly; Bell, Tamara; Dwyer, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The quality of feedback provided to university students has long been recognised as the most important predictor of student learning and satisfaction. However, providing quality feedback to students is challenging in the current context, in which universities increasingly rely on casualised and inexperienced academic staff to assess undergraduate…

  15. A Study of the Validity and Reliability of a Mathematics Lesson Attitude Scale and Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Murat; Ozcan, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes of the students towards mathematics lessons are very important in terms of their success and motivation. The purpose of this study is to develop a scale for the assessment of primary school students' attitudes towards mathematics courses in the 2nd and 3rd grades, to analyse its validity-reliability structure and to determine the…

  16. With Interest It Comes To...Unconscionable Clauses in Sales Contracts. A Student's Lesson Plan [and] A Teacher's Lesson Plan [and] A Lawyer's Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Estelle; And Others

    One of a series of secondary level teaching units presenting case studies with pro and con analysis of particular legal problems, the document presents a student's lesson plan, a teacher's lesson plan, and a lawyer's lesson plan on unconscionable clauses in sales contracts. The unit acquaints students with the operation of sales contracts and…

  17. Ecological risk assessment: Lessons learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This conference was held November 14--18, 1993 in Houston, Texas for the purpose of providing a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on ecological risk assessment. This book is comprised of the abstracts of the presentations at this symposium. Individual abstracts have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  18. Graduate students teaching elementary earth science through interactive classroom lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Jawin, E. R.; Robinson, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, graduate students in the Brown University Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Studies have volunteered to teach science to second-grade students at Vartan Gregorian Elementary School in Providence, RI. Initially developed to bring science into classrooms where it was not explicitly included in the curriculum, the graduate student-run program today incorporates the Providence Public Schools Grade 2 science curriculum into weekly, interactive sessions that engage the students in hypothesis-driven science. We will describe the program structure, its integration into the Providence Public Schools curriculum, and 3 example lessons relevant to geology. Lessons are structured to develop the students' ability to share and incorporate others' ideas through written and oral communication. The volunteers explain the basics of the topic and engage the students with introductory questions. The students use this knowledge to develop a hypothesis about the upcoming experiment, recording it in their "Science Notebooks." The students record their observations during the demonstration and discuss the results as a group. The process culminates in the students using their own words to summarize what they learned. Activities of particular interest to educators in geoscience are called "Volcanoes!", "The "Liquid Race," and "Phases of the Moon." The "Volcanoes!" lesson explores explosive vs. effusive volcanism using two simulated volcanoes: one explosive, using Mentos and Diet Coke, and one effusive, using vinegar and baking soda (in model volcanoes that the students construct in teams). In "Liquid Race," which explores viscosity and can be integrated into the "Volcanoes!" lesson, the students connect viscosity to flow speed by racing liquids down a ramp. "Phases of the Moon" teaches the students why the Moon has phases, using ball and stick models, and the terminology of the lunar phases using cream-filled cookies (e.g., Oreos). These lessons, among many others

  19. Achievement of Eighth-Grade Students in Korea on the TIMSS 2011 Assessment: Effects of Confidence in Mathematics and Engagement in Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, J. Daniel; Telese, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Research studies have identified several factors related to mathematics achievement of students in Korea. Further, results from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) assessments have shown that instructional practices and beliefs about mathematics were significantly associated with mathematics achievement of students in…

  20. Engagement in Science Lessons and Achievement Test Scores of Eighth-Grade Students in Korea: Findings from the TIMSS 2011 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, J. Daniel; Telese, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific literacy and student engagement in science are important components of the school curriculum in Korea. In addition, several studies from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) assessments have identified factors associated with the learning outcomes of students in Korea. The purpose of this study was to…

  1. Kinesthetic Astronomy: Significant Upgrades to the Sky Time Lesson that Support Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C. A.; Zawaski, M.

    2004-12-01

    This paper will report on a significant upgrade to the first in a series of innovative, experiential lessons we call Kinesthetic Astronomy. The Sky Time lesson reconnects students with the astronomical meaning of the day, year, and seasons. Like all Kinesthetic Astronomy lessons, it teaches basic astronomical concepts through choreographed bodily movements and positions that provide educational sensory experiences. They are intended for sixth graders up through adult learners in both formal and informal educational settings. They emphasize astronomical concepts and phenomenon that people can readily encounter in their "everyday" lives such as time, seasons, and sky motions of the Sun, Moon, stars, and planets. Kinesthetic Astronomy lesson plans are fully aligned with national science education standards, both in content and instructional practice. Our lessons offer a complete learning cycle with written assessment opportunities now embedded throughout the lesson. We have substantially strengthened the written assessment options for the Sky Time lesson to help students translate their kinesthetic and visual learning into the verbal-linguistic and mathematical-logical realms of expression. Field testing with non-science undergraduates, middle school science teachers and students, Junior Girl Scouts, museum education staff, and outdoor educators has been providing evidence that Kinesthetic Astronomy techniques allow learners to achieve a good grasp of concepts that are much more difficult to learn in more conventional ways such as via textbooks or even computer animation. Field testing of the Sky Time lesson has also led us to significant changes from the previous version to support student learning. We will report on the nature of these changes.

  2. Can lessons designed with Gestalt laws of visual perception improve students' understanding of the phases of the moon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistisen, Michele

    There has been limited success teaching elementary students about the phases of the moon using diagrams, personal observations, and manipulatives. One possible reason for this is that instruction has failed to apply Gestalt principles of perceptual organization to the lesson materials. To see if fourth grade students' understanding could be improved, four lessons were designed and taught using the Gestalt laws of Figure-Ground, Symmetry, and Similarity. Students (n = 54) who were taught lessons applying the Gestalt principles scored 12% higher on an assessment than students (n = 51) who only were taught lessons using the traditional methods. Though scores showed significant improvement, it is recommended to follow the American Association for the Advancement of Science guidelines and wait until 9th grade to instruct students about the phases.

  3. Aesthetic Inquiry into Chinese University Student Fatherly Life Lessons: "Roots" and Their Implications for Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura Blythe

    2017-01-01

    Globally, teachers are trained to educate and assess children through matrices based on comparative competition, a practice that thrives on ranking. In an era of glocalization, how might educational systems cultivate classroom connections embracing diverse student gifts? This arts-based narrative inquiry explores fatherly life lessons of 17…

  4. A Mixed Methods Comparison of Teachers' Lunar Modeling Lesson Implementation and Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Mary F.; Wilhelm, Jennifer Anne; Cole, Merryn

    2018-01-01

    The authors compare three teachers' adaptations and implementation of a lunar modeling lesson to explain marked differences in student learning outcomes on a spatial-scientific lunar assessment. They used a modified version of the Practices of Science Observation Protocol (P-SOP; Forbes, Biggers, & Zangori, 2013) to identify ways in which…

  5. Analyzing students' attitudes towards science during inquiry-based lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenbader, Tracy C.

    Due to the logistics of guided-inquiry lesson, students learn to problem solve and develop critical thinking skills. This mixed-methods study analyzed the students' attitudes towards science during inquiry lessons. My quantitative results from a repeated measures survey showed no significant difference between student attitudes when taught with either structured-inquiry or guided-inquiry lessons. The qualitative results analyzed through a constant-comparative method did show that students generate positive interest, critical thinking and low level stress during guided-inquiry lessons. The qualitative research also gave insight into a teacher's transition to guided-inquiry. This study showed that with my students, their attitudes did not change during this transition according to the qualitative data however, the qualitative data did how high levels of excitement. The results imply that students like guided-inquiry laboratories, even though they require more work, just as much as they like traditional laboratories with less work and less opportunity for creativity.

  6. Developing and Implementing the Qatar Student Assessment System. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriella; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Broer, Markus; Mariano, Louis T.; Froemel, J. Enrique; Goldman, Charles A.; DaVanzo, Julie

    2009-01-01

    This research brief summarizes the development of a standards-based student assessment system in Qatar, lessons for policymakers in Qatar and elsewhere, and challenges in aligning the assessment with future changes in the curriculum standards. Analysis of Qatar's standards-based student assessment system, the first in the region, offers several…

  7. The effect of application of contextual teaching and learning (CTL model-based on lesson study with mind mapping media to assess student learning outcomes on chemistry on colloid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Fadillah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted to determine the effect of the application of CTL learning model based on lesson study with mind mapping media to the learning outcomes of students on colloid systems. The population of this research was all students of grade XI of SMA N 1 Sunggal. The sample was taken using on the purposive random sampling. The Experiment class was taught with Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL model based on Lesson Study with Mind Mapping media and the control class taught with conventional learning model. The data was collected using an objective test was consisting of 20 questions which validity, reliability, level of difficulty and power of difference had been tested. T test results showed that tcalculate = 2.1 and ttable = 1.6697 thus tcalculate> ttable which means that Ha is accepted and Ho is rejected. The enhancement of the student learning outcomes showed that the results of experiment class are g = 72.88%, while the control class is 68.97%. From the percentage, it can be seen that learning outcomes of the experiment class are greater than the control class. The analysis of developing cognitive aspects pointed out that C1 = 70.02%, C2 = 73.58%, C3 = 68.63%, Thus the domain of cognitive level are on the cognitive aspects of C2. The result of Lesson Study Analysis showed the results of 71.09% at the first lesson and 88.28% at the second lesson. It means that there is increasing adherence to the indicators after two lessons. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that the result of studying chemistry of the students of class XI of SMA Negeri I Sunggal TA 2014/2015 taught by a CTL model based  on Lesson Study with Mind Mapping media was higher (72.88% than those taught by conventional learning models (68.97% in the subject matter of colloids System.

  8. Expository Text and Middle School Students: Some Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Presents the "Structured Reading Lesson" as one simple way to structure reading activities so that the before, during, and after phases of the reading experience are all touched upon. Considers how reading strategies that students have developed to comprehend fictional narratives do not always help them with textbooks. Presents…

  9. Lessons and challenges from software quality assessment: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lessons and challenges from software quality assessment: The case of space systems software. ... esoteric software technologies and paradigms such as object oriented development, etc. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  10. Spelling Lessons for Gifted Language Arts Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Janet C.; Gipe, Joan P.

    1993-01-01

    These strategies for teaching spelling to gifted students focus on student choice of words, personal dictionaries, cloze passages, categorizing or word sorting, words borrowed from other languages, word etymology, multiple meaning words, and onomatopoetic words. (JDD)

  11. Lessons Learned in Student Venture Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, Edward

    The Physics Entrepreneurship Master's Program (PEP) at Case Western Reserve University is now in its 15th year of operation. PEP is a 27 credit-hour Master of Science in Physics, Entrepreneurship Track. The curriculum can be tailored to the needs of each student. Coursework consists of graduate-level classes in science, business, intellectual property law, and innovation. A master's thesis is required that is based on a real-world project in innovation or entrepreneurship within an existing company or startup (possibly the student's). PEP faculty help students connect with mentors, advisors, partners, funding sources and job opportunities. In this talk I will chronicle several pitfalls that we have encountered with our ''real world'' student projects and start-up businesses, several of which met their complete demise despite showing great promise for success. I will discuss how we have learned to avoid most of these pitfalls by taking surprisingly simple actions.

  12. The Effects of Formative Assessment on Academic Achievement, Attitudes toward the Lesson, and Self-Regulation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, Ceyhun; Kincal, Remzi Y.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of formative assessment practices on students' academic achievement, attitudes toward lessons, and self-regulation skills in the fifth-grade social studies class. Mixed method research was used to conduct the study. The research group consisted of 45 students in the fifth grade of a secondary…

  13. Do Students Really Understand Topology in the Lesson? A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narli, Serkan

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to specify to what extent students understand topology during the lesson and to determine possible misconceptions. 14 teacher trainees registered at Secondary School Mathematics education department were observed in the topology lessons throughout a semester and data collected at the first topology lesson is presented here.…

  14. The Key Factors Affecting Students' Individual Interest in School Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2018-01-01

    Individual interest in school science lessons can be defined as a relatively stable and enduring personal emotion comprising affective and behavioural reactions to events in the regular science lessons at school. Little research has compared the importance of different factors affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons. The…

  15. Effects of Multimedia Usage in Students' Attitude towards Turkish Republic Revolution History and Kemalism Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    In this study, whether the multimedia in the history lesson affects the students' attitude towards this lesson or not has been studied. With this object, whether there is a difference among the point averages that students take from the preliminary test and whether there is a difference among the point averages that students take from the last…

  16. Interpersonal Interactions in Instrumental Lessons: Teacher/Student Verbal and Non-Verbal Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined verbal and non-verbal teacher/student interpersonal interactions in higher education instrumental music lessons. Twenty-four lessons were videotaped and teacher/student behaviours were analysed using a researcher-designed instrument. The findings indicate predominance of student and teacher joke among the verbal behaviours with…

  17. Helping Students Reflect: Lessons from Cognitive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Gary; Jones, Lydia; Whitfield, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of teaching students to reflect on experience and, thus, learn from it, are better understood with the application of constructs from cognitive psychology. The present paper focuses on two such constructs--self-schemas and scripts--to help educators better understand both the threats and opportunities associated with effective…

  18. Anticipating students' reasoning and planning prompts in structured problem-solving lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Colleen; Widjaja, Wanty; Doig, Brian; Groves, Susie

    2018-02-01

    Structured problem-solving lessons are used to explore mathematical concepts such as pattern and relationships in early algebra, and regularly used in Japanese Lesson Study research lessons. However, enactment of structured problem-solving lessons which involves detailed planning, anticipation of student solutions and orchestration of whole-class discussion of solutions is an ongoing challenge for many teachers. Moreover, primary teachers have limited experience in teaching early algebra or mathematical reasoning actions such as generalising. In this study, the critical factors of enacting the structured problem-solving lessons used in Japanese Lesson Study to elicit and develop primary students' capacity to generalise are explored. Teachers from three primary schools participated in two Japanese Lesson Study teams for this study. The lesson plans and video recordings of teaching and post-lesson discussion of the two research lessons along with students' responses and learning are compared to identify critical factors. The anticipation of students' reasoning together with preparation of supporting and challenging prompts was critical for scaffolding students' capacity to grasp and communicate generality.

  19. The key factors affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek

    2018-01-01

    Individual interest in school science lessons can be defined as a relatively stable and enduring personal emotion comprising affective and behavioural reactions to events in the regular science lessons at school. Little research has compared the importance of different factors affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons. The present study aimed to address this gap, using a mixed methods design. Qualitative interview data were collected from 60 Hong Kong junior secondary school students, who were asked to describe the nature of their interest in science lessons and the factors to which they attribute this. Teacher interviews, parent interviews, and classroom observations were conducted to triangulate student interview data. Five factors affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons were identified: situational influences in science lessons, individual interest in science, science self-concept, grade level, and gender. Quantitative data were then collected from 591 students using a questionnaire. Structural equation modelling was applied to test a hypothesised model, which provided an acceptable fit to the student data. The strongest factor affecting students' individual interest in school science lessons was science self-concept, followed by individual interest in science and situational influences in science lessons. Grade level and gender were found to be nonsignificant factors. These findings suggest that teachers should pay special attention to the association between academic self-concept and interest if they want to motivate students to learn science at school.

  20. Denmark's Master of Public Governance Program: Assessment and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Carsten; Pedersen, Anne Reff

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on Denmark's Master of Public Governance and its assessments and lessons learned. Denmark is seen to have an efficient economy and public sector, a digitalized public service delivery system, and an advanced work-life balance. The Danish government invested substantial resources into developing a Master of Public Governance…

  1. Formative assessment in teacher talk during lesson studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, Nicolette; Goei, Sui Lin; Akkerman, Sanne F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the extent of systematic examination of students’ educational (support) needs by teachers participating in lesson study (LS) meetings within a framework of formative assessment (FA). Design/methodology/approach: The study took place in the context of

  2. Analysis of the lesson as one of productive responses in the formation of personality and professional qualities of the student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Бурла

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article points to the importance of the ability to analyze the lessons of geography students during teaching practice as a condition of personality formation and professional competence of the future teacher. Main types of the current lesson: short, structural, prolonged, comprehensive and integrated are briefly described. For students beginning their teaching career a plan of structural analysis as the best option is given. Particular attention is paid to the specific subject of geography, especially in the formation of physical and economic geography concepts, the implementation of the principle of local lore. Conclusions regarding the geography lesson, the possibility of assessing its strengths and weaknesses, the ability to determine the reserves and unrealizable formulation of new goals, objectives in terms of improvement of the educational process have been presented in the article.

  3. Do Lessons in Nature Boost Subsequent Classroom Engagement? Refueling Students in Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers wishing to offer lessons in nature may hold back for fear of leaving students keyed up and unable to concentrate in subsequent, indoor lessons. This study tested the hypothesis that lessons in nature have positive—not negative—aftereffects on subsequent classroom engagement. Using carefully matched pairs of lessons (one in a relatively natural outdoor setting and one indoors, we observed subsequent classroom engagement during an indoor instructional period, replicating these comparisons over 10 different topics and weeks in the school year, in each of two third grade classrooms. Pairs were roughly balanced in how often the outdoor lesson preceded or followed the classroom lesson. Classroom engagement was significantly better after lessons in nature than after their matched counterparts for four of the five measures developed for this study: teacher ratings; third-party tallies of “redirects” (the number of times the teacher stopped instruction to direct student attention back onto the task at hand; independent, photo-based ratings made blind to condition; and a composite index each showed a nature advantage; student ratings did not. This nature advantage held across different teachers and held equally over the initial and final 5 weeks of lessons. And the magnitude of the advantage was large. In 48 out of 100 paired comparisons, the nature lesson was a full standard deviation better than its classroom counterpart; in 20 of the 48, the nature lesson was over two standard deviations better. The rate of “redirects” was cut almost in half after a lesson in nature, allowing teachers to teach for longer periods uninterrupted. Because the pairs of lessons were matched on teacher, class (students and classroom, topic, teaching style, week of the semester, and time of day, the advantage of the nature-based lessons could not be attributed to any of these factors. It appears that, far from leaving students too keyed up to concentrate

  4. The Effects of Instruction of Creative Invention on Students' Situational Interest in Physics Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Tim

    There are a few empirical studies (Palmer, 2008; Dohn, 2010) or intervention programs (Hidi & Harackiewicz, 2000) about students' situational interest in physics lessons, although the declining interest in physics among students has been well documented in the research literature (Gardner, 1998 ; International Bureau for Education, 2001; European Commission, 2007; Oon & Subramaniam, 2011). Even in the research area of science education, yet little is known about how to trigger students' catching and holding situational interest in a physics lesson. In this study, five intervention lessons of creative invention were developed. Each lesson consists of three parts including Eberle's (1971, 1972) SCAMPER technique on the creative thinking, knowledge and concepts of physics curriculum, hands-on activities related to both SCAMPER technique and physics concepts. Two surveys were developed and used to measure the situational interest and individual interest of students in physics lessons. Qualitative conversational interviews were used to interpret the sources of situational interest of students in physics lessons. Results in this study indicate that new inventive products and television programs or films related to SCAMPER can trigger the catching interest in physics lessons. Meaningful hands-on activities related to both SCAMPER technique and physics concepts can trigger the holding interest in physics lessons. There is no significant difference in situational interest among students with different academic abilities except in the topic related to electronic components. The students with lower academic ability have greater situational interest than the students with higher academic ability in learning the topic related to electronic components. There is no significant difference in situational interest between boys and girls except in the topic related to revolving paper lantern. Girls have higher situational interest than boys in learning the topic related to revolving

  5. lessons and challenges from software quality assessment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    www.globaljournalseries.com, Email: info@globaljournalseries.com ... ASSESSMENT: THE CASE OF SPACE SYSTEMS SOFTWARE. ... KEYWORDS: Software, Software Quality ,Quality Standard, Characteristics, ... and communication, etc.

  6. Developing Student Autonomy in the One-to-One Music Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Graham J.

    2013-01-01

    As a practitioner in both the classroom and in the instrumental studio, I am interested in how one educational context might inform the other. Within an action research paradigm, I gave a violin lesson in front of colleagues as a means to gain feedback and to open up discussion on the concept of student autonomy within the one-to-one lesson. The…

  7. Strategies for Successfully Teaching Students with ADD or ADHD in Instrumental Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melago, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers can easily encounter students with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the instrumental lesson setting. Applicable to instrumental lesson settings in the public or private schools, private studios, or college studios, this article focuses on specific strategies ranging from the…

  8. An Action Research Study: Using Classroom Guidance Lessons to Teach Middle School Students about Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Rebecca C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a three-part classroom guidance lesson that teaches middle school students the definition of sexual harassment, the difference between flirting and sexual harassment, and the harmful effects of sexual harassment. An action research study evaluated the effectiveness of the lessons in decreasing referrals for sexual harassment…

  9. Tailoring of feedback in online assessment: Lessons learnt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasilyeva, E.; De Bra, P.M.E.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Bonk, C.J.; et al., xx

    2008-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role in the learning process. Particularly, the functions of the elaborated feedback (EF) in online assessment may include assisting students in understanding their mistakes and misconceptions, motivating the student for further learning, suggesting directions for

  10. Investigating University Students' Attitudes towards Physics Lesson, Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Burnout Levels for the Prediction of Their Academic Success in Physics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Burhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out whether university students' attitudes towards physics lesson, their self-efficacy beliefs and burnout levels predict their academic success in physics lessons. The research group consists of 641 university students of which 307 are girls (47.1%) and 334 boys (52.9%). The research data were collected using…

  11. Assessment of Continuing Interprofessional Education: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Brian; Wagner, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) and continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) are becoming established activities within the education of health professions, assessment of learners continues to be limited. Arguably, this in part is due to a lack of IPE and CIPE within in the clinical workplace. The accountability of…

  12. Lessons learned from fossil FAC assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, R. Barry; Shields, Kevin J. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Oakville, ON (Canada); Shulder, Stephen J. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    2010-09-15

    In their work the authors have noted great diversity in the Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) Programs used at conventional fossil power plants. The results and findings of FAC Program assessments conducted at 22 conventional plants are summarized and discussed. By comparing the FAC Program characteristics and relevant unit features with damage and failure experiences, a number of common factors requiring attention from fossil utility organizations have been identified. The assessment experiences have also provided a picture of trends in specific FAC activities and general awareness within the conventional fossil fleet. One of the most important aspects of these studies is that while a few new locations of FAC have been found, there is some consolidation of the most frequently found locations. (orig.)

  13. Fun on the farm: evaluation of a lesson to teach students about the spread of infection on school farm visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith K D Hawking

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School visits to farms are a positive educational experience but pose risks due to the spread of zoonotic infections. A lesson plan to raise awareness about microbes on the farm and preventative behaviours was developed in response to the Griffin Investigation into the E. coli outbreak associated with Godstone Farm in 2009. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the delivery of the lesson plan in increasing knowledge about the spread of infection on the farm, amongst school students. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-five 9-11 year old students from seven junior schools in England participated. Two hundred and ten students filled in identical questionnaires covering microbes, hand hygiene, and farm hygiene before and after the lesson. Statistical analysis assessed knowledge change using difference in percentage correct answers. RESULTS: Significant knowledge improvement was observed for all sections. In the 'Farm Hygiene' section, girls and boys demonstrated 18% (p<0.001 and 11% (p<0.001 improvement, respectively (girls vs. boys p<0.004. As girls had lower baseline knowledge the greater percentage improvement resulted in similar post intervention knowledge scores between genders (girls 80%, boys 83%. CONCLUSIONS: The lesson plan was successful at increasing awareness of microbes on the farm and infection prevention measures and should be used by teachers in preparation for a farm visit.

  14. An Assessment of Need for Instructional Professional Development for Middle School Science Teachers Using Interactive Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Amanda

    Numerous studies on the impact of interactive lessons on student learning have been conducted, but there has been a lack of professional development (PD) programs at a middle school focusing on ways to incorporate interactive lessons into the science classroom setting. The purpose of this case study was to examine the instructional practices of science teachers to determine whether the need for an interactive lessons approach to teaching students exists. This qualitative case study focused on teachers' perceptions and pedagogy to determine whether the need to use interactive lessons to meet the needs of all students is present. The research question focused on identifying current practices and determining whether a need for interactive lessons is present. Qualitative data were gathered from science teachers at the school through interviews, lesson plans, and observations, all of which were subsequently coded using an interpretative analysis. The results indicated the need for a professional development (PD) program centered on interactive science lessons. Upon completion of the qualitative study, a detailed PD program has been proposed to increase the instructional practices of science teachers to incorporate interactive lessons within the science classroom. Implications for positive social change include improved teaching strategies and lessons that are more student-centered resulting in better understanding and comprehension, as well as performance on state-mandated tests.

  15. Computer-based teaching and evaluation of introductory statistics for health science students: some lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala Colgan

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become possible to introduce health science students to statistical packages at an increasingly early stage in their undergraduate studies. This has enabled teaching to take place in a computer laboratory, using real data, and encouraging an exploratory and research-oriented approach. This paper briefly describes a hypertext Computer Based Tutorial (CBT concerned with descriptive statistics and introductory data analysis. The CBT has three primary objectives: the introduction of concepts, the facilitation of revision, and the acquisition of skills for project work. Objective testing is incorporated and used for both self-assessment and formal examination. Evaluation was carried out with a large group of Health Science students, heterogeneous with regard to their IT skills and basic numeracy. The results of the evaluation contain valuable lessons.

  16. Assessing Business Student Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    The development of student thinking skills is a major goal of business education. As with other such goals, student outcomes assessment must be undertaken to measure goal achievement. Thinking is difficult to teach; it is also difficult to assess. The purpose of this article is to improve management educators' understanding of student thinking…

  17. Designing a database for performance assessment: Lessons learned from WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martell, M.A.; Schenker, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) used a relational database that was originally designed only to supply the input parameters required for implementation of the PA codes. Reviewers used the database as a point of entry to audit quality assurance measures for control, traceability, and retrievability of input information used for analysis, and output/work products. During these audits it became apparent that modifications to the architecture and scope of the database would benefit the EPA regulator and other stakeholders when reviewing the recertification application. This paper contains a discussion of the WPP PA CCA database and lessons learned for designing a database

  18. Assessment in the Private Studio Setting: Supporting Student Learning, Providing Effective Instruction, and Building Faculty-Student Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubenthal, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    A significant amount of literature exists about how to design and implement an effective assessment process for students in a music program, specifically in the classroom setting. This article suggests a framework for incorporating individualized assessment in the private-lesson setting based on effective classroom assessment practices. Many…

  19. Students' perception of mathematics and science plasma lessons in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to follow the lessons appropriately. Moreover, on regular basis the ministry of education should make appropriate mechanisms for the improvements of the lessons. In addition to this, trainings should be given to high school teachers for maximum utilization of the technology. Keywords: education, plasma TV, mathematics, ...

  20. Deep geologic disposal. Lessons learnt from recent performance assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Andersson, J.

    1998-01-01

    Performance assessment (PA) studies are part of the decision basis for the siting, operation, and closure of deep repositories of long-lived nuclear wastes. In 1995 the NEA set up the Working Group on Integrated Performance Assessments of Deep Repositories (IPAG) with the goals to analyse existing PA studies, learn about what has been produced to date, and shed light on what could be done in future studies. Ten organisations submitted their most recent PA study for analysis and discussion, including written answers to over 70 questions. Waste management programmes, disposal concepts, geologies, and different types and amounts of waste offered a unique opportunity for exchanging information, assessing progress in PA since 1990, and identifying recent trends. A report was completed whose main lessons are overviewed. (author)

  1. Utilizing Lesson Study in Improving Year 12 Students' Learning and Performance in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Siew Yin Chong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of Lesson Study to improve Year 12 students' performance in conditional probability through Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL lessons. In total, 66 students comprised of three Year 12 classes of similar abilities, and their three respective teachers from a government junior college participated in the study. The instruments used to collect the relevant data in this study were teachers' reflective journals and students' achievement tests. The collected data were then analyzed and interpreted quantitatively using the SPSS. The analysis of the students' pre- and post-tests concluded that as the lesson plans were gradually refined and enhanced, their performance in solving conditional probability questions steadily improved.

  2. Development of concept-based physiology lessons for biomedical engineering undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Regina K; Chesler, Naomi C; Strang, Kevin T

    2013-06-01

    Physiology is a core requirement in the undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. In one or two introductory physiology courses, engineering students must learn physiology sufficiently to support learning in their subsequent engineering courses and careers. As preparation for future learning, physiology instruction centered on concepts may help engineering students to further develop their physiology and biomedical engineering knowledge. Following the Backward Design instructional model, a series of seven concept-based lessons was developed for undergraduate engineering students. These online lessons were created as prerequisite physiology training to prepare students to engage in a collaborative engineering challenge activity. This work is presented as an example of how to convert standard, organ system-based physiology content into concept-based content lessons.

  3. Swedish Upper Secondary Students' Perspectives on the Typical Mathematics Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Paul; Larson, Niclas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a group interview study of Swedish upper secondary students' perspectives on the typical mathematics lesson. Students, from four demographically different schools, constructed a collective synthesis of their many years' experience of mathematics classrooms. Transcriptions were subjected to a constant comparison analysis, which…

  4. Black Students' Recollections of Pathways to Resilience: Lessons for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on narrative data from a multiple case study, I recount the life stories of two resilient Black South African university students to theorize about the processes that encouraged these students, familiar with penury and parental illiteracy, to resile. I aimed to uncover lessons for school psychologists about resilience, and their role in…

  5. Effects of Asynchronous Music on Students' Lesson Satisfaction and Motivation at the Situational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digelidis, Nikolaos; Karageorghis, Costas I.; Papapavlou, Anastasia; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of asynchronous (background) music on senior students' motivation and lesson satisfaction at the situational level. A counterbalanced mixed-model design was employed with two factors comprising condition (three levels) and gender (two levels). Two hundred students (82 boys, 118 girls; M [subscript…

  6. History-Infused Lessons in Introductory Calculus at the Secondary Level: Students' Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Wei Beng; Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2016-01-01

    A history-infused lesson package developed by a team of teachers in a professional learning community was used to teach introductory calculus in a secondary school. First, we report a quasi-experimental design that showed that students in the experimental group performed significantly better than students in the control group. Second, we report on…

  7. Strategies and Perceptions of Students' Field Note-Taking Skills: Insights from a Geothermal Field Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohaney, Jacqueline; Brogt, Erik; Kennedy, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Field note-taking skills are fundamental in the geosciences but are rarely explicitly taught. In a mixed-method study of an introductory geothermal field lesson, we characterize the content and perceptions of students' note-taking skills to derive the strategies that students use in the field. We collected several data sets: observations of the…

  8. Lessons for Teachers: What Lower Secondary School Students Tell Us about Learning a Musical Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In this study I set out to investigate why many students drop out from elective instrument programmes, particularly in lower secondary school. I examined the values and beliefs a sample of students in their first year in secondary school attach to learning an instrument, and the impact of the instrument lesson upon these values and beliefs.…

  9. Lessons Learned from a Decade of Serving Data to Students and the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Martin, A. M.; Riebeek, H.; Jackson, R.

    2015-12-01

    NASA holds petabytes of Earth science data from a fleet of satellites going back decades. While these data can be invaluable for use in STEM education and communication (E/C), the simple fact that the archive is public is not enough. The key to successful use is to provide technological tools in strategic combination with best practices to meet the needs of various audiences. Students and teachers need access points that are specifically tailored to meet the technology resources in the classroom; citizen scientists need to feel a connection to NASA, easy-to-use technological interfaces, and are motivated by contributing to real research activities; the general public needs short, focused, easily digested tidbits. NASA's Earth science E/C teams have developed strategies combining audience knowledge with new technical capabilities through programs like MY NASA DATA, S'COOL, Earth Observatory, Giovanni, climate.gov, etc. The capability to offer a range of resources targeted to specific audience needs has advanced along several fronts over the last decade through use of the following key strategies: Regularly publishing articles, fact sheets and image captions written with greater detail than media releases to connect basic science concepts with current NASA research. Providing for differing levels of engagement, with basic, intermediate and advanced data access tools as well as lesson plans for grades K-2 through high school. Facilitating the important scientific process of asking questions once students are actively engaged though exploration and manipulation of current Earth data delivered through desktop and mobile apps.. Providing curated data sets that students can more easily interpret. Assessing users' needs through ongoing formative evaluation. Using Analytics to make data-driven decisions about technologies and approaches. We will survey the range of approaches to enabling data use for STEM E/C and will share some of the key lessons learned.

  10. BLENDED LEARNING: STUDENT PERCEPTION OF FACE-TO-FACE AND ONLINE EFL LESSONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda M. Wright

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-increasing development of technology, online teaching is more readily accepted as a viable component in teaching and learning, and blended learning, the combining of online and face-to-face learning, is becoming commonplace in many higher education institutions. Blended learning is, particularly in developing countries, in its early stages and not without its challenges. Asynchronous online lessons are currently still more prevalent in many areas of South-East Asia, perhaps due to potential difficulty in obtaining strong Internet connections, which may deter educators from synchronous options. Technological media have the potential to broaden the scope of resources available in teaching and to enhance the language learning experience. Although research to date shows some focus on blended learning, literature on distance online teaching seems more prevalent. This study exposed 112 Malaysian undergraduate EFL students' responses to an online lesson as part of an English grammar course, and investigates common student perceptions of the online lesson as compared with face-to-face lessons. Questionnaires using qualitative (Likert scale questions and quantitative (open-ended questions approaches provided data for content analysis to determine common student perceptions, with particular reference to motivation and interest. In general, more students associated in-class lessons with higher motivation and more interest, due to better understanding, valued classroom interaction with the lecturer and peers, and input from the lecturer. Students preferring the online lesson cited speed and convenience of study and flexibility of time and place of study as reasons for their choice. Skilful implementation of online lessons can enhance a language course but should not undermine the value of face-to-face instruction with EFL teachers.

  11. Fun on the Farm: Evaluation of a Lesson to Teach Students about the Spread of Infection on School Farm Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Meredith K. D.; Lecky, Donna M.; Verlander, Neville Q.; McNulty, Cliodna A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background School visits to farms are a positive educational experience but pose risks due to the spread of zoonotic infections. A lesson plan to raise awareness about microbes on the farm and preventative behaviours was developed in response to the Griffin Investigation into the E. coli outbreak associated with Godstone Farm in 2009. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the delivery of the lesson plan in increasing knowledge about the spread of infection on the farm, amongst school students. Methods Two hundred and twenty-five 9–11 year old students from seven junior schools in England participated. Two hundred and ten students filled in identical questionnaires covering microbes, hand hygiene, and farm hygiene before and after the lesson. Statistical analysis assessed knowledge change using difference in percentage correct answers. Results Significant knowledge improvement was observed for all sections. In the ‘Farm Hygiene’ section, girls and boys demonstrated 18% (plesson plan was successful at increasing awareness of microbes on the farm and infection prevention measures and should be used by teachers in preparation for a farm visit. PMID:24146765

  12. Text Linguistics in Research Papers Prepared by University Students: Teaching through Lesson Plans and Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Albarrán-Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research project revolves around the properties of text linguistics under a qualitative approach.  The author analyzed drafts of a research paper by two university students as well as lesson plans and textbooks of high school Spanish Language and Literature courses and lesson plans of courses from the Licentiate degree in Education.  According to the information from the drafts, students struggle with coherence and cohesion in writing; however, they succeed in choosing the correct language for the type of writing.  Difficulties are most likely due to fact that this topic is not included in secondary education plans and is not commonly addressed in textbooks or university classes.  In conclusion, teachers should include the properties of text linguistics in their lesson plans in order to help students overcome these difficulties.

  13. Lessons learned from Khartoum flash flood impacts: An integrated assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Mohamad Ibrahim; Elagib, Nadir Ahmed; Horn, Finlay; Saad, Suhair A G

    2017-12-01

    This study aims at enabling the compilation of key lessons for decision makers and urban planners in rapidly urbanizing cities regarding the identification of representative, chief causal natural and human factors for the increased level of flash flood risk. To achieve this, the impacts of flash flood events of 2013 and 2014 in the capital of Sudan, Khartoum, were assessed using seven integrated approaches, i.e. rainfall data analysis, document analysis of affected people and houses, observational fieldwork in the worst flood affected areas, people's perception of causes and mitigation measures through household interviews, reported drinking water quality, reported water-related diseases and social risk assessment. Several lessons have been developed as follows. Urban planners must recognize the devastating risks of building within natural pathways of ephemeral watercourses. They must also ensure effective drainage infrastructures and physio-geographical investigations prior to developing urban areas. The existing urban drainage systems become ineffective due to blockage by urban waste. Building of unauthorized drainage and embankment structures by locals often cause greater flood problems than normal. The urban runoff is especially problematic for residential areas built within low-lying areas having naturally low infiltration capacity, as surface water can rapidly collect within hollows and depressions, or beside elevated roads that preclude the free flow of floodwater. Weak housing and infrastructure quality are especially vulnerable to flash flooding and even to rainfall directly. Establishment of services infrastructure is imperative for flash flood disaster risk reduction. Water supply should be from lower aquifers to avoid contaminant groundwater. Regular monitoring of water quality and archiving of its indicators help identify water-related diseases and sources of water contamination in the event of environmental disasters such as floods. Though the

  14. TED-Ed lessons & TED-Ed clubs: Educational activities to amplify students' voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villias, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    TED-Ed lessons and TED-Ed clubs are two powerful educational tools that can be used in today's school classrooms in order to create an educational environment that is engaging for the students and favors their active participation, created and fostered by TED-Ed. TED-Ed is TED's educational initiative, committed to create lessons worth sharing and amplify the voices and ideas of teachers and students around the world. TED-Ed animated lessons are fully organized lessons structured around an animated video that introduces new topics to learners in an exciting, thought-provoking way. These lessons have been created as a result of the cooperation between expert educators and animators and have been uploaded at the TED-Ed platform (http://ed.ted.com). On the other hand, TED-Ed Clubs are also an interesting way to offer students the chance, the voice and the opportunity to express their thoughts, engage actively on these matters and connect with each other, both at a local, as well as at an international level (http://ed.ted.com/clubs). By developing new TED-Ed lessons or by customizing appropriately existing animated TED-Ed lessons (translating, modifying the questions asked, introducing new discussion topics), I have created and implemented in my student-centered, didactic approach, a series of TED-ED animated lessons directly connected with the Greek national science syllabus that were used to spark students curiosity and initiate a further analytical discussion or introduce other relevant educational activities (http://gvillias.wixsite.com/education). Furthermore, at my school, we established Varvakeio TED-Ed Club, an environment that supports and empowers our students to research, develop and disseminate their own personal ideas that worth spreading. During the year, our members were inspired by watching TED talks presented by experts on their field on various different areas, including social, economical, environmental and technological-scientific issues. Our aim

  15. Monitoring and assessment activities and indications of empathic behavior of the examined teachers during physical education lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslaw Muszkieta

    2015-12-01

    The material of the studies was the physical education teachers of randomly chosen Poznań (Poland schools: primary, grammar, and secondary schools. The studies involved 584 physical education teachers. The studies were conducted in the school year of 1999-2000. For the studies, an observation method was applied consisting in lesson observations during physical education lessons carried out by physical education teachers. The results of the studies form characteristic upward or downward tendencies. The higher the educational stage the higher the percentage value for the teachers who: a assess attitudes and behavior of the students; b monitor and assess knowledge of the students in the field of physical culture; c assess with grades or points motor and organizational skills; d assess verbally tasks’ achievement; e apply and introduce self-monitoring and self-assessment of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and physical fitness of the students. The downward tendencies were observed exclusively for monitoring attitudes and behavior of the students (i.e. having sports outfit, activity, involvement, attendance, etc.. The examined women were characterized by better and more positive empathic behavior. For all parameters, the women appeared to be better.

