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Sample records for lesquerella lesquerella fendleri

  1. Develop a New Lesquerella fendleri Crop for Castor Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed oil of Lesquerella fendleri contains a valuable hydroxy fatty acid (HFA), lesquerolic acid (20:1OH). The conventional source of HFA is ricinoleic acid (18:1OH) from castor seeds. Ricinoleic acid and its derivatives are used as raw materials for numerous industrial products, such as lubricants, ...

  2. Various extraction methods influence the adhesive properties of DDGS .... pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) and lesquerella (Lesquerella fendleri A. Gary (S. Watson) in the fabrication of lignocellulosic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignocellulosic composite (LC) panels were fabricated using an adhesive matrix prepared from three different agricultural by-products: dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) press cake (PPC) or lesquerella (Lesquerella fendleri A. Gary (S. Watson) press cake (L...

  3. Effective elimination of chimeric tissue in transgenics for the stable genetic transformation of lesquerella fendleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to improve the potential of Lesquerella fendleri as a valuable industrial oilseed crop, a stable genetic transformation system was developed. Genetic transformation was performed by inoculating leaf segments with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL1 carrying binary vector pCAMBIA 1301.1...

  4. Biotechnology for improving hydroxy fatty acid production in lesquerella

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Lesquerella [Physaria fendleri (A. Gray)], formerly Lesquerella fendleri, (Brassicaceae), being developed as a new industrial oilseed crop in the southwestern region of the United States, is valued for its unusual hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) in seed. The majority of HFA in lesquerella is lesquerolic...

  5. Production of intertribal somatic hybrids between Brassica napus L. and Lesquerella fendleri (Gray) Wats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarzhinskaya, M.; Landgren, M.; Glimelius, K.

    1996-01-01

    Intertribal Brassica napus (+) Lesquerella fendleri hybrids have been produced by polyethylene glycol-induced fusions of B. napus hypocotyl and L. fendleri mesophyll protoplasts. Two series of experiments were performed. In the first, symmetric fusion experiments, protoplasts from the two materials were fused without any pretreatments. In the second, asymmetric fusion experiments, X-ray irradiation at doses of 180 and 200 Gy were used to limit the transfer of the L. fendleri genome to the hybrids. X-ray irradiation of L. fendleri mesophyll protoplasts did not suppress the proliferation rate and callus formation of the fusion products but did significantly decrease growth and differentiation of non-fused L. fendleri protoplasts. In total, 128 regenerated plants were identified as intertribal somatic hybrids on the basis of morphological criteria. Nuclear DNA analysis performed on 80 plants, using species specific sequences, demonstrated that 33 plants from the symmetric fusions and 43 plants from the asymmetric fusions were hybrids. Chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed a biased segregation that favoured B. napus organelles in the hybrids from the symmetric fusion experiments. The bias was even stronger in the hybrids from the asymmetric fusion experiments where no hybrids with L. fendleri organelles were found. X-ray irradiation of L. fendleri protoplasts increased the possibility of obtaining mature somatic hybrid plants with improved fertility. Five plants from the symmetric and 24 plants from the asymmetric fusion experiments were established in the greenhouse. From the symmetric fusions 2 plants could be fertilised and set seeds after cross-pollination with B. napus. From the asymmetric fusions 9 plants could be selfed as well as fertilised when backcrossed with B. napus. Chromosome analysis was performed on all of the plants but 1 that were transferred to the greenhouse. Three plants from the symmetric fusions contained 50 chromosomes, which

  6. Various Extraction Methods Influence the Adhesive Properties of Dried Distiller’s Grains and Solubles, and Press Cakes of Pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L. and Lesquerella [Lesquerella fendleri (A. Gary S. Watson], in the Fabrication of Lignocellulosic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Tisserat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic composite (LC panels were fabricated using an adhesive matrix prepared from three different agricultural by-products: dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS, pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L. press cake (PPC, or lesquerella [Lesquerella fendleri (A. Gary S. Watson] press cake (LPC reinforced with Paulownia elongata L. wood (PW particles. The goal in this study was to assess the mechanical properties of composites utilizing these low-cost matrix materials, which were subjected to various oil extraction methods. Three types of oil extraction methods were utilized: ethanol, supercritical CO2, and hexane, in order to generate matrix materials. These matrix materials were mixed with equal proportions of PW and hot pressed to generate panels. Overall, hexane extraction was the best method to enhance the mechanical properties of the matrices used to fabricate lignocellulosic composites. LPC’s produced a matrix that gave the resulting composite superior flexural properties compared to composites generated from DDGS and PPC matrices. The mechanical properties of composites generated from soy products (soybean meal flour or soy protein isolate were similar to those derived from DDGS, PPC, or LPC. The dimensional stability properties of LCs were improved when the hexane extraction method was employed, unlike with the other extraction methods that were used to generate matrices.

