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Sample records for leptin receptor binding

  1. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

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    John A Hammond

    Full Text Available The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional

  2. Kinetics of leptin binding to the Q223R leptin receptor.

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    Hans Verkerke

    Full Text Available Studies in human populations and mouse models of disease have linked the common leptin receptor Q223R mutation to obesity, multiple forms of cancer, adverse drug reactions, and susceptibility to enteric and respiratory infections. Contradictory results cast doubt on the phenotypic consequences of this variant. We set out to determine whether the Q223R substitution affects leptin binding kinetics using surface plasmon resonance (SPR, a technique that allows sensitive real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. We measured the binding and dissociation rate constants for leptin to the extracellular domain of WT and Q223R murine leptin receptors expressed as Fc-fusion proteins and found that the mutant receptor does not significantly differ in kinetics of leptin binding from the WT leptin receptor. (WT: ka 1.76×106±0.193×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.21×10-4±0.707×10-4 s-1, KD 6.47×10-11±3.30×10-11 M; Q223R: ka 1.75×106±0.0245×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.47×10-4±0.0505×10-4 s-1, KD 8.43×10-11±0.407×10-11 M. Our results support earlier findings that differences in affinity and kinetics of leptin binding are unlikely to explain mechanistically the phenotypes that have been linked to this common genetic variant. Future studies will seek to elucidate the mechanism by which this mutation influences susceptibility to metabolic, infectious, and malignant pathologies.

  3. Leptin Increases Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in Leptin-Deficient Obese (ob/ob) Mice

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    Pfaffly, J.; Michaelides, M.; Wang, G-J.; Pessin, J.E.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral and central leptin administration have been shown to mediate central dopamine (DA) signaling. Leptin-receptor deficient rodents show decreased DA D2 receptor (D2R) binding in striatum and unique DA profiles compared to controls. Leptin-deficient mice show increased DA activity in reward-related brain regions. The objective of this study was to examine whether basal D2R-binding differences contribute to the phenotypic behaviors of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and whether D2R binding is altered in response to peripheral leptin treatment in these mice. Leptin decreased body weight, food intake, and plasma insulin concentration in ob/ob mice but not in wild-type mice. Basal striatal D2R binding (measured with autoradiography [{sup 3}H] spiperone) did not differ between ob/ob and wild-type mice but the response to leptin did. In wild-type mice, leptin decreased striatal D2R binding, whereas, in ob/ob mice, leptin increased D2R binding. Our findings provide further evidence that leptin modulates D2R expression in striatum and that these effects are genotype/phenotype dependent.

  4. Variability in the leptin, leptin receptor and heart fatty acid binding protein genes in relationship with meat quality traits in pigs

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    Renata Mikolášová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The leptin (LEP-HinfI, leptin receptor (LEPR-HpaII and heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP-HinfI genes and their genotypes combination (LEP-HinfI *LEPR-HpaII were tested for associations with the pH1, pH24, myoglobin content (mg/100 g, intramuscular fat content (% and remission (%. The genotypes were determined in Large White, Landrace and Duroc breeds (n = 106, 56 and 4, respectively. The allele frequencies were: LEP-HinfI: C = 0.133 T = 0.867; LEPR-HpaII: A = 0.331 B = 0.669; H-FABP-HinfI: H = 0.745 h = 0.255. The populations of breeds were in the genetic equilibrium according to the χ2 test in the tested loci. The combinations of LEP-HinfI and LEPR-HpaII were significantly associated with the pH24 and remission. The H-FABP-HinfI locus was significantly associated with intramuscular fat content.

  5. [Leptin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedvídková, J

    1997-12-01

    Leptin (ob-protein), a previously unknown protein signal, is secreted from adipose tissue, circulates in the blood, probably bound to a family of binding proteins, and acts on central neural networks, that regulate weight and energy homeostasis. Leptin provides a communication link between fat tissue and the brain. Ob protein appears to play a major role in the control of body fat stores through coordinated regulation of feeding behavior, metabolism, autonomic nervous system and body energy balance in rodents, primates and humans. Leptin levels have pulsative and diurnal character. In lean subjects with relatively low adipose tissue, the majority of circulating leptin is in the bound form. On other hand, in obese individuals the majority of leptin circulates in free form presumably bioactive protein, and thus obese subjects are resistant to free leptin. Leptin's resistance is often coupled with insuline resistance postreceptor type. Leptin receptor is product of db genes. Ob-protein receptor belongs to the cytokine superfamily of receptors and has several variants. Leptin-receptor gene is expressed in abundant degree in ovary, uterus, testes, less in hypothalamus, hypophysis, and little in kidney. Leptin stimulates the reproductive endocrine system and may serve as a permissive signal to the reproductive system of normal animals. Ob-gene product, leptin is regulated by feedings patterns and hormones, such as insulin and glucocorticoids. There is assumed that neuropeptide Y (NPY) and melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and its receptor (MCR) are a critical components of the biological response to leptin levels. MCR in contrast to leptin receptors are coupled with G-transduction system.

  6. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

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    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with leptin receptor deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production ... weight gain associated with this disorder. Because hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs in leptin receptor deficiency , researchers suggest that ...

  8. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    of the receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...... interactions between the aromatic residues of the peptide. It may be speculated that these differences affect the ability of the full domains to form alternative structures around the WSXWS motif....

  9. Leptin receptor in peripheral adipose tissues of obese subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Zizheng; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei; Han Liu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between leptin receptor and obesity by studying the leptin receptor density B max and dissociation constant K d in peripheral adipose tissue in subjects with different body weight mass (BMI). Methods: Leptin receptor density B max and K d were assayed via radioligand method in 71 cases, including 32 classified as obese, 19 over-weight and 20 normal control. Results: With the escalating of BMI, the leptin receptor density significantly decreased in obese and over-weight group compared with that in normal control (both P d values were of no differences among all three groups suggesting no correlation between the binding ability of leptin to its receptor and BMI. A negative correlation between BMI and B max (r=-0.76, P<0.01) displayed after all. Conclusion: Leptin receptor density correlates with the BMI in obese cases and it suggests that the down-regulation of leptin receptor may contribute to the occurrence of leptin resistance and obesity after-wards

  10. The designer leptin antagonist peptide Allo-aca compensates for short serum half-life with very tight binding to the receptor.

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    Otvos, Laszlo; Vetter, Stefan W; Koladia, Mohit; Knappe, Daniel; Schmidt, Rico; Ostorhazi, Eszter; Kovalszky, Ilona; Bionda, Nina; Cudic, Predrag; Surmacz, Eva; Wade, John D; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The leptin receptor antagonist peptide Allo-aca exhibits picomolar activities in various cellular systems and sub-mg/kg subcutaneous efficacies in animal models making it a prime drug candidate and target validation tool. Here we identified the biochemical basis for its remarkable in vivo activity. Allo-aca decomposed within 30 min in pooled human serum and was undetectable beyond the same time period from mouse plasma during pharmacokinetic measurements. The C max of 8.9 μg/mL at 5 min corresponds to approximately 22% injected peptide present in the circulation. The half-life was extended to over 2 h in bovine vitreous fluid and 10 h in human tears suggesting potential efficacy in ophthalmic diseases. The peptide retained picomolar anti-proliferation activity against a chronic myeloid leukemia cell line; addition of a C-terminal biotin label increased the IC50 value by approximately 200-fold. In surface plasmon resonance assays with the biotin-labeled peptide immobilized to a NeutrAvidin-coated chip, Allo-aca exhibited exceptionally tight binding to the binding domain of the human leptin receptor with ka = 5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and kdiss = 1.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) values. Peptides excel in terms of high activity and selectivity to their targets, and may activate or inactivate receptor functions considerably longer than molecular turnovers that take place in experimental animals.

  11. The effect of four weeks restricted diet on serum soluble leptin receptor levels and adipocyte leptin receptor density in normoweight rattus norvegicus strain Wistar

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    M. R. Indra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the five possible mechanisms of leptin resistance in human obesity is the defect in the leptin receptor (Ob-R. Evidence has accumulated that leptin-binding activity in human serum is related to a soluble form of the leptin receptor, and restriction of energy intake resulted a decrease in circulating leptin levels. Aim of this study is to examine the difference of serum soluble leptin receptor level and leptin receptor density in rat adipose tissue of adventitial aorta after four weeks treated with different restricted diets. Soluble leptin receptor level was measured by ELISA and leptin receptor density by using immuno-histochemistry. The soluble leptin receptor in group treated with 40% of normal daily calori diet was found significantly lower than control (p = 0.02. There were no any significant differences among group treated with 40 % of normal daily calori diet, “1 day fast-1day eat”, and ”1day fast-2 days eat” groups, and among 1 day fast-1 day eat”, ”day fast - 2 days eat” and control groups as well. On the other hand, leptin receptor density in adipose tissues was higher in restricted diet group than control. Diet of 40 % normal daily calorie for 4 weeks decreased soluble leptin receptor level, but increased adipocyte leptin receptor density of the adipose tissue of rat adventitial aorta. These changes may be resulted from an up regulation mechanism in relation with homeostatic maintenance. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:145-50 Keywords: restricted diet, leptin receptor, soluble leptin receptor, adipocyte, obesity

  12. Leptin as well as Free Leptin Receptor Is Associated with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Young Women

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    Nasser M. Rizk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Leptin has two forms in the circulation: free and bound forms. The soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R circulates in the blood and can bind to leptin. The aim of this study is to assess the concentrations of the leptin and the sOB-R in PCOS and its relation to adiposity, insulin resistance, and androgens. Methods. A cross-sectional study included 78 female students aged 17–25 years. Fasting serum leptin and sOB-R concentrations were measured. The anthropometric variables and the hormonal profile such as insulin, female and male sex hormones, and prolactin were assessed. Results. In PCOS, leptin level (ng/ml and free leptin index (FLI increased significantly while sOB-R (ng/ml significantly decreased compared to control subjects. In age-matched subjects, obese PCOS had increased leptin level in ng/ml (median level with interquartile levels of 45.67 (41.98–48.04 and decreased sOB-R in ng/ml 11.47 (7.59–16.44 compared to lean PCOS 16.97 (10.60–45.55 for leptin and 16.62 (11.61–17.96 for sOB-R with p values 0.013 and 0.042, respectively. However, body mass index (BMI is significantly correlated with leptin and s-OBR, while no significant correlations with parameters of insulin resistance were detected. Conclusion. PCOS is associated with hyperleptinemia and increased free leptin index. Decreased sOB-R could be a compensatory mechanism for the defective action of leptin.

  13. Analysis of changes of serum leptin, C-peptide levels and peripheral fat tissue leptin receptor expression in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of obesity and obesity accompanied type two diabetes mellitus by investigating changes of serum leptin, C-peptide (C-P) levels and leptin receptor expression in peripheral adipose tissues. Methods: Peripheral leptin receptor density was measured via radio-ligand binding method, serum leptin and C - P levels were measured via radioimmunoassay in 91 cases (38 in obesity group, 23 in over weight, and 30 in normal controls). Results: With the increase of body mass index (BMI), the peripheral leptin receptor density of the over weight and obese cases decreased and was mash less than that of normal cases (both p<0.01, respectively). There was no statistical differences for Kd value among the three groups, suggesting no associated change between the binding ability of leptin receptor to its ligand. There was a negative correlation between BMI and leptin receptor density (r = -0.70, p < 0.01). The serum leptin and C-P levels in weight excess and obese subjects with type two DM were both increased, but significantly higher in obese group than those in weight excess group (p < 0.01). The increase of C-P was much marked than that of leptin. Serum C-P level was positively correlated with BMI. Conclusion: Changes of serum leptin, C-P levels and peripheral leptin receptor expression in cases with simple obesity and obesity accompanied with type two DM were related closely with BMI. Type 2 DM in obese subjects was related with leptin resistance and insulin resistance

  14. Subcloning, expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human leptin-binding domain.

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    Sandowski, Yael; Raver, Nina; Gussakovsky, Eugene E; Shochat, Suzan; Dym, Orly; Livnah, Oded; Rubinstein, Menachem; Krishna, Radha; Gertler, Arieh

    2002-11-29

    A subdomain of the human leptin receptor encoding part of the extracellular domain (amino acids 428 to 635) was subcloned, expressed in a prokaryotic host, and purified to homogeneity, as evidenced by SDS-PAGE, with over 95% monomeric protein. The purified leptin-binding domain (LBD) exhibited the predicted beta structure, was capable of binding human, ovine, and chicken leptins, and formed a stable 1:1 complex with all mammalian leptins. The binding kinetics, assayed by surface plasmon resonance methodology, showed respective k(on) and k(off) values (mean +/- S.E.) of 1.20 +/- 0.23 x 10(-5) mol(-1) s(-1) and 1.85 +/- 0.30 x 10(-3) s(-1) and a K(d) value of 1.54 x 10(-8) m. Similar results were achieved with conventional binding experiments. LBD blocked leptin-induced, but not interleukin-3-induced, proliferation of BAF/3 cells stably transfected with the long form of human leptin receptor. The modeled LBD structure and the known three-dimensional structure of human leptin were used to construct a model of 1:1 LBD.human leptin complex. Two main residues, Phe-500, located in loop L3, and Tyr-441, located in L1, are suggested to contribute to leptin binding.

  15. Polymorphism in leptin receptor gene was associated with obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pramudji Hastuti

    2016-01-11

    Jan 11, 2016 ... Abstract Background: Leptin is a hormone that regulates homeostasis energy through the cen- tral–peripheral mechanism as well as regulates hunger and satiety. Leptin receptor is important in leptin signal transduction that is located mainly in the hypothalamus. The mutation in leptin receptor (LEPR) gene ...

  16. Polymorphism in leptin receptor gene was associated with obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Leptin is a hormone that regulates homeostasis energy through the central– peripheral mechanism as well as regulates hunger and satiety. Leptin receptor is important in leptin signal transduction that is located mainly in the hypothalamus. The mutation in leptin receptor (LEPR) gene causes splicing ...

  17. Relevance of Serum Leptin and Leptin-Receptor Concentrations in Critically Ill Patients

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    Alexander Koch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin was implicated to link inflammation and metabolic alterations. We investigated the potential role of leptin components in critically ill patients, because systemic inflammation, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia are common features of critical illness. Upon admission to Medical Intensive Care Unit (ICU, free leptin and soluble leptin-receptor serum concentrations were determined in 137 critically ill patients (95 with sepsis, 42 without sepsis and 26 healthy controls. Serum leptin or leptin-receptor did not differ between patients or controls and were independent of sepsis. However, serum leptin was closely associated with obesity and diabetes and clearly correlated with markers of metabolism and liver function. Leptin-receptor was an unfavourable prognostic indicator, associated with mortality during three years follow-up. Our study indicates a functional role of leptin in the pathogenesis of severe illness and emphasizes the impact of complex metabolic alterations on the clinical outcome of critically ill patients.

  18. Gene Expression of Leptin and Long Leptin Receptor Isoform in Endometriosis: A Case-Control Study

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    Andrea Prestes Nácul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, leptin/BMI ratio in serum and peritoneal fluid and gene expression of leptin and long form leptin receptor (OB-RL were assessed in eutopic and ectopic endometria of women with endometriosis and controls. Increased serum leptin/BMI ratio was found in endometriosis patients. Leptin and OB-RL gene expression was significantly higher in ectopic versus eutopic endometrium of patients and controls. A positive, significant correlation was observed between leptin and OB-RL transcripts in ectopic endometria and also in eutopic endometria in endometriosis and control groups. A negative and significant correlation was found between OB-RL mRNA expression and peritoneal fluid leptin/BMI ratio only in endometriosis. These data suggest that, through a modulatory interaction with its active receptor, leptin might play a role in the development of endometrial implants.

  19. Leptin Receptor Deficiency is Associated With Upregulation of Cannabinoid 1 Receptors in Limbic Brain Regions

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    THANOS, PANAYOTIS K.; RAMALHETE, ROBERTO C.; MICHAELIDES, MICHAEL; PIYIS, YIANNI K.; WANG, GENE-JACK; VOLKOW, NORA D.

    2009-01-01

    Leptin receptor dysfunction results in overeating and obesity. Leptin regulates hypothalamic signaling that underlies the motivation to hyperphagia, but the interaction between leptin and cannabinoid signaling is poorly understood. We evaluated the role of cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1R) in overeating and the effects of food deprivation on CB1R in the brain. One-month-old Zucker rats were divided into unrestricted and restricted (fed 70% of unrestricted rats) diet groups and maintained until adulthood (4 months). Levels of relative binding sites of CB1R (CB1R binding levels) were assessed using [3H] SR141716A in vitro autoradiography. These levels were higher (except cerebellum and hypothalamus) at 4 months than at 1 month of age. One month CB1R binding levels for most brain regions did not differ between Ob and Lean (Le) rats (except in frontal and cingulate cortices in Le and in the hypothalamus in Ob). Four month Ob rats had higher CB1R binding levels than Le in most brain regions and food restriction was associated with higher CB1R levels in all brain regions in Ob, but not in Le rats. CB1R binding levels increased between adolescence and young adulthood which we believe was influenced by leptin and food availability. The high levels of CB1R in Ob rats suggest that leptin's inhibition of food-intake is in part mediated by downregulation of CB1R and that leptin interferes with CB1R upregulation under food-deprivation conditions. These results are consistent with prior findings showing increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids in the Ob rats corroborating the regulation of cannabinoid signaling by leptin. PMID:18563836

  20. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers.

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    Bruno, Andreina; Alessi, Marinella; Soresi, Simona; Bonanno, Anna; Riccobono, Loredana; Montalbano, Angela Marina; Albano, Giusy Daniela; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Profita, Mirella

    2011-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to the infection. The leptin receptor is expressed in the lung and in the neutrophils. We measured the levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in sputum and plasma from 27 smoker and former smoker patients with stable COPD using ELISA methods. Further we analyzed leptin and its receptor expression in sputum cells from 16 COPD patients using immunocytochemistry. In plasma of COPD patients, leptin was inversely correlated with TNF-α and positively correlated with the patient weight, whereas the levels of sICAM-1 were positively correlated with TNF-α. In sputum of COPD patients leptin levels were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vitality capacity. Additionally, increased levels of sputum leptin and TNF-α were observed in COPD former smokers rather than smokers. Further the expression of leptin receptor in sputum neutrophils was significantly higher in COPD former smokers than in smokers, and the expression of leptin and its receptor was positively correlated in neutrophils of COPD former smokers. Our findings suggest a role of leptin in the local and systemic inflammation of COPD and, taking into account the involvement of neutrophils in this inflammatory disease, describe a novel aspect of the leptin/leptin receptor pathway in the regulation of host defense after smoking cessation.

  1. Sheep oocyte expresses leptin and functional leptin receptor mRNA

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    Seyyed Jalil Taheri

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The result of present study reveals that leptin and its functional receptor (Ob-Rb mRNA are expressed in sheep oocyte and further studies should investigate the role(s of leptin on sheep oocyte physiology and embryo development.

  2. Hypoxic Living and Exercise Training Alter Adipose Tissue Leptin/Leptin Receptor in Rats

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    Yingli Lu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypobaric hypoxia results in weight loss in obese individuals, and exercise training is advocated for the treatment of obesity and its related metabolic dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hypoxic living and exercise training on obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor in dietary-induced obese rats. Methods: One hundred and thirty high-fat diet fed Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned into one of the following groups (n=10 each: control, sedentary hypoxic living for 1 to 4 weeks (SH1, SH2, SH3, and SH4, living and exercise training in normoxic conditions for 1 to 4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4, and living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 1 to 4 weeks (TN1, TN2, TN3, and TN4. Epididymal adipose tissue expression levels of leptin and leptin receptor were determined. Results: Compared to hypoxic living and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions for 3-4 weeks resulted in lower Lee index (P<0.05 to P<0.01, and higher expression of leptin and leptin receptor (P<0.05 to P<0.01 in adipose tissue. Conclusion: In a rodent model of altitude training, living and exercise training in hypoxic conditions resulted in greater alterations in obesity and adipose tissue leptin/leptin receptor than hypoxic living alone and living and exercise training in normoxic conditions.

  3. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers

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    Bruno A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreina Bruno1, Marinella Alessi2, Simona Soresi2, Anna Bonanno1, Loredana Riccobono1, Angela Marina Montalbano1, Giusy Daniela Albano1, Mark Gjomarkaj1, Mirella Profita11Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Italian National Research Council, Palermo, Italy; 2Dipartimento Biomedico di Biomedicina Interna e Specialistica, University Palermo, ItalyBackground: Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and its deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to the infection. The leptin receptor is expressed in the lung and in the neutrophils.Methods: We measured the levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a and soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 in sputum and plasma from 27 smoker and former smoker patients with stable COPD using ELISA methods. Further we analyzed leptin and its receptor expression in sputum cells from 16 COPD patients using immunocytochemistry.Results: In plasma of COPD patients, leptin was inversely correlated with TNF-a and positively correlated with the patient weight, whereas the levels of sICAM-1 were positively correlated with TNF-a. In sputum of COPD patients leptin levels were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vitality capacity. Additionally, increased levels of sputum leptin and TNF-a were observed in COPD former smokers rather than smokers. Further the expression of leptin receptor in sputum neutrophils was significantly higher in COPD former smokers than in smokers, and the expression of leptin and its receptor was positively correlated in neutrophils of COPD former smokers.Conclusion: Our findings suggest a role of leptin in the local and systemic inflammation of COPD and, taking into account the involvement of neutrophils in this inflammatory disease, describe a novel aspect of the leptin/leptin

  4. Hindbrain leptin receptor stimulation enhances the anorexic response to cholecystokinin.

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    Williams, Diana L; Baskin, Denis G; Schwartz, Michael W

    2009-11-01

    Leptin is thought to reduce food intake, in part, by increasing sensitivity to satiation signals, including CCK. Leptin action in both forebrain and hindbrain reduces food intake, and forebrain leptin action augments both the anorexic and neuronal activation responses to CCK. Here, we asked whether leptin signaling in hindbrain also enhances these responses to CCK. We found that food intake was strongly inhibited at 30 min after a combination of 4th-intracerebroventricular (4th-icv) leptin injection and intraperitoneal CCK administration, whereas neither hormone affected intake during this period when given alone. Leptin injections targeted directly at the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) similarly enhanced the anorexic response to intraperitoneal CCK. Intra-DVC leptin injection also robustly increased the number of neurons positive for phospho-STAT3 staining in the area surrounding the site of injection, confirming local leptin receptor activation. Conversely, the anorexic response to 4th-icv leptin was completely blocked by IP devazepide, a CCKA-R antagonist, suggesting that hindbrain leptin reduces intake via a mechanism requiring endogenous CCK signaling. We then asked whether hindbrain leptin treatment enhances the dorsomedial hindbrain, hypothalamus, or amygdala c-Fos responses to IP CCK. We found that, in contrast to the effects of forebrain leptin administration, 4th-icv leptin injection had no effect on CCK-induced c-Fos in any structures examined. We conclude that leptin signaling in either forebrain or hindbrain areas can enhance the response to satiation signals and that multiple distinct neural circuits likely contribute to this interaction.

  5. Study of polymorphism of leptin gene receptor in Mazandaran fowls ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In chickens, leptin is expressed mainly in the liver and adipose tissue. In Iran, Mazandaran native fowls are under recording and breeding programs, but according to the action modes and importance of the leptin receptor, its polymorphisms can be related to economical traits such as body weight. In this study, in order to ...

  6. Discovery of the elusive leptin in birds: identification of several 'missing links' in the evolution of leptin and its receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Prokop

    Full Text Available Leptin is a pleiotropic protein best known for regulation of appetite and fat storage in mammals. While many leptin orthologs have been identified among vertebrates, an authentic leptin in birds has remained elusive and controversial. Here we identify leptin sequence from the Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus (pfleptin, and identify sequences from two other birds (mallard and zebra finch, and 'missing' vertebrates (elephant shark, alligator, Indian python, Chinese soft-shelled turtle, and coelacanth. The pattern of genes surrounding leptin (snd1, rbm28 is syntenic between the falcon and mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all known leptin protein sequences improves our understanding of leptin's evolution. Structural modeling of leptin orthologs highlights a highly conserved hydrophobic core in the four-helix cytokine packing domain. A docked model of leptin with the leptin receptor for Peregrine falcon reveals several conserved amino acids important for the interaction and possible coevolution of leptin with its receptor. We also show for the first time, an authentic avian leptin sequence that activates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These newly identified sequences, structures, and tools for avian leptin and its receptor will allow elucidation of the function of these proteins in feral and domestic birds.

  7. Human breast milk and adipokines--A potential role for the soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R) in the regulation of infant energy intake and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepf, F D; Rao, P; Moore, J; Stewart, R; Ladino, Yuli Martinez; Hartmann, B T

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of different adipokines in human breast milk are thought to be able to affect energy intake of the infant. Leptin is a hormone synthesized by adipose tissue and the human placenta and favors satiety. The availability of leptin in breast milk is influenced by epithelial cells of the mammary gland that are known to be able to produce leptin, as well as leptin from maternal circulation that is transported to the breast milk, and which can thus in turn reach neonatal blood after absorption. Research so far as mainly focused on leptin concentrations in breast milk. However, evidence suggests that in addition to leptin concentrations levels of the so-called soluble leptin receptor (sOb-R), the main high-affinity binding protein for leptin in humans, are necessary in order to calculate the free leptin index (FLI) and to assess function of the leptin axis. FLI is calculated from the ratio of leptin to the sOb-R, and serves as the main parameter for assessing function of the leptin axis throughout maturation and development. Here we propose that assessing sOb-R levels in addition to leptin concentrations in breast milk could serve as a valuable tool to investigate effects of the leptin axis in breast milk because sOb-R concentrations can impact available leptin levels, and which in turn can have significant implications for infant energy intake and related development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute up-regulation of the rat brain somatostatin receptor-effector system by leptin is related to activation of insulin signaling and may counteract central leptin actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perianes-Cachero, A; Burgos-Ramos, E; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Canelles, S; Frago, L M; Hervás-Aguilar, A; de Frutos, S; Toledo-Lobo, M V; Mela, V; Viveros, M P; Argente, J; Chowen, J A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E; Barrios, V

    2013-11-12

    Leptin and somatostatin (SRIF) have opposite effects on food seeking and ingestive behaviors, functions partially regulated by the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that the acute suppression of food intake mediated by leptin decreases with time, the counter-regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Our aims were to analyze the effect of acute central leptin infusion on the SRIF receptor-effector system in these areas and the implication of related intracellular signaling mechanisms in this response. We studied 20 adult male Wister rats including controls and those treated intracerebroventricularly with a single dose of 5 μg of leptin and sacrificed 1 or 6h later. Density of SRIF receptors was unchanged at 1h, whereas leptin increased the density of SRIF receptors at 6h, which was correlated with an elevated capacity of SRIF to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in both areas. The functional capacity of SRIF receptors was unaltered as cell membrane levels of αi1 and αi2 subunits of G inhibitory proteins were unaffected in both brain areas. The increased density of SRIF receptors was due to enhanced SRIF receptor subtype 2 (sst2) protein levels that correlated with higher mRNA levels for this receptor. These changes in sst2 mRNA levels were concomitant with increased activation of the insulin signaling, c-Jun and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB); however, activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was reduced in the cortex and unchanged in the hippocampus and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 remained unchanged in these areas. In addition, the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A blocked the leptin-induced changes in SRIF receptors, leptin signaling and CREB activation. In conclusion, increased activation of insulin signaling after leptin infusion is related to acute up-regulation of the SRIF receptor-effector system that may antagonize short-term leptin actions in the rat brain

  9. Influence of the metabolic syndrome on leptin and leptin receptor in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Paul A; Healy, Laura; Lysaght, Joanne; Boyle, Terry; Reynolds, John V; Kennedy, M John; Pidgeon, Graham; Connolly, Elizabeth M

    2011-08-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome (MetS) are recognized risk factors for breast cancer. The molecular basis for this association remains largely unknown. Adipokines, in particular leptin and adiponectin, are thought to form part of the mechanism linking obesity with cancer through their altered expression/production either systemically (endocrine pathway) or locally (paracrine/autocrine pathway). Using quantitative PCR, mRNA expression of adiponectin (AdipoQ) and leptin (Ob) in mammary adipose tissue (MAT), intratumoral leptin and associated ligand receptors (ObR, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2) was examined in 77 patients with complete anthropomorphic and serological data. Expression of Ob in MAT, and ObR in matched tumor tissue was significantly higher in patients with MetS compared to obese only or normal weight cancer patients (P < 0.005). There was no difference in intratumoral leptin adiponectin or its ligand receptors in the same groups. Individual features of MetS correlated with Ob and ObR expression, but not obesity markers (BMI, waist circumference). mRNA expression of leptin (Ob) and ObR, in adipose tissue and matched tumor samples, respectively, appear to be associated with obesity status in breast cancer. Increasing insulin resistance is a predominant feature of this higher Ob/ObR expression observed. These novel data indicate that the MetS may be an amenable risk factor for breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Role of leptin on the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naval Kishor Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Leptin resistance oriented hyperleptinaemia is a common problem in obese subjects in association with hypercholesterolaemia. The most common target for hypercholesterolaemia is impaired low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR. This study was carried out to investigate whether any alteration in LDLR expression could explain the occurrence of hypercholesterolaemia in the event of hyperleptinaemia. Methods: Expression of LDLR and SREBP2 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 were examined in HepG2 cells by RT-PCR and Western blotting. JAK2 inhibitor II was used to verify the effect of JAK-STAT (Janus Kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription pathway (common mediator for cytokine signaling. Co-localization of LDLR and insulin receptor (IR was examined by confocal microscopy. Results: Leptin was found to reduce the expression of LDLR and its transcription factor SREBP2. On the other hand, a weak signal for stimulation of LDLR by leptin was noted to be mediated by JAK2 pathway. But the joint effect of the two signaling pathways kept LDLR only in depressed mode in presence of leptin. Confocal microscopy showed that LDLR made an intensively co-localized complex with insulin receptor in presence of leptin. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show that though leptin stimulates LDLR expression very weakly through JAK-STAT signaling pathway, it mainly imposes inhibition on LDLR expression by inhibiting transcription factor SREBP2. The inter-association between LDLR and IR may be a reason to render LDLR functionally inactive in presence of leptin.

  11. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Morini

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R. Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR. In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R.

  12. Leptin receptor polymorphisms and lung function decline in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Hansel, N.N.; Gao, L.; Rafaels, N.M.; Mathias, R.A.; Neptune, E.R.; Tankersley, C.; Grant, A.V.; Connett, J.; Beaty, T.H.; Wise, R.A.; Barnes, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    Only a fraction of all smokers develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), suggesting a large role for genetic susceptibility. The leptin receptor (LEPR) is present in human lung tissue and may play a role in COPD pathogenesis. The present study examined the association between genetic variants in the LEPR gene and lung function decline in COPD.

  13. Leptin receptor Gln223Arg polymorphism and breast cancer risk in Nigerian women: A case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okobia, Michael N; Taioli, Emanuela; Bunker, Clareann H; Garte, Seymour J; Zmuda, Joseph M; Ezeome, Emmanuel R; Anyanwu, Stanley N; Uche, Emmanuel E; Kuller, Lewis H; Ferrell, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Leptin, a 16 kDa polypeptide hormone, implicated in various physiological processes, exerts its action through the leptin receptor, a member of the class I cytokine receptor family. Both leptin and leptin receptor have recently been implicated in processes leading to breast cancer initiation and progression in animal models and humans. An A to G transition mutation in codon 223 in exon 6 of the leptin receptor gene, resulting in glutamine to arginine substitution (Gln223Arg), lies within the first of two putative leptin-binding regions and may be associated with impaired signaling capacity of the leptin receptor. This study was designed to assess the role of this polymorphism in breast cancer susceptibility in Nigerian women. We utilized a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay to evaluate the association between the Gln223Arg polymorphism of the leptin receptor gene and breast risk in Nigeria in a case control study involving 209 women with breast cancer and 209 controls without the disease. Study participants were recruited from surgical outpatient clinics and surgical wards of four University Teaching Hospitals located in Midwestern and southeastern Nigeria between September 2002 and April 2004. Premenopausal women carrying at least one LEPR 223Arg allele were at a modestly increased risk of breast cancer after adjusting for confounders (OR = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0–3.2, p = 0.07). There was no association with postmenopausal breast cancer risk (OR = 0.9, 95% CI 0.4–1.8, p = 0.68). Our results suggest that the LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism in the extracellular domain of the LEPR receptor gene is associated with a modestly increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer in Nigerian women

  14. Training, leptin receptors and SOCS3 in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedillas, H; Guerra, B; Guadalupe-Grau, A; Santana, A; Fuentes, T; Dorado, C; Serrano-Sanchez, J A; Calbet, J A L

    2011-05-01

    Endurance exercise induces SUPPRESSOR of CYTOKINE SIGNALING 3 (SOCS3) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle and endurance training overimposed on strength training blunts the hypertrophic response to strength training by an unknown mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training on fat mass, serum leptin concentration, muscle morphology, and muscle vastus lateralis leptin receptors (OB-Rb) and SOCS3 protein expression. 16 healthy young men were assigned to a control (C; n=7), and to a 12-week weightlifting (3 sessions/week)+endurance training program (T; n=9) group. Training enhanced maximal dynamic strength in lower and upper body exercises (18-54%), reduced fat mass by 1.8 kg and serum leptin concentration per kg of fat mass, and elicited muscle hypertrophy of type 2 (+18.5%, Ptraining. In conclusion, concurrent strength and endurance training reduces fat mass and serum leptin and the ratio leptin/fat mass without significant effects on vastus lateralis OB-Rb protein expression. Training does not increase the basal expression of SOCS3 protein in humans. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Deficiency of leptin receptor in myeloid cells disrupts hypothalamic metabolic circuits and causes body weight increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqing Gao

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Myeloid cell leptin receptor deficient mice partially replicate the db/db phenotype. Leptin signaling in hypothalamic microglia is important for microglial function and a correct formation of the hypothalamic neuronal circuit regulating metabolism.

  16. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P chickens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Leptin, its receptor and aromatase expression in deep infiltrating endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Helder F; Zendron, Carolina; Cavalcante, Fernanda S; Aiceles, Verônica; Oliveira, Marco Aurélio P; Manaia, Jorge Henrique M; Babinski, Márcio A; Ramos, Cristiane F

    2015-08-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the leptin levels in the serum and peritoneal fluid (PF) and the protein expression in three different peritoneal ectopic implants in patients who underwent surgery for deep infiltrating endometriosis. All patients had been treated at the Department of Gynecology of the Pedro Ernesto University Hospital, Rio de Janeiro. The study group consisted of 15 patients who underwent surgery for adnexal masses and infertility, while the control group consisted of ten women who underwent surgery for tubal ligation. Peritoneal fluid and samples tissues were collected during surgery. Serum samples were obtained before anesthesia. In this study, the leptin levels in the serum and peritoneal fluid (PF) were evaluated by ELISA. The protein expression of leptin and its receptors (ObR) and aromatase enzyme were evaluated by Western blot analysis of the intestine, uterosacral ligament and vaginal septum in the ectopic implants. The t-test and one-way ANOVA with Holm-Sìdak post-test were used, and p endometriosis = 19.2 ng/mL ± 1.84, p endometriosis = 7.71 ng/mL ± 0.59, p = 0.18). Comparing women with and without ovarian implants, the leptin levels in both the serum and PF were significantly higher in women without ovarian implants (serum: with ovarian implant = 15.85 ± 1.99; without ovarian implant = 23.14 ± 2.60; ng/mL, p = 0.04; PF: with ovarian implant = 4.28 ± 1.30; without ovarian implant = 11.18 ± 2.98;ng/mL, p = 0.048). The leptin, ObR and aromatase protein expression levels were increased in lesions in the vaginal septum and were decreased in the intestine lesions. This study reports several interesting associations between the leptin levels in serum, peritoneal fluid, and tissue samples and the localization of the ectopic endometrium. Although this study does not provide a clear picture of the role of leptin in the development and progression of peritoneal implants

  18. Early childhood BMI trajectories in monogenic obesity due to leptin, leptin receptor, and melanocortin 4 receptor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlsdorf, Katja; Nunziata, Adriana; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Brandt, Stephanie; von Schnurbein, Julia; Vollbach, Heike; Lennerz, Belinda; Fritsch, Maria; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Luedeke, Manuel; Borck, Guntram; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Wabitsch, Martin

    2018-02-27

    To evaluate whether early childhood body mass index (BMI) is an appropriate indicator for monogenic obesity. A cohort of n = 21 children living in Germany or Austria with monogenic obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency (group LEP, n = 6), leptin receptor deficiency (group LEPR, n = 6) and primarily heterozygous MC4 receptor deficiency (group MC4R, n = 9) was analyzed. A control group (CTRL) was defined that consisted of n = 22 obese adolescents with no mutation in the above mentioned genes. Early childhood (0-5 years) BMI trajectories were compared between the groups at selected time points. The LEP and LEPR group showed a tremendous increase in BMI during the first 2 years of life with all patients displaying a BMI >27 kg/m 2 (27.2-38.4 kg/m 2 ) and %BMI P95 (percentage of the 95th percentile BMI for age and sex) >140% (144.8-198.6%) at the age of 2 years and a BMI > 33 kg/m 2 (33.3-45.9 kg/m 2 ) and %BMI P95  > 184% (184.1-212.6%) at the age of 5 years. The MC4R and CTRL groups had a later onset of obesity with significantly lower BMI values at both time points (p BMI trajectories in this pediatric cohort with monogenic obesity we suggest that BMI values >27.0 kg/m 2 or %BMI P95  > 140% at the age of 2 years and BMI values >33.0 kg/m 2 or %BMI P95  > 184% at the age of 5 years may be useful cut points to identify children who should undergo genetic screening for monogenic obesity due to functionally relevant mutations in the leptin gene or leptin receptor gene.