  16. Development of Lesson Plans and Student Worksheets Based Socio-Scientific Issues on Pollution Environmental Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, S.; Meyliana, M.; Arlingga, A.; Reny, R.; Siahaan, P.; Hernani, H.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop lesson plans and student worksheets based socio-scientific issues on pollution environmental topic for seventh-grade junior high school students. Environmental pollution topic split into several subtopics namely air pollution, water pollution and soil pollution. The composing of lesson plans were developed based on socio-scientific issues with five stages, namely (1) Motivate; (2) Challenge; (3) Collect scientific evidence; (4) Analyse the evidence; (5) Build knowledge and make connections; and (6) Use evidence. While student worksheets contain articles on socio-scientific issues, practice, and there are a few questions to determine students’ reasoning. The method that is used in this research is research and development (R & D method). Development model used in this study is a model of Plomp that consists of four stages, namely: (1) Initial Research; (2) Design; (3) Realization or Construction; (4) Testing, evaluation and revision; (5) Implementation, while the research was limited to the fourth stage. Lesson plans and student worksheets based on socio-scientific issues was validated through an expert validation. The result showed that lesson plans and student worksheets based socio-scientific issues on pollution theme have a very decent and be able to apply in science classroom.

  17. Assessment of Students Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; Stachowicz, Marian S.

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation and assessment of engineering programmes is a big issue, and there exist many concepts and methods. This paper deals with the assessment methods which can be used when assessing the knowledge, skills and competences developed in projects using PBL (problem based and project organized...... learning) pedagogical approaches. The experience of assessing first year projects from the Medialogy education at Aalborg University and third year projects from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at University of Minnesota, Duluth are presented, and the different methods discussed....... The conclusion is that process as well as product has to be assessed in a way which evaluates all aspects of students’ learning outcomes....

  18. Nursing students assess nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Linda; Buerhaus, Peter I; Donelan, Karen; McCloskey, Barbara; Dittus, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the characteristics of nursing students currently enrolled in nursing education programs, how students finance their nursing education, their plans for clinical practice and graduate education, and the rewards and difficulties of being a nursing student. Data are from a survey administered to a national sample of 496 nursing students. The students relied on financial aid and personal savings and earnings to finance their education. Parents, institutional scholarships, and government loans are also important sources, but less than 15% of the students took out bank loans. Nearly one quarter of the students, particularly younger and minority students, plan to enroll in graduate school immediately after graduation and most want to become advanced nursing practitioners. Most of the nursing students (88%) are satisfied with their nursing education and nearly all (95%) provided written answers to two open-ended questions. Comments collapsed into three major categories reflecting the rewards (helping others, status, and job security) and three categories reflecting the difficulties (problems with balancing demands, quality of nursing education, and the admissions process) of being a nursing student. Implications for public policymaking center on expanding the capacity of nursing education programs, whereas schools themselves should focus on addressing the financial needs of students, helping them strike a balance among their school, work, and personal/family responsibilities and modifying certain aspects of the curriculum.

  19. Formative assessment: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D A; Guinea, A I; McCarthy, W H

    1994-09-01

    An educator's view would be that formative assessment has an important role in the learning process. This study was carried out to obtain a student perspective of the place of formative assessment in the curriculum. Final-year medical students at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital took part in four teaching sessions, each structured to integrate teaching with assessment. Three assessment methods were used; the group objective structured clinical examination (G-OSCE), structured short answer (SSA) questions and a pre/post-test multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ). Teaching sessions were conducted on the subject areas of traumatology, the 'acute abdomen', arterial disorders and cancer. Fifty-five students, representing 83% of those who took part in the programme, responded to a questionnaire where they were asked to rate (on a 5-point Likert scale) their response to general questions about formative assessment and 13 specific questions concerning the comparative value of the three assessment modalities. Eighty-nine per cent of respondents felt that formative assessment should be incorporated into the teaching process. The SSA assessment was regarded as the preferred modality to reinforce previous teaching and test problem-solving skills. The MCQ was the least favoured assessment method. The effect size variable between the total scores for the SSA and MCQ was 0.64. The variable between G-OSCE and SSA/MCQ was 0.26 and 0.33 respectively. Formative assessment is a potentially powerful method to direct learning behaviour. Students should have input into the methods used.

  20. Addressing data heterogeneity: Lessons learned from a multimedia risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezkaynak, H.; Xue, Jianping; Butler, D.A.; Haroun, L.A.; MacDonell, M.M.; Fingleton, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cleanup activities are currently being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at a former chemical plant site that has been inactive for more than 20 years. The Army produced nitroaromatic explosives at the 220-acre site during the 1940s, and radioactive materials of the uranium and thorium series were processed there by DOE's predecessor agency during the 1950s and 1960s. Chemical and radioactive contaminants are present in soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater at the site as a result of both past releases and disposal activities and subsequent contaminant migration. Samples have been collected from these media over a number of years under both DOE's environmental monitoring program and the site characterization program of the Superfund process. Results of samples analyses have been compiled in a computerized data base. These data are being evaluated in the context of potential exposure pathways that are currently present at the site or that may be present in the future, in order to estimate possible adverse impacts to human health and the environment in the absence of cleanup. This paper discusses the methodology used to address associated tasks and the lessons learned during the assessment process. Statistical issues and recommended future directions for dealing with technical aspects of this project and with similar multimedia risk assessment projects are addressed in the final discussion. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. Effects of Outdoor School Ground Lessons on Students' Science Process Skills and Scientific Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Kan Lin; Siew, Nyet Moi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of outdoor school ground lessons on Year Five students' science process skills and scientific curiosity. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. The participants in the study were divided into two groups, one subjected to the experimental treatment, defined as…

  2. The Effect of Knowledge Linking Levels in Biology Lessons upon Students' Knowledge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadouh, Julia; Liu, Ning; Sandmann, Angela; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge structure is an important aspect for defining students' competency in biology learning, but how knowledge structure is influenced by the teaching process in naturalistic biology classroom settings has scarcely been empirically investigated. In this study, 49 biology lessons in the teaching unit "blood and circulatory system" in…

  3. Effect of Pop Music on Students' Attitudes to Music Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Gökhan; Çiftçibasi, M. Can

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify whether the use of popular music in teaching song creates a significant difference in attitudes of middle school students to music lessons. "Pretest-posttest design" from experimental models was used. The experimental and control groups consists of 8 classes of continuing education from four different middle…

  4. Implementing Mathematics Teaching That Promotes Students' Understanding through Theory-Driven Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongjin; Gong, Zikun; Han, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Lesson study (LS) has been practiced in China as an effective way to advance teachers' professional development for decades. This study explores how LS improves teaching that promotes students' understanding. A LS group including didacticians (practice-based teaching research specialist and University-based mathematics educators) and mathematics…

  5. Culturally Responsive Education: Developing Lesson Plans for Vietnamese Students in the American Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the application of the philosophical principles of John Dewey and Culturally Responsive Education in the creation of lesson plans for Vietnamese students in the American Diaspora. Through a Fulbright-Hayes Program a group of teachers from the New York City Public School System and Long Island spent six weeks in Vietnam…

  6. Lessons Learned: An Open Letter to Recreational Therapy Students and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, David R.

    2010-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" provides a personalized approach and a fresh, bold guide for students and practitioners in recreational therapy. This thought-provoking, inspiring, and accessible text will help the next generation of recreational therapists to find purpose, meaning, and fulfillment in their own lives and to bring health and happiness to their…

  7. Exciting middle and high school students about immunology: an easy, inquiry-based lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Kara

    2013-03-01

    High school students in the United States are apathetic about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), and the workforce pipeline in these areas is collapsing. The lack of understanding of basic principles of biology means that students are unable to make educated decisions concerning their personal health. To address these issues, we have developed a simple, inquiry-based outreach lesson centered on a mouse dissection. Students learn key concepts in immunology and enhance their understanding of human organ systems. The experiment highlights aspects of the scientific method and authentic data collection and analysis. This hands-on activity stimulates interest in biology, personal health and careers in STEM fields. Here, we present all the information necessary to execute the lesson effectively with middle and high school students.

  8. Transformation of High School Students' Understanding about Household Work : Through Home Economics Lessons Focused on Relationships with One's Family

    OpenAIRE

    Kishi, Noriko; Suzuki, Akiko; Takahashi, Miyoko

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to clarify learners' understanding about household work and to see how the objectives of Home Economics lessons are achieved. Lessons about household work which were focused on relationships with one's family were given in a high school. 119 student descriptions on lesson worksheets were analyzed. From these data, the learners' understanding was categorized into four domains: feeling, utility, valuing, and social domains. These domains had a hierarchical stru...

  9. Students' Views About Secondary School Science Lessons: The Role of Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, Rob

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports an interpretive study that sought students' views about the role that practical work plays in their school science lessons. Twenty-nine students aged between 13 and 16 years were selected from three secondary schools in England. Data were collected from initial lesson observations and in-depth interviews in order to explore students' views about practical work. The findings suggest that students have three main reasons why practical work is important in their school science lessons: for interest and activity, including social and personal features such as participation and autonomy; as an alternative to other forms of science teaching involving a pedagogy of transmission, and as a way of learning, including memorizing and recall. The findings are discussed in the context of a critical view of previous work on the role of practical work, work on attitudes to science and on the student voice. The paper concludes that practical work is seen to provide opportunities for students to engage with and influence their own learning but that learning with practical work remains a complex issue that needs further research and evaluation about its use, effectiveness and of the role of scientific inquiry as a component of practical activity.

  10. Lessons learned from first generation nuclear plant probabalistic risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrick, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper by Garrick summarizes the state-of-the-art in what are perhaps the most archetypical probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs). Because of its unique regulatory environment and because of the high levels of perceived (not necessarily actual) risk, the nuclear industry more than any other has been concerned with quantitative risk analysis. Garrick's paper summarizes the lessons learned from ten PRA's conducted in the nuclear industry, including six that can be characterized as full-scope risk studies. Most of the quantitative data, though, came from two especially thorough studies done for the Zion and Indian Point power plants, operated by Commonwealth Edison and Consolidated Edison respectively. The principal conclusions of the Garrick survey are that the public risk (from radiation release) is now known to be very small for commercial nuclear power plants, but that the risk to utilities (from core damage) is somewhat larger. Significant radiation releases require both core meltdown -- an event occurring only about once every 10,000 reactor-years -- and containment failure, occurring only about once in every hundred meltdowns

  11. A Lesson Based on Student-Generated Ideas: A Practical Example Highlighting the Role of a Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Sarah Quebec

    2011-01-01

    The role of a teacher is different from that in traditional mathematics instruction when the implementation of a lesson is based on students' ideas. The author's experience teaching the same lesson (of the latter format) to two different classes of pre-service teachers in an elementary mathematics methods course is described. Since whole-class…

  12. The implementation of discovery learning model based on lesson study to increase student's achievement in colloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanti, Retno Dwi; Purba, Deby Monika

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this research are to get the increase student's achievement on the discovery learning model based on lesson study. Beside of that, this research also conducted to know the cognitive aspect. This research was done in three school that are SMA N 3 Medan. Population is all the students in SMA N 11 Medan which taken by purposive random sampling. The research instruments are achievement test instruments that have been validated. The research data analyzed by statistic using Ms Excell. The result data shows that the student's achievement taught by discovery learning model based on Lesson study higher than the student's achievement taught by direct instructional method. It can be seen from the average of gain and also proved with t-test, the normalized gain in experimental class of SMA N 11 is (0.74±0.12) and control class (0.45±0.12), at significant level α = 0.05, Ha is received and Ho is refused where tcount>ttable in SMA N 11 (9.81>1,66). Then get the improvement cognitive aspect from three of school is C2 where SMA N 11 is 0.84(high). Then the observation sheet result of lesson study from SMA N 11 92 % of student working together while 67% less in active using media.

  13. Hazard assessment for small torrent catchments - lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisl, Julia; Huebl, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    for sediment retention. As far as the transport capacity of the lower reaches is limited a balance had to be found between protection on the one hand and sediment connectivity to the Wölzer-river on the other. The lessons learned kicked off discussions for future hazard assessment especially concerning the use of rainfall data and design precipitation values for small torrent catchments. Also the comparison with empirical values showed the need for differentiated concepts for hazard analysis. Therefor recommendations for the use of spatial rainfall reduction factors as well as the demarcation of hazard maps using different event scenarios are proposed.

  14. Practising environmental assessment overseas: experience and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattrysse, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    Performing Environmental Assessments in developing nations can present significant challenges beyond those encountered when applying Canadian EA systems and standards to projects in Canada. In this respect, it is useful to explore the answers to two questions: What are some of the challenges of practising EA to Canadian standards in a developing country? and, despite these challenges, what can be accomplished to accrue the greatest benefits from an EA for an energy project in a developing nation? This paper explores some of the main components that are common to EA processes and practice in Canada for energy projects, but which can present significant complications and challenges when practised in a developing nation setting. Lessons are drawn from experience in Southeast Asia and elsewhere to assist in future EA planning for energy projects in developing nations. Addressed are such key aspects of EA as 1) timing and resources of a study; 2) discussion of project alternatives; 3) institutional arrangements; 4) carrying out public consultation and socio-economic impact studies; and finally, 5) some perspective on what can be accomplished to accrue the greatest benefits from an EA. Experience with the Bakun Hydroelectric Project in Southeast Asia and elsewhere identifies a number of constraints which challenge EA practice in developing nations. These challenges include: narrow windows of 'quality time' for carrying out EA studies within project life-cycles limitations imposed on the scope of discussion of alternatives; and, carrying out public consultation in foreign nations with languages, cultures and political systems different from our own. However, despite these challenges, it was found that very useful EAs can be produced for energy projects in developing nations through: persistent coordination of effort and use of the project to facilitate communication links between agencies within the developing nation; using advanced communication technologies to access

  15. Communicating uncertainty: lessons learned and suggestions for climate change assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, A.; Dessai, S.

    2005-01-01

    Assessments of climate change face the task of making information about uncertainty accessible and useful to decision-makers. The literature in behavior economics provides many examples of how people make decisions under conditions of uncertainty relying on inappropriate heuristics, leading to inconsistent and counterproductive choices. Modern risk communication practices recommend a number of methods to overcome these hurdles, which have been recommended for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment reports. This paper evaluates the success of the most recent IPCC approach to uncertainty communication, based on a controlled survey of climate change experts. Evaluating the results from the survey, and from a similar survey recently conducted among university students, the paper suggests that the most recent IPCC approach leaves open the possibility for biased and inconsistent responses to the information. The paper concludes by suggesting ways to improve the approach for future IPCC assessment reports. (authors)

  16. Listening to Students from Refugee Backgrounds: Lessons for Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthethwa-Sommers, Shirley; Kisiara, Otieno

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a study that examined how students from refugee backgrounds cope with victimization and bullying in three urban high schools in the United States. Qualitative methods of data collection and analysis were employed. Twelve high school students from refugee backgrounds participated in the study, which involved focus group…

  17. Student Technology Rollouts in Higher Education: Lessons from DISCOVERe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcore, Henry D.; Neufeld, Philip

    2017-01-01

    ICT rollouts are no longer discretionary: they have become a mandatory function of effective educational institutions. This study examines the rollout of tablet technology at a public, four-year university with particular attention to variations within the student population and the student voice. The research questions included: Do expectations…

  18. Describing Physics Student Teachers' Orientations through Lesson Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Isik Saliha

    2017-01-01

    Recent educational reforms realized in teacher education programs (TEPs) and secondary physics syllabus were aimed at placing the learning and teaching approaches in a constructivist framework. For this reason, student teachers in pre-service TEPs are expected to develop orientations adopting student-centred teaching approaches. The purpose of…

  19. Beyond Educational Tourism: Lessons Learned while Student Teaching Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Reyes L.

    2004-01-01

    Many universities provide overseas student teaching yet little is known as to what knowledge, skills, and dispositions university students have prior to arriving in their host country as well as after their return to their home country. This article considers several key issues and suggests factors that schools of education should consider when…

  20. Practice for beginners programming lesson using App Lab: Introduction of programming learning for undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    榊原, 直樹

    2017-01-01

    App Lab is an online programming education environment. It was designed classes of programming for beginners using the App Lab. Through 15 lessons of the class, it was to understand the basic structure of the programming of the sequential-repetition-branch. Students were allowed to complete the game as a final project. The effectiveness of App the Lab has been confirmed from these results.

  1. Decolonising medical curricula through diversity education: lessons from students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazar, Mahdi; Kendall, Kathleen; Day, Lawrence; Nazar, Hamde

    2015-04-01

    The General Medical Council (GMC) expects that medical students graduate with an awareness of how the diversity of the patient population may affect health outcomes and behaviours. However, little guidance has been provided on how to incorporate diversity teaching into medical school curricula. Research highlights the existence of two different models within medical education: cultural competency and cultural humility. The Southampton medical curriculum includes both models in its diversity teaching, but little was known about which model was dominant or about the students' experience. Fifteen semi-structured, in-depth interviews were carried out with medical students at the University of Southampton. Data were analysed thematically using elements of grounded theory and constant comparison. Students identified early examples of diversity teaching consistent with a cultural humility approach. In later years, the limited diversity teaching recognised by students generally adopted a cultural competency approach. Students tended to perceive diversity as something that creates problems for healthcare professionals due to patients' perceived differences. They also reported witnessing a number of questionable practices related to diversity issues that they felt unable to challenge. The dissonance created by differences in the largely lecture based and the clinical environments left students confused and doubting the value of cultural humility in a clinical context. Staff training on diversity issues is required to encourage institutional buy-in and establish consistent educational and clinical environments. By tackling cultural diversity within the context of patient-centred care, cultural humility, the approach students valued most, would become the default model. Reflective practice and the development of a critical consciousness are crucial in the improvement of cultural diversity training and thus should be facilitated and encouraged. Educators can adopt a

  2. MANAGING PERSONAL FINANCES: EXAMPLES AND LESSONS FROM CROATIAN STUDENT POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Branko Matic; Hrvoje Serdarusic; Maja Vretenar Cobovic

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the authors present the results of their research related to financial involvement and management of personal finances of the student population on the territory of eastern Croatia. The research focused on the reasons for the entrance of student population into the financial system, the amount of their use of credit institutions’ services as well as their motives for choosing a certain credit institution

  3. Measuring University students' understanding of the greenhouse effect - a comparison of multiple-choice, short answer and concept sketch assessment tools with respect to students' mental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Harris, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The greenhouse effect comes up in most discussions about climate and is a key concept related to climate change. Existing studies have shown that students and adults alike lack a detailed understanding of this important concept or might hold misconceptions. We studied the effectiveness of different interventions on University-level students' understanding of the greenhouse effect. Introductory level science students were tested for their pre-knowledge of the greenhouse effect using validated multiple-choice questions, short answers and concept sketches. All students participated in a common lesson about the greenhouse effect and were then randomly assigned to one of two lab groups. One group explored an existing simulation about the greenhouse effect (PhET-lesson) and the other group worked with absorption spectra of different greenhouse gases (Data-lesson) to deepen the understanding of the greenhouse effect. All students completed the same assessment including multiple choice, short answers and concept sketches after participation in their lab lesson. 164 students completed all the assessments, 76 completed the PhET lesson and 77 completed the data lesson. 11 students missed the contrasting lesson. In this presentation we show the comparison between the multiple-choice questions, short answer questions and the concept sketches of students. We explore how well each of these assessment types represents student's knowledge. We also identify items that are indicators of the level of understanding of the greenhouse effect as measured in correspondence of student answers to an expert mental model and expert responses. Preliminary data analysis shows that student who produce concept sketch drawings that come close to expert drawings also choose correct multiple-choice answers. However, correct multiple-choice answers are not necessarily an indicator that a student produces an expert-like correlating concept sketch items. Multiple-choice questions that require detailed

  4. Assessing HITECH Implementation and Lessons: 5 Years Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marsha; McLAUGHLIN, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The expansive goals of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act required the simultaneous development of a complex and interdependent infrastructure and a wide range of relationships, generating points of vulnerability. While federal legislation can be a powerful stimulus for change, its effectiveness also depends on its ability to accommodate state and local policies and private health care markets. Ambitious goals require support over a long time horizon, which can be challenging to maintain. The future of health information technology (health IT) support nationally is likely to depend on the ability of the technology to satisfy its users that its functionalities address the interests policymakers and other stakeholders have in using technology to promote better care, improved outcomes, and reduced costs. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act set ambitious goals for developing electronic health information as one tool to reform health care delivery and improve health outcomes. With HITECH's grant funding now mostly exhausted but statutory authority for standards remaining, this article looks back at HITECH's experience in the first 5 years to assess its implementation, remaining challenges, and lessons learned. This review derives from a global assessment of the HITECH Act. Earlier, we examined the logic of HITECH and identified interdependencies critical to its ultimate success. In this article, we build on that framework to review what has and has not been accomplished in building the infrastructure authorized by HITECH since it was enacted. The review incorporates quantitative and qualitative evidence of progress from the global assessment and from the evaluations funded by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) of individual programs authorized by the HITECH Act. Our review of the evidence provides a mixed picture. Despite HITECH

  5. Student projects in medicine: a lesson in science and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah J L

    2009-11-01

    Regulation of biomedical research is the subject of considerable debate in the bioethics and health policy worlds. The ethics and governance of medical student projects is becoming an increasingly important topic in its own right, especially in the U.K., where there are periodic calls to change it. My main claim is that there seems to be no good reason for treating student projects differently from projects led by qualified and more experienced scientists and hence no good grounds for changing the current system of ethics review. I first suggest that the educational objectives cannot be met without laying down standards of good science, whatever they may be. Weak science is unnecessary for educational purposes, and it is, in any case, unlikely to produce good researchers in the future. Furthermore, it is curious to want to change the system of ethics review specifically for students when it is the science that is at stake, and when the science now falls largely outside the ethics remit. I further show that ethics review is nevertheless important since students carry a new potential conflict of interests that warrants independent oversight which supervisory support does not offer. This potential conflict may become more morally troublesome the greater the risks to the subjects of the research, and students may impose greater risks on their subjects (relative to professional researchers) by virtue of being inexperienced, whatever the nature of the project. Pragmatic concerns may finally be allayed by organizing the current system more efficiently at critical times of the university calendar.

  6. Comparison of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, H.P.; Berg, H.P.; Steininger, U.

    2001-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) have been performed for all German nuclear power plants in operation. These assessments are mainly based on the recent German PSA guide and an earlier draft, respectively. However, comparison of these PSA show differences in the results which are discussed in this paper. Lessons learned from this comparison and further development of the PSA methodology are described. (orig.) [de

  7. Lessons Learned from Net Zero Energy Assessments and Renewable Energy Projects at Military Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, M.; Anderson, K.; Booth, S.; Katz, J.; Tetreault, T.

    2011-09-01

    Report highlights the increase in resources, project speed, and scale that is required to achieve the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) energy efficiency and renewable energy goals and summarizes the net zero energy installation assessment (NZEI) process and the lessons learned from NZEI assessments and large-scale renewable energy projects implementations at DoD installations.

  8. Serving Others: Student-Run Restaurant Teaches Many Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Cairns and cares: they sound nearly alike, and at Tommie Kunst Junior High School (Santa Maria, CA), the two words are synonymous. Kim Cairns is a "Pitsco Education" Life Skills lab facilitator who cares deeply about her students--what they do, what they say, how they act, what they learn, and everything in between. Cairns has taken…

  9. Supporting Military Veteran Students: Early Lessons from Kohlberg Prize Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Klempin, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education participation is critical for military-connected individuals as they transition back to civilian life. The Kisco Foundation's Kohlberg Prize, a competitive grant awarded in 2015 and 2016, is aimed at making community colleges more welcoming and better able to meet the needs of veteran students. This review details the early…

  10. Choosing a Wiki Platform for Student Projects--Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Ross A.

    2010-01-01

    Wikis offer many benefits, such as two-way flows of information, early and consistent feedback, and greater student group collaboration, in an educational setting. Some researchers have already reported on the use of Wikis in their classes. However, instructors must choose an appropriate Wiki platform in order to receive all of the benefits of…

  11. Complementary use of life cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: Lessons learned from chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Successful strategies to handle the potential health and environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) often rely upon the well-established frameworks of life cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA). However, current research and specific guidance on how to actually apply these two...... scientific research efforts have taken into account some key lessons learned from past experiences with chemicals at the same time that many key challenges remain to applying these frameworks to ENM. In that setting, two main proposed approaches to use LCA and RA together for ENM are identified: i) LC......-based RA, similar to traditional RA applied in a life cycle perspective, and ii) RA-complemented LCA, similar to conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life cycle steps. This study finds that these two approaches for using LCA and RA together for ENM are similar to those made for chemicals...

  12. A Summer Math and Physics Program for High School Students: Student Performance and Lessons Learned in the Second Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas; Baird, Michael; Bennett, Jake; Fry, Jason; Garrison, Lance; Maltese, Adam

    2013-05-01

    For the past two years, the Foundations in Physics and Mathematics (FPM) summer program has been held at Indiana University in order to fulfill two goals: provide additional physics and mathematics instruction at the high school level, and provide physics graduate students with experience and autonomy in designing curricula and teaching courses. In this paper we will detail changes made to the program for its second year and the motivation for these changes, as well as implications for future iterations of the program. We gauge the impact of the changes on student performance using pre-/post-test scores, student evaluations, and anecdotal evidence. These data show that the program has a positive impact on student knowledge and this impact was greater in magnitude in the second year of the program. We attribute this improvement primarily to the inclusion of more inquiry-driven activities. All activities, worksheets, and lesson plans used in the program are available online.

  13. Student Emotions in Conversation-Based Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Blair A.; Zapata-Rivera, Diego

    2018-01-01

    Students can experience a variety of emotions while completing assessments. Some emotions can get in the way of students performing their best (e.g., anxiety, frustration), whereas other emotions can facilitate student performance (e.g., engagement). Many new, non-traditional assessments, such as automated conversation-based assessments (CBA), are…

  14. I Can Assess Myself: Singaporean Primary Students' and Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Self-Assessment Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hwei Ming

    2016-01-01

    Student self-assessment engages the students in purposeful reflection about what they are learning and how they are learning it. This study investigated the perceptions of students and teachers towards the students' self-assessment ability in two Singapore primary schools. A total of 75 students were taught how to use self-assessment. Eighteen…

  15. Importance of Students' Views and the Role of Self-Esteem in Lessons of Creative Dance in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Claudia; Steinberg, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to capture the student's views in lessons of creative dance. A qualitative empirical research design was carried out using video-stimulated recall interviews. The participants in this study were 88 children (63 female and 25 male) between the ages of 9 and 11 years (M = 10.5, SD = 1.2) in physical education lessons. A…

  16. Development of WebQuest Lesson Enhancing Thai Reading Skills for Students with Down Syndrome at Lower Elementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewchote, Nantawan; Chongchaikit, Maturos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to enhancing the Thai language oral reading skills of lower elementary students with Down syndrome using WebQuest lesson. The sample groups were the 5 lower elementary students, purposively selected from Watnonsaparam public school under the Office of Saraburi Educational Service Area, Thailand. The research…

  17. Perceived Advantages of 3D Lessons in Constructive Learning for South African Student Teachers Encountering Learning Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Thelma

    2017-01-01

    Research shows that three-dimensional (3D)-animated lessons can contribute to student teachers' effective learning and comprehension, regardless of the learning barriers they experience. Student teachers majoring in the subject Life Sciences in General Subject Didactics viewed 3D images of the heart during lectures. The 3D images employed in the…

  18. An Examination of Science High School Students' Motivation towards Learning Biology and Their Attitude towards Biology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisoglu, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine motivation of science high school students towards learning biology and their attitude towards biology lessons. The sample of the study consists of 564 high school students (308 females, 256 males) studying at two science high schools in Aksaray, Turkey. In the study, the relational scanning method, which is…

  19. An Analysis of Metaphors Used by High School Students to Describe Physics, Physics Lesson and Physics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe high school students' "physics", physics lesson" and "physics teacher" conceptions by using metaphors. 313 students participated in the study from different high school types in Siirt, Turkey. A metaphorical perception form constructed by researcher was individually conducted,…

  20. Randomized trials of alcohol-use interventions with college students and their parents: lessons from the Transitions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, A C; Wood, M D; Laforge, R; Black, J T

    2011-04-01

    Matriculation from high school to college is typified by an increase in alcohol use and related harm for many students. Therefore, this transition period is an ideal time for preventive interventions to target alcohol use and related problems. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and methods used in the Transitions Project, a randomized controlled trial of two interventions designed to prevent and reduce heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related negative consequences among incoming college students. This study used a 2 × 2 factorial design to investigate the effects of a two-session brief motivational intervention delivered to students and a handbook-based parent intervention. Interventions were administered to students and parents. Follow-up assessment took place at 10- and 22-months post-baseline. The Transitions Project successfully recruited and retained participants across a major transition period (i.e., entering college), administered and compared two distinct but complementary interventions, and collected and analyzed highly skewed data. The application of a factorial design and two-part latent growth curve modeling allowed us to examine main and interactive intervention effects in terms of both initiation and growth in heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. While we conducted successful tests of our primary and secondary study hypotheses over a lengthy follow-up period, our study design did not permit full interpretation of null findings. We suggest that researchers carefully consider assessment timing, tests of assessment reactivity, and ensure objective tests of intervention efficacy when conducting clinical trials of motivational interventions. The lessons we learned while conducting this trial have the potential to assist other researchers designing and conducting future preventive interventions targeting parents and college students. The data analytic procedures presented can also help guide trials that plan to analyze

  1. Interprofessional education through service-learning: lessons from a student-led free clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Janice L; Goodwin, Charles; Sevilla, Javier

    2015-05-01

    The academic community must replicate and strengthen existing models for interprofessional education (IPE) to meet widespread calls for team-based patient-centered care. One effective but under-explored possibility for IPE is through student-led clinics, which now exist in the majority of medical schools. This short report presents the Indiana University Student Outreach Clinic (IU-SOC), which involves seven different professional programs across three institutions, as a model for how IPE can be delivered formally through service learning. Lessons learned, such as nurturing an intentional interprofessional program, structured orientation and reflection, and resource and knowledge sharing between the clinic and academic institutions, can be applied to all student-led clinics, but also can inform other IPE initiatives in health professional curricula.

  2. Pregnant Students Of Secondary Schools As Descendants Of Unwed Mothers Some Lessons To Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenda M. Wamelda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This phenomenological study was designed to determine the experiences of pregnant secondary school students aged 12-19 students who were descendants of unwed mothers. In-depth-interview and focus group discussion were applied with 14 pregnant students who were utilized in selecting the participants of the study. The participants revealed that their experiences were on humiliation and disdain remorse fear and insecurity escape and remediation support and love financial constraints and acquiescence. Their coping mechanisms were being positive about the situation having the aid and support of the family faith and hope to the divine God and the wisdom of the family. Importantly the teenage mothers valued the lessons learned from the experience the values of resilience and elasticity resolution and repentance for what they have done and hopes and dreams for the future.

  3. Learning Lessons from TMI to Fukushima and Other Industrial Accidents: Keys for Assessing Safety Management Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechy, N.; Rousseau, J.-M.; Dien, Y.; Montmayeul, R.; Llory, M.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the paper is to discuss and to argue about transfer, from an industrial sector to another industrial sector, of lessons learnt from accidents. It will be achieved through the discussion of some theoretical foundations and through the illustration of examples of application cases in assessment of safety management practices in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The nuclear energy production industry has faced three big ones in 30 years (TMI, Chernobyl, Fukushima) involving three different reactor technologies operated in three quite different cultural, organizational and regulatory contexts. Each of those accident has been the origin of questions, but also generator of lessons, some changing the worldview (see Wilpert and Fahlbruch, 1998) of what does cause an accident in addition to the engineering view about the importance of technical failures (human error, safety culture, sociotechnical interactions). Some of their main lessons were implemented such as improvements of human-machine interfaces ergonomics, recast of some emergency operating procedures, severe accident mitigation strategies and crisis management. Some lessons did not really provide deep changes. It is the case for organizational lessons such as, organizational complexity, management of production pressures, regulatory capture, and failure to learn, etc.

  4. Students' Preferences in Undergraduate Mathematics Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, P.; Simpson, A.

    2015-01-01

    Existing research into students' preferences for assessment methods has been developed from a restricted sample: in particular, the voice of students in the 'hard-pure sciences' has rarely been heard. We conducted a mixed method study to explore mathematics students' preferences of assessment methods. In contrast to the message from the general…

  5. Student Self-Assessment in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.N.M. Lew (Magdeleine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis addresses the theme of student self-assessment in higher education. Self-assessment is defined as the process by which students make judgments about their learning, particularly their learning outcomes (Boud & Falchikov, 1989; Eva et al., 2004). It functions to train students

  6. Engaging with Assessment: Increasing Student Engagement through Continuous Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Naomi

    2018-01-01

    Student engagement is intrinsically linked to two important metrics in learning: student satisfaction and the quality of the student experience. One of the ways that engagement can be influenced is through careful curriculum design. Using the knowledge that many students are "assessment-driven," a low-stakes continuous weekly summative…

  7. Student Engagement in Assessments: What Students and Teachers Find Engaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soung; Kokka, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Although research has shown that student engagement is strongly related to performance on assessment tasks, especially for traditionally underserved subgroups of students, increasing student engagement has not been the goal of standardized tests of content knowledge. Recent state and federal policies, however, are changing the assessment…

  8. Students' beliefs and behaviour regarding low-calorie beverages, sweets or snacks: are they affected by lessons on healthy food and by changes to school vending machines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, Paul L; van Kesteren, Nicole M C; Buijs, Goof; Snel, Jeltje; Dusseldorp, Elise

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of school lessons about healthy food on adolescents' self-reported beliefs and behaviour regarding the purchase and consumption of soft drinks, water and extra foods, including sweets and snacks. The lessons were combined with the introduction of lower-calorie foods, food labelling and price reductions in school vending machines. A cluster-randomized controlled design was used to allocate schools to an experimental group (i.e. lessons and changes to school vending machines) and a control group (i.e. 'care as usual'). Questionnaires were used pre-test and post-test to assess students' self-reported purchase of extra products and their knowledge and beliefs regarding the consumption of low-calorie products. Secondary schools in the Netherlands. Twelve schools participated in the experimental group (303 students) and fourteen in the control group (311 students). The students' mean age was 13.6 years, 71.5% were of native Dutch origin and mean BMI was 18.9 kg/m(2). At post-test, the experimental group knew significantly more about healthy food than the control group. Fewer students in the experimental group (43%) than in the control group (56%) reported bringing soft drinks from home. There was no significant effect on attitude, social norm, perceived behavioural control and intention regarding the consumption of low-calorie extra products. The intervention had limited effects on students' knowledge and self-reported behaviour, and no effect on their beliefs regarding low-calorie beverages, sweets or snacks. We recommend a combined educational and environmental intervention of longer duration and engaging parents. More research into the effects of such interventions is needed.

  9. Students' Perceptions of Assessment in Undergraduate Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Paola; Simpson, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A consistent message emerges from research on undergraduate students' perceptions of assessment which describes traditional assessment as detrimental to learning. However this literature has not included students in the pure sciences. Mathematics education literature advocates the introduction of innovative assessment at university. In this…

  10. The Appropriate Use of Student Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Skilled teachers who assess students using high quality, relevant and timely assessments can use the results to modify, refine and individualize instruction. Student assessments should be a reflection of what is taught in the classroom. As more accountability provisions have been implemented at the national, state and district levels, the focus on…

  11. BiteScis: Connecting K-12 teachers with science graduate students to produce lesson plans on modern science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Many students graduate high school having never learned about the process and people behind modern science research. The BiteScis program addresses this gap by providing easily implemented lesson plans that incorporate the whos, whats, and hows of today's scienctific discoveries. We bring together practicing scientists (motivated graduate students from the selective communicating science conference, ComSciCon) with K-12 science teachers to produce, review, and disseminate K-12 lesson plans based on modern science research. These lesson plans vary in topic from environmental science to neurobiology to astrophysics, and involve a range of activities from laboratory exercises to art projects, debates, or group discussion. An integral component of the program is a series of short, "bite-size" articles on modern science research written for K-12 students. The "bite-size" articles and lesson plans will be made freely available online in an easily searchable web interface that includes association with a variety of curriculum standards. This ongoing program is in its first year with about 15 lesson plans produced to date.

  12. The study features of test procedures of students' knowledge on the physical training lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobejnik V.A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to determine the significance of the relationship and special professional skills necessary to detect and correct errors and evaluating students in physical education classes. The surveys were a group of qualified teachers (n = 31 with different pedagogical experience. Each teacher was asked to arrange the professional quality of the places from 1 to 10. It was found that all investigated have a certain quality and a high level of relationship, but they are manifested in different periods of teaching. It is shown that the process of organizing and carrying out checks of expertise includes logically related mental operations which are the basis of test procedures of students' knowledge on the physical training lessons. Found that the most weighty qualities were related to skills: a rating, comment exposed estimate visually identify the error and determine its significance.

  13. The second generation of natural resource damage assessments: Lessons learned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthi, R.B.; Burlington, L.B.; Reinharz, E.; Shutler, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Damage Assessment Regulations Team (DART), under the Office of General Counsel of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has centered its efforts on developing natural resource damage assessment regulations for oil pollution in navigable waters. These procedures will likely lower the costs associated with damage assessments, encourage joint cooperative assessments and simplify most assessments. The DART team of NOAA is developing new regulations for the assessment of damages due to injuries related to oil spills under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. These regulations will involve coordination, restoration, and economic valuation. Various methods are currently being developed to assess damages for injuries to natural resources. The proposed means include: compensation tables for spills under 50,000 gallons, Type A model, expedited damage assessment (EDA) procedures, and comprehensive procedures. They are being developed to provide trustees with a choice for assessing natural resource damages for each oil spill

  14. Effects of multiple intelligences instruction strategy on students achievement levels and attitudes towards English Lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Bas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences instruction strategy and traditional instructionalenvironment on students’ achievement and their attitude towards English lesson. The research was carried out in 2009 – 2010education-instruction year in Karatli Sehit Sahin Yilmaz Elementary School, Nigde, Turkey. Totally 60 students in two differentclasses in the 4th grade of this school participated in the study. In this study, an experimental method with a control group hasbeen used in order to find out the difference between the students who were taught by multiple intelligences instructionstrategy in the experiment group and the students who were taught by traditional instructional methods in the control group.The results of the research showed a significant difference between the attitude scores of the experiment group and thecontrol group. It was also found out that the multiple intelligences instruction strategy activities were more effective in thepositive development of the students’ attitudes. At the end of the research, it is revealed that the students who are educatedby multiple intelligences instruction strategy are more successful and have a higher motivation level than the students who areeducated by the traditional instructional methods.