  7. Impact of Lygus spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) on damage, yield and quality of lesquerella (Physaria fendleri), a potential new oil-seed crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Steven E; Ellsworth, Peter C; Dierig, David A

    2011-10-01

    Lesquerella, Physaria fendleri (A. Gray) S. Watson, is a mustard native to the western United States and is currently being developed as a commercial source of valuable hydroxy fatty acids that can be used in a number of industrial applications, including biolubricants, biofuel additives, motor oils, resins, waxes, nylons, plastics, corrosion inhibitors, cosmetics, and coatings. The plant is cultivated as a winter-spring annual and in the desert southwest it harbors large populations of arthropods, several of which could be significant pests once production expands. Lygus spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) are common in lesquerella and are known pests of a number of agronomic and horticultural crops where they feed primarily on reproductive tissues. A 4-yr replicated plot study was undertaken to evaluate the probable impact of Lygus spp. on production of this potential new crop. Plant damage and subsequent seed yield and quality were examined relative to variable and representative densities of Lygus spp. (0.3-4.9 insects per sweep net) resulting from variable frequency and timing of insecticide applications. Increasing damage to various fruiting structures (flowers [0.9-13.9%], buds [1.2-7.1%], and seed pods [19.4-42.5%]) was significantly associated with increasing pest abundance, particularly the abundance of nymphs, in all years. This damage, however, did not consistently translate into reductions in seed yield (481-1,336 kg/ha), individual seed weight (0.5-0.7 g per 1,000 seed), or seed oil content (21.8-30.4%), and pest abundance generally explained relatively little of the variation in crop yield and quality. Negative effects on yield were not sensitive to the timing of pest damage (early versus late season) but were more pronounced during years when potential yields were lower due to weed competition and other agronomic factors. Results suggest that if the crop is established and managed in a more optimal fashion, Lygus spp. may not significantly limit yield

  8. Phenylpropanoid esters of lesquerella and castor oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesquerella (LO) and castor oil (CO) were esterified at the secondary hydroxyl groups of their 14-hydroxyeicos-cis-11-enoic fatty acids and 12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic fatty acids, respectively, with 4-acetoxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (acetoxyferulic acid). The unconventional esterifications were co...

  9. Methyl esters from vegetable oils with hydroxy fatty acids: Comparison of lesquerella and castor methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The search for alternative feedstocks for biodiesel as partial replacement for petrodiesel has recently extended to castor oil. In this work, the castor oil methyl esters were prepared and their properties determined in comparison to the methyl esters of lesquerella oil, which in turn is seen as alt...

  10. Quantification of the molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids in lesquerella oils using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten molecular species of diacylglycerols (DAG), 54 of triacylglycerols (TAG) and 13 of tetraacylglycerols (tetraAG, triacylglycerol estolides) containing hydroxy fatty acids (FA) as well as 20 of TAG containing three normal FA (non-hydroxylated) in lesquerella oil were quantified by a newly improved...

  11. Transformation of Lesquerella fendleri with the new binary vector pGPro4-35S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop genetic engineering requires the use of various promoters to control the expression of introduced transgenes. Some of the binary vectors currently available for promoter characterization in dicotyledonous plants have pitfalls due to their construction, such as containing a selectable marker ca...

  12. Structural characteristics of the molecular species of tetraacylglycerols in lesquerella (Physaria fendleri) oil elucidated by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetraacylglycerols (triacylglycerol estolides) contain an acylacyl chain (one fatty acid attached to the hydroxyl group of another fatty acid attached to the glycerol backbone) and have different physical properties from those of triacylglycerols. Tetraacylglycerols can be used in industry such as t...

  13. Biotechnology for improved hHydroxy fatty acid production in oilseed lesquerella

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conventional source of hydroxy fatty acid (HFA) is from castor (Ricinus communis), 90% of castor oil is ricinoleic acid (18:1OH). Ricinoleic acid and its derivatives are used as raw materials for numerous industrial products, such as lubricants, plasticizers and surfactants. The production of ca...