  19. Leptin receptor is expressed by epidermis and skin appendages in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercati, Francesca; Maranesi, Margherita; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Scocco, Paola; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2014-10-01

    Leptin is a polypeptide secreted by adipocytes which binds to a specific receptor (Ob-R) that is expressed in various tissues. The wide distribution of the Ob-R suggests that leptin might exert diverse biological functions, not only by regulating energy metabolism and appetite, but also by acting as a mitogen in many cell types, including keratinocytes. In this study, the presence and localization of Ob-R was investigated in the skin of the dog using RT-PCR and immunohistochemical techniques. RT-PCR revealed the presence of Ob-R m-RNA in the skin specimens collected from the dorsal region of two smooth coat breed dogs. Through immunohistochemistry performed on the skin of five dogs, the expression of the receptor was observed in the basal layer of the epidermis, in the hair follicles as well as in the apocrine sweat and sebaceous glands. No staining for Ob-R was detected in the suprabasal epidermis layers. Strong positive signals were observed in many cells of the outer root sheath of hair follicles in growing and in regressive phases. The identification of Ob-R in the above targets suggests that leptin may play a role in the regulation of cyclic renewal of the epidermis and skin appendages in dog. This study represents an important contribution to understand the complex mechanisms that are involved in the skin biology in this species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between expression of leptin receptors mRNA in breast tissue, plasma leptin level in breast cancer patients with obesity and clinical pathologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunrui; Liu Wenli; Sun Hanying; Zhou Jianfeng

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of leptin receptors mRNA in breast tissue and plasma leptin levels in breast cancer patients with obesity and their relationship with clinical pathologic data, 124 subjects who were either obesity or had suffered from breast benign disease with obesity, or breast cancer with obesity were entered into this study. The levels of plasma leptin in all subjects were determined and leptin receptors mRNA expression levels were measured by RT-PCR in breast tissue of breast cancer patients with obesity and breast benign disease with obesity. The results showed that plasma leptin levels in breast cancer patients with obesity were significantly higher than those in breast benign disease with obesity and obesity patients alone (P<0.05). The expression of the leptin receptor long form [-Lep-R(L)-] mRNA and the leptin receptor short form [-Lep-R(S)-] mRNA in breast tissue of breast cancer patients with obesity were significantly higher than that in breast tissue of breast benign disease patients with obesity (P<0.05). The plasma leptin level had remarkable positive correlation with the expressions of the Lep-R(L) mRNA and the Lep-R(S) mRNA. The plasma leptin level and leptin receptors mRNA expression levels in patients were not correlated with the axillary node metastasis, menopause, the TNM stage or pathological type. Therefore, leptin may have a promoting effect on the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. (authors)

  1. LEPTIN AND OBESITY – NEUROENDOCRINE , METABOLIC AND ATHEROGENIC EFFECTS OF LEPTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišo Šabovič

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that was recently discovered. Leptin and leptin resistance play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Leptin acts by binding to specific receptors in the hypothalamus to alter the expression of several neuropeptides that regulate food intake and energy expenditure. As commonly found, obese persons have leptin resistance and consequently attenuated effects of leptin. Mechanism underlying leptin resistance has not been explained yet: it might be the result of a receptor or post receptor defect, impaired transport of leptin through cerebrovascular barrier or inactivation of leptin by binding proteins. Phase I and II clinical trials proved that recombinant leptin administration to humans is safe. First results of the current phase III clinical trials demonstrated that leptin is moderately effective in the treatment of obesity.Conclusions. Beside anti-obesity effect, leptin can have important metabolic and neuroendocrine effects. It is involved in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, pathogenesis of polymetabolic syndrome, diabetes and arterial hypertension. In addition it affects some processes of atherothrombosis. It interacts with and significantly influences hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal, thyroid, sexual glands and growth hormone axes. Explaining the mechanism of leptin resistance could be important for understanding the pathogenesis of obesity and associated pathologic states as polymetabolic syndrom, diabetes, arterial hipertension and atherothrombosis.

  2. Leptin receptor polymorphisms and lung function decline in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, N N; Gao, L; Rafaels, N M; Mathias, R A; Neptune, E R; Tankersley, C; Grant, A V; Connett, J; Beaty, T H; Wise, R A; Barnes, K C

    2009-07-01

    Only a fraction of all smokers develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), suggesting a large role for genetic susceptibility. The leptin receptor (LEPR) is present in human lung tissue and may play a role in COPD pathogenesis. The present study examined the association between genetic variants in the LEPR gene and lung function decline in COPD. In total, 429 European Americans were randomly selected from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Lung Health Study. 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in LEPR were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate platform (Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA). Mean annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted over the 5-yr period was calculated using linear regression. Linear regression models were also used to adjust for potential confounders. In addition, in vivo expression of the receptor gene was assessed with immunohistochemistry on lungs from smoke-exposed inbred mice. We identified significant associations (pCOPD pathogenesis. We identified genetic variants in the LEPR gene significantly associated with lung function decline in a population of smokers with COPD. Our results support a role for LEPR as a novel candidate gene for COPD.

  3. Leptin Antagonizes Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Signaling in Growth Plate Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is an obesity-associated cytokine-like hormone encoded by the ob gene. Recent studies reveal that leptin promotes proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, suggesting a peripheral role of leptin in regulating growth plate function. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ is a transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis. Locally, PPARγ negatively regulates chondrogenic differentiation and terminal differentiation in the growth plate. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that leptin may suppress the inhibitory effects of PPARγ on growth plate chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were collected from distal femoral growth plates of newborn rats and were cultured in monolayer or cell pellets in the presence or absence of leptin and the PPARγ agonist ciglitazone. The results show that leptin attenuates the suppressive effects of PPARγ on chondrogenic differentiation and T3-mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy. Leptin treatment also leads to a mild downregulation of PPAR mRNA expression and a significant MAPK/ERK-dependent PPARγ phosphorylation at serine 112/82. Blocking MAPK/ERK function with PD98059 confirmed that leptin antagonizes PPARγ function in growth plate chondrocytes through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Furthermore, leptin signaling in growth plate cells is also negatively modulated by activation of PPARγ, implying that these two signaling pathways are mutually regulated in growth plate chondrocytes.

  4. Abalation of Ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis compared to Ghrelin-abalated Leptin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is produced predominantly in stomach and is known to be the endogenous ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin is a GH stimulator and an orexigenic hormone. In contrast, leptin is an anorexic hormone, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice are obese and diabetic. To study...

  5. Leptin, Leptin Soluble Receptor, and the Free Leptin Index following a Diet and Physical Activity Lifestyle Intervention in Obese Males and Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey E. Herrick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin (LEP is associated with appetite regulation and metabolism. Concentration is linear with adiposity, suggesting LEP resistance. LEP circulates freely and bound with its soluble receptor (sOB-r; the ratio is the free leptin index (FLI, an index of leptin resistance; lower FLI suggests reduced biological action. Purpose. The aim was to determine the effect of changes in adipose tissue distribution on LEP, sOB-r, and FLI following 6 months (6 M of a diet/exercise weight loss program (WLP. In addition, we aim to identify predictors of the FLI. Methods. 6 M WLP consisted of diet/lifestyle interventions following ADA guidelines. Body composition was assessed by DXA. LEP and sOB-r analysis were done via ELISA. Results. 10 adults completed the WLP. Significant reductions were seen in total fat percentage (% fat, nontrunk fat, (NTF, and trunk fat (TF from base to 3 m and 6 M (p≤0.05. The FLI were reduced at 3 M and 6 M for males and 6 M for females. Total body fat and body weight predicted the FLI in both sexes. Conclusions. LEP and FLI reductions following 6 M of WLP were achieved independent of sOB-r changes. We also demonstrate that the FLI can be predicted noninvasively through total fat mass and body weight in kilograms.

  6. The Gln223Arg polymorphism of the leptin receptor in Pima Indians: influence on energy expenditure, physical activity and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, N; Vozarova, B; Del Parigi, A

    2002-01-01

    whether this variant influences energy metabolism and adiposity in Pima Indians, we genotyped non-diabetic Pima Indians in whom we had measured body composition and 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE), physical activity level (PAL) and 24 h respiratory quotient (24 h RQ) in a respiratory chamber (n=268......Leptin regulates body weight by its receptor-mediated anorectic, thermogenic and antisteatotic effects. Recently, lower leptin binding to the soluble form of the leptin receptor (LEPR) was shown in carriers of the Arg223-encoding allele of the Gln223Arg polymorphism of the LEPR. To investigate......) and who had undergone percutaneous fat biopsies from the periumbilical region (n=184). Genotype was not associated with percent body fat (P>0.39), but was associated with 24 h EE, PAL and mean subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size (SAAS all P...

  7. Immunoreactivities of PPARγ2, leptin and leptin receptor in oviduct of Chinese brown frog during breeding period and pre-hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Weng, J; Huang, S; Shen, Y; Sheng, X; Han, Y; Xu, M; Weng, Q

    2014-09-09

    The Chinese brown frog (Rana dybowskii) is a special amphibian with one unique physiological phenomenon, which is that its oviduct expands prior to hibernation, instead of during the breeding period. In this study, we investigate the localization and expression level of PPARγ2, leptin and leptin receptor proteins in oviduct of Rana dybowskii during  breeding period and pre-hibernation. There were significant variations in oviductal weight and size, with values much lower in the breeding period than in pre-hibernation. PPARγ2 was observed in stromal and epithelial cells in both periods. Leptin was immunolocalized in epithelial cells in both periods, whereas leptin receptor was detected only in stromal cells. Consistently, the protein levels of PPARγ2, leptin and leptin receptor were higher in pre-hibernation as compared to the breeding period. These results suggested that oviduct was the target organ of leptin, which may play an important paracrine role in regulating the oviductal hypertrophy during pre-hibernation.

  8. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Profita, Mirella; Bruno,; Alessi,; Soresi,; Bonanno,; Riccobono,; Montalbano,; Albano,; Gjomarkaj,

    2011-01-01

    Andreina Bruno1, Marinella Alessi2, Simona Soresi2, Anna Bonanno1, Loredana Riccobono1, Angela Marina Montalbano1, Giusy Daniela Albano1, Mark Gjomarkaj1, Mirella Profita11Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Italian National Research Council, Palermo, Italy; 2Dipartimento Biomedico di Biomedicina Interna e Specialistica, University Palermo, ItalyBackground: Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in infla...

  9. Genetic variants of estrogen beta and leptin receptors may cause gynecomastia in adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Erdal; Edgunlu, Tuba; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Cakir, Esra Deniz Papatya; Demir, Korcan; Cetin, Esin Sakalli; Celik, Sevim Karakas

    2014-05-15

    Gynecomastia is a benign breast enlargement in males that affects approximately one-third of adolescents. The exact mechanism is not fully understood; however, it has been proposed that estrogen receptors and aromatase enzyme activity may play important roles in the pathogenesis of gynecomastia. While many studies have reported that aromatase enzyme (CYP19) gene polymorphism is associated with gynecomastia, only one study has shown a relationship between estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta gene polymorphism and gynecomastia. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between CYP19 (rs2414096), ER alpha (rs2234693), ER beta (rs4986938), leptin (rs7799039), and leptin receptor (rs1137101) gene polymorphisms and gynecomastia. This study included 107 male adolescents with gynecomastia and 97 controls. Total serum testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels were measured, and DNA was extracted from whole blood using the PCR-RFLP technique. The polymorphic distributions of CYP19, ER alpha, ER beta, leptin and leptin receptor genes were compared. The median E2 level was 12.41 (5.00-65.40) pg/ml in the control group and 16.86 (2.58-78.47) pg/ml in the study group (pgynecomastia and leptin receptor rs1137101 (p=0.002) and ER beta receptor rs4986938 gene polymorphisms (p=0.002). According to our results, increased E2 level and ER beta gene rs4986938 polymorphism might explain why some adolescents have gynecomastia. Leptin receptor gene rs1137101 polymorphism might affect susceptibility to gynecomastia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine leptin and leptin receptor genes with growth and ultrasound carcass traits in Nellore cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R C G; Ferraz, J B S; Meirelles, F V; Eler, J P; Balieiro, J C C; Cucco, D C; Mattos, E C; Rezende, F M; Silva, S L

    2012-10-11

    Given the important role of leptin in metabolism, we looked for a possible association of leptin and leptin receptor polymorphisms with carcass and growth traits in Nellore cattle. We examined associations of leptin and leptin receptor SNPs with ultrasound carcass (longissimus dorsi muscle area (ribeye area), backfat thickness and rump fat thickness and growth traits (weaning weight adjusted to 210 days of age, yearling weight adjusted to 550 days of age, weight gain of weaning to yearling and scrotal circumference adjusted to 550 days of age) of 2162 Bos primigenius indicus (Nellore) animals. Allele and genotypic frequencies were calculated for each marker. Allele substitution, additive and dominance effects of the polymorphisms were also evaluated. Some alleles of the molecular markers had low frequencies, lower than 1%, in the sample analyzed, although the same polymorphisms described for B. p. taurus cattle were found. Due to very low allelic frequencies, the E2JW, A59V and UASMS2 markers were not included in the analysis, because they were almost fixed. E2FB was found to be significantly associated with weight gain, ribeye area and backfat thickness. The promoter region markers, C963T and UASMS1, were also found to be significantly associated with ribeye area. T945M was significantly associated with weight gain. We conclude that the leptin and receptor gene markers would be useful for marker-assisted selection.

  11. Overexpression of leptin receptor predicts an unfavorable outcome in Middle Eastern ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavi Prashant

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that obesity is associated with ovarian cancer. Obesity hormone leptin and its receptor (Ob-R contribute to tumor development by enhancing cell growth and survival. This study was design to investigate the prevalence of leptin and Ob-R in Middle Eastern epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC and to analyze the role of leptin and the mechanisms under its action in EOC tissue sample and cell lines. Methods The expression of leptin and Ob-R was examined by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray of 156 EOC samples. Proliferation of EOC cells in response to leptin was assessed by MTT assays, and its anti-apoptotic effects were determined by flow cytometry. Effect of leptin on PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was further determined by western blotting. Results In clinical samples, Ob-R overexpression was seen in 59.2% EOCs and was significantly associated with poor progression free survival (p = 0.0032. Furthermore, Ob-R expression was associated with anti apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL (p = 0.0035 and XIAP (p = 0.0001. In vitro analysis using EOC cell lines showed that leptin stimulated cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis via activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Inhibition of PI3K activity by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3-kinase abrogated leptin mediated PI3K/AKT signaling. Gene silencing of Ob-R with Ob-R siRNA in EOC cells resulted in down regulation of phospho-AKT and its down stream targets. Conclusion Our findings have potential clinical implication for EOC development and progression.

  12. Androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism is associated with serum testosterone levels, obesity and serum leptin in men with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanworth, R D; Kapoor, D; Channer, K S; Jones, T H

    2008-12-01

    To determine the relationships between androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism length (AR CAG), sex hormones and clinical variables in men with type 2 diabetes (DM2). Men with DM2 are known to have a high prevalence of low testosterone levels. Studies suggest that testosterone replacement therapy may improve insulin sensitivity and glycaemic control in men with DM2 and reduces central obesity and serum leptin. AR CAG is known to correlate negatively with AR sensitivity and positively with body fat, insulin levels, and leptin in healthy men. Cross-sectional study set in a district general hospital diabetes centre. Sex hormones, AR CAG and symptoms of hypogonadism were assessed in 233 men with DM2. Associations were sought between these variables and others such as obesity, leptin, glycaemic control, and blood pressure. Testosterone was negatively associated and AR CAG positively associated with obesity and leptin. The associations of AR CAG with leptin and obesity were independent of testosterone, estradiol, gonadotropins, and age. AR CAG was also independently associated with total, bioavailable and free testosterone, LH, waist circumference, body mass index, leptin, and systolic blood pressure. There was no association of AR CAG with sex hormone binding globulin, estradiol, HbA(1C) or the symptoms of hypogonadism. The association of longer AR CAG with obesity and leptin suggests that shorter AR CAG may have an influence in maintaining healthy anthropomorphics and metabolism in men with DM2. Testosterone and LH levels are higher in men with longer AR CAG, probably reflecting reduced negative feedback through a less sensitive receptor.

  13. The anti-tumor activity of a neutralizing nanobody targeting leptin receptor in a mouse model of melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis McMurphy

    Full Text Available Environmental and genetic activation of a brain-adipocyte axis inhibits cancer progression. Leptin is the primary peripheral mediator of this anticancer effect in a mouse model of melanoma. In this study we assessed the effect of a leptin receptor antagonist on melanoma progression. Local administration of a neutralizing nanobody targeting the leptin receptor at low dose adjacent to tumor decreased tumor mass with no effects on body weight or food intake. In contrast, systemic administration of the nanobody failed to suppress tumor growth. Daily intraperitoneal injection of high-dose nanobody led to weight gain, hyperphagia, increased adiposity, hyperleptinemia, and hyperinsulinemia, and central effects mimicking leptin deficiency. The blockade of central actions of leptin by systemic delivery of nanobody may compromise its anticancer effect, underscoring the need to develop peripherally acting leptin antagonists coupled with efficient cancer-targeting delivery.

  14. The anti-tumor activity of a neutralizing nanobody targeting leptin receptor in a mouse model of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurphy, Travis; Xiao, Run; Magee, Daniel; Slater, Andrew; Zabeau, Lennart; Tavernier, Jan; Cao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Environmental and genetic activation of a brain-adipocyte axis inhibits cancer progression. Leptin is the primary peripheral mediator of this anticancer effect in a mouse model of melanoma. In this study we assessed the effect of a leptin receptor antagonist on melanoma progression. Local administration of a neutralizing nanobody targeting the leptin receptor at low dose adjacent to tumor decreased tumor mass with no effects on body weight or food intake. In contrast, systemic administration of the nanobody failed to suppress tumor growth. Daily intraperitoneal injection of high-dose nanobody led to weight gain, hyperphagia, increased adiposity, hyperleptinemia, and hyperinsulinemia, and central effects mimicking leptin deficiency. The blockade of central actions of leptin by systemic delivery of nanobody may compromise its anticancer effect, underscoring the need to develop peripherally acting leptin antagonists coupled with efficient cancer-targeting delivery.

  15. Impaired clearance of influenza A virus in obese, leptin receptor deficient mice is independent of leptin signaling in the lung epithelium and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Radigan

    Full Text Available During the recent H1N1 outbreak, obese patients had worsened lung injury and increased mortality. We used a murine model of influenza A pneumonia to test the hypothesis that leptin receptor deficiency might explain the enhanced mortality in obese patients.We infected wild-type, obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db and non-obese mice with tissue specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the lung epithelium (SPC-Cre/LepR fl/fl or macrophages and alveolar type II cells (LysM-Cre/Lepr fl/fl with influenza A virus (A/WSN/33 [H1N1] (500 and 1500 pfu/mouse and measured mortality, viral clearance and several markers of lung injury severity.The clearance of influenza A virus from the lungs of mice was impaired in obese mice globally deficient in the leptin receptor (db/db compared to normal weight wild-type mice. In contrast, non-obese, SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl had improved viral clearance after influenza A infection. In obese mice, mortality was increased compared with wild-type mice, while the SP-C-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl and LysM-Cre+/+/LepR fl/fl mice exhibited improved survival.Global loss of the leptin receptor results in reduced viral clearance and worse outcomes following influenza A infection. These findings are not the result of the loss of leptin signaling in lung epithelial cells or macrophages. Our results suggest that factors associated with obesity or with leptin signaling in non-myeloid populations such as natural killer and T cells may be associated with worsened outcomes following influenza A infection.

  16. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  17. Genetic polymorphism of exon 9-11 of the leptin gene receptor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    primer3_www.cgi). These primers were designed based on the chicken sequence leptin gene receptor (GenBank –. NC006095.2) Gallus gallus chromosome 8, reference assembly. (based on Gallus_gallus-2.1). The primers were ...

  18. The Impact of LEP G-2548A and LEPR Gln223Arg Polymorphisms on Adiposity, Leptin, and Leptin-Receptor Serum Levels in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria-Avila, Efraín; Gomez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Lizeth; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz Teresita; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphisms in leptin (LEP G-2548A) and leptin-receptor (LEPR Gln223Arg) seem to influence obesity and lipid metabolism among others. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these polymorphisms on adiposity, leptin (sLeptin), and leptin-receptor (sLeptin-receptor) serum concentrations as well as inflammation markers. We included 382 adults originally from Western Mexico. They were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Obese individuals showed higher sLeptin (58.2 ± 31.35 ng/mL) but lower sLeptin-receptor (12.6 ± 3.74 ng/mL) levels than normal weight ones (17.6 ± 14.62 ng/mL, 17.4 ± 4.62 ng/mL, resp.), P < 0.001. Obese subjects carriers of Arg/Arg genotype had more (P = 0.016) sLeptin-receptor (14.7 ± 4.96 ng/mL) and less (P = 0.004) sLeptin (44.0 ± 28.12 ng/mL) levels than Gln/Gln genotype (11.0 ± 2.92 ng/mL, 80.3 ± 33.24 ng/mL, resp.). Body fat mass was lower (P from 0.003 to 0.045) for A/A (36.5% ± 6.80) or Arg/Arg (36.8% ± 6.82) genotypes with respect to G/G (41.3% ± 5.52) and G/A (41.6% ± 5.61) or Gln/Gln (43.7% ± 4.74) and Gln/Arg (41.0% ± 5.52) genotypes carriers. Our results suggest that LEP -2548A and LEPR 223Arg could be genetic markers of less body fat mass accumulation in obese subjects from Western Mexico. PMID:26064921

  19. Purinergic receptor X7 mediates leptin induced GLUT4 function in stellate cells in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekaran, Varun; Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Alhasson, Firas; Michelotti, Gregory; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Diehl, Anna Mae; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic oxidative stress via CYP2E1 can act as a second hit in NASH progression. Our previous studies have shown that oxidative stress in NASH causes higher leptin levels and induces purinergic receptor X7 (P2X7r). We tested the hypothesis that higher circulating leptin due to CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress induces P2X7r. P2X7r in turn activates stellate cells and causes increased proliferation via modulating Glut4, the glucose transporter, and increased intracellular glucose. Using a hig...

  20. Leptin receptor expressing neurons express phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) and leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Maitrayee; Sahu, Abhiram

    2015-11-01

    Leptin signaling in the hypothalamus is critical for normal food intake and body weight regulation. Cumulative evidence suggests that besides the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway, several non-STAT3 pathways including the phosphodiesterase-3B (PDE3B) pathway mediate leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. We have shown that PDE3B is localized in various hypothalamic sites implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis and that the anorectic and body weight reducing effects of leptin are mediated by the activation of PDE3B. It is still unknown if PDE3B is expressed in the long form of the leptin-receptor (ObRb)-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus and whether leptin induces STAT3 activation in PDE3B-expressing neurons. In this study, we examined co-localization of PDE3B with ObRb neurons in various hypothalamic nuclei in ObRb-GFP mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 2h. Results showed that most of the ObRb neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, 93%), ventromedial nucleus (VMN, 94%), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN, 95%), ventral premammillary nucleus (PMv, 97%) and lateral hypothalamus (LH, 97%) co-expressed PDE3B. We next examined co-localization of p-STAT3 and PDE3B in the hypothalamus in C57BL6 mice that were treated with leptin (5mg/kg, ip) for 1h. The results showed that almost all p-STAT3 positive neurons in different hypothalamic nuclei including ARC, VMN, DMN, LH and PMv areas expressed PDE3B. These results suggest the possibility for a direct role for the PDE3B pathway in mediating leptin action in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The features of leptin and its receptor expression in metastatic cutaneous melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lushnikova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a multifunctional hormone with the activity of cytokines, which regulates critical signaling pathways that can induce cell proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and tumor growth. Leptin plays an important role in the regulation of metabolism, energy exchange, functions of the neuro-endocrine system, including the pituitary, hypothalamus, adrenals, and immune system functions. Recently, some evidences have been appeared concerning the role of leptin in induction of chronic inflammatory processes, autoimmune pathologies, type 2 diabetes and cancer. An elevated blood level of the hormone is considered as a risk factor for different neoplasm developmentObjective. Analysis of the hormone leptin (Lep, the long and short isoforms of its receptor (LepR1 and LepR2 expression in blood, tumor cells and normal skin fibroblasts in the patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma (CM with various clinico-pathological characteristics for prognostic assessment.Materials and methods. 15 patients with metastatic CM (10 women and 5 men, aged 22 to 67 years with body mass from normal to obese have been studied. The expression of Lep / LepR in the patient and donor blood sera, tumor and normal skin fibroblasts were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and RT PCR using total RNAs isolated from pairs of tumor samples and normal tissue.Results. Average level of leptin in the blood of CM patients and in tumor cells exceeds the normal one. Concentration of lepin in female CM patients was higher than in male patients. The expression level of Lep and LepR1 genes (but not LepR2 in tumor cells was relatively higher than in normal skin fibroblasts of these patients, and above the level of GAPDH gene expression. In the female patients with overweight (body mass index = 25,00–29,99 kg/m2 there was a trend to higher concentrations of leptin in the blood in comparison of the patients with normal body mass and leptin level in the sera of male CM

  2. Leptin and leptin receptor are detectable in equine spermatozoa but are not involved in in vitro fertilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Corradetti, Bruna; Perrini, Claudia; Bizzaro, Davide; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2016-04-01

    In human and swine, leptin (OB) has been identified in seminal plasma and leptin receptors (OB-R) on the cell surface of spermatozoa, indicating that spermatozoa are a target for OB. This hormone has also been detected in follicular fluid (FF) in women and mares, although its role requires further study. The aims of this study were to investigate the immunolocalisation and the expression of OB and OB-R in equine spermatozoa and to evaluate the involvement of OB in equine in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Since progesterone (P) and OB are both found in FF, the individual and combined effects of these two hormones were studied in equine IVF and compared with the results obtained from the use of FF for in vitro sperm preparation. For the first time, we were able to identify OB and OB-R mRNA and their corresponding proteins in equine spermatozoa. When spermatozoa were treated with OB, there was a decrease in the three motility parameters VSL, STR and LIN, commonly associated with hyperactivation, whilst the acrosome reaction rate increased (P<0.05). The fertilisation rate was 51% with FF, 46.15% with P, 43.64% with P+OB and 0% with OB alone. The percentage of eight-cell stage embryos was 18.7% with FF, 17.1% with P and 16.7% with OB+P. OB alone did not permit oocyte fertilisation, indicating that, in the horse, OB is involved in capacitation and hyperactivation but not in sperm penetration.

  3. Leptin receptor Lys109Arg and Gln223Arg polymorphisms are associated with early atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saukko, Meiju; Kesäniemi, Y Antero; Ukkola, Olavi

    2010-10-01

    Leptin is a hormone expressed by the leptin gene, primarily in adipocytes, controlling food intake and energy expenditure. The effects of leptin are mediated by its receptor (LEPR) located in the central nervous system and other tissues, including adipocytes and endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to characterize two polymorphisms of LEPR, Lys109Arg (rs1137100) and Gln223Arg (rs1137101), as risk factors for early atherosclerosis. This connection has not been studied before. This study was performed in the randomly selected, middle-aged control subjects (n=526) from our well-defined OPERA (Oulu Project Elucidating Risk of Atherosclerosis) study. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to study the associations between genotypes, intima media thickness (IMT) measurements, and risk factors for atherosclerosis. Subjects with the genotype Lys109Arg had the lowest body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.035), whereas Arg109Arg homozygotes had the highest total cholesterol (P=0.021) when adjusted for sex and age. Gln223Arg associated independently with systolic blood pressure (P=0.036). There were no differences in leptin concentrations between the genotypes. The adjusted (sex, age, BMI, smoking status, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose) means for the IMT measurements were lowest in the Arg109 and Arg223 homozygotes (P=0.042 and P=0.041, ANCOVA, respectively). The variations in the LEPR gene are independently associated with early atherosclerosis and some of its risk factors. These variations could possibly affect leptin signaling and thereby modify the effects of leptin on the atherosclerotic process.

  4. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  5. Distinct roles of free leptin, bound leptin and soluble leptin receptor during the metabolic-inflammatory response in patients with liver cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ockenga, J.; Tietge, U. J. F.; Boeker, K. H. W.; Manns, M. P.; Brabant, G.; Bahr, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Alteration of the leptin system appears to play a role in the inflammatory-metabolic response in catabolic diseases such as chronic liver diseases. Aim To investigate the association between leptin components, inflammatory markers and hepatic energy and substrate metabolism. Methods We

  6. Testosterone interacts with the feedback mechanisms engaged by Tyr985 of the leptin receptor and diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joshua A; Calo, Sal; Nair, Lekshmi; IglayReger, Heidi B; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Skorupski, Josh; Myers, Martin G; Bodary, Peter F

    2012-11-01

    Inhibitory signaling through Tyr985 of the leptin receptor contributes to the attenuation of anorectic leptin action in obese animals. Leptin receptor (LEPR-B) Tyr985Leu homozygote mutant mice (termed l/l) were previously generated to study Tyr985's contributions to inhibition of LEPR-B signaling; young female l/l mice display a lean, leptin-sensitive phenotype, while young male l/l are not significantly different from wild-type. We report here that testosterone (but not estrogen) determines the sex-specificity of the l/l phenotype. This provides additional insight into the cellular mechanism by which gonadal hormones determine central sensitivity to leptin, and may help elucidate the long-noted sex differences in leptin sensitivity. Additionally, we observed that Tyr985 signaling protects against a diet-dependent switch that exacerbates obesity with high fat feeding, such that the enhanced leptin sensitivity of l/l mice on a normal diet leads to increased adiposity in the face of chronic high-fat diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morini, M.; Pasquier, J.; van den Thillart, G.

    2015-01-01

    subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential...... of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated...

  8. Developmental Expression and Glucocorticoid Control of the Leptin Receptor in Fetal Ovine Lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles J De Blasio

    Full Text Available The effects of endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids on fetal lung maturation are well-established, although the role of leptin in lung development before birth is unclear. This study examined mRNA and protein levels of the signalling long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb in fetal ovine lungs towards term, and after experimental manipulation of glucocorticoid levels in utero by fetal cortisol infusion or maternal dexamethasone treatment. In fetal ovine lungs, Ob-Rb protein was localised to bronchiolar epithelium, bronchial cartilage, vascular endothelium, alveolar macrophages and type II pneumocytes. Pulmonary Ob-Rb mRNA abundance increased between 100 (0.69 fractional gestational age and 144 days (0.99 of gestation, and by 2-4-fold in response to fetal cortisol infusion and maternal dexamethasone treatment. In contrast, pulmonary Ob-Rb protein levels decreased near term and were halved by glucocorticoid treatment, without any significant change in phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3 at Ser727, total STAT3 or the pulmonary pSTAT3:STAT3 ratio. Leptin mRNA was undetectable in fetal ovine lungs at the gestational ages studied. These findings demonstrate differential control of pulmonary Ob-Rb transcript abundance and protein translation, and/or post-translational processing, by glucocorticoids in utero. Localisation of Ob-Rb in the fetal ovine lungs, including alveolar type II pneumocytes, suggests a role for leptin signalling in the control of lung growth and maturation before birth.

  9. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  10. Discovery and functional characterization of leptin and its receptors in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dandan; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Li, Hong; Li, Yanmin; Ren, Junxiao; Tian, Yadong; Li, Zhuanjian; Jiao, Yuping; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an important endocrine regulation factor of food intake and energy homeostasis in mammals; however, the existence of a poultry leptin gene (LEP) is still debated. Here, for the first time, we report the cloning of a partial exon 3 sequence of LEP (qLEP) and four different leptin receptor splicing variants, including a long receptor (qLEPRl) and three soluble receptors (qLEPR-a, qLEPR-b and qLEPR-c) in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The qLEP gene had high GC content (64%), which is similar to other reported avian leptin genes. The encoded qLEP protein possessed the conserved pair of cysteine residues that are required to form a lasso knot for full biological activity, but shared relatively low identities with LEPs of other vertebrates. The translated qLEPRl protein contained 1143 amino acids and shared high amino acid sequence identity with a chicken homolog (89% identity). qLEPRl also contained all the motifs, domains, and basic tyrosine residues that are conserved in the LEPRl proteins of other vertebrates. qRT-PCR analysis showed that LEP and the four LEPR variants were expressed extensively in all tissues examined; the expression levels of LEP were relatively high in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and pancreas, while the expression levels of the LEPRs were highest in the pituitary. Compared with the expression levels of juvenile qLEP and total qLEPR (including all LEPR variants), the expression levels of mature qLEP and total qLEPR were up-regulated in the hypothalamus and pituitary, and down-regulated in the ovary. The expressions of LEP/LEPR increased when fasting and decreased when refeeding in the brain and peripheral tissues of juvenile quail, which suggested that the LEP/LEPR system modulated food intake and energy expenditure, although, unlike in mammals, LEP may actually act to inhibit food intake during fasting, at least in juvenile quail. The results indicate that qLEP and qLEPR have unique expression patterns and that the encoded

  11. Brain-mediated antidiabetic, anorexic, and cardiovascular actions of leptin require melanocortin-4 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alexandre A; Spradley, Frank T; Granger, Joey P; Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M

    2015-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that leptin has powerful central nervous system (CNS)-mediated antidiabetic actions. In this study we tested the importance of melanocortin-4 receptors (MC4Rs) for leptin's ability to suppress food intake, increase blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and normalize glucose levels in insulin-dependent diabetes. MC4R knockout (MC4R-KO) and control wild-type (WT) rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula and BP and HR were measured 24 h/day by telemetry. After 5-day control period, an injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, ip) was used to induce diabetes. Eight days after injection, an osmotic pump was implanted subcutaneously and connected to the ICV cannula to deliver leptin (15 μg/day) for 7 days. At baseline, MC4R-KO rats were hyperphagic and 40% heavier than WT rats. Despite obesity, BP was similar (112 ± 2 vs. 111 ± 2 mmHg) and HR was lower in MC4R-KO rats (320 ± 6 vs. 347 ± 5 beats/min). Induction of diabetes increased food intake (30%) and reduced BP (∼17 mmHg) and HR (∼61 beats/min) in WT rats, while food intake, BP, and HR were reduced by ∼10%, 7 mmHg, and 33 beats/min, respectively, in MC4R-KO rats. Leptin treatment normalized blood glucose (437 ± 10 to 136 ± 18 mg/dl), reduced food intake (40%), and increased HR (+60 beats/min) and BP (+9 mmHg) in WT rats. Only modest changes in blood glucose (367 ± 16 to 326 ± 23 mg/dl), food intake (5%), HR (+16 beats/min) and BP (+4 mmHg) were observed in MC4R-KO rats. These results indicate that intact CNS MC4R signaling is necessary for leptin to exert its chronic antidiabetic, anorexic, and cardiovascular actions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Electroacupuncture Reduces Weight Gain Induced by Rosiglitazone through PPARγ and Leptin Receptor in CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA on protecting the weight gain side effect of rosiglitazone (RSG in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM rats and its possible mechanism in central nervous system (CNS. Our study showed that RSG (5 mg/kg significantly increased the body weight and food intake of the T2DM rats. After six-week treatment with RSG combined with EA, body weight, food intake, and the ratio of IWAT to body weight decreased significantly, whereas the ratio of BAT to body weight increased markedly. HE staining indicated that the T2DM-RSG rats had increased size of adipocytes in their IWAT, but EA treatment reduced the size of adipocytes. EA effectively reduced the lipid contents without affecting the antidiabetic effect of RSG. Furthermore, we noticed that the expression of PPARγ gene in hypothalamus was reduced by EA, while the expressions of leptin receptor and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 were increased. Our results suggest that EA is an effective approach for inhibiting weight gain in T2DM rats treated by RSG. The possible mechanism might be through increased levels of leptin receptor and STAT3 and decreased PPARγ expression, by which food intake of the rats was reduced and RSG-induced weight gain was inhibited.