  15. "Estuaries and coasts" CLIL* lesson plans in English and geology fieldtrip to Cornwall for students in European section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempelli, Nathalie; Voyer, Karine; Lebourgeois, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    When the European section was created in our high school we had to choose an overarching theme. After considering that we live both in the River Seine estuary and near the English Channel it became obvious that our theme should be "estuaries and coasts". We began the 2012-2013 school year with a day-trip around the River Seine estuary to introduce the theme. First we made a general landscape study from a viewpoint, then we discussed the history of the navigation on the Seine, of local farming on marshland and finally we focused on farmhouse architecture. To conclude we visited the natural reserve near the "Normandy Bridge". As an introduction our poster aims at presenting this part of Normandy. And then we would like to show some examples of our CLIL lesson plans about this chosen topic. The aim of a CLIL lesson is to create interactive speaking between students working in pairs or in groups. There are three different stages: - Warm-up activities - In-depth study: listening, reading, echoing, looking for information on the internet, making a slide show and doing an oral presentation, participating to a role play… - Assessment : using what has been learnt to answer questions Finally we wish to present our field trip to Cornwall. We have already done it twice before (in 2002 and 2004) and this year it is scheduled in May 2013 with our European section students. The aim of this trip is to study geology and botany in English in order to extend what we teach in our CLIL lessons about estuaries and coasts. It also helps promoting exchanges with British families and building intercultural knowledge and understanding. Our program includes for example, fossil hunting and studying the Jurassic cliffs in Charmouth, observing an old ocean crust in Coverack, visiting Saint-Mickael's mount, discovering a tin mine in Geevor, walking through the "Lost Gardens of Heligan" and thus discovering an example of this world-renowned restored English garden, and last but not least having

  16. Student Voices in School-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Siu Yin Annie; Adamson, Bob

    2015-01-01

    The value of student voices in dialogues about learning improvement is acknowledged in the literature. This paper examines how the views of students regarding School-based Assessment (SBA), a significant shift in examination policy and practice in secondary schools in Hong Kong, have largely been ignored. The study captures student voices through…

  17. Peer/Self Assessment and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, Abdou

    2017-01-01

    Effective and durable learning achievements can result from students' engagement in their own learning. This study explored students' perceptions of the mechanisms and processes through which peer and self-assessment can contribute to their learning. More specifically, the study investigated students' perceived ways in which peer and…

  18. History's lessons: A Critical assessment of the desrochers papers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A.A. Boons (Frank)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA major claim of the work of Desrochers is that students of industrial ecology can learn a great deal from historical evidence on industrial practices regarding waste recovery. In this article, I argue that this requires that such evidence should be put into its institutional context, to

  19. Systemic Assessment as a new tool for assessing students learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Assessment [SA] has been shown to be highly effective new tool in raising the level of students academic achievements, improve their ability to learn by enhancing the process of teaching and learning, and converts students from surface to deep learning. It also allow teacher to monitor students learning ...

  20. The Nature of Feedback Given to Elementary Student Teachers from University Supervisors after Observations of Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Catherine; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Poling, Lisa; Richardson, Kerri; Polly, Drew

    2018-01-01

    This research explores the frequency and nature of mathematics-specific feedback given to elementary student teachers by university supervisors across a collection of post-lesson observation forms. Approximately one-third of the forms (n = 250) analysed from five large universities had no comments related to mathematics. Forms that did have…

  1. Effects of Multiple Intelligences Supported Project-Based Learning on Students' Achievement Levels and Attitudes towards English Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Gökhan; Beyhan, Ömer

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences supported project-based learning and traditional foreign language-teaching environment on students' achievement and their attitude towards English lesson. The research was carried out in 2009-2010 education-instruction year in Karatli Sehit Sahin Yilmaz Elementary…

  2. Attitudes of Select Music Performance Faculty toward Students Teaching Private Lessons after Graduation: A USA Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, William E.; Moore, Christopher; Gavin, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to pilot test an adjusted version of a questionnaire, used in earlier studies with college music students, to determine opinions of college music faculty on the topic of private lesson teaching. Full-time tenure-track college music faculty, with primary appointments in applied music at two universities in the United…

  3. Incorporating the Use of Writing-to-Learn Strategy in Grade 10 Mathematics Lessons: The Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaimi, Zuhairina; Shahrill, Masitah; Tengah, Khairul Amilin; Abbas, Nor'Arifahwati Haji

    2016-01-01

    This study incorporated the use of writing-to-learn strategy, particularly journal writing, in Grade 10 mathematics lessons. Although part of a study conducted to investigate the effects of journal writing on academically lower-achieving learners with English as their second language, this paper will focus only on the students' perceptions of…

  4. The Fit between Students’ Lesson Perceptions and Desires: Relations with Student Characteristics and the Importance of Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könings, Karen; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Könings, K. D., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2011). The match between students’ lesson perceptions and preferences: Relations with student characteristics and the importance of motivation. Educational Research, 53(4), 439-457.

  5. Rational Behavior Training: A Seven Lesson Sequence for Teaching Rational Behavior Skills to Students with Social and Emotional Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Patricia Lucey

    This seven lesson curriculum sequence is designed to help teachers teach principles of Rational Behavior Training (RBT) which targets thinking behaviors, feeling behaviors, and behavioral responses to the environment. The program is appropriate for students with social and emotional disabilities and also develops reading, writing, spelling,…

  6. METHODOLOGY OF ORGANIZATION OF INTEGRATED LESSONS OF NATURAL-SCIENCE CYCLE (ON THE EXAMPLE OF TEACHING SPE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsou Raufovna Kamaleeva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the process of transition of Russian organizations of secondary professional education to educational standards of the third generation educational process is reduced to formation of students’ competences. This article presents methodology of creating integrated lessons of natural-science cycle (for example, in physics and informatics. These lessons are constructed on the basis of interdisciplinary integration and focused on task solution. The main purpose is to teach students how to solve particular tasks in physics with the use of informatics, in particular on the basis of algorithmization and programming (Pascal language. Didactic conditions, which are the basis of the algorithm of designing corresponding tasks, are described in this article. Structural components of the integrated lessons created on the traditional principle are marked out. During the research we observed that realization of all stages of the corresponding lessons in practice allows the teacher to create educational process over the borders of disciplinary basis. This approach helps to form generalization of knowledge. Being one of the most optimal forms of education, an integrated lesson allows students to solve various educational and professional problems in non-standard situations and stimulates their cognitive activity and their involvement in the process of education and their responsibility for the result which promotes an intensification of educational process.

  7. Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Assessment as a New Tool for Assessing Students Learning in Chemistry using SATL Methods: Systemic Matching, Systemic Synthesis, Systemic Analysis, Systemic Synthetic – Analytic, as Systemic Question Types.

  8. Assessing student clinical learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehyba, Katrine; Miller, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne; Singer, Barbara

    2017-08-01

    This article describes the use of an activity worksheet and questionnaire to investigate the learning experience of students on clinical placement. The worksheet measures the amount of time students spend in different learning activities, and the questionnaire explores student satisfaction and preferred learning activities. An activity worksheet and questionnaire … investigate[d] the learning experiences of students on clinical placement METHODS: The activity worksheet and questionnaire were used in a cohort pilot study of physiotherapy students on clinical placement. The activity worksheet provides details of the amount of time students engage in a range of clinical and non-clinical tasks while on placement, such as time spent treating patients, working individually, working with their peers and engaging in reflective practice. In combination with the questionnaire results, it allows clinicians to gain an understanding of the clinical learning environment experienced by their students. The data collected using these tools provide a description of the students' activities while undertaking the clinical placement. This information may guide the refinement of the clinical experience, and offers an opportunity to individualise learning activities to match students' needs and preferences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  9. University students' attitudes towards peer assessment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the whole, the findings show that students were happy to peer assess but not so much to be peer assessed. Also, half of the participants estimated that their assessments did not match those to be expected by their course instructor even if the same assessment criteria were to be used. Some recommendations are ...

  10. The Acadia Learning Project: Lessons Learned from Engaging High School Teachers and Students in Citizen Science Supporting National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, S. J.; Zoellick, B.; Davis, Y.; Lindsey, E.

    2009-12-01

    In 2007 the authors initiated a citizen science research project, supported with funding from the Maine Department of Education, designed to extend research at Acadia National Park to a broader geographic area while also providing high school students and teachers with an opportunity to engage in authentic research in cooperation with working scientists. The scientific focus of the work has been on providing information about the mercury burden of organisms at different trophic levels across different geographic and environmental settings. The pedagogical focus has been on providing students with immersion in a substantial, field-based project, including background research, hypothesis formulation, data collection and analysis, and presentation of research findings. Starting work with 6 teachers in two schools the first year, the project expanded to involve more than 20 teachers and 350 students in a dozen schools in its second year. In coming years, with support from NOAA and cooperation from other National Parks in the region, the project will expand to include work in other states along the coast of the Gulf of Maine. In this paper the authors describe evolution in the use of the Internet over the first two years of the project, a sharpened focus on professional development for teachers, survey results regarding student views of the nature of science, the importance of focusing on rigorous, useful data collection from an educational perspective, success in establishing that samples collected by students are useful in research, the disjuncture between scientific and pedagogical outcomes, an assessment of the value of student poster presentations, and lessons learned about preparation and use of curriculum support materials. The authors also describe future directions, which include an increased focus on professional development and student work with graphs, a narrower focus in sample collection, and increased use of the Internet to provide participating teachers

  11. Assessing Student Understanding of Physical Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, A. J.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Our objective is to characterize and assess upper division and graduate student thinking by developing and testing an assessment tool for a physical hydrology class. The class' learning goals are: (1) Quantitative process-based understanding of hydrologic processes, (2) Experience with different methods in hydrology, (3) Learning, problem solving, communication skills. These goals were translated into two measurable tasks asked of students in a questionnaire: (1) Describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and (2) Describe laws governing these processes. A third question below assessed the students' ability to apply their knowledge: You have been hired as a consultant by __ to (1) assess how urbanization and the current drought have affected a local spring and (2) predict what the effects will be in the future if the drought continues. What information would you need to gather? What measurements would you make? What analyses would you perform? Student and expert responses to the questions were then used to develop a rubric to score responses. Using the rubric, 3 researchers independently blind-coded the full set of pre and post artifacts, resulting in 89% inter-rater agreement on the pre-tests and 83% agreement on the post-tests. We present student scores to illustrate the use of the rubric and to characterize student thinking prior to and following a traditional course. Most students interpreted Q1 in terms of physical processes affecting the water cycle, the primary organizing framework for hydrology, as intended. On the pre-test, one student scored 0, indicating no response, on this question. Twenty students scored 1, indicating rudimentary understanding, 2 students scored a 2, indicating a basic understanding, and no student scored a 3. Student scores on this question improved on the post-test. On the 22 post-tests that were blind scored, 11 students demonstrated some recognition of concepts, 9 students showed a basic understanding, and 2

  12. Problem of Generating Interest in and Motivation for Physical Training Lessons in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. А. Щирба

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to study the factors that effect pupils’ interest in physical education and sports. Research methods: questionnaires and surveys, analysis of literary sources. The experiment took place at boarding school-lyceé No. 23 “Kadetskyi Korpus”. The participants were 100 high school students.  Research results. The students’ low motivation for activity is conditioned by certain factors whose effect can vary in proportions depending on the youth’s living conditions, environment, and family upbringing. The analysis of reasons behind the high school students’ dissatisfaction with the forms of physical education allows to determine the incentives that help increase the students’ activity. Their answers reveal the need for physical load, active games, and presence of their favorite types of exercises at the lesson, background music, contests, etc.

  13. Lessons learnt from Fukushima Accident - What did McMaster Undergraduate Students learn?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, S., E-mail: nagasas@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear communities not only in Japan but also around the world learnt a lot of lessons from the Fukushima accident. The direct cause of the accident from the viewpoint of traditional engineering is clear, and as a result various measures have been implemented around the world. The accident also provides many insights into the relationship between traditional engineering and Japanese society. In this paper, the root causes of the accident were studied by applying a psychological model for evocation of an individual's anxiety related to social affairs [1] to the discussions in an undergraduate course at McMaster University. In the last section, the challenges, which McMaster students considered Japanese nuclear community is now facing and Canadian nuclear community can contribute to in future, are summarized. (author)

  14. Lessons learnt from Fukushima Accident - What did McMaster Undergraduate Students learn?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear communities not only in Japan but also around the world learnt a lot of lessons from the Fukushima accident. The direct cause of the accident from the viewpoint of traditional engineering is clear, and as a result various measures have been implemented around the world. The accident also provides many insights into the relationship between traditional engineering and Japanese society. In this paper, the root causes of the accident were studied by applying a psychological model for evocation of an individual's anxiety related to social affairs [1] to the discussions in an undergraduate course at McMaster University. In the last section, the challenges, which McMaster students considered Japanese nuclear community is now facing and Canadian nuclear community can contribute to in future, are summarized. (author)

  15. A mixed-methods approach to studying co-regulation of student autonomy through teacher–student interactions in music lessons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupers, Elisa; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul; McPherson, G.E.

    Interactions that occur between teacher and student during instrumental music lessons are complex and multifaceted and embrace a full range of promotive and demotive factors that not only underpin effective learning, but also have an impact on whether children will persist with their learning

  16. Pipeline external corrosion direct assessment methodology: lessons learned - part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Angel R. [DNV Columbus, Inc., OH (United States)

    2009-07-01

    DNV Columbus (Former CC Technologies) played a key role in the development of Direct Assessment (DA) methodologies, providing leadership in the NACE technical committees charged with development of DA standards. Since the first publication of NACE Standard RP-0502-2002, External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) has been successfully applied over a great number of pipelines to evaluate the impact of external corrosion on the pipeline integrity. This paper summarizes the results of applying ECDA over a selected number of underground pipelines and presents interesting facts about the methodology. (author)

  17. Evaluation of Phosphorus Site Assessment Tools: Lessons from the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Andrew; Kleinman, Peter; Baffaut, Claire; Beegle, Doug; Bolster, Carl; Collick, Amy; Easton, Zachary; Lory, John; Nelson, Nathan; Osmond, Deanna; Radcliffe, David; Veith, Tamie; Weld, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    Critical source area identification through phosphorus (P) site assessment is a fundamental part of modern nutrient management planning in the United States, yet there has been only sparse testing of the many versions of the P Index that now exist. Each P site assessment tool was developed to be applicable across a range of field conditions found in a given geographic area, making evaluation extremely difficult. In general, evaluation with in-field monitoring data has been limited, focusing primarily on corroborating manure and fertilizer "source" factors. Thus, a multiregional effort (Chesapeake Bay, Heartland, and Southern States) was undertaken to evaluate P Indices using a combination of limited field data, as well as output from simulation models (i.e., Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender, Annual P Loss Estimator, Soil and Water Assessment Tool [SWAT], and Texas Best Management Practice Evaluation Tool [TBET]) to compare against P Index ratings. These comparisons show promise for advancing the weighting and formulation of qualitative P Index components but require careful vetting of the simulation models. Differences among regional conclusions highlight model strengths and weaknesses. For example, the Southern States region found that, although models could simulate the effects of nutrient management on P runoff, they often more accurately predicted hydrology than total P loads. Furthermore, SWAT and TBET overpredicted particulate P and underpredicted dissolved P, resulting in correct total P predictions but for the wrong reasons. Experience in the United States supports expanded regional approaches to P site assessment, assuming closely coordinated efforts that engage science, policy, and implementation communities, but limited scientific validity exists for uniform national P site assessment tools at the present time. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Integrating UNESCO ICT-Based Instructional Materials in Chemistry Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLIE P. NACARIO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the effectiveness of the lessons in Chemistry integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional material on the achievement of Chemistry students at Central Bicol State University of Agriculture. It aimed to identify lessons that may be developed integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials, determine the effect of the developed lessons using the material on: conceptual understanding; science process skills; and attitude towards chemistry and gather insights from the experiences of the students and teacher. The study used the single group pretest and posttest experimental design. Descriptive, quantitative and qualitative techniques were also utilized. Quantitative data were taken from the pretest-posttest results on the Test on Conceptual Understanding, Science Process Skills and Chemistry Attitudinaire. Qualitative data were drawn from the experts’ assessment of the developed lessons and research instruments, and the insights of students and teacher. The developed lessons integrating UNESCO ICT-based instructional materials were Atomic Model and Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, Chemical Bonding, and Balancing Chemical Equation. These lessons increased the conceptual understanding of the students by topic and skill from very low mastery to average mastery level. The students have slightly improved along the different science process skills. After teaching the lessons, the students’ attitude also improved. The students became more motivated and interested in Chemistry and the lessons were student centered and entailed teacher’s competence and flexibility in computer use.

  19. Global health partnership for student peer-to-peer psychiatry e-learning: Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynejad, Roxanne C

    2016-12-03

    Global 'twinning' relationships between healthcare organizations and institutions in low and high-resource settings have created growing opportunities for e-health partnerships which capitalize upon expanding information technology resources worldwide. E-learning approaches to medical education are increasingly popular but remain under-investigated, whilst a new emphasis on global health teaching has coincided with university budget cuts in many high income countries. King's Somaliland Partnership (KSP) is a paired institutional partnership health link, supported by Tropical Health and Education Trust (THET), which works to strengthen the healthcare system and improve access to care through mutual exchange of skills, knowledge and experience between Somaliland and King's Health Partners, UK. Aqoon, meaning knowledge in Somali, is a peer-to-peer global mental health e-learning partnership between medical students at King's College London (KCL) and Hargeisa and Amoud Universities, Somaliland. It aims to extend the benefits of KSP's cross-cultural and global mental health education work to medical students and has reported positive results, including improved attitudes towards psychiatry in Somaliland students. The process of devising, piloting, evaluating, refining, implementing, re-evaluating and again refining the Aqoon model has identified important barriers to successful partnership. This article describes lessons learned during this process, sharing principles and recommendations for readers wishing to expand their own global health link beyond qualified clinicians, to the healthcare professionals of the future.

  20. ASSESSING STUDENT PERFORMANCE ON INTERPRETING THROUGH PEER-ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titik Ismailia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As a part of translation interpreting is translating spoken discourse orally. It needs some requirements like ability to speak clearly, clarity, fluency, eye contact, and self-confidence. It also needs linguistic proficiency, analytical skill, listening and recall, interpersonal skills, ethical behaviour, speaking skills, cultural knowledge, and subject knowledge. Evaluating students performance on interpreting can be done through peer assessment. Peer- assessment is one of alternative assessment to grade the peers in group or individuals by commenting on and judging other students work. To do this process there is a join work between listening and speaking, and two students. The first student as a speaker and the second student as an interpreter. Both of them should do the same quality on speak clearly as a speaker and as an interpreter should able to listen and translating the spoken discourse orally. Evaluation can use analytical grade that allows teacher to set clear criteria for correction like fluency, grammar, terminology, general content, and mechanics. Students and teacher can give comment on every criteria based on their own competency. During the process on making criteria, students and teacher can discuss and give reasonable suggestion to make the assessment suitable to the students competency. At the end, a rubric of assessment with the score from 0 to 100 and criteria and also the comment included in the paper of assessment.

  1. Self-determined motivation and students' physical activity during structured physical education lessons and free choice periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Chris; Sabiston, Catherine M; Raedeke, Thomas D; Ha, Amy S C; Sum, Raymond K W

    2009-01-01

    Various organizations have suggested that physical education (PE) should play a central role in increasing adolescents' physical activity (PA) levels. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between students' self-determined motivation and their PA behavior during a structured PE lesson led by their teacher and a free-choice period in which they were not required to be active. 528 Hong Kong students (mean age=15.78 years) participated in this study in April and May 2007. Situational Motivation Scale scores were used to form high and low self-determined motivation groups. Students wore a pedometer during a 20-minute structured basketball lesson and a 20-minute free choice period, during which they did not receive instruction. ANOVA revealed that self-determined motivation and PE class environments which provided students opportunities to make choices were related to greater PA. Furthermore, the difference in PA between the high and low self-determined groups was greater in the free-choice condition than the structured lesson, suggesting that self-determined motivation is especially important when students are not supervised. Findings indicated that promoting self-determined motivation may be an effective means of ensuring that PE programs are able to increase PA levels, foster self-initiated PA behaviors, and enhance adolescents' health.

  2. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Lesson with Interdisciplinary Connections for Middle-Level Music Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Mary Frances; Terry, Cynthia

    This lesson begins with a very brief biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. The lesson identifies its educational objectives; addresses National Standards for Music Education; lists materials needed; details six step-by-step classroom procedures for lesson implementation; and provides curriculum connections for language arts, visual art, physical…

  3. Estimation of portion size in children's dietary assessment: lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E; Adamson, A J; Anderson, A S; Barton, K L; Wrieden, W L

    2009-02-01

    Assessing the dietary intake of young children is challenging. In any 1 day, children may have several carers responsible for providing them with their dietary requirements, and once children reach school age, traditional methods such as weighing all items consumed become impractical. As an alternative to weighed records, food portion size assessment tools are available to assist subjects in estimating the amounts of foods consumed. Existing food photographs designed for use with adults and based on adult portion sizes have been found to be inappropriate for use with children. This article presents a review and summary of a body of work carried out to improve the estimation of portion sizes consumed by children. Feasibility work was undertaken to determine the accuracy and precision of three portion size assessment tools; food photographs, food models and a computer-based Interactive Portion Size Assessment System (IPSAS). These tools were based on portion sizes served to children during the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. As children often do not consume all of the food served to them, smaller portions were included in each tool for estimation of leftovers. The tools covered 22 foods, which children commonly consume. Children were served known amounts of each food and leftovers were recorded. They were then asked to estimate both the amount of food that they were served and the amount of any food leftover. Children were found to estimate food portion size with an accuracy approaching that of adults using both the food photographs and IPSAS. Further development is underway to increase the number of food photographs and to develop IPSAS to cover a much wider range of foods and to validate the use of these tools in a 'real life' setting.

  4. Damage assessment in coastal habitats: Lessons learned from Exxon Valdez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, T.A.; McDonald, L.; Stekoll, M.S.; Rosenthal, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines alternative designs for the monitoring and assessment of damages of environmental impacts such as oil spills. The optimal design requires sampling at pairs of impacted (oiled) and control (unoiled) sites both before and after the event. However, this design proved impractical in evaluating impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on nearshore subtidal communities, and may be impractical for future monitoring. An alternative design is discussed in which sampling is conducted at pairs of control and impact sites only after the impact

  5. The effectiveness of students redrafting continuous assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve academic language competence, students in two academic literacy modules at the University of Johannesburg were given opportunities to resubmit continuous assessment tasks utilising tutor feedback to improve performance. Despite the potential benefits to the students, not all of them were taking ...

  6. International academic service learning: lessons learned from students' travel experiences of diverse cultural and health care practices in morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddoura, Mahmoud; Puri, Aditi; Dominick, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Academic service learning (ASL) is an active teaching-learning approach to engage students in meaningful hands-on activities to serve community-based needs. Nine health professions students from a private college and a private university in the northeastern United States volunteered to participate in an ASL trip to Morocco. The participants were interviewed to reflect on their experiences. This article discusses the lessons learned from students' ASL experiences regarding integrating ASL into educational programs. The authors recommend a paradigm shift in nursing and dental hygiene curricula to appreciate diversity and promote cultural competency, multidisciplinary teamwork, and ethics-based education. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Climate change in the classroom: Reaching out to middle school students through science and math suitcase lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo, A. C.; Collay, R.; Harris, R. N.; de Silva, L.

    2011-12-01

    We have formed a link between the Increasing Diversity in Earth Sciences (IDES) program with the Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences (SMILE) program, both at Oregon State University. The IDES mission is to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population and the SMILE mission is to provide science and math enrichment for underrepresented and other educationally underserved students in grades 4-12. Traditionally, underserved schools do not have enough time or resources to spend on science and mathematics. Furthermore, numerous budget cuts in many Oregon school districts have negatively impacted math and science cirriculum. To combat this trend we have designed suitcase lessons in climate change that can be carried to a number of classrooms. These lesson plans are scientifically rich and economically attractive. These lessons are designed to engage students in math and science through climate change presentations, group discussions, and hands-on activities. Over the past year we have familiarized ourselves with the academic ability of sixth and seventh graders through in-class observation in Salem Oregon. One of the suit case lessons we developed focuses on climate change by exploring the plight of polar bears in the face of diminishing sea ice. Our presentation will report the results of this activity.

  8. The Effects of Collaborative Care of Living Animals in Biology Lessons on Students' Relatedness Toward Their Teacher Across Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckes, Alexander; Großmann, Nadine; Wilde, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    The transition from elementary school to the upper grades can lead to ambiguous feelings toward the new, male teachers. This study investigated whether collaborative animal care in biology lessons affects students' feelings of relatedness toward their biology teachers positively during the first year after the school transition. Four hundred twenty fifth graders (M age = 10.5 years, SD age = 0.6 years) of higher types of tracking participated. We designed one experimental group that involved caring for the living animals to be used in the upcoming lessons, and two control groups. The first control group included lessons with living animals, but did not include prior care of those animals, and the second incorporated neither living animals nor prior care. All groups received biology lessons with the same content. To examine the effects of caretaking, we used an adapted version of the scale "relatedness" (Ryan 1982). In both control groups, boys showed lower relatedness toward female teachers and girls toward male teachers, respectively. Collaborative mice care promoted equal relatedness across all gender combinations among teachers and students.

  9. Validation of an observation tool to assess physical activity-promoting physical education lessons in high schools: SOFIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Stuart J; Weaver, R Glenn; Johnson, Siobhan; Rawlinson, Jack

    2018-05-01

    SOFIT+ is an observation tool to measure teacher practices related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) promotion during physical education (PE). The objective of the study was to examine the validity of SOFIT+ during high school PE lessons. This cross-sectional, observational study tested the construct validity of SOFIT+ in boys' and girls' high school PE lessons. Twenty-one PE lessons were video-recorded and retrospectively coded using SOFIT+. Students wore hip-mounted accelerometers during lessons as an objective measure of MVPA. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of students engaging in MVPA during different teacher practices represented by observed individual codes and a combined SOFIT+ index-score. Fourteen individual SOFIT+ variables demonstrated a statistically significant relationship with girls' and boys' MVPA. Observed lesson segments identified as high MVPA-promoting were related to an increased likelihood of girls engaging in 5-10 (OR=2.86 [95% CI 2.41-3.40]), 15-25 (OR=7.41 [95% CI 6.05-9.06]), and 30-40 (OR=22.70 [95% CI 16.97-30.37])s of MVPA. For boys, observed high-MVPA promoting segments were related to an increased likelihood of engaging in 5-10 (OR=1.71 [95% CI 1.45-2.01]), 15-25 (OR=2.69 [95% CI 2.31-3.13]) and 30-40 (OR=4.26 [95% CI 3.44-5.29])s of MVPA. Teacher practices during high school PE lessons are significantly related to students' participation in MVPA. SOFIT+ is a valid and reliable tool to examine relationships between PE teacher practices and student MVPA during PE. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment Schemes for Sustainability Design through BIM: Lessons Learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaruzzaman Syahrul Nizam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing demand on sustainability-led design to reduce negative impacts brought by construction development. The capability of Building Information Modeling (BIM to achieve sustainability is widely acknowledged. Various sustainability analysis and calculation can be performed at early stages to help the designers in decision making. However, the level of implementation is still not popular in the construction industry. Many of the industry players are still rely on traditional 2D method for designing and analysis. Hence, this study aims to demonstrate a proof concept of using BIM for sustainability design. The first phase of this study conducted a critical review of existing assessment schemes: BREEAM, LEED, SBTool, CASBEE, BEAM Plus, Green Star, Green Mark and GBI, to develop a set of main criteria to be considered for sustainability design. The findings revealed that fourteen criteria are considered, which are management, sustainable site, transport, indoor environmental quality, energy, waste, water, material, pollution, innovation, economics, social, culture and quality of services. It was found that most of the existing schemes emphasized on environmental aspect as compared to economics, social and culture except SBTool. The next phase of this study will conduct a case study to demonstrate sustainability design through BIM by using the criteria developed from the first phase.

  11. Governance in Strategic Environmental Assessment: Lessons from the Portuguese practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Margarida B.; Partidário, Maria Rosário

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of governance in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) can help understand why, whether and how strategic decision-making happens. Understanding the governance context is strategic to improve the role and capacity of SEA to stimulate, and legitimate decisions that integrate environmental issues and are sustainability driven. The objective of this paper is to discuss why governance is important in SEA. In the SEA literature governance is mostly addressed in silos (i.e. public participation or decisions transparency or accountability) rather than in an integrated way. In addition few authors adopt a strategic view to address the governance context within which SEA is used. In this paper we address the heuristics of governance in SEA based on theoretical and empirical evidence, suggesting how SEA may incorporate the governance dimension. First a review of the SEA literature in relation to governance sets the context to the analysis on how governance is approached in practice, based on 60 Portuguese SEA cases. This is followed by the presentation of an empirical SEA case conducted in Portugal to illustrate what, in our understanding, can be an example of good practice in considering governance in SEA. Final discussion reflects on the role of governance in SEA in promoting engagement, enabling collaborative action, learning processes and dialogues, concluding on the relevance of governance in creating development contexts that can deal with change.

  12. Systemic assessment as a new tool to assess student learning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    students' systemic thinking level developed in organic chemistry is strongly related to a deeper understanding of the relevant chemistry concepts (7) .In this regards we will illustrate five types of SAQ,s in heterocyclic chemistry based on systemics to assess students at synthesis and analysis learning levels. We experiment ...

  13. The Knitting Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pamela

    1987-01-01

    Based on Jean-Francois Millet's 1869 painting, "The Knitting Lesson," this lesson's goal is to introduce students in grades seven through nine to genre (everyday life) painting the nineteenth century. The lesson is also designed to show that some aspects of genre may be timeless. (BSR)

  14. Students' response to disaster: a lesson for health care professional schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Humberto

    2010-11-16

    The response of medical students, young physicians, and other health professionals to the February 2010 earthquake and tsunami in Chile provides important lessons about health care delivery during disasters and about the development of professionalism. Tertiary and secondary care of victims of these disasters was possible because local and national resources were available and field hospitals provided by Chile's armed forces and foreign countries replaced damaged hospitals. However, primary care of persons living on the outskirts of towns and in small villages and coves that were destroyed and isolated by the disaster required the involvement of volunteer groups that were largely composed of students and other young members of the health professions, all of whom were motivated by solidarity, compassion, and social commitment. This experience, similar to previous catastrophes in Chile and elsewhere, reinforces that medical and other health professional schools must instill in graduates an understanding that the privileges of being a health professional come with responsibilities to society. Beyond providing high-quality scientific and technological education, curricula in these schools should include training that enables graduates to meaningfully contribute in the setting of unexpected disasters and that nurtures a sense of responsibility to do so.

  15. Comparative analysis of climate change vulnerability assessments. Lessons from Tunisia and Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammill, Anne; Bizikova, Livia; Dekens, Julie; McCandless, Matthew

    2013-03-15

    Vulnerability assessments (VAs) are central to shaping climate change adaptation decisions. They help to define the nature and extent of the threat that may harm a given human or ecological system, providing a basis for devising measures that will minimize or avoid this harm. Yet the wide variety of VA approaches can be confusing for practitioners, creating uncertainty about the ''right'' way to assess vulnerability. In an effort to provide some guidance on designing and conducting VAs, this paper reviews and compares VAs undertaken in Indonesia and Tunisia to distill key approaches, components and lessons. It begins with a general overview of definitions, approaches and challenges with conducting VAs, and then proposes a framework for analyzing and comparing them. The framework looks at four components of VAs: (1) Framing: where do we come from? (2) Process of conducting the VAs: how does it work? (3) Inputs: what is needed? (4) Outputs: what does it tell us? The framework is then applied to analyze the assessments carried out in Tunisia and Indonesia, from their respective framings of vulnerability to the outputs of the process. The report then concludes with observations on differences and similarities between the VAs, as well as lessons learned that can inform the design and execution of future assessments.

  16. Comparative analysis of climate change vulnerability assessments. Lessons from Tunisia and Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammill, Anne; Bizikova, Livia; Dekens, Julie; McCandless, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    Vulnerability assessments (VAs) are central to shaping climate change adaptation decisions. They help to define the nature and extent of the threat that may harm a given human or ecological system, providing a basis for devising measures that will minimize or avoid this harm. Yet the wide variety of VA approaches can be confusing for practitioners, creating uncertainty about the ''right'' way to assess vulnerability. In an effort to provide some guidance on designing and conducting VAs, this paper reviews and compares VAs undertaken in Indonesia and Tunisia to distill key approaches, components and lessons. It begins with a general overview of definitions, approaches and challenges with conducting VAs, and then proposes a framework for analyzing and comparing them. The framework looks at four components of VAs: (1) Framing: where do we come from? (2) Process of conducting the VAs: how does it work? (3) Inputs: what is needed? (4) Outputs: what does it tell us? The framework is then applied to analyze the assessments carried out in Tunisia and Indonesia, from their respective framings of vulnerability to the outputs of the process. The report then concludes with observations on differences and similarities between the VAs, as well as lessons learned that can inform the design and execution of future assessments.

  17. Lessons Learned From Studying The Effects Of Forest Fires With High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjorski, N.; Hall, M.; Sundberg, F.

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the educational successes and challenges of a high school research project designed to assess the effects of a wildfire and subsequent logging on soil erosion during the 2004-2005 school year. The project is extra-curricular for students from Show Low High School in Arizona. Fieldwork is done on Saturdays and lab work is done during lunch periods and after school sessions. Using a silt fence, shovels, and brushes, students collect and measure erosion rates of unburned, burned, and burned and logged land. The project has involved 17 students, 3 female and 14 male students, and their two science teachers. A key goal of the project is to introduce a group of high school students to the process of scientific inquiry through fieldwork and scientific research. A core requirement of this project is that the students will be self-motivated and will lead all major field and laboratory efforts. Interviews of the students and teachers in the fall of 2004 and spring of 2005 are the primary source of the assessment of this project in addition to data collected by informal interviews during two field trips. Consistent student participation was a main challenge to this project in the first year. While most students continued with the program throughout the year, participation was sporadic and generally low during any one class or field session. This is partially due to not having a set schedule for activities and the challenge for students to self-motivate. Interestingly, despite their actual amount of involvement in the project, the students all consider themselves active members of the project and are generally proud of their efforts. To increase the consistency of student participation in the coming year a regular semester schedule has been set and student time and effort requirements have been increased and explicitly stated. Students have a great amount of choice in which role they will fulfill in the project, and which data gathering and analysis skills they

  18. Lessons Learned from an External Review of the Savannah River Site Saltstone Performance Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is actively working on a total revision of the Saltstone Performance Assessment. 'Lessons Learned' from the review are being applied to this effort. Examples of the areas in which significant new work is being done are development of a methodology to do probabilistic uncertainty analyses, employing quantitative analytical tools to represent long-term chemical degradation of both concrete and the Saltstone wasteform, and then using those tools to come to a better understanding of how changes in the vault and Saltstone will affect the performance of the overall disposal system over long periods of time. (authors)

  19. Improving Online Interactions: Lessons from an Online Anatomy Course with a Laboratory for Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attardi, Stefanie M; Barbeau, Michele L; Rogers, Kem A

    2018-03-01

    An online section of a face-to-face (F2F) undergraduate (bachelor's level) anatomy course with a prosection laboratory was offered in 2013-2014. Lectures for F2F students (353) were broadcast to online students (138) using Blackboard Collaborate (BBC) virtual classroom. Online laboratories were offered using BBC and three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer models. This iteration of the course was modified from the previous year to improve online student-teacher and student-student interactions. Students were divided into laboratory groups that rotated through virtual breakout rooms, giving them the opportunity to interact with three instructors. The objectives were to assess student performance outcomes, perceptions of student-teacher and student-student interactions, methods of peer interaction, and helpfulness of the 3D computer models. Final grades were statistically identical between the online and F2F groups. There were strong, positive correlations between incoming grade average and final anatomy grade in both groups, suggesting prior academic performance, and not delivery format, predicts anatomy grades. Quantitative student perception surveys (273 F2F; 101 online) revealed that both groups agreed they were engaged by teachers, could interact socially with teachers and peers, and ask them questions in both the lecture and laboratory sessions, though agreement was significantly greater for the F2F students in most comparisons. The most common methods of peer communication were texting, Facebook, and meeting F2F. The perceived helpfulness of the 3D computer models improved from the previous year. While virtual breakout rooms can be used to adequately replace traditional prosection laboratories and improve interactions, they are not equivalent to F2F laboratories. Anat Sci Educ. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Helen; Brookes, Kate L; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind power provides a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed and in deeper water, but there is still much that is unknown about the effects on the environment. Here we describe the lessons learned based on the recent literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals and seabirds, and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world. The four key lessons learned that we discuss are: 1) Identifying the area over which biological effects may occur to inform baseline data collection and determining the connectivity between key populations and proposed wind energy sites, 2) The need to put impacts into a population level context to determine whether they are biologically significant, 3) Measuring responses to wind farm construction and operation to determine disturbance effects and avoidance responses, and 4) Learn from other industries to inform risk assessments and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. As the number and size of offshore wind developments increases, there will be a growing need to consider the population level consequences and cumulative impacts of these activities on marine species. Strategically targeted data collection and modeling aimed at answering questions for the consenting process will also allow regulators to make decisions based on the best available information, and achieve a balance between climate change targets and environmental legislation.

  1. The language learning experiences of students with dyslexia: lessons from an interview study.

    OpenAIRE

    Kormos, Judit; Csizér, Kata; Sarkadi, Ágnes

    2009-01-01

    Our interview study investigated what experiences Hungarian students with dyslexia have in the language learning group and concerning the general behavior, the instructional methods and assessment techniques of their language teachers. Long qualitative interviews were conducted with 15 students of different ages who studied foreign languages in a variety of educational settings. Our results indicate that the participants generally had negative experiences when studying in groups, especially i...

  2. Implementation of an education development project in pathology to improve student competency-lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Gita; Harsh, Meena; Chauhan, Vijendra D; Kalra, Vinita; Agarwal, Pradeep; Kusum, Anuradha

    2015-08-01

    Basic medical sciences and clinical teachings are not coordinated in the present medical education system. They are not taught keeping in mind the outcomes required at the time of actual handling of patients in the community. An educational development project was implemented in the Department of Pathology with the aim that it will result in the student learning to link the pathophysiology of the disease to clinical scenarios and become fully competent for lifelong medical practice. The pathology teaching of the second professional batch was modified by starting with defining the desired outcomes/competencies in the student's knowledge, skills, and attitude which were then addressed by lectures, demonstrations, practical classes and small group activities where case scenarios and laboratory reports were included. The outcome was assessed by Objectively Structured Clinical/Practical Examination and multiple choice questions. Force field analysis, faculty and student interviews, and questionnaires were used to assess the factors affecting its implementation and impact. Totally 80 students of the 2(nd) Professional MBBS were exposed to a competency-based education development project. It was found that the system was appreciated by faculty and students, especially the integration with clinical scenarios. There were many factors which influenced the execution of this program, including motivation level of students and faculty, time, logistics and meticulous planning. There was a significant improvement in student's performance and satisfaction. Many factors including prior planning were a major determinant for the success of this education development project.