  14. Nutrient solution and substrates for ‘cedro doce’ (Pochota fendleri seedling production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar J. Smiderle

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study assessed the effect of different substrates and addition of nutrient solution on the production of Pochota fendleri seedlings, leaf contents of macro and micronutrients and chlorophyll a and b. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a 3 x 2 factorial scheme, with four replicates. The factors were three substrates, with or without addition of nutrient solution, composing six treatments: (T1 = sand; (T2 = soil; (T3 = sand + soil (1:1; (T4 = sand + nutrient solution; (T5 = soil + nutrient solution; (T6 = sand + soil + nutrient solution. Growth characteristics (height, collar diameter, shoot dry matter, root dry matter, root/shoot ratio and total dry matter and contents of macro- and micronutrients and chlorophyll a and b were evaluated. The use of nutrient solution reduces the time to obtain seedlings of Pochota fendleri, and it is important for proper growth and quality of seedlings. The sequence of nutritional requirement presented by Pochota fendleri seedlings in three substrates with addition of nutrient solution follows the descending order: macronutrients (N > Ca > K > Mg > P > S and micronutrients (Fe > Mn > B > Zn > Cu.

  15. Stable plastid transformation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelivelt, Cilia L C; McCabe, Matthew S; Newell, Christine A; Desnoo, C Bastiaan; van Dun, Kees M P; Birch-Machin, Ian; Gray, John C; Mills, Kingston H G; Nugent, Jacqueline M

    2005-08-01

    Although plastid transformation in higher plants was first demonstrated in the early 1990s it is only recently that the technology is being extended to a broader range of species. To date, the production of fertile transplastomic plants has been reported for tobacco, tomato, petunia, soybean, cotton and Lesquerella fendleri (Brassicaceae). In this study we demonstrate a polyethylene glycol-mediated plastid transformation system for lettuce that generates fertile, homoplasmic, plastid-transformed lines. Transformation was achieved using a vector that targets genes to the trnA/trnI intergenic region of the lettuce plastid genome employing the aadA gene as a selectable marker against spectinomycin. Spectinomycin resistance and heterologous gene transcription were shown in T(1) plants derived from self-pollinated primary regenerants demonstrating transmission of the plastid-encoded transgene to the first seed generation. Crossing with male sterile wild-type lettuce showed that spectinomycin resistance was not transmitted via pollen. Constructs containing the gfp gene showed plastid-based expression of green fluorescent protein. The lettuce plastid could have potential both as a production and a delivery system for edible human therapeutic proteins.

  16. 40 CFR 180.582 - Pyraclostrobin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., seed 0.45 Hop, dried cones 23.0 Jojoba, seed 0.45 Lesquerella, seed 0.45 Lunaria, seed 0.45 Mango 0.6... use of the pesticide under section 18 emergency exemptions granted by EPA. The time-limited tolerance...

  17. Chemistry and physical properties of estolides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isbell, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Estolides are a developing class of natural and synthetic compounds that have been synthesized from hydroxy oils like castor and lesquerella or by the condensation of fatty acids across the olefin of a second fatty acid. Castor and lesquerella estolides are derived from either their triglycerides or their free fatty acids utilizing their hydroxyl moiety to establish the estolide bond. The triglyceride estolides have pour points of 9 to -36 degrees centigrade but suffer poor oxidative stability with RPVOT times of 29 - 52 minutes even with 1% of an anti-oxidant package incorporated into the samples. In contrast to the triglyceride estolides of castor and lesquerella, the estolides from lesquerolic and ricinoleic acids have very good pour points of -36 to - 54 degrees centigrade. Estolides derived from the acid catalyzed condensation of oleic acid with a variety of fatty acids can be made in good yield and posses a wide range of physical properties. Of particular interest are the saturated capped estolides of oleic that have both good low temperature properties (pour point -5 to -39 degrees centigrade) and good oxidative stability. Estolides from meadow foam fatty acids do not have good low temperature properties but have been extensively used in cosmetics where they provide good moisturizing properties. (Author).

  18. Chemistry and physical properties of estolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbell, Terry A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Estolides are a developing class of natural and synthetic compounds that have been synthesized from hydroxy oils like castor and lesquerella or by the condensation of fatty acids across the olefin of a second fatty acid. Castor and lesquerella estolides are derived from either their triglycerides or their free fatty acids utilizing their hydroxyl moiety to establish the estolide bond. The triglyceride estolides have pour points of 9 to –36ºC but suffer poor oxidative stability with RPVOT times of 29 – 52 minutes even with 1% of an anti-oxidant package incorporated into the samples. In contrast to the triglyceride estolides of castor and lesquerella, the estolides from lesquerolic and ricinoleic acids have very good pour points of –36 to –54ºC. Estolides derived from the acid catalyzed condensation of oleic acid with a variety of fatty acids can be made in good yield and posses a wide range of physical properties. Of particular interest are the saturated capped estolides of oleic that have both good low temperature properties (pour point –5 to – 39ºC and good oxidative stability. Estolides from meadowfoam fatty acids do not have good low temperature properties but have been extensively used in cosmetics where they provide good moisturizing properties.