  13. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leptin receptor signaling inhibits ovarian follicle development and egg laying in chicken hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nutrition intake during growth strongly influences ovarian follicle development and egg laying in chicken hens, yet the underlying endocrine regulatory mechanism is still poorly understood. The relevant research progress is hindered by difficulties in detection of leptin gene and its expression in the chicken. However, a functional leptin receptor (LEPR) is present in the chicken which has been implicated to play a regulatory role in ovarian follicle development and egg laying. The present study targeted LEPR by immunizing against its extracellular domain (ECD), and examined the resultant ovarian follicle development and egg-laying rate in chicken hens. Methods Hens that have been immunized four times with chicken LEPR ECD were assessed for their egg laying rate and feed intake, numbers of ovarian follicles, gene expression profiles, serum lipid parameters, as well as STAT3 signaling pathway. Results Administrations of cLEPR ECD antigen resulted in marked reductions in laying rate that over time eventually recovered to the levels exhibited by the Control hens. Together with the decrease in egg laying rate, cLEPR-immunized hens also exhibited significant reductions in feed intake, plasma concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein. Parallelled by reductions in feed intake, mRNA gene expression levels of AgRP, orexin, and NPY were down regulated, but of POMC, MC4R and lepR up-regulated in Immunized hen hypothalamus. cLEPR-immunization also promoted expressions of apoptotic genes such as caspase3 in theca and fas in granulosa layer, but severely depressed IGF-I expression in both theca and granulosa layers. Conclusions Immunization against cLEPR ECD in egg-laying hens generated antibodies that mimic leptin bioactivity by enhancing leptin receptor transduction. This up-regulated apoptotic gene expression in ovarian follicles, negatively regulated the expression of genes that promote follicular development

  15. Leptin and Pathological Indexes in Women with Breast Cancer

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    B Noori Alavicheh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and one of the factors threatening the health of women worldwide. Leptin is a 16 kD glycoprotein hormone produced predominantly by white adipose tissue. Leptin binds to receptors in the hypothalamus and plays a key role in regulation of metabolism. Both leptin and leptin receptor have recently been implicated in processes and progress leading to breast cancer initiation. The aim of this study was to identify if there is association between leptin and pathological indexes in patients with breast cancer Methods: 45women with breast cancer were enrolled. Serum leptin levels of patients were measured by the ELISA method. Pathological information such as stage of the breast cancer, Hormonal receptor (ER, PR and Her2 status in these patients were determined. Result: Results revealed that the patients who were in stage one and two, the mean serum leptin level was (34.18±21.22 ng/ml And patients who were in stage three and four, the mean serum leptin level was (32.21±21/93 ng/ml. Also the mean serum leptin levels in patients whose receptor status of ER, PR and HER2 positive were (35.90±23.55, 35.74±23.91and 37.02±24.25ng/ml, respectively. The Patients whose receptor status of ER, PR and HER2 negative were 26.64±13.13, 28.17±14.26and31.32±19.9ng/ml respectively. No significant association was found between leptin leveland stage of the breast cancer, hormonal receptor (ER, PR and Her2 status in Patients with Breast cancer(p>0.05. Conclusions: In this study, no association was found between serum leptin level and pathological indices in women with Breast cancer in Yasuj, Iran.

  16. Leptin receptor blockade reduces intrahepatic vascular resistance and portal pressure in an experimental model of rat liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, María Gabriela; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi; Marrone, Giusi; Rodríguez-Vilarrupla, Aina; Deulofeu, Ramon; Abraldes, Juan G; Bosch, Jaume; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Increased hepatic vascular resistance mainly due to elevated vascular tone and to fibrosis is the primary factor in the development of portal hypertension in cirrhosis. Leptin, a hormone associated with reduction in nitric oxide bioavailability, vascular dysfunction, and liver fibrosis, is increased in patients with cirrhosis. We aimed at evaluating whether leptin influences the increased hepatic resistance in portal hypertension. CCl4-cirrhotic rats received the leptin receptor-blocker ObR antibody, or its vehicle, every other day for 1 wk. Hepatic and systemic hemodynamics were measured in both groups. Hepatic nitric oxide production and bioavailability, together with oxidative stress, nitrotyrosinated proteins, and liver fibrosis, were evaluated. In cirrhotic rats, leptin-receptor blockade significantly reduced portal pressure without modifying portal blood flow, suggesting a reduction in the intrahepatic resistance. Portal pressure reduction was associated with increased nitric oxide bioavailability and with decreased O2(-) levels and nitrotyrosinated proteins. No changes in systemic hemodynamics and liver fibrosis were observed. In conclusion, the present study shows that blockade of the leptin signaling pathway in cirrhosis significantly reduces portal pressure. This effect is probably due to a nitric oxide-mediated reduction in the hepatic vascular tone.

  17. Novel Leptin Receptor Mutations Identified in Two Girls with Severe Obesity Are Associated with Increased Bone Mineral Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Hannema (Sabine); Wit, J.M. (Jan M.); E.C.A.M. Houdijk (Mieke); A. van Haeringen (Arie); E.C. Bik (Elsa); A. Verkerk; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.G. Kant (Sarina); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); E. Bakker (Egbert); H.A. Delemarre-van de Waal (Henriette); M. Losekoot (Monique)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recessive mutations in the leptin receptor (LEPR) are a rare cause of hyperphagia and severe early-onset obesity. To date, the phenotype has only been described in 25 obese children, some of whom also had altered immune function, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, reduced growth

  18. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin receptor in human periapical granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, J; Carmona-Fernández, A; Pérez-Pérez, A; Sánchez-Jiménez, F; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Segura-Egea, J J

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin receptor (LEPR) in human periapical granulomas. Periapical inflammatory lesions were obtained from extracted human teeth and teeth which underwent periapical surgery. After their histopathological categorization as periapical granulomas (n = 20), they were examined by immunohistochemistry using human LEPR monoclonal antibodies. LEPR mRNA expression was also determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and the amount of LEPR protein was analysed by immunoblot. All granuloma samples expressed LEPR. Amongst inflammatory cells, only macrophages showed expression of LEPR. Western blot analysis revealed the presence in the samples of a protein with apparent molecular weight of ~120 kDa, corresponding to the estimated molecular weight of LEPR. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of LEPR mRNA, corresponding the size of the amplified fragment (338 bp), assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis, to that of LEPR mRNA. Human periapical granulomas express LEPR. In periapical granulomas, only macrophages showed expression of LEPR. This finding suggests that leptin can play a role in inflammatory and immune periapical responses. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Absence of functional leptin receptor isoforms in the POUND (Lepr(db/lb)) mouse is associated with muscle atrophy and altered myoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arounleut, Phonepasong; Bowser, Matthew; Upadhyay, Sunil; Shi, Xing-Ming; Fulzele, Sadanand; Johnson, Maribeth H; Stranahan, Alexis M; Hill, William D; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Leptin receptors are abundant in human skeletal muscle, but the role of leptin in muscle growth, development and aging is not well understood. Here we utilized a novel mouse model lacking all functional leptin receptor isoforms (POUND mouse, Lepr(db/lb)) to determine the role of leptin in skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameters were examined in POUND mice, and primary myoblast cultures were used to determine the effects of altered leptin signaling on myoblast proliferation and differentiation. ELISA assays, integrated pathway analysis of mRNA microarrays, and reverse phase protein analysis were performed to identify signaling pathways impacted by leptin receptor deficiency. Results show that skeletal muscle mass and fiber diameter are reduced 30-40% in POUND mice relative to wild-type controls. Primary myoblast cultures demonstrate decreased proliferation and decreased expression of both MyoD and myogenin in POUND mice compared to normal mice. Leptin treatment increased proliferation in primary myoblasts from muscles of both adult (12 months) and aged (24 months) wild-type mice, and leptin increased expression of MyoD and myogenin in aged primary myoblasts. ELISA assays and protein arrays revealed altered expression of molecules associated with the IGF-1/Akt and MAPK/MEK signaling pathways in muscle from the hindlimbs of mice lacking functional leptin receptors. These data support the hypothesis that the adipokine leptin is a key factor important for the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and that leptin can act directly on its receptors in peripheral tissues to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Interaction between leptin and leptin receptor in gastric carcinoma: Gene ontology analysis Interacción entre la leptina y su receptor en el carcinoma gástrico: análisis de ontología genética

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    V. Wiwanitkit

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is a rare but important malignancy. The link between leptin, a cytokine that is elevated in obese individuals, and cancer development has been proposed. It is noted that leptin and its receptor may play a positive role in the progression in gastric cancer. However, the exact mechanism resulting form the interaction between leptin and leptin receptor has never been clarified. Here, the author used a new gene ontology technology to predict the molecular function and biological process due to the interaction between leptin and leptin receptor. Comparing to leptin and leptin receptor, the leptin-leptin receptor poses the same function and biological process as leptin receptor. This can confirm that leptin receptor has a significant suppressive effect on the expression of leptin. Loss of hormone activity and disturbance of normal cell signaling pathway of leptin can be seen. Blocking of receptor might be rational therapeutic strategy.El carcinoma gástrico es un cáncer muy poco frecuente pero importante. Se ha postulado que la leptina, una citocina que aparece elevada en las personas obesas, está relacionada con el cáncer. Se sabe que la leptina y su receptor pueden desempeñar un papel positivo en la progresión del cáncer gástrico. Sin embargo, nunca se ha dilucidado el mecanismo exacto al que daría lugar la interacción entre la leptina y el receptor de leptina. Aquí, el autor empleó una nueva tecnología de ontología genética para predecir la función molecular y el proceso biológico resultantes de la interacción entre la leptina y su receptor. Frente a la leptina y su receptor, el compuesto leptina-receptor realiza la misma función y el mismo proceso biológico que el receptor de leptina. Esto puede confirmar que el receptor de leptina ejerce un importante efecto supresor sobre la expresión de leptina. Pueden observarse una pérdida de actividad hormonal y la alteración de la vía normal de señalización celular

  1. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators of this sign...

  2. The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligand rosiglitazone modulates bronchoalveolar lavage levels of leptin, adiponectin, and inflammatory cytokines in lean and obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Fernando; Rojas, Mauricio; Hart, C Michael

    2007-12-01

    Obese mice that lack leptin receptor (db (-) /db (-)) have been shown to have innate bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR). It has been proposed that the obesity-mediated BHR may involve a combination of increased leptin and reduced systemic adiponectin levels. The aim of this study was to determine if obesity modifies the airway concentration of leptin and adiponectin and whether treatment with a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligand can reduce airway leptin and increase airway adiponectin. In this study, obese, leptin receptor-deficient (db (-) /db (-)), or lean (db ( + ) /db (-)) mice were treated with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by gavage daily for 1 week. Bronchioalveolar lavage (BAL) was subsequently performed to determine levels of leptin, adiponectin, and inflammatory cytokines. Treatment with rosiglitazone increased BAL adiponectin levels in lean (p = 0.04) and to a lesser extent in obese mice (p = 0.07). Rosiglitazone treatment lowered leptin levels in lean mice, but increased leptin levels in BAL fluid of obese mice (p < 0.01). The BAL levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were lower in the lean rosiglitazone-treated group compared with the obese vehicle-treated group and lower in the obese rosiglitazone-treated group compared with the obese vehicle-treated group. These results demonstrate that obesity is associated with alterations in adipokine and cytokine levels in the airways that can be modulated by treatment with roziglitazone.

  3. Expression of mutant huntingtin in leptin receptor-expressing neurons does not control the metabolic and psychiatric phenotype of the BACHD mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Hult Lundh

    Full Text Available Metabolic and psychiatric disturbances occur early on in the clinical manifestation of Huntington's disease (HD, a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin (HTT gene. Hypothalamus has emerged as an important site of pathology and alterations in this area and its neuroendocrine circuits may play a role in causing early non-motor symptoms and signs in HD. Leptin is a hormone that controls energy homeostasis by signaling through leptin receptors in the hypothalamus. Disturbed leptin action is implicated in both obesity and depression and altered circulating levels of leptin have been reported in both clinical HD and rodent models of the disease. Pathological leptin signaling may therefore be involved in causing the metabolic and psychiatric disturbances of HD. Here we tested the hypothesis that expression of mutant HTT in leptin receptor carrying neurons plays a role in the development of the non-motor phenotype in the BACHD mouse model. Our results show that inactivation of mutant HTT in leptin receptor-expressing neurons in the BACHD mouse using cross-breeding based on a cre-loxP system did not have an effect on the metabolic phenotype or anxiety-like behavior. The data suggest that mutant HTT disrupts critical hypothalamic pathways by other mechanisms than interfering with intracellular leptin signaling.

  4. Pivotal role of leptin in insulin effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Ceddia

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The OB protein, also known as leptin, is secreted by adipose tissue, circulates in the blood, probably bound to a family of binding proteins, and acts on central neural networks regulating ingestive behavior and energy balance. The two forms of leptin receptors (long and short forms have been identified in various peripheral tissues, a fact that makes them possible target sites for a direct action of leptin. It has been shown that the OB protein interferes with insulin secretion from pancreatic islets, reduces insulin-stimulated glucose transport in adipocytes, and increases glucose transport, glycogen synthesis and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. Under normoglycemic and normoinsulinemic conditions, leptin seems to shift the flux of metabolites from adipose tissue to skeletal muscle. This may function as a peripheral mechanism that helps control body weight and prevents obesity. Data that substantiate this hypothesis are presented in this review.

  5. In ovo leptin administration modulates glucocorticoid receptor mRNA expression specifically in the hypothalamus of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Wang, Yufeng; Hu, Yan; Zhao, Ruqian

    2017-01-18

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is well documented to play a crucial role in the central control of energy homeostasis in mammals. However, the distribution and function of the GR in the chicken brain are less clear. Leptin is a key hormone regulating energy homeostasis in mammals, yet its action in the chicken is still under debate. In this study, the distribution of GR mRNA in the chicken brain and the effects of in ovo administration of leptin and its antagonist on early post-hatch growth and GR mRNA expression in different hypothalamic nuclei were investigated via in situ hybridization (ISH) and quantitative PCR. GR mRNA was widely expressed in the chicken brain, mainly in the corpus striatum, nucleus rotundus, dorsolateral nucleus, nucleus ovoidalis, nucleus reticularis superior and the hippocampus (Hp) and in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus. High doses of leptin (5.0μg) significantly promoted post-hatch growth, resulting in a significant high body weight increased by 24.64% at day (D) 21 of life. Meanwhile, hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in the LL and HL groups was down-regulated significantly by 7.02% and 13.65% respectively (Phypothalamus of D21 broiler chickens. The leptin antagonist was able to reverse the effect of leptin on the growth rate and hypothalamic GR mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that in ovo administration of leptin influences early post-hatch growth and the hypothalamic expression of GR mRNA in broiler chickens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The daidzein- and estradiol- induced anorectic action in CCK or leptin receptor deficiency rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitani, Mina; Mizushige, Takafumi; Bhattarai, Keshab; Iwahara, Asami; Aida, Ryojiro; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of daidzein feeding and estradiol treatment on food intake in cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK1R) deficiency, leptin receptor (ObRb) deficiency rats and their wild-type rats. These rats underwent an ovariectomy or a sham operation. For the 5 week experiment, each rat was divided in three groups: control, daidzein (150 mg/kg diet), and estradiol (4.2 μg/rat/day) groups. In both CCK1R+ and CCK1R- rats, daidzein feeding and estradiol treatment significantly decreased food intake. Daidzein feeding significantly reduced food intake in ovariectomized ObRb- rats, although not in ObRb+ rats. Estradiol treatment significantly lowered food intake in ovariectomized ObRb+ and ObRb- rats. In the ovariectomized rats, estradiol treatment significantly increases uterine weight, while daidzein feeding did not change it, suggesting that daidzein might have no or weak estrogenic effect in our experiment. These results suggest that CCK1R and ObRb signalings were not essential for the daidzein- and estradiol-induced anorectic action.

  7. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wen-Zhu [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Hainan Branch of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Hainan 572013 (China); Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Miao, Yu-Liang [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Wen-Zhi [Department of Anesthesiology, Beijing Military General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100700 (China); Wu, Wei, E-mail: wwzwgk@163.com [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Li, Bao-Wei [Department of Head and Neck Surgery of Otolaryngology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); An, Li-Na [Department of Anesthesiology, Armed Police General Hospital, Beijing 100039 (China); Fang, Wei-Wu [Department of Anesthesiology, PLA No. 306 Hospital, Beijing 100101 (China); Mi, Wei-Dong, E-mail: elite2005gg@163.com [Anesthesia and Operation Center, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  8. Somato-dendritic localization and signaling by leptin receptors in hypothalamic POMC and AgRP neurons.

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    Sangdeuk Ha

    Full Text Available Leptin acts via neuronal leptin receptors to control energy balance. Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related peptide (AgRP/Neuropeptide Y (NPY/GABA neurons produce anorexigenic and orexigenic neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, and express the long signaling form of the leptin receptor (LepRb. Despite progress in the understanding of LepRb signaling and function, the sub-cellular localization of LepRb in target neurons has not been determined, primarily due to lack of sensitive anti-LepRb antibodies. Here we applied light microscopy (LM, confocal-laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and electron microscopy (EM to investigate LepRb localization and signaling in mice expressing a HA-tagged LepRb selectively in POMC or AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. We report that LepRb receptors exhibit a somato-dendritic expression pattern. We further show that LepRb activates STAT3 phosphorylation in neuronal fibers within several hypothalamic and hindbrain nuclei of wild-type mice and rats, and specifically in dendrites of arcuate POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons of Leprb (+/+ mice and in Leprb (db/db mice expressing HA-LepRb in a neuron specific manner. We did not find evidence of LepRb localization or STAT3-signaling in axon-fibers or nerve-terminals of POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. Three-dimensional serial EM-reconstruction of dendritic segments from POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons indicates a high density of shaft synapses. In addition, we found that the leptin activates STAT3 signaling in proximity to synapses on POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA dendritic shafts. Taken together, these data suggest that the signaling-form of the leptin receptor exhibits a somato-dendritic expression pattern in POMC and AgRP/NPY/GABA neurons. Dendritic LepRb signaling may therefore play an important role in leptin's central effects on energy balance, possibly through modulation of synaptic activity via post-synaptic mechanisms.

  9. Validity of leptin receptor-deficiency (db/db) type 2 diabetes mellitus mice as a model of secondary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Le; You, Yong-Ke; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Zheng, Li-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chen, Hai-Yong; Yao, Dong; Lan, Hui-Yao; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validation of the leptin receptor-deficient mice model for secondary osteoporosis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at bone micro-architectural level. Thirty three 36-week old male mice were divided into four groups: normal control (db/m) (n = 7), leptin receptor-deficient T2DM (db/db) (n = 8), human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic normal control (crp/db/m) (n = 7), and human CRP transgenic T2DM (crp/db/db) (n = 11). Lumber vertebrae (L5) and bilateral lower limbs were scanned by micro-CT to analyze trabecular and cortical bone quality. Right femora were used for three-point bending to analyze the mechanical properties. Trabecular bone quality at L5 was better in db/db or crp/db/db group in terms of bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and separation (all p  0.05). Maximum loading and energy yield in mechanical test were similar among groups while the elastic modulus in db/db and crp/db/db significantly lower than db/m. The leptin-receptor mice is not a proper model for secondary osteoporosis associated with T2DM.

  10. Prenatal caffeine exposure induced a lower level of fetal blood leptin mainly via placental mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yi-meng; Luo, Han-wen; Kou, Hao; Wen, Yin-xian; Shen, Lang; Pei, Ling-guo; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Yuan-zhen; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    It's known that blood leptin level is reduced in intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) fetus, and placental leptin is the major source of fetal blood leptin. This study aimed to investigate the decreased fetal blood leptin level by prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) and its underlying placental mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered caffeine (30–120 mg/kg day) from gestational day 9 to 20. The level of fetal serum leptin and the expression of placental leptin-related genes were analyzed. Furthermore, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the reduced placental leptin's expression by treatment with caffeine (0.8–20 μM) in the BeWo cells. In vivo, PCE significantly decreased fetal serum leptin level in caffeine dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, placental mRNA expression of adenosine A2a receptor (Adora2a), cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), a short-type leptin receptor (Ob-Ra) and leptin was reduced in the PCE groups. In vitro, caffeine significantly decreased the mRNA expression of leptin, CREB and ADORA2A in concentration and time-dependent manners. The addition of ADORA2A agonist or adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonist reversed the inhibition of leptin expression induced by caffeine. PCE induced a lower level of fetal blood leptin, which the primary mechanism is that caffeine inhibited antagonized Adora2a and AC activities to decreased cAMP synthesis, thus inhibited the expression of the transcription factor CREB and target gene leptin in the placenta. Meantime, the reduced transportation of maternal leptin by placental Ob-Ra also contributed to the reduced fetal blood leptin. Together, PCE decreased fetal blood leptin mainly via reducing the expression and transportation of leptin in the placenta. - Highlights: • Caffeine reduced fetal blood leptin level. • Caffeine inhibited placental leptin production and transport. • Caffeine down-regulated placental leptin expression via antagonizing ADORA2. • Caffeine

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 couples cyclo-oxygenase-2 with pro-angiogenic actions of leptin on human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Garonna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin influences the behaviour of a wide range of cell types and is now recognised as a pro-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory factor. In the vasculature, these effects are mediated in part through its direct leptin receptor (ObRb-driven actions on endothelial cells (ECs but the mechanisms responsible for these activities have not been established. In this study we sought to more fully define the molecular links between inflammatory and angiogenic responses of leptin-stimulated human ECs.Immunoblotting studies showed that leptin increased cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression (but not COX-1 in cultured human umbilical vein ECs (HUVEC through pathways that depend upon activation of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38(MAPK and Akt, and stimulated rapid phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 on Tyr(1175. Phosphorylation of VEGFR2, p38(MAPK and Akt, and COX-2 induction in cells challenged with leptin were blocked by a specific leptin peptide receptor antagonist. Pharmacological inhibitors of COX-2, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway and p38(MAPK abrogated leptin-induced EC proliferation (assessed by quantifying 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, calcein fluorescence and propidium iodide staining, slowed the increased migration rate of leptin-stimulated cells (in vitro wound healing assay and inhibited leptin-induced capillary-like tube formation by HUVEC on Matrigel. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity reduced leptin-stimulated p38(MAPK and Akt activation, COX-2 induction, and pro-angiogenic EC responses, and blockade of VEGFR2 or COX-2 activities abolished leptin-driven neo-angiogenesis in a chick chorioallantoic membrane vascularisation assay in vivo.We conclude that a functional endothelial p38(MAPK/Akt/COX-2 signalling axis is required for leptin's pro-angiogenic actions and that this is regulated upstream by ObRb-dependent activation of VEGFR2

  12. Orexin A/Hypocretin Modulates Leptin Receptor-Mediated Signaling by Allosteric Modulations Mediated by the Ghrelin GHS-R1A Receptor in Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Mireia; Aguinaga, David; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canela, Enric I; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Franco, Rafael

    2017-07-17

    The hypothalamus is a key integrator of nutrient-seeking signals in the form of hormones and metabolites originated in both the central nervous system and the periphery. The main autocrine and paracrine target of orexinergic-related hormones such as leptin, orexin/hypocretin, and ghrelin are neuropeptide Y neurons located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the molecular and functional relationships between leptin, orexin/hypocretin and ghrelin receptors. Biophysical studies in a heterologous system showed physical interactions between them, with potential formation of heterotrimeric complexes. Functional assays showed robust allosteric interactions particularly different when the three receptors are expressed together. Further biochemical and pharmacological assays provided evidence of heterotrimer functional expression in primary cultures of hypothalamic neurons. These findings constitute evidence of close relationships in the action of the three hormones already starting at the receptor level in hypothalamic cells.

  13. Leptin receptor interacts with rat chromosome 1 to regulate renal disease traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gularte-Mérida, Rodrigo; Fisler, Janis S.; Hansen, Susan; Shibata, Noreene; Le, Anh; Medrano, Juan F.; Stern, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Linkage mapping in a backcross of {Brown Norway [BN/Crl (BN)] × ZUC-Lepr faSte (ZUC)} × ZUC identified a male-specific quantitative trait locus (QTL) for urinary albumin excretion (UAE) on rat chromosome 1. A homozygous ZUC.BN-(D1Rat42-D1Rat90)/Ste congenic was produced containing BN donor alleles from 135 to 276 Mb from chromosome 1 on the ZUC background. We observed threefold higher urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (ACR) in 15-wk-old Zucker background strain males than in same sex and age congenic animals when both strains are also homozygous for the ZUC leptin receptor fatty mutation (Lepr faSte) (P < 0.0001). We then linkage mapped within the donor region without confounded effects from other chromosomes. Phenotypes were collected in 248 F2 male rats in a population made by crossing parents heterozygous for both the BN donor region and ZUC Lepr faSte. Significant interactions were observed between the Lepr genotype and chromosome 1 QTL for six renal traits: urine volume, UAE at 10 and 15 wk, ACR, right kidney weight, and plasma urea nitrogen. A few traits, such as UAE and ACR, exhibit a second peak at the distal end of the chromosome. Hydronephrosis exhibited one or two QTLs contingent on adjustment for body weight. The results now demonstrate at least two sets of coincident traits with different correlations to kidney function. PMID:22968639

  14. [Association between feeding behavior, and genetic polymorphism of leptin and its receptor in obese Chilean children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Macarena; Obregón, Ana María; Weisstaub, Gerardo; Burrows, Raquel; Patiño, Ana; Ho-Urriola, Judith; Santos, José Luis

    2014-09-12

    Leptin (LEP) is mainly produced in adipose tissue and acts in the hypothalamus to regulate energy intake. Mutations in the LEP gene or its receptor (LEPR) that produce monogenic obesity are infrequent. However, LEP and LEPR polymorphisms have been associated with obesity multifactorial, due to the association found with body weight and eating behavior. Measure the association between LEP and LEPR polymorphisms with childhood obesity and eating behavior. 221 Chilean obese children (BMI above the 95th percentile) were recruited. Parents of 134 of these children were also recruited to determine the association between LEP and LEPR polymorphisms with obesity in a case study-parent trio. Eating behavior was measured through the questionnaire of three factors progenitors' version (TFEQ-P19) and eating behavior in children (CEBQ). No significant difference between the studied polymorphisms and childhood obesity, after correction for multiple comparisons, was observed. The dimensions; "Slow eating", "emotional eating", "enjoyment of food" and "uncontrolling eating" were significant associated with certain polymorphisms of LEP and LEPR. There would be an association between polymorphisms of the LEP and LEPR genes with eating behavior in Chilean obese children. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/Ob receptor-mediated signals in hypothalamus of GD3 synthase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shuting; Tokizane, Kyohei; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Okajima, Tetsuya; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko

    2016-10-21

    Gangliosides are widely involved in the regulation of cells and organs. However, little is known about their roles in adipose tissues and hypothalamus. In GD3 synthase-knockout (GD3S KO) mice, deletion of b-series gangliosides resulted in the reduction of serum leptin due to disturbed secretion from adipocytes. To examine whether leptin signals altered, leptin/leptin receptor (ObR)-mediated signaling in hypothalamus was analyzed. Hypothalamus of GD3S KO mouse showed increased expression of GM1 and GD1a, and increased activation of ObR-mediated signals such as pSTAT3 and c-Fos. Leptin stimulation of hypothalamus-derived N-41 cells and their transfectants with GD3S cDNA showed that a-series gangliosides positively regulate leptin/ObR-mediated signals. Co-precipitation analysis revealed that ObR interacts with a-series gangliosides with increased association by leptin stimulation. In brown adipose tissues (BAT) of GD3S KO mice, their weights and adipocyte numbers were increased, and BAT markers such as PGC1α and UCP-1 were also up-regulated. These results suggested that leptin/ObRb-mediated signals were enhanced in hypothalamus of GD3S KO mice due to increased a-series gangliosides, leading to the apparently similar features of energy expenditure between the KO and wild type mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Gln223Arg polymorphism in the leptin receptor is associated with familial combined hyperlipidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, G.M. van der; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Hijmans, A.G.M.; Blom, H.J.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Graaf, J. de

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is characterized by elevated levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and is associated with premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Other features of FCH are obesity and insulin resistance. Serum leptin

  17. Leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA expression and serum leptin concentration in patients with colorectal and metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkasap, N.; Ozkurt, M.; Erkasap, S.; Yasar, F.; Uzuner, K.; Ihtiyar, E.; Uslu, S.; Kara, M.; Bolluk, O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on the progression of colorectal carcinoma to metastatic disease by analyzing the serum leptin concentration and Ob-R gene expression in colon cancer tissues. Tissue samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent surgical resection for colon (18 cases) and metastatic colon (13 cases) cancer. Serum leptin concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ob-R mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for both groups. ELISA data were analyzed by the Student t-test and RT-PCR data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. RT-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA expression of Ob-R in human metastatic colorectal cancer was higher than in local colorectal cancer tissues. On the other hand, mean serum leptin concentration was significantly higher in local colorectal cancer patients compared to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of the present study suggest a role for leptin in the progression of colon cancer to metastatic disease without weight loss. In other words, significantly increased Ob-R mRNA expression and decreased serum leptin concentration in patients with metastatic colon cancer indicate that sensitization to leptin activity may be a major indicator of metastasis to the colon tissue and the determination of leptin concentration and leptin gene expression may be used to aid the diagnosis

  18. Expressão do gene da leptina e seu receptor Ob-Rb no parênquima mamário de novilhas leiteiras Leptin and leptin receptor Ob-Rb gene expression in mammary parenchyma of dairy heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Joyce Lew

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os efeitos de uma dieta de alto nível de energia e proteína combinada com a aplicação de bST no perfil de expressão dos genes da leptina e de seu receptor Ob-Rb no parênquima mamário de novilhas leiteiras. Foram utilizadas amostras de parênquima mamário de 32 novilhas holandesas distribuídas aleatoriamente em quatro tratamentos (n=8: dieta com alto ou baixo teor de energia e proteína combinada ou não com a aplicação de bST. O delineamento utilizado foi em blocos casualizados com arranjo de tratamentos em esquema fatorial 2 × 2. A extração do RNA total das amostras de tecido foi feita e o nível de expressão gênica foi analisado por qRT-PCR utilizando-se o gene da glicuronidase β como controle, pelo método 2-ΔΔCt. Animais que receberam a dieta com alto conteúdo de energia e proteína apresentaram maior expressão de mRNA de leptina, com aumento de 56%, e menor expressão de mRNA do receptor Ob-Rb, com redução de 18%. Por outro lado, a aplicação de bST resultou em diminuição da expressão do mRNA de leptina e do receptor Ob-Rb em 74% e 23%, respectivamente. Não houve interação entre dieta e aplicação de bST. O aumento na expressão de leptina pode explicar, ao menos em parte, os efeitos negativos da dieta de alta energia e proteína, oferecida no período pré-púbere, sobre a produção de leite de novilhas leiteiras.The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a diet with high level of energy and protein, combined with bST injections, on leptin and leptin-receptor (Ob-Rb gene expression profile in the mammary parenchyma of dairy heifers. Mammary parenchyma samples from 32 Holstein heifers, randomly assigned to one of four treatments (n=8, were utilized: high or low energy and protein diet, with or without bST injection. The experiment was designed in randomized blocks and arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Total RNA was extracted from tissue samples

  19. The Expression of Leptin, Estrogen Receptors, and Vitellogenin mRNAs in Migrating Female Chum Salmon, : The Effects of Hypo-osmotic Environmental Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jae Choi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leptin plays an important role in energy homeostasis and reproductive function in fish, especially in reproduction. Migrating fish, such as salmonoids, are affected by external environmental factors, and salinity changes are a particularly important influence on spawning migrations. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in salinity affect the expression of leptin, estrogen receptors (ERs, and vitellogenin (VTG in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta. The expression and activity of leptin, the expression of ERs and VTG, and the levels of estradiol-17β and cortisol increased after the fish were transferred to FW, demonstrating that changes in salinity stimulate the HPG axis in migrating female chum salmon. These findings reveal details about the role of elevated leptin levels and sex steroid hormones in stimulating sexual maturation and reproduction in response to salinity changes in chum salmon.

  20. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  1. The inhibitory effect of combination treatment with leptin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist on food intake and body weight gain is mediated by serotonin 1B and 2C receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Juszczak, M; Drobnik, J; Bojanowska, E

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies reported that the co-injection of leptin and cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists reduces food intake and body weight in rats, and this effect is more profound than that induced by these compounds individually. Additionally, serotonin mediates the effects of numerous anorectic drugs. To investigate whether serotonin interacts with leptin and endocannabinoids to affect food intake and body weight, we administered 5-hydroxytryptamine(HT)1B and 5-hydroxytryptamine(HT)2C serotonin receptor antagonists (3 mg/kg GR 127935 and 0.5 mg/kg SB 242084, respectively) to male Wistar rats treated simultaneously with leptin (100 μg/kg) and the CB1 receptor inverse agonist AM 251 (1 mg/kg) for 3 days. In accordance with previous findings, the co-injection of leptin and AM 251, but not the individual injection of each drug, resulted in a significant decrease in food intake and body weight gain. Blockade of the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors completely abolished the leptin- and AM 251-induced anorectic and body-weight-reducing effects. These results suggest that serotonin mediates the leptin- and AM 251-dependent regulation of feeding behavior in rats via the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors.

  2. Structural Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Receptor Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, John; Karalewitz, Andrew; Benefield, Desire A.; Mushrush, Darren J.; Pruitt, Rory N.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt); (MCW)

    2010-10-19

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds peripheral neurons at the neuromuscular junction through a dual-receptor mechanism that includes interactions with ganglioside and protein receptors. The receptor identities vary depending on BoNT serotype (A-G). BoNT/B and BoNT/G bind the luminal domains of synaptotagmin I and II, homologous synaptic vesicle proteins. We observe conditions under which BoNT/B binds both Syt isoforms, but BoNT/G binds only SytI. Both serotypes bind ganglioside G{sub T1b}. The BoNT/G receptor-binding domain crystal structure provides a context for examining these binding interactions and a platform for understanding the physiological relevance of different Syt receptor isoforms in vivo.

  3. Automated pipeline to analyze non-contact infrared images of the paraventricular nucleus specific leptin receptor knock-out mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Martinez, Myriam; Ghamari-Langroudi, Masoud; Gifford, Aliya; Cone, Roger; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Evidence of leptin resistance is indicated by elevated leptin levels together with other hallmarks of obesity such as a defect in energy homeostasis.1 As obesity is an increasing epidemic in the US, the investigation of mechanisms by which leptin resistance has a pathophysiological impact on energy is an intensive field of research.2 However, the manner in which leptin resistance contributes to the dysregulation of energy, specifically thermoregulation,3 is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the leptin receptor expressed in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons plays a role in thermoregulation at different temperatures. Non-contact infrared (NCIR) thermometry was employed to measure surface body temperature (SBT) of nonanesthetized mice with a specific deletion of the leptin receptor in the PVN after exposure to room (25 °C) and cold (4 °C) temperature. Dorsal side infrared images of wild type (LepRwtwt/sim1-Cre), heterozygous (LepRfloxwt/sim1-Cre) and knock-out (LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre) mice were collected. Images were input to an automated post-processing pipeline developed in MATLAB to calculate average and maximum SBTs. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between sex, cold exposure and leptin genotype with SBT measurements. Findings indicate that average SBT has a negative relationship to the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype, the female sex and cold exposure. However, max SBT is affected by the LepRfloxflox/sim1-Cre genotype and the female sex. In conclusion this data suggests that leptin within the PVN may have a neuroendocrine role in thermoregulation and that NCIR thermometry combined with an automated imaging-processing pipeline is a promising approach to determine SBT in non-anesthetized mice.

  4. Leptin as a critical regulator of hepatocellular carcinoma development through modulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanou Nikolaos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous epidemiological studies have documented that obesity is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological actions regulated by leptin, the obesity biomarker molecule, and its receptors in HCC and the correlation between leptin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, a known mediator of cellular immortalization. Methods We investigated the relationship between leptin, leptin receptors and hTERT mRNA expression in HCC and healthy liver tissue samples. In HepG2 cells, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to study signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3 and myc/mad/max transcription factors downstream of leptin which could be responsible for hTERT regulation. Flow cytometry was used for evaluation of cell cycle modifications and MMP1, 9 and 13 expression after treatment of HepG2 cells with leptin. Blocking of leptin's expression was achieved using siRNA against leptin and transfection with liposomes. Results We showed, for the first time, that leptin's expression is highly correlated with hTERT expression levels in HCC liver tissues. We also demonstrated in HepG2 cells that leptin-induced up-regulation of hTERT and TA was mediated through binding of STAT3 and Myc/Max/Mad network proteins on hTERT promoter. We also found that leptin could affect hepatocellular carcinoma progression and invasion through its interaction with cytokines and matrix mettaloproteinases (MMPs in the tumorigenic microenvironment. Furthermore, we showed that histone modification contributes to leptin's gene regulation in HCC. Conclusions We propose that leptin is a key regulator of the malignant properties of hepatocellular carcinoma cells through modulation of hTERT, a critical player of oncogenesis.