  3. Designing Conservation Corridors in Production Landscapes: Assessment Methods, Implementation Issues, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda T. Lombard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Designing broad-scale conservation corridors has become increasingly common as a way of conducting an assessment for achieving targets for the representation and persistence of nature. However, since many of these corridors must traverse agricultural and other production landscapes, planning and implementation are not trivial tasks. Most approaches to conservation assessments in the dynamic world of production landscapes are data-intensive and analytically complex. However, in the real world, donor and other external requirements impose time and budget constraints, and dictate strong stakeholder involvement in the entire planning process. In order to accommodate this, assessments must be rapid, cheap, and the approach and products must be comprehensible and acceptable to stakeholders. Here we describe such an assessment aimed at identifying and implementing a network of conservation corridors in the Gouritz Initiative project domain of South Africa's Cape Floristic Region hotspot. We used empirical data and expert knowledge to identify a corridor network hypothesized to sustain key ecological and evolutionary processes. We also consulted experts to provide a spatially explicit assessment of the opportunity costs of conservation associated with agriculture, the predominant land use in the region. We used these products to identify categories of land requiring different actions and instruments to achieve conservation goals, thereby moving from the "where" to the "how" of conservation. This information was then fed into the collaborative strategy development process for the Gouritz Initiative. Our discussion emphasizes the lessons that we learnt from undertaking this assessment, particularly lessons regarding the implementation of the planning products. We conclude that at the outset of any planning project, a consensus on the vision must be achieved, a detailed social assessment of appropriate institutions must be undertaken, and a learning

  4. Assessing Students' Technical Skill Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Haley

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS) is working to comply with the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006 (Perkins) to ensure that its graduates have mastered the technical skills needed by business and industry. The legislation requires that each state identify and approve program assessment strategies…

  5. Assessing Oral Cancer Awareness Among Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Gaye; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2018-02-14

    The aim of this study was to assess oral cancer awareness among undergraduate dental students in Marmara University Faculty of Dentistry. A validated questionnaire which tested oral cancer awareness was given to third- and fifth-year students of the dental faculty of Marmara University. A total of 198 students participated in this survey. Knowledge of oral cancer risk factors and diagnosis procedures, dentistry student's attitude towards oral cancers, management practice regarding oral cancer, and oral cancer information sources were assessed using 25 questions. The data were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0 program. Among 198 participant dentistry students, there were 99 (50%) third-grade and 99 (50%) fifth-grade students. The largest number of the third- and last-grade students identified tobacco (98%) and alcohol usage (87.4%), prior oral cancer lesions (94.9%), viral infections (91.9%), UV exposure (94.4%), betel quid chewing (84.8%), older age (62.1%), and low consumption of fruit and vegetables (85.4%). Both groups showed higher scores in indicating squamous cell carcinoma as the most common form of oral cancer (p oral cancer detection and prevention.

  6. Project RAILS: Lessons Learned about Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Jackie; Zou, Ning; Mills, Jenny Rushing; Holmes, Claire; Oakleaf, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Rubric assessment of information literacy is an important tool for librarians seeking to show evidence of student learning. The authors, who collaborated on the Rubric Assessment of Informational Literacy Skills (RAILS) research project, draw from their shared experience to present practical recommendations for implementing rubric assessment in a…

  7. Fieldwork practice for learning: Lessons from occupational therapy students and their supervisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshini Naidoo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fieldwork practice forms a vital part of occupational therapy (OT education and contributes significantly to competent practice and students’ clinical reasoning. Students’ learning is positively or negatively influenced by their fieldwork experience. Objective. To explore the views and experiences of final-year OT students, site-based clinicians and university-based academic supervisors to identify strategies that influenced students’ learning during fieldwork practice. Methods. This descriptive qualitative study used a purposeful sampling technique. Data collection strategies included focus group discussions with clinical and academic supervisors and semistructured interviews with final-year students. Each set of data was analysed according to the research questions. The researcher analysed the data into themes, which were corroborated by a supervisor. Data source and analyst triangulation ensured trustworthiness of the study. Results. Two themes, i.e. difficulties experienced by students during fieldwork and supervision strategies that they found beneficial for learning, are described. Guidance and mentoring from experienced therapists helped students to link observations from assessments and intervention plans. Observations of treatment sessions, peer learning and practice in the skills laboratories were beneficial for learning, competence and confidence. Guided questions from supervisors to enhance reflexive practice and peer learning strengthened the students’ confidence and ability to give feedback to their peers. The students also benefited from sessions that allowed them the freedom and space to work autonomously. Conclusion. This study provides insight into the difficulties that students experienced when engaging with fieldwork and offers some strategies that have been found to advance their learning.

  8. Analysis of the Design of Grade 9 Listening Lessons in the Student's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to examine the design of the listening lessons in the Grade 9 English for Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to see how the listening lessons were presented to identify if there were problems related to the design. The study employed a descriptive research design using both qualitative and ...

  9. Improving Students' Knowledge and Values in Physical Education through "Physical Best" Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, Melissa; Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of using "Physical Best" lessons to promote adolescent energy balance knowledge and task values. Seventh graders (N = 90) were randomly assigned to the experiment and the comparison groups. The experiment group took 10 selected "Physical Best" lessons, while the comparison experienced 10 district…

  10. The Effect of an Augmented Reality Enhanced Mathematics Lesson on Student Achievement and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estapa, Anne; Nadolny, Larysa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess student achievement and motivation during a high school augmented reality mathematics activity focused on dimensional analysis. Included in this article is a review of the literature on the use of augmented reality in mathematics and the combination of print with augmented reality, also known as interactive…

  11. Postsecondary STEM Education for Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from a Decade of NSF Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Linda P.; Shuman, Cindy; Middendorf, B. Jan; Johnson, Cassandra

    2017-01-01

    The Research in Disabilities Education Synthesis Project (RDE-SP), a four-year mixed methods research project, assessed a decade of funded projects (2001-2011) under the National Science Foundation's Research in Disabilities Education program which is aimed at increasing participation and retention of students with disabilities (SWD) in Science,…

  12. The attitudes of technical-school students towards assessments and motivation for studying physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanivuk Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this paper was the analysis of the attitudes of the students of a secondary technical school towards assessments and motivation for studying physics. The research was conducted with the sample of462 first- and second-year students of several four-year course profiles in technical schools in Novi Sad and Subotica. Scaling was the used technique and the instrument was construed according to the five-point Likert scale for attitudes. The results show the following: (! the students have predominantly positive attitudes towards assessments in physics, the majority think that their grades are the result of their engagement, and only few students think that the subject teacher is responsible for their low grades, (2 the students are not sufficiently motivated for studying physics, (3 the attitudes of the students towards their grades affect their motivation for learning if they think that the teacher's assessments are not fair or the lessons are too big and complex. The paper ends with a suggestion that students' motivation for studying physics should be stimulated, and stresses the importance of assessments for motivation.

  13. Comparison of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balfanz, H.P. [TUeV Nord, Hamburg (Germany); Berg, H.P. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany); Steininger, U. [TUeV Energie- und Systemtechnik GmbH, Unternehmensgruppe TUeV Sueddeutschland, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    Probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) have been performed for all German nuclear power plants in operation. These assessments are mainly based on the recent German PSA guide and an earlier draft, respectively. However, comparison of these PSA show differences in the results which are discussed in this paper. Lessons learned from this comparison and further development of the PSA methodology are described. (orig.) [German] Probabilistische Sicherheitsanalysen (PSA) sind fuer alle in Betrieb befindlichen deutschen Kernkraftwerke durchgefuehrt worden. Diese Analysen basierten in der Regel auf dem aktuellen deutschen PSA-Leitfaden bzw. einem frueheren Entwurf. Ein Vergleich dieser PSA zeigt Unterschiede in den Ergebnissen, die in diesem Beitrag diskutiert werden. Erfahrungen und Erkenntnisse, die aus diesem Vergleich abgeleitet werden koennen, und weitere Entwicklungen der PSA-Methoden werden beschrieben. (orig.)

  14. Formative assessment in mathematics for engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat; Carr, Michael

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present a range of formative assessment types for engineering mathematics, including in-class exercises, homework, mock examination questions, table quizzes, presentations, critical analyses of statistical papers, peer-to-peer teaching, online assessments and electronic voting systems. We provide practical tips for the implementation of such assessments, with a particular focus on time or resource constraints and large class sizes, as well as effective methods of feedback. In addition, we consider the benefits of such formative assessments for students and staff.

  15. Assessing students' readiness towards e-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Nasrudin Md; Yusoff, Siti Hawa Mohd; Latif, Shahida Abd

    2014-07-01

    The usage of e-Learning methodology has become a new attraction for potential students as shown by some higher learning institutions in Malaysia. As such, Universiti Selangor (Unisel) should be ready to embark on e-Learning teaching and learning in the near future. The purpose of the study is to gauge the readiness of Unisel's students in e-Learning environment. A sample of 110 students was chosen to participate in this study which was conducted in January 2013. This sample consisted of students from various levels of study that are foundation, diploma and degree program. Using a structured questionnaire, respondents were assessed on their basic Internet skills, access to technology required for e-Learning and their attitude towards characteristics of successful e-Learning student based on study habits, abilities, motivation and time management behaviour. The result showed that respondents did have access to technology that are required for e-Learning environment, and respondents were knowledgeable regarding the basic Internet skills. The finding also showed that respondents' attitude did meet all characteristics of successful e-Learning student. Further analysis showed that there is no significant relationshipeither among gender, level of study or faculty with those characteristics. As a conclusion, the study shows that current Unisel's students are ready to participate in e-Learning environment if the institution decided to embark on e-Learning methodology.

  16. Alternative Student Assessments in Advertising Copywriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, Ronda

    Instructors of professional courses such as advertising copywriting need to exercise caution in assigning grades to their students' creative work. Some alternative assessment methods can equally emphasize process and product. One successful technique is "praiseworthy grading," which shifts the focus from fault-finding to appreciation of…

  17. Students Fly High with Creative Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    At one Pennsylvania school, building a model airplane is a learning experience used to assess the abilities of students with reading difficulties. Specific model-building behaviors that can be observed are gathering information, employing prior knowledge, summarizing, visualizing, predicting, self-monitoring, evaluating, measuring, calculating,…

  18. Student Engagement and Assessment Modes: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anil

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this project is to attempt a factorial analysis of the congruence amongst three layers of assessments of Oral Presentation: "Expert, Self, and Peer". Participants included graduate and undergraduate students of Asian background studying Research Writing at a technological university. The research instrument consisted of a set…

  19. Student Teachers' Perceptions towards Teaching Practice Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chireshe, R.; Chireshe, E.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the perceptions of student teachers towards teaching practice assessment. Participants N=180:90 males, 90 females were randomly drawn from three primary school teachers' colleges in Masvingo Educational Region of Zimbabwe. A questionnaire was used to gather data from the respondents. A chi-square test was used to analyse the…

  20. Experience and lessons learned in the assessment of safety justifications for experiments mounted in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Some experiments in research reactors are arguably a risky undertaking due to their uncertain outcome. The justifications for such experiments require careful assessment to validate their undertaking. The public, the operators and the installation itself must be safeguarded. Assessment of the potential risk is an acquired skill but in doing so the route can be eased by learning from the lessons experience can teach. This paper, essentially for the usage of safety managers, sets out some of the issues relating to the assessment process gained from our experience over a few tens of years in the assessment of experiments. Many of the conclusions reached may appear all too obvious viewed in retrospect, but they were not necessarily clear at the time. Those organizations setting up assessment teams may find some of the conclusions of value such that their proposed management system can embrace methodologies for assessment that can avoid or lessen the impact of some of the pitfalls we have tried to identify. Failure to recognise some of these points may run the risk of delayed clearances, dilated timescales and cost overruns. It is in the hope of reducing all these penalties that we offer our experiences

  1. The Investigation of the Effects of Physical Education Lessons Planned in Accordance with Cooperative Learning Approach on Secondary School Students' Problem Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorucu, Alpaslan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate the effects of physical education lessons planned in accordance with cooperative learning approach on secondary school students' problem solving skills. The research was conducted on 48 students studying at Konya/Selçuklu Sehit Mustafa Çuhadar Secondary School in fall semester of 2015-2016…

  2. SYSTEMIC ASSESSMENT [SA] AS A TOOL TO ASSESS STUDENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    our studies on Systemic Assessment [SA] [5-8] is an ongoing process of .... schema can be considered as a single element in working memory [9]. This is ... our students from surface learning to deep learning of chemical processes in sodium ...

  3. Assessing the Impact of Lesson Study on the Teaching Practice of Middle School Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Michael C.

    Despite wave after wave of educational reform in the United States our students continue to lag behind their peers in other industrialized countries on virtually all measures of academic achievement. Effective professional development (PD) is seen as a key to improving instructional practice and therefore student learning, but traditional forms of PD have been wholly unsuccessful in changing teaching practice. Over the last two decades an emerging body of research has identified some key features of effective PD that seem to create meaningful change and improvement in instructional practice. Some of this research highlights the promise of adapting Japanese lesson study (LS) to the American context as a means of incrementally improving instruction. Much of the existing research around LS is descriptive in nature and offers little insight into if and how participation in LS impacts subsequent instructional practice. This study utilized case study methodology to examine the instructional practice of one group of four middle school science teachers before, during, and after participation in LS. The study attempted to identify specific learning outcomes of a LS process, to identify influences on teacher learning during LS, and to identify subsequent changes in the instructional practice of participants resulting from participation in LS. Key findings from the study include significant teacher learning derived from the LS process, the identification of influences that enhanced or inhibited teacher learning, and clear evidence that participants successfully integrated learning from the LS into subsequent instructional practice. Learning outcomes included deepening of subject matter knowledge, increased understanding of student thinking and abilities, clarity of expectations for student performance, recognition of the ineffectiveness of past instructional practice, specific instructional strategies, shared student learning goals, and an increased commitment to future

  4. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module II. Human Systems and Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on human systems and patient assessment is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Four units are presented: (1) medical terminology, which covers some common prefixes and suffixes and the use of the medical dictionary; (2) an overview of the…

  5. Nutritional knowledge assessment of syrian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louay Labban

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that affect nutritional status and nutritional habits of individuals, families, and societies. Nutrition knowledge is an important tool in assessing the nutritional status of an individual, group or community. Researchers have been trying to design and develop reliable and valid questionnaires that distinguish and measure nutrition knowledge and its impact on dietary behavior and diet-health awareness. Many studies have shown that nutrition knowledge can affect someone to follow dietary recommendations. The aim of this study was to assess the nutrition knowledge of Syrian university students and to find out if there was any relationship between anthropometric measurements, socioeconomic status, type of university and nutrition knowledge of the students. Nutritional knowledge was assessed using valid nutrition knowledge questionnaire, which covered six main sections. The questionnaire was designed for this study and was adapted from Parameter and Wardle. The number of students participated in the study was 998 students and were selected from four universities in Syria. They were asked to complete the nutrition knowledge questionnaire under supervision of trained nutritionist. Anthropometric measurements were taken for all participants by trained professional. The results were statistically analyzed and P 30 had the highest points in TNK. Females had higher TNK score as compared with males. Furthermore, students enrolled in the private university and in health-related programs showed typically better TNK scores than those enrolled in public universities and in nonhealth-related programs. The highest TNK score based on BMI was found among students with BMI >30. The results support the likely value of including nutrition knowledge as a target for health education campaigns aimed at promoting healthy eating.

  6. Assessing social impacts in a life cycle perspective-Lessons learned

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Jørgensen, Andreas; Dreyer, Louise Camilla

    2008-01-01

    In our globalised economy, important stakeholder groups nowadays hold companies responsible for the social impacts they cause in their product chain through activities like child labour, corruption or discrimination of employees. Many companies thus see themselves in need of a tool which can help...... LCA methodology supplements the traditional environment-oriented LCA and the life cycle costing tools in support of sustainability management addressing all three pillars of sustainability: people, planet and profit....... them make informed decisions about their social impacts throughout the life cycle of their products. The paper presents lessons learned from four years of work with industry on development of a methodology for social Life Cycle Assessment and implementation in the industrial product chain. The Social...

  7. Student Generated Rubrics: An Assessment Model To Help All Students Succeed. Assessment Bookshelf Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Larry; Christinson, Jan

    The assessment model described in this guide was initially developed by a team of fifth-grade teachers who wrote objectives of integrating social studies and language arts. It helps the teacher guide students to create a task-specific rubric that they use to evaluate their own and peers' work. Teachers review the student evaluations, determine the…

  8. Teachers’ assessments of demonstration of student initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komlenović Đurđica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores student initiative or student engagement in activities in school environment, as an aspect of students’ functioning that is assumed to be a prerequisite for their contribution to the quality of instruction and better use of possibilities for education and development in school environment. We approach this topic from teachers’ perspective since it is our aim to observe how teachers assess the initiative of their students (how important it is, how it is manifested, how present it is in different segments of school activities. In the first part of the paper we analyze the construct “student initiative” and a similar construct “student engagement”. In the second part of the paper we present the results of a research in which primary school teachers (N=182 from the territory of Serbia expressed their views on student initiative. Teachers’ answers to open- and close-ended questions from the questionnaire (19 items in total were processed by quantitative and qualitative methodology. Research results indicate that the majority of teachers believed that student initiative was a very important general feature of behavior in school environment, independent of age, which was most present in the domain of peer socializing and relationship with teachers, and least present in the very domains of student functioning that teachers deemed the most desirable (mastering the curriculum, regulation of disciplinary issues. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179034: Od podsticanja inicijative, saradnje, stvaralaštva u obrazovanju do novih uloga i identiteta u društvu i br. 47008: Unapređivanje kvaliteta i dostupnosti obrazovanja u procesima modernizacije Srbije

  9. Assessing student understanding of measurement and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirungnimitsakul, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and assess student understanding of measurement and uncertainty. A test has been adapted and translated from the Laboratory Data Analysis Instrument (LDAI) test, consists of 25 questions focused on three topics including measures of central tendency, experimental errors and uncertainties, and fitting regression lines. The test was evaluated its content validity by three physics experts in teaching physics laboratory. In the pilot study, Thai LDAI was administered to 93 freshmen enrolled in a fundamental physics laboratory course. The final draft of the test was administered to three groups—45 freshmen taking fundamental physics laboratory, 16 sophomores taking intermediated physics laboratory and 21 juniors taking advanced physics laboratory at Chiang Mai University. As results, we found that the freshmen had difficulties in experimental errors and uncertainties. Most students had problems with fitting regression lines. These results will be used to improve teaching and learning physics laboratory for physics students in the department.

  10. Assessing Student Achievement in Physical Education for Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    While many teachers continue to ignore the practice of assessing student achievement in physical education, recent federal pressures to include student assessment data in teacher evaluation systems has shown that assessment of student outcomes is here to stay. Though there is a strong tradition of assessing teacher practice in physical education,…

  11. Do Accounting Students Believe in Self-Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    In education, formal assessment focuses on summative assessment with the objective of allocating grades, limiting learning by students. Formative assessment, in the form of self-assessment, has been proposed as beneficial to student learning in various fields. This study explores the perceptions of accounting students of the self-assessment…

  12. Community-based approaches to strategic environmental assessment: Lessons from Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, A. John; Sims, Laura; Spaling, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a community-based approach to strategic environmental assessment (SEA) using a case study of the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad's (ICE) watershed management agricultural program (WMAP) in Costa Rica. The approach focused on four highly interactive workshops that used visioning, brainstorming and critical reflection exercises. Each workshop represented a critical step in the SEA process. Through this approach, communities in two rural watersheds assessed the environmental, social and economic impacts of a proposed second phase for WMAP. Lessons from this community-based approach to strategic environmental assessment include a recognition of participants learning what a participatory SEA is conceptually and methodologically; the role of interactive techniques for identifying positive and negative impacts of the proposed program and generating creative mitigation strategies; the effect of workshops in reducing power differentials among program participants (proponent, communities, government agencies); and, the logistical importance of notice, timing and location for meaningful participation. The community-based approach to SEA offers considerable potential for assessing regional (watershed) development programs focused on sustainable resource-based livelihoods

  13. Lessons learned from the disruption of dental training of Malaysian students studying in Egypt during the Arab spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Sibu Sajjan; Ramachandra, Srinivas Sulugodu; Abdullah, Datuk Dr Fawzia; Islam, Md Nurul; Kalyan, C G

    2016-01-01

    Political crisis and worsening security situation in Egypt in late 2013 resulted in Malaysian students who were pursuing their dental education in Egypt being recalled home to Malaysia. The Ministry of Higher Education in Malaysia took steps to integrate these students into public and private universities in Malaysia. We used a questionnaire and informal interviews to learn from students returning from Egypt about their experiences transitioning from dental schools in Egypt to Malaysia. We discuss the challenges students faced with regards to credit transfer, pastoral care, the differences in the curriculum between the dental faculties of the two nations, and the financial implications of this disruption of their training. We live in a fragile world where similar political situations will surely arise again. The approaches used by the Malaysian government and the lessons learned from these students may help others. The perspectives of these students may help educators reintegrate expatriate students who are displaced by political instability back into the education system of their own countries.

  14. An online formative assessment tool to prepare students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feedback to students and promotes student learning, whereas summative assessment is .... Kolb's experiential learning cycle, as it offers students the opportunity for ..... Theory and learning in medical education: How theory can inform practice.

  15. Student Assessment in the Ubiquitously Connected World

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Student cheating on university assessments from entrance exams to finals and from contract cheating on coursework to requesting exam answers using a mobile phone during the exam, has received more and more attention of late. As connection to the Internet becomes ubiquitous and computing and communications technology more embedded in our environment, it is argued that a re-focussing on providing educational opportunities is needed in higher education, rather than chasing the ever-retreating p...

  16. Medical student selection and society: Lessons we learned from sociological theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei, Minoo; Yazdani, Shahram; Ahmady, Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the interaction between the society, applicants and medical schools in terms of medical student selection. In this study, the trends to implement social factors in the selection process were highlighted. These social factors were explored through functionalism and conflict theories, each focusing on different categories of social factors. While functionalist theorists pay attention to diversity in the selection process, conflict theorists highlight the importance of socio-economic class. Although both theories believe in sorting, their different views are reflected in their sorting strategies. Both theories emphasize the importance of the person-society relationship in motivation to enter university. Furthermore, the impacts of social goals on the selection policies are derived from both theories. Theories in the sociology of education offer an approach to student selection that acknowledges and supports complexity, plurality of approaches and innovative means of selection. Medical student selection does not solely focus on the individual assessment and qualification, but it focuses on a social and collective process, which includes all the influences and interactions between the medical schools and the society. Sociological perspective of medical student selection proposes a model that envelops the individual and the society. In this model, the selection methods should meet the criteria of merit at the individual level, while the selection policies should aim at the society goals at the institutional level.

  17. No Light at the End of Tunnel Vision: Steps for Improving Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Rita; Craig, Martin; Favre, Lois; Markus, Doron; Pedota, Paul; Sookdeo, Gale; Stock, Jessica; Terry, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this article believe that the current structure of lesson plans impede differentiation, individualization, and innovation and offer little in assessing the quality of teaching and learning. Concrete steps will be offered for planning to better respond to student diversity in meeting lesson objectives. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Evaluating the Effects of Lesson Study as a Way to Help Student Teachers Learn How to Use Student Thinking when Planning and Revising Mathematics Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisofo, Eric Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The use of student thinking in teaching has been linked to improved instruction and learning. It is reasonable to assume that the University of Delaware's undergraduate program might be interested in figuring out ways to develop this skill in its mathematics specialist pre-service teachers. Currently, the student teaching experience at the…

  19. Can Research Homework Provide a Vehicle for Assessment for Learning in Science Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Louise; Winterbottom, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many English schools have a homework policy which prescribes how much homework should be set for each pupil each week, irrespective of whether it can be made meaningful. Research recommends "Assessment for Learning" (AfL) as supportive of students' learning, but teachers can find it difficult to incorporate AfL techniques into their…

  20. Student Self-Assessment and Multisource Feedback Assessment: Exploring Benefits, Limitations, and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Scott N.

    2014-01-01

    It has become common practice for management students to participate in some sort of self-assessment or multisource feedback assessment (MSF; also called 360-degree assessment or multirater assessment) during their management degree program. These assessments provide students invaluable feedback about themselves and assist students in their…

  1. Effects of Infographics on Students Achievement and Attitude towards Geography Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    Geography is a very comprehensive field of study with many subjects to study topics. Using a wide range of materials in the teaching of this course can this lesson be made effective and permanent because we do not have chances to observe natural phenomena. Therefore, in geography education materials natural environment is to be brought to class by…

  2. Assessment of values in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Manuel MORALES RODRÍGUEZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a questionnaire for assessing social values in university students (VASOL. Increasingly, society demands that its professionals must know how to cope with complexity, considering the human and social aspects of such situations. The European Higher Education Area (ehea has emphasized the interest in training future professionals as agents of social change, not only as regards the creation and management of new knowledge but also in the action of citizens who contribute to greater social cohesion. This research team has developed a new questionnaire to assess social justice and solidarity values. The questionnaire revealed a unifactorial configuration coherent with the theory. A sample of 945 university students completed the VASOL and these were subjected to a series of instruments aimed at evaluating the validity of the questionnaire. The VASOL proved to be a reliable and valid instrument. We discuss the usefulness of this new instrument for the screening of social justice and solidarity values, specifically for their detection, and for assessing social or interpersonal skills in the current model of the ehea and validation of psycho-educational programs.

  3. Lessons for Teaching Art Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry, Ed.; Clark, Gilbert, Ed.

    This collection of lessons is meant to be a practical guide to help teachers engage children in art criticism. The lessons generally follow a similar format. Most suggest an age group but may be modified for use with younger or older students. Several authors suggest variations and extensions for lessons that include studio activities. A broad…

  4. "Frankenstein." [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melanie

    Based on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that active readers interpret a novel (its characters, plot, setting, and theme) in different ways; and the great literature can be and has been adapted in many ways over time. The main activity of the lesson involves students…

  5. Assessment of Student Outcomes in Undergraduate Health Information Administration Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jody

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to a) determine what assessment methods are being used in undergraduate health information administration programs to assess student learning and the usefulness of those methods, b) determine to what extent programs have incorporated good student learning assessment practices. Programs use a variety of assessment tools to measure student learning; the most useful include assessments by the professional practice supervisor, course tests, assignments, presentati...

  6. First-Generation College Student Dissertation Abstracts: Research Strategies, Topical Analysis, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, James H.

    2014-01-01

    First-generation college students are students whose parents or guardians did not obtain a four year college degree (Davis, 2012). As a group these students make up a large part of the college student population and are often reported to encounter difficulties in their campus experience. While the topic of first-generation student has received…

  7. The Experience of a Highly Skilled Student during Handball Lessons in Physical Education: A Relevant Pointer to the Gap between School and Sports Contexts of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crance, Marie-Cecile; Trohel, Jean; Saury, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the experience of a highly skilled student during a handball physical education unit in a French high school. More specifically, the analysis describes the nature of his involvement during two lessons that follow a pedagogical model close to the principles of Sport Education. The present case study of a…

  8. Application of Education Management and Lesson Study in Teaching Mathematics to Students of Second Grade of Public School in District 3 of Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhoush, Masoumeh; Majedi, Parisima; Behrangi, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    The present paper studies the effects of lesson study as a sample of participative researches in classroom as well as Behrangi Education Management Model in courses by aiming at exploring and allowing students to use the indexes of course concepts as an effective model in learning. The research plan is pre-test, posttest with control group type.…

  9. "What if We Were in a Test Tube?" Students' Gendered Meaning Making during a Biology Lesson about the Basic Facts of the Human Genitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was…

  10. Experience and lessons from health impact assessment for human rights impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcito, Kendyl; Utzinger, Jürg; Krieger, Gary R; Wielga, Mark; Singer, Burton H; Winkler, Mirko S; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2015-09-16

    As globalisation has opened remote parts of the world to foreign investment, global leaders at the United Nations and beyond have called on multinational companies to foresee and mitigate negative impacts on the communities surrounding their overseas operations. This movement towards corporate impact assessment began with a push for environmental and social inquiries. It has been followed by demands for more detailed assessments, including health and human rights. In the policy world the two have been joined as a right-to-health impact assessment. In the corporate world, the right-to-health approach fulfils neither managers' need to comprehensively understand impacts of a project, nor rightsholders' need to know that the full suite of their human rights will be safe from violation. Despite the limitations of a right-to-health tool for companies, integration of health into human rights provides numerous potential benefits to companies and the communities they affect. Here, a detailed health analysis through the human rights lens is carried out, drawing on a case study from the United Republic of Tanzania. This paper examines the positive and negative health and human rights impacts of a corporate operation in a low-income setting, as viewed through the human rights lens, considering observations on the added value of the approach. It explores the relationship between health impact assessment (HIA) and human rights impact assessment (HRIA). First, it considers the ways in which HIA, as a study directly concerned with human welfare, is a more appropriate guide than environmental or social impact assessment for evaluating human rights impacts. Second, it considers the contributions HRIA can make to HIA, by viewing determinants of health not as direct versus indirect, but as interrelated.

  11. Integrated regional assessment of global climatic change. Lessons from the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Stewart J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper outlines the potential role integrated regional assessments of global climatic change scenarios could play in building better links between science and related policy concerns. The concept is illustrated through description of an ongoing case study from Canada-the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study (MBIS). As part of the Government of Canada's Green Plan, the Global Warming Science Program includes a study of regional impacts of global warming scenarios in the Mackenzie Basin, located in northwestern Canada. The MBIS is a six-year program focussing on potential climate-induced changes in the land and water resource base, and the implications of four scenarios of global climatic change on land use and economic policies in this region. These policy issues include interjurisdictional water management, sustainability of native lifestyles, economic development opportunities (agriculture, forestry, tourism, etc.), sustainability of ecosystems and infrastructure maintenance. MBIS is due to be completed in 1997. MBIS represents an attempt to address regional impacts by incorporating a 'family of integrators' into the study framework, and by directly involving stakeholders in planning and research activities. The experience in organizing and carrying out this project may provide some lessons for others interested in organizing regional or country studies

  12. Environmental assessment of nuclear projects in Canada - process, participation, lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underdown, G.A.; Brown, P.A.; Morrison, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper documents public participation in decision-making for five cases of nuclear-based projects in Canada. Two cases involve the application of the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process (EARP), a formal, non-judicial process for public involvement in projects with a potential environmental impact. It is being applied to the development of new Uranium mines and the disposal of used nuclear fuels. The siting of radioactive waste facilities, generally unwanted by the communities, presents many difficult challenges which needs to be addressed before a project goes through the EARP process. An open, consultative, community-based approach to decision-making about siting is being applied in the three cases: Port Hope, Scarborough and Surrey. A number of lessons have been learned, the most important that there is a need to establish an acceptable process that includes 'getting the science right' on a project before attempting to find a site. The EARP, in most cases, provides a good mechanism for the sharing of information about a potential between the proponents and the public as long as there are no major unresolved contentious issues such as the unwanted siting of a waste facility in a particular community. 19 refs

  13. Assessing Weather Curiosity in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    This research focuses upon measuring an individual's level of trait curiosity about the weather using the Weather Curiosity Scale (WCS). The measure consists of 15 self-report items that describe weather preferences and/or behaviors that people may perform more or less frequently. The author reports on two initial studies of the WCS that have used the responses of 710 undergraduate students from a large university in the southeastern United States. In the first study, factor analysis of the 15 items indicated that the measure was unidimensional - suggesting that its items singularly assessed weather curiosity. The WCS also was internally consistent as evidenced by an acceptable Cronbach's alpha, a = .81). The second study sought to identify other personality variables that may relate with the WCS scores and thus illuminate the nature of weather curiosity. Several clusters of personality variables appear to underlie the curiosity levels people exhibited, the first of which related to perceptual curiosity (r = .59). Being curious about sights, sounds, smells, and textures generally related somewhat to curiosity about weather. Two measures of trait sensitivity to environmental stimulation, the Highly Sensitive Person Scale (r = .47) and the Orientation Sensitivity Scale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (r = .43), also predicted weather curiosity levels. Finally, possessing extraverted personality traits (r = .34) and an intense style of experiencing one's emotions (r = .33) related to weather curiosity. How can this measure be used in K-12 or post-secondary settings to further climate literacy? First, the WCS can identify students with natural curiosities about weather and climate so these students may be given more challenging instruction that will leverage their natural interests. Second, high-WCS students may function as weather and climate ambassadors during inquiry-based learning activities and thus help other students who are not as oriented to the

  14. Standardizing assessment practices of undergraduate medical competencies across medical schools: challenges, opportunities and lessons learned from a consortium of medical schools in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubuuke, Aloysius Gonzaga; Mwesigwa, Catherine; Maling, Samuel; Rukundo, Godfrey; Kagawa, Mike; Kitara, David Lagoro; Kiguli, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health professions education is gradually moving away from the more traditional approaches to new innovative ways of training aimed at producing professionals with the necessary competencies to address the community health needs. In response to these emerging trends, Medical Education for Equitable Services to All Ugandans (MESAU), a consortium of Ugandan medical schools developed key competencies desirable of graduates and successfully implemented Competency Based Education (CBE) for undergraduate medical students. Objectives To examine the current situation and establish whether assessment methods of the competencies are standardized across MESAU schools as well as establish the challenges, opportunities and lessons learned from the MESAU consortium. Methods It was a cross-sectional descriptive study involving faculty of the medical schools in Uganda. Data was collected using focus group discussions and document reviews. Findings were presented in form of themes. Results Although the MESAU schools have implemented the developed competencies within their curricular, the assessment methods are still not standardized with each institution having its own assessment procedures. Lack of knowledge and skills regarding assessment of the competencies was evident amongst the faculty. The fear for change amongst lecturers was also noted as a major challenge. However, the institutional collaboration created while developing competencies was identified as key strength. Conclusion Findings demonstrated that despite having common competencies, there is no standardized assessment blue print applicable to all MESAU schools. Continued collaboration and faculty development in assessment is strongly recommended. PMID:25995778

  15. Standardizing assessment practices of undergraduate medical competencies across medical schools: challenges, opportunities and lessons learned from a consortium of medical schools in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubuuke, Aloysius Gonzaga; Mwesigwa, Catherine; Maling, Samuel; Rukundo, Godfrey; Kagawa, Mike; Kitara, David Lagoro; Kiguli, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Health professions education is gradually moving away from the more traditional approaches to new innovative ways of training aimed at producing professionals with the necessary competencies to address the community health needs. In response to these emerging trends, Medical Education for Equitable Services to All Ugandans (MESAU), a consortium of Ugandan medical schools developed key competencies desirable of graduates and successfully implemented Competency Based Education (CBE) for undergraduate medical students. To examine the current situation and establish whether assessment methods of the competencies are standardized across MESAU schools as well as establish the challenges, opportunities and lessons learned from the MESAU consortium. It was a cross-sectional descriptive study involving faculty of the medical schools in Uganda. Data was collected using focus group discussions and document reviews. Findings were presented in form of themes. Although the MESAU schools have implemented the developed competencies within their curricular, the assessment methods are still not standardized with each institution having its own assessment procedures. Lack of knowledge and skills regarding assessment of the competencies was evident amongst the faculty. The fear for change amongst lecturers was also noted as a major challenge. However, the institutional collaboration created while developing competencies was identified as key strength. Findings demonstrated that despite having common competencies, there is no standardized assessment blue print applicable to all MESAU schools. Continued collaboration and faculty development in assessment is strongly recommended.

  16. The Assessment of Lesson Plans in Teacher Education: A Case Study in Assessment Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummons, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper forms part of an exploration of assessment on one part-time higher education (HE) course: an in-service, professional qualification for teachers and trainers in the learning and skills sector which is delivered on a franchise basis across a network of further education colleges in the north of England. This paper proposes that the…

  17. Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

  18. Disaggregating Assessment to Close the Loop and Improve Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Janita; Hammons, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    This study examined student learning outcomes for accelerated degree students as compared to conventional undergraduate students, disaggregated by class levels, to develop strategies for then closing the loop with assessment. Using the National Survey of Student Engagement, critical thinking and oral and written communication outcomes were…

  19. The Benefits of Mouse Keeping—an Empirical Study on Students' Flow and Intrinsic Motivation in Biology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Annika; Klingenberg, Konstantin; Wilde, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Contact with living animals is an exceptional possibility within biology education to facilitate an intense immersion into the study topic and even allow for a flow experience (Csikszentmihalyi 2000). Further, it might affect the perceptions of the students' basic needs for autonomy and competence and thereby their quality of motivation (Deci and Ryan 1985, 2002). Still, there is little empirical evidence about the duration of the exposure with living animals that is required. We investigated the students' flow experience, and the students' motivation, reported retrospectively in three different treatments: lessons involving short-term or long-term contact with living harvest mice and a control group without living animals. Our sample consisted of 156 fifth graders (10.76 years, SD = 0.513). The test instruments were adapted versions of the Flow Short Scale (FSS, Rheinberg et al. 2003) and of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI, Ryan 1982). As expected, the control group produced significantly lower scores for both FSS and IMI. In addition, we found a significant difference between students with short-term versus long-term contact. Whereas the flow experience was indistinguishable for all pupils who had contact with living animals, those with long-term experience reported significantly higher intrinsic motivation.

  20. Assessment for Learning as Support for Student Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    Assessment for learning (AfL) is integral to teaching and learning, and has as its central foci (i) pedagogical intervention in the immediacy of student learning, and (ii) the students' agency in the learning and assessment process. The role that students adopt in AfL is consistent with the idea of self-regulated learning, which involves students…

  1. Assessing students in community settings: the role of peer evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); A.A. Abdel-Hameed (Ahmed); M.E.M. Mohi Eldin (Magzoub)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe assessment of students in community settings faces unique difficulties. Since students are usually posted in small groups in different community settings and since the learning (largely) takes place outside the classroom, assessing student performance becomes an intrinsically complex

  2. Teachers upgrading to favour the environmental dimension in Physical Education lesson for sixth grader students of Pinar del Rio Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margelia Bárbara Ramírez-Blanco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research that is presented proposes a training program for the professo rs of Physical Education that favours the introduction of the environmental dimension in the class for senior high school students of Pinar del Río municipality, to improve this training process related with the Environmental Education, the objective of the preparation is to offer the professors of Physical Education the necessary knowledge that it allows them to eliminate the obstacle that represents the lack of professional competitions for the construction of the environmental dimension because when obtaining the professor bigger knowledge it can fulfil its function better the pupil. With the objective of determining the insufficiencies in relation to the envi ronmental work, as well as to know the way of upgrading that was been using at the moment of the research there were applied scientific methods as observation, to Physical Education lessons and interview to Physical Education teachers and officials, who d eclared that there are not orientations in Physical Education syllabus to develop environmental education, it was verified there was a poor development of the didactic integrating conception of it, as well as a lack of documents and methodological and pre cise orientations. The designed program has 40 lesson hours, it is developed in three themes and y it is adapted to the new tendencies of competitions that mark the new laws of the education and structured in Thematic Plan, System of knowledge, Abilities, Securities to develop, methodological Orientations for its use and Evaluation.