    Los estólidos son una familia de compuestos sintetizados a partir de aceites hidroxilados como los de ricino o lesquerella o mediante la condensación de ácidos grasos sobre el doble enlace de un segundo ácido graso insaturado. Los estólidos de ricino y lesquerela se derivan tanto de sus triglicéridos como de sus ácidos grasos libres empleándose el residuo hidroxilo para formar los ésteres estólidos de los mismos. Los triglicéridos estólidos tienen puntos de fluidez crítica de entre 9 y -36ºC y baja estabilidad, con tiempos de oxidación en recipiente vacío a presión (RPVOT de entre 29 y 52 minutos incluso con la adición de un 1% de una mezcla antioxidante a las

  19. Root traits contributing to plant productivity under drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise eComas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Geneticists and breeders are positioned to breed plants with root traits that improve productivity under drought. However, a better understanding of root functional traits and how traits are related to whole plant strategies to increase crop productivity under different drought conditions is needed. Root traits associated with maintaining plant productivity under drought include small fine root diameters, long specific root length (SRL, and considerable root length density, especially at depths in soil with available water. In environments with late season water deficits, small xylem diameters in targeted seminal roots save soil water deep in the soil profile for use during crop maturation and result in improved yields. Capacity for deep root growth and large xylem diameters in deep roots may also improve root acquisition of water when ample water at depth is available. Xylem pit anatomy that makes xylem less ‘leaky’ and prone to cavitation warrants further exploration holding promise that such traits may improve plant productivity in water-limited environments without negatively impacting yield under adequate water conditions. Rapid resumption of root growth following soil rewetting may improve plant productivity under episodic drought. Genetic control of many of these traits through breeding appears feasible. Several recent reviews have covered methods for screening root traits but an appreciation for the complexity of root systems (e.g. functional differences between fine and coarse roots needs to be paired with these methods to successfully identify relevant traits for crop improvement. Screening of root traits at early stages in plant development can proxy traits at mature stages but verification is needed on a case by case basis that traits are linked to increased crop productivity under drought. Examples in lesquerella (Physaria and rice (Oryza show approaches to phenotyping of root traits and current understanding of root trait

  20. Effects of a natural fire on a Kuenzler's hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus fendleri var. kuenzleri) and nylon hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus viridiflorus) population in Southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Sivinski

    2007-01-01

    During the summer of 1992, a natural wildfire burned 250 acres of juniper savanna on Rawhide Ridge in the Guadalupe Mountains of southeastern New Mexico. This fire burned through the center of a Kuenzler's hedgehog cactus population. This threatened cactus is locally sympatric with the more abundant nylon hedgehog cactus, which has similar growth form and stature...

  1. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Airborne Laser Program at Kirtland AFB, White Sands Missile Range/ Holloman AFB, New Mexico; Edwards AFB, Vandenberg AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Sneed pincushion cactus T Kuen_zler hedgehog cactus - Sacramento oricklv ooppy - I Sacramento Mountains checkerspot - ! butterfly . . Federal Status E...caiifomicus Coho salmon ~_j_Pncorhynchus kisutch , Unarmoured three- spined 1 C~asterosleus aculeatus- ----: stickleback , wi/liamsoni 1 E T E...septentrionalis) Kuenzler hedgehog cachts (Echinocereus fendleri var. kuenzleri) THREATENED Bald eagle (Haliaeetus /.:ucocephalus) Mexican spotted owl (Strix

  2. Archaeological Investigations of Three Sites within the Wipp Core Area, Eddy County, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    leaves are eaten as food (Castetter 1935:33). Cactaceae c macroMeris Texas devilshead Echinocereaus pi s Caespitose hedgehog E. fendleri Fendler hedgehog...Ountia ad.isii Davis cholla . kleiniae Klein cholla 0. ept is Christmas cactus 0. phaeacantha Prickly pear Fruits of most cactaceae are edible. The