  5. Leptin as a critical regulator of hepatocellular carcinoma development through modulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, Nikolaos; Papanikolaou, Vassilis; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tsezou, Aspasia

    2010-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have documented that obesity is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the biological actions regulated by leptin, the obesity biomarker molecule, and its receptors in HCC and the correlation between leptin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a known mediator of cellular immortalization. We investigated the relationship between leptin, leptin receptors and hTERT mRNA expression in HCC and healthy liver tissue samples. In HepG2 cells, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to study signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and myc/mad/max transcription factors downstream of leptin which could be responsible for hTERT regulation. Flow cytometry was used for evaluation of cell cycle modifications and MMP1, 9 and 13 expression after treatment of HepG2 cells with leptin. Blocking of leptin's expression was achieved using siRNA against leptin and transfection with liposomes. We showed, for the first time, that leptin's expression is highly correlated with hTERT expression levels in HCC liver tissues. We also demonstrated in HepG2 cells that leptin-induced up-regulation of hTERT and TA was mediated through binding of STAT3 and Myc/Max/Mad network proteins on hTERT promoter. We also found that leptin could affect hepatocellular carcinoma progression and invasion through its interaction with cytokines and matrix mettaloproteinases (MMPs) in the tumorigenic microenvironment. Furthermore, we showed that histone modification contributes to leptin's gene regulation in HCC. We propose that leptin is a key regulator of the malignant properties of hepatocellular carcinoma cells through modulation of hTERT, a critical player of oncogenesis

  6. Relation of Absolute or Relative Adiposity to Insulin Resistance, Retinol Binding Protein-4, Leptin, and Adiponectin in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Lim Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCentral fat mass (CFM correlates with insulin resistance and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications; however, peripheral fat mass (PFM is associated with insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of absolute and relative regional adiposity to insulin resistance index and adipokines in type 2 diabetes.MethodsTotal of 83 overweighted-Korean women with type 2 diabetes were enrolled, and rate constants for plasma glucose disappearance (KITT and serum adipokines, such as retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4, leptin, and adiponectin, were measured. Using dual X-ray absorptiometry, trunk fat mass (in kilograms was defined as CFM, sum of fat mass on the lower extremities (in kilograms as PFM, and sum of CFM and PFM as total fat mass (TFM. PFM/TFM ratio, CFM/TFM ratio, and PFM/CFM ratio were defined as relative adiposity.ResultsMedian age was 55.9 years, mean body mass index 27.2 kg/m2, and mean HbA1c level 7.12±0.84%. KITT was positively associated with PMF/TFM ratio, PMF/CFM ratio, and negatively with CFM/TFM ratio, but was not associated with TFM, PFM, or CFM. RBP4 levels also had a significant relationship with PMF/TFM ratio and PMF/CFM ratio. Adiponectin, leptin, and apolipoprotein A levels were related to absolute adiposity, while only adiponectin to relative adiposity. In correlation analysis, KITT in type 2 diabetes was positively related with HbA1c, fasting glucose, RBP4, and free fatty acid.ConclusionThese results suggest that increased relative amount of peripheral fat mass may aggravate insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Transactivation of ErbB receptors by leptin in the cardiovascular system: mechanisms, consequences and target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jazmroz-Wiśniewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that elevated leptin concentration in patients with obesity/metabolic syndrome contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders including arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis after coronary angioplasty and myocardial hypertrophy. Receptor tyrosine kinases belonging to the ErbB family, especially ErbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and ErbB2 are abundantly expressed in the blood vessels and the heart. EGFR is activated not only by its multiple peptide ligands but also by many other factors including angiotensin II, endothelin-1, norepinephrine, thrombin and prorenin; the phenomenon referred to as "transactivation". Augmented EGFR signaling contributes to abnormalities of vascular tone and renal sodium handling as well as vascular remodeling and myocardial hypertrophy through various intracellular mechanisms, in particular extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Recent experimental studies indicate that chronically elevated leptin transactivates the EGFR through the mechanisms requiring reactive oxygen species and cytosolic tyrosine kinase, c-Src. In addition, hyperleptinemia increases ErbB2 activity in the arterial wall. Stimulation of EGFR and ErbB2 downstream signaling pathways such as ERK and PI3K in the vascular wall and the kidney may contribute to the increase in vascular tone, enhanced tubular sodium reabsorption as well as vascular and renal lesions in hyperleptinemic obese subjects.

  8. Whole-Body Vibration Mimics the Metabolic Effects of Exercise in Male Leptin Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wenger, Karl H; Misra, Sudipta; Davis, Catherine L; Pollock, Norman K; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Ding, Kehong; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W; Wosiski-Kuhn, Marlena; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Mattson, Mark P; Cutler, Roy G; Yu, Jack C; Stranahan, Alexis M

    2017-05-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) has gained attention as a potential exercise mimetic, but direct comparisons with the metabolic effects of exercise are scarce. To determine whether WBV recapitulates the metabolic and osteogenic effects of physical activity, we exposed male wild-type (WT) and leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mice to daily treadmill exercise (TE) or WBV for 3 months. Body weights were analyzed and compared with WT and db/db mice that remained sedentary. Glucose and insulin tolerance testing revealed comparable attenuation of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in db/db mice following TE or WBV. Both interventions reduced body weight in db/db mice and normalized muscle fiber diameter. TE or WBV also attenuated adipocyte hypertrophy in visceral adipose tissue and reduced hepatic lipid content in db/db mice. Although the effects of leptin receptor deficiency on cortical bone structure were not eliminated by either intervention, exercise and WBV increased circulating levels of osteocalcin in db/db mice. In the context of increased serum osteocalcin, the modest effects of TE and WBV on bone geometry, mineralization, and biomechanics may reflect subtle increases in osteoblast activity in multiple areas of the skeleton. Taken together, these observations indicate that WBV recapitulates the effects of exercise on metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Genetic polymorphism of exon 9-11 of the leptin gene receptor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... pothalamic NPY (orexigenic effector) to inhibit ingestive behavior (Schwartz et al., 1997). Several studies have shown that .... Almeidate EA, Almeida JC, Morqes F, Weimer T (2003). Molecular marker in the leptin gene and reproductive performance of beef cattle. J. Anin. Endo. 9(2): 106-120. Bado A ...

  10. Modulatory effects of peroxovanadates on insulin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, D W; Leung, W N; Xu, M; Zhu, S Q; Cheng, C H

    1996-11-15

    The insulin-mimetic effects exhibited by vanadate, hydrogen peroxide, and some peroxovanadates have recently been shown to occur, at least in part, through an activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, we examine the effects of these compounds on insulin receptor binding using receptor preparations from human placental membranes. Among the 16 vanadium(V)-peroxo complexes studied, the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion, where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, was found to increase insulin receptor binding by 24%, whereas the [VO(O2)2(en)]- ion, where en = ethylenediamine, was found to reduce insulin receptor binding by about the same amount under steady-state conditions. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicates that the observed effect of the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion on insulin receptor binding is exerted mainly at the high-capacity low-affinity sites. Furthermore, this modulatory effect is reversible and requires a continuous presence of the compound. By perturbing the membrane environment of the insulin receptor, we have shown that an intact membrane structure is essential for an observable effect. The observed modulation of insulin receptor binding by peroxovanadates is interpreted in terms of a ternary complex model in which the peroxovanadate acts as an allosteric effector modulating the binding equilibrium between insulin and its receptor.

  11. Leptin controls hair follicle cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kabashima-Kubo, Rieko; Yoshioka, Manabu; Nishio, Daisuke; Nakamura, Motonobu

    2014-04-01

    Leptin is a cytokine well known for its ability to control body weight and energy metabolism. Several lines of evidence have recently revealed that leptin also plays an important role in wound healing and immune modulation in skin. Sumikawa et al. Exp Dermatol 2014 evaluated the effect of leptin on hair follicle cycling using mutant and wild-type mice. They report that leptin is produced in dermal papilla cells in hair follicles and that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice show an abnormality in hair follicle cycling. Moreover, leptin injection induced the transition into the growth stage of the hair cycle (anagen). On this basis, it now deserves exploration whether leptin-mediated signalling is a key stimulus for anagen induction and whether this may be targeted to manage human hair disorders with defect in the control of hair follicle cycling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Prader-Willi syndrome proteins MAGEL2 and necdin regulate leptin receptor cell surface abundance through ubiquitination pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, Tishani Methsala; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Masschaele, Delphine; Sanderson, Matthea R; Carias, Karin Vanessa; Tavernier, Jan; Wevrick, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    In Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), obesity is caused by the disruption of appetite-controlling pathways in the brain. Two PWS candidate genes encode MAGEL2 and necdin, related melanoma antigen proteins that assemble into ubiquitination complexes. Mice lacking Magel2 are obese and lack leptin sensitivity in hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin neurons, suggesting dysregulation of leptin receptor (LepR) activity. Hypothalamus from Magel2-null mice had less LepR and altered levels of ubiquitin pathway proteins that regulate LepR processing (Rnf41, Usp8, and Stam1). MAGEL2 increased the cell surface abundance of LepR and decreased their degradation. LepR interacts with necdin, which interacts with MAGEL2, which complexes with RNF41 and USP8. Mutations in the MAGE homology domain of MAGEL2 suppress RNF41 stabilization and prevent the MAGEL2-mediated increase of cell surface LepR. Thus, MAGEL2 and necdin together control LepR sorting and degradation through a dynamic ubiquitin-dependent pathway. Loss of MAGEL2 and necdin may uncouple LepR from ubiquitination pathways, providing a cellular mechanism for obesity in PWS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Treatment with a GLP-1 receptor agonist diminishes the decrease in free plasma leptin during maintenance of weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, E W; Lundgren, J; Dirksen, C

    2015-01-01

    of weight gain, low-calorie diet products were allowed to replace up to two meals per day to achieve equal weight maintenance. Glucose tolerance and hormone responses were investigated before and after weight loss and after 52 weeks weight maintenance. Primary end points: increase in soluble leptin receptor.......3 kg (95% CI=-0.6 to -4.0)), and had fewer meal replacements per day compared with the control group (minus one meal per day (95% CI=-0.6 to -1)), P....3±0.1 mmol l(-1) to the level before weight loss (-0.5mmol l(-1) (95% CI=-0.1 to -0.9)), PMeal response of peptide PYY3-36 was higher at week 52 in the GLP-1RA group compared with the control group, P

  14. High expression of leptin receptor leads to temozolomide resistance with exhibiting stem/progenitor cell features in gliobalastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guosheng; Wang, Laixing; Zhao, Wenyuan; Yue, Zhijian; Zhao, Rui; Li, Yanan; Zhou, Xiaoping; Hu, Xiaowu; Liu, Jianmin

    2013-12-15

    Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive malignant disease with notable resistance to chemotherapy. In this study, we found that leptin receptor (ObR)-positive glioblastoma cells were resistant to temozolomide (TMZ), and TMZ-resistant cells exhibited high expression of ObR. ObR can serve as a marker to enrich glioblastoma cells with some stem/progenitor cell traits, which explained the reason for TMZ resistance of ObR+ cells. STAT3-mediated SOX2/OCT4 signaling axis maintained the stem/progenitor cell properties of ObR+ cells, which indirectly regulated glioblastoma TMZ resistance. These findings gain insight into the molecular link between obesity and glioblastoma, and better understanding of this drug-resistant population may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions for glioblastoma.

  15. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  16. On the benzodiazepine binding pocket in GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoy, Dmytro; Nyfeler, Yves; Gonthier, Anne; Schwob, Hervé; Goeldner, Maurice; Sigel, Erwin

    2004-01-30

    Benzodiazepines are used for their sedative/hypnotic, anxiolytic, muscle relaxant, and anticonvulsive effects. They exert their actions through a specific high affinity binding site on the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor, the gamma-aminobutyric acid, type A (GABA(A)) receptor channel, where they act as positive allosteric modulators. To start to elucidate the relative positioning of benzodiazepine binding site ligands in their binding pocket, GABA(A) receptor residues thought to reside in the site were individually mutated to cysteine and combined with benzodiazepine analogs carrying substituents reactive to cysteine. Direct apposition of such reactive partners is expected to lead to an irreversible site-directed reaction. We describe here the covalent interaction of alpha(1)H101C with a reactive group attached to the C-7 position of diazepam. This interaction was studied at the level of radioactive ligand binding and at the functional level using electrophysiological methods. Covalent reaction occurs concomitantly with occupancy of the binding pocket. It stabilizes the receptor in its allosterically stimulated conformation. Covalent modification is not observed in wild type receptors or when using mutated alpha(1)H101C-containing receptors in combination with the reactive ligand pre-reacted with a sulfhydryl group, and the modification rate is reduced by the binding site ligand Ro15-1788. We present in addition evidence that gamma(2)Ala-79 is probably located in the access pathway of the ligand to its binding pocket.

  17. Discovery and characterization of the first genuine avian leptin gene in the rock dove (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Einat, Miriam; Cogburn, Larry A; Yosefi, Sara; Hen, Gideon; Shinder, Dmitry; Shirak, Andrey; Seroussi, Eyal

    2014-09-01

    Leptin, the key regulator of mammalian energy balance, has been at the center of a great controversy in avian biology for the last 15 years since initial reports of a putative leptin gene (LEP) in chickens. Here, we characterize a novel LEP in rock dove (Columba livia) with low similarity of the predicted protein sequence (30% identity, 47% similarity) to the human ortholog. Searching the Sequence-Read-Archive database revealed leptin transcripts, in the dove's liver, with 2 noncoding exons preceding 2 coding exons. This unusual 4-exon structure was validated by sequencing of a GC-rich product (76% GC, 721 bp) amplified from liver RNA by RT-PCR. Sequence alignment of the dove leptin with orthologous leptins indicated that it consists of a leader peptide (21 amino acids; aa) followed by the mature protein (160 aa), which has a putative structure typical of 4-helical-bundle cytokines except that it is 12 aa longer than human leptin. Extra residues (10 aa) were located within the loop between 2 5'-helices, interrupting the amino acid motif that is conserved in tetrapods and considered essential for activation of leptin receptor (LEPR) but not for receptor binding per se. Quantitative RT-PCR of 11 tissues showed highest (P < .05) expression of LEP in the dove's liver, whereas the dove LEPR peaked (P < .01) in the pituitary. Both genes were prominently expressed in the gonads and at lower levels in tissues involved in mammalian leptin signaling (adipose; hypothalamus). A bioassay based on activation of the chicken LEPR in vitro showed leptin activity in the dove's circulation, suggesting that dove LEP encodes an active protein, despite the interrupted loop motif. Providing tools to study energy-balance control at an evolutionary perspective, our original demonstration of leptin signaling in dove predicts a more ancient role of leptin in growth and reproduction in birds, rather than appetite control.

  18. Hypothyroidism reduces ObRb-STAT3 leptin signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary of rats associated with resistance to leptin acute anorectic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Camila; Souza, Luana L; Costa-e-Sousa, Ricardo H; Almeida, Norma A S; Trevenzoli, Isis H; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C

    2012-10-01

    Leptin has been shown to regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, acting primarily through the STAT3 pathway triggered through the binding of leptin to the long-chain isoform of the leptin receptor, ObRb. We previously demonstrated that although hyperthyroid rats presented leptin effects on TSH secretion, those effects were abolished in hypothyroid rats. We addressed the hypothesis that changes in the STAT3 pathway might explain the lack of TSH response to leptin in hypothyroidism by evaluating the protein content of components of leptin signalling via the STAT3 pathway in the hypothalamus and pituitary of hypothyroid (0·03% methimazole in the drinking water/21 days) and hyperthyroid (thyroxine 5 μg/100 g body weight /5 days) rats. Hypothyroid rats exhibited decreased ObRb and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) protein in the hypothalamus, and in the pituitary gland they exhibited decreased ObRb, total STAT3, pSTAT3 and SOCS3 (P<0·05). Except for a modest decrease in pituitary STAT3, no other alterations were observed in hyperthyroid rats. Moreover, unlike euthyroid rats, the hypothyroid rats did not exhibit a reduction in food ingestion after a single injection of leptin (0·5 mg/kg body weight). Therefore, hypothyroidism decreased ObRb-STAT3 signalling in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland, which likely contributes to the loss of leptin action on food intake and TSH secretion, as previously observed in hypothyroid rats.

  19. Control of estrogen receptor ligand binding by Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliss, A E; Benzeno, S; Rao, J; Caplan, A J

    2000-04-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 interacts with unliganded steroid hormone receptors and regulates their activity. We have analyzed the function of yeast and mammalian Hsp90 in regulating the ability of the human estrogen receptor (ER) to bind ligands in vivo and in vitro. Using the yeast system, we show that the ER expressed in several different hsp82 mutant strains binds reduced amounts of the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol compared to the wild type. This defect in hormone binding occurs without any significant change in the steady state levels of ER protein. To analyze the role of mammalian Hsp90, we synthesized the human ER in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor. At low concentrations of geldanamycin we observed reduced levels of hormone binding by the ER. At higher concentrations, we found reduced synthesis of the receptor. These data indicate that Hsp90 functions to maintain the ER in a high affinity hormone-binding conformation.

  20. Bio-nanocapsule-based scaffold improves the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of mammalian receptors on the sensor chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian receptors are recognized as target molecules for drug discovery, and chemical libraries have been screened for both potential antagonists and agonists mainly by ligand-binding assays using immobilized receptors. A bio-nanocapsule (BNC) of approximately 30 nm that displays a tandem form of the protein A-derived immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding Z domains (denoted as ZZ-BNC) has been developed for both clustering and oriented immobilization of IgGs on the solid phase of immunosensors. In this study, human IgG1 Fc-fused vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor was immobilized through ZZ-BNC on the sensor chip of quartz crystal microbalance (ZZ-BNC-coating). When compared with direct adsorption and protein A-coating, the sensor chip showed higher sensitivity (∽46- and ∽165-fold, respectively) and larger ligand-binding capacity (∽4- and ∽18-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the number of VEGF molecules bound to its receptor increased from 0.20 (direct adsorption) to 2.06 by ZZ-BNC-coating, strongly suggesting that ZZ-BNC reduced the steric hindrance near ligand recognition sites through oriented immobilization. Similarly, the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of leptin and prolactin receptors were both enhanced at a level comparable to that observed for the VEGF receptor. Thus, the combination of ZZ-BNC and Fc-fused receptors could significantly improve the function of ligand-binding assays. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The effect of leptin receptor deficiency and fasting on cannabinoid receptor 1 mRNA expression in the rat hypothalamus, brainstem and nodose ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Philip Just; Vrang, Niels

    2009-10-02

    Despite ample evidence for the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the control of appetite, food intake and energy balance, relatively little is known about the regulation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)R) expression in respect to leptin signalling and fasting. In the present study, we examined CB(1)R mRNA levels in lean (Fa/?) and obese (fa/fa) male Zucker rats under basal and food-restricted conditions. Using stereological sampling principles coupled with semi-quantitative radioactive in situ hybridization we provide semi-quantitative estimates of CB(1)R mRNA expression in key appetite regulatory hypothalamic and brainstem areas, as well as in the nodose ganglia. Whereas no effect of fasting were determined on CB(1)R mRNA levels in the paraventricular (PVN) and ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus, in the brainstem dorsal vagal complex or nodose ganglion of lean Zucker rats, CB(1)R mRNA levels were consistently elevated in obese Zucker rats pointing to a direct influence of disrupted leptin signalling on CB(1)R mRNA regulation.

  2. Decreased serum level of soluble-leptin-receptor in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, K; Ebadi, P; Naeimi, S

    2012-09-01

    There is some evidence suggesting that leptin and its negative regulator, soluble-leptinreceptor (SLR) may be able to influence inflammatory and autoimmune processes. In this study, several variables including socio-demographics, health-related habits, depression score, serum molecules and blood parameters besides the SLR level were evaluated in patients with SLE (SLE-patients) and healthy controls. The patients had significantly lower SLR level and higher depression score than the controls and both of these variables have a significant association with the occurrence of disease in logistic regression model. Moreover, the results of Pearson correlation analysis showed that patients' SLR level was negatively correlated with their weights and BDI scores. For the first time, this study indicated a lower level of SLR in SLE-patients and suggested that lower concentrations of SLR in these patients may be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  3. Dysregulation of Striatal Dopamine Receptor Binding in Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Megan L; Kassir, Suham A; Underwood, Mark D; Bakalian, Mihran J; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2017-03-01

    Inconsistent evidence implicates disruptions of striatal dopaminergic indices in suicide and major depression. To determine whether there are alterations in the striatal dopamine system in suicide, we conducted a quantitative autoradiographic survey of dopamine transporter (DAT; [ 3 H]mazindol), D1 receptor ([ 3 H]SCH23390), and D2 receptor ([ 3 H]sulpiride) binding in the dorsal striatum postmortem from matched suicides and controls. Axis I and axis II psychiatric diagnosis, recent treatment history, and early life adversity (ELA) were determined by psychological autopsy. Mean DAT, D2, and D1 receptor binding did not differ in suicide. However, there was a positive correlation between D1 and D2 receptor binding in the dorsal striatum of control subjects (R 2 =0.31, p<0.05) that was not present in suicides (R 2 =0.00, p=0.97). In suicides and controls with reported ELA, there was no correlation between striatal DAT and D1 receptor binding (R 2 =0.07, p=0.33), although DAT and D1 receptor binding was positively correlated in subjects with no report of ELA (R 2 =0.32, p<0.05). After controlling for age, there were no significant ELA-related mean differences. Binding of D1 receptors and DAT throughout the striatum correlated negatively with age (D1 receptor: R 2 =0.12, p<0.05; DAT: R 2 =0.36, p<0.001). There appears to be an imbalance in dopaminergic receptor and transporter expression related to suicide that differs from that associated with ELA or age.

  4. Diet-induced obese mice retain endogenous leptin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaway, Nickki; Mahbod, Parinaz; Rivero, Belen; Norman, Lee Ann; Gertler, Arieh; D'Alessio, David A; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-06-02

    Obesity is characterized by hyperleptinemia and decreased response to exogenous leptin. This has been widely attributed to the development of leptin resistance, a state of impaired leptin signaling proposed to contribute to the development and persistence of obesity. To directly determine endogenous leptin activity in obesity, we treated lean and obese mice with a leptin receptor antagonist. The antagonist increased feeding and body weight (BW) in lean mice, but not in obese models of leptin, leptin receptor, or melanocortin-4 receptor deficiency. In contrast, the antagonist increased feeding and BW comparably in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, an increase associated with decreased hypothalamic expression of Socs3, a primary target of leptin. These findings demonstrate that hyperleptinemic DIO mice retain leptin suppression of feeding comparable to lean mice and counter the view that resistance to endogenous leptin contributes to the persistence of DIO in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nan Jiang,1,* Rongtong Sun,2,* Qing Sun3 1Shandong University School of Medicine, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Weihai Municipal Hospital, Weihai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, QianFoShan Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Previous reports indicate that over 13 different tumors, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, are related to obesity. Obesity-associated inflammatory, metabolic, and endocrine mediators, as well as the functioning of the gut microbiota, are suspected to contribute to tumorigenesis. In obese people, proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6, insulin and insulin-like growth factors, adipokines, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, adiponectin, and leptin are found to play crucial roles in the initiation and development of cancer. The cytokines induced by leptin in adipose tissue or tumor cells have been intensely studied. Leptin-induced signaling pathways are critical for biological functions such as adiposity, energy balance, endocrine function, immune reaction, and angiogenesis as well as oncogenesis. Leptin is an activator of cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis in several cell types, and an inducer of cancer stem cells; its critical roles in tumorigenesis are based on its oncogenic, mitogenic, proinflammatory, and pro-angiogenic actions. This review provides an update of the pathological effects of leptin signaling with special emphasis on potential molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targeting, which could potentially be used in future clinical settings. In addition, leptin-induced angiogenic ability and molecular mechanisms in HCC are discussed. The stringent binding affinity of leptin and its receptor Ob-R, as well as the highly upregulated expression of both

  6. Methodological aspects on drug receptor binding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, A.

    1978-01-01

    Although drug receptors occur in relatively low concentrations, they can be visualized by the use of appropriate radioindicators. In most cases the procedure is rapid and can reach a high degree of accuracy. Specificity of the interaction is studied by competition analysis. The necessity of using several radioindicators to define a receptor population is emphasized. It may be possible to define isoreceptors and drugs with selectivity for one isoreceptor. (Author)

  7. Modeling of ligand binding to dopamine D2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostopovici-Halip Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminic receptors have been for long time the major targets for developing new small molecules with high affinity and selectivity to treat psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration, drug abuse, and other therapeutic areas. In the absence of a 3D structure for the human D2 dopamine (HDD2 receptor, the efforts for discovery and design of new potential drugs rely on comparative models generation, docking and pharmacophore development studies. To get a better understanding of the HDD2 receptor binding site and the ligand-receptor interactions a homology model of HDD2 receptor based on the X-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor has been built and used to dock a set of partial agonists of HDD2 receptor. The main characteristics of the binding mode for the HDD2 partial agonists set are given by the ligand particular folding and a complex network of contacts represented by stacking interactions, salt bridge and hydrogen bond formation. The characterization of the partial agonist binding mode at HDD2 receptor provide the needed information to generate pharmacophore models which represent essential information in the future virtual screening studies in order to identify new potential HDD2 partial agonists.

  8. Mechanical Vibration Mitigates the Decrease of Bone Quantity and Bone Quality of Leptin Receptor-Deficient Db/Db Mice by Promoting Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Luo, Erping; Cai, Jing; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Shen, Guanghao; Wang, Xin; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a major hormonal product of adipocytes, is involved in regulating appetite and energy metabolism. Substantial studies have revealed the anabolic actions of leptin on skeletons and bone cells both in vivo and in vitro. Growing evidence has substantiated that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice exhibit decreased bone mass and impaired bone microstructure despite several conflicting results previously reported. We herein systematically investigated bone microarchitecture, mechanical strength, bone turnover and its potential molecular mechanisms in db/db mice. More importantly, we also explored an effective approach for increasing bone mass in leptin receptor-deficient animals in an easy and noninvasive manner. Our results show that deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture and decreases of skeletal mechanical strength-including maximum load, yield load, stiffness, energy, tissue-level modulus and hardness-in db/db mice were significantly ameliorated by 12-week, whole-body vibration (WBV) with 0.5 g, 45 Hz via micro-computed tomography (μCT), three-point bending, and nanoindentation examinations. Serum biochemical analysis shows that WBV significantly decreased serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) and CTx-1 levels and also mitigated the reduction of serum osteocalcin (OCN) in db/db mice. Bone histomorphometric analysis confirmed that decreased bone formation-lower mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone-in db/db mice were suppressed by WBV. Real-time PCR assays show that WBV mitigated the reductions of tibial alkaline phosphatase (ALP), OCN, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), type I collagen (COL1), BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6, and β-catenin mRNA expression, and prevented the increases of tibial sclerostin (SOST), RANK, RANKL, RANL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene levels in db/db mice. Our results show that WBV promoted bone quantity and quality in db/db mice with obvious

  9. Characterisation of the melanocortin 4 receptor by radioligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schioeth, H.B.; Wikberg, J.E.S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Pharmaceutical Pharmacology, Uppsala (Sweden); Muceniece, R. [Inst. of Organic Synthesis, Lab. of Pharmacology, Riga (Latvia)

    1996-09-01

    The DNA encoding the human melanocortin 4 receptor was expressed in COS (CV-1 origin, Sv 40) cells and its radioligand binding properties was tested by using the [{sup 124}I](Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}) {alpha}melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). The radioligand was found to bind to a single saturable site with a K{sub d} of 3l84{+-}0.57 nmol/l in the MC4 receptor expressing cells. The order of potency of a number of substance competing for the [{sup 12}25I][Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}] {alpha}MSH binding was the following; [Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}] {alpha}-MSH>[Nle{sup e}]-{alpha}-MSH>{beta}-MSH>desacetyl-{alpha}-MSH >{alpha}-MSH>ACTH (1-39)>ACTH (4-10)>{gamma}2-MSH. This order of potency is unique for the melanocortin 4 receptor when compared to our previously published data for the other melanocortin receptor subtypes. Most notably the melanocortin 4 receptor shows highest affinity for {beta}-MSH, among the endogenous MSH-peptides. Furthermore the melanocortin 4 receptor shows very low affinity for the {gamma}-MSH peptides. This distinguishes the melanocortin 4 receptor from the melanocortin 3 receptor, which is the other major central nervous system melanocortin-receptor, as melanocortin 3 receptor shows high affinity for {gamma}-MSH. Our finding might indicate a specific role for {beta}-MSH for the melanocortin 4 receptor. (au) 31 refs.

  10. Leptin as local inflammatory marker in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, R; Vernooy, J H J; Schols, A M W J; Dentener, M A; Wouters, E F M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the lung is a characteristic finding in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Leptin is a pleiotropic cytokine thought to play a role in host response to inflammation. As recent studies have shown that leptin receptors are present in the lung, this study aimed to determine if leptin is detectable in induced sputum of COPD patients and if there is a relationship between leptin and other inflammatory markers in sputum. Sputum was induced in 14 male patients with moderate COPD (FEV1: 56 (15) % pred.). Leptin, total tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed in induced sputum supernatant by ELISA. Leptin was also determined in EDTA plasma. Leptin was detectable in induced sputum of 10 COPD patients. A significant relationship was found between sputum leptin and CRP (r = 0.943, P leptin and sputum leptin were inversely correlated (r = -0.643, P leptin is detectable in induced sputum of patients with moderate COPD and is related to other inflammatory markers. The observed correlations between leptin and inflammatory markers in sputum may indicate that leptin is involved in the local inflammatory response in COPD.

  11. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10 -6 to 10 -8 M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these 125 I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by 125 I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors

  12. Leptin rapidly activates PPARs in C2C12 muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendinelli, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta; Maroni, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that leptin operates on the tissues, including skeletal muscle, also by modulating gene expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have shown that physiological doses of leptin promptly increase the binding of C2C12 cell nuclear extracts to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) response elements in oligonucleotide probes and that all three PPAR isoforms participate in DNA-binding complexes. We pre-treated C2C12 cells with AACOCF 3 , a specific inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A 2 (cPLA 2 ), an enzyme that supplies ligands to PPARs, and found that it abrogates leptin-induced PPAR DNA-binding activity. Leptin treatment significantly increased cPLA 2 activity, evaluated as the release of [ 3 H]arachidonic acid from pre-labelled C2C12 cells, as well as phosphorylation. Further, using MEK1 inhibitor PD-98059 we showed that leptin activates cPLA 2 through ERK induction. These results support a direct effect of leptin on skeletal muscle cells, and suggest that the hormone may modulate muscle transcription also by precocious activation of PPARs through ERK-cPLA 2 pathway

  13. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure.

  14. Goldfish Leptin-AI and Leptin-AII: Function and Central Mechanism in Feeding Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Fen Yan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin is a peripheral satiety factor that inhibits feeding by regulating a variety of appetite-related hormones in the brain. However, most of the previous studies examining leptin in fish feeding were performed with mammalian leptins, which share very low sequence homologies with fish leptins. To elucidate the function and mechanism of endogenous fish leptins in feeding regulation, recombinant goldfish leptin-AI and leptin-AII were expressed in methylotrophic yeast and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. By intraperitoneal (IP injection, both leptin-AI and leptin-AII were shown to inhibit the feeding behavior and to reduce the food consumption of goldfish in 2 h. In addition, co-treatment of leptin-AI or leptin-AII could block the feeding behavior and reduce the food consumption induced by neuropeptide Y (NPY injection. High levels of leptin receptor (lepR mRNA were detected in the hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of the goldfish brain. The appetite inhibitory effects of leptins were mediated by downregulating the mRNA levels of orexigenic NPY, agouti-related peptide (AgRP and orexin and upregulating the mRNA levels of anorexigenic cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART, cholecystokinin (CCK, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and proopiomelanocortin (POMC in different areas of the goldfish brain. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights into the functions and mechanisms of leptins in appetite control in a fish model.

  15. Sweet Taste Receptor Serves to Activate Glucose- and Leptin-Responsive Neurons in the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus and Participates in Glucose Responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Daisuke; Koike, Miho; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic feeding center plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In the feeding center, whole-body energy signals including hormones and nutrients are sensed, processed, and integrated. As a result, food intake and energy expenditure are regulated. Two types of glucose-sensing neurons exist in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC): glucose-excited neurons and glucose-inhibited neurons. While some molecules are known to be related to glucose sensing in the hypothalamus, the mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in the hypothalamus are not fully understood. The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of taste type 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and taste type 1 receptor 3 (T1R3) and senses sweet tastes. T1R2 and T1R3 are distributed in multiple organs including the tongue, pancreas, adipose tissue, and hypothalamus. However, the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC remains to be clarified. To examine the role of sweet taste receptors in the ARC, cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in isolated single ARC neurons were measured using Fura-2 fluorescent imaging. An artificial sweetener, sucralose at 10 -5 -10 -2 M dose dependently increased [Ca 2+ ] i in 12-16% of ARC neurons. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was suppressed by a sweet taste receptor inhibitor, gurmarin. The sucralose-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increase was inhibited under an extracellular Ca 2+ -free condition and in the presence of an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, nitrendipine. Sucralose-responding neurons were activated by high-concentration of glucose. This response to glucose was markedly suppressed by gurmarin. More than half of sucralose-responding neurons were activated by leptin but not ghrelin. Percentages of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons among sucralose-responding neurons and sweet taste receptor expressing neurons were low, suggesting that majority of sucralose-responding neurons are non-POMC neurons. These data suggest that sweet taste receptor-mediated cellular activation

  16. Leptin Receptor Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Sun, Dali

    2017-04-03

    Few studies have assessed the association between leptin receptor (LEPR) gene polymorphism and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Of the few epidemiological studies on this topic, the results are still controversial. PubMed and Embase were screened for studies from their inception to 9 October 2016. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with the corresponding confidence intervals (CI) were used to measure the effect size for studies that reported the association under allelic, homozygous, and dominant models. Pre-specified characteristics were conducted in the subgroup analysis. Heterogeneity between subgroups was evaluated by meta-regression analysis. Seven eligible studies involving 44,133 participants were included in our meta-analysis. Borderline significant association was observed between the LEPR gene polymorphism (rs1137101, rs1137100, rs6700896, and rs8179183) and the increased risk of CVD with considerable heterogeneity under the allelic model, and the overall pooled OR (95% CI) was 1.10 (0.99, 1.22). The LEPR gene variant rs6700896, 109G allele, and 109GG genotype were significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD. Furthermore, stratified group analysis revealed that the association was more pronounced for stroke. Race-differences might also cause the considerable heterogeneity and non-significant association. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the association between LEPR gene variants and CVD risk. Some LEPR gene variants were significantly associated with the increased risk of CVD. However, the present study is limited in its small number of included studies, considerable heterogeneity, and observational study design. Further research is still warranted to confirm the magnitude of the association.

  17. Adult exposure to tributyltin affects hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, Y1 receptor distribution, and circulating leptin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, E; Farinetti, A; Marraudino, M; Sterchele, D; Eva, C; Gotti, S; Panzica, G

    2016-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a pesticide used in antifouling paints, is toxic for aquatic invertebrates. In vertebrates, TBT may act in obesogen- inducing adipogenetic gene transcription for adipocyte differentiation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that acute administration of TBT induces c-fos expression in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult exposure to TBT may alter a part of the nervous pathways controlling animal food intake. In particular, we investigated the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity. This neuropeptide forms neural circuits dedicated to food assumption and its action is mediated by Y1 receptors that are widely expressed in the hypothalamic nuclei responsible for the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. To this purpose, TBT was orally administered at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg/day/body weight to adult animals [male and female C57BL/6 (Y1-LacZ transgenic mice] for 4 weeks. No differences were found in body weight and fat deposition, but we observed a significant increase in feed efficiency in TBT-treated male mice and a significant decrease in circulating leptin in both sexes. Computerized quantitative analysis of NPY immunoreactivity and Y1-related β-galactosidase activity demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in NPY and Y1 transgene expression in the hypothalamic circuit controlling food intake of treated male mice in comparison with controls. In conclusion, the present results indicate that adult exposure to TBT is profoundly interfering with the nervous circuits involved in the stimulation of food intake. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  18. Effects of high fat diet, ovariectomy, and physical activity on leptin receptor expression in rat brain and white fat tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blažetić, Senka; Labak, Irena; Viljetić, Barbara; Balog, Marta; Vari, Sandor G.; Krivošíková, Zora; Gajdoš, Martin; Kramárová, Patrícia; Kebis, Anton; Vuković, Rosemary; Puljak, Livia; Has-Schön, Elizabeta; Heffer, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate in a rat animal model whether ovariectomy, high fat diet (HFD), and physical activity in the form of running affect leptin receptor (Ob-R) distribution in the brain and white fat tissue compared to sham (Sh) surgery, standard diet (StD), and sedentary conditions. Methods The study included 48 female laboratory Wistar rats (4 weeks old). Following eight weeks of feeding with standard or HFD, rats were subjected to either OVX or Sh surgery. After surgery, all animals continued StD or HFD for the next 10 weeks. During these 10 weeks, ovariectomy and Sh groups were subjected to physical activity or sedentary conditions. Free-floating immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods were carried out to detect Ob-R in the brain and adipose tissue. Results StD-ovariectomy-sedentary group had a greater number of Ob-R positive neurons in lateral hypothalamic nuclei than StD-Sh-sedentary group. There was no difference in Ob-R positive neurons in arcuatus nuclei between all groups. Ob-R distribution in the barrel cortex was higher in HFD group than in StD group. Ob-R presence in perirenal and subcutaneous fat was decreased in StD-ovariectomy group. Conclusion HFD and ovariectomy increased Ob-R distribution in lateral hypothalamic nuclei, but there was no effect on arcuatus nuclei. Our results are first to suggest that HFD, ovariectomy, and physical activity affect Ob-R distribution in the barrel cortex, which might be correlated with the role of Ob-R in election of food in rats. PMID:24891281

  19. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  20. Agonist Binding to Chemosensory Receptors: A Systematic Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Fierro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Human G-protein coupled receptors (hGPCRs constitute a large and highly pharmaceutically relevant membrane receptor superfamily. About half of the hGPCRs' family members are chemosensory receptors, involved in bitter taste and olfaction, along with a variety of other physiological processes. Hence these receptors constitute promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. Molecular modeling has been so far the most important tool to get insights on agonist binding and receptor activation. Here we investigate both aspects by bioinformatics-based predictions across all bitter taste and odorant receptors for which site-directed mutagenesis data are available. First, we observe that state-of-the-art homology modeling combined with previously used docking procedures turned out to reproduce only a limited fraction of ligand/receptor interactions inferred by experiments. This is most probably caused by the low sequence identity with available structural templates, which limits the accuracy of the protein model and in particular of the side-chains' orientations. Methods which transcend the limited sampling of the conformational space of docking may improve the predictions. As an example corroborating this, we review here multi-scale simulations from our lab and show that, for the three complexes studied so far, they significantly enhance the predictive power of the computational approach. Second, our bioinformatics analysis provides support to previous claims that several residues, including those at positions 1.50, 2.50, and 7.52, are involved in receptor activation.