  3. Emporiatric enteritis: lessons learned from U.S. students in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, H L; Ericsson, C D; Dupont, M W

    1986-01-01

    In the studies reported, evidence has been presented that U.S. students traveling to Mexico represent a model for the study of travelers' diarrhea. The incidence of illness acquisition approximates that published in other studies of travelers. Natural immunity was shown to develop as students remained in Mexico presumably through repeated exposure to prevalent agents, particularly ETEC. ETEC, shigella strains and no detectable agent represented the largest groups when etiologic assessment was made. Food probably served as the important source of diarrhea particularly that due to ETEC and shigella strains. The level of bacteria isolated from food suggested that organism replication occurred due to improper temperature storage rather than to heavy initial contamination. The location of food consumption was related to degree of risk: self preparation was the safest, eating in Mexican homes the least safe and consumption of food in public restaurants was intermediate in risk. Water probably played a role in the transmission of viral infection. The risk of water contamination appeared to be highest during the rainy seasons. Finally, the antimicrobial agents TMP/SMX and TMP alone were shown to effectively prevent and treat this form of travelers' diarrhea.

  4. Getting and Keeping Nora on Board: A Novice Elementary ESOL Student Teacher's Practices for Lesson Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Hansun Zhang; Hruska, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes how a novice ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) student teacher successfully navigates an instructional path in a one-on-one tutoring session with a second grade student. We document the student teacher's strategies to both engage and disengage her student, who alternately resists and cooperates throughout the…

  5. Using the Blooms-Banks Matrix to Develop Multicultural Differentiated Lessons for Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman Scott, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Many classrooms are comprised of students with differing abilities ranging from students with disabilities to students with gifts and talents. While these students are sharing the same space, their differing cognitive levels must be met. Therefore, curricula must be used to meet the needs of the cognitive level that is represented within the…

  6. The Meaning of Student Engagement and Disengagement in the Classroom Context: Lessons from Organisational Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwant, Paul T.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the popularity of student engagement and, by association, student disengagement, the academic literature is unclear about the meaning of these terms. This review extends existing conceptual studies of student engagement by offering clear definitions and conceptualisations of both student engagement and disengagement in the classroom…

  7. Improving the argumentative skills of high school students through teacher’s questioning techniques and argumentative assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristianti, T. P.; Ramli, M.; Ariyanto, J.

    2018-05-01

    This research aims to know how students’ argumentative skills improved by applying teacher’s questioning techniques and argumentative assessment through collaborative action research between college student who did teaching practicum, biology teacher as tutor teacher, and lecturers. The action research was done in three cycles involving one class consisted of 36 eleventh graders. Lesson plans were developed collaboratively, and teaching practices were by the student teacher. In the reflective phase prior to the first cycle, learning processes were dominated by the teacher, hence students did not have sufficient opportunity to argue. Students were divided into two, 14 students were grouped as low achievement (LA) and 22 students were the high achievement (HA). Teacher questions and students’ responses were furtherly coded and interpreted following the validated rubric of level of argumentation. A divergent essay as an argumentative assessment was also tested to students at the end of each cycle. At the end of the third cycle, HA and LA students showed a significant change in argumentative skills responded the teacher’s questions. However, only four LA students who actively argued. Students from HA groups also showed the improvement on the level of argumentation, where they move from level 1 to 3.

  8. Variation in Students' Conceptions of Self-Assessment and Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Kiat Kelvin Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a phenomenographic study on the different ways that secondary students understood and utilized student self-assessment and how various ego types could affect the accuracy of self-assessment. The study sought to contribute to the growing literature which recognizes the critical role that students play in assessment processes, and in particular the different roles that they assume in student self-assessment. The results of the study provide insights into how different students experience self-assessment by articulating the variation in the perception and purposes of assessing one's own learning. This variation is depicted as a hierarchy of logically related students' conceptions of self-assessment.

  9. Perceptions of Students and Self- assessment of Lecturers on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assessments of lecturers on written essay error feedback. Overall 153 University of Botswana students and 20 lecturers participated in this study. All the students and 12 lecturers completed different but related questionnaires with both closed and ...

  10. Connecting polar research to NGSS STEM classroom lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, R.; Kast, D.

    2016-12-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are designed to bring consistent, rigorous science teaching across the United States. Topics are categorized as Performance Expectations (PE), Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI), Cross-Cutting Concepts (CCC), and Science and Engineering Practices (SEP). NGSS includes a focus on environmental science and climate change across grade levels. Earth and planetary sciences are required at the high school level. Integrating polar science lessons into NGSS classrooms brings relevant, rigorous climate change curriculum across grade levels. Polar science provides opportunities for students to use current data during lessons, conduct their own field work, and collaborate with scientists. Polar science provides a framework of learning that is novel to most students. Inquiry and engagement are high with polar science lessons. Phenomenon related to polar science provide an excellent tool for science teachers to use to engage students in a lesson, stimulate inquiry, and promote critical thinking. When taught effectively, students see the connections between their community, polar regions and climate change, regardless of where on the planet students live. This presentation describes examples of how to effectively implement NGSS lessons by incorporating polar science lessons and field research. Examples of introductory phenomenon and aligned PEs, CCCs, DCIs, and SEPs are given. Suggested student activities, assessments, examples of student work, student research, labs, and PolarTREC fieldwork, use of current science data, and connections to scientists in the field are provided. The goals of the presentation are to give teachers a blueprint to follow when implementing NGSS lessons, and give scientists an understanding of the basics of NGSS so they may be better able to relate their work to U.S. science education and be more effective communicators of their science findings.

  11. Assessing the impact of blended learning on student performance

    OpenAIRE

    Do Won Kwak; Flavio Menezes; Carl Sherwood

    2013-01-01

    This paper assesses quantitatively the impact on student performance of a blended learning experiment within a large undergraduate first year course in statistics for business and economics students. We employ a differences- in-difference econometric approach, which controls for differences in student characteristics and course delivery method, to evaluate the impact of blended learning on student performance. Although students in the course manifest a preference for live lectures over online...

  12. Development of a harmonized approach to safety assessment of decommissioning: Lessons learned from international experience (DeSa project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, K.; Nokhamzon, J.-G.; Ferch, R.; Batandjieva, B.

    2006-01-01

    The number of nuclear facilities being or planned to be shutdown as they reach the end of their design life, due to accidents or other political and social factors has been increasing worldwide. This has led to an increase in the awareness of regulators and operators of the importance of development and implementation of adequate safety requirements and criteria for decommissioning of these facilities. A general requirement at international and national levels, even for new facilities to be commissioned, is the development of a decommissioning plan, which includes evaluation of potential radiological consequences to public and workers during planned and accidental decommissioning activities. Experience has been gained in the safety assessment of decommissioning at various sites with different complexities and hazard potentials. This experience shows that various approaches have been used in conducting safety assessments and that there is a need for harmonisation of these approaches and for transferring the good practice and lessons learned to other countries, in particular developing countries with limited financial and human resources. The IAEA launched an international project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning (DeSa) in 2004 to provide a forum for exchange of lessons learned between site operators, regulators, safety assessors and other specialists in safety assessment of decommissioning of nuclear power plants, research reactors, laboratories, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, etc. This paper presents the lessons learned through the project up to date, i.e.; (i) a common approach to safety assessment is being applied worldwide with the following steps - establishment of assessment framework; description of the facility; definition of decommissioning activities; hazard identification and analysis; calculation of consequences; and analysis of results; (ii) a deterministic approach to safety assessment is most commonly applied; (iii) a

  13. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  14. Innovative Assessment Paradigm to Enhance Student Learning in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maaddawy, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of student self-assessment (SSA) in engineering education offers opportunities to support and encourage learner-led-learning. This paper presents an innovative assessment paradigm that integrates formative, summative, and SSA to enhance student learning. The assessment innovation was implemented in a senior-level civil engineering…

  15. Contribution of continuous assessment to student learning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study seeks to find out whether continuous assessment contributes to students' performance mathematics. The objectives of this study were to find out whether; Students see continuous assessment as a motivating factor in their learning, there is any workload involved in filling of continuous assessment termly, ...

  16. Assessing Students in the Margin: Challenges, Strategies, and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Michael; Kavanaugh, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    The importance of student assessment, particularly for summative purposes, has increased greatly over the past thirty years. At the same time, emphasis on including all students in assessment programs has also increased. Assessment programs, whether they are large-scale, district-based, or teacher developed, have traditionally attempted to assess…

  17. Assessment of Written Expression Skills of University Students in Terms of Text Completion Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir KIRBAŞ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Writing is to transfer the visualised ideas on the paper. Writing, one of the language skills, is a significant tool of communication which provides the permanency of information conveying emotions and thoughts. Since writing has both cognitive and physical aspects, it makes writing the hardest and the latest language skill to improve. The studies show that writing activity is the most difficult skill students have difficulty. In higher education, in order to improve writing skills of students and give basic information and skills about writing skills written expression, composition and writing education lessons are taught both in the department of Turkish Language and Literature and in the departments of Turkish Language in the Faculties of Education. One of the aims of these lessons is to teach students written expression techniques together with the purposes and practices. One of the written expression techniques is text completion skill that improves student’s creativity and enhances her/his imaginary world. The purpose of this study is to assess students’ skills of using text completion technique with reference to the writing studies of students in higher education. the sample of the study consists of 85 college students studying in the department of Turkish Language and Literature in Gümüşhane University in 2016-2017 academic year. The data of the study were obtained from the written expression studies of the students. The introduction part of the article ‘On Reading’ by F. Bacon was given to the students and they were required to complete the text. ‘Text Completion Rating Scale in Writing Expression’ was developed to assess the data of the study by taking opinions of lecturers and Turkish education experts. The data of the study were presented with percentage and frequency rates. At the end of the study, it was concluded that students had weakness in some skills such as writing an effective body part about the topic given

  18. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van M.; Dochy, F.; Segers, M.; Braeken, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality

  19. Peer Mentoring for International Students in a UK Law School: Lessons from a Pilot Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragavan, Shamini K.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study discusses the impact of a support network for international students of culturally diverse backgrounds using a peer mentoring scheme. The scheme focused on facilitating cultural integration in the international student community in Newcastle and sought to engender a cooperative community among new students. Data obtained…

  20. Lessons for Teaching Botany: What Middle School Students Know about Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Chitra; Chunawala, Sugra; Apte, Swapna; Ramadas, Jayashree

    Students' alternative conceptions arise out of an interconnected system of beliefs: about the nature of science, of learning, of the natural and social world. Cross-cultural perspectives on these world views are therefore essential. This study probed middle school students' conceptions about plants. Tribal students were found to have a richer and…

  1. Cognitively Accessible Academic Lessons for Students with Intellectual Disabilities Using the iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Jamie Linn; Higgins, Kyle; Morgan, Joseph John; Tandy, Richard; Brown, Monica R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve access to general education curricula, through the use of an iPad, for students with intellectual disabilities (IDs). The participants were 72 students (kindergarten through eighth grade) identified as having an ID. During the 6-week study, the 41 students in the experimental iPad group received academic…

  2. Designing and assessing fixed dental prostheses 2 multimedia-based education in dentistry students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahandideh, Yousef; Roohi Balasi, Leila; Vadiati Saberi, Bardia; Dadgaran, Ideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Above all methods effective learning results from decent training, acquired in the proper environment and encouraging creative methods. Computer-assisted training by educational software is considered a fundamental measure to improve medical and dentistry education systems. This study aims to design and assess fixed dental prostheses via 2 multimedia instructional contents at the Guilan dentistry school. Methods: This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. First off, the instructional content was analyzed. The software used to produce multimedia was the iSpring suite Ver.7.0. After designing the instructional multimedia, this software was loaded by LMS. Sixty-nine dentistry students in the 5th semester at Guilan Dentistry School were selected via convenience sampling. At the end of the course, a structured questionnaire containing 26 items were handed to the students to evaluate the instructional multimedia quality. Results: Mean ±SD age was 24.68±3.24 years, 43 were women (62.4%) and 26 were men (37.6%) -the majority of 76.8% used the internet at home. A portion of 33.3% were inclined to use multimedia and the internet with in-person training. About 60% declared that multimedia quality as being good. Conclusion: the instructional multimedia designs which are compatible with lesson objectives and audiovisual facilities can have a great effect on the student's satisfaction. Preparing instructional multimedia makes the instructional content easily accessible for students to be able to review it several times at the proper opportunity and if presented through LMS they would be able to study the lesson subject wherever and whenever accessing the internet.

  3. Masterwork Art Lesson: Kandinsky Watercolors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LiPira, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students which also can be used with other grade levels. Explains that the artwork of Wassily Kandinsky served as inspiration for this lesson. Explains that the students learned about abstract art and used watercolors to create their own paintings in the style of Kandinsky. (CMK)

  4. Bead Game Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Ken

    This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to participate in the three basic economic systems (market, command, and tradition). By working in each of the systems, students will internalize the fundamental values present in each system and will gain insights into the basic advantages and disadvantages of each system. The lesson plan provides…

  5. Keiko, Killer Whale. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    This lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Keiko, the killer whale, lived for a long time in an aquarium and had to be taught to live independently; and that computer users can get updates on how Keiko is doing. The main activity of the lesson involves middle school students working in small groups to produce a…

  6. Assessing Student Outcomes of Undergraduate Research with URSSA, the Undergraduate Student Self-Assessment Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S. L.; Weston, T. J.; Thiry, H.

    2012-12-01

    URSSA is the Undergraduate Research Student Self-Assessment, an online survey instrument for programs and departments to use in assessing the student outcomes of undergraduate research (UR). URSSA focuses on what students learn from their UR experience, rather than whether they liked it. The online questionnaire includes both multiple-choice and open-ended items that focus on students' gains from undergraduate research. These gains include skills, knowledge, deeper understanding of the intellectual and practical work of science, growth in confidence, changes in identity, and career preparation. Other items probe students' participation in important research-related activities that lead to these gains (e.g. giving presentations, having responsibility for a project). These activities, and the gains themselves, are based in research and thus constitute a core set of items. Using these items as a group helps to align a particular program assessment with research-demonstrated outcomes. Optional items may be used to probe particular features that are augment the research experience (e.g. field trips, career seminars, housing arrangements). The URSSA items are based on extensive, interview-based research and evaluation work on undergraduate research by our group and others. This grounding in research means that URSSA measures what we know to be important about the UR experience The items were tested with students, revised and re-tested. Data from a large pilot sample of over 500 students enabled statistical testing of the items' validity and reliability. Optional items about UR program elements were developed in consultation with UR program developers and leaders. The resulting instrument is flexible. Users begin with a set of core items, then customize their survey with optional items to probe students' experiences of specific program elements. The online instrument is free and easy to use, with numeric results available as raw data, summary statistics, cross-tabs, and

  7. Development, Implementation, and Assessment of Climate Curricular Materials for Introductory Undergraduates: Lessons Learned from the InTeGrate Project's Climate of Change Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B.; Fadem, C. M.; Shellito, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Designing climate change curricular materials suitable for wide adoption across institutions and academic disciplines (including those outside of the geosciences) requires collaboration among faculty at different types of institutions and consideration of a variety of student populations, learning styles, and course formats. The Interdisciplinary Teaching of Geoscience for a Sustainable Future (InTeGrate) project, an NSF STEP Center program, provides opportunities for faculty to develop 2-3 week teaching modules to engage students in understanding the intersections between geoscience topics and societal issues. From 2012-2014, a team of 3 faculty from a liberal arts college, comprehensive university, and community college developed, implemented, assessed, and revised a 2-3 week module for introductory undergraduates entitled "Climate of change: interactions and feedbacks between water, air, and ice". The module uses authentic atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere data from several regions to illustrate how climate impacts human societies and that the climate system has interacting components complicated by feedbacks, uncertainties, and human behavioral decisions. Students also consider past and present human adaptations to climate fluctuations. The module was piloted in introductory geology, meteorology, and oceanography courses during the 2012-2013 academic year, during which time formative and summative assessments were administered and used to modify the curricular materials. We will provide an overview of the module's content, instructional strategies involved in implementing the module, and methods of formative and summative assessment. We will also report on lessons learned during the development, piloting, revision, and publishing process, the importance of fostering partnerships between faculty from different institution types, and design approaches that promote widespread adoption of climate curricular materials.

  8. Student Affairs Assessment, Strategic Planning, and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallucca, Amber

    2017-01-01

    This chapter illustrates how student affairs units participate in accreditation across regional agency expectations and program-level requirements. Strategies for student affairs units to engage in campus strategic planning processes to further highlight their contributions are also recommended.

  9. Assessing Multicultural Competence of Helping-Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on assessing multicultural competence of helping-profession students. The "Multicultural Competence Scale of Helping-Profession Students" was used for data collection. The aim of the research was to find out the level of students' multicultural competence due to the current lack of this information in Central…

  10. Assessing Postgraduate Students' Critical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Atif; Qurat-Ul-Ain, Ansa

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses to assess the critical thinking ability of postgraduate students. The target population was the male and female students at University level in Pakistan. A small sample of 45 male and 45 female students were selected randomly from The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Cornell Critical Thinking Test Series, The…

  11. Biometric and Intelligent Self-Assessment of Student Progress System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaklauskas, A.; Zavadskas, E. K.; Pruskus, V.; Vlasenko, A.; Seniut, M.; Kaklauskas, G.; Matuliauskaite, A.; Gribniak, V.

    2010-01-01

    All distance learning participants (students, professors, instructors, mentors, tutors and the rest) would like to know how well the students have assimilated the study materials being taught. The analysis and assessment of the knowledge students have acquired over a semester are an integral part of the independent studies process at the most…

  12. Assessing Students Perceptions on Intensive Face to Face in Open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study assessed students‟ perception on Intensive Face to Face sessions. The study specifically aimed at identifying students‟ perception on quality of interaction between tutors and students and between students on the other hand. It also explored the nature of challenges students meet in attending face to ...

  13. Needs Assessment of International Students at Eastern Oregon State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mamoud Taha; Jordan-Domschot, Theresa

    The purpose of the research project was to assess the needs, satisfaction, and concerns of international students attending Eastern Oregon State College. The international student population consisted of students from Micronesia, Netherlands, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Japan, Thailand, Zimbabwe, Belgium, Canada, Nigeria, China,…

  14. Assessing Student Learning in Academic Advising Using Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning apply to academic advising for measuring student learning outcomes. Community college students (N = 120) participated in an individual academic-advising session. We assessed students' post-intervention self-efficacy in academic planning and…

  15. A Validation Study of the Student Oral Proficiency Assessment (SOPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lynn E.; Kenyon, Dorry M.; Rhodes, Nancy C.

    This study validated the Student Oral Proficiency Assessment (SOPA), an oral proficiency instrument designed for students in elementary foreign language programs. Elementary students who were tested with the SOPA were also administered other instruments designed to measure proficiency. These instruments included the Stanford Foreign Language Oral…

  16. Peer Assessment with Online Tools to Improve Student Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Leslie J.

    2012-11-01

    Introductory physics courses often require students to develop precise models of phenomena and represent these with diagrams, including free-body diagrams, light-ray diagrams, and maps of field lines. Instructors expect that students will adopt a certain rigor and precision when constructing these diagrams, but we want that rigor and precision to be an aid to sense-making rather than meeting seemingly arbitrary requirements set by the instructor. By giving students the authority to develop their own models and establish requirements for their diagrams, the sense that these are arbitrary requirements diminishes and students are more likely to see modeling as a sense-making activity. The practice of peer assessment can help students take ownership; however, it can be difficult for instructors to manage. Furthermore, it is not without risk: students can be reluctant to critique their peers, they may view this as the job of the instructor, and there is no guarantee that students will employ greater rigor and precision as a result of peer assessment. In this article, we describe one approach for peer assessment that can establish norms for diagrams in a way that is student driven, where students retain agency and authority in assessing and improving their work. We show that such an approach does indeed improve students' diagrams and abilities to assess their own work, without sacrificing students' authority and agency.

  17. Inclusive assessment in a site-selection process. Approach, experience, reflections and some lessons beyond boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueeler, Thomas [Directorate of Public Works, Nuclear Technology Unit, Zurich (Switzerland). Energy Dept.; ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. for Environmental Decisions

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal indisputably is a controversial socio-technical issue in most societies widely using nuclear technology. All the more it is pivotal to proceed in a comprehensive, transparent and participative manner. The contribution suggests fundamental rules to follow and confronts them with the currently ongoing site-selection process in Switzerland. Finally it draws some lessons for the audience.

  18. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Teacher Study Guides Used in Conjunction with Educational Television Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Lynne Schafer

    One of three different types of study guide materials was given to teachers whose classes watched televised music lessons. One guide provided a description of the program content, suggested activities to be performed before and after the program, and other supplementary material; a second guide provided only a description of the program content;…

  19. Assessment Training Effects on Student Assessment Skills and Task Performance in a Technology-Facilitated Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an assessment training module on student assessment skills and task performance in a technology-facilitated peer assessment. Seventy-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants completed an assessment training exercise, prior to engaging in peer-assessment activities. During the…

  20. An evaluation of medical student-led podcasts: what are the lessons learnt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Smriti; Catton, Rory; Khalil, Hisham

    2018-01-01

    Student-led podcasts were developed by 5th year Peninsula Medical School students as part of an educational grant. The students completed 35 video podcasts using PREZI software, and based on clinical indicative presentations of the Peninsula Medical School curriculum. Third, 4th and 5th year medical students were invited to complete the evaluation of the indicative presentation video podcasts they watched. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through anonymized questionnaires. A thematic analysis of qualitative data was carried out. Seven hundred and fifty students were invited to evaluate the podcasts of which 142 responded to the email. One hundred and forty-two students were assigned podcasts, of whom 122 completed the podcast questionnaire (85.9%), with 20 students dropping out for unknown reasons. The majority of the students found the podcasts to be clear, of an appropriate length, targeted at the right academic level and providing a good method of learning. However, there were mixed views in relation to the preference of podcasts over conventional learning methods. The thematic analysis identified positive comments and areas of improvement for the podcasts. Podcasts conducted in an interview style with an engaging voice and images are thought to help maintain student engagement from their perspective. Further evaluation/research is required to help establish the correct depth and breadth of information to be included in podcasts.

  1. Falls risk assessment begins with hello: lessons learned from the use of one home health agency's fall risk tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Patricia J; Ramsay, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Identifying older adults at risk for falls is a challenge all home healthcare agencies (HHAs) face. The process of assessing for falls risk begins with the initial home visit. One HHA affiliated with an academic medical center describes its experience in development and use of a Falls Risk Assessment (FRA) tool over a 10-year period. The FRA tool has been modified since initial development to clarify elements of the tool based on research and to reflect changes in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) document. The primary purpose of this article is to share a validated falls risk assessment tool to facilitate identification of fall-related risk factors in the homebound population. A secondary purpose is to share lessons learned by the HHA during the 10 years using the FRA.

  2. Student Teachers' Team Teaching: How Do Learners in the Classroom Experience Team-Taught Lessons by Student Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Simons, Mathea

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' team teaching. Two team teaching models (sequential and parallel teaching) were applied by 14 student teachers in a quasi-experimental design. When implementing new teaching models, it is important to take into account the perspectives of all actors involved. Although learners are key actors in the teaching…

  3. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  4. Investigating ESL Students' Performance on Outcomes Assessments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Elliott, Diane Cardenas; Liu, Ou Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes assessments are gaining great attention in higher education because of increased demand for accountability. These assessments are widely used by U.S. higher education institutions to measure students' college-level knowledge and skills, including students who speak English as a second language (ESL). For the past decade, the increasing…

  5. Validating a Written Instrument for Assessing Students' Fractions Schemes and

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this study,…

  6. Understanding Arts and Humanities Students' Experiences of Assessment and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Joelle; McNab, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how undergraduate students on arts and humanities courses experience assessment and feedback. The research uses a detailed audit, a specially devised questionnaire (the Assessment Experience Questionnaire), and student focus group data, and the article examines results from 19 programmes, comparing those from "arts and…

  7. Investigating Secondary School Students' Unmediated Peer Assessment Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivitanidou, Olia E.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Hovardas, Tasos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate secondary school students' unmediated peer assessment skills. Specifically, 36 seventh graders, without receiving any kind of support, were anonymously assigned to reciprocally assess their peers' science web-portfolios. Additionally, students' attitudes towards and intentions about the use of…

  8. Assessment of Students' and Parents' Attitudes to Continuous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the status of the students' (the beneficiaries) and their parents' (major stakeholders) attitudes to Continuous assessment in order to determine their entry behaviour for SBA with a view to either upgrading or sustaining. The populations of the study were the Junior Secondary School students and their ...

  9. The Effects of Portfolio Assessment on Writing of EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezakatgoo, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the effect of portfolio assessment on final examination scores of EFL students' writing skill. To determine the impact of portfolio-based writing assessment 40 university students who enrolled in composition course were initially selected and divided randomly into two experimental and control…

  10. Exploring assessment factors contributing to students' study strategies: literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Kadri, H.M.; Al-Moamary, M.S.; Roberts, C.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    "Assessment steers students' learning" is a statement that has been used repeatedly without solid evidence in the literature. This manuscript aims to evaluate the published literatures on the effect of teaching learning environment in particular, the implemented assessment on students' learning

  11. Rapid knowledge assessment (RKA): Assessing students content knowledge through rapid, in class assessment of expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Erin

    Understanding how students go about problem solving in chemistry lends many possible advantages for interventions in teaching strategies for the college classroom. The work presented here is the development of an in-classroom, real-time, formative instrument to assess student expertise in chemistry with the purpose of developing classroom interventions. The development of appropriate interventions requires the understanding of how students go about starting to solve tasks presented to them, what their mental effort (load on working memory) is, and whether or not their performance was accurate. To measure this, the Rapid Knowledge Assessment (RKA) instrument uses clickers (handheld electronic instruments for submitting answers) as a means of data collection. The classroom data was used to develop an algorithm to deliver student assessment scores, which when correlated to external measure of standardized American Chemical Society (ACS) examinations and class score show a significant relationship between the accuracy of knowledge assessment (p=0.000). Use of eye-tracking technology and student interviews supports the measurements found in the classroom.

  12. Assessment of Cognitive Style to Examine Students' Use of Hypermedia within Historic Costume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Diane; Simonson, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Cognitive style of 70 students in fashion merchandising or education was compared to their choice of media in a hypermedia lesson on costume using HyperCard. Students used hypermedia effectively to accommodate preferred style; 56% chose visual, 30% text, and 14% auditory. (SK)

  13. Disciplinary Action as an Intervention That Supports Students: Lessons from a Large Comprehensive High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharrams, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify if there was a relationship between student or administrator characteristics (Independent variables) and the application of various disciplinary actions (Dependent variables). This study examined student's gender, race, grade point average, number of credits, and disciplinary…

  14. Social Networks and Students' Performance in Secondary Schools: Lessons from an Open Learning Centre, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhingi, Wilkins Ndege; Mutavi, Teresia; Kokonya, Donald; Simiyu, Violet Nekesa; Musungu, Ben; Obondo, Anne; Kuria, Mary Wangari

    2015-01-01

    Given the known positive and negative effects of uncontrolled social networking among secondary school students worldwide, it is necessary to establish the relationship between social network sites and academic performances among secondary school students. This study, therefore, aimed at establishing the relationship between secondary school…

  15. Literacy and Arts-Integrated Science Lessons Engage Urban Elementary Students in Exploring Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P.; Elser, C. F.; Klein, J. L.; Rule, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study examined student attitudes, writing skills and content knowledge of urban fourth and fifth graders (6 males, 9 female) during a six-week literacy, thinking skill, and art-integrated environmental science unit. Pre- and post-test questions were used to address knowledge of environmental problems and student environmental…

  16. Teacher-Student Interaction, Empathy and Their Influence on Learning in Swimming Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lémonie, Yannick; Light, Richard; Sarremejane, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The bulk of interest in the role that interaction plays in learning in sport and physical education (PE) has focused on peer interaction at the expense of teacher-student interaction. This article redresses this imbalance in the literature by reporting on a study that inquired into the nature of teacher-student interaction and its effect on…

  17. Physical Education Lesson Content and Teacher Style and Elementary Students' Motivation and Physical Activity Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Heather E.; Stellino, Megan Babkes; Beets, Michael W.; Beighle, Aaron; Johnson, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity levels among American children are increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to a lack of regular physical activity (PA). Physical education (PE) is one way to facilitate student PA. The overarching PA goal for physical educators is 50% PA for students. Self-determination theory suggests that PA levels in PE and a variety of other…

  18. "Object Lesson": Using Family Heirlooms to Engage Students in Art History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Marice

    2012-01-01

    This first written assignment of the semester for the author's undergraduate introductory art history class--an essay where students describe and reflect upon the significance of a family heirloom--is instrumental in meeting class objectives. The author's objectives in this class are for students: (1) to broaden their conception of what art is…

  19. Constructing Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Ethical Experiences of Classroom Lessons and Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Amy J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Ethics is an integral component of the nursing profession. This phenomenological study aimed to describe how baccalaureate nursing students experience learning ethics both in the classroom and clinical setting. The interviews in this study were conducted with eight second semester senior nursing students. Four themes emerged from analyses of the…

  20. Learning Vicariously: Students' Reflections of the Leadership Lessons Portrayed in "The Office"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Gaea; Meyers, Courtney; Porter, Haley; Shaw, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Leadership educators are encouraged to identify and apply new ways to teach leadership. This paper provides the qualitative results of post-secondary students' reflections of learning leadership concepts after watching several episodes of the television show, "The Office." Students used reflective journaling to record their reactions and…

  1. Student Injuries and Negligence: Lessons from the International Scene with Implications for Singapore's Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Many jurisdictions are showing a trend of school-related negligence cases being taken to court. This article explores the legal principles applied by the courts in England, Australia, Canada, the United States, and New Zealand to ensure the safety of students in schools. As we look at the developments in these countries, we can see student injury…

  2. Elementary Students' Roles and Epistemic Stances during Document-Based History Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study that repositioned elementary students in new roles as active, critical participants in historical inquiry--roles that required a more mature epistemic stance. It reports 5th-grade students' responses to instructional methods intended to help them understand the nature of historical knowledge, appreciate the work of…

  3. Can Scholarships Alone Help Students Succeed? Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Reshma; Rudd, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The passage of the Higher Education Act of 1965, which extended need-based financial assistance to the general population for the first time, has improved college access for American students, but more work remains to be done to improve college success. According to government statistics, in 2006, about one in six students had earned a degree or…

  4. Catalyzing Political Engagement: Lessons for Civic Educators from the Voices of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Nicholas V.; Drury, Christopher; Battistoni, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes the comparative impact of three educational interventions aimed at increasing students' political engagement, two at the undergraduate level and one at the high school level. Findings from interviews with student participants in these programs indicate that political competencies are best acquired through democratic practice,…

  5. Managing Student Self-Disclosure in Class Settings: Lessons from Feminist Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borshuk, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    This article describes difficulties and opportunities associated with students' disclosure of their personal experiences in university class settings. In classes that deal with topics such as violence, racism, family dynamics, mental health or social justice, students with first-hand experience of these topics can bring valuable real-life…

  6. Deception, discrimination, and fear of reprisal: lessons in ethics from third-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldicott, Catherine V; Faber-Langendoen, Kathy

    2005-09-01

    To systematically examine ethical conflicts reported by all State University of New York Upstate Medical University third-year students, compare them with conflicts reported in the literature, and identify content areas that compel new or renewed emphasis in national educational objectives, standard curricula, and texts. From 1999 to 2002, all third-year students submitted papers for a required bioethics course. These papers depicted ethical issues arising during clinical clerkships. The authors devised a checklist of ethical issues; after analyzing the students' papers, the authors applied the checklist to the papers to create a taxonomy. Three hundred twenty-seven students submitted 688 cases involving 40 ethical issues. The most common issues were deliberate lies or deceptions (n = 68), patients' right to refuse recommended treatment (n = 48), and insistence on futile treatment (n = 46). Students perceived overt and subtle discrimination toward patients, reflected in substandard or excessive treatment. In 81 cases (12%), students expressed reluctance to speak up about moral conflict for fear of reprisal. This fear was expressed in 18 (45%) of the 40 issues-particularly student-specific (36 [52% of 69]) and quality of care (7 [24% of 29])-and most frequently in cases involving surgery (p ethical dilemmas in both "usual and customary" and seemingly incidental situations. Students who described fear of speaking up perceived a tradeoff between academic survival and patients' interests. The cases demonstrated that students still lacked the tools to navigate ethical dilemmas effectively. The authors propose that moral courage is within the realm of professional expectations for medical students; its cultivation is an appropriate formal objective for medical education.

  7. Evaluation of World Wide Web-based Lessons for a First Year Dental Biochemistry Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Alan E. Levine

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available First year dental students at The University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston (Dental Branch are required to take a basic biochemistry course. To facilitate learning and allow student self-assessment of their progress, WWW-based lessons covering intermediary metabolism were developed as a supplement to traditional lectures. Lesson design combined text, graphics, and animations and included learner control, links to other learning resources, and practice exercises and exams with immediate feedback. Results from an on-line questionnaire completed by students in two different classes showed that they completed 50% of the lessons and spent an average of 4 hrs. on-line. A majority of the students either agreed or strongly agreed that practice exercises were helpful, that the ability to control the pace of the lessons was important, that the lesson structure and presentation was easy to follow, that the illustrations, animations, and hyperlinks were helpful, and that the lessons were effective as a review. The very positive response to the WWW-based lessons indicates the usefulness of this approach as a study aid for dental students.

  8. Preservice music teachers' predictions, perceptions, and assessment of students with special needs: the need for training in student assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWeelden, Kimberly; Whipple, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine preservice teachers' predictions and perceptions of students with special needs' levels of mastery of specific music education concepts and actual grades achieved by these students using alternative assessments and testing accommodations within two subpopulations: students with emotional and/or behavior disorders (EDBD) and students with acute cognitive delays (ACD). The preservice teachers predicted students within the EDBD class would achieve a significantly higher level of mastery of the music concepts than students within the ACD classroom. After the field experience, however, the preservice teachers' perceptions of all students' levels of mastery increased from prediction scores overall. Additionally, preservice teachers were able to execute testing accommodations and implement successful alternative assessments which gave empirical data on the students' levels of mastery of the music education concepts within the curriculum. Implications for music therapists, as consultants in special education, are discussed.

  9. Case study: a midclerkship crisis-lessons learned from advising a medical student with career indecision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; Cayea, Danelle; Shochet, Robert B; Wright, Scott M

    2010-04-01

    Advising medical students is a challenging task. Faculty who serve as advisors for students require specific skills and knowledge to do their jobs effectively. Career choice is one of the many complex issues about which medical students often seek assistance from a faculty advisor. The authors present a case of a third-year medical student with career indecision, with a focus on the various factors that may be influencing her thinking about career choice. Key advising principles are provided as a framework for the discussion of the case and include reflection, self-disclosure, active listening, support and advocacy, confidentiality, and problem solving. These principles were developed as part of the Advising Case Conference series of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Colleges Advisory Program. Emergent themes from the case included a student's evolving professional identity, a student's distress and burnout, lifestyle considerations, and advisor bias and self-awareness. The authors propose reflective questions to enhance meaningful discussions between the advisor and student and assist in problem solving. Many of these questions, together with the key advising principles, are generalizable to a variety of advising scenarios between advisors and learners at all levels of training.

  10. The Use of Academic Portfolio in the Learning and Assessment of Physics Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Kay Ling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research paper is to examine the use of portfolios in the teaching and learning of physics at a Singapore private college. The paper starts with a short introduction of the types of students and the purpose of using academic portfolios in their learning and assessment. Some ideas of how portfolios can be used in the local context will also be discussed. It is necessary for teachers to know how to incorporate portfolio assessment in their daily lesson plans. At the same time, students who are studying physics at the college should also know how to use portfolios to their academic advantage. The paper also highlights three of the relevant work artifacts that can be included into the physics portfolios. The three work samples are concept-maps, internet research reports and newspaper articles reports. Concept-maps are useful tools to help students establish the connections between concepts. Internet research reports serve as important means for students to know more about how some scientific devices or technology use physics in the operations. Newspaper articles reports allow students to understand the real impact of physics on the lives of people. Subsequent sections of the paper discuss about the organizational flow of the portfolio, the timeline, the selection process, the portfolio checklist and assessment rubrics, the positive influences of using portfolios, the issues to consider and also the potential problems that physics teachers may face in implementing portfolios. These sections present the important framework which teachers can use as references for their portfolio initiatives in schools.

  11. Teaching Teachers: Assessing Students as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Rosemary S.; Conlin, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Most elementary science teachers would like to give their students opportunities to do science. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NGSS Lead States 2013; NRC 2012) make this goal explicit by requiring that students learn how to engage in the practices of science. Consequently,…

  12. Assessing Student Satisfaction in Transnational Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Given that there exists in the literature relatively little research into student experiences in transnational higher education, the purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants of student satisfaction at international branch campuses in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative study involved…

  13. Assessment of microbiology students' progress with an audience response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The development of new approaches to teaching of large lecture courses is needed. Today's classroom has a wide range of students including high-achieving motivated learners, students struggling to understand basic concepts, and learning-challenged students. Many of these students can be lost in large classes under the shadow of the high-achieving extroverted students who dominate classroom question-and-answer sessions. Measuring a student's understanding and achievement of content standards becomes difficult until an assessment has been done. To close this gap, an audience response system was introduced in an introductory Principles of Microbiology course. This technology specifically addressed the goal of individualizing instruction to the needs of the students. The evaluation of this project indicated an overall positive impact on student learning.

  14. Recycling Lesson Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaz, Abeer Ali

    2013-01-01

    This lesson plan designed for grade 2 students has the goal of teaching students about the environmental practice of recycling. Children will learn language words related to recycling such as: "we can recycle"/"we can't recycle" and how to avoid littering with such words as: "recycle paper" and/or "don't throw…

  15. Assessment Drives Student Learning: Evidence for Summative Assessment from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Rashida; Zahoor, Mahrukh; Zahoor, Mahwish

    2017-01-01

    Research studies from various parts of the world indicate that university students find research methodology courses among the most difficult subjects to grasp. Students in Pakistan display similar attitudes towards learning of research. Those of us who teach research at the institutions of higher learning in Pakistan continuously hear students…

  16. Lessons learned from recruiting young female students to a randomised controlled trial of chlamydia screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaz, Stella; Brennan, Sarah; Dean, Sally; Hay, Sima; Hay, Phillip; Kerry, Sally; Oakeshott, Pippa

    2006-04-01

    Recruitment is a problem in many trials. Two female medical students offered to help with recruiting problems in a community-based trial of chlamydia screening to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease. We need to recruit 2500 sexually active female students and ask them to provide a self-taken low vaginal swab and complete a questionnaire with follow-up after a year. To identify recruitment difficulties in a community-based trial of chlamydia screening and to investigate how they might be overcome. Descriptive study. London South Bank and Kingston Universities. The students observed the recruitment methods used for the first 4 months of the trial. This comprised single researchers recruiting individual women in student bars and common rooms. With the researchers they piloted a new method of group recruitment with pairs of researchers making announcements at the end of lectures after first sending out all male students and those aged>25 years. This involved extra time planning and liaising with the lecturers in advance of recruitment sessions. The recruitment rate had been averaging only 25 participants per week. Many students were ineligible: never been sexually active, too old, recently been tested for chlamydia. Many eligible students were reluctant to take part because of embarrassment or anxiety about providing a swab. Using a new method of group recruitment after lectures we recruited 192 participants in 2 weeks. For a study on a sensitive topic, two researchers recruiting women in groups after lectures may be a more effective and cost-effective way than individual recruitment by researchers working alone.