  3. RELACIÓN ENTRE LA BIOMASA Y ALGUNAS CARACTERÍSTICAS MORFOLÓGICAS DE LAS BROMELIAS FITOTELMATAS DE UN BOSQUE ALTO ANDINO COLOMBIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaza Carolina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron algunas características morfológicas para seis especies de bromelias fitotelmata (Guzmania gloriosa, Racinaea tetrantha, Tillandsia biflora, T. complanata, T. fendleri y T. turneri con el fin de establecer cuales características podrían utilizarse como estimadores indirectos de la biomasa total de la planta. El estudio se realizó en un bosque alto andino de la Sabana de Bogotá, Colombia, ubicado a 2900 m de altitud. Para cada especie se recolectaron entre 32 y 64 individuos en diferentes estadios de crecimiento, a cada uno de los cuales se le registró: 1 el número de hojas por roseta; 2 el perímetro de la base de la roseta; 3 la cobertura de la planta; 4 el largo de la lámina foliar; 5 la altura de la roseta; y 6 la biomasa total. Los resultados de la prueba Wilcoxon muestran que la cobertura fue la variable que más se relacionó con la biomasa. Una prueba de ajuste de curva mostró que la línea recta es la que más explica la relación entre la cobertura y la biomasa, permitiendo hacer estimaciones a partir de la ecuación sin ser necesario un muestreo destructivo.

  4. Taxonomic and phytogeographic implications from ITS phylogeny in Berberis (Berberidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hee; Landrum, Leslie R

    2004-06-01

    A phylogeny based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences from 79 taxa representing much of the diversity of Berberis L. (four major groups and 22 sections) was constructed for the first time. The phylogeny was basically congruent with the previous classification schemes at higher taxonomic levels, such as groups and subgroups. A notable exception is the non-monophyly of the group Occidentales of compound-leaved Berberis (previously separated as Mahonia). At lower levels, however, most of previous sections and subsections were not evident especially in simple-leaved Berberis. Possible relationship between section Horridae (group Occidentales) and the simple-leaved Berberis clade implies paraphyly of the compound-leaved Berberis. A well-known South America-Old World (mainly Asia) disjunctive distribution pattern of the simple-leaved Berberis is explained by a vicariance event occurring in the Cretaceous period. The ITS phylogeny also suggests that a possible connection between the Asian and South American groups through the North American species ( Berberis canadensis or B. fendleri) is highly unlikely.

  5. Análisis del sitio de un bosque altoandino con énfasis en el mantillo. Microcuenca de la quebrada "La Vieja", Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Paola Vargas Núñez

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENLa materia orgánica es un compartimento importante dentro de los ecosistemas y su estudiopuede proporcionar criterios de manejo para ecosistemas con conflicto de uso, como son los Bos-ques Altoandinos en Colombia. Para realizar este estudio, se escogió un bosque altoandino en loscerros orientales de la ciudad de Bogotá. Para el sitio de estudio se caracterizaron las reservasorgánicas y minerales de los compartimentos foliar, mantillo y suelo; adicionalmente se establecióla descomposición mediante el método de canastas de descomposición de tres mantillos de dis-tintas procedencias (bosque altoandino de Bojacá, bosque de robles de Pacho y páramo de CruzVerde, además del mantillo del sitio, y de cuatro especies seleccionadas (Clusia multiflora, Piperbogotense, Juglans neotropicay Tillandsia fendleri. Las especies con mayor descomposición fueronJuglans neotropicay Piper bogotense, las cuales presentaron también los mayores contenidos denutrientes y la mayor liberación de nutrientes en la descomposición; Clusia multifloray Tillandsiafendleripresentaron menor descomposición y menores contenidos de nutrientes. C. multiflorapre-sentó una liberación media de nutrientes y T. fendleriuna liberación baja. Basándose en estascaracterísticas, se sugiere utilizar a J. neotropicay P. bogotense para la movilización de nutrientesdentro del sitio y a C. multiflorapara promover la reserva de nutrientes dentro del mantillo delbosque. El aporte desde el compartimento foliar al compartimento mantillo representado en lacaída de hojarasca fue de 13.4 Ton · Ha-1 · Año-1, siendo las especies que más aportan Clusiamultiflora, Vaccinumsp. y Weinmannia tomentosa. La profundidad promedio del mantillo fue de 16cm, con una densidad promedio de 14.32 Kg · m-3y un peso promedio de 23.49 Ton por hectárea.El mantillo proveniente de Bojacá y el mantillo nativo del sitio presentaron la mayor descom-posición, los mayores contenidos de nutrientes y