  1. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  2. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity......-contributing interactions are attributed to different domains and known to occur in two steps. Here, knowledge on chemokine and receptor domains involved in the first binding-step and the second activation-step is reviewed. A mechanism comprising at least two steps seems consistent; however, several intermediate...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  3. Receptor binding kinetics equations: Derivation using the Laplace transform method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Sam R J

    Measuring unlabeled ligand receptor binding kinetics is valuable in optimizing and understanding drug action. Unfortunately, deriving equations for estimating kinetic parameters is challenging because it involves calculus; integration can be a frustrating barrier to the pharmacologist seeking to measure simple rate parameters. Here, a well-known tool for simplifying the derivation, the Laplace transform, is applied to models of receptor-ligand interaction. The method transforms differential equations to a form in which simple algebra can be applied to solve for the variable of interest, for example the concentration of ligand-bound receptor. The goal is to provide instruction using familiar examples, to enable investigators familiar with handling equilibrium binding equations to derive kinetic equations for receptor-ligand interaction. First, the Laplace transform is used to derive the equations for association and dissociation of labeled ligand binding. Next, its use for unlabeled ligand kinetic equations is exemplified by a full derivation of the kinetics of competitive binding equation. Finally, new unlabeled ligand equations are derived using the Laplace transform. These equations incorporate a pre-incubation step with unlabeled or labeled ligand. Four equations for measuring unlabeled ligand kinetics were compared and the two new equations verified by comparison with numerical solution. Importantly, the equations have not been verified with experimental data because no such experiments are evident in the literature. Equations were formatted for use in the curve-fitting program GraphPad Prism 6.0 and fitted to simulated data. This description of the Laplace transform method will enable pharmacologists to derive kinetic equations for their model or experimental paradigm under study. Application of the transform will expand the set of equations available for the pharmacologist to measure unlabeled ligand binding kinetics, and for other time

  4. Cardiovascular receptor binding affinity of aqueous extracts from Allium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the antihypertensive effect of garlic could to be associated to interactions with adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors involved in regulating blood pressure and to compare these data with those obtained from wild Allium species. The aqueous extracts of bulbs or leaves of Allium sativum L. (garlic), Allium neapolitanum Cyr., Allium subhirsutum L., and Allium roseum L. were tested for their in vitro affinity for the adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2)) and dopaminergic (D(1) and D(2)) receptors by radioligand binding assays. Interesting results were shown by bulbs extracts of A. neapolitanum and A. subhirsutum with higher affinities for the beta(2) receptors and by bulbs extract of A. roseum for D(2) receptors. The known antihypertensive activity of Allium sativum cannot be correlated with binding to receptors involved in blood pressure regulation. However, aqueous extracts of the wild-type species of Allium show much higher affinities, warranting further explorations.

  5. Recombinant Collagen Engineered to Bind to Discoidin Domain Receptor Functions as a Receptor Inhibitor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Xu, Huifang; Gavriilidou, Despoina; Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W.; Kaplan, David L.; Balduini, Alessandra; Leitinger, Birgit; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial collagen-like protein Scl2 has been developed as a recombinant collagen model system to host human collagen ligand-binding sequences, with the goal of generating biomaterials with selective collagen bioactivities. Defined binding sites in human collagen for integrins, fibronectin, heparin, and MMP-1 have been introduced into the triple-helical domain of the bacterial collagen and led to the expected biological activities. The modular insertion of activities is extended here to the discoidin domain receptors (DDRs), which are collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinases. Insertion of the DDR-binding sequence from human collagen III into bacterial collagen led to specific receptor binding. However, even at the highest testable concentrations, the construct was unable to stimulate DDR autophosphorylation. The recombinant collagen expressed in Escherichia coli does not contain hydroxyproline (Hyp), and complementary synthetic peptide studies showed that replacement of Hyp by Pro at the critical Gly-Val-Met-Gly-Phe-Hyp position decreased the DDR-binding affinity and consequently required a higher concentration for the induction of receptor activation. The ability of the recombinant bacterial collagen to bind the DDRs without inducing kinase activation suggested it could interfere with the interactions between animal collagen and the DDRs, and such an inhibitory role was confirmed in vitro and with a cell migration assay. This study illustrates that recombinant collagen can complement synthetic peptides in investigating structure-activity relationships, and this system has the potential for the introduction or inhibition of specific biological activities. PMID:26702058

  6. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  7. Receptor-binding profiles of H7 subtype influenza viruses in different host species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Gambaryan (Alexandra ); T.Y. Matrosovich (Tatyana); J. Philipp (Jennifer); V.J. Munster (Vincent); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G. Cattoli (Giovanni); I. Capua (Ilaria); S.L. Krauss (Scott); R.G. Webster (Robert); J. Banks (James); N.V. Bovin (Nicolai); H.D. Klenk

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses of gallinaceous poultry and wild aquatic birds usually have distinguishable receptor-binding properties. Here we used a panel of synthetic sialylglycopolymers and solid-phase receptor-binding assays to characterize receptor-binding profiles of about 70 H7 influenza

  8. DMPD: LPS-binding proteins and receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9665271 LPS-binding proteins and receptors. Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT. J Leukoc Biol.... 1998 Jul;64(1):25-32. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS-binding proteins and receptors. PubmedID 9665271 Title LPS-binding prot...eins and receptors. Authors Fenton MJ, Golenbock DT. Publication J Leukoc Biol. 199

  9. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M

    2016-01-13

    Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Estrogen receptor diminishes DNA-binding activities of chicken GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holth, L T; Sun, J M; Coutts, A S; Murphy, L C; Davie, J R

    1997-12-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) repressed erythroid differentiation and erythroid-specific gene expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of ER alpha (referred to throughout as ER) on DNA-binding activities of transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of erythroid-specific genes, and, in particular, the histone H5 gene. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we found that in the presence of rabbit reticulocyte lysate, human ER reduced the binding activities of chicken immature erythrocyte nuclear extracted proteins to GATA and CACCC sites in the H5 promoter and enhancer. In contrast, the binding activities of NF1 and Sp1 were not affected by ER. Binding of ER to an estrogen response element was enhanced by addition of rabbit reticulocyte lysate. This lysate was also necessary for ER to diminish the DNA-binding activity of GATA-1. These results suggest that additional factor(s) are necessary for full ER function. Both GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins are critical for the developmentally regulated expression of erythroid-specific genes. We hypothesize that interference in DNA-binding activities of GATA-1 and CACCC-binding proteins is the mechanism by which the ER inhibits regulation of these genes.

  11. LEPTIN AND ADIPONECTIN CONTENT IN BLOOD SERUM AND RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN OSTEOPENIA AND OSTEOPOROSIS IN PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Ugay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to identify the leptin and adiponectin content in blood regarding their receptor expression in the soft tissue of the hip in case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with the signs of osteporosis.80 COPD patients and 76 healthy persons were examined. Receptor expression to leptin and adiponectin in the vessels was tested by immune-fluorescent technique in 30 patients.Control leptin and adiponectin expression was presented in skin, subcutaneous fat and cross-striped muscles. In case of COPD leptin and adiponectin expression was identified in skin and subcutaneous fat. In control cases and COPD leptin expression was identified in endothelium and myocytes achieving confident reduction at stages II and III. Adiponectin expression in control cases and in stage I was detection only in adventitia. In stages II and III stages adiponectin is expressed in myocytes and endothelium. Receptor expression to leptin and adiponectin repeats their content in blood. The correlations between leptin and adiponectin and their expression with body mass index and mineral bone density have been found out.The detected changes confirm the contribution of adiponectin to re-modeling of muscle and bone tissue in case of COPD. 

  12. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J Scott; Simcox, Judith A; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T; McClain, Donald A

    2015-09-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression.

  13. Development of prolactin receptor antagonists with reduced pH-dependence of receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mathilde Johanne Kaas; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt; Bernichtein, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The cytokine hormone prolactin has a vast number of diverse functions. Unfortunately, it also exhibits tumor growth promoting properties, which makes the development of prolactin receptor antagonists a priority. Prolactin binds to its cognate receptor with much lower affinity at low p....... From evaluation of known molecular structures of human prolactin, of the prolactin receptor and of different complexes of the two, three histidine residues in the hormone-receptor binding site 1 were selected for mutational studies. We analyzed 10 variants by circular dichroism spectroscopy, affinity...... antagonists were developed earlier and the histidine mutations were introduced within such background. The antagonistic properties were maintained and the high affinity at low pH conserved. The implications of these findings may open new areas of research in the field of prolactin cancer biology. Copyright...

  14. Cholinergic receptor binding in the frontal cortex of suicide victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.

    1986-01-01

    Because there is a high incidence of individuals diagnosed as having an affective disorder who subsequently commit suicide, the author thought it would be of interest to determine QNB binding in the brains of a large sample of suicide victims, and to compare the findings with a well-matched control group. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from 22 suicide victims and 22 controls. Frontal cortex samples were diseected, frozen, and stored until assayed. Samples of tissue homogenate were incubated in duplicate with 10 concentrations of tritium-QNB. Specific binding was determined with and without atropine. The results confirmed previous studies in which no changes were noted in suicide versus control brains. While the findings neither disprove nor support the cholinergic hypothesis of depression, they do suggest that the neurochemical basis for the in vivo observations of increased responsivity of depressed individuals to muscarinic cholinergic agents might not involve changes in receptors estimated by QNB binding

  15. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Liang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1. However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands.

  16. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    , the ghrelin receptor, neuropeptide Y, adiponectin and proopiomelanocortin. We investigated whether the expression of these factors was affected in rats chronically treated with the antipsychotic risperidone. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with risperidone (1.0 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (20......% hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin) for 28 days. Expression of the aforementioned factors were examined together with plasma prolactin and ghrelin levels. RESULTS: No difference in body weight gained during treatment was observed between risperidone and vehicle treated rats, but plasma risperidone levels...... positively correlated with visceral fat mass. Risperidone treatment increased CB(1) receptor binding in the arcuate nucleus (40%), hippocampus (25-30%) and amygdala (35%) without concurrent alterations in the CB(1) receptor mRNA. Risperidone treatment increased adiponectin mRNA. CONCLUSION: The present study...

  17. In vivo regulation of intestinal absorption of amino acids by leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; De Pablo-Maiso, Lorena; Lostao, María Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is secreted by the gastric mucosa and is able to reach the intestinal lumen and bind to its receptors located in the apical membranes of enterocytes. We have previously demonstrated that apical leptin inhibits uptake of amino acids in rat intestine in vitro and in Caco-2 cells. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of leptin on absorption of amino acids using in vivo techniques, which generate situations closer to physiological conditions. In vivo intestinal absorption of amino acids in rats was measured by isolating a jejunal loop and using the single-pass perfusion system. Disappearance of glutamine (Gln), proline (Pro), and β-alanine (β-Ala) from the perfusate, in the absence or presence of leptin, was measured using a radioactivity method. Luminal leptin (25 nM) inhibited the absorption of 2 mM Pro, 5 mM β-Ala, and 5 mM Gln by approximately 45% after 5-15 min; the effect remained constant until the end of the experiment (80 min) and was rapidly and completely reversed when leptin was removed from the perfusion medium. Moreover, leptin was able to regulate the absorption of galactose and Gln in the same animal, indicating a direct action of the hormone on the specific transporters implicated in the uptake of each nutrient. The results of the present work indicate that luminal leptin decreases absorption of amino acids in vivo in a short-term manner and in a reversible way. These results, together with our previous findings, make it evident that leptin can be considered as a hormone which provides the intestine with a control mechanism to handle absorption of nutrients. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. The Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Stereotype C Binds Phosphoinositides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M.

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD50 of {approx} 1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a 'dual receptor' mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Here, using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides. Additional interactions to phosphoinositides may help BoNT/C bind membrane more tightly and transduct signals for subsequent steps of intoxication. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms of host cell membrane recognition by BoNTs.

  19. LEPTIN AND ADIPONECTIN CONTENT IN BLOOD SERUM AND RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN OSTEOPENIA AND OSTEOPOROSIS IN PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    L. G. Ugay; V. A. Nevzorova; E. A. Kochetkova; E. V. Burtseva; Yu. V. Maystrovskaya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose is to identify the leptin and adiponectin content in blood regarding their receptor expression in the soft tissue of the hip in case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with the signs of osteporosis.80 COPD patients and 76 healthy persons were examined. Receptor expression to leptin and adiponectin in the vessels was tested by immune-fluorescent technique in 30 patients.Control leptin and adiponectin expression was presented in skin, subcutaneous fat and cross-striped muscles...

  20. Correlation between maternal and cord blood leptin and fetal growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... IL -2 and growth hormone. The long form of the leptin receptor functions similarly to cytokine ... regulation of leptin synthesis and the risk for obesity in the offspring. In species such as the human and sheep, ..... Hormonal regulation of leptin levels in the fetus and neonate might be different from the endocrine ...

  1. Influence of age on leptin induced skeletal muscle signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guadalupe Grau, Amelia; Larsen, Steen; Guerra, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Age associated fat mass accumulation could be due to dysregulation of leptin signaling in skeletal muscle. Thus, we investigated total protein expression and phosphorylation levels of the long isoform of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb), and leptin signaling through Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal...... skeletal muscle of different age....

  2. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  3. Treponema pallidum receptor binding proteins interact with fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, K.M.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Analysis of plasma proteins avidly bound to T. pallidum surfaces revealed the ability of T. pallidum to acquire numerous host macromolecules. No acquisition was evident by the avirulent spirochete, T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Western blotting technology using hyperimmune antifibronectin serum as a probe revealed the ability of virulent treponemes to avidly bind fibronectin from a complex medium such as plasma. The specificity of the tiplike adherence of motile T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated glass surfaces and to fibronectin on HEp-2 cells was reinforced by the observation that pretreatment of coverslips or cell monolayers with monospecific antiserum against fibronectin substantially reduced T. pallidum attachment. The stoichiometric binding of T. pallidum to fibronectin-coated coverslips and the inability of unlabeled or /sup 35/S-radiolabeled treponemes to interact with glass surfaces treated with other plasma proteins further established the specific nature of the interaction between virulent T. pallidum and fibronectin. The avid association between three outer envelope proteins of T. pallidum and fibronectin was also demonstrated. These treponemal surface proteins have been previously identified as putative receptor-binding proteins responsible for T. pallidum parasitism of host cells. The data suggest that surface fibronectin mediates tip-oriented attachment of T. pallidum to host cells via a receptor-ligand mechanism of recognition.

  4. Ablation of ghrelin receptor in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice has paradoxical effects on glucose homeostasis when compared with ablation of ghrelin in ob/ob mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is important in diabetes because it has an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. Ghrelin ablation in leptin-deficient ob/ob (Ghrelin(-/-):ob/ob) mice increases insulin secretion and improves hyperglycemia. The physiologically relevant ghrelin receptor is the growth ...

  5. Reduced striatal D2 receptor binding in myoclonus-dystonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukers, R.J.; Weisscher, N.; Tijssen, M.A.J.; Booij, J.; Zijlstra, F.; Amelsvoort, T.A.M.J. van

    2009-01-01

    To study striatal dopamine D 2 receptor availability in DYT11 mutation carriers of the autosomal dominantly inherited disorder myoclonus-dystonia (M-D). Fifteen DYT11 mutation carriers (11 clinically affected) and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were studied using 123 I-IBZM SPECT. Specific striatal binding ratios were calculated using standard templates for striatum and occipital areas. Multivariate analysis with corrections for ageing and smoking showed significantly lower specific striatal to occipital IBZM uptake ratios (SORs) both in the left and right striatum in clinically affected patients and also in all DYT11 mutation carriers compared to control subjects. Our findings are consistent with the theory of reduced dopamine D 2 receptor (D2R) availability in dystonia, although the possibility of increased endogenous dopamine, and consequently, competitive D2R occupancy cannot be ruled out. (orig.)

  6. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, D Ransom; Holland, William C; McCall, Jennifer R; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Tester, Patricia A; Shea, Damian; Quintana, Harold A Flores; Morris, James A; Litaker, R Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R)). However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R) in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F)) was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2) for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C) with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1). Fish (N = 61) of six different species were screened using the RBA(F). Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) correlated well (R2 = 0.71) with those of the RBA(F), given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F) affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F), which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F) advantages include the long-term (> 5 years) stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R). The RBA(F) is cost-effective, allows high sample

  7. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ransom Hardison

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs. One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R. However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2 for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1. Fish (N = 61 of six different species were screened using the RBA(F. Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a correlated well (R2 = 0.71 with those of the RBA(F, given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F, which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F advantages include the long-term (> 5 years stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R. The RBA(F is cost-effective, allows high sample

  8. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+)-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+). Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125)I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+) transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  9. Menthol binding and inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ashoor

    Full Text Available Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca(2+-dependent Cl(- channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca(2+-free bathing solution containing Ba(2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [(125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca(2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner.

  10. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  11. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  12. Leptin Regulation of Mammary Cell Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pighetti, Gina

    2000-01-01

    .... The studies of this proposal were designed to test the hypothesis that the interaction of leptin with its receptor regulates normal and pathologic mammary epithelial cell proliferation and/or differentiation...

  13. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-01-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, 3 H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion ( 3 H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that 3 H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin

  14. The Trend in Distribution of Q223R Mutation of Leptin Receptor Gene in Amoebic Liver Abscess Patients from North India: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Host genetic susceptibility is an important risk factor in infectious diseases. We explored the distribution of Q223R mutation in leptin receptor gene of amoebic liver abscess (ALA patients of North India. A total of 55 ALA samples along with 102 controls were subjected to PCR-RFLP analysis. The frequency of allele “G” (coding for arginine was in general high in Indian population irrespective of the disease. Our results of Fisher exact test shows that heterozygous mutant (QQ versus QR, P=0.049 and homozygous mutant (QQ versus RR, P=0.004 were significantly associated with amoebic liver abscess when compared with homozygous wild (QQ.

  15. The effects of leptin in combination with a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, AM 251, or cannabidiol on food intake and body weight in rats fed a high-fat or a free-choice high sugar diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Bojanowska, E

    2014-08-01

    High intake of fats and sugars has prompted a rapid growth in the number of obese individuals worldwide. To further investigate whether simultaneous pharmacological intervention in the leptin and cannabinoid system might change food and water intake, preferences for palatable foods, and body weight, we have examined the effects of concomitant intraperitoneal administration of leptin and AM 251, a cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, or cannabidiol (CBD), a plant cannabinoid, in rats maintained on either a high-fat (HF) diet (45% energy from fat) or free-choice (FC) diet consisting of high-sucrose and normal rat chow (83% and 61% energy from carbohydrates, respectively). Leptin at a dose of 100 μg/kg injected individually for 3 subsequent days to rats fed a HF diet reduced significantly the daily caloric intake and inhibited body weight gain. The hormone had no significant effects, however, on either caloric intake, body weight or food preferences in rats fed an FC diet. Co-injection of leptin and 1 mg/kg AM 251 resulted in a further significant decrease in HF diet intake and a profound reduction in body weight gain both in HF diet- and FC diet-fed rats. This drug combination, however, had no effect on the consumption of high-sucrose chow. In contrast, 3mg/kg of CBD co-injected with leptin did not modify leptin effects on food intake in rats maintained on an FC or HF diet. None of the drug combinations affected water consumption. It is concluded that the concomitant treatment with leptin and AM 251 attenuated markedly body weight gain in rats maintained on high-calorie diets rich in fat and carbohydrates but did not affect preferences for sweet food.

  16. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist Losartan binds and activates bradykinin B2 receptor signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Olsen, Kristine Boisen; Erikstrup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    connected and some of the cardioprotective effects of Losartan are abolished by blocking the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R) signaling. In this study, we investigated the ability of six clinically available ARBs to specifically bind and activate the B2R. First, we investigated their ability to activate...... phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in COS-7 cells transiently expressing the B2R. We found that only Losartan activated the B2R, working as a partial agonist compared to the endogenous ligand bradykinin. This effect was blocked by the B2R antagonist HOE 140. A competitive binding analysis revealed that Losartan does...

  17. Distinct phosphotyrosines on a growth factor receptor bind to specific molecules that mediate different signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantl, W J; Escobedo, J A; Martin, G A; Turck, C W; del Rosario, M; McCormick, F; Williams, L T

    1992-05-01

    The receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) binds two proteins containing SH2 domains, GTPase activating protein (GAP) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase). The sites on the receptor that mediate this interaction were identified by using phosphotyrosine-containing peptides representing receptor sequences to block specifically binding of either PI3-kinase or GAP. These results suggested that PI3-kinase binds two phosphotyrosine residues, each located in a 5 aa motif with an essential methionine at the fourth position C-terminal to the tyrosine. Point mutations at these sites caused a selective elimination of PI3-kinase binding and loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Mutation of the binding site for GAP prevented the receptor from associating with or phosphorylating GAP, but had no effect on PI3-kinase binding and little effect on DNA synthesis. Therefore, GAP and PI3-kinase interact with the receptor by binding to different phosphotyrosine-containing sequence motifs.

  18. Genetic, functional and molecular features of glucocorticoid receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Luca

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs are key mediators of stress response and are widely used as pharmacological agents to treat immune diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, and certain types of cancer. GCs act mainly by activating the GC receptor (GR, which interacts with other transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Here, we combined different functional genomics approaches to gain molecular insights into the mechanisms of action of GC. By profiling the transcriptional response to GC over time in 4 Yoruba (YRI and 4 Tuscans (TSI lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, we suggest that the transcriptional response to GC is variable not only in time, but also in direction (positive or negative depending on the presence of specific interacting transcription factors. Accordingly, when we performed ChIP-seq for GR and NF-κB in two YRI LCLs treated with GC or with vehicle control, we observed that features of GR binding sites differ for up- and down-regulated genes. Finally, we show that eQTLs that affect expression patterns only in the presence of GC are 1.9-fold more likely to occur in GR binding sites, compared to eQTLs that affect expression only in its absence. Our results indicate that genetic variation at GR and interacting transcription factors binding sites influences variability in gene expression, and attest to the power of combining different functional genomic approaches.

  19. Benzodiazepine receptor binding in vivo with (/sup 3/)-Ro 15-1788

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1985-07-29

    In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding has generally been studied by ex vivo techniques. In this investigation, the authors identify the conditions where (/sup 3/H)-Ro 15-1788 labels benzodiazepine receptors by true in vivo binding, i.e. where workable specific to nonspecific ratios are obtained in intact tissues without homogenization or washing. (/sup 3/H)-Flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)-clonazepam did not exhibit useful in vivo receptor binding. 39 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  20. Managing tight-binding receptors for new separations technologies. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, D.H.; Givens, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    'Whereas such traditional separation methodologies as ion exchange and solvent extraction require rapid interaction between ligands and metal ions, the most strongly binding ligands invariably bind slowly; e.g., cryptates bind and dissociate more slowly than macrocycles, which are slower than open-chain chelating ligands. This project seeks to maximize the binding and dissociation rates for tight-binding receptors in order to make them more useful to separations science. An alternative slow-binding technology is also under exploration.'

  1. Does leptin play a cytokine-like role within the airways of COPD patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, A; Chanez, P; Chiappara, G; Siena, L; Giammanco, S; Gjomarkaj, M; Bonsignore, G; Bousquet, J; Vignola, A M

    2005-09-01

    The leptin-leptin receptor system might be up-regulated in the airways of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In bronchial biopsies obtained from normal subjects and smokers, with and without COPD, the present study examined leptin and leptin-receptor expression and their co-localisation in airway and inflammatory cells. Combining immunohistochemistry with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labelling techniques, apoptosis in airway and inflammatory cells and in leptin and leptin-receptor expressing cells was investigated. In the epithelial cells both leptin and leptin-receptor expression was higher in normal subjects than in smokers and COPD subjects. By contrast, in the sub-mucosa, leptin was over-expressed in COPD when compared with normal subjects and smokers. Leptin and its receptor were co-localised, mainly with activated T cells (CD45R0) and CD8+ T lymphocytes. In smokers, apoptosis was found in some inflammatory cells, whereas in COPD inflammatory cells, leptin and leptin-receptor positive cells were not apoptotic. Leptin expression was related to COPD severity and assessed using the Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease classification. In conclusion, the present study shows an increased leptin expression in bronchial mucosa of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, associated with airway inflammation and airflow obstruction.

  2. Role of leptin during childhood growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, J N; Rogol, A D

    1999-12-01

    Leptin, the product of the ob/ob gene in rodents, regulates energy balance and fertility. Two genetic models, the ob/ob mouse (deletion of leptin protein) and the db/db mouse (deletion of leptin receptor) have markedly augmented research in obesity. Human obesity is more closely linked to leptin resistance than to the absence of leptin. Serum leptin concentrations reflect the size of the subcutaneous fat depot better than total fat mass or abdominal visceral fat. At the initiation of puberty there is a divergence in circulating leptin concentrations between boys and girls. In boys, leptin concentrations increase and then markedly decrease to prepubertal concentration levels. In girls there are only increasing concentrations. The authors believe these patterns are relevant to the markedly different alterations in the regional distribution of body fat that occurs in boys and girls at puberty.

  3. Thyroid hormone and leptin in the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Fonte Ramos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is primarily expressed in white adipose tissue; however, it is expressed in the hypothalamus and reproductive tissues as well. Leptin acts by activating the leptin receptors (Ob-Rs. Additionally, the regulation of several neuroendocrine and reproductive functions, including the inhibition of glucocorticoids and enhancement of thyroxine and sex hormone concentrations in humans and mice are leptin functions. It has been suggested that thyroid hormones (TH could directly regulate leptin expression. Additionally, hypothyroidism compromises the intracellular integration of leptin signaling specifically in the arcuate nucleus. Two TH receptor isoforms are expressed in the testis, TRa and TRb, with TRa being the predominant one that is present in all stages of development. The effects of TH involve the proliferation and differentiation of Sertoli and Leydig cells during development, spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. In this context, TH disorders are associated with sexual dysfunction. An endocrine and/or direct paracrine effect of leptin on the gonads inhibits testosterone production in Leydig cells. Further studies are necessary to clarify the effects of both hormones in the testis during hypothyroidism. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge regarding leptin and TH in the testis.

  4. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  5. Role of leptin in farm animals: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mácajová, M; Lamosová, D; Zeman, M

    2004-05-01

    The discovery of hormone leptin has led to better understanding of the energy balance control. In addition to its effects on food intake and energy expenditure, leptin has now been implicated as a mediator of diverse physiological functions. Recently, leptin has been cloned in several domestic species. The sequence similarity suggests a common function or mechanism of this peptide hormone across species. Leptin receptors are expressed in most of tissues, which is consistent with the multiplicity of leptin functions. The main goal of this review was to summarize knowledge about effect of leptin on physiology of farm animals. Experiments point to a stimulatory action of leptin on growth hormone (GH) secretion, normal growth and development of the brain. Surprisingly, leptin is synthesized at a high rate in placenta and may function as a growth factor for fetus, signalling the nutritional status from the mother to her offspring. Maturation of reproductive system can be stimulated by leptin administration. Morphological and hormonal changes, consistent with a major role of leptin in the reproductive system, have also been described, including the stimulation of the release of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin. Leptin has a substantial effect on food intake and feeding behaviour in animals. Administration of leptin reduces food intake. Its level decrease within hours after initiation of fasting. Leptin also serves as a mediator of the adaptation to fasting, and this role may be the primary function for which was the molecule evolved.

  6. Seasonal variation in glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics in human mononuclear leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhurst, G; McElroy, P K; Fraser, R; Swan, R L; Connell, J M

    2001-11-01

    Glucocorticoid sensitivity varies between individuals and between tissues in the same individual. Although some of this variation is explained by the activity of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, the possibility that glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity is modulated remains unexplored. This study examined glucocorticoid receptor binding in leucocytes and assessed the effects of seasonal hormonal variation on receptor binding. Two populations were studied. In the first, 318 healthy subjects were studied over 2 years with a single measurement of receptor binding made on each. In the second study nine healthy male subjects each had receptor binding measurements made at 3-week intervals over 1 year. In both populations there was significant seasonal variation in receptor binding. In the first population Kd for dexamethasone was highest in November and lowest in July (8.37 +/- 0.5 nmol/l vs. 1.58 +/- 0.7, mean +/- SEM P vs. 4969 +/- 302, P melatonin raised Kd without affecting receptor number. Co-incubation with forskolin lowered Kd suggesting that melatonin might act through the ML1 receptor class by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase. No correlations were found with 0900 h plasma cortisol. The results suggest that the glucocorticoid receptor might be modulated by season. Melatonin might mediate part of these effects. The lack of correlation with cortisol suggests that it is not an important determinant of receptor binding and that leucocyte receptors are regulated differently from central receptors.

  7. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  8. Analysis of the hormone-binding domain of steroid receptors using chimeras generated by homologous recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Danielsen, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor are members of the steroid receptor family that exhibit ligand cross-reactivity. Specificity of steroid receptor action is investigated in the present work by the construction and characterization of chimeras between the glucocorticoid receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor. We used an innovative approach to make novel steroid receptor proteins in vivo that in general, contrary to our expectations, show increased ligand specificity compared to the parental receptors. We describe a receptor that is specific for the potent synthetic glucocorticoid triamcinolone acetonide and does not bind aldosterone. A further set of chimeras has an increased ability to discriminate between ligands, responding potently to mineralocorticoids and only very weakly to synthetic glucocorticoids. A chimera with the fusion site in the hinge highlights the importance of the region between the DNA-binding and the hormone-binding domains since, unlike both the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors, it only responds to mineralocorticoids. One chimera has reduced specificity in that it acts as a general corticoid receptor, responding to glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids with similar potency and efficacy. Our data suggest that regions of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domains are functionally non-reciprocal. We present transcriptional, hormone-binding, and structure-modeling evidence that suggests that receptor-specific interactions within and across domains mediate aspects of specificity in transcriptional responses to steroids

  9. Enhancer transcripts mark active estrogen receptor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Nasun; Murakami, Shino; Nagari, Anusha; Danko, Charles G; Kraus, W Lee

    2013-08-01

    We have integrated and analyzed a large number of data sets from a variety of genomic assays using a novel computational pipeline to provide a global view of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1; a.k.a. ERα) enhancers in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Using this approach, we have defined a class of primary transcripts (eRNAs) that are transcribed uni- or bidirectionally from estrogen receptor binding sites (ERBSs) with an average transcription unit length of ∼3-5 kb. The majority are up-regulated by short treatments with estradiol (i.e., 10, 25, or 40 min) with kinetics that precede or match the induction of the target genes. The production of eRNAs at ERBSs is strongly correlated with the enrichment of a number of genomic features that are associated with enhancers (e.g., H3K4me1, H3K27ac, EP300/CREBBP, RNA polymerase II, open chromatin architecture), as well as enhancer looping to target gene promoters. In the absence of eRNA production, strong enrichment of these features is not observed, even though ESR1 binding is evident. We find that flavopiridol, a CDK9 inhibitor that blocks transcription elongation, inhibits eRNA production but does not affect other molecular indicators of enhancer activity, suggesting that eRNA production occurs after the assembly of active enhancers. Finally, we show that an enhancer transcription "signature" based on GRO-seq data can be used for de novo enhancer prediction across cell types. Together, our studies shed new light on the activity of ESR1 at its enhancer sites and provide new insights about enhancer function.

  10. Cholinergic, opioid and glycine receptor binding sites localized in human spinal cord by in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg, P.-G.; Aquilonius, S.-M.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites for the receptor ligands 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzilate, 3 H-alpha-bungarotoxin ( 3 H-alpha-Btx), 3 H-etorphine and 3 H-strychnine were localized autoradiographically at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels of spinal cords from post-mortem human control subjects and subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The highest densities of muscarinic binding sites were found in the motor neuron areas and in the substantia gelatinosa, while the grey matter binding was very low within Clarke's column. Both 3 H-alpha-Btx and opioid receptor binding sites were numerous within the substantia gelatinosa, while glycine receptor binding sites were more uniformly distribute within the spinal grey matter. In ALS cases, muscarinic receptor binding sites were markedly reduced in motor neuron areas and slightly reduced in the dorsal horn, while the other binding sites studied were relatively unchanged. (author)

  11. Receptor concentration and diffusivity control multivalent binding of Sv40 to membrane bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliwia M Szklarczyk

    Full Text Available Incoming Simian Virus 40 particles bind to their cellular receptor, the glycolipid GM1, in the plasma membrane and thereby induce membrane deformation beneath the virion leading to endocytosis and infection. Efficient membrane deformation depends on receptor lipid structure and the organization of binding sites on the internalizing particle. To determine the role of receptor diffusion, concentration and the number of receptors required for stable binding in this interaction, we analyze the binding of SV40 to GM1 in supported membrane bilayers by computational modeling based on experimental data. We measure the diffusion rates of SV40 virions in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and of the receptor in bilayers by single molecule tracking. Quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D is used to measure binding of SV40 virus-like particles to bilayers containing the viral receptor GM1. We develop a phenomenological stochastic dynamics model calibrated against this data, and use it to investigate the early events of virus attachment to lipid membranes. Our results indicate that SV40 requires at least 4 attached receptors to achieve stable binding. We moreover find that receptor diffusion is essential for the establishment of stable binding over the physiological range of receptor concentrations and that receptor concentration controls the mode of viral motion on the target membrane. Our results provide quantitative insight into the initial events of virus-host interaction at the nanoscopic level.

  12. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  13. Circulating ghrelin and leptin concentrations and growth hormone secretagogue receptor abundance in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue of beef cattle exhibiting differences in composition of gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, J S; Wertz-Lutz, A E; Pritchard, R H; Weaver, A D; Keisler, D H; Bruns, K

    2011-12-01

    Data from species other than cattle indicate that ghrelin and GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) could play a key role in fat deposition, energy homeostasis, or glucose metabolism by directly affecting liver and adipose tissue metabolism. Beef steers (n = 72) were used to test the hypothesis that plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and abundance of the GHS-R in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues differ in steers exhibiting differences in composition of gain. At trial initiation (d 0), 8 steers were slaughtered for initial carcass composition. The remaining 64 steers were stratified by BW, allotted to pen, and treatment was assigned randomly to pen. Steers were not implanted with anabolic steroids. Treatments were 1) a low-energy (LE) diet fed during the growing period (0 to 111 d) followed by a high-energy (HE) diet during the finishing period (112 to 209 d; LE-HE) or 2) the HE diet for the duration of the trial (1 to 209 d; HE-HE). Eight steers per treatment were slaughtered on d 88, 111, 160, and 209. Carcass ninth, tenth, and eleventh rib sections were dissected for chemical composition and regression equations were developed to predict compositional gain. Liver, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for subsequent Western blotting for GHS-R. Replicate blood samples collected before each slaughter were assayed for ghrelin and leptin concentrations. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, the rate of carcass fat accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was greater (P muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissue was not different between treatment groups. The role of ghrelin in cattle metabolism warrants further investigation as it could have a significant effect on composition of BW gain, feed efficiency, and metabolic disorders such as ketosis and fatty liver.

  14. QCM-4, a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist ameliorates plasma HPA axis hyperactivity, leptin resistance and brain oxidative stress in depression and anxiety-like behavior in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2015-01-02

    Several preclinical studies have revealed antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. In our earlier study, we have reported the antidepressive-like effect of 3-methoxy-N-p-tolylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-4) in obese mice subjected to chronic stress. The present study deals with the biochemical mechanisms associated with depression co-morbid with obesity. Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks, further subjected for treatment with QCM-4 (1 and 2mg/kg p.o.) and standard antidepressant escitalopram (ESC) (10mg/kg p.o.) for 28 days. Behavioral assays for depression such as sucrose preference test (SPT), forced swim test (FST) and for anxiety such as light and dark test (LDT) and hole board test (HBT) were performed in obese mice. Biochemical assessments including plasma leptin and corticosterone concentration followed by brain oxidative stress parameters malonaldehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were performed. Results confirmed that QCM-4 exhibits antidepressive effect by increasing the sucrose consumption in SPT, reducing immobility time in FST and anxiolytic effect by increasing transitions and time in light chamber in LDT, increasing head dip and crossing score in HBT. Furthermore, QCM-4 attenuated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity by reducing the plasma corticosterone, reversing altered plasma leptin, restoring the imbalance of brain MDA and GSH concentration. In conclusion, QCM-4 showed antidepressive and anxiolytic effect by reversing the behavioral alterations that were supported by biochemical estimations in obese mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Survivin upregulation, dependent on leptin-EGFR-Notch1 axis, is essential for leptin induced migration of breast carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Brandi B.; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela M.; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Yang, Lily; Cohen, Cynthia; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2012-01-01

    Obese breast cancer patients exhibit a higher risk for larger tumor burden and increased metastasis. Molecular effects of obesity on carcinogenesis are mediated by autocrine and paracrine effects of adipocytokine leptin. Leptin participates in tumor progression and metastasis of human breast. We show that leptin induces clonogenicity and migration potential of breast cancer cells. We found that survivin expression is induced in response to leptin. In this study, we examine the role and leptin-mediated regulation of survivin. Leptin treatment leads to survivin upregulation, due in part to the activation of Notch1 and release of transcriptionally active Notch1-intracellular-domain (NICD). ChIP analysis show that NICD gets recruited to survivin promoter at CSL-binding-site in response to leptin treatment. Inhibition of Notch1 activity inhibits leptin-induced survivin upregulation. Leptin-induced transactivation of EGFR is involved in leptin-mediated Notch1 and survivin upregulation showing a novel upstream role of leptin-EGFR-Notch1 axis. We further show that leptin-induced migration of breast cancer cells requires survivin, as overexpression of survivin further increases, whereas silencing survivin abrogates leptin-induced migration. Using a pharmacological approach to inhibit survivin, we show that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A-reductase inhibitors (HRIs), lovastatin, can effectively inhibit leptin-induced survivin expression and migration. Importantly, leptin increased breast tumor growth in nude mice. These data show a novel role for survivin in leptin-induced migration and put forth pharmacological survivin inhibition as a potential novel therapeutic target. This conclusion is supported by in vivo data showing overexpression of leptin and survivin in epithelial cells of high grade ductal carcinoma in situ and high grade invasive carcinoma. PMID:21555376

  16. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in structural biology for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have provided new opportunities to improve the definition of the transmembrane binding pocket. Here a reference set of 44 residue positions accessible for ligand binding was defined through detailed analysis of all...... to endogenous ligand types, although it revealed subdivision of certain classes, notably peptide and lipid receptors. The transmembrane binding site reference set, particularly when coupled with a means of identifying the subset of ligand binding residues, provides a general paradigm for understanding...