  17. Preparing people to make a difference: Transferable lessons from a first-year student leadership development programme in New Zealand. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Elnagar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transition from a secondary to a university education environment is one rife with opportunity and novelty. It can be a difficult time for students as they begin to participate and take part in a new culture. Lessons learned from a specific programme for first-year students, the Emerging Leaders Development Programme (ELDP, provide an example of an initiative that not only assists with the transition, but also offers leadership development opportunities. Data collected from ELDP participants suggests that there are valuable, relatable, and transferable ideas that can inform the design and implementation of other transition programmes generally, and leadership development programmes specifically.   

  18. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  19. Empowering Student Learning Through Rubric-Referenced Self-Assessment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaohua; Canty, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of rubric-referenced self-assessment on performance of anatomy assignments in a group of chiropractic students. Methods: Participants (N = 259) were first-quarter students who were divided into a treatment group (n = 130) and a comparison group (n = 129). The intervention for both groups involved the use of rubrics to complete the first draft of assignments. General feedback was given by the instructor, and then the students had the opportunity to amend the assignments before resubmission (second draft). The treatment group, however, was also asked to perform rubric-referenced self-assessment of their assignments during their second draft. Although the comparison group was also provided with the identical rubrics for the assignments, the students in this group did not perform rubric-referenced self-assessment. Results: The results revealed that the students in the treatment group who used a rubric-referenced self-assessment learning tool received statistically significant higher scores than the comparison group, who did not use this rubric-referenced self-assessment tool. Conclusion: This study suggests that practicing rubric-referenced self-assessment enhances student performance on assignments. However, educators continue to face the challenge of developing practical and useful rubric tools for student self-assessment PMID:22778527

  20. Lessons from White Lake - Connecting Students to their Community through Environmental Stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Susan

    2014-05-01

    White Lake and its surrounding community have been negatively affected by shoreline degradation and wildlife habitat loss caused primarily by historical logging practices, and reduced water quality from industrial pollution and storm water runoff. This led to the lake being identified as a Great Lakes Area of Concern by the United States Environmental Protection Agency three decades ago. Local community partners have worked diligently in recent years to reverse habitat loss, and repair damaged ecosystems. The "H2O White Lake" (Healthy Habitats On White Lake) project has involved over seven hundred middle school students in grades six through eight over the course of the last five years. Students begin by researching the environmental history of the watershed and then they monitor six tributaries of the lake for nutrient pollution and habitat degradation. Students use the field experience as a community inventory to identify stewardship needs, for which they then identify solutions that take into account land usage and community behaviors. Class projects have focused on stream bank restoration, storm water management, eradication of invasive species, shoreline clean-up, and community outreach and education. This year, the project culminated in the first ever White Lake Environmental Film Festival, for which students had the opportunity to create their own short documentary. This multiple year place based education project allows students to apply their classroom studies of surface water and groundwater dynamics to an authentic, real-world situation, conduct themselves as scientists, and feel valuable through connections with community partners.

  1. Student-generated reading questions: diagnosing student thinking with diverse formative assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Montplaisir, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment has long been identified as a critical element to teaching for conceptual development in science. It is therefore important for university instructors to have an arsenal of formative assessment tools at their disposal which enable them to effectively uncover and diagnose all students' thinking, not just the most vocal or assertive. We illustrate the utility of one type of formative assessment prompt (reading question assignment) in producing high-quality evidence of student thinking (student-generated reading questions). Specifically, we characterized student assessment data using three distinct analytic frames to exemplify their effectiveness in diagnosing student learning in relationship to three sample learning outcomes. Our data will be useful for university faculty, particularly those engaged in teaching upper-level biochemistry courses and their prerequisites, as they provide an alternative mechanism for uncovering and diagnosing student understanding. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Assessing students' beliefs, emotions and causal attribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: academic emotion; belief; causal attribution; statistical validation; students' conceptions of learning ... Sadi & Lee, 2015), through their effect on motivation and learning strategies .... to understand why they may or may not be doing.

  3. Assessment of critical thinking in pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Robert M

    2009-07-10

    To determine whether changes occur over 1 academic year in pharmacy students' critical thinking skills and disposition to think critically. First, second, third, and fourth-year pharmacy students completed the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) and the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI) at the beginning and end of 1 academic year. One hundred thirty-seven students completed the study. No significant changes occurred over the year in total scores on either instrument. However, scores in 3 of 12 subscale scores changed significantly and several significant correlations were found. Pharmacy students' scores on 2 critical thinking instruments showed no major improvements over 1 academic year but most scores were above average. Some areas of possible weakness were identified. Additional studies comparing scores over a longer period of time (eg, admission to graduation) are needed.

  4. Design and Implementation of an HCI course for MIS students – Some lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Or-Bach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Courses on Human Computer Interaction (HCI largely differ in the conception of the role of the course in the program, in the topics to be included, in emphases, in the instructional strategies that are employed, and more. This paper describes the design and implementation of a HCI course for students of the Management Information Systems department in our college. Students’ intermediate and final homework assignments were analyzed to provide feedback for the course design. Quantitative analysis showed high correlation between the quality of the requirement analysis performed by the students and the quality of the final interface prototype, and also that the quality of design alternatives that were considered by the students can be a good predictor for the quality of the overall interface design. Qualitative analysis of students’ submissions showed the need for practicing skills required in users’ studies, especially conducting interviews and observations. Implications from these and other findings are discussed.

  5. Living with students: Lessons learned while pursuing tenure, administration, and raising a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Michael; Callahan, Janet; Harrison, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    An emerging promising practice in many universities has been the development of faculty-in-residence programs, in which university faculty members and their family moved into university student residences, sharing common living spaces with students. This case study is centered on two faculty-in-residence living in university residence halls. One was an assistant professor pursuing tenure while raising a young child, while the second was a tenured full professor and associate dean raising two teens. This case study offers the post-experience conclusions of these two faculty-in-residence individuals, noting the benefits and challenges each experienced while living -and working closely with these students outside of the university classroom, all while striving for an optimal balance in managing professional and familial obligations.

  6. Which preferences associate with school performance?-Lessons from an exploratory study with university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Daniel; Kiss, Hubert Janos

    2018-01-01

    Success in life is determined to a large extent by school performance so it is important to understand the effect of the factors that influence it. In this exploratory study, in addition to cognitive abilities, we attempt to link measures of preferences with outcomes of school performance. We measured in an incentivized way risk, time, social and competitive preferences and cognitive abilities of university students to look for associations between these measures and two important academic outcome measures: exam results and GPA. We find consistently that cognitive abilities (proxied by the Cognitive Reflection Test) are very well correlated with school performance. Regarding non-cognitive skills, we report suggestive evidence for many of our measured preferences. We used two alternative measures of time preference: patience and present bias. Present bias explains exam grades better, while patience explains GPA relatively better. Both measures of time preferences have a non-linear relation to school performance. Competitiveness matters, as students, who opt for a more competitive payment scheme in our experimental task have a higher average GPA. We observe also that risk-averse students perform a little better than more risk-tolerant students. That makes sense in case of multiple choice exams, because more risk-tolerant students may want to try to pass the exam less prepared, as the possibility of passing an exam just by chance is not zero. Finally, we have also detected that cooperative preferences-the amount of money offered in a public good game-associates strongly with GPA in a non-linear way. Students who offered around half of their possible amounts had significantly higher GPAs than those, who offered none or all their money.

  7. Improving Student Learning Outcomes Marketing Strategy Lesson By Applying SFAE Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winda Nur Rohmawati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Research objectives for improving student learning outcomes on the subjects of marketing strategy through the implementation of model learning SFAE. This type of research this is a class action research using a qualitative approach which consists of two cycles with the subject Marketing X grade SMK YPI Darussalam 2 Cerme Gresik Regency. This research consists of four stages: (1 the Planning Act, (2 the implementation of the action, (3 observations (observation, and (4 Reflection. The result of the research shows that cognitive and affective learning outcomes of students have increased significantly.

  8. Final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice: Perspectives of nursing teachers, students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Kristiina; Johnson, Martin; Isoaho, Hannu; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2017-12-01

    To describe the phenomenon of final assessment of the clinical practice of nursing students and to examine whether there were differences in assessments by the students and their teachers and mentors. Final assessment of students in clinical practice during their education has great importance for ensuring that enough high-quality nursing students are trained, as assessment tasks affect what the nursing student learns during the clinical practice. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional design. The population of this study comprised nursing students (n = 276) and their teachers (n = 108) in five universities of applied sciences in Finland as well as mentors (n = 225) who came from five partner hospitals. A questionnaire developed for this study contained questions about background variables as well as structured questions scored on a four-point scale, which also allowed the respondents to provide additional comments. When comparing the results related to nursing teachers' presence in the final assessment situation, it was found that teachers and mentors evaluated this as being carried out more often than nursing students suggested. Nursing students noted that fair and consistent assessment is carried out more often than nursing teachers thought. Mentors and teachers said that honest and direct criteria-based final assessment was carried out more often than nursing students evaluated. Nursing students and mentors need support from educational institutions and from nursing teachers in order to ensure the completion of a relevant assessment process. The findings of this study highlight an awareness of final assessment process. It is desirable to have a common understanding, for example, of how the assessment should be managed and what the assessment criteria are, as this will ensure a good quality process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Do Students Learn More from a Flip? An Exploration of the Efficacy of Flipped and Traditional Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Joshua; Van Curen, Rebecca; Putsch, Jake; Metzger, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Flipped lesson planning, as popularized by Bergman & Sams (2012a), has been viewed by many as a revolutionary pedagogy, tailor-made for the twenty-first century classroom. Enthusiasm for flipped lesson planning has out-paced the collection of data that might determine its effectiveness. This paper presents the results of a study that compared…

  10. Impact of self-assessment by students on their learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajeev; Jain, Amit; Gupta, Naveenta; Garg, Sonia; Batta, Meenal; Dhir, Shashi Kant

    2016-01-01

    Tutor assessment is sometimes also considered as an exercise of power by the assessor over assesses. Student self-assessment is the process by which the students gather information about and reflect on their own learning and is considered to be a very important component of learning. The primary objective of this study was to analyze the impact of self-assessment by undergraduate medical students on their subsequent academic performance. The secondary objective was to obtain the perception of students and faculty about self-assessment as a tool for enhanced learning. The study was based on the evaluation of two theory tests consisting of both essay type and short answer questions, administered to students of the 1(st) year MBBS (n = 89). They self-assessed their performance after 3 days of the first test followed by marking of faculty and feedback. Then, a nonidentical theory test on the same topic with the same difficulty level was conducted after 7 days and assessed by the teachers. The feedback about the perception of students and faculty about this intervention was obtained. Significant improvement in the academic performance after the process of self-assessment was observed (P academic performance, helping them in development of critical skills for analysis of their own work.

  11. Identification and assessment of students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschly, D J

    1996-01-01

    Students with disabilities or suspected disabilities are evaluated by schools to determine whether they are eligible for special education services and, if eligible, to determine what services will be provided. In many states, the results of this evaluation also affect how much funding assistance the school will receive to meet the students' special needs. Special education classification is not uniform across states or regions. Students with identical characteristics can be diagnosed as disabled in one state but not in another and may be reclassified when they move across state or school district lines. Most disabilities with a clear medical basis are recognized by the child's physician or parents soon after birth or during the preschool years. In contrast, the majority of students with disabilities are initially referred for evaluation by their classroom teacher (or parents) because of severe and chronic achievement or behavioral problems. There is evidence that the prevalence of some disabilities varies by age, the high-incidence disabilities such as learning disabilities and speech-language disabilities occur primarily at the mild level, the mild disabilities exist on broad continua in which there are no clear demarcations between those who have and those who do not have the disability, and even "mild" disabilities may constitute formidable barriers to academic progress and significantly limit career opportunities. Problems with the current classification system include stigma to the child, low reliability, poor correlation between categorization and treatment, obsolete assumptions still in use in treatment, and disproportionate representation of minority students. Both African-American and Hispanic students are disproportionately represented in special education but in opposite directions. The disproportionately high number of African Americans in special education reflects the fact that more African-American students than white students are diagnosed with

  12. In Search of Teaching Quality of EFL Student Teachers through Teaching Practicum: Lessons from a Teacher Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nurul Azkiyah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to investigate the teaching quality of student teachers when they conducted their teaching practicum. Teaching quality is conceptualised based on eight classroom factors (orientation, structuring, modelling, application, questioning, building classroom as a learning environment, assessment, and time management of the dynamic model, which have previously been found to affect student outcomes. The study used a mixed-methods design: a survey on students’ perceptions of the teaching quality of their teacher (student teachers and classroom observation. The study was conducted in Tangerang Selatan, Indonesia, involving English as a Foreign Language (EFL student teachers in the English Education Program, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Indonesia and 199 students of three different schools. The findings revealed that the student teachers did not yet practice the classroom factors of the dynamic model. Some recommendations include incorporating the classroom factors of the dynamic model in the curriculum or syllabus related to pedagogical skills to better prepare teachers in the future. It is also beneficial to study the possibility of sending student teachers to school earlier not only for the teaching practicum but also for other relevant purposes.

  13. Formation of motivation to lessons by physical culture and sports in students

    OpenAIRE

    Martyn I.; Gontyurev A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical culture and sport take the major place in formation of the identity of student’s youth in modern society. An important problem is the formation of students’ motivation for physical education. The article discusses various ways of formation of motivation to sports activities in students for developing a healthy lifestyle.

  14. The AAU-cubesat Student Satellite Project: Architectual Overview and Lessons Learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten

    satellite like the AAU-cubesat. Results from the operation phase will be stated, and recommendations on further work on pico-satellite designs will be given. In addition as the project has been carried through by students, the educational value of the project will be addressed as well....

  15. Lessons Learned from Undergraduate Students in Designing a Science-Based Course in Bioethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loike, John D.; Rush, Brittany S.; Schweber, Adam; Fischbach, Ruth L.

    2013-01-01

    Columbia University offers two innovative undergraduate science-based bioethics courses for student majoring in biosciences and pre-health studies. The goals of these courses are to introduce future scientists and healthcare professionals to the ethical questions they will confront in their professional lives, thus enabling them to strategically…

  16. A lesson in listening: Is the student voice heard in the rush to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is encouraging, as the call to incorporate technology in teaching and learning in higher education is increasing. The student voice in the planning and implementation of blended learning strategies is, however, not adequately addressed in many of the studies to date. Objective. To utilise videos and blogging in a ...

  17. Teachers' Views about Science and Technology Lesson Effects on the Development of Students' Entrepreneurship Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacanak, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the views of science and technology teachers about the effects of 6th, 7th and 8th grade science and technology courses on students' entrepreneurship skills. In the study, phenomenographic method was used and data were collected through a semi-structured interview method with 8 questions. 5 science and…

  18. An Interactive Modeling Lesson Increases Students' Understanding of Ploidy during Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, L. Kate; Newman, Dina L.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome structure is confusing to students at all levels, and chromosome behavior during meiosis is a notoriously difficult topic. Undergraduate biology majors are exposed to the process of meiosis numerous times during their presecondary and postsecondary education, yet understanding of key concepts, such as the point at which haploidy is…

  19. Meeting Students' Needs on the Titanic: Lessons Learned While Closing a Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Kathryn L.

    In March 1991, the Regents of the University of Minnesota voted to close the two-year campus at Waseca (UMW) campus effective June 1992. Student needs were the overriding factor in administrative decision making during the final year. It was necessary to continue current services in a "normal," if modified, fashion, while at the same…

  20. Public-Private Partnerships in College Student Housing: Lessons from Three Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Kevin R.; Ryder, Andrew J.; DeVita, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of public-private partnerships, empirical research about the origins, models, and long-term outcomes of this approach to financing, constructing, and managing college student housing is scant. In this study, we sought to investigate the origins, models, and outcomes of public-private partnerships in college…

  1. High-Quality Collaboration Benefits Teachers and Students. Lessons from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Joellen Killion highlights the methodology, analysis, findings, and limitations of Ronfeldt, M., Farmer, S., McQueen, K., & Grissom, J. (2015), "Teacher collaboration in instructional teams and student achievement," "American Educational Research Journal," 52(3), 475-514. Using sophisticated statistical…

  2. When Teachers Learn to Use Technology, Students Benefit. Lessons from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilion, Joellen

    2016-01-01

    Joellen Killion is senior advisor to Learning Forward. In each issue of JSD, Killion explores a recent research study to help practitioners understand the impact of particular professional learning practices on student outcomes. The study presented here builds on past research about the relationships between teacher practice and beliefs, teacher…

  3. Teachers' Thoughts on Student Decision Making during Engineering Design Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Helen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I share the results of a study of teachers' ideas about student decision-making at entry into a professional development program to integrate engineering into their instruction. The framework for the Engineering Design Process (EDP) was based on a Challenge-Based Learning (CBL) model. The EDP embedded within the CBL model suggests…

  4. Leadership for Twenty-First-Century Schools and Student Achievement: Lessons Learned from Three Exemplary Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrum, Lynne; Levin, Barbara B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand ways exemplary award winning secondary school leaders have transformed their schools for twenty-first-century education and student achievement. This article presents three diverse case studies and identifies ways that each school's leader and leadership team reconfigured its culture and expectations,…

  5. Engaging Students in Science Courses: Lessons of Change from the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Lawrence K.; Godduhn, Anna; Fabbri, Cindy E.; van Muelken, Mary; Nicholas-Figueroa, Linda; Middlecamp, Catherine Hurt

    2011-01-01

    Where you live should have something to do with what you teach. In the Arctic, the idea of place-based education--teaching and sharing knowledge that is needed to live well--is central to the UARCTIC consortium and the 4th International Polar Year educational reform effort. A place-based issue oriented context can engage students in chemistry…

  6. Engaging Students in the Pacific and beyond Using an Inquiry-Based Lesson in Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorospe, Kelvin D.; Fox, Bradley K.; Haverkort-Yeh, Roxanne D.; Tamaru, Clyde S.; Rivera, Malia Ana J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a hands-on, inquiry-based activity exploring how CO[subscript 2] input to seawater affects the skeletons of several species of reef-building corals and other marine organisms by testing for changes in pH and calcium ion concentrations. Originally developed to inspire and recruit high school students in the state of Hawai'i into the…

  7. Early Intervening for Students with Speech Sound Disorders: Lessons from a School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mire, Stephen P.; Montgomery, Judy K.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of early intervening services was introduced into public school systems with the implementation of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004. This article describes a program developed for students with speech sound disorders that incorporated concepts of early intervening services, response to…

  8. The AAU-cubesat Student Satellite Project: Architectual Overview and Lessons Learnt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten

    2004-01-01

    the cubesat concept that prescribes a satellite with dimensions 10x10x10cm and mass one kilogram. This paper will describe the overall architecture of the AAU-cubesat in order to show what a pico-satellite can be and demonstrate all the fields of engineering which must come together to built a student...

  9. Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raee, Hojat; Amini, Mitra; Momen Nasab, Ameneh; Malek Pour, Abdolrasoul; Jafari, Mohammad Morad

    2014-07-01

    Self and peer assessment provides important information about the individual's performance and behavior in all aspects of their professional environment work. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional behavior and performance in medical students in the form of team based assessment. In a cross-sectional study, 100 medical students in the 7(th) year of education were randomly selected and enrolled; for each student five questionnaires were filled out, including one self-assessment, two peer assessments and two residents assessment. The scoring system of the questionnaires was based on seven point Likert scale.  After filling out the questions in the questionnaire, numerical data and written comments provided to the students were collected, analyzed and discussed. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of the questionnaires was assessed. A p<0.05 was considered as significant level. Internal consistency was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha 0.83). Interviews revealed that the majority of students and assessors interviewed found the method acceptable. The range of scores was 1-6 (Mean±SD=4.39±0.57) for the residents' assessment, 2-6 (Mean±SD= 4.49±0.53) for peer assessment, and 3-7 (Mean±SD=5.04±0.32) for self-assessment. There was a significant difference between self assessment and other methods of assessment. This study demonstrates that a team-based assessment is an acceptable and feasible method for peer and self-assessment of medical students' learning in a clinical clerkship, and has some advantages over traditional assessment methods. Further studies are needed to focus on the strengths and weaknesses.

  10. Examining student heuristic usage in a hydrogen bonding assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathryn; Kim, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the role of representational competence in student responses to an assessment of hydrogen bonding. The assessment couples the use of a multiple-select item ("Choose all that apply") with an open-ended item to allow for an examination of students' cognitive processes as they relate to the assignment of hydrogen bonding within a structural representation. Response patterns from the multiple-select item implicate heuristic usage as a contributing factor to students' incorrect responses. The use of heuristics is further supported by the students' corresponding responses to the open-ended assessment item. Taken together, these data suggest that poor representational competence may contribute to students' previously observed inability to correctly navigate the concept of hydrogen bonding. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):411-416, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Defining and assessing critical thinking skills for student radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Developing critical thinking skills is a key aim of higher education and is important in preparing student radiographers for their future careers in clinical practice. The aim of this paper was to attempt to devise and assess six key components of critical thinking appropriate for radiographic practice. Each of the six components was divided into three dimensions and a Critical Thinking Skills Scoring Chart (CTSSC) devised to assess students' written performance against each dimension. Scores revealed that approximately 30% of students were rated as good and approximately 10% of students were rated as poor in each component, although there was some variability between different dimensions. It is suggested that educators need to encourage and support students to develop their critical thinking skills by reviewing their curriculum to clearly define specific skills and ensure that they are appropriately taught and assessed

  12. Assessment of Teacher of Nursing Subjects by Pupils and Students

    OpenAIRE

    Bednářová, Markéta

    2006-01-01

    The dissertation Assessment of a teacher of nursing subjects by pupils and students focuses on finding the opinion of pupils of secondary nursing schools and students of higher nursing schools and universities on teachers of nursing. The subject of the interest was particularly qualities and skills of the nursing teachers which pupils and students consider important and desirable. The theoretical part of the work summarizes conclusions from thematically similar studies. The empirical part of ...

  13. Assessment, Student Learning and Classroom Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amua-Sekyi, Ekua Tekyiwa

    2016-01-01

    Assessment in its various forms has always been a central part of educational practice. Evidence gleaned from the empirical literature suggests that assessment, especially high stakes external assessment has effect on how teachers teach and consequently, how students learn. Through focus group discussions, this paper draws upon the experiences of…

  14. Assessment of Medical Students in a New Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Charles E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reliable and valid methods of student assessment in Newcastle University's new undergraduate medical curriculum are examined as indices of competence within the constraints of the educational program objectives. Considerable attention is given to the assessment of sciences basic to medicine through assessment instruments developed from clinical…

  15. Business Students' Views of Peer Assessment on Class Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Fidella

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to introduce peer and self assessment on tutorial class participation to a marketing unit at Curtin Sarawak. This assessment strategy was introduced with desire to improve class participation and increase student involvement in assessment. At the end of semester, a questionnaire was used to gather responses from a…

  16. Assessment of creativity in Psychology undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Luísa da Cruz Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is an important human faculty in several performance areas, including the work of a psychologist. This article aimed to describe creativity in a group of Psychology undergraduate students in order to verify whether their professional development fosters creative potential. The study comprised 75 students, equally distributed in three groups from the first, fifth and tenth terms, aged 18 to 59, who were submitted to the Verbal TTCT (Torrance Test of Creative Thinking: Thinking Creatively with Words, following technical specifications of this tool. Further to test evaluation, results of the three groups were statistically compared and the main results showed higher creativity index in senior students, mainly regarding Fluency – ability to produce a large number of ideas, and Originality – ability to produce new and infrequent ideas.

  17. Learning assessment for students with mental and behavioral disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræby, Anders

    The session aims at presenting a learning-based model for how to conduct a comprehensive psychological evaluation of the learning resources and challenges amongst students with mental and behavioral disorders. In the learning assessment model the learning resources and challenges of the students...

  18. The Achilles' Heel of Quality: The Assessment of Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Peter T.

    2002-01-01

    Explores the dependability of assessments of student achievement when used for internal and external quality monitoring (IQM and EQM). Identifies problems and suggests responses, including a radical approach based on accepting that reliable national data about complex student achievements are not available. Asserts that reliance on EQM is unwise…

  19. Assessing the Food Safety Knowledge of University of Maine Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferk, Chelsea C.; Calder, Beth L.; Camire, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne illness is a global public health issue. Young adults may work in foodservice while they are university students, and their habits may later shape the practices and well-being of their children. The objective of this study was to establish baseline data and assess the food safety knowledge of 18- to 26-year-old Univ. of Maine students.…

  20. Dental Students' Self-Assessed Competence in Geriatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, H. Asuman; Brudvik, James

    1992-01-01

    A study of four classes of dental students (n=172) exposed to both didactic and clinical geriatric dental training found that the students perceived significant improvements in their abilities to manage geriatric patients in all areas assessed, notably treatment planning, preventive dentistry, referrals, and providing care in alternative settings.…

  1. Assessing the knowledge and perceptions of medical students from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The secondary objectives were to determine the degree to which students are involved in awareness campaigns and implementation of the MDG, and to assess students' perceptions regarding the need for the MDG in South Africa. Method: This observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study collected quantitative data.

  2. Assessing College Student Needs for Comprehensive Financial Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinae; Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Griesdorn, Timothy S.; Hong, Gong-Soog

    2016-01-01

    To meet college student needs for financial counseling, it is important to assess why they seek counseling and the extent to which differing financial situations are tied to financial stress. This study examined these issues with a sample of 554 college students who participated in financial counseling and found financial problems in various…

  3. Student Engagement and Blended Learning: Making the Assessment Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Norman

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased focus on student engagement and blended approaches to learning in higher education. This article demonstrates how collaborative learning applications and a blended approach to learning can be used to design and support assessment activities that increase levels of student engagement with course concepts, their peers, faculty…

  4. Career Assessment and Planning Strategies for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Richard T.; Hennessey, Mary L.; Hogan, Ebony M.; Savickas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Career assessment and planning services that enable students with disabilities to make successful transitions from higher education to careers are an important component often missing in the postsecondary educational experience. Comprehensive services in this regard involve students in considering how to incorporate their preferences, assets, and…

  5. Mentoring and Tutoring Your Students through Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Betty

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes practical procedures in mentoring/tutoring students through self-assessment (SA) to establish and maintain partnership in learning. High school teachers ("n"?=?10) allow their students ("N"?=?515: 359 males) to engage in activities that help them identify standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and…

  6. Students as Tour Guides: Innovation in Fieldwork Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Neil M.; Smyth, Fiona M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces and details an innovative mode of fieldcourse assessment in which students take on the role of tour guides to offer their lecturer and peers a themed, theoretically informed journey through the urban landscape of Havana, Cuba. Informed by notions of student-centered learning and mobile methods, the tour offers an enjoyable,…

  7. Assessing Students' Motivation to Engage in Sustainable Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Mary; Bielefeldt, Angela R.; Swan, Christopher W.; Paterson, Kurtis G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to design an assessment instrument to evaluate students' attitudes toward sustainable engineering (SE). Factors that impact SE beliefs could then be explored. Design/methodology/approach: Using the definition of sustainability from the Brundtland report and expectancy value theory, students' sentiment toward…

  8. Students' Assessment Of Farm Practical Programme In Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Assessment Of Farm Practical Programme In Selected Universities Of Southwestern, Nigeria. ... Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences ... Students reported that lack of planning, improper implementation of activities lined up for the programme, lack of fund to properly finance the programme and ...

  9. Assessment of Student Professional Outcomes for Continuous Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohsen; Baghdarnia, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a method for the assessment of professional student outcomes (performance-type outcomes or soft skills). The method is based upon group activities, research on modern electrical engineering topics by individual students, classroom presentations on chosen research topics, final presentations, and technical report writing.…

  10. Using Learning Analytics to Assess Student Learning in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Ndoye, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    Learning analytics can be used to enhance student engagement and performance in online courses. Using learning analytics, instructors can collect and analyze data about students and improve the design and delivery of instruction to make it more meaningful for them. In this paper, the authors review different categories of online assessments and…

  11. Assessing Goal Intent and Achievement of University Learning Community Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer-Lachs, Carole F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the goal intent and achievement of university students, during the Fall 2011 semester, at Blue Wave University, a high research activity public institution in the southeast United States. This study merged theories of motivation to measure goal setting and goal attainment to examine if students who chose to…

  12. Defining and Assessing Team Skills of Business and Accountancy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghalith, Nabil; Blum, Michael; Medlock, Amanda; Weber, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the project are (1) to define the skills necessary for students to work effectively with others to achieve common goals, and (2) to develop an assessment instrument to measure student progress toward achieving these skills. The defined skill set will form a basis for common expectations related to team skills that will be shared…

  13. Fukushima's lessons from the blue butterfly: A risk assessment of the human living environment in the post-Fukushima era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Joji M

    2016-10-01

    A series of studies on the pale grass blue butterfly that were carried out to assess the biological effects of the Fukushima nuclear accident teach 3 important lessons. First, it is necessary to have an environmental indicator species, such as the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan, that is common (not endangered), shares a living environment (air, water, and soil) with humans, and is amenable to laboratory experiments. The monitoring of such indicator species before and immediately after a nuclear accident likely reflects acute impacts caused by initial exposure. To assess transgenerational and chronic effects, continuous monitoring over time is encouraged. Second, it is important to understand the actual health status of a polluted region and comprehend the whole picture of the pollution impacts, rather than focusing on the selected effects of radiation alone. In our butterfly experiments, plant leaves from Fukushima were fed to larval butterflies to access whole-body effects, focusing on survival rate and morphological abnormalities (rather than focusing on a specific disease or biochemical marker). Our results revealed that ionizing radiation is unlikely to be the exclusive source of environmental disturbances. Airborne particulate matter from a nuclear reactor, regardless of its radioactivity, is likely equally important. Finally, our butterfly experiments demonstrate that there is considerable variation in sensitivities to nuclear pollution within a single species or even within a local population. Based on these results, it is speculated that high pollution sensitivity in humans may be caused not only by low levels of functional DNA repair enzymes but also by immunological responses to particulate matter in the respiratory tract. These lessons from the pale grass blue butterfly should be integrated in studying future nuclear pollution events and decision making on nuclear and environmental policies at the local and international levels in the post

  14. Assessing Cultural Competence in Graduating Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Hermeet K.; Kohli, Amarpreet S.; Huber, Ruth; Faul, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    Twofold purpose of this study was to develop a framework to understand cultural competence in graduating social work students, and test that framework for appropriateness and predictability using multivariate statistics. Scale and predictor variables were collected using an online instrument from a nationwide convenience sample of graduating…

  15. Assessing Students' Spiritual and Religious Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Alexander W.; Astin, Helen S.; Lindholm, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive set of 12 new measures for studying undergraduate students' spiritual and religious development. The three measures of spirituality, four measures of "spiritually related" qualities, and five measures of religiousness demonstrate satisfactory reliability, robustness, and both concurrent and predictive validity.…

  16. Developing and Assessing College Student Teamwork Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard L.; Jones, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    Some form of team-oriented work is employed in most, if not all, organizations today. It would seem, then, that an important role for higher education should involve developing critical teamwork skills among students so as to prepare them for success in life. This very point was highlighted in a 2009 poll conducted on behalf of the Association of…

  17. Assessing Computer Knowledge among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Allen; And Others

    This paper reports on a study involving the administration of two examinations that were designed to evaluate student knowledge in several areas of computing. The tests were given both to computer science majors and to those enrolled in computer science classes from other majors. They sought to discover whether computer science majors demonstrated…

  18. Understanding students visions about environmental global problems. Experience and lessons learned of teaching in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Siarova, Hanna; Misiūnė, Ieva; Cerda, Artemi; Úbeda, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, environment is accepted to be an important element of our welfare. Our activities and societal status are strongly related with the quality of the environment where we live. On the other hand historical and cultural backgrounds shape importantly our views about the environment and how we act towards it in our daily life. In a context of globalization and increase of competition at international level, knowledge appears to be one of the key components for the advance of the word. Most of the knowledge produced comes from high level education institutions and research centres, which have responsibility to create and encourage critical thinking. Individuals aware of the problems can be more active and can push things forward. We think that environmental knowledge and awareness are fundamental for the future of the society. In order to develop better methodologies are developed if we have a better perception of students understanding of environmental problems. The objective of this work is to study the Lithuanian university level student's perception about some environmental challenges of our society. We selected several questions for the students rate according the relevance of the question, as "Air Pollution", "Waste Management", "Resources overexplotation", "Biodiversity reduction", "Human Overpopulation" "Poverty", "Global Warming/Climate change", Natural disasters", "Terrorism", "Economical crisis", "War and armed conflicts" and the "Spread of infectious diseases". We ask to the respondents to rate the importance using a likert scale (1=Not Important, 2= not so important, 3=important, 4=very important, 5=the most important). Among all the questions, the most rated where the Water pollution, the Spread of infectious diseases and Air Pollution and the less important where Biodiversity Reduction, Human overpopulation and climate change. These results helped us to identify where some efforts should be taken to raise student's awareness about global

  19. Assessing students' conceptual knowledge of electricity and magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Michele W.; Finn, Rose A.; Broder, Darren L.; Hassel, George E.

    2017-12-01

    We present the Electricity and Magnetism Conceptual Assessment (EMCA), a new assessment aligned with second-semester introductory physics courses. Topics covered include electrostatics, electric fields, circuits, magnetism, and induction. We have two motives for writing a new assessment. First, we find other assessments such as the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment and the Conceptual Survey on Electricity and Magnetism not well aligned with the topics and content depth of our courses. We want to test introductory physics content at a level appropriate for our students. Second, we want the assessment to yield scores and gains comparable to the widely used Force Concept Inventory (FCI). After five testing and revision cycles, the assessment was finalized in early 2015 and is available online. We present performance results for a cohort of 225 students at Siena College who were enrolled in our algebra- and calculus-based physics courses during the spring 2015 and 2016 semesters. We provide pretest, post-test, and gain analyses, as well as individual question and whole test statistics to quantify difficulty and reliability. In addition, we compare EMCA and FCI scores and gains, and we find that students' FCI scores are strongly correlated with their performance on the EMCA. Finally, the assessment was piloted in an algebra-based physics course at George Washington University (GWU). We present performance results for a cohort of 130 GWU students and we find that their EMCA scores are comparable to the scores of students in our calculus-based physics course.

  20. Team-based assessment of professional behavior in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOJAT RAEE

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Introducrion: Self and peer assessment provides important information about the individual’s performance and behavior in all aspects of their professional environment work. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional behavior and performance in medical students in the form of team based assessment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 100 medical students in the 7th year of education were randomly selected and enrolled; for each student five questionnaires were filled out, including one self-assessment, two peer assessments and two residents assessment. The scoring system of the questionnaires was based on seven point Likert scale. After filling out the questions in the questionnaire, numerical data and written comments provided to the students were collected, analyzed and discussed. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of the questionnaires was assessed. A p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Internal consistency was acceptable (Cronbach’s alpha 0.83. Interviews revealed that the majority of students and assessors interviewed found the method acceptable. The range of scores was 1-6 (Mean±SD=4.39±0.57 for the residents' assessment, 2-6 (Mean±SD=4.49±0.53 for peer assessment, and 3-7 (Mean±SD=5.04±0.32 for self-assessment. There was a significant difference between self assessment and other methods of assessment. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a team-based assessment is an acceptable and feasible method for peer and self-assessment of medical students’ learning in a clinical clerkship, and has some advantages over traditional assessment methods. Further studies are needed to focus on the strengths and weaknesses.

  1. New assessment forms of educational outcomes of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyanskaya E.N.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the context of practice-oriented training assessment system applies not only to quality control in vocational education, but becomes one of the control elements of the teacher education system. The article discusses so called assessment for learning. The author believes that the purpose of assessment for learning is to provide research and reflexive independence of students which provides the opportunity to adjust the educational outcomes, forms of students training and evaluation tools. The basic features of assessment for learning are considered from this point of view. The article discusses use of internet-services in assessment for learning , risks and provides procedure of assessment for learning and describes in detail such specific procedures as criteria-based assessment, construction of tests and mindmaps, cumulative assessment.

  2. Using Mobile Apps to Promote a Healthy Lifestyle Among Adolescents and Students: A Review of the Theoretical Basis and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dute, Denise Jantine; Bemelmans, Wanda Jose Erika; Breda, João

    2016-05-05

    European adolescents and students tend to have low levels of physical activity and eat unhealthy foods, and the prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased, which poses a public health challenge. Mobile apps play an important role in their daily lives, suggesting their potential to be used in health-promoting strategies. This review aimed to explore how mobile apps can contribute to the promotion of healthy nutrition, physical activity, and prevention of overweight in adolescents and students. For the apps identified, the review describes the content, the theoretical mechanisms applied, and lessons learned. The databases Scopus, MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched for English-language publications from January 2009 to November 2013. Studies were included if (1) the primary component of the intervention involves an app; (2) the intervention targets healthy nutrition, or physical activity, or overweight prevention; and (3) the target group included adolescents or students (aged 12-25 years). A total of 15 studies were included, which describe 12 unique apps. Ten of these apps functioned as monitoring tools for assessing dietary intake or physical activity levels. The other apps used a Web-based platform to challenge users to exercise and to allow users to list and photograph their problem foods. For 5 apps, the behavioral theory underpinning their development was clearly specified. Frequently applied behavior change techniques are prompting self-monitoring of behavior and providing feedback on performance. Apps can function self-contained, but most of them are used as part of therapy or to strengthen school programs. From the age of 10 years users may be capable of using apps. Only 4 apps were developed specifically for adolescents. All apps were tested on a small scale and for a short period. Despite large potential and abundant usage by young people, limited research is available on apps and health promotion for adolescents. Apps seem to be a

  3. Peer assessment of student-produced mechanics lab report videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings to lab reports than do experts, that peers begin the semester by giving high ratings most frequently and end the semester with frequent middle ratings, and that peers go through the semester without much change in the frequency of low ratings. We then use student interviews to develop a model for student engagement with peer assessment. This model is based on two competing influences which appear to shape peer evaluation behavior: a strong disinclination to give poor ratings with a complementary preference to give high ratings when in doubt, and an attempt to develop an expertlike criticality when assessing peers' work.

  4. Parent assessment of medical student skills in ambulatory pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Persson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Partnership with parents is a vital part of pediatric medical education, yet few studies have examined parent attitudes towards learners in pediatric settings. Methods: Questionnaires were used to determine parent and student assessment of professional and clinical skills (primary outcome and parent attitudes towards 3rd year medical students (secondary outcome at the University of Alberta. Chi Square, Kendall’s Tau and Kappa coefficients were calculated to compare parent and student responses in 8 areas: communication, respect, knowledge, listening, history taking, physical examination, supervision, and overall satisfaction. Results: Overall satisfaction with medical student involvement by parents was high: 56.7% of all parents ranked the encounter as ‘excellent’. Areas of lesser satisfaction included physician supervision of students. Compared to the parent assessment, students tended to underrate many of their skills, including communication, history taking and physical exam. There was no relationship between parent demographics and their attitude to rating any of the students’ skills. Conclusions: Parents were satisfied with medical student involvement in the care of their children. Areas identified for improvement included increased supervision of students in both history taking and physical examination. This is one of the largest studies examining parent attitudes towards pediatric students. The results may enhance undergraduate curriculum development and teaching in pediatric ambulatory clinics and strengthen the ongoing partnership between the community and teaching clinics.

  5. Essentials for emergency care: Lessons from an inventory assessment of an emergency centre in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Marfo Osei

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Beyond pointing out specific material resource deficiencies at the Surgical Medical Emergency (SME centre, our inventory assessment indicated a need to develop better implementation strategies for infection control policies, to collaborate with other departments on coordination of patient care, and to set a research agenda to develop emergency and acute care protocols that are both effective and sustainable in our setting. Equipment and supplies are essential elements of emergency preparedness that must be both available and ‘ready-to-hand’. Consequently, key factors in determining readiness to provide quality emergency care include supply-chain, healthcare financing, functionality of systems, and a coordinated institutional vision. Lessons learnt may be useful for others facing similar challenges to emergency medicine development.

  6. The Measurement Properties of the Assessing Math Concepts' Assessments of Primary Students' Number Sense Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christie; Lambert, Richard; Polly, Drew; Wang, Chuang; Pugalee, David

    The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement properties of the Assessing Math Concepts AMC Anywhere Hiding and Ten Frame Assessments, formative assessments of primary students' number sense skills. Each assessment has two parts, where Part 1 is intended to be foundational skills for part two. Part 1 includes manipulatives whereas Part 2 does not. Student data from 228 kindergarten through second grade teachers with a total of 3,666 students was analyzed using Rasch scaling. Data analyses indicated that when the two assessments were examined separately the intended order of item difficulty was clear. When the parts of both assessments were analyzed together, the items in Part 2 were not consistently more difficult that the items in Part 1. This suggests an alternative sequence of tasks in that students may progress from working with a specific number with manipulatives then without manipulatives rather than working with a variety of numbers with manipulatives before moving onto assessments without manipulatives.

  7. Assessment succession of student's goes in for basketball.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temchenko V.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The questions of working out of the criteria for assessment the results of students by subject "Physical education" (basketball section are considered. The article focuses on variants of assessing the results physical training employment of the students under the credit and module system. It is set that at the choice of type of sport (or directions motive activity about 40% students of basic separation are given by a preference the playing types of sport. From this number 12% choose basket-ball. Norms in special physical training are given. It's emphasized that there is no common system of assessment the results of students; the model of sectional form of physical training is worked out not enough.

  8. Assessment of the critical thinking skills of student radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Alan [University of Portsmouth, Centre for Radiography Education, St George' s Building, Portsmouth PO1 2HY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: alan.castle@port.ac.uk

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: Enabling students to develop critical thinking skills is one of the key aims of higher education and in preparing student radiographers for the future, there are increasing demands on educators to teach critical thinking skills to facilitate reflective, evidence-based practice and inter-professional working. The aim of the paper is to attempt to compare students' self-perception of their critical thinking skills to their actual written assessment performance. Methods: Students were asked to self-report how they thought the course had developed their critical thinking skills and the outcomes of this exercise were compared to the scores of previous assessments that required the demonstration of these skills. Results: The results suggest that whilst students report having developed critical thinking skills during the course, the results of their written assessments requiring the demonstration of these skills all had a mean score of less than 60% which indicates (in terms of the university's grade criteria guidelines) 'little attempt to use critical discussion in their work.' Discussion: Thirteen components of critical thinking are proposed, together with ways in which they could be incorporated into a radiographic curriculum. Conclusions: It is suggested that educators may need to review the constructive alignment of their curricula and re-assess their teaching and assessment strategies in order to effectively develop students' critical thinking skills.

  9. Assessment of the critical thinking skills of student radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Enabling students to develop critical thinking skills is one of the key aims of higher education and in preparing student radiographers for the future, there are increasing demands on educators to teach critical thinking skills to facilitate reflective, evidence-based practice and inter-professional working. The aim of the paper is to attempt to compare students' self-perception of their critical thinking skills to their actual written assessment performance. Methods: Students were asked to self-report how they thought the course had developed their critical thinking skills and the outcomes of this exercise were compared to the scores of previous assessments that required the demonstration of these skills. Results: The results suggest that whilst students report having developed critical thinking skills during the course, the results of their written assessments requiring the demonstration of these skills all had a mean score of less than 60% which indicates (in terms of the university's grade criteria guidelines) 'little attempt to use critical discussion in their work.' Discussion: Thirteen components of critical thinking are proposed, together with ways in which they could be incorporated into a radiographic curriculum. Conclusions: It is suggested that educators may need to review the constructive alignment of their curricula and re-assess their teaching and assessment strategies in order to effectively develop students' critical thinking skills

  10. Assessment of university student health literacy toward Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Meraji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Outbreak of influenza A/H1N1 become serious concern. Student in academic institutions can play effective role in prevention and control of influenza. Here paramedical faculty student health literacy toward Influenza was assessed. Methods: A cross sectional-descriptive study was conducted among 139 students in Medical Records, Physiotherapy, Radiology, Health Information Technology, Speech Therapy and Optometry discipline at paramedical faculty of Mashhad medical university in 2016. A pandemic influenza questionnaire was translated and edited. Demographic characteristics of student, level of knowledge and perception toward influenza and perception toward government and media were collected. Results: More than half of student correctly identified influenza symptoms as fever 95/1%, body ache 51/2%, cough 46/3% and headaches 43/9%.person to person transmission and contact with infected objects were recognized by 87/8% and 68/3% of student as a mode of transmission. Students Covering identified nose and mouth 87/8%, hand washing with soap and water 80/5% and throwing tissues in rubbish bin as precutions.48/6% of student believed that influenza is not fatal; despite 88/9% of student perceived influenza as serious disease. In Government and media assessment, 39% of student agreed health department and other health authorities had a good control plan, 51/4% of student agreed with transparency of necessary intervention during flu outbreak. Conclusion: This study shows that paramedical faculty student has appropriate influenza health literacy. Delivering more information about mode of transmission, high risk group and precaution intervention and playing more effective role by media is recommended. Paper Type: Research Article.

  11. A Relevant Lesson: Hitler Goes to the Mall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, David

    2003-01-01

    A "Motivation" eliciting the "Aim" of each lesson initiates each lesson in the orthodox "developmental lesson-plan" that has dominated classroom instruction in NYC public schools for at least the past half-century. An action-research study of 38 lesson-plans (over 5 each from 5 teachers) drawn from student-teaching…

  12. Improving Mathematics Teaching as Deliberate Practice through Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongjin; Prince, Kyle M.; Barlow, Angela T.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how a ninth grade teacher improved an Algebra I lesson through a lesson study approach. We used multiple data sources to investigate the improvement of the lesson towards student-centered mathematics instruction, perceived benefits of the teacher, and factors associated with the improvement of teaching. The lesson group…

  13. In It for the Long Haul: Lessons from a Decade of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searing, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes student evaluations of library orientation and information literacy instruction over a ten-year period, 2002 to 2011. The survey respondents were five hundred students who were taking or had just completed their first course in LEEP, the distance education option of the M.S. program at the University of Illinois. This case…

  14. Gender stereotypes among women engineering and technology students in the UK: lessons from career choice narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Abigail; Dainty, Andrew; Bagilhole, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In the UK, women remain under-represented in engineering and technology (E&T). Research has, therefore, investigated barriers and solutions to women's recruitment, retention and progression. Recruitment into the sector may be supported by exploring the career decisions of women and men who have chosen to study E&T. Triangulating quantitative and qualitative data from E&T students at a UK university, this paper examines the gendered nature of career choice narratives. It finds that women often maintain contradictory views; upholding gendered stereotypes about women's suitability for the so-called masculine work, yet also subscribing to ideals that the sector is accessible to all who wish to work in it. This is explained using an individualist framework in which women construct an autonomous sense of self, yet are also shaped by a gendered self. Women's discourse around career choice, therefore, reveals the problematic nature of gender norms for achieving gender equity in E&T.

  15. Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key ‘‘lessons learned’’ from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches...... for using these methods together for NM: ‘‘LC-based RA’’ (traditional RA applied in a life-cycle perspective) and ‘‘RA-complemented LCA’’ (conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life-cycle steps). Hence, the latter is the only identified approach which genuinely combines LC- and RA-based methods......While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance...

  16. Pesticide leaching through sandy and loamy fields – Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbom, Annette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn; Grant, Ruth; Juhler, René K.; Brüsch, Walter; Kjær, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The European Union authorization procedure for pesticides includes an assessment of the leaching risk posed by pesticides and their degradation products (DP) with the aim of avoiding any unacceptable influence on groundwater. Twelve-year's results of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveal shortcomings to the procedure by having assessed leaching into groundwater of 43 pesticides applied in accordance with current regulations on agricultural fields, and 47 of their DP. Three types of leaching scenario were not fully captured by the procedure: long-term leaching of DP of pesticides applied on potato crops cultivated in sand, leaching of strongly sorbing pesticides after autumn application on loam, and leaching of various pesticides and their DP following early summer application on loam. Rapid preferential transport that bypasses the retardation of the plow layer primarily in autumn, but also during early summer, seems to dominate leaching in a number of those scenarios. - Highlights: • Field-results reveal shortcomings in the EU authorization procedure for pesticides. • The plough layer can be bypassed via preferential transport in e.g. wormholes. • Pesticides properties are decisive for leaching pattern on the sandy fields. • The hydrogeological settings control the leaching patterns on the loamy fields. • Pesticide detection frequency seems to be independent of the month of the year. - Long-term lessons learnt from the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme reveals shortcomings in the European Union authorization procedure for pesticides

  17. Formative assessment (assessment for learning educational achievements of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyаnskaya E.N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present definition of the concept of formative assessment and its significance for modern education. Displaying developmental approach in foreign studies, the further development, the risks and the possibility of their reduction. We discuss some of the techniques and examples of formative assessment. We investigate the relationship between formative and final evaluation, including the national curriculum levels.

  18. A Self-Assessment Checklist for Undergraduate Students' Argumentative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimehchisalem, Vahid; Chye, David Yoong Soon; Jaswant Singh, Sheena Kaur A/P; Zainuddin, Siti Zaidah; Norouzi, Sara; Khalid, Sheren

    2014-01-01

    With a growing emphasis on students' ability to assess their own written works in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) writing courses, self-assessment checklists are today regarded as useful tools. These checklists can help learners diagnose their own weaknesses and improve their writing performance. This necessitates development of…

  19. Using Longitudinal Scales Assessment for Instrumental Music Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    In music education, current assessment trends emphasize student reflection, tracking progress over time, and formative as well as summative measures. This view of assessment requires instrumental music educators to modernize their approaches without interfering with methods that have proven to be successful. To this end, the Longitudinal Scales…

  20. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  1. Developing a Competency-Based Assessment Approach for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education accrediting bodies are increasing the emphasis on assessing student learning outcomes as opposed to teaching methodology. The purpose of this article is to describe the process used by Troy University's Master of Public Administration program to change their assessment approach from a course learning objective perspective to a…

  2. Data on Student Performance Under Different Forms of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Russell

    1976-01-01

    Recognition of various abilities and skills in university degree work, and the development of an appropriate range of assessment modes to test these abilities, presupposes that students will perform differently under the various forms of assessment. The limited data available to test this supposition are reviewed and analysis of one geography…

  3. The Importance of Culturally Safe Assessment Tools for Inuit Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Jasmin

    2017-01-01

    There are still no major assessment and diagnostic tools that educators can use to properly assess our Inuit students' learning. Cultural safety as it is currently defined in New Zealand educational research (Macfarlane et al., 2007) is necessary in creating a classroom community that encourages the appreciation of culture and worldview, and…

  4. Enhancing Student Experiences Abroad: The Potential of Dynamic Assessment to Develop Student Interculturality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, Claudia; Poehner, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions are acknowledging the requirements of a globalized world on students' mobility, interculturality, and language skills by offering study-abroad programmes. These need to be accompanied by procedures to assess student needs prior to and during their time abroad as well as upon their return. In the exploratory study reported…

  5. Dental Hygiene Students' Self-Assessment of Ergonomics Utilizing Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partido, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    Due to postural demands, dental professionals are at high risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs). Dental clinicians' lack of ergonomic awareness may impede the clinical application of recommendations to improve their posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether feedback involving photography and self-assessment would improve dental hygiene students' ergonomic scores and accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. The study involved a randomized control design and used a convenience sample of all 32 junior-year dental hygiene students enrolled in the autumn 2016 term in The Ohio State University baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Sixteen students were randomly assigned to each of two groups (control and training). At weeks one and four, all participants were photographed and completed ergonomic self-evaluations using the Modified-Dental Operator Posture Assessment Instrument (M-DOPAI). During weeks two and three, participants in the training group were photographed again and used those photographs to complete ergonomic self-assessments. All participants' pre-training and post-training photographs were given ergonomic scores by three raters. Students' self-assessments in the control group and faculty evaluations of the training group showed significant improvement in scores over time (F(1,60)=4.25, p<0.05). In addition, the accuracy of self-assessment significantly improved for students in the training group (F(1,30)=8.29, p<0.01). In this study, dental hygiene students' self-assessments using photographs resulted in improvements in their ergonomic scores and increased accuracy of their ergonomic self-assessments. Any improvement in ergonomic score or awareness can help reduce the risks for WMSDs, especially among dental clinicians.

  6. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL PEMBINAAN KOMPETENSI CALON GURU MATEMATIKA MELALUI LESSON STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmad Bustanul Anwar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Education has a very important role in improving the quality of human resources. Therefore, education is expected to be one of the ways to prepare generations of qualified human resources and has the ability to deal with the progress of time and technology development . In order to enhance the quality of student mastery of competencies in the development of prospective teachers in this study will be applied to the activities in the process of lesson study in lecture . Lesson study is a model of coaching to people who work as both teacher educators and lecturers through collaborative learning and assessment in building sustainable learning communities. The purpose of this research is to improve the competence of prospective mathematics teachers through lesson study . More specifically , this study aims to describe the efforts made to improve the pedagogical, professional competence , social competence and personal competence prospective mathematics teachers through lesson study . Subjects in this study were students who took the micro teaching courses totaling 15 students , divided into 3 group . This type of research is a qualitative descriptive study is to develop the competence of prospective mathematics teachers through lesson study . Lesson study conducted collaborated with Action Research activities ( Action Reseach. The results of this research activity is the implementation of lesson study to greater competence to prospective teachers teaching mathematics through the micro subjects namely: pedagogical competence categories were 80 % and 20 % lower, professional competence categories were 46.7 % and 53.3 % lower, personal competence 100 % category being and social competence categories were 86.7 % and 13.3 % lower .

  7. Exploring the role of assessment criteria during teachers' collaborative judgement processes of students' portfolios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der M.F.; Baartman, L.K.J.; Prins, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Student portfolios are increasingly used for assessing student competences in higher education, but results about the construct validity of portfolio assessment are mixed. A prerequisite for construct validity is that the portfolio assessment is based on relevant portfolio content. Assessment

  8. Peer assessment of student-produced mechanics lab report videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S. Douglas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine changes in students’ rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers’ physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings to lab reports than do experts, that peers begin the semester by giving high ratings most frequently and end the semester with frequent middle ratings, and that peers go through the semester without much change in the frequency of low ratings. We then use student interviews to develop a model for student engagement with peer assessment. This model is based on two competing influences which appear to shape peer evaluation behavior: a strong disinclination to give poor ratings with a complementary preference to give high ratings when in doubt, and an attempt to develop an expertlike criticality when assessing peers’ work.

  9. Assessment of Postgraduate Health Professions Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ebola virus disease is a serious acute illness that is often fatal if untreated. Multiple outbreaks have occurred in Africa from 1976 to 2014. The recent outbreak of Ebola in West Africa was declared by the WHO as a public health emergency of international concern. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess ...

  10. Assessing Students' Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Reichard, Carla A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes development and validation of a new self-report instrument, the Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory, designed to assess adolescent and adult readers' metacognitive awareness and perceived use of reading strategies while reading academic materials. After a brief review of the literature, the development and validation…

  11. Student assessment by objective structured examination in a neurology clerkship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Smith, Sandy; Blood, Angela; Brorson, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the reliability and predictive ability of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the assessment of medical students at the completion of a neurology clerkship. Methods: We analyzed data from 195 third-year medical students who took the OSCE. For each student, the OSCE consisted of 2 standardized patient encounters. The scores obtained from each encounter were compared. Faculty clinical evaluations of each student for 2 clinical inpatient rotations were also compared. Hierarchical regression analysis was applied to test the ability of the averaged OSCE scores to predict standardized written examination scores and composite clinical scores. Results: Students' OSCE scores from the 2 standardized patient encounters were significantly correlated with each other (r = 0.347, p neurology clerkship. PMID:22855865

  12. Self-Assessment of Problem Solving Disposition in Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Olivares-Olivares, Silvia Lizett; López-Cabrera, Mildred Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Medical schools are committed to both students and society to develop capabilities required to succeed in health care environments. Present diagnosis and treatment methods become obsolete faster, demanding that medical schools incorporate competency-based education to keep pace with future demands. This study was conducted to assess the problem solving disposition of medical students. A three-subcategory model of the skill is proposed. The instrument was validated on content by a group of 17 ...

  13. Parent assessment of medical student skills in ambulatory pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Persson; Christina Haines; Mia Lang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Partnership with parents is a vital part of pediatric medical education, yet few studies have examined parent attitudes towards learners in pediatric settings. Methods: Questionnaires were used to determine parent and student assessment of professional and clinical skills (primary outcome) and parent attitudes towards 3rd year medical students (secondary outcome) at the University of Alberta. Chi Square, Kendall’s Tau and Kappa coefficients were calculated to compare parent an...

  14. U.S. Students, Poverty, and School Libraries: What Results of the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment Tell Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Denice

    2014-01-01

    This paper looks at results from the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment to examine the effects of school libraries on students' test performance, with specific focus on the average of students' family wealth in a school. The paper documents students' school library use and students' home possessions to indicate how school…

  15. The Effect on Learning, Communication, and Assessment when Student-Created Youtubes of Microteaching Were Used in an Online Teacher-Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Eileen A.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study within an online teacher-education course required pre-service teachers to develop self-videotaped microteaching lessons which were posted in a private YouTube. Analysis of the students' YouTube lessons, course postings, and peer interactions found that students learned the technology requirements quickly, were able to develop…

  16. Lessons learned in using realist evaluation to assess maternal and newborn health programming in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alayne; Sedalia, Saroj; McNab, Shanon; Sarker, Malabika

    2016-03-01

    Realist evaluation furnishes valuable insight to public health practitioners and policy makers about how and why interventions work or don't work. Moving beyond binary measures of success or failure, it provides a systematic approach to understanding what goes on in the 'Black Box' and how implementation decisions in real life contexts can affect intervention effectiveness. This paper reflects on an experience in applying the tenets of realist evaluation to identify optimal implementation strategies for scale-up of Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) programmes in rural Bangladesh. Supported by UNICEF, the three MNH programmes under consideration employed different implementation models to deliver similar services and meet similar MNH goals. Programme targets included adoption of recommended antenatal, post-natal and essential newborn care practices; health systems strengthening through improved referral, accountability and administrative systems, and increased community knowledge. Drawing on focused examples from this research, seven steps for operationalizing the realist evaluation approach are offered, while emphasizing the need to iterate and innovate in terms of methods and analysis strategies. The paper concludes by reflecting on lessons learned in applying realist evaluation, and the unique insights it yields regarding implementation strategies for successful MNH programming. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  17. Nutritional knowledge assessment of syrian university students

    OpenAIRE

    Louay Labban

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition knowledge is one of the factors that affect nutritional status and nutritional habits of individuals, families, and societies. Nutrition knowledge is an important tool in assessing the nutritional status of an individual, group or community. Researchers have been trying to design and develop reliable and valid questionnaires that distinguish and measure nutrition knowledge and its impact on dietary behavior and diet-health awareness. Many studies have shown that nutrition knowledge ...

  18. Assessing Student Learning About Climate Change With Earth System Place-Based Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.; Krumhansl, R. A.; Acker, J. G.; Manitakos, J.; Elston, A.

    2012-12-01

    California and Western New York. The data sets also contain geospatially distributed projected values of temperature, precipitation, and land cover in 2050 and 2099, which were derived from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change-sanctioned and National Center for Atmospheric Research-derived A2 climate change scenario. STORE teachers choose from broad open-ended pre-post questions that assess their students' enduring understandings about weather, climate, and ecosystems. Students get the opportunity to build these enduring understandings and a set of adaptive instructional lessons centered on the data. Teachers can also administer broad map interpretation questions that check student understanding of the types of map-based data displays available in the project's geographic information system interfaces, data sets, and instructional materials. The paper will overview these assessments, with special attention to how the items are designed to differentiate student data literacy needs from scientific understanding needs, so that the teacher can follow up with appropriately targeted interventions. Classroom implementations of the assessments are occurring in the 2012-13 school year, and preliminary results will be reported at AGU.

  19. Brothers Grimm. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery Communications, Inc., Bethesda, MD.

    Based on Grimm's fairy tales, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that fairy tales connect them to earlier generations, help them think about present situations, that magic figures prominently in fairy tales, and that fairy tales can inspire readers to create original works of art. The main activity in the…

  20. Smart Consumer Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey Consortium for Consumer Education, Newark.

    Lesson plans are provided for use with different populations of pre-K through senior high school students in four different areas of consumer education. Eight units in advertising are included: A First Look at Ads (pre-K-Grade 3), Don't Judge a Book by Its Cover (Grades 1-3), Fatal Distraction (Junior High), Package Labeling (Junior High), Product…

  1. The Challenges and Success of Implementing Climate Studies Lessons for Pre-Professional Teachers at a Small Historically Black College to Engage Student Teaching of Science Pedagogy and Content Skill Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J.; Wider-Lewis, F.; Miller-Jenkins, A.

    2017-12-01

    This poster is a description of the challenges and success of implementing climate studies lessons for pre-service teachers to engage student teaching pedagogy and content skill based learning. Edward Waters College is a historical black college with an elementary education teacher program focused on urban elementary school teaching and learning. Pre-Service Elementary Educator Students often have difficulty with science and mathematics content and pedagogy. This poster will highlight the barriers and successes of using climate studies lessons to develop and enhance pre-service teachers' knowledge of elementary science principles particularly related to climate studies, physical and earth space science.

  2. The Effects of Autonomy Support on Student Engagement in Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiangmei; Kim, ChanMin

    2018-01-01

    Although peer assessment is widely implemented in higher education, not all students are highly engaged in it. To enhance student engagement in peer assessment, we designed and developed a web-based tool, autonomy-supportive peer assessment (ASPA), to support students' need for autonomy when they conducted peer assessment. Students' sense of…

  3. A Framework for Assessing High School Students' Statistical Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shiau Wei; Ismail, Zaleha; Sumintono, Bambang

    2016-01-01

    Based on a synthesis of literature, earlier studies, analyses and observations on high school students, this study developed an initial framework for assessing students' statistical reasoning about descriptive statistics. Framework descriptors were established across five levels of statistical reasoning and four key constructs. The former consisted of idiosyncratic reasoning, verbal reasoning, transitional reasoning, procedural reasoning, and integrated process reasoning. The latter include describing data, organizing and reducing data, representing data, and analyzing and interpreting data. In contrast to earlier studies, this initial framework formulated a complete and coherent statistical reasoning framework. A statistical reasoning assessment tool was then constructed from this initial framework. The tool was administered to 10 tenth-grade students in a task-based interview. The initial framework was refined, and the statistical reasoning assessment tool was revised. The ten students then participated in the second task-based interview, and the data obtained were used to validate the framework. The findings showed that the students' statistical reasoning levels were consistent across the four constructs, and this result confirmed the framework's cohesion. Developed to contribute to statistics education, this newly developed statistical reasoning framework provides a guide for planning learning goals and designing instruction and assessments.

  4. The effects of autonomy-supportive and controlling teaching behaviour in biology lessons with primary and secondary experiences on students' intrinsic motivation and flow-experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferber, Natalia; Basten, Melanie; Großmann, Nadine; Wilde, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Self-Determination Theory and Flow Theory propose that perceived autonomy fosters the positive qualities of motivation and flow-experience. Autonomy-support can help to maintain students' motivation in very interesting learning activities and may lead to an increase in the positive qualities of motivation in less interesting learning activities. This paper investigates whether autonomy-supportive or controlling teaching behaviour influence students' motivation and flow-experience in biology class. In study 1, 158 students of grade six worked on the adaptations of Harvest Mice (Micromys minutus) with living animals. The 153 sixth graders of study 2 dealt with the same content but instead worked with short films on laptops. Previous studies have shown that students perceive film sequences as less interesting than working with living animals. Students' intrinsic motivation and flow-experience were measured at the end of the first and the third lesson. In study 1, autonomy-supportive teaching behaviour led to significant differences in students' intrinsic motivation and flow-experience when compared to controlling teaching behaviour. In study 2, motivation and flow-experience were not always in line with theory. The positive effects of autonomy-supportive and the non-beneficial effects of the controlling teaching behaviour seem to be dependent on the interestingness of the teaching material.

  5. The impact of curricula and lesson planning in the teaching process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlinda Lika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lesson planning is at the core of teaching. It allows teachers to create an orientation path in the process of teaching, taking into consideration, many elements such as, students’ styles of learning, previous knowledge, types of intelligences, interests etc. Effective curricula plans are characterized by principles of coherence, flexibility, integration of knowledge etc. Effective lesson plans strongly rely on previous information gathered through different forms of assessment, and provide inclusive opportunities for every student. This paper will show how planning affects teaching and the quality of learning. First, a review of the literature will represent the importance of flexible planning and incorporation of differentiated elements of planning that ensure inclusive opportunities of learning for all students. Second, there will be a detailed analysis of findings taken by 25 full school inspections practices on the field of “lesson planning”. This part of the study will specify the planning difficulties the teachers face and how this affects the process of teaching and learning. Third, benefits of lesson plans that rely on good assessment practices and integrate differentiated instruction according to students' needs will be discussed as ways of helping teachers adjust lesson plans to overcome their planning difficulties. Findings indicate that teachers design lesson plans that do not rely on good assessment practices. Lesson plans are not flexible enough to respond and satisfy the needs of all categories of students, impacting that way the quality of instruction and learning. The paper will serve teachers to review their planning approaches and integrate elements of differentiated instruction as an organic part of the process, responding to traits and uniqueness students represent.

  6. Assessing Leader Development: Lessons from a Historical Review of MBA Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Angela M.; Boyatzis, Richard E.; Wei, Hongguo

    2018-01-01

    Graduate management education seeks to enhance the likelihood that graduates will be effective leaders, managers, or professionals. This requires programs that are designed to enable students to develop the related competencies, and increasing regulatory pressures require programs to document evidence of success. However, both the design of…

  7. Successes, Challenges and Lessons Learned for Recruiting, Engaging and Preparing a Diverse Student Population for 21st Century Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2015-12-01

    Diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce is still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines, a problem that will be only be solved by recruiting, engaging and retaining a more diverse student population. The Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates program is housed at California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB), an HSI with strong connections to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system. From this unique position, 11 sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students engage in rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two cohorts (2014, 2015) and here we present successes, challenges and lessons learned for a program designed to prepare students for 21st century Ocean Science careers.

  8. Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment for Individual Student Assessment and Curricular Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Day M.; Bennett, Lunawati L.; Ferrill, Mary J.; Brown, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    The Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) is a standardized examination for assessing academic progress of pharmacy students. Although no other national benchmarking tool is available on a national level, the PCOA has not been adopted by all colleges and schools of pharmacy. Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBAU) compared 2008-2010 PCOA results of its P1, P2, and P3 students to their current grade point average (GPA) and to results of a national cohort. The reliability coefficient of ...

  9. Adapting the Quebecois method for assessing implementation to the French National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012: lessons for gerontological services integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Somme

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many countries face ageing-related demographic and epidemiological challenges, notably neurodegenerative disorders, due to the multiple care services they require, thereby pleading for a more integrated system of care. The integrated Quebecois method issued from the Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy inspired a French pilot experiment and the National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012. Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy method implementation was rated with an evaluation grid adapted to assess its successive degrees of completion.Discussion: The approaching end of the president's term led to the method's institutionalization (2011–2012, before the implementation study ended. When the government changed, the study was interrupted. The results extracted from that ‘lost’ study (presented herein have, nonetheless, ‘found’ some key lessons.Key lessons/conclusion: It was possible to implement a Quebecois integrated-care method in France. We describe the lessons and pitfalls encountered in adapting this evaluation tool. This process is necessarily multidisciplinary and requires a test phase. A simple tool for quantitative assessment of integration was obtained. The first assessment of the tool was unsatisfactory but requires further studies. In the meantime, we recommend using mixed methodologies to assess the services integration level.

  10. Adapting the Quebecois method for assessing implementation to the French National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012: lessons for gerontological services integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Somme

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many countries face ageing-related demographic and epidemiological challenges, notably neurodegenerative disorders, due to the multiple care services they require, thereby pleading for a more integrated system of care. The integrated Quebecois method issued from the Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy inspired a French pilot experiment and the National Alzheimer Plan 2008–2012. Programme of Research to Integrate Services for the Maintenance of Autonomy method implementation was rated with an evaluation grid adapted to assess its successive degrees of completion. Discussion: The approaching end of the president's term led to the method's institutionalization (2011–2012, before the implementation study ended. When the government changed, the study was interrupted. The results extracted from that ‘lost’ study (presented herein have, nonetheless, ‘found’ some key lessons. Key lessons/conclusion: It was possible to implement a Quebecois integrated-care method in France. We describe the lessons and pitfalls encountered in adapting this evaluation tool. This process is necessarily multidisciplinary and requires a test phase. A simple tool for quantitative assessment of integration was obtained. The first assessment of the tool was unsatisfactory but requires further studies. In the meantime, we recommend using mixed methodologies to assess the services integration level.

  11. Implementing ILDs and Assessment in Small-enrollment, Calculus-based Physics Classes -- Lessons, Observations and Open Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason-McCaffrey, Deborah

    2011-04-01

    At Salem State, we offer a Physics minor, but most of our teaching load is support courses for other science majors and a lab sequence which satisfies the University's core education requirement. In three years of using assessments and ILDs in small-enrollment calculus-based Physics classes, there has been a significant implementation learning curve, there are encouraging results, a few cautions, and still some open questions to report. ILDs can be highly effective teaching tools. They do require significant advance preparation as well as a safe environment for student participation. Motivating students to do their best on assessment pre- and post-tests can also be difficult. Strategies for motivating assessment performance, experiments using clickers to encourage participation in ILDs, and modifying and developing home-grown ILDs are discussed.

  12. Assessing study skills among university students: an Iranian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didarloo, Alireza; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2014-05-05

    Numerous studies have revealed that study skills have a constructive role on the academic performance of students, in addition to educational quality, student' intelligence, and their affective characteristics. This study aims to examine study skills and the factors influencing them among the health sciences students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran. This was a cross-sectional study carried out from May to November 2013. A total of 340 Urmia health sciences students were selected using a simple sampling method. Data were collected using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire of Counseling Center of Houston University and analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics. The mean and standard deviation of the students' study skills were 172.5±23.2, out of a total score of 240. Around 1.2% of the study skills were weak; 86.8%, moderate; and 12%, good. Among the study skills, the scores of time management, and memory and concentration were better than the others. Also, there was a significant positive correlation between study skills scores and the students' family housing status and academic level (Pstudy skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

  13. Are we assessing correctly our students? Spain versus Finland.

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho-Miñano, María del Mar; Del Campo, Cristina; Pascual-Ezama, David; Urquia-Grande, Elena; Rivero, Carlos; Akpinar, Murat

    2016-01-01

    [EN] The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to analyse the comparison of coursework and final examination between Finland and Spain to test if there are differences in assessment methodologies; second, to study whether there are different factors (such as gender, age, subject, students’ motivation, and preferences) that have an impact on the assessment of students from the two countries. The final grades obtained by 117 freshmen enrolled on the Statistics and/or Financial ...

  14. Assessing computer skills in Tanzanian medical students: an elective experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Rob

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One estimate suggests that by 2010 more than 30% of a physician's time will be spent using information technology tools. The aim of this study is to assess the information and communication technologies (ICT skills of medical students in Tanzania. We also report a pilot intervention of peer mentoring training in ICT by medical students from the UK tutoring students in Tanzania. Methods Design: Cross sectional study and pilot intervention study. Participants: Fourth year medical students (n = 92 attending Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Main outcome measures: Self-reported assessment of competence on ICT-related topics and ability to perform specific ICT tasks. Further information related to frequency of computer use (hours per week, years of computer use, reasons for use and access to computers. Skills at specific tasks were reassessed for 12 students following 4 to 6 hours of peer mentoring training. Results The highest levels of competence in generic ICT areas were for email, Internet and file management. For other skills such as word processing most respondents reported low levels of competence. The abilities to perform specific ICT skills were low – less than 60% of the participants were able to perform the core specific skills assessed. A period of approximately 5 hours of peer mentoring training produced an approximate doubling of competence scores for these skills. Conclusion Our study has found a low level of ability to use ICT facilities among medical students in a leading university in sub-Saharan Africa. A pilot scheme utilising UK elective students to tutor basic skills showed potential. Attention is required to develop interventions that can improve ICT skills, as well as computer access, in order to bridge the digital divide.

  15. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of consumption and reasons why athletes consumed energy drinks. Methods A total number of 180 student-athletes gave their consent to participate in the study and completed a questionnaire which was administered during an inter-university sports competition. Results Most of the participants (62.2%) reported consuming at least one can of energy drink in a week. A high proportion (53.6%) of the respondents who drink energy drinks indicated that they did so to replenish lost energy after training or a competition. Other reasons given as to why energy drinks were consumed by the study participants included to provide energy and fluids to the body (25.9%), to improve performance (9.8%) and to reduce fatigue (5.4%). Conclusion These results suggest the need to plan health education programmes to particularly correct some wrong perceptions that athletes have regarding the benefits of energy drinks and also create awareness among student-athletes about the side effects of excessive intake of energy drinks. PMID:22444601

  16. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxton Christiana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of consumption and reasons why athletes consumed energy drinks. Methods A total number of 180 student-athletes gave their consent to participate in the study and completed a questionnaire which was administered during an inter-university sports competition. Results Most of the participants (62.2% reported consuming at least one can of energy drink in a week. A high proportion (53.6% of the respondents who drink energy drinks indicated that they did so to replenish lost energy after training or a competition. Other reasons given as to why energy drinks were consumed by the study participants included to provide energy and fluids to the body (25.9%, to improve performance (9.8% and to reduce fatigue (5.4%. Conclusion These results suggest the need to plan health education programmes to particularly correct some wrong perceptions that athletes have regarding the benefits of energy drinks and also create awareness among student-athletes about the side effects of excessive intake of energy drinks.

  17. Assessing students' communication skills: validation of a global rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Simone; Muehlinghaus, Isabel; Froehmel, Annette; Ortwein, Heiderose

    2008-12-01

    Communication skills training is an accepted part of undergraduate medical programs nowadays. In addition to learning experiences its importance should be emphasised by performance-based assessment. As detailed checklists have been shown to be not well suited for the assessment of communication skills for different reasons, this study aimed to validate a global rating scale. A Canadian instrument was translated to German and adapted to assess students' communication skills during an end-of-semester-OSCE. Subjects were second and third year medical students at the reformed track of the Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin. Different groups of raters were trained to assess students' communication skills using the global rating scale. Validity testing included concurrent validity and construct validity: Judgements of different groups of raters were compared to expert ratings as a defined gold standard. Furthermore, the amount of agreement between scores obtained with this global rating scale and a different instrument for assessing communication skills was determined. Results show that communication skills can be validly assessed by trained non-expert raters as well as standardised patients using this instrument.

  18. Self-Assessment: Challenging Students to Take Charge of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Violet H.

    2010-01-01

    Students are frequently unaware that they hold the power of learning in their own hands. Their ability to figure out what they are doing and where they are heading are crucial keys to consciously applying learning strategies, developing effective work habits, and assessing their own performance. The ability to regulate one's own learning means…

  19. Assessing Student Leadership Development From Mentoring, Coaching, and Advising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Daniel A; Lawhead, Justin

    2018-06-01

    Leadership educators must demonstrate the contributions their programs make to the learning and development of students. This chapter provides an overview of assessment principles for educators to apply in their practices of mentoring, coaching, and advising. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Developing and Using Dashboard Indicators in Student Affairs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Joshua J.; Ryder, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Dashboard systems are increasingly popular as assessment and performance management tools in higher education. This chapter examines the use of dashboards in student affairs, including examples of key indicators and considerations for developing and implementing these tools. The chapter begins with an overview of the origins of dashboards, from…

  1. Racial Differences in College Students' Assessments of Campus Race Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Celia C.; McCallum, Debra M.; Hughes, Michael; Smith, Gabrielle P. A.; McKnight, Utz

    2017-01-01

    Guided by the principles of critical race theory, we sought to understand how race and racism help explain differences in White and Black students' assessments of race relations on a predominantly White college campus. The authors employed data from a campus-wide survey conducted in Spring 2013 at the University of Alabama; the sample numbered…

  2. Student Assessment of the Master of Philosophy in Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to determine student assessment of the Master of Philosophy (Mphil) and Master of Science (MSc) in Information Sciences Records and Archives Management (RAM) programmes and propose recommendations to enhance the course content and structure to meet the education and market needs ...

  3. Assessing a Theoretical Model on EFL College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ping

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) integrate relevant language learning models and theories, (2) construct a theoretical model of college students' English learning performance, and (3) assess the model fit between empirically observed data and the theoretical model proposed by the researchers of this study. Subjects of this study were 1,129 Taiwanese EFL…

  4. Student Consistency and Implications for Feedback in Online Assessment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Tanimoto, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Most of the emphasis on mining online assessment logs has been to identify content-specific errors. However, the pattern of general "consistency" is domain independent, strongly related to performance, and can itself be a target of educational data mining. We demonstrate that simple consistency indicators are related to student outcomes,…

  5. Investigating Access to Educational Assessment for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Parkinson, Gill; Lewis, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Many countries have established systems for identifying, and providing for, the range of students with disabilities during their formal educational assessments. Most systems include the provision of variously termed "special access arrangements" (SAAs), such as the provision of extra time or practical assistance with some aspect of an…

  6. Assessing Students' Learning of Internal Controls: Closing the Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, T. S.; Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the multifaceted components of an assessment process. The paper explains a novel approach in which an advisory council participated in a "fun," hands-on activity to rank-order learning outcomes. The top ranked learning competency, as identified by the advisory council, was the need for students to gain a better…

  7. High School Students' Perceptions of Narrative Evaluations as Summative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Sylvia S.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on data collected at "Progressive Secondary School" in Southern California, a high school which uses narrative evaluations and other forms of alternative summative assessment on a school wide basis. Through a survey and personal interviews, students were asked to describe what they liked most and least about the use of…

  8. Assessing students' performance in first-year university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students and tutor evaluations suggested that the tool developed, met the first two criteria successfully. Achieving the third criterion proved challenging for two reasons: (1) the difficulties involved in making the assessment criteria explicit and (2) the inconsistency across tutors when converting the criterion-referenced ...