  17. Neuronal low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 binds and endocytoses prion fibrils via receptor cluster 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jen, Angela; Parkyn, Celia J; Mootoosamy, Roy C

    2010-01-01

    For infectious prion protein (designated PrP(Sc)) to act as a template to convert normal cellular protein (PrP(C)) to its distinctive pathogenic conformation, the two forms of prion protein (PrP) must interact closely. The neuronal receptor that rapidly endocytoses PrP(C) is the low......-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We show here that on sensory neurons LRP1 is also the receptor that binds and rapidly endocytoses smaller oligomeric forms of infectious prion fibrils, and recombinant PrP fibrils. Although LRP1 binds two molecules of most ligands independently to its receptor...... both prion and LRP1 biology....

  18. Familial defective apolipoprotein B-100: low density lipoproteins with abnormal receptor binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innerarity, T.L.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Arnold, K.S.; Mahley, R.W.; Krauss, R.M.; Vega, G.L.; Grundy, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Previous in vivo turnover studies suggested that retarded clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) from the plasma of some hypercholesterolemic patients is due to LDL with defective receptor binding. The present study examined this postulate directly by receptor binding experiments. The LDL from a hypercholesterolemic patient (G.R.) displayed a reduced ability to bind to the LDL receptors on normal human fibroblasts. The G.R. LDL possessed 32% of normal receptor binding activity. Likewise, the G.R. LDL were much less effective than normal LDL in competing with 125 I-labeled normal LDL for cellular uptake and degradation and in stimulating intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. The defect in LDL binding appears to be due to a genetic abnormality of apolipoprotein B-100: two brothers of the proband possess LDL defective in receptor binding, whereas a third brother and the proband's son have normally binding LDL. Further, the defect in receptor binding does not appear to be associated wit an abnormal lipid composition or structure of the LDL. Normal and abnormal LDL subpopulations were partially separated from plasma of two subjects by density-gradient ultracentrifugation, a finding consistent with the presence of a normal and a mutant allele. The affected family members appear to be heterozygous for this disorder, which has been designated familial defective apolipoprotein B-100. These studies indicate that the defective receptor binding results in inefficient clearance of LDL and the hypercholesterolemia observed in these patients

  19. Expression and immunohistochemical localization of leptin in human periapical granulomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, Jénifer; Carmona-Fernández, Antonio; Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Leptin, initially described as an adipocyte-derived hormone to regulate weight control, is expressed in normal and inflamed human dental pulp, being up-regulated during pulp experimental inflammation. Leptin receptor (LER) has been identified in human periapical granulomas. The aim of this study was to analyze and characterize the expression of leptin in human periapical granulomas. Material and Methods Fifteen periapical inflammatory lesions were obtained from extracted human teeth and teeth which underwent periapical surgery. After their morphological categorization as periapical granulomas and gradation of the inflammatory infiltrate, they were examined by immunohistochemistry using human leptin policlonal antibodies. Leptin mRNA expression was also determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and the amount of leptin protein was analyzed by immunoblot. Results All periapical lesions exhibited the characteristic of chronic granulomatous inflammatory process with inflammatory infiltrate grade III. Leptin+ cells were detected in 13 periapical granulomas (86.6%). The median number of Leptin+ cells in periapical granulomas was 1.70 (0.00-7.4). Amongst the inflammatory cells in the periapical granulomas, only macrophages were reactive to leptin antibodies. Western blot analysis revealed the presence in all samples of a protein with apparent molecular weight of approximately 16 kDa, corresponding to the estimated molecular weights of leptin. The expression of leptin mRNA was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis and the size of the amplified fragment (296 bp for leptin and 194 bp for cyclophilin) was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Conclusions For the first time, it has been demonstrated that human periapical granuloma expresses the adipokine leptin. Key words: Apical granuloma, dental pulp, endodontics, leptin, leptin receptor, immune system, immunohistochemistry, periapical inflammatory response. PMID:25662559

  20. Differential Effects of Leptin on the Invasive Potential of Androgen-Dependent and -Independent Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanand D. Deo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has been linked with an increased risk of prostate cancer. The formation of toxic free oxygen radicals has been implicated in obesity mediated disease processes. Leptin is one of the major cytokines produced by adipocytes and controls body weight homeostasis through food intake and energy expenditure. The rationale of the study was to determine the impact of leptin on the metastatic potential of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP cells as well as androgen-insensitive (PC-3 and DU-145 cells. At a concentration of 200_nm, LNCaP cells showed a significant increase (20% above control; P<.0001 in cellular proliferation without any effect on androgen-insensitive cells. Furthermore, exposure to leptin caused a significant (P<.01 to P<.0001 dose-dependent decrease in migration and invasion of PC3 and Du-145 prostate carcinoma cell lines. At the molecular level, exposure of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to leptin stimulates the phosphorylation of MAPK at early time point as well as the transcription factor STAT3, suggesting the activation of the intracellular signaling cascade upon leptin binding to its cognate receptor. Taken together, these results suggest that leptin mediates the invasive potential of prostate carcinoma cells, and that this effect is dependent on their androgen sensitivity.

  1. Characterization of FIBCD1 as an acetyl group-binding receptor that binds chitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa; Moeller, Jesper B

    2009-01-01

    Chitin is a highly acetylated compound and the second most abundant biopolymer in the world next to cellulose. Vertebrates are exposed to chitin both through food ingestion and when infected with parasites, and fungi and chitin modulate the immune response in different directions. We have...... assembles the protein into tetramers. Functional analysis showed a high-affinity and calcium-dependent binding of acetylated components to the fibrinogen domain, and a function in endocytosis was demonstrated. Screening for ligands revealed that the FIBCD1 is a high-affinity receptor for chitin and chitin...... fragments. FIBCD1 may play an important role in controlling the exposure of intestine to chitin and chitin fragments, which is of great relevance for the immune defense against parasites and fungi and for immune response modulation....

  2. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experime...

  3. Protein kinase A regulates AKAP250 (gravin) scaffold binding to the β2-adrenergic receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Wang, Hsien-yu; Malbon, Craig C.

    2003-01-01

    A-kinase-anchoring protein 250 (AKAP250; gravin) acts as a scaffold that binds protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C and protein phosphatases, associating reversibly with the β2-adrenergic receptor. The receptor-binding domain of the scaffold and the regulation of the receptor–scaffold association was revealed through mutagenesis and biochemical analyses. The AKAP domain found in other members of this superfamily is essential for the scaffold–receptor interactions. Gravin constructs lackin...

  4. The impact of leptin on perinatal development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleau, Jeanette C; Sullivan, Elinor L

    2014-11-01

    Leptin has long been associated with metabolism as it is a critical regulator of both food intake and energy expenditure, but recently, leptin dysregulation has been proposed as a mechanism of psychopathology. This review discusses the evidence supporting a role for leptin in mental health disorders and describes potential mechanisms that may underlie this association. Leptin plays a critical role in pregnancy and in fetal growth and development. Leptin's role and profile during development is examined in available human studies, and the validity of applying studies conducted in animal models to the human population are discussed. Rodents experience a postnatal leptin surge, which does not occur in humans or larger animal models. This suggests that further research using large mammal models, which have a leptin profile across pregnancy and development similar to humans, are of high importance. Maternal obesity and hyperleptinemia correlate with increased leptin levels in the umbilical cord, placenta, and fetus. Leptin levels are thought to impact fetal brain development; likely by activating proinflammatory cytokines that are known to impact many of the neurotransmitter systems that regulate behavior. Leptin is likely involved in behavioral regulation as leptin receptors are widely distributed in the brain, and leptin influences cortisol release, the mesoaccumbens dopamine pathway, serotonin synthesis, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In humans, both high and low levels of leptin are reported to be associated with psychopathology. This inconsistency is likely due to differences in the metabolic state of the study populations. Leptin resistance, which occurs in the obese state, may explain how both high and low levels of leptin are associated with psychopathology, as well as the comorbidity of obesity with numerous mental illnesses. Leptin resistance is likely to influence disorders such as depression and anxiety where high leptin levels have been correlated

  5. Evaluation of a novel virtual screening strategy using receptor decoy binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-08-23

    Virtual screening is used in biomedical research to predict the binding affinity of a large set of small organic molecules to protein receptor targets. This report shows the development and evaluation of a novel yet straightforward attempt to improve this ranking in receptor-based molecular docking using a receptor-decoy strategy. This strategy includes defining a decoy binding site on the receptor and adjusting the ranking of the true binding-site virtual screen based on the decoy-site screen. The results show that by docking against a receptor-decoy site with Autodock Vina, improved Receiver Operator Characteristic Enrichment (ROCE) was achieved for 5 out of fifteen receptor targets investigated, when up to 15 % of a decoy site rank list was considered. No improved enrichment was seen for 7 targets, while for 3 targets the ROCE was reduced. The extent to which this strategy can effectively improve ligand prediction is dependent on the target receptor investigated.

  6. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Interaction of orthosteric ligands with extracellular domain was described at several aminergic G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The orthosteric antagonists quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) bind to the binding pocket of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor formed by transmembrane α-helices. We show that high concentrations of either QNB or NMS slow down dissociation of their radiolabeled species from all five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting allosteric binding. The affinity of NMS at the allosteric site is in the micromolar range for all receptor subtypes. Using molecular modelling of the M2 receptor we found that E172 and E175 in the second extracellular loop and N419 in the third extracellular loop are involved in allosteric binding of NMS. Mutation of these amino acids to alanine decreased affinity of NMS for the allosteric binding site confirming results of molecular modelling. The allosteric binding site of NMS overlaps with the binding site of some allosteric, ectopic and bitopic ligands. Understanding of interactions of NMS at the allosteric binding site is essential for correct analysis of binding and action of these ligands.

  7. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  8. 20 years of leptin: leptin and reproduction: past milestones, present undertakings, and future endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehab, Farid F

    2014-10-01

    The association between leptin and reproduction originated with the leptin-mediated correction of sterility in ob/ob mice and initiation of reproductive function in normal female mice. The uncovering of a central leptin pathway regulating food intake prompted the dissection of neuroendocrine mechanisms involving leptin in the metabolic control of reproduction. The absence of leptin receptors on GnRH neurons incited a search for intermediary neurons situated between leptin-responsive and GnRH neurons. This review addresses the most significant findings that have furthered our understanding of recent progress in this new field. The role of leptin in puberty was impacted by the discovery of neurons that co-express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin and these could act as leptin intermediates. Furthermore, the identification of first-order leptin-responsive neurons in the premammilary ventral nucleus and other brain regions opens new avenues to explore their relationship to GnRH neurons. Central to these advances is the unveiling that agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y neurons project onto GnRH and kisspeptin neurons, allowing for a crosstalk between food intake and reproduction. Finally, while puberty is a state of leptin sensitivity, mid-gestation represents a state of leptin resistance aimed at building energy stores to sustain pregnancy and lactation. The mechanisms underlying leptin resistance in pregnancy have lagged; however, the establishment of this natural state is significant. Reproduction and energy balance are tightly controlled and backed up by redundant mechanisms that are critical for the survival of our species. It will be the goal of the following decade to shed new light on these complex and essential pathways. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  9. Mammary gland leptin in relation to lactogenesis in the periparturient dairy goat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Alice Neess; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2008-01-01

    The role of leptin in development of mammary gland secretory function was studied during the periparturient period in dairy goats. Changes in mammary leptin and leptin receptor (short cytoplasmic form) expression were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and related to changes in milk and plasma leptin...... peak in milk leptin 2 days post-partum needs to be understood. We did not find evidence that milk leptin can be absorbed, and thus play a role in systemic regulation, of the neonatal goat....... concentrations from 5 weeks pre-partum to 7 weeks post-partum. It was further investigated if systemic leptin concentration in the neonate is affected by milk leptin intake. We found no evidence of accumulation of leptin in colostrum pre-partum. Pre- and post-partum milk leptin concentrations were similar...

  10. Leptin, adiponectin and pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Assad, Nour; Sood, Akshay

    2012-10-01

    Adipose tissue produces leptin and adiponectin - energy-regulating adipokines that may also play a role in inflammatory pulmonary conditions, as suggested by some murine studies. Leptin and adiponectin and their respective receptors are expressed in the human lung. The association between systemic or airway leptin and asthma in humans is currently controversial, particularly among adults. The majority of the evidence among children however suggests that systemic leptin may be associated with greater asthma prevalence and severity, particularly among prepubertal boys and peripubertal/postpubertal girls. Systemic and airway leptin concentrations may also be disproportionately higher in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, particularly among women, and reflect greater airway inflammation and disease severity. Quite like leptin, the association between systemic and airway adiponectin and asthma in humans is also controversial. Some but not all studies, demonstrate that serum adiponectin concentrations are protective against asthma among premenopausal women and peripubertal girls. On the other hand, serum adiponectin concentrations are inversely associated with asthma severity among boys but positively associated among men. Further, systemic and airway adiponectin concentrations are higher in COPD patients than controls, as demonstrated by case-control studies of men. Systemic adiponectin is also positively associated with lung function in healthy adults but inversely associated with lung function in subjects with COPD. It is therefore possible that pro-inflammatory effects of adiponectin dominate under certain physiologic conditions and anti-inflammatory effects under others. The adipokine-lung disease literature has critical gaps that include a lack of adequately powered longitudinal or weight-intervention studies; inadequate adjustment for confounding effect of obesity; and unclear understanding of potential sex interactions. It is also uncertain

  11. Protective Effects of Six Selected Dietary Compounds against Leptin-Induced Proliferation of Oestrogen Receptor Positive (MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meran Keshawa Ediriweera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Obesity is considered as one of the risk factors for breast cancer. Leptin has been found to be involved in breast cancer progression. Therefore, novel approaches to antagonize biological effects of leptin are much needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of six dietary compounds (quercetin, curcumin, gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, ascorbic acid and catechin and assess the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 in leptin-stimulated MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Methods: MCF-7 cells were exposed to leptin, leptin and compound and compound alone for 48 h. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide MTT and fluorometric assays after 48 h incubation. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was quantified by ELISA. Results: Only quercetin, curcumin and EGCG showed significant protective effects against leptin-induced proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to leptin was reduced by the addition of quercetin, curcumin and EGCG. Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of obesity, this observation provides a rationale for use of curcumin, quercetin and EGCG as antagonists of leptin in the treatment of obese breast cancer patients.

  12. Reduced anorexigenic efficacy of leptin, but not of the melanocortin receptor agonist melanotan-II, predicts diet-induced obesity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, G; de Vries, K; Nyakas, C; Buwalda, B; Adage, T; Kuipers, F; Kas, M.J.H.; Adan, RAH; Wilkinson, CW; Thiele, TE; Scheurink, AJW

    2005-01-01

    Leptin gains access to the central nervous system where it influences activity of neuronal networks involved in ingestive behavior, neuroendocrine activity, and metabolism. In particular, the brain melanocortin (MC) system is important in leptin signaling and maintenance of energy balance. Although

  13. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  14. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: physiology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S I; Stevenson, J L; Roupas, P

    1994-07-01

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular form(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR.

  15. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  16. Differences in both glycosylation and binding properties between rat and mouse liver prolactin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascols, O; Cherqui, G; Munier, A; Picard, J; Capeau, J

    1994-05-01

    To investigate whether glycanic chains of prolactin receptors (PRL-R) play a role in hormone binding activity, comparison was made of rat and mouse liver solubilized receptors with respect to both their affinity for the hormone and their glycosylation properties. As compared with rat receptors, mouse receptors exhibited a 2-fold higher affinity for human growth hormone (hGH), the hormone being bound by both tissues with a lactogenic specificity. Along with this increased affinity, mouse receptors had a 2 lower M(r) relative to rat receptors (62 kDa versus 64 kDa as measured on hGH cross-linked receptors). These differences could be ascribed to different glycosylation properties of the receptors from the two species, as supported by the followings. 1) After treatment with endoglycosidase F (endo F), rat and mouse PRL-R no longer exhibited any difference in their M(r) (54 kDa for both cross-linked receptors). 2) Neuraminidase treatment increased by 37% the binding of hGH to mouse receptors, but was ineffective on the hormone-binding to rat receptors. Conversely, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), another sialic acid specific probe, decreased hGH binding to rat receptors by 25%, but had no effect on this process for mouse ones. 3) Marked differences were observed in the recoveries of rat and mouse hormone-receptor (HR) complexes from ricin-1- (RCA1-), concanavalin A- (ConA-) and WGA-immobilized lectins. These differences were reduced (RCA1 and ConA) or abolished (WGA) after rat and mouse receptor desialylation by neuraminidase, a treatment which decreased the M(r) of both receptors by 2 kDa. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the PRL-R from rat and mouse liver contain biantennary N-linked oligosaccharidic chains with distinct type of sialylation, which may account for their differential hormone-binding affinities.

  17. [Interaction of polymorphisms of Leptin receptor gene Gln223Arg, MnSOD9Ala/Val genes and smoking in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoxian; Guo, Like; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the interaction of polymorphisms of leptin receptor (LR) gene Gln223Arg, manganese superoxide dismutase9Ala/Val (MnSOD9Ala/Val) genes and smoking in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The genetic polymorphisms of LEPR gene Gln223 Arg and MnSOD9Ala/Val were analyzed bypolymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique in peripheral blood leukocytes of 600 NAFLD cases and 600 healthy persons. The frequencies of LR gene Gln223Arg (G/G) and MnSOD9Ala/Val (V/V) were 48. 67% and 50.17% in NAFLD cases and 21. 17% and 21. 50% in healthy controls respectively. Statistical tests showed significant difference in the frequencies between the two groups (P smoking rate of the case group was significantly higher than which in the control group (OR = 3. 6754, 95% CI = 1. 4193 - 4. 9581, P smoking and Gln223Arg ( G/G)/ MnSOD9Ala/Val (V/V) which increase risk of NAFLD ( OR = 9. 8665; OR = 8. 5476). Gln223Arg (G/G), MnSOD9Ala/Val (V/V) and smoking are the risk factors in NAFLD, and the significant interactions between geneticpolymorphisms of Gln223Arg,MnSOD9Ala/Val and smoking added the risk of NAFLD.

  18. Leptin Receptor Gene Gln223Arg Polymorphism Is Not Associated with Hypertension: A Preliminary Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geórgia das Graças Pena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is responsible for high morbidity and mortality as one of the most important cardiometabolic risk factors. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the Gln223Arg in the leptin receptor (LEPR influences the prevalence of hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out in individuals aged ≥ 18 years. Polymorphism identification was performed using PCR-RFLP analysis. Participants with blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg or medication use were considered hypertensive. Frequencies, means, cross-tabulations, and multivariate models were produced to study differences in hypertension prevalence by genotypes. The study includes 470 participants. The frequency of GG polymorphism variant was 10.43%, 46.81% AG, and 42.77% AA. The distribution of hypertension frequency by LEPR genotypes was the following: AA 43.8%, AG 40.4%, and GG 40.8%; there were no significant differences between groups. Comparative analysis which used multivariate Poisson regression adjusted by many potential confounders (age, sex, schooling, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and family history of parental obesity did not modify this result. In this large sample of population-based study, the association of the LEPR Gln223Arg gene polymorphism with hypertension was not observed.

  19. Unsaturated free fatty acids increase benzodiazepine receptor agonist binding depending on the subunit composition of the GABAA receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, M R; Westh-Hansen, S E; Rasmussen, P B; Hastrup, S; Nielsen, M

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown previously that unsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) strongly enhance the binding of agonist benzodiazepine receptor ligands and GABAA receptor ligands in the CNS in vitro. To investigate the selectivity of this effect, recombinant human GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complexes formed by different subunit compositions (alpha x beta y gamma 2, x = 1, 2, 3, and 5; y = 1, 2, and 3) were expressed using the baculovirus-transfected Sf9 insect cell system. At 10(-4) M, unsaturated FFAs, particularly arachidonic (20:4) and docosahexaenoic (22:6) acids, strongly stimulated (> 200% of control values) the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNM) to the alpha 3 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination in whole cell preparations. No effect or small increases in levels of unsaturated FFAs on [3H]FNM binding to alpha 1 beta x gamma 2 and alpha 2 beta x gamma 2 receptor combinations were observed, and weak effects (130% of control values) were detected using the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination. The saturated FFAs, stearic and palmitic acids, were without effect on [3H]FNM binding to any combination of receptor complexes. The hydroxylated unsaturated FFAs, ricinoleic and ricinelaidic acids, were shown to decrease the binding of [3H]FNM only if an alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination was used. Given the heterogeneity of the GABAA/ benzodiazepine receptor subunit distribution in the CNS, the effects of FFAs on the benzodiazepine receptor can be assumed to vary at both cellular and regional levels.

  20. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H.

    1990-01-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-[ 3 H]ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [( 3 H]NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the [ 3 H]NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors

  1. On the use of cells or membranes for receptor binding: growth hormone secretagogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyot, A; Nikolovski, Z; Bosch, J; Segura, J; Gutiérrez-Gallego, R

    2010-04-15

    Receptor binding techniques have been widely used in different biochemical applications, with isolated membranes being the most used receptor preparation in this type of assays. In this study, intact cells were compared with isolated membranes as receptor support for radioligand receptor binding assay. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a) expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells was used as a model of G-protein-coupled receptors. Differences between using intact cells in suspension and using isolated membranes were evaluated for different aspects of the receptor binding assay: total binding variations while both receptor preparations remain on ice, modifications in incubation conditions, saturation, and competition using different agonists. Intact cells are more prone to variability. Although under optimized settings both preparations were equivalent, the K(d) value for intact cells was three times higher than that using isolated membranes. However, no significant differences were observed in competition assays obtaining practically identical K(i) values for all ligands tested. For the GHSR-1a, isolated membranes are the better choice if particular incubation conditions are required (less variability), whereas intact cells yield easy, fast, and physiological conditions for receptor binding assays. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterisation of the human NMDA receptor subunit NR3A glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Duan, J; Mo-Boquist, L-L

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we characterise the binding site of the human N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. Saturation radioligand binding of the NMDA receptor agonists [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-glutamate showed that only glycine binds to human NR3A (hNR3A) with high affinity (K(d)=535nM (277......-793nM)). Eight amino acids, which correspond to amino acids that are critical for ligand binding to other NMDA receptor subunits, situated within the S1S2 predicted ligand binding domain of hNR3A were mutated, which resulted in complete or near complete loss of [(3)H]-glycine binding to hNR3A. The NMDA...

  3. Dietary xenoestrogens differentially impair 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and persistently affect leptin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrakonkham, Pascal; Viengchareun, Say; Belloir, Christine; Lombès, Marc; Artur, Yves; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie-Chantal

    2008-05-01

    Recent observations have highlighted adipogenesis alterations under exposure to several xenoestrogens at critical stages, and pointed at their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of obesity. However, it remains unclear whether these effects are mediated by classical estrogen receptor (ER) binding and subsequent transcriptional modulation. The aim of this study was to determine the (anti-)adipogenic impact of apigenin, bisphenol A, genistein and 17beta-estradiol at the onset of adipose cell maturation, and to correlate it to their estrogenic potential. In steroid-free conditions, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced to differentiate in the presence of xenoestrogens for 2 days. DNA and triglyceride levels, leptin secretion and expression of Pref-1, C/EBPbeta, PPARgamma2, FAS, leptin and ERs were measured on days 0, 3 and 8 of differentiation. Genistein potently blocked mitotic clonal expansion and all markers of maturation. Bisphenol A and estradiol did not modify triglyceride accumulation but increased the expression of differentiation genes. Apigenin caused a weak but reversible delay in adipogenesis although it unexpectedly enhanced leptin synthesis. However, the expression of steroid hormone receptors was not associated with these differential effects. In conclusion, we could not put a clear estrogen-dependent mechanism forward, but early exposure to xenoestrogens persistently disrupted adipocyte gene expression and leptin synthesis.

  4. The minor binding pocket: a major player in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Frimurer, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    From the deep part of the main ligand-binding crevice, a minor, often shallower pocket extends between the extracellular ends of transmembrane domains (TM)-I, II, III and VII of 7TM receptors. This minor binding pocket is defined by a highly conserved kink in TM-II that is induced by a proline...... residue located in one of two adjacent positions. Here we argue that this minor binding pocket is important for receptor activation. Functional coupling of the receptors seems to be mediated through the hydrogen bond network located between the intracellular segments of these TMs, with the allosteric...

  5. Leptin and its cardiovascular effects: Focus on angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Tahergorabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is an endocrine hormone synthesized by adipocytes. It plays a key role in the energy homeostasis in central and peripheral tissues and has additional roles are attributed to it, such as the regulation of reproduction, immune function, bone homeostasis, and angiogenesis. The plasma concentration of leptin significantly increases in obese individuals. In the present review, we give an introduction concerning leptin, its receptors, signaling pathways, and its effect on cardiovascular system, especially on angiogenesis.

  6. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  7. Leptin and psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    obese and normal body weight controls, and negatively corre- lated with weight loss due to food restriction. Reports of studies of leptin in patients with anorexia nervosa are limited. In starved female anorectics at very low body weights, leptin levels are reduced significantly.15,16 Leptin in-. Fig. 2. A schematic representation ...

  8. Mu receptor binding of some commonly used opioids and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhaorong; Irvine, R.J. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)); Somogyi, A.A.; Bochner, F. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia) Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    The binding affinity to the {mu} receptor of some opioids chemically related to morphine and some of their metabolites was examined in rat brain homogenates with {sup 3}H-DAMGO. The chemical group at position 6 of the molecule had little effect on binding. Decreasing the length of the alkyl group at position 3 decreased the K{sub i} values (morphine < codeine < ethylmorphine < pholcodine). Analgesics with high clinical potency containing a methoxyl group at position 3 had relatively weak receptor binding, while their O-demethylated metabolites had much stronger binding. Many opioids may exert their pharmacological actions predominantly through metabolites.

  9. Analyzing machupo virus-receptor binding by molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin G. Meyer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In many biological applications, we would like to be able to computationally predict mutational effects on affinity in protein–protein interactions. However, many commonly used methods to predict these effects perform poorly in important test cases. In particular, the effects of multiple mutations, non alanine substitutions, and flexible loops are difficult to predict with available tools and protocols. We present here an existing method applied in a novel way to a new test case; we interrogate affinity differences resulting from mutations in a host–virus protein–protein interface. We use steered molecular dynamics (SMD to computationally pull the machupo virus (MACV spike glycoprotein (GP1 away from the human transferrin receptor (hTfR1. We then approximate affinity using the maximum applied force of separation and the area under the force-versus-distance curve. We find, even without the rigor and planning required for free energy calculations, that these quantities can provide novel biophysical insight into the GP1/hTfR1 interaction. First, with no prior knowledge of the system we can differentiate among wild type and mutant complexes. Moreover, we show that this simple SMD scheme correlates well with relative free energy differences computed via free energy perturbation. Second, although the static co-crystal structure shows two large hydrogen-bonding networks in the GP1/hTfR1 interface, our simulations indicate that one of them may not be important for tight binding. Third, one viral site known to be critical for infection may mark an important evolutionary suppressor site for infection-resistant hTfR1 mutants. Finally, our approach provides a framework to compare the effects of multiple mutations, individually and jointly, on protein–protein interactions.

  10. Analyzing machupo virus-receptor binding by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Sara L.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2014-01-01

    In many biological applications, we would like to be able to computationally predict mutational effects on affinity in protein–protein interactions. However, many commonly used methods to predict these effects perform poorly in important test cases. In particular, the effects of multiple mutations, non alanine substitutions, and flexible loops are difficult to predict with available tools and protocols. We present here an existing method applied in a novel way to a new test case; we interrogate affinity differences resulting from mutations in a host–virus protein–protein interface. We use steered molecular dynamics (SMD) to computationally pull the machupo virus (MACV) spike glycoprotein (GP1) away from the human transferrin receptor (hTfR1). We then approximate affinity using the maximum applied force of separation and the area under the force-versus-distance curve. We find, even without the rigor and planning required for free energy calculations, that these quantities can provide novel biophysical insight into the GP1/hTfR1 interaction. First, with no prior knowledge of the system we can differentiate among wild type and mutant complexes. Moreover, we show that this simple SMD scheme correlates well with relative free energy differences computed via free energy perturbation. Second, although the static co-crystal structure shows two large hydrogen-bonding networks in the GP1/hTfR1 interface, our simulations indicate that one of them may not be important for tight binding. Third, one viral site known to be critical for infection may mark an important evolutionary suppressor site for infection-resistant hTfR1 mutants. Finally, our approach provides a framework to compare the effects of multiple mutations, individually and jointly, on protein–protein interactions. PMID:24624315

  11. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  12. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for 125 I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells

  13. Ascorbic acid enables reversible dopamine receptor 3H-agonist binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leff, S.; Sibley, D.R.; Hamblin, M.; Creese, I.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ascorbic acid on dopaminergic 3 H-agonist receptor binding were studied in membrane homogenates of bovine anterior pituitary and caudate, and rat striatum. In all tissues virtually no stereospecific binding (defined using 1uM (+)butaclamol) of the 3 H-agonists N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA), apomorphine, or dopamine could be demonstrated in the absence of ascorbic acid. Although levels of total 3 H-agonist binding were three to five times greater in the absence than in the presence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, the increased binding was entirely non-stereospecific. Greater amounts of dopamine-inhibitable 3 H-NPA binding could be demonstrated in the absence of 0.1% ascorbic acid, but this measure of ''specific binding'' was demonstrated not to represent dopamine receptor binding since several other catecholamines and catechol were equipotent with dopamine and more potent than the dopamine agonist (+/-)amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) in inhibiting this binding. High levels of dopamine-displaceable 3 H-agonist binding were detected in fresh and boiled homogenates of cerebellum, an area of brain which receives no dopaminergic innervation, further demonstrating the non-specific nature of 3 H-agonist binding in the absence of ascorbic acid. These studies emphasize that under typical assay conditions ascorbic acid is required in order to demonstrate reversible and specific 3 H-agonist binding to dopamine receptors

  14. Protein kinase A regulates AKAP250 (gravin) scaffold binding to the beta2-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Wang, Hsien-Yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2003-12-15

    A-kinase-anchoring protein 250 (AKAP250; gravin) acts as a scaffold that binds protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C and protein phosphatases, associating reversibly with the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor. The receptor-binding domain of the scaffold and the regulation of the receptor-scaffold association was revealed through mutagenesis and biochemical analyses. The AKAP domain found in other members of this superfamily is essential for the scaffold-receptor interactions. Gravin constructs lacking the AKAP domain displayed no binding to the receptor. Metabolic labeling studies in vivo demonstrate agonist-stimulated phosphorylation of gravin and enhanced gravin-receptor association. Analysis of the AKAP domain revealed two canonical PKA sites phosphorylated in response to elevated cAMP, blocked by PKA inhibitor, and essential for scaffold-receptor association and for resensitization of the receptor. The AKAP appears to provide the catalytic PKA activity responsible for phosphorylation of the scaffold in response to agonist activation of the receptor as well as for the association of the scaffold with the receptor, a step critical to receptor resensitization.

  15. [3H]cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic 3 H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of [ 3 H]cytisine in rat brain homogenates. [ 3 H]Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that [ 3 H]cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of [ 3 H]cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors

  16. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  17. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of 125 I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound 125 I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor

  18. Nongenomic actions of estrogens and xenoestrogens by binding at a plasma membrane receptor unrelated to estrogen receptor α and estrogen receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Angel; Ropero, Ana B.; Laribi, Ouahiba; Maillet, Marjorie; Fuentes, Esther; Soria, Bernat

    2000-01-01

    The molecular mechanism used by environmental chemicals to exert their hormone-like actions is still only partially resolved. Although it generally is accepted that xenoestrogens act at the genomic level by binding to intracellular estrogen receptors, we have shown here that they trigger nongenomic effects in pancreatic β cells. Both xenoestrogens and the circulating hormone, 17β-estradiol, bind with high affinity to a common membrane binding site unrelated to the intracellular estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. This binding site is shared by dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine and has the pharmacological profile of the γadrenergic receptor. This study provides an outline of the membrane receptor involved in rapid xenoestrogen actions. PMID:11027358

  19. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH Receptor Structure and GnRH Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A. Flanagan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH regulates reproduction. The human GnRH receptor lacks a cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal tail but has amino acid sequence motifs characteristic of rhodopsin-like, class A, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. This review will consider how recent descriptions of X-ray crystallographic structures of GPCRs in inactive and active conformations may contribute to understanding GnRH receptor structure, mechanism of activation and ligand binding. The structures confirmed that ligands bind to variable extracellular surfaces, whereas the seven membrane-spanning α-helices convey the activation signal to the cytoplasmic receptor surface, which binds and activates heterotrimeric G proteins. Forty non-covalent interactions that bridge topologically equivalent residues in different transmembrane (TM helices are conserved in class A GPCR structures, regardless of activation state. Conformation-independent interhelical contacts account for a conserved receptor protein structure and their importance in the GnRH receptor structure is supported by decreased expression of receptors with mutations of residues in the network. Many of the GnRH receptor mutations associated with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, including the Glu2.53(90 Lys mutation, involve amino acids that constitute the conserved network. Half of the ~250 intramolecular interactions in GPCRs differ between inactive and active structures. Conformation-specific interhelical contacts depend on amino acids changing partners during activation. Conserved inactive conformation-specific contacts prevent receptor activation by stabilizing proximity of TM helices 3 and 6 and a closed G protein-binding site. Mutations of GnRH receptor residues involved in these interactions, such as Arg3.50(139 of the DRY/S motif or Tyr7.53(323 of the N/DPxxY motif, increase or decrease receptor expression and efficiency of receptor coupling to G protein signaling, consistent with the

  20. Leptin and cancer: Pathogenesis and modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin, a product of Ob gene from adipocytes regulates appetite, energy expenditure and body mass composition by decreasing orexigenic and increasing anorexigenic neuropeptide release from hypothalamus. Research over the past few years have suggested leptin/leptin receptor dysregulation to have a role in the development of a large variety of malignancies like breast ca, thyroid ca, endometrial ca and gastrointestinal malignancies, predominantly through JAK/STAT pathway which modulates PI3K/AKT3 signaling, ERK1/2 signaling, expression of antiapoptotic proteins (like XIAP, systemic inflammation (TNF-α, IL6, angiogenic factors (VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1a (HIF-1a expression. In this review, the current understanding of leptin′s role in carcinogenesis has been elaborated. Also a few agents modulating leptin signaling to inhibit cancer cell growth has been described.

  1. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...... be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...

  2. Growth Hormone Overexpression Disrupts Reproductive Status Through Actions on Leptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Growth and reproduction are closely related. Growth hormone (GH-transgenic common carp exhibit accelerated growth and delayed reproductive development, which provides an amenable model to study hormone cross talk between the growth and reproductive axes. We analyzed the energy status and reproductive development in GH-transgenic common carp by using multi-tissue RNA sequencing, real-time-PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, immunofluorescence, and in vitro incubation. The expression of gys (glycogen synthase and igfbp1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein as well as blood glucose concentrations are lower in GH-transgenic carp. Agrp1 (agouti-related protein 1 and sla (somatolactin a, which are related to appetite and lipid catabolism, are significantly higher in GH-transgenic carp. Low glucose content and increased appetite indicate disrupted metabolic and energy deprivation status in GH-transgenic carp. Meanwhile, the expression of genes, such as gnrhr2 (gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2, gthα (gonadotropin hormone, alpha polypeptide, fshβ (follicle stimulating hormone, beta polypeptide, lhβ [luteinizing hormone, beta polypeptide] in the pituitary, cyp19a1a (aromatase A in the gonad, and cyp19a1b (aromatase B in the hypothalamus, are decreased in GH-transgenic carp. In contrast, pituitary gnih (gonadotropin inhibitory hormone, drd1 (dopamine receptor D1, drd3 (dopamine receptor D3, and drd4 (dopamine receptor D4 exhibit increased expression, which were associated with the retarded reproductive development. Leptin receptor mRNA was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the pituitary including the pars intermedia and proximal pars distalis, suggesting a direct effect of leptin on LH. Recombinant carp Leptin protein was shown to stimulate pituitary gthα, fshβ, lhβ expression, and ovarian germinal vesicle breakdown in vitro. In addition to neuroendocrine factors, we suggest that reduced hepatic leptin signaling to the

  3. Dietary components in the development of leptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, Joseph R; Scarpace, Philip J; Harris, Ruth B S; Banks, William A

    2013-03-01

    Classically, leptin resistance has been associated with increased body fat and circulating leptin levels, and the condition is believed to contribute to the onset and/or maintenance of obesity. Although a great deal is known about the central nervous system mechanisms mediating leptin resistance, considerably less is known about the role of diet in establishing and maintaining this altered hormonal state. An exciting new finding has recently been published demonstrating the existence of leptin resistance in normal-weight rats with lean leptin levels by feeding them a high-concentration-fructose diet. This finding has opened the possibility that specific macronutrients may be capable of inducing leptin resistance, independently of the amount of body fat or circulating leptin present in the treated animals. This review describes several lines of research that have recently emerged indicating that specific types of dietary sugars and fats are capable of inducing leptin resistance in experimental rodent models. The results further show that diet-induced leptin resistance is capable of increasing energy intake and elevating body weight gain under appropriate dietary challenges. It appears that biological mechanisms on multiple levels may underlie the dietary induction of leptin resistance, including alterations in the leptin blood-to-brain transport system, in peripheral glucose metabolism, and in central leptin receptor signaling pathways. What is clear from the findings reviewed here is that diet-induced leptin resistance can occur in the absence of elevated circulating leptin levels and body weight, rendering it a potential cause and/or predisposing factor to excess body weight gain and obesity.

  4. Dietary Components in the Development of Leptin Resistance123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, Joseph R.; Scarpace, Philip J.; Harris, Ruth B. S.; Banks, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Classically, leptin resistance has been associated with increased body fat and circulating leptin levels, and the condition is believed to contribute to the onset and/or maintenance of obesity. Although a great deal is known about the central nervous system mechanisms mediating leptin resistance, considerably less is known about the role of diet in establishing and maintaining this altered hormonal state. An exciting new finding has recently been published demonstrating the existence of leptin resistance in normal-weight rats with lean leptin levels by feeding them a high-concentration-fructose diet. This finding has opened the possibility that specific macronutrients may be capable of inducing leptin resistance, independently of the amount of body fat or circulating leptin present in the treated animals. This review describes several lines of research that have recently emerged indicating that specific types of dietary sugars and fats are capable of inducing leptin resistance in experimental rodent models. The results further show that diet-induced leptin resistance is capable of increasing energy intake and elevating body weight gain under appropriate dietary challenges. It appears that biological mechanisms on multiple levels may underlie the dietary induction of leptin resistance, including alterations in the leptin blood-to-brain transport system, in peripheral glucose metabolism, and in central leptin receptor signaling pathways. What is clear from the findings reviewed here is that diet-induced leptin resistance can occur in the absence of elevated circulating leptin levels and body weight, rendering it a potential cause and/or predisposing factor to excess body weight gain and obesity. PMID:23493533

  5. Structural Analysis of the Receptor Binding Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known. The mechanism for entry into neuronal cells for serotypes A, B, E, F, and G involves a well understood dual receptor (protein and ganglioside) process, however, the mechanism of entry for serotypes C and D remains unclear. To provide structural insights into how BoNT/D enters neuronal cells, the crystal structure of the receptor binding domain (S863-E1276) for this serotype (BoNT/D-HCR) was determined at 1.65{angstrom} resolution. While BoNT/D-HCR adopts an overall fold similar to that observed in other known BoNT HCRs, several major structural differences are present. These structural differences are located at, or near, putative receptor binding sites and may be responsible for BoNT/D host preferences. Two loops, S1195-I1204 and K1236-N1244, located on both sides of the putative protein receptor binding pocket, are displaced >10{angstrom} relative to the corresponding residues in the crystal structures of BoNT/B and G. Obvious clashes were observed in the putative protein receptor binding site when the BoNT/B protein receptor synaptotagmin II was modeled into the BoNT/D-HCR structure. Although a ganglioside binding site has never been unambiguously identified in BoNT/D-HCR, a shallow cavity in an analogous location to the other BoNT serotypes HCR domains is observed in BoNT/D-HCR that has features compatible with membrane binding. A portion of a loop near the putative receptor binding site, K1236-N1244, is hydrophobic and solvent-exposed and may directly bind membrane lipids. Liposome-binding experiments with BoNT/D-HCR demonstrate that this membrane lipid may be phosphatidylethanolamine.

  6. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  7. Inactivation of SOCS3 in leptin receptor-expressing cells protects mice from diet-induced insulin resistance but does not prevent obesity a

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Cardinali, Lais I.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M.; Tirapegui, Julio; Elias, Carol F.; Donato, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that improve leptin sensitivity have potential as an alternative treatment approach against obesity and related comorbidities. We investigated the effects of Socs3 gene ablation in different mouse models to understand the role of SOCS3 in the regulation of leptin sensitivity, diet-induced obesity (DIO) and glucose homeostasis. Neuronal deletion of SOCS3 partially prevented DIO and improved glucose homeostasis. Inactivation of SOCS3 only in LepR-expressing cells protected against lep...

  8. Aqueous and Ethanolic Valeriana officinalis Extracts Change the Binding of Ligands to Glutamate Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mojica, Lisa M.; Cordero-Hernández, José M.; González-Medina, Giselle; Ramos-Vélez, Igmeris; Berríos-Cartagena, Nairimer; Torres-Hernández, Bianca A.; Ortíz, José G.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of two valerian extracts (aqueous and hydroalcoholic) were investigated through [3H]Glutamate ([3H]Glu) and [3H]Fluorowillardine ([3H]FW) receptor binding assays using rat synaptic membranes in presence of different receptor ligands. In addition, the extract stability was monitored spectrophotometrically. Both extracts demonstrated interaction with ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). However, the extracts displayed considerable differences in receptor selectivity. The hydroalcoholic extract selectively interacted with quisqualic acid (QA), group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) ligand, while the aqueous extract did not alter the binding of QA. The stability of the extracts was examined during several weeks. Freshly prepared extract inhibited 38–60% of [3H]FW binding (AMPA). After 10 days, the aqueous extract inhibited 85% of [3H]FW binding while the hydroalcoholic extract markedly potentiated (200%) [3H]FW binding to AMPA receptors. Thus, our results showed that factors such as extraction solvent and extract stability determine the selectivity for glutamate receptor (GluR) interactions. PMID:21151614

  9. Changes in 5-HT4 receptor and 5-HT transporter binding in olfactory bulbectomized and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie L; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Zueger, Maha

    2010-01-01

    . The olfactory bulbectomized mice displayed increased activity in the open field test, a characteristic depression-like feature of this model. After bulbectomy, 5-HT(4) receptor binding was increased in the ventral hippocampus (12%) but unchanged in the dorsal hippocampus, frontal and caudal caudate putamen......]citalopram in two murine models of depression-related states, olfactory bulbectomy and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous (GR(+/-)) mice. The olfactory bulbectomy model is characterized by 5-HT system changes, while the GR(+/-) mice have a deficit in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system control....... Among post hoc analyzed regions, there was a 14% decrease in 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the olfactory tubercles. The 5-HTT binding was unchanged in the hippocampus and caudate putamen of bulbectomized mice but post hoc analysis showed small decreases in lateral septum and lateral globus pallidus...

  10. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2016-01-01

    structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been detd., providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small mol. antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compd. to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate......The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurol. disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resoln. x-ray crystal...

  11. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  12. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large class of seven transmembrane proteins, which bind selectively agonists or antagonists with important consequences for cellular signaling and function. Comprehension of the molecular details of ligand binding is important for the understanding...

  13. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  14. Computational approaches to modeling receptor flexibility upon ligand binding: Application to interfacially activated enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, R.C.; Sobolev, V.; Ortiz, A.R. .

    1998-01-01

    Receptors generally undergo conformational change upon ligand binding. We describe how fairly simple techniques may be used in docking and design studies to account for some of the changes in the conformations of proteins on ligand binding. Simulations of protein-ligand interactions that give...

  15. Molecular determinants of receptor binding and signaling by the CX3C chemokine fractalkine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizoue, L S; Sullivan, S K; King, D S

    2001-01-01

    , but not all, pathways required for migration. Fractalkine also binds the human cytomegalovirus receptor US28, and analysis of the mutants indicates that US28 recognizes many of the same epitopes of fractalkine as CX3CR1. Comparison of the binding surfaces of fractalkine and the CC chemokine MCP-1 reveals...

  16. Photocontrol of Anion Binding Affinity to a Bis-urea Receptor Derived from Stiff-Stilbene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Sander J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2017-01-01

    Toward the development of photoresponsive anion receptors, a stiff-stilbene photoswitch has been equipped' with two urea anion -binding motifs. Photoinduced E/Z isomerization has been studied in detail by UV-vis and NMR spectroscopy. Titration experiments (H-1 NMR) reveal strong binding of acetate

  17. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    The past couple of years have seen several novel X-ray structures of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors in complex with antagonists and even with a peptide fragment of a G protein. These structures demonstrate that the main ligand-binding pocket in 7TM receptors is like a funnel with a partial 'lid...

  18. A Unified Model of the GABA(A) Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Bergmann, Rikke; Sørensen, Pernille Louise

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length a1b2c2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate...

  19. Altered [125I]epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that [ 125 I]EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers

  20. Interaction of alpha-conotoxin ImII and its analogs with nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine-binding proteins: additional binding sites on Torpedo receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasheverov, I.E.; Zhmak, M.N.; Fish, A.; Rucktooa, P.; Khruschov, A.Y.; Osipov, A.V.; Ziganshin, R.H.; D'Hoedt, D.; Bertrand, D.; Sixma, T.K.; Smit, A.B.; Tsetlin, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    α-Conotoxins interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) at the sites for agonists/competitive antagonists. α-Conotoxins blocking muscle-type or α7 nAChRs compete with α-bungarotoxin. However, α-conotoxin ImII, a close homolog of the α7

  1. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gajewska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2 Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006, an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022 and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001. In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002. We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period.

  2. Sequences Flanking the Gephyrin-Binding Site of GlyRβ Tune Receptor Stabilization at Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Nora; Jan, Audric; Salvatico, Charlotte; Kress, Vanessa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G; Schwarz, Guenter

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic transmission is determined by the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses. Their recruitment depends upon the availability of postsynaptic scaffolding molecules that interact with specific binding sequences of the receptor. At inhibitory synapses, gephyrin is the major scaffold protein that mediates the accumulation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) via the cytoplasmic loop in the β-subunit (β-loop). This binding involves high- and low-affinity interactions, but the molecular mechanism of this bimodal binding and its implication in GlyR stabilization at synapses remain unknown. We have approached this question using a combination of quantitative biochemical tools and high-density single molecule tracking in cultured rat spinal cord neurons. The high-affinity binding site could be identified and was shown to rely on the formation of a 3 10 -helix C-terminal to the β-loop core gephyrin-binding motif. This site plays a structural role in shaping the core motif and represents the major contributor to the synaptic confinement of GlyRs by gephyrin. The N-terminal flanking sequence promotes lower affinity interactions by occupying newly identified binding sites on gephyrin. Despite its low affinity, this binding site plays a modulatory role in tuning the mobility of the receptor. Together, the GlyR β-loop sequences flanking the core-binding site differentially regulate the affinity of the receptor for gephyrin and its trapping at synapses. Our experimental approach thus bridges the gap between thermodynamic aspects of receptor-scaffold interactions and functional receptor stabilization at synapses in living cells.

  3. Identification of steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites within the glucocorticoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of these studies was to localize the steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites of the glucocorticoid receptor. The synthetic steroid, dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) forms a covalent thioether bond via the sulfhydryl group of a cysteine residue in the receptor. To determine the covalent site of attachment of this ligand, receptors in WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells were labeled with ({sup 3}H)DM and purified with a monoclonal antibody. The receptor was completely digested with trypsin and a single peptide covalently labeled with steroid identified by reversed-phase HPLC. This peptide was analyzed by automated Edman degradation to determine the location of the steroid-labeled residue. A similar analysis was performed on an overlapping peptide produced by Staphylococcus aureus protease digestion. Analysis of tryptic peptides from receptors labeled with both ({sup 3}H)DM and L-({sup 35}S)methionine indicated that this peptide contained methionine. These analyses, coupled with the published amino acid sequence of the receptor, identified Cysteine-644 in the steroid-binding domain of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor as the residue involved in covalent steroid-binding. A synthetic peptide representing amino acids 640-650 of the mouse receptor was prepared and analyzed to confirm the identification. These biochemical studies represent a direct demonstration of an amino acid important in receptor function. It has been proposed that the receptor functions through a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle to explain the dependence of hormone binding capacity upon cellular ATP. The glucocorticoid receptor has been shown to be a phosphoprotein. As an initial step to identifying a role of phosphorylation in receptor action, phosphorylated sites within the functional domains of the protein were identified.

  4. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y...

  5. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  6. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na+ channel interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na + channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) [G-protein(s)]. These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of [ 3 H] acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of [ 3 H]batrachotoxin to Na + channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced 22 Na + uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na + channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na + channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na + channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na + channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues

  7. Association between Salivary Leptin Levels and Taste Perception in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lénia Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The satiety inducing hormone leptin acts not only at central nervous system but also at peripheral level. Leptin receptors are found in several sense related organs, including the mouth. A role of leptin in sweet taste response has been suggested but, until now, studies have been based on in vitro experiments, or in assessing the levels of the hormone in circulation. The present study investigated whether the levels of leptin in saliva are related to taste perception in children and whether Body Mass Index (BMI affects such relationship. Sweet and bitter taste sensitivity was assessed for 121 children aged 9-10 years and unstimulated whole saliva was collected for leptin quantification, using ELISA technique. Children females with lower sweet taste sensitivity presented higher salivary leptin levels, but this is only in the normal weight ones. For bitter taste, association between salivary leptin and caffeine threshold detection was observed only in preobese boys, with higher levels of salivary hormone in low sensitive individuals. This study is the first presenting evidences of a relationship between salivary leptin levels and taste perception, which is sex and BMI dependent. The mode of action of salivary leptin at taste receptor level should be elucidated in future studies.

  8. Identification of a Binding Site for Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nurr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Giri, Pankaj K; Munoz-Tello, Paola; Brust, Richard; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Shang, Jinsai; Campbell, Sean; Wilson, Henry D; Granados, Juan; Gardner, William J; Creamer, Trevor P; Solt, Laura A; Kojetin, Douglas J

    2016-07-15

    Nurr1/NR4A2 is an orphan nuclear receptor, and currently there are no known natural ligands that bind Nurr1. A recent metabolomics study identified unsaturated fatty acids, including arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that interact with the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a related orphan receptor, Nur77/NR4A1. However, the binding location and whether these ligands bind other NR4A receptors were not defined. Here, we show that unsaturated fatty acids also interact with the Nurr1 LBD, and solution NMR spectroscopy reveals the binding epitope of DHA at its putative ligand-binding pocket. Biochemical assays reveal that DHA-bound Nurr1 interacts with high affinity with a peptide derived from PIASγ, a protein that interacts with Nurr1 in cellular extracts, and DHA also affects cellular Nurr1 transactivation. This work is the first structural report of a natural ligand binding to a canonical NR4A ligand-binding pocket and indicates a natural ligand can bind and affect Nurr1 function.

  9. Preliminary Molecular Dynamic Simulations of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain from Antagonist to Apo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian E. Roitberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER are known as nuclear receptors. They exist in the cytoplasm of human cells and serves as a DNA binding transcription factor that regulates gene expression. However the estrogen receptor also has additional functions independent of DNA binding. The human estrogen receptor comes in two forms, alpha and beta. This work focuses on the alpha form of the estrogen receptor. The ERα is found in breast cancer cells, ovarian stroma cells, endometrium, and the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT, and other pesticides causes conformational changes in the estrogen receptor. Before examining these factors, this work examines the protein unfolding from the antagonist form found in the 3ERT PDB crystal structure. The 3ERT PDB crystal structure has the estrogen receptor bound to the cancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The 4-hydroxytamoxifen ligand was extracted before the simulation, resulting in new conformational freedom due to absence of van der Waals contacts between the ligand and the receptor. The conformational changes that result expose the binding clef of the co peptide beside Helix 12 of the receptor forming an apo conformation. Two key conformations in the loops at either end of the H12 are produced resulting in the antagonist to apo conformation transformation. The results were produced over a 42ns Molecular Dynamics simulation using the AMBER FF99SB force field.

  10. Leptin im Knochenstoffwechsel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vock L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin ist ein in Adipozyten exprimiertes Hormon mit vielfältigen Funktionen im gesamten Organismus. Verschiedene Studien legen eine positive Wirkung von Leptin auf den Knochenstoffwechsel nahe. In vitro führte die Inkubation von Knochenmarkstromazellen mit Leptin zu deren Differenzierung zu Osteoblasten und Mineralisation der Matrix. Bei ovarektomierten Ratten konnte durch Leptin der Knochenverlust vermindert werden. Überraschenderweise zeigten andere Studien eine zentrale inhibitorische Wirkung von Leptin auf Osteoblasten bei Nagern. Diese einander scheinbar widersprechenden Ergebnisse zeigen, daß die molekularen Mechanismen, mit welchen Leptin auf den Knochenstoffwechsel wirkt, noch nicht ausreichend verstanden werden. In klinischen Studien findet sich eine protektive Wirkung von Fettmasse und "body mass index" (BMI auf die Knochendichte (postmenopausaler Frauen überwiegend bestätigt. Damit im Einklang, konnten erhöhte Leptinspiegel gefunden werden. Ob Leptin nun direkt in den Knochenstoffwechsel eingreift oder bloß indirekt etwa über eine erhöhte mechanische Belastung, läßt sich aus klinischen Studien allein nicht beantworten. Hingegen dürfte Leptin im Knochenstoffwechsel von Männern keine oder nur eine untergeordnete Rolle spielen. Die Situation bei Kindern und Jugendlichen ist noch unklar, wobei eine positive Wirkung von Leptin in fetalem Knochen relativ sicher ist. Leptin könnte jedoch auch im Wachstum und der Knochenreifung bei Kindern und Jugendlichen eine Rolle spielen.

  11. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    or interference with conformational properties of the receptor critical for ligand binding. This distinction is central when employing the antibodies as tools in the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of the protein in question. We have studied the effect of monoclonal antibodies against......PA/uPAR complex. The continuous recording of binding and dissociation, obtained in BIA, is central in characterizing these phenomena. The identification of a non-competitive inhibitory mechanism against this receptor reveals the presence of a determinant which influences the binding properties of a remote site...

  12. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    modelling now explain how ivermectin binds to these receptors and reveal why it is selective for invertebrate members of the Cys-loop receptor family. Combining this with emerging genomic information, we are now in a position to predict species sensitivity to ivermectin and better understand the molecular...... basis of ivermectin resistance. An understanding of the molecular structure of the ivermectin binding site, which is formed at the interface of two adjacent subunits in the transmembrane domain of the receptor, should also aid the development of new lead compounds both as anthelmintics and as therapies...

  13. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the α subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K d of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site

  14. Characterization of 125ITSH binding to its receptor in thyroid hyperplasies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.C.; Nunes, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    An unpredictable and unbalanced response to a stimulus like TSH is indeed a striking characteristic of the follicles of the simple goiter. Since it is known that the first step for TSH action on its target cell is binding to specific TSH plasma membrane receptors, the binding of 125 ITSH to these receptors was studied in normal and ''cold'' hyperplastic thyroid fragments obtained at surgery. Through the Scatchard analysis it was verified that there are no differences with regard to the binding capacity of TSH receptors between normal and hyperplastic tissues. On the other hand, a significant decrease of the dissociation constant (Kd) was observed in hyperplastic tissue indicating higher affinity for TSH binding. It is known that intracellular iodine content can interfere with the TSH induced modifications on the thyroid folicular cells. It is supposed that this is mediated by interference on TSH binding to its receptor and/or activation of adenylate cyclase. Due to impaired organification capacity of ''cold'' tissue it is assumed that these cells present decreased intracellular iodine content. Therefore it is proposed that alterations of TSH binding to its receptors detected in the present investigation are consequent of the low iodine content of the hyperplastic folicular cell. (author) [pt

  15. Stoichiometry of Heteromeric BAFF and APRIL Cytokines Dictates Their Receptor Binding and Signaling Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Das, Dolon; Willen, Laure; Vigolo, Michele; Tardivel, Aubry; Lebon, Luc; Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Nys, Josquin; Smulski, Cristian; Zheng, Timothy S.; Maskos, Klaus; Lammens, Alfred; Jiang, Xuliang; Hess, Henry; Tan, Seng-Lai; Schneider, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The closely related TNF family ligands B cell activation factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serve in the generation and maintenance of mature B-lymphocytes. Both BAFF and APRIL assemble as homotrimers that bind and activate several receptors that they partially share. However, heteromers of BAFF and APRIL that occur in patients with autoimmune diseases are incompletely characterized. The N and C termini of adjacent BAFF or APRIL monomers are spatially close and can be linked to create single-chain homo- or hetero-ligands of defined stoichiometry. Similar to APRIL, heteromers consisting of one BAFF and two APRILs (BAA) bind to the receptors B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) but not to the BAFF receptor (BAFFR). Heteromers consisting of one APRIL and two BAFF (ABB) bind to TACI and BCMA and weakly to BAFFR in accordance with the analysis of the receptor interaction sites in the crystallographic structure of ABB. Receptor binding correlated with activity in reporter cell line assays specific for BAFFR, TACI, or BCMA. Single-chain BAFF (BBB) and to a lesser extent single-chain ABB, but not APRIL or single-chain BAA, rescued BAFFR-dependent B cell maturation in BAFF-deficient mice. In conclusion, BAFF-APRIL heteromers of different stoichiometries have distinct receptor-binding properties and activities. Based on the observation that heteromers are less active than BAFF, we speculate that their physiological role might be to down-regulate BAFF activity. PMID:25953898

  16. Is insulin binding followed by disulfide interchange between insulin and the receptor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, P.E.; Lipkin, E.W.; Teller, D.C.; de Haeen, C.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of insulin binding to rat adipocytes at 15 0 C can best be described by a 2-step model. Insulin, I, first binds to the receptor, R. Occupied receptors, RI, then convert reversibly to another form, R'I, from which insulin cannot dissociate directly. At equilibrium, the R'I:RI ratio is ∼3:2. To elucidate the nature of R'I, the effects of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) on the kinetics of insulin binding were investigated. DTNB (2.5 mM) added with 1 nM 125 I-iodoinsulin doubled insulin binding relative to cells without DTNB. When labeled insulin prebound to cells was dissociated with excess unlabeled insulin, DTNB added with the unlabeled insulin reduced the amount of dissociating label. Treatment of adipocytes with DTNB prior to insulin exposure did not alter the subsequent response of insulin binding to DTNB. These data suggest that the receptor exists in at least two conformational states: R, the unoccupied receptor, with a cryptic sulfhydryl group, and the occupied receptors RI and R'I, in which a sulfhydryl group is sensitive to DTNB. The authors propose that R'I formation is the result of disulfide exchange between the receptor and insulin, in accordance with the kinetics evidence that insulin cannot directly dissociate from R'I. The disulfide exchange generates a free sulfhydryl on insulin, with which DTNB reacts to trap insulin covalently bound in the R'I form

  17. Quantitative Prediction of Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinities for Influenza, Cholera, and Anthrax Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2018-03-05

    Multivalency achieves strong, yet reversible binding by the simultaneous formation of multiple weak bonds. It is a key interaction principle in biology and promising for the synthesis of high-affinity inhibitors of pathogens. We present a molecular model for the binding affinity of synthetic multivalent ligands onto multivalent receptors consisting of n receptor units arranged on a regular polygon. Ligands consist of a geometrically matching rigid polygonal core to which monovalent ligand units are attached via flexible linker polymers, closely mimicking existing experimental designs. The calculated binding affinities quantitatively agree with experimental studies for cholera toxin ( n = 5) and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) and allow to predict optimal core size and optimal linker length. Maximal binding affinity is achieved for a core that matches the receptor size and for linkers that have an equilibrium end-to-end distance that is slightly longer than the geometric separation between ligand core and receptor sites. Linkers that are longer than optimal are greatly preferable compared to shorter linkers. The angular steric restriction between ligand unit and linker polymer is shown to be a key parameter. We construct an enhancement diagram that quantifies the multivalent binding affinity compared to monovalent ligands. We conclude that multivalent ligands against influenza viral hemagglutinin ( n = 3), cholera toxin ( n = 5), and anthrax receptor ( n = 7) can outperform monovalent ligands only for a monovalent ligand affinity that exceeds a core-size dependent threshold value. Thus, multivalent drug design needs to balance core size, linker length, as well as monovalent ligand unit affinity.

  18. A2A adenosine receptor ligand binding and signalling is allosterically modulated by adenosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Eduard; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Moreno, Estefanía; Barkešová, Jana; Mallol, Josefa; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I

    2011-05-01

    A2ARs (adenosine A2A receptors) are highly enriched in the striatum, which is the main motor control CNS (central nervous system) area. BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer) assays showed that A2AR homomers may act as cell-surface ADA (adenosine deaminase; EC 3.5.4.4)-binding proteins. ADA binding affected the quaternary structure of A2ARs present on the cell surface. ADA binding to adenosine A2ARs increased both agonist and antagonist affinity on ligand binding to striatal membranes where these proteins are co-expressed. ADA also increased receptor-mediated ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) phosphorylation. Collectively, the results of the present study show that ADA, apart from regulating the concentration of extracellular adenosine, may behave as an allosteric modulator that markedly enhances ligand affinity and receptor function. This powerful regulation may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of neuronal A2ARs.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farde, Lars; Hall, Hakan; Ehrin, Erling; Sedvall, Goran

    1986-01-01

    D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to 17 picomoles per cubic centimeter and dissociation constants from 3.4 to 4.7 nanomolar. Maximum binding for human putamen at autopsy was 15 picomoles per cubic centimeter. Studies of [11C]raclopride binding indicate that clinically effective doses of chemically distinct neuroleptic drugs result in 85 to 90 percent occupancy of D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of schizophrenic patients.

  20. Leptin distribution and metabolism in the pregnant rat: transplacental leptin passage increases in late gestation but is reduced by excess glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy T; Waddell, Brendan J

    2003-07-01

    Leptin is essential for the establishment of pregnancy and appears to promote fetal growth, but the mechanisms regulating fetal leptin exposure remain unclear. In rodents, indirect evidence suggests that fetal leptin is partly derived from the maternal circulation via transplacental passage. Indeed, the placenta expresses mRNA for Ob-Ra, one of the short forms of the leptin receptor (Ob-R(S)) important in leptin transport, and this expression increases markedly in late pregnancy. Therefore, we determined the transplacental passage of maternal leptin to the fetus in the rat and whether this transport increases near term in association with a rise in placental expression of Ob-R(S) protein. Because of the proposed role of leptin in promoting fetal growth, we also assessed the effect of glucocorticoid-induced fetal growth retardation on placental leptin transport. Anesthetized rats received a constant infusion of (125)I-leptin via a jugular cannula before and at d 16 and 22 of pregnancy (term = d 23); plasma samples were obtained at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 min, and fetuses and placentas were collected at the time of the final sample. The metabolic clearance rate of leptin fell (P pregnancy. Over this same period, Ob-R(S) protein expression in the placental labyrinth zone increased by almost 2-fold. Transplacental leptin passage was reduced (P pregnancy. Consistent with the proposed role of leptin as a fetal growth factor, transplacental leptin passage is reduced in association with glucocorticoid-induced fetal growth retardation.

  1. Kinetic binding and activation profiles of endogenous tachykinins targeting the NK1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederpelt, I; Bleeker, D; Tuijt, B; IJzerman, A P; Heitman, L H

    2016-10-15

    Ligand-receptor binding kinetics (i.e. association and dissociation rates) are emerging as important parameters for drug efficacy in vivo. Awareness of the kinetic behavior of endogenous ligands is pivotal, as drugs often have to compete with those. The binding kinetics of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonists have been widely investigated while binding kinetics of endogenous tachykinins have hardly been reported, if at all. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the binding kinetics of endogenous tachykinins and derivatives thereof and their role in the activation of the NK1 receptor. We determined the binding kinetics of seven tachykinins targeting the NK1 receptor. Dissociation rate constants (k off ) ranged from 0.026±0.0029min -1 (Sar 9 ,Met(O 2 ) 11 -SP) to 0.21±0.015min -1 (septide). Association rate constants (k on ) were more diverse: substance P (SP) associated the fastest with a k on value of 0.24±0.046nM -1 min -1 while neurokinin A (NKA) had the slowest association rate constant of 0.001±0.0002nM -1 min -1 . Kinetic binding parameters were highly correlated with potency and maximal response values determined in label-free impedance-based experiments on U-251 MG cells. Our research demonstrates large variations in binding kinetics of tachykinins which correlate to receptor activation. These findings provide new insights into the ligand-receptor interactions of tachykinins and underline the importance of measuring binding kinetics of both drug candidates and competing endogenous ligands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol 125 I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function

  3. Characterization of the novel progestin gestodene by receptor binding studies and transactivation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, U; Slater, E P; Fritzemeier, K H

    1995-01-01

    Gestodene is a novel progestin used in oral contraceptives with an increased separation of progestogenic versus androgenic activity and a distinct antimineralocorticoid activity. This specific pharmacological profile of gestodene is defined by its pattern of binding affinities to a variety of steroid hormone receptors. In the present study the affinity of gestodene to the progesterone receptor (PR), the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated by steroid binding assays and compared to those obtained for 3-keto-desogestrel and progesterone. The two synthetic progestins displayed identical high affinity to rabbit PR and similar marked binding to rat AR and GR, while progesterone showed high affinity to PR but only low binding to AR and GR. Furthermore, 3-keto-desogestrel exhibited almost no binding to MR, whereas gestodene, similar to progesterone, showed marked affinity to this receptor. In addition to receptor binding studies, transactivation assays were carried out to investigate the effects of gestodene on AR-, GR- and MR-mediated induction of transcription. In contrast to progesterone, which showed antiandrogenic activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel both exhibited androgenic activity. Furthermore, all three progestins exhibited weak GR-mediated antagonistic activity. In contrast to progesterone, which showed almost no glucocorticoid activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel showed weak glucocorticoid action. In addition, gestodene inhibited the aldosterone-induced reporter gene transcription, similar to progesterone, whereas unlike progesterone, gestodene did not induce reporter gene transcription. 3-Keto-desogestrel showed neither antimineralocorticoid nor mineralocorticoid action.

  4. Subtype-Specific Agonists for NMDA Receptor Glycine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maolanon, Alex R.; Risgaard, Rune; Wang, Shuang Yan

    2017-01-01

    A series of analogues based on serine as lead structure were designed, and their agonist activities were evaluated at recombinant NMDA receptor subtypes (GluN1/2A-D) using two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology. Pronounced variation in subunit-selectivity, potency, and agonist...... efficacy was observed in a manner that was dependent on the GluN2 subunit in the NMDA receptor. In particular, compounds 15a and 16a are potent GluN2C-specific superagonists at the GluN1 subunit with agonist efficacies of 398% and 308% compared to glycine. This study demonstrates that subunit......-selectivity among glycine site NMDA receptor agonists can be achieved and suggests that glycine-site agonists can be developed as pharmacological tool compounds to study GluN2C-specific effects in NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission....

  5. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric (NIH)

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  6. Sulfhydryl group content of chicken progesterone receptor: effect of oxidation on DNA binding activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peleg, S.; Schrader, W.T.; O'Malley, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    DNA binding activity of chicken progesterone receptor B form (PRB) and A form (PRA) has been examined. This activity is strongly dependent upon the presence of thiols in the buffer. Stability studies showed that PRB was more sensitive to oxidation that was PRA. Receptor preparations were fractionated by DNA-cellulose chromatography to DNA-positive and DNA-negative subpopulations, and sulfhydryl groups were quantified on immunopurified receptor by labeling with [ 3 H]-N-ethylmaleimide. Labeling of DNA-negative receptors with [ 3 H]-N-ethylmaleimide showed 21-23 sulfhydryl groups on either PRA or PRB form when the proteins were reduced and denatured. A similar number was seen without reduction if denatured DNA-positive receptor species were tested. In contrast, the DNA-negative PRB had only 10-12 sulfhydryl groups detectable without reduction. A similar number (12-13 sulfhydryl groups) was found for PRA species that lost DNA binding activity after exposure to a nonreducing environment in vitro. The authors conclude that the naturally occurring receptor forms unable to bind to DNA, as well as receptor forms that have lost DNA binding activity due to exposure to nonreducing environment in vitro, contain 10-12 oxidized cysteine residues, likely present as disulfide bonds. Since they were unable to reduce the disulfide bonds when the native DNA-negative receptor proteins were treated with dithiothreitol (DTT), they speculate that irreversible loss of DNA binding activity of receptor in vitro is due to oxidation of cysteine residues that are not accessible to DTT in the native state

  7. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan-specific......Motivation: Receptor-ligand interactions play an important role in controlling many biological systems. One prominent example is the binding of peptides to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules controlling the onset of cellular immune responses. Thousands of MHC allelic versions...... exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...

  8. Complex Relationship between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Bessman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays pivotal roles in development and is mutated or overexpressed in several cancers. Despite recent advances, the complex allosteric regulation of EGFR remains incompletely understood. Through efforts to understand why the negative cooperativity observed for intact EGFR is lost in studies of its isolated extracellular region (ECR, we uncovered unexpected relationships between ligand binding and receptor dimerization. The two processes appear to compete. Surprisingly, dimerization does not enhance ligand binding (although ligand binding promotes dimerization. We further show that simply forcing EGFR ECRs into preformed dimers without ligand yields ill-defined, heterogeneous structures. Finally, we demonstrate that extracellular EGFR-activating mutations in glioblastoma enhance ligand-binding affinity without directly promoting EGFR dimerization, suggesting that these oncogenic mutations alter the allosteric linkage between dimerization and ligand binding. Our findings have important implications for understanding how EGFR and its relatives are activated by specific ligands and pathological mutations.

  9. Identification of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 receptor binding site in botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotmeier, Jasmin; Mahrhold, Stefan; Krez, Nadja; Janzen, Constantin; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Binz, Thomas; Rummel, Andreas

    2014-04-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) inhibit neurotransmitter release by hydrolysing SNARE proteins. The most important serotype BoNT/A employs the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) isoforms A-C as neuronal receptors. Here, we identified their binding site by blocking SV2 interaction using monoclonal antibodies with characterised epitopes within the cell binding domain (HC). The site is located on the backside of the conserved ganglioside binding pocket at the interface of the HCC and HCN subdomains. The dimension of the binding pocket was characterised in detail by site directed mutagenesis allowing the development of potent inhibitors as well as modifying receptor binding properties. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The association of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 with the neuronal Ca2+-binding protein 2 modulates receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Laia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Albergaria, Catarina; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate in part the CNS effects of glutamate. These receptors interact with a large array of intracellular proteins in which the final role is to regulate receptor function. Here, using co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments we showed a close and specific interaction between mGlu(5) receptor and NECAB2 in both transfected human embryonic kidney cells and rat hippocampus. Interestingly, in pull-down experiments increasing concentrations of calcium drastically reduced the ability of these two proteins to interact, suggesting that NECAB2 binds to mGlu(5) receptor in a calcium-regulated manner. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and mGlu(5) receptor in the rat hippocampal formation indicated that both proteins are codistributed in the same subcellular compartment of pyramidal cells. In addition, the NECAB2/mGlu(5) receptor interaction regulated mGlu(5b)-mediated activation of both inositol phosphate accumulation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Overall, these findings indicate that NECAB2 by its physical interaction with mGlu(5b) receptor modulates receptor function.

  11. MANAGING TIGHT BINDING RECEPTORS FOR NEW SPEARATIONS TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DARYLE H BUSCH RICHARD S GIVENS

    2004-12-10

    Much of the earth's pollution involves compounds of the metallic elements, including actinides, strontium, cesium, technetium, and RCRA metals. Metal ions bind to molecules called ligands, which are the molecular tools that can manipulate the metal ions under most conditions. This DOE-EMSP sponsored program strives (1) to provide the foundations for using the most powerful ligands in transformational separations technologies and (2) to produce seminal examples of their applications to separations appropriate to the DOE EM mission. These ultra tight-binding ligands can capture metal ions in the most competitive of circumstances (from mineralized sites, lesser ligands, and even extremely dilute solutions), but they react so slowly that they are useless in traditional separations methodologies. Two attacks on this problem are underway. The first accommodates to the challenging molecular lethargy by developing a seminal slow separations methodology termed the soil poultice. The second designs ligands that are only tight-binding while wrapped around the targeted metal ion, but can be put in place by switch-binding and removed by switch-release. We envision a kind of molecular switching process to accelerate the union between metal ion and tight-binding ligand. Molecular switching processes are suggested for overcoming the slow natural equilibration rate with which ultra tight-binding ligands combine with metal ions. Ligands that bind relatively weakly combine with metal ions rapidly, so the trick is to convert a ligand from a weak, rapidly binding species to a powerful, slow releasing ligand--during the binding of the ligand to the metal ion. Such switch-binding ligands must react with themselves, and the reaction must take place under the influence of the metal ion. For example, our generation 1 ligands showed that a well-designed linear ligand with ends that readily combine, forms a cyclic molecule when it wraps around a metal ion. Our generation 2 ligands are

  12. Strychnine Binding Associated with Glycine Receptors of the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anne B.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1973-01-01

    [3H]Strychnine binds to synaptic-membrane fractions of the spinal cord in a selective fashion, indicating an interaction with postsynaptic glycine receptors. Displacement of strychnine by glycine and other amino acids parallels their glycine-like neurophysiologic activity. The regional localization of strychnine binding in the central nervous system correlates closely with endogenous glycine concentrations. In subcellular fractionation experiments, strychnine binding is most enhanced in synaptic-membrane fractions. Strychnine binding is saturable, with affinity constants for glycine and strychnine of 10 and 0.03 μM, respectively. PMID:4200724

  13. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric (Oregon HSU)

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  14. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-05

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular conformation, receptor binding, and hormone action of natural and synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, W L; Griffin, J F; Weeks, C M; Korach, K S

    1985-01-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structural determinations of synthetic estrogens and antiestrogens provide reliable information on the global minimum energy conformation of these molecules or a local minimum energy conformation that is within 1 or 2 kcal/mole of the global minimum. In favorable cases, state-of-the-art molecular mechanics calculations provide quantitative agreement with X-ray results and information on the relative energy of other local minimum energy conformations not observed crystallographically. Because the conformation of diethylstilbestrol (DES) observed in solvated crystals has an overall conformation and dipole moment more similar to estradiol it is the form more likely to bind to the receptor and produce hormone activity. Either phenol ring of DES can successfully mimic the estradiol A-ring in binding to the receptor. Indenestrol A (INDA) and indenestrol B (INDB) have nearly identical fully extended planar conformations. Either the alpha or gamma rings of these compounds may mimic the A ring of estradiol and compete for the estrogen receptor. Although there are eight distinct ways in which molecules of a racemic mixture of INDA or INDB can bind to the receptor, not all of them may be able to elicit a hormonal response. This may account for the reduced biological activity of the compounds despite their successful competition for receptor binding. The minimum energy conformations of Z-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (ZPD) and E-pseudodiethylstilbestrol (EPD) are bent in a fashion similar to that of indanestrol (INDC). These molecules have good binding affinity suggesting that the receptor does not require a flat molecule. Therefore these conformations would appear to be compatible with receptor binding, but only the Z isomer has an energetically allowed extended conformation that accounts for its observed biological activity relative to DES. PMID:3905370

  16. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. Molecular recognition of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by an acetylcholine binding protein reveals determinants of binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Balle, Thomas; Gajhede, Michael; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette S

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and homologues, details of acetylcholine binding are not completely resolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of acetylcholine bound to the receptor homologue acetylcholine binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis. This is the first structure of acetylcholine in a binding pocket containing all five aromatic residues conserved in all mammalian nAChRs. The ligand-protein interactions are characterized by contacts to the aromatic box formed primarily by residues on the principal side of the intersubunit binding interface (residues Tyr89, Trp143 and Tyr185). Besides these interactions on the principal side, we observe a cation-π interaction between acetylcholine and Trp53 on the complementary side and a water-mediated hydrogen bond from acetylcholine to backbone atoms of Leu102 and Met114, both of importance for anchoring acetylcholine to the complementary side. To further study the role of Trp53, we mutated the corresponding tryptophan in the two different acetylcholine-binding interfaces of the widespread α4β2 nAChR, i.e. the interfaces α4(+)β2(-) and α4(+)α4(-). Mutation to alanine (W82A on the β2 subunit or W88A on the α4 subunit) significantly altered the response to acetylcholine measured by oocyte voltage-clamp electrophysiology in both interfaces. This shows that the conserved tryptophan residue is important for the effects of ACh at α4β2 nAChRs, as also indicated by the crystal structure. The results add important details to the understanding of how this neurotransmitter exerts its action and improves the foundation for rational drug design targeting these receptors.

  18. HLA class I allelic sequence and conformation regulate leukocyte Ig-like receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Apps, Richard; Lapaque, Nicolas; Smith, Isobel; Kono, Azumi; Chang, Chiwen; Boyle, Louise H; Taylor, Craig J; Trowsdale, John; Allen, Rachel L

    2011-03-01

    Leukocyte Ig-like receptors (LILRs) are a family of innate immune receptors predominantly expressed by myeloid cells that can alter the Ag presentation properties of macrophages and dendritic cells. Several LILRs bind HLA class I. Altered LILR recognition due to HLA allelic variation could be a contributing factor in disease. We comprehensively assessed LILR binding to >90 HLA class I alleles. The inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2 varied in their level of binding to different HLA alleles, correlating in some cases with specific amino acid motifs. LILRB2 displayed the weakest binding to HLA-B*2705, an allele genetically associated with several autoimmune conditions and delayed progression of HIV infection. We also assessed the effect of HLA class I conformation on LILR binding. LILRB1 exclusively bound folded β(2)-microglobulin-associated class I, whereas LILRB2 bound both folded and free H chain forms. In contrast, the activating receptor LILRA1 and the soluble LILRA3 protein displayed a preference for binding to HLA-C free H chain. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the ligand of LILRA3. These findings support the hypothesis that LILR-mediated detection of unfolded versus folded MHC modulates immune responses during infection or inflammation.

  19. Demonstration of beta1-adrenergic receptors in human placenta by (-)I125 Iodocyanopindolol binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, A.; Cocci, F.; Niedermeyer, H.P.; Matteucci, E.; Vitali, C.; Ciarimboli, G.; Bombardieri, S.

    1989-01-01

    The highly specific β-adrenergic radioligand (-) 125 I Iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) was used to characterize the β-adrenergic receptor subtype present in human placenta. Binding of ICYP to membranes from human placenta was saturable with time and ligand concentration, of high affinity, and demonstrated appropriate stereoselectivity and agonist rank order of potency for binding to a β-adrenergic receptor. From saturation binding curves, the K D and B max values for ICYP binding were 233±51 pM and 690±139 fmol/mg of proteins, respectively.Analysis of inhibition of ICYP binding by β 1 - and β 2 -selective adrenergic antagonists via Hofstee analysis resulted in linear plots, indicating the existence of a homogeneous population of β-adrenergic receptors. From the resulting K I -values for the β 1 -selective drugs practolol (4.0±0.9 μM) and metoprolol (0.19±0.07 μM) and for the β 2 -selective drug ICI 118,551 (0.30)±0.06 μM) it is concluded that the β-adrenergic receptor in human placenta is of the β 1 -subtype. This is further supported by the fact that (-)-noradrenaline and (-)-adrenaline were equipotent in inhibiting ICYP binding

  20. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-[4-(2-[2-[(4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino]ethylaminocarbonyl]- ethyl)phenyl]ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-[(R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl]adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-[(S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl]adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate

  1. Insulin receptor binding and protein kinase activity in muscles of trained rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohm, G.L.; Sinha, M.K.; Caro, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, and muscle is quantitatively the most important tissue of insulin action. Since the first step in insulin action is the binding to a membrane receptor, the authors postulated that exercise training would change insulin receptors in muscle and in this study they have investigated this hypothesis. Female rats initially weighing ∼ 100 g were trained by treadmill running for 2 h/day, 6 days/wk for 4 wk at 25 m/min (0 grade). Insulin receptors from vastus intermedius muscles were solubilized by homogenizing in a buffer containing 1% Triton X-100 and then partially purified by passing the soluble extract over a wheat germ agglutinin column. The 4 wk training regimen resulted in a 65% increase in citrate synthase activity in red vastus lateralis muscle, indicating an adaptation to exercise [ 125 I]. Insulin binding by the partially purified receptor preparations was approximately doubled in muscle of trained rats at all insulin concentrations, suggesting an increase in the number of receptors. Training did not alter insulin receptor structure as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Basal insulin receptor protein kinase activity was higher in trained than untrained animals and this was likely due to the greater number of receptors. However, insulin stimulation of the protein kinase activity was depressed by training. These results demonstrate that endurance training does alter receptor number and function in muscle and these changes may be important in increasing insulin sensitivity after exercise training

  2. In vivo (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding: imaging of receptor regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B. Jr.; Young, A.B.

    1986-08-01

    The use of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam as a ligand to measure alterations in benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in rats was investigated. Animals were injected with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam i.v., arterial samples of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam were obtained and, later, the animals were sacrificed to assay brain binding. (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam enters the brain rapidly and binds to benzodiazepine receptors. About two-thirds of this binding is blocked by predosing the animals with 5 mg/kg of clonazepam. The amount of remaining (nonspecific) binding correlates very well (r = 0.88) with the amount of radioactivity found in plasma at the time of death. A series of rats were lesioned unilaterally with kainic acid in the caudate-putamen several months before the infusion of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam. In vivo autoradiography in lesioned rats showed that benzodiazepine binding in globus pallidus and substantia nigra on the side of the lesion was increased significantly as compared to the intact side. The observed changes in benzodiazepine binding were similar to those observed previously in lesioned rats using in vitro techniques. Thus, benzodiazepine receptor regulation can be imaged quantitatively using in vivo binding techniques.

  3. Dopamine receptors in the guinea-pig heart. A binding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrini, M.; Benelli, A.; Baraldi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists to guinea-pig myocardial membrane preparations was studied using 3 H-dopamine and 3 H-spiperone as radioligand. 3 H-Dopamine bound specifically to heart membranes while 3 H-spiperone did not. A Scatchard analysis of 3 H-dopamine binding showed a curvilinear plot indicating the presence of two dopamine receptor populations that we have termed high- (K/sub d/ = 1.2 nM, B/sub mx/ = 52.9 fmol/mg prot.) and low- (K/sub d/ = 11.8 nM, B/sub mx/ = 267.3 fmol/gm prot.) affinity binding sites, respectively. The charactization of the high-affinity component of 3 H-dopamine binding indicated that the binding is rapid, saturable, stereospecific, pH- and temperature-dependent, and displaced by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists known to act similarly in vivo. The finding that pretreatment with dibenamine (which has been described as an α-adrenoceptor irreversible blocker) did not affect the binding of dopamine to cardiac membrane preparations suggests that α-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors have separate recognition sites in the heart. It is concluded that 3 H-dopamine binds to specific dopamine receptors in the heart of guinea-pigs

  4. Field flow fractionation for assessing neonatal Fc receptor and Fcγ receptor binding to monoclonal antibodies in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastrini, Joey; Dillon, Thomas M; Bondarenko, Pavel; Chou, Robert Y-T

    2011-07-01

    Analysis of the strength and stoichiometry of immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) is important for evaluating the pharmacokinetics and effector functions of therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) products, respectively. The current standard for assessing FcγR and FcRn binding is composed of cell-based and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays. In this work, asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) was evaluated to establish the true stoichiometry of IgG binding in solution. AF4 and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) were applied to directly observe IgG/FcγR and IgG/FcRn complexes, which were not observed using nonequilibrium size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Human serum albumin (HSA), an abundant component of human blood and capable of binding FcRn, was studied in combination with FcRn and IgG. AF4 demonstrated that the majority of large complexes of IgG/FcRn/HSA were at an approximate 1:2:1 molar ratio. In addition, affinity measurements of the complex were performed in the sub-micromolar affinity range. A significant decrease in binding was detected for IgG molecules with increased oxidation in the Fc region. AF4 was useful in detecting weak binding between full-length IgG/Fc fragments and Fc receptors and the effect of chemical modifications on binding. AF4 is a useful technique in the assessment of mAb product quality attributes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tall Fescue Alkaloids Bind Serotonin Receptors in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The serotonin (5HT) receptor 5HT2A is involved in the tall fescue alkaloid-induced vascular contraction in the bovine periphery. This was determined by evaluating the contractile responses of lateral saphenous veins biopsied from cattle grazing different tall fescue/endophyte combinations. The contr...

  6. [3H]Ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) binding in recombinant GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagle, Monica A; Martin, Michael W; de Fiebre, Christopher M; de Fiebre, NancyEllen C; Drewe, John A; Dillon, Glenn H

    2003-12-01

    Ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate (EBOB) is a recently developed ligand that binds to the convulsant site of the GABAA receptor. While a few studies have examined the binding of [3H]EBOB in vertebrate brain tissue and insect preparations, none have examined [3H]EBOB binding in preparations that express known configurations of the GABAA receptor. We have thus examined [3H]EBOB binding in HEK293 cells stably expressing human alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha2beta2gamma2 GABAA receptors, and the effects of CNS convulsants on its binding. The ability of the CNS convulsants to displace the prototypical convulsant site ligand, [35S]TBPS, was also assessed. Saturation analysis revealed [3H]EBOB binding at a single site, with a K(d) of approximately 9 nM in alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha2beta2gamma2 receptors. Binding of both [3H]EBOB and [35S]TBPS was inhibited by dieldrin, lindane, tert-butylbicycloorthobenzoate (TBOB), PTX, TBPS, and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) at one site in a concentration-dependent fashion. Affinities were in the high nM to low microM range for all compounds except PTZ (low mM range), and the rank order of potency for these convulsants to displace [3H]EBOB and [35S]TBPS was the same. Low [GABA] stimulated [3H]EBOB binding, while higher [GABA] (greater than 10 microM) inhibited [3H]EBOB binding. Overall, our data demonstrate that [3H]EBOB binds to a single, high affinity site in alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha2beta2gamma2 GABAA receptors, and modulation of its binding is similar to that seen with [35S]TBPS. [3H]EBOB has a number of desirable traits that may make it preferable to [35S]TBPS for analysis of the convulsant site of the GABAA receptor.

  7. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  8. Similar serotonin-2A receptor binding in rats with different coping styles or levels of aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Anniek Kd; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders Bue

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in coping style emerge as a function of underlying variability in the activation of a mesocorticolimbic brain circuitry. Particularly serotonin seems to play an important role. For this reason, we assessed serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT2A R) binding in the brain of rats...... with different coping styles. We compared proactive and reactive males of two rat strains, Wild-type Groningen (WTG) and Roman high- and low avoidance (RHA, RLA). 5-HT2A R binding in (pre)frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus was investigated using a radiolabeled antagonist ([(3) H]MDL-100907) and agonist ([(3) H......]Cimbi-36) in binding assays. No differences in 5-HT2A R binding were observed in male animals with different coping styles. [(3) H]MDL-100907 displayed a higher specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio than [(3) H]Cimbi-36. Our findings suggest that in these particular rat strains, 5-HT2A R binding...

  9. Mineralocorticoid receptors along the nephron: [3H]aldosterone binding in rabbit tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, A.; Katz, A.I.

    1981-01-01

    To identify the site of mineralocorticoid action along the nephron, we measured the specific binding of [ 3 H]aldosterone to nephron segments microdissected from aldosterone-deficient rabbits. Specific binding was defined as the difference between binding measured in the absence or in the presence of 2,000-fold excess of unlabeled hormone (in 10 -18 mol.cm tubule length -1 +/- SE). High specific binding capacity was found in the branched collecting tubule (108 +/- 4), the cortical collecting tubule (119 +/- 9), and the outer medullary collecting tubule (115 +/- 16), whereas specific binding was negligible in the proximal convoluted tubule (8 +/- 9), pars recta (2 +/- 6), medullary thick ascending limb (4 +/- 6), cortical thick ascending limb (6 +/- 2), and distal convoluted tubule (6 +/- 6). In cortical collecting tubules, Scatchard analysis of the specific [ 3 H]aldosterone binding indicated a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 2.2 X 10 -9 and a maximum number of binding sites of 157 X 10 -18 mol.cm tubule length -1 . The steroid specificity was assessed from the competition of various steroids for [ 3 H]aldosterone binding sites. Receptors from the cortical collecting tubule revealed the following sequence of affinities: aldosterone > DOCA > spironolactone > dexamethasone > 5α-dihydrotestosterone = progesterone = 17β-estradiol, indicating that the binding sites in the collecting tubule are mineralocorticoid receptors. These results demonstrate significant [ 3 H]aldosterone binding to receptors of high affinity and mineralocorticoid specificity only in the collecting tubule and suggest that this nephron segment is the target site of mineralocorticoid action in the rabbit kidney

  10. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Karen R; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-10-04

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1 Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand-receptor interactions.

  11. Biological activity of cloned mammary tumor virus DNA fragments that bind purified glucocorticoid receptor protein in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, K.R.; Payvar, F.; Firestone, G.L.; Maler, B.A.; Wrange, O.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Chandler, V.L.; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    To test whether high-affinity receptor:DNA interactions can be correlated with receptor effects on promoter function in vivo, we have mapped in greater detail the receptor-binding regions on murine mammary tumor virus DNA, using both nitrocellulose-filter binding and electron microscopy. Recombinant plasmids bearing these receptor-binding domains have been transfected into cultured cells, and the expression of the plasmid sequences has been monitored for hormonal regulation. The results are considered in terms of a speculative proposal that the glucocorticoid receptor may effect changes in promoter activity via specific alteration of chromatin and/or DNA structure. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  12. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, [ 3 H] dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for [ 3 H] [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites

  13. Diphtheria toxin can simultaneously bind to its receptor and adenylyl-(3',5')-uridine 3'-monophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, J.T.; Collins, C.M.; Collier, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin (DT) that was bound to receptors on BS-C-1 cells was able to bind approximately 1 molar equiv of adenylyl-(3',5')-uridine 3'-monophosphate (ApUp). In contrast, receptor-bound CRM197, a mutant form of toxin with greatly diminished affinity for dinucleotides, did not bind ApUp. Affinity of the dinucleotide for receptor-bound toxin differed from that for free toxin by less than an order of magnitude. These results indicate that the receptor site and the ApUp site on the toxin do not significantly overlap. BS-C-1 cells were incubated with or without 125 I-DT or CRM 197. They were then incubated with [ 32 P]ApUp, and assayed

  14. Convulxin binding to platelet receptor GPVI: competition with collagen related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedergang, F; Alcover, A; Knight, C G; Farndale, R W; Barnes, M J; Francischetti, I M; Bon, C; Leduc, M

    2000-06-24

    Convulxin (CVX), a potent platelet aggregating protein from the venom of the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus, is known to bind to the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI). CVX binding to human platelets was investigated by flow cytometry, using fluorescein labeled convulxin (FITC-CVX). Scatchard analysis indicated high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of 0.6 and 4 nM and Bmax values of 1200 and 2000 binding sites per platelet. FITC-CVX binding was inhibited by collagen related peptides (CRPs) comprising a repeated GPO sequence, namely GCO(GPO)(10)GCOGNH(2) and GKO(GPO)(10)GKOGNH(2), which also bind to receptor GPVI. These peptides (monomeric or cross-linked forms) gave a high affinity inhibition of 10-20% for concentrations between 10 ng/ml and 5 microg/ml, followed by a second phase of inhibition at concentrations greater than 5 microg/ml. It was shown also that the inhibition of FITC-CVX binding by CRPs was independent on the time of preincubation of platelets with CRPs, and the same percentage of inhibition was seen with various concentrations of convulxin. Confocal microscopy of the distribution of FITC-CVX binding sites on platelets showed an homogeneous distribution of FITC-CVX bound to GPVI, although some limited clustering may exist. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Acute treatment with pentobarbital alters the kinetics of in vivo receptor binding in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Yojiro [Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chibashi 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yojiro.sakiyama@pfizer.com; Saito, Masao [Department of Medical Science, Institute of Medical Electronics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of pentobarbital, a sedative-hypnotic barbiturate, on the in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptors in the mouse brain was investigated. Dose-related changes in the apparent binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 ([{sup 3}H]flumazenil) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla were observed by pretreatment with pentobarbital. For quantification of the kinetic properties of the in vivo binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788, time courses of radioactivity following its injection were examined, and kinetic analysis was performed using the compartment model. The time courses of radioactivity following injection of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 with 3 mg/kg Ro15-1788 were used as input function. In all regions studied, rate constants between input compartment and specific binding compartment were significantly decreased by pentobarbital. However, no significant alterations in the binding potential (BP=K {sub 3}/K {sub 4}) of benzodiazepine receptors by pentobarbital were observed in any of the regions. A saturation experiment indicated that the decrease in the input rate constant (K {sub 3}), which includes both the association rate constant (k {sub on}) and the number of binding sites available (B {sub max}), was mainly due to decrease in k {sub on}. These results suggest that apparent increases in binding at 20 min after tracer injection were due to the decrease in the association and dissociation rates of binding in vivo.

  16. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L

    1991-01-01

    The purified urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) was cleaved into two fragments by mild chymotrypsin treatment. The smaller fragment (apparent Mr 16,000) possessed the ligand-binding capability, as shown by chemical cross-linking analysis. This fragment constituted the NH2-terminal...... part of the intact receptor, probably including the whole sequence 1-87, and contained N-linked carbohydrate. After detergent phase separation in the Triton X-114 system, the fragment was present in the water phase where its binding activity could be demonstrated in the absence of the rest...

  17. QSAR modeling on dopamine D2 receptor binding affinity of 6-methoxy benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Soma; Debnath, Bikash; Gayen, Shovanlal; Ghosh, Balaram; Basu, Anindya; Srikanth, Kolluru; Jha, Tarun

    2005-10-01

    QSAR modeling was performed on 58 (S) N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-6-methoxy benzamides as dopamine (DA) D2 receptor antagonists to identify the structural requirements for DA D2 receptor binding affinity. The study pointed out that the presence of hydrophobic substituents at R3 position and electron-donating groups at R5 position increased the biological activity. Substitutions at phenyl ring favored the binding affinity of these benzamides. Ethyl group and iodine at R3 position were advantageous to the activity whereas nitro group at phenyl ring hindered the antagonistic activity.

  18. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  19. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  20. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  1. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, J.S.; Holford, N.H.; Sadee, W.

    1985-06-01

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of (/sup 3/H)etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described.

  2. Rapid estimation of binding activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin to human and avian receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A critical step for avian influenza viruses to infect human hosts and cause epidemics or pandemics is acquisition of the ability of the viral hemagglutinin (HA to bind to human receptors. However, current global influenza surveillance does not monitor HA binding specificity due to a lack of rapid and reliable assays. Here we report a computational method that uses an effective scoring function to quantify HA-receptor binding activities with high accuracy and speed. Application of this method reveals receptor specificity changes and its temporal relationship with antigenicity changes during the evolution of human H3N2 viruses. The method predicts that two amino acid differences at 222 and 225 between HAs of A/Fujian/411/02 and A/Panama/2007/99 viruses account for their differences in binding to both avian and human receptors; this prediction was verified experimentally. The new computational method could provide an urgently needed tool for rapid and large-scale analysis of HA receptor specificities for global influenza surveillance.

  3. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  4. In Uncontrolled Diabetes, Hyperglucagonemia and Ketosis Result From Deficient Leptin Action in the Parabrachial Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Thomas H; Matsen, Miles E; Faber, Chelsea L; Samstag, Colby L; Damian, Vincent; Nguyen, Hong T; Scarlett, Jarrad M; Flak, Jonathan N; Myers, Martin G; Morton, Gregory J

    2018-04-01

    Growing evidence implicates neurons that project from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) to the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) in a neurocircuit that drives counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia, including increased glucagon secretion. Among LPBN neurons in this circuit is a subset that expresses cholecystokinin (LPBNCCK neurons) and is tonically inhibited by leptin. Because uncontrolled diabetes is associated with both leptin deficiency and hyperglucagonemia, and because intracerebroventricular (ICV) leptin administration reverses both hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia in this setting, we hypothesized that deficient leptin inhibition of LPBNCCK neurons drives activation of this LPBN→VMN circuit and thereby results in hyperglucagonemia. Here, we report that although bilateral microinjection of leptin into the LPBN does not ameliorate hyperglycemia in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (STZ-DM), it does attenuate the associated hyperglucagonemia and ketosis. To determine if LPBN leptin signaling is required for the antidiabetic effect of ICV leptin in STZ-DM, we studied mice in which the leptin receptor was selectively deleted from LPBNCCK neurons. Our findings show that although leptin signaling in these neurons is not required for the potent antidiabetic effect of ICV leptin, it is required for leptin-mediated suppression of diabetic hyperglucagonemia. Taken together, these findings suggest that leptin-mediated effects in animals with uncontrolled diabetes occur through actions involving multiple brain areas, including the LPBN, where leptin acts specifically to inhibit glucagon secretion and associated ketosis.

  5. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    OpenAIRE

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wav...

  6. Selectivity in progesterone and androgen receptor binding of progestagens used in oral contraceptives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloosterboer, H.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, C.A.; Turpijn, E.W.

    1988-09-01

    The relative binding affinities (RBAs) of four progestational compounds (norethisterone, levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene) for the human progesterone and androgen receptors were measured in MCF-7 cytosol and intact MCF-7 cells. For the binding to the progesterone receptor, both Org 2058 and Org 3236 (or 3-keto-desogestrel) were used as labelled ligands. The following ranking (low to high) for the RBA of the nuclear (intact cells) progesterone receptor irrespective of the ligand used is found: norethisterone much less than levonorgestrel less than 3-keto-destogestrel less than gestodene. The difference between the various progestagens is significant with the exception of that between 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene, when Org 2058 is used as ligand. For the cytosolic progesterone receptor, the same order is found with the exception that similar RBAs are found for gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel. The four progestagens clearly differ with respect to binding to the androgen receptor using dihydrotestosterone as labelled ligand in intact cells; the ranking (low to high) is: norethisterone less than 3 keto-desogestrel less than levonorgestrel and gestodene. The difference between 3-keto-desogestrel and levonorgestrel or gestodene is significant. The selectivity indices (ratio of the mean RBA for the progesterone receptor to that of androgen receptor) in intact cells are significantly higher for 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene than for levonorgestrel and norethisterone. From these results we conclude that the introduction of the 18-methyl in norethisterone (levonorgestel) increases both the binding to the progesterone and androgen receptors.

  7. Importin β-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. → Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. → The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. → Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. → The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin β family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of β-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of β-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Improved estimation of receptor density and binding rate constants using a single tracer injection and displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.; Delforge, J.; Mazoyer, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of improving receptor model parameter estimation using a displacement experiment in which an excess of an unlabeled ligand (J) is injected after a delay (t D ) following injection of trace amounts of the β + - labeled ligand (J*) is investigated. The effects of varying t D and J/J* on parameter uncertainties are studied in the case of 11 C-MQNB binding to myocardial acetycholine receptor using parameters identified in a dog experiment

  9. Signaling-sensitive amino acids surround the allosteric ligand binding site of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinau, Gunnar; Haas, Ann-Karin; Neumann, Susanne; Worth, Catherine L; Hoyer, Inna; Furkert, Jens; Rutz, Claudia; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Schülein, Ralf; Krause, Gerd

    2010-07-01

    The thyrotropin receptor [thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR)], a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is endogenously activated by thyrotropin, which binds to the extracellular region of the receptor. We previously identified a low-molecular-weight (LMW) agonist of the TSHR and predicted its allosteric binding pocket within the receptor's transmembrane domain. Because binding of the LMW agonist probably disrupts interactions or leads to formation of new interactions among amino acid residues surrounding the pocket, we tested whether mutation of residues at these positions would lead to constitutive signaling activity. Guided by molecular modeling, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 24 amino acids in this spatial region, followed by functional characterization of the mutant receptors in terms of expression and signaling, measured as cAMP accumulation. We found that mutations V421I, Y466A, T501A, L587V, M637C, M637W, S641A, Y643F, L645V, and Y667A located in several helices exhibit constitutive activity. Of note is mutation M637W at position 6.48 in transmembrane helix 6, which has a significant effect on the interaction of the receptor with the LMW agonist. In summary, we found that a high proportion of residues in several helices surrounding the allosteric binding site of LMW ligands in the TSHR when mutated lead to constitutively active receptors. Our findings of signaling-sensitive residues in this region of the transmembrane bundle may be of general importance as this domain appears to be evolutionarily retained among GPCRs.

  10. Residues within the Transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Involved in Ligand Binding and Receptor Activation: Modelling the Ligand-Bound Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopman, K.; Wallis, R.; Robb, G.; Brown, A. J. H.; Wilkinson, G. F.; Timms, D.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal regions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) bind to the N terminus of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R), facilitating interaction of the ligand N terminus with the receptor transmembrane domain. In contrast, the agonist exendin-4 relies less on the transmembrane domain, and truncated antagonist analogs (e.g. exendin 9–39) may interact solely with the receptor N terminus. Here we used mutagenesis to explore the role of residues highly conserved in the predicted transmembrane helices of mammalian GLP-1Rs and conserved in family B G protein coupled receptors in ligand binding and GLP-1R activation. By iteration using information from the mutagenesis, along with the available crystal structure of the receptor N terminus and a model of the active opsin transmembrane domain, we developed a structural receptor model with GLP-1 bound and used this to better understand consequences of mutations. Mutation at Y152 [transmembrane helix (TM) 1], R190 (TM2), Y235 (TM3), H363 (TM6), and E364 (TM6) produced similar reductions in affinity for GLP-1 and exendin 9–39. In contrast, other mutations either preferentially [K197 (TM2), Q234 (TM3), and W284 (extracellular loop 2)] or solely [D198 (TM2) and R310 (TM5)] reduced GLP-1 affinity. Reduced agonist affinity was always associated with reduced potency. However, reductions in potency exceeded reductions in agonist affinity for K197A, W284A, and R310A, while H363A was uncoupled from cAMP generation, highlighting critical roles of these residues in translating binding to activation. Data show important roles in ligand binding and receptor activation of conserved residues within the transmembrane domain of the GLP-1R. The receptor structural model provides insight into the roles of these residues. PMID:21868452

  11. Effect of receptor binding domain mutations on receptor binding and transmissibility of avian influenza H5N1 viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maines, Taronna R; Chen, Li-Mei; Van Hoeven, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Although H5N1 influenza viruses have been responsible for hundreds of human infections, these avian influenza viruses have not fully adapted to the human host. The lack of sustained transmission in humans may be due, in part, to their avian-like receptor preference. Here, we have introduced...

  12. Binding of canonical Wnt ligands to their receptor complexes occurs in ordered plasma membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Azbazdar, Yagmur; Ng, Xue W; Teh, Cathleen; Simons, Kai; Weidinger, Gilbert; Wohland, Thorsten; Eggeling, Christian; Ozhan, Gunes

    2017-08-01

    While the cytosolic events of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (canonical Wnt signaling) pathway have been widely studied, only little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in Wnt binding to its receptors at the plasma membrane. Here, we reveal the influence of the immediate plasma membrane environment on the canonical Wnt-receptor interaction. While the receptors are distributed both in ordered and disordered environments, Wnt binding to its receptors selectively occurs in more ordered membrane environments which appear to cointernalize with the Wnt-receptor complex. Moreover, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is significantly reduced when the membrane order is disturbed by specific inhibitors of certain lipids that prefer to localize at the ordered environments. Similarly, a reduction in Wnt signaling activity is observed in Niemann-Pick Type C disease cells where trafficking of ordered membrane lipid components to the plasma membrane is genetically impaired. We thus conclude that ordered plasma membrane environments are essential for binding of canonical Wnts to their receptor complexes and downstream signaling activity. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Role of leptin as a link between metabolism and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Vilariño-García, Teresa; Fernández-Riejos, Patricia; Martín-González, Jenifer; Segura-Egea, Juan José; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2017-06-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone not only with an important role in the central control of energy metabolism, but also with many pleiotropic effects in different physiological systems. One of these peripheral functions of leptin is a regulatory role in the interplay between energy metabolism and the immune system, being a cornerstone of the new field of immunometabolism. Leptin receptor is expressed throughout the immune system and the regulatory effects of leptin include cells from both the innate and adaptive immune system. Leptin is one of the adipokines responsible for the inflammatory state found in obesity that predisposes not only to type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, but also to autoimmune and allergic diseases. Leptin is an important mediator of the immunosuppressive state in undernutrition status. Placenta is the second source of leptin and it may play a role in the immunomodulation during pregnancy. Finally, recent work has pointed to the participation of leptin and leptin receptor in the pathophysiology of inflammation in oral biology. Therefore, leptin and leptin receptor should be considered for investigation as a marker of inflammation and immune activation in the frontier of innate-adaptive system, and as possible targets for intervention in the immunometabolic mediated pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, K; Senda, M

    1999-08-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D2-like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11C-labeled analog ([11C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [11C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [11C]NEM and one of six dopamine D2-like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [11C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [11C]NEM was reduced by D2-like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D2-like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [11C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [11C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D2-like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum.

  15. In vivo binding of [11C]nemonapride to sigma receptors in the cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Senda, Michio

    1999-01-01

    Radiolabeled nemonapride (NEM, YM-09151-2) is widely used as a representative dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligand in pharmacological and neurological studies, and 11 C-labeled analog ([ 11 C]NEM) has been developed for positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo to sigma receptors. [ 11 C]NEM and one of six dopamine D 2 -like receptor ligands or seven sigma receptor ligands were co-injected into mice, and the regional brain uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was measured by a tissue dissection method. The striatal uptake of [ 11 C]NEM was reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands, NEM, haloperidol, (+)-butaclamol, raclopride, and sulpiride, but not by a D 4 receptor ligand clozapine. In the cortex and cerebellum the uptake was also reduced by D 2 -like receptor ligands with affinity for sigma receptors, but not by raclopride. Although none of seven sigma receptor ligands, SA6298, N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]ethylamine hydrochloride (NE-100), (+)-pentazocine, R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ([-]-PPAP), (-)-pentazocine, R(+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine hydrochloride ([+]-3-PPP), and (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride ([+]-SKF 10047), blocked the striatal uptake, five of them with relatively higher affinity significantly reduced the [ 11 C]NEM uptake by the cortex, and four of them reduced that by the cerebellum. We concluded that [ 11 C]NEM binds in vivo not only to dopamine D 2 -like receptors in the striatum but also to sigma receptors in other regions such as cortex and cerebellum

  16. Alterations in hemagglutinin receptor-binding specificity accompany the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heider, Alla; Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-05-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3'SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(c)) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3'SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLe(x)), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical "poultry-like" receptor, 3'SLN, is provided by substitutions in the receptor-binding

  17. Alterations in Hemagglutinin Receptor-Binding Specificity Accompany the Emergence of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalova, Larisa; Harder, Timm; Tuzikov, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai; Wolff, Thorsten; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) of hemagglutinin H5 and H7 subtypes emerge after introduction of low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIVs) from wild birds into poultry flocks, followed by subsequent circulation and evolution. The acquisition of multiple basic amino acids at the endoproteolytical cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) is a molecular indicator for high pathogenicity, at least for infections of gallinaceous poultry. Apart from the well-studied significance of the multibasic HA cleavage site, there is only limited knowledge on other alterations in the HA and neuraminidase (NA) molecules associated with changes in tropism during the emergence of HPAIVs from LPAIVs. We hypothesized that changes in tropism may require alterations of the sialyloligosaccharide specificities of HA and NA. To test this hypothesis, we compared a number of LPAIVs and HPAIVs for their HA-mediated binding and NA-mediated desialylation of a set of synthetic receptor analogs, namely, α2-3-sialylated oligosaccharides. NA substrate specificity correlated with structural groups of NAs and did not correlate with pathogenic potential of the virus. In contrast, all HPAIVs differed from LPAIVs by a higher HA receptor-binding affinity toward the trisaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ (3′SLN) and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ (SiaLec) and by the ability to discriminate between the nonfucosylated and fucosylated sialyloligosaccharides 3′SLN and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAcβ (SiaLex), respectively. These results suggest that alteration of the receptor-binding specificity accompanies emergence of the HPAIVs from their low-pathogenic precursors. IMPORTANCE Here, we have found for the first time correlations of receptor-binding properties of the HA with a highly pathogenic phenotype of poultry viruses. Our study suggests that enhanced receptor-binding affinity of HPAIVs for a typical “poultry-like” receptor, 3′SLN, is provided by

  18. Quantitative characterization of glycan-receptor binding of H9N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1 subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties.

  19. Stoichiometry of Heteromeric BAFF and APRIL Cytokines Dictates Their Receptor Binding and Signaling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Das, Dolon; Willen, Laure; Vigolo, Michele; Tardivel, Aubry; Lebon, Luc; Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Nys, Josquin; Smulski, Cristian; Zheng, Timothy S; Maskos, Klaus; Lammens, Alfred; Jiang, Xuliang; Hess, Henry; Tan, Seng-Lai; Schneider, Pascal

    2015-06-26

    The closely related TNF family ligands B cell activation factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serve in the generation and maintenance of mature B-lymphocytes. Both BAFF and APRIL assemble as homotrimers that bind and activate several receptors that they partially share. However, heteromers of BAFF and APRIL that occur in patients with autoimmune diseases are incompletely characterized. The N and C termini of adjacent BAFF or APRIL monomers are spatially close and can be linked to create single-chain homo- or hetero-ligands of defined stoichiometry. Similar to APRIL, heteromers consisting of one BAFF and two APRILs (BAA) bind to the receptors B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) but not to the BAFF receptor (BAFFR). Heteromers consisting of one APRIL and two BAFF (ABB) bind to TACI and BCMA and weakly to BAFFR in accordance with the analysis of the receptor interaction sites in the crystallographic structure of ABB. Receptor binding correlated with activity in reporter cell line assays specific for BAFFR, TACI, or BCMA. Single-chain BAFF (BBB) and to a lesser extent single-chain ABB, but not APRIL or single-chain BAA, rescued BAFFR-dependent B cell maturation in BAFF-deficient mice. In conclusion, BAFF-APRIL heteromers of different stoichiometries have distinct receptor-binding properties and activities. Based on the observation that heteromers are less active than BAFF, we speculate that their physiological role might be to down-regulate BAFF activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Cloning, ligand-binding, and temporal expression of ecdysteroid receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Baozhen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae, is a devastating pest of cruciferous crops worldwide, and has developed resistance to a wide range of insecticides, including diacylhydrazine-based ecdysone agonists, a highly selective group of molt-accelerating biopesticides targeting the ecdysone receptors. Result In this study, we cloned and characterized the ecdysone receptors from P. xylostella, including the two isoforms of EcR and a USP. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis showed striking conservations among insect ecdysone receptors, especially between P. xylostella and other lepidopterans. The binding affinity of ecdysteroids to in vitro-translated receptor proteins indicated that PxEcRB isoform bound specifically to ponasterone A, and the binding affinity was enhanced by co-incubation with PxUSP (Kd =3.0±1.7 nM. In contrast, PxEcRA did not bind to ponasterone A, even in the presence of PxUSP. The expression of PxEcRB were consistently higher than that of PxEcRA across each and every developmental stage, while the pattern of PxUSP expression is more or less ubiquitous. Conclusions Target site insensitivity, in which the altered binding of insecticides (ecdysone agonists to their targets (ecdysone receptors leads to an adaptive response (resistance, is one of the underlying mechanisms of diacylhydrazine resistance. Given the distinct differences at expression level and the ligand-binding capacity, we hypothesis that PxEcRB is the ecdysone receptor that controls the remodeling events during metamorphosis. More importantly, PxEcRB is the potential target site which is modified in the ecdysone agonist-resistant P. xylostella.

  1. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  2. Very Strong Binding for a Neutral Calix[4]pyrrole Receptor Displaying