  9. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  10. Institutional Assessment of Student Information Literacy Ability: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    With increasing interest in the assessment of learning outcomes in higher education, stakeholders are demanding concrete evidence of student learning. This applies no less to information literacy outcomes, which have been adopted by many colleges and universities around the world. This article describes the experience of a university library in…

  11. Innovative Approaches to Increasing the Student Assessment Procedures Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Evgenij M.; Chelyshkova, Marina B.; Malygin, Alexey A.; Toymentseva, Irina A.; Anopchenko, Tatiana Y.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the investigated problem is determined by the need to improving the evaluation procedures in education and the student assessment in the age of the context of education widening, new modes of study developing (such as blending learning, e-learning, massive open online courses), immediate feedback necessity, reliable and valid…

  12. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  13. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Method and Systematic Teaching on Students' Achievement and Retention of Knowledge in Social Studies Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz Toklucu, Selma; Tay, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Many effective instructional strategies, methods, and techniques, which were developed in accordance with constructivist approach, can be used together in social studies lessons. Constructivist education comprises active learning processes. Two active learning approaches are cooperative learning and systematic teaching. Purpose…

  14. Using the Chemistry of Fireworks to Engage Students in Learning Basic Chemical Principles: A Lesson in Eco-Friendly Pyrotechnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Klapotke, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Fascination with fireworks and pyrotechnics can be used for educational purposes. Several aspects of pyrochemistry such as redox reactions, flame colors, or the theory of combustion can be incorporated in the curriculum to illustrate some basic chemical principles, guaranteeing a lesson that will be engaging and memorable. Beyond classic…

  15. Mini-Lessons on Language (The Round Table).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes several successful lessons that provide students with new awareness of the English language. Includes lessons focusing on language change, onomatopoeia, slang, word origin, dialect, and language functions. (MM)

  16. Sustainable development and the environment: lessons from the St Lucia environmental impact assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, FJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact assessment (ETA) on the effects of the proposed mining on the Eastern Shores of Lake St Lucia was arguably the largest and most transparent yet undertaken on the African continent. It assessed the consequences of proposed...

  17. Lessons Learnt in the Development of Level 1 PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor Probability Safety Assessment: A Collaboration Project under the Norwegian Extra Budgetary Fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazleha Maskin; Tom, P.P.; Ahmad Hassan Sallehudin Mohd Sarif; Faizal Mohamed; Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Muhamad Puad Abu

    2014-01-01

    This article reports about the lessons learnt from the development of level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) project that was implemented under the IAEA mentoring program for TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI research reactor (RTP). As a project that involved more than 3 organizations, a strategic planning of the management and implementation of individual assignment is truly a hectic task. This report compiles all related activities from the forming of the Malaysian PSA team up to the final report submitted to the IAEA. (author)

  18. Assessing changes in HIV-related legal and policy environments: Lessons learned from a multi-country evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura; Nicholson, Alexandra; Henry, Ian; Saha, Amitrajit; Sellers, Tilly; Gruskin, Sofia

    2018-01-01

    There is growing recognition in the health community that the legal environment-including laws, policies, and related procedures-impacts vulnerability to HIV and access to HIV-related services both positively and negatively. Assessing changes in the legal environment and how these affect HIV-related outcomes, however, is challenging, and understanding of appropriate methodologies nascent. We conducted an evaluation of a UNDP project designed to strengthen legal environments to support the human rights of key populations, in particular LGBT populations, women and girls, affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We analyzed data on activities designed to improve legal environments through a systematic document review and 53 qualitative interviews. The project made substantial strides towards legal change in many places, and examples provide broader lessons for work in this area. Two core pillars appear fundamental: a government-led participatory assessment of the legal environment, and building the capacity of those impacted by and engaged in this work. Systematic attention to human rights is vital: it can help open new spaces for dialogue among diverse stakeholders, foster new collaborations, and ensure local ownership, nuanced understanding of the political landscape, attention to marginalized populations, and accountability for (in)action. Entry points for effecting legal change go beyond "HIV laws" to also include other laws, national policies and strategies. Conducting legal environment assessments, multi-stakeholder dialogues, action planning and related activities, alongside capacity building, can contribute to changes in knowledge and attitudes directly relevant to reforming laws that are found to be harmful. Shorter-term goals along the causal pathway to legal change (e.g. changes in policy) can constitute interim markers of success, and recognition of these can maintain momentum. Increasing understanding of progress towards changes in the legal environment

  19. Assessing changes in HIV-related legal and policy environments: Lessons learned from a multi-country evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition in the health community that the legal environment-including laws, policies, and related procedures-impacts vulnerability to HIV and access to HIV-related services both positively and negatively. Assessing changes in the legal environment and how these affect HIV-related outcomes, however, is challenging, and understanding of appropriate methodologies nascent.We conducted an evaluation of a UNDP project designed to strengthen legal environments to support the human rights of key populations, in particular LGBT populations, women and girls, affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We analyzed data on activities designed to improve legal environments through a systematic document review and 53 qualitative interviews.The project made substantial strides towards legal change in many places, and examples provide broader lessons for work in this area. Two core pillars appear fundamental: a government-led participatory assessment of the legal environment, and building the capacity of those impacted by and engaged in this work. Systematic attention to human rights is vital: it can help open new spaces for dialogue among diverse stakeholders, foster new collaborations, and ensure local ownership, nuanced understanding of the political landscape, attention to marginalized populations, and accountability for (inaction. Entry points for effecting legal change go beyond "HIV laws" to also include other laws, national policies and strategies.Conducting legal environment assessments, multi-stakeholder dialogues, action planning and related activities, alongside capacity building, can contribute to changes in knowledge and attitudes directly relevant to reforming laws that are found to be harmful. Shorter-term goals along the causal pathway to legal change (e.g. changes in policy can constitute interim markers of success, and recognition of these can maintain momentum. Increasing understanding of progress towards changes in the legal

  20. Hardware and software for physical assessment work and health students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Юрійович Азархов

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hardware and software used to assess the state of the students’ health by means of information technology were described in the article and displayed in the form of PEAC – (physical efficiency assessment channel. The list of the diseases that students often suffer from has been prepared for which minimum number of informative primary biosignals have been selected. The structural scheme PEAC has been made up, the ways to form and calculate the secondary parameters for evaluating the health of students have been shown. The resulting criteria, indices, indicators and parameters grouped in a separate table for ease of use, are also presented in the article. The given list necessitates the choice of vital activities parameters, which are further to be used as the criteria for primary express-diagnostics of the health state according to such indicators as electrocardiogram, photoplethysmogram, spirogram, blood pressure, body mass length, dynamometry. But these indicators (qualitative should be supplemented with measurement methods which provide quantitative component of an indicator. This method makes it possible to obtain assessments of students’ health with desired properties. Channel of the student physical disability assessment, along with the channel of activity comprehensive evaluation and decision support subsystem ensure assessment of the student's health with all aspects of his activity and professional training, thereby creating adequate algorithm of his behavior that provides maximum health, longevity and professional activities. The basic requirements for hardware have been formed, and they are, minimum number of information-measuring channels; high noise stability of information-measuring channels; comfort, providing normal activity of a student; small dimensions, weight and power consumption; simplicity, and in some cases service authorization

  1. The Framing Discussion: Connecting Student Experience with Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, John E.; Balong, Megan

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the framing discussion, an informal discussion of a mathematical problem that takes place at the beginning of a lesson or unit. The purpose of the framing discussion is to assess student knowledge, motivate student interest, and to serve as a basis for guiding students to more formal mathematical knowledge. The article…

  2. A data infrastructure for the assessment of health care performance: lessons from the BRIDGE-health project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique; Estupiñán-Romero, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    The integration of different administrative data sources from a number of European countries has been shown useful in the assessment of unwarranted variations in health care performance. This essay describes the procedures used to set up a data infrastructure (e.g., data access and exchange, definition of the minimum common wealth of data required, and the development of the relational logic data model) and, the methods to produce trustworthy healthcare performance measurements (e.g., ontologies standardisation and quality assurance analysis). The paper ends providing some hints on how to use these lessons in an eventual European infrastructure on public health research and monitoring. Although the relational data infrastructure developed has been proven accurate, effective to compare health system performance across different countries, and efficient enough to deal with hundred of millions of episodes, the logic data model might not be responsive if the European infrastructure aims at including electronic health records and carrying out multi-cohort multi-intervention comparative effectiveness research. The deployment of a distributed infrastructure based on semantic interoperability, where individual data remain in-country and open-access scripts for data management and analysis travel around the hubs composing the infrastructure, might be a sensible way forward.

  3. Implementing Self-Assessment in Singapore Primary Schools: Effects on Students' Perceptions of Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hwei Ming

    2017-01-01

    Student academic self-assessment engages the students in deliberate reflection about what they are learning and how they are learning it. This intervention study investigated the effects of self-assessment training on students' perceptions towards self-assessment in two Singaporean primary schools. The study, which used a pretest-posttest design,…

  4. Longitudinal assessment of depression, stress, and burnout in medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Akhil D; Akarte, Sulbha V; Agrawal, Sumita P; Yadav, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Medical students can and do suffer from mental disorders is a concept yet to get wide acceptance. There are few studies comprehensively evaluating depression, stress, and burnout in medical students, especially in a longitudinal way in India. The current study aims to assess the impact of medical education on the development of psychological morbidities and the role of personality. First-year medical students of a leading medical college of India were enrolled on admission and given anonymized, validated, self-administered questionnaires assessing depression, stress, burnout, and personality. This was repeated at the end of 1 st year. Data were analyzed independently as questionnaires were anonymized. We found that 1 st year of medical college showed a significantly increasing depression ( P stress ( P burnout did not increase significantly. However, only disengagement dimension of burnout increased significantly. Personalities with weak capacity to adjust had a significant positive correlation with depression ( r = 0.277, P stress scores ( r = 0.210, P = 0.008). However, burnout did not correlate with any of the personality dimensions. Right from the 1 st year of medical education students perceive high-stress levels and have a high risk of depression. Burnout starts to creep in at least in the form of disengagement. This study provides a sound groundwork for planning interventions to reduce student's mental morbidity and avoid burnout.

  5. Long-term lessons on pesticide leaching obtained via the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Anette E.; Olsen, Preben; Plauborg, Finn

    To avoid any unacceptable influence on the environment posed by pesticides and their degradation products, all pesticides used in the European Union needs authorization. The authorization procedure includes assessing the leaching risk of both pesticides and their degradation products...

  6. Employing Picture Description to Assess the Students' Descriptive Paragraph Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Mega Cahyani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing is considered as an important skill in learning process which is needed to be mastered by the students. However, in teaching learning process at schools or universities, the assessment of writing skill is not becoming the focus of learning process and the assessment is administered inappropriately. In this present study, the researcher undertook the study which dealt with assessing descriptive paragraph writing ability of the students through picture description by employing an ex post facto as the research design. The present study was intended to answer the research problem dealing with the extent of the students’ achievement of descriptive paragraph writing ability which is assessed through picture description. The samples under the study were 40 students determined by means of random sampling technique with lottery system. The data were collected through administering picture description as the research instrument. The obtained data were analyzed by using norm-reference measure of five standard values. The results of the data analysis showed that there were 67.50% samples of the study were successful in writing descriptive paragraph, while there were 32.50% samples were unsuccessful in writing descriptive paragraph which was assessed by administering picture description test

  7. Lesson Exemplars in Electricity and Students’ Epistemological Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergel P. Mirana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the effects of a developed lesson exemplars in electricity integrating computer simulations and constructivist approach on students' Epistemological Beliefs. Specifically, it sought to determine how computer simulations, constructivist approach and Formativ e Assessment Classroom Technique (FACT can be integrated in the lesson exemplars in electricity; and evaluate the effects of the developed lesson exemplars in the students’ Epistemological Beliefs. The investigation employed the pre - experimental single - gr oup pretest and posttest study using the Epistemological Beliefs Assessment in Physical Sciences (EBAPS questionnaire. The study was conducted among seventy - two (72 Grade 10 students of a laboratory high school from a state university in the Philippines. They were taught using Physics Educational Technology (PhET and other web - based simulations, constructivist approach, and formative assessment classroom technique. The results revealed that the over - all Epistemological Beliefs of the students did not cha nge significantly; only along Nature of Knowing and Learning and Real - Life Applicability. Generally, utilizing computer simulations and applying constructivist approach did not alter students' epistemological beliefs in its entirety. However, it can be en gaging and effective in promoting students’ understanding of Physics.

  8. The Effects of a Computer-Assisted Teaching Material, Designed According to the ASSURE Instructional Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, on Students' Achievement Levels in a Mathematics Lesson and Their Resulting Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, Hilal; Karamete, Aysen; Okçu, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects that computer-assisted instruction had on students' attitudes toward a mathematics lesson and toward learning mathematics with computer-assisted instruction. The computer software we used was based on the ASSURE Instructional Systems Design and the ARCS Model of Motivation, and the software was designed to teach…

  9. Supervisory Management in the Water/Wastewater Field: Self Study Program. Revised Second Edition. Textbook and Student Manual. Lessons 1-7 and Appendix. Executive Programs of the Graduate School of Business Administration of Michigan State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebrenz, Marilyn L., Ed.

    This document is the student manual for a self-study course on managerial principles as they relate to the water or wastewater treatment field. Each of the seven lessons is concerned with a segment of the management process and corresponds to reading material in the accompanying text. An objective and subjective test portion is included in each…

  10. Assessment of the Opinions and Practices of Student Teachers on Micro-Teaching as a Teaching Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göçer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of study is to ascertain the effectiveness of micro-teaching, a training technique used to help student teachers establish a strong pedagogical background. Student teachers were required to give classroom-lessons in a natural school environment, to enable them to convert their knowledge into respective skills. Accordingly, within the scope…

  11. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fastré, Greet; Van der Klink, Marcel; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Fastré, G. M. J., Van der Klink, M. R., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills. Advances in Health Science Education, 15(4), 517-532.

  12. Assessing multiple intelligences in elementary-school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Catherine Hunt

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to gain a clear understanding of the manner in which fourth-grade students attending a Kansas elementary school learn when engaged in science activities grounded in H. Gardner's book, Frames of mind the theory of multiple intelligences (1983). The significance of this research lies in the discovery of the difference between teaching practice grounded in multiple intelligences versus that based upon traditional theory. Teacher self-perceptions with regard to the effectiveness of their instruction and student assessment within the classroom were also explored. The research evaluated the overall effectiveness of both traditional curriculum delivery and that rooted in the concept of multiple intelligences.

  13. Use of the Attribute Hierarchy Method for Development of Student Cognitive Models and Diagnostic Assessments in Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, S.; Brodsky, L. M.; Loper, S.; Brown, N.; Curley, J.; Baker, J.; Goss, M.; Castek, J.; Barber, J.

    2010-12-01

    indications of the final assessment measures. The project’s efforts to create an on-line geoscience curriculum for use in the middle school grades that adapts to student performances by customizing whole lessons, grouping assignments or student feedback will provide a broader context for the discussion.

  14. Performance assessment instrument to assess the senior high students' psychomotor for the salt hydrolysis material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahadi, Firman, Harry; Yulina, Erlis

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a performance assessment instrument for assessing the competence of psychomotor high school students on salt hydrolysis concepts. The design used in this study was the Research & Development which consists of three phases: development, testing and application of instruments. Subjects in this study were high school students in class XI science, which amounts to 93 students. In the development phase, seven validators validated 17 tasks instrument. In the test phase, we divided 19 students into three-part different times to conduct performance test in salt hydrolysis lab work and observed by six raters. The first, the second, and the third groups recpectively consist of five, six, and eight students. In the application phase, two raters observed the performance of 74 students in the salt hydrolysis lab work in several times. The results showed that 16 of 17 tasks of performance assessment instrument developed can be stated to be valid with CVR value of 1,00 and 0,714. While, the rest was not valid with CVR value was 0.429, below the critical value (0.622). In the test phase, reliability value of instrument obtained were 0,951 for the five-student group, 0,806 for the six-student group and 0,743 for the eight-student group. From the interviews, teachers strongly agree with the performance instrument developed. They stated that the instrument was feasible to use for maximum number of students were six in a single observation.

  15. Lessons learned and new challenges for integrated assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, S.A.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the first government-sponsored demands for integrated assessment to support decision making in the United States is embodied in the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Over the past 25 years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported federal agencies` in evaluating health and environmental impacts as required by NEPA. Many of ORNL`s efforts have focused on complex, programmatic assessments that break new ground and require and integrate expertise from a wide range of technical disciplines. Examples of ORNL projects that illustrate the use of integrated assessment approaches include environmental documentation for: (1) the Department of the Army`s Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, (2) the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s licensing activities related to the Owens River Basin in eastern California and along a 500-mile reach of the upper Ohio River, and (3) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s decision regarding restart of the undamaged reactor (Unit 1) at Three Mile Island. Our discussion of these examples illustrates successful integrated assessment approaches and identifies new challenges facing integrated assessment activities.

  16. Lessons learned: Needs for improving human health risk assessment at USDOE Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    Realistic health risk assessments were performed in a pilot study of three U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites. These assessments, covering a broad spectrum of data and methods, were used to identify needs for improving future health risk assessments at USDOE sites. Topics receiving specific recommendations for additional research include: choice of distributions for Monte Carlo simulation; estimation of risk reduction; analysis of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Database on food and nutrient intakes; investigations on effects of food processing on contaminant levels; background food and environmental concentrations of contaminants; method for handling exposures to groundwater plumes, methods for analyzing less than lifetime exposure to carcinogens; and improvement of bioaccumulation factors

  17. The Role of Integrated Modelling and Assessment for Decision-Making: Lessons from Water Allocation Issues in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, A. J.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; El Sawah, S.; Hamilton, S.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated modelling and assessment (IMA) is best regarded as a process that can support environmental decision-making when issues are strongly contested and uncertainties pervasive. To be most useful, the process must be multi-dimensional and phased. Principally, it must be tailored to the problem context to encompass diverse issues of concern, management settings and stakeholders. This in turn requires the integration of multiple processes and components of natural and human systems and their corresponding spatial and temporal scales. Modellers therefore need to be able to integrate multiple disciplines, methods, models, tools and data, and many sources and types of uncertainty. These dimensions are incorporated into iteration between the various phases of the IMA process, including scoping, problem framing and formulation, assessing options and communicating findings. Two case studies in Australia are employed to share the lessons of how integration can be achieved in these IMA phases using a mix of stakeholder participation processes and modelling tools. One case study aims to improve the relevance of modelling by incorporating stakeholder's views of irrigated viticulture and water management decision making. It used a novel methodology with the acronym ICTAM, consisting of Interviews to elicit mental models, Cognitive maps to represent and analyse individual and group mental models, Time-sequence diagrams to chronologically structure the decision making process, an All-encompassing conceptual model, and computational Models of stakeholder decision making. The second case uses a hydro-economic river network model to examine basin-wide impacts of water allocation cuts and adoption of farm innovations. The knowledge exchange approach used in each case was designed to integrate data and knowledge bearing in mind the contextual dimensions of the problem at hand, and the specific contributions that environmental modelling was thought to be able to make.

  18. Lessons from the use of a long-term energy model for consequential life cycle assessment: the BTL case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menten, Fabio; Tchung-Ming, Stephane; Lorne, Daphne; Bouvart, Frederique

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a methodology adapted to the prospective environmental evaluation of actions in the energy sector. It describes how a bottom-up long-term energy model can be used in a life cycle assessment (LCA) framework. The proposed methodology is applied in a case study about the global warming impacts occurring as a consequence of the future production of synthetic diesel from biomass 'biomass to liquids' - BTL), a second generation biofuel, in France. The results show a high sensitivity of the system-wide GHG balance to (i) the policy context and to (ii) the economic environment. Both influence the substitutions occurring within the system due to the production of BTL. Under the specific conditions of this study, the consequences of introducing BTL are not clear-cut. Therefore, we focus on the lessons from the detailed analysis of the results more than in the precise-looking projections, illustrating how this type of models can be used for strategic planning (industry and policy makers). TIMES-type models allow a detailed description of the numerous technologies affected by BTL production and how these vary under different policy scenarios. Moreover, some recommendations are presented, which should contribute for a proper systematization of consequential and prospective LCA methodologies. We provide argumentation on how to define a functional unit and system boundaries that are better linked with the goal of the study. Other crucial methodological issues are also discussed: how to treat temporal aspects in such environmental evaluation and how to increase the consistency of life cycle assessments. (authors)

  19. Transparent stakeholder engagement in practice: Lessons learned from applying comprehensive environmental assessment to research planning for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Christina; Hendren, Christine; Wang, Amy; Davis, J Michael

    2014-10-01

    As efforts to develop new applications of engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) continue to grow, so too has interest in the environmental, health, and safety (EHS) implications of these materials. However, thorough evaluation and interpretation of such implications could require substantial resources (e.g., estimated as >$120 million per year in federal funding 2013-2017). A structured, strategic approach for transparently planning research would support improved linkages between ENM research and risk assessments, and thereby enhance the utility of financial and other resources for EHS studies of ENMs. For this reason, we applied Comprehensive Environmental Assessment (CEA) as an approach to provide transparent input into research planning for 2 types of ENMs: nanoscale titanium dioxide and nanoscale silver. For each of these CEA applications, we employed a collective judgment method known as Nominal Group Technique (NGT) in 2 workshops sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The objective of this paper is to present the outcomes of these CEA applications in the context of how our methodology can inform future efforts to identify collective goals in science (e.g., research priorities) through structured decision support approaches. Outcomes include clear lists of research priorities for each ENM developed through transparently engaging stakeholders having diverse technical and sector perspectives. In addition, we identified several procedural aspects that could be refined, including emphasizing breakout group interactions, identifying broad information priorities before more detailed research questions, and using rating rather than ranking prioritization methods. Beyond the research directions identified for specific ENMs, lessons learned about engaging stakeholders in research planning are expected to inform future research planning efforts for ENMs and other emerging materials across the scientific community. © 2014 SETAC.

  20. ``What if we were in a test tube?'' Students' gendered meaning making during a biology lesson about the basic facts of the human genitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlander, Auli Arvola

    2014-06-01

    This paper explores what happens in the encounters between presentations of "basic facts" about the human genitals and 15-year-old students during a biology lesson in a Swedish secondary school. In this paper, meaning making was approached as relational, context-dependent and continually transacted. For this reason the analysis was conducted through a series of close readings of situations where students interacted with each other and the teacher in opening up gaps about alternative ways of discussing gender. Drawing on Foucault's theories about the inclusion and exclusion of knowledge and the subsequent work of Butler and other feminist researchers, the paper illuminates what gendered relations remain tacit in the conversation. It then illustrates possible ways in which these tacit gendered meanings could be made overt and discussed with the students when making meaning about the human genitals. The paper also shows how the ways in which human genitals are transacted in the science classroom have importance for what kind of learning is made available to the students.

  1. Contextualize Technical Writing Assessment to Better Prepare Students for Workplace Writing: Student-Centered Assessment Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han

    2008-01-01

    To teach students how to write for the workplace and other professional contexts, technical writing teachers often assign writing tasks that reflect real-life communication contexts, a teaching approach that is grounded in the field's contextualized understanding of genre. This article argues to fully embrace contextualized literacy and better…

  2. Learning Not Borrowing from the Queensland Education System: Lessons on Curricular, Pedagogical and Assessment Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin; McGregor, Glenda

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed account of the Queensland education system's engagement with reforming curriculum, pedagogies and assessment. In so doing, it responds to the University College London's Institute of Education report on "high-performing" jurisdictions, of which Queensland, Australia, was identified as one. In this report,…

  3. The assessment of ongoing community-based interventions to prevent obesity: lessons learned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, J.S.; Mathisen, F.K.S.; Samdal, O.; Lobstein, T.; Kohl, L.F.M.; Leversen, I.; Lakerveld, J.; Kremers, S.P.J.; Assema, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The assessment of real-life, community-based interventions to tackle obesity is an important step in the development of effective policies. Especially multi-level interventions have a high likely effectiveness and potential reach in counteracting the obesity epidemic. Although much can

  4. Environmental impact assessment of CCS chains – Lessons learned and limitations from LCA literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsten, M.A.M.; Ramirez, C.A.; Shen, L.; Koornneef, A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This study performs an assessment of existing LCA literature to obtain insights into potential environmental impacts over the complete life cycle of fossil fuel fired power plants with CCS. CCS results in a net reduction of the GWP of power plants through their life cycle in the order of 65–84%

  5. The Use of Academic Portfolio in the Learning and Assessment of Physics Students from a Singapore Private College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Kay Ling

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research paper is to examine the use of portfolios in the teaching and learning of physics at a Singapore private college. The paper starts with a short introduction of the types of students and the purpose of using academic portfolios in their learning and assessment. Some ideas of how portfolios can be used in the local context will also be discussed. It is necessary for teachers to know how to incorporate portfolio assessment in their daily lesson plans. At the same time, students who are studying physics at the college should also know how to use portfolios to their academic advantage. The paper also highlights three of the relevant work artifacts that can be included into the physics portfolios. The three work samples are concept-maps, internet research reports and newspaper articles reports. Concept-maps are useful tools to help students establish the connections between concepts. Internet research reports serve as important means for students to know more about how some scientific devices or technology use physics in the operations. Newspaper articles reports allow students to understand the real impact of physics on the lives of people. Subsequent sections of the paper discuss about the organizational flow of the portfolio, the timeline, the selection process, the portfolio checklist and assessment rubrics, the positive influences of using portfolios, the issues to consider and also the potential problems that physics teachers may face in implementing portfolios. These sections present the important framework which teachers can use as references for their portfolio initiatives in schools.

  6. Hygiene on maternity units: lessons from a needs assessment in Bangladesh and India

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    Suzanne Cross

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the proportion of deliveries in health institutions increases in low- and middle-income countries, so do the challenges of maintaining standards of hygiene and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs in mothers and babies. Adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH and infection prevention and control (IPC in these settings should be seen as integral parts of the broader domain of quality care. Assessment approaches are needed which capture standards for both WASH and IPC, and so inform quality improvement processes. Design: A needs assessment was conducted in seven maternity units in Gujarat, India, and eight in Dhaka Division, Bangladesh in 2014. The WASH & CLEAN study developed and applied a suite of tools – a ‘walkthrough checklist’ which included the collection of swab samples, a facility needs assessment tool and document review, and qualitative interviews with staff and recently delivered women – to establish the state of hygiene as measured by visual cleanliness and the presence of potential pathogens, and individual and contextual determinants or drivers. Results: No clear relationship was found between visually assessed cleanliness and the presence of pathogens; findings from qualitative interviews and the facility questionnaire found inadequacies in IPC training for healthcare providers and no formal training at all for ward cleaners. Lack of written policies and protocols, and poor monitoring and supervision also contributed to suboptimal IPC standards. Conclusions: Visual assessment of cleanliness and hygiene is an inadequate marker for ‘safety’ in terms of the presence of potential pathogens and associated risk of infection. Routine environmental screening of high-risk touch sites using simple microbiology could improve detection and control of pathogens. IPC training for both healthcare providers and ward cleaners represents an important opportunity for quality improvement. This should

  7. Hygiene on maternity units: lessons from a needs assessment in Bangladesh and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Suzanne; Afsana, Kaosar; Banu, Morsheda; Mavalankar, Dileep; Morrison, Emma; Rahman, Atiya; Roy, Tapash; Saxena, Deepak; Vora, Kranti; Graham, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Background As the proportion of deliveries in health institutions increases in low- and middle-income countries, so do the challenges of maintaining standards of hygiene and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) in mothers and babies. Adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and infection prevention and control (IPC) in these settings should be seen as integral parts of the broader domain of quality care. Assessment approaches are needed which capture standards for both WASH and IPC, and so inform quality improvement processes. Design A needs assessment was conducted in seven maternity units in Gujarat, India, and eight in Dhaka Division, Bangladesh in 2014. The WASH & CLEAN study developed and applied a suite of tools – a ‘walkthrough checklist’ which included the collection of swab samples, a facility needs assessment tool and document review, and qualitative interviews with staff and recently delivered women – to establish the state of hygiene as measured by visual cleanliness and the presence of potential pathogens, and individual and contextual determinants or drivers. Results No clear relationship was found between visually assessed cleanliness and the presence of pathogens; findings from qualitative interviews and the facility questionnaire found inadequacies in IPC training for healthcare providers and no formal training at all for ward cleaners. Lack of written policies and protocols, and poor monitoring and supervision also contributed to suboptimal IPC standards. Conclusions Visual assessment of cleanliness and hygiene is an inadequate marker for ‘safety’ in terms of the presence of potential pathogens and associated risk of infection. Routine environmental screening of high-risk touch sites using simple microbiology could improve detection and control of pathogens. IPC training for both healthcare providers and ward cleaners represents an important opportunity for quality improvement. This should occur in conjunction with

  8. Assessment and treatment of MAM in infants aged <6 months: lessons from Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mwangome, Martha; Berkley, James

    2014-01-01

    Full text: It is estimated that worldwide, 8.5 million infants under 6 months are wasted. Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) defined as weight-for-length between -3 and -2 z score affects 4.7 million infants. In this age group there is lack of data on the outcomes of malnutrition, on the use and interpretation of anthropometry and on potential interventions. The current case definition of acute malnutrition for infants is inferred from results of studies conducted among older children aged 6 to 59 months and is therefore problematic when applied to infants under 6 months. We have been conducting experiments towards establishing appropriate anthropometric criteria for diagnosing acute malnutrition among infants aged less than 6 months. Informed by the properties outlined within the framework of requirement for selecting of an appropriate screening and diagnosis indicator, we set up experiments to assess the intra and inter-observer reliability, accuracy, validity, objectivity and predictive value of using WFLz and the mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) among infants below 6 months within community and hospital settings. Among infants aged below 6 months, the reliability and accuracy of anthropometry performed by rural community health workers (CHWs) was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient and Bland Altman plots. Absolute measures of MUAC, weight and length were more reliably and accurately assessed than calculated indices, especially length based indices. Secondly, among hospitalized dehydrated infants and children, anthropometry was assessed before and after rehydration. MUAC was less affected by hydration than WFLz and is potentially more suitable for nutritional assessment of acutely ill children. Thirdly, in a survival analysis of longitudinal demographic surveillance system (DSS) data from the Gambia, the hazards and population attributable risks for post-neonatal infant death were demonstrated. MUAC at the age of infant vaccination was highly

  9. Toward a More Complete Picture of Student Learning: Assessing Students' Motivational Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Beghetto

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the assessment of students' motivational beliefs. The..body of the article is focused on a particular type of motivational belief, namely, beliefs involving..achievement goal orientations. I explain why these beliefs are an important aspect of academic learning,..and suggest how teachers can incorporate assessments of them within existing classroom routines.

  10. Toward a More Complete Picture of Student Learning: Assessing Students' Motivational Beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald A. Beghetto

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the assessment of students' motivational beliefs. The..body of the article is focused on a particular type of motivational belief, namely, beliefs involving..achievement goal orientations. I explain why these beliefs are an important aspect of academic learning,..and suggest how teachers can incorporate assessments of them within existing classroom routines.

  11. Assessing Student Behaviors and Motivation for Actively Learning Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael Edward

    Vision and Change states that one of the major changes in the way we design biology courses should be a switch in approach from teacher-centered learning to student-centered learning and identifies active learning as a recommended methods. Studies show performance benefits for students taking courses that use active learning. What is unknown is why active learning is such an effective instructional tool and the limits of this instructional method’s ability to influence performance. This dissertation builds a case in three steps for why active learning is an effective instructional tool. In step one, I assessed the influence of different types of active learning (clickers, group activities, and whole class discussions) on student engagement behavior in one semester of two different introductory biology courses and found that active learning positively influenced student engagement behavior significantly more than lecture. For step two, I examined over four semesters whether student engagement behavior was a predictor of performance and found participation (engagement behavior) in the online (video watching) and in-class course activities (clicker participation) that I measure were significant predictors of performance. In the third, I assessed whether certain active learning satisfied the psychological needs that lead to students’ intrinsic motivation to participate in those activities when compared over two semesters and across two different institutions of higher learning. Findings from this last step show us that student’s perceptions of autonomy, competency, and relatedness in doing various types of active learning are significantly higher than lecture and consistent across two institutions of higher learning. Lastly, I tie everything together, discuss implications of the research, and address future directions for research on biology student motivation and behavior.

  12. An Entropy Approach to Disclosure Risk Assessment: Lessons from Real Applications and Simulated Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Bai, Xue; Malin, Bradley A.

    2011-01-01

    We live in an increasingly mobile world, which leads to the duplication of information across domains. Though organizations attempt to obscure the identities of their constituents when sharing information for worthwhile purposes, such as basic research, the uncoordinated nature of such environment can lead to privacy vulnerabilities. For instance, disparate healthcare providers can collect information on the same patient. Federal policy requires that such providers share “de-identified” sensitive data, such as biomedical (e.g., clinical and genomic) records. But at the same time, such providers can share identified information, devoid of sensitive biomedical data, for administrative functions. On a provider-by-provider basis, the biomedical and identified records appear unrelated, however, links can be established when multiple providers’ databases are studied jointly. The problem, known as trail disclosure, is a generalized phenomenon and occurs because an individual’s location access pattern can be matched across the shared databases. Due to technical and legal constraints, it is often difficult to coordinate between providers and thus it is critical to assess the disclosure risk in distributed environments, so that we can develop techniques to mitigate such risks. Research on privacy protection has so far focused on developing technologies to suppress or encrypt identifiers associated with sensitive information. There is growing body of work on the formal assessment of the disclosure risk of database entries in publicly shared databases, but a less attention has been paid to the distributed setting. In this research, we review the trail disclosure problem in several domains with known vulnerabilities and show that disclosure risk is influenced by the distribution of how people visit service providers. Based on empirical evidence, we propose an entropy metric for assessing such risk in shared databases prior to their release. This metric assesses risk by

  13. The molecular biology capstone assessment: a concept assessment for upper-division molecular biology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Brian A; Wood, William B; Knight, Jennifer K

    2015-03-02

    Measuring students' conceptual understandings has become increasingly important to biology faculty members involved in evaluating and improving departmental programs. We developed the Molecular Biology Capstone Assessment (MBCA) to gauge comprehension of fundamental concepts in molecular and cell biology and the ability to apply these concepts in novel scenarios. Targeted at graduating students, the MBCA consists of 18 multiple-true/false (T/F) questions. Each question consists of a narrative stem followed by four T/F statements, which allows a more detailed assessment of student understanding than the traditional multiple-choice format. Questions were iteratively developed with extensive faculty and student feedback, including validation through faculty reviews and response validation through student interviews. The final assessment was taken online by 504 students in upper-division courses at seven institutions. Data from this administration indicate that the MBCA has acceptable levels of internal reliability (α=0.80) and test-retest stability (r=0.93). Students achieved a wide range of scores with a 67% overall average. Performance results suggest that students have an incomplete understanding of many molecular biology concepts and continue to hold incorrect conceptions previously documented among introductory-level students. By pinpointing areas of conceptual difficulty, the MBCA can provide faculty members with guidance for improving undergraduate biology programs. © 2015 B. A. Couch et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Keeping Students "on Their Toes and on Their Game": Serendipitous Findings in Students' Assessments and Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Kathie L.

    2017-01-01

    This study extends the empirical findings of the use of continuous, lecture-embedded assessments to increase engagement and enhance learning. Outcome data (exam performance and attendance rates) from college students in three upper-division business course sections who took quizzes and wrote two-minute papers (test group) were compared to outcome…

  15. Model analysis: Representing and assessing the dynamics of student learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Bao

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Decades of education research have shown that students can simultaneously possess alternate knowledge frameworks and that the development and use of such knowledge are context dependent. As a result of extensive qualitative research, standardized multiple-choice tests such as Force Concept Inventory and Force-Motion Concept Evaluation tests provide instructors tools to probe their students’ conceptual knowledge of physics. However, many existing quantitative analysis methods often focus on a binary question of whether a student answers a question correctly or not. This greatly limits the capacity of using the standardized multiple-choice tests in assessing students’ alternative knowledge. In addition, the context dependence issue, which suggests that a student may apply the correct knowledge in some situations and revert to use alternative types of knowledge in others, is often treated as random noise in current analyses. In this paper, we present a model analysis, which applies qualitative research to establish a quantitative representation framework. With this method, students’ alternative knowledge and the probabilities for students to use such knowledge in a range of equivalent contexts can be quantitatively assessed. This provides a way to analyze research-based multiple choice questions, which can generate much richer information than what is available from score-based analysis.

  16. Lessons from the SPA European performance assessment exercise for spent fuel disposal in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudoin, P.; Besnus, F.; Gay, D.; Serres, C.

    2000-01-01

    The SPA project, addressing performance assessment of spent fuel disposal, is a direct continuation of the efforts made by the European Community since 1982 to build a common understanding of the methods applicable to performance assessment of a deep geological disposal. It enabled to draw preliminary conclusions on the respective importance of the radionuclides present in the different types of waste, on the influence of some of the main assumptions used in the modelling and helped to specify the expectable role of disposal system components. From 1996 to 1999, six national research institutions in six member countries of EU (Spain, Germany, France, The Netherlands, Belgium and Finland) were involved in this project devoted to the case of spent fuel. This paper only addresses the assessments made by IPSN (France) for the granite site in the case of the normal evolution scenario. According to the results obtained, the maximum effective dose is in a first time mainly caused by two fission products ( 129 I and 79 Se). Then, radionuclides from radioactive decay chains ( 226 Ra , 230 Th and 229 Th) progressively become the main contributors. (author)

  17. Performance assessment and the safety case: Lessons from recent international projects and areas for further development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galson, Daniel A.; Bailey, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The European Commission (EC) PAMINA project - Performance Assessment Methodologies in Application to Guide the Development of the Safety Case - was conducted over the period 2006-2009 and brought together 27 organisations from 10 countries. PAMINA had the aim of improving and developing a common understanding of performance assessment (PA) methodologies for disposal concepts for spent fuel and other long-lived radioactive wastes in a range of geological environments. This was followed by a Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) sponsored project on Methods for Safety Assessment of Geological Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste (MeSA), which was completed in 2012. This paper presents a selection of conclusions from these projects, in the context of general understanding developed on what would constitute an acceptable safety case for a geological disposal facility, and outlines areas for further development. The paper also introduces a new project on PA that is under consideration within the context of the EC Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP). (authors)

  18. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

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    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  19. Evaluating Eyewitness Reports [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This lesson offers students experience in making historical meaning from eyewitness accounts that present a range of different perspectives. Students begin with a case study in working with alternative reports of a single event: the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. First, they compare two newspaper reports on the fire, then two memoirs of the fire…

  20. The Great Gatsby. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelasko, Ken

    Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel "The Great Gatsby," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that adapting part of a novel into a dramatic reading makes students more intimate with the author's intentions and craft; and that a part of a novel may lend itself to various oral interpretations. The main activity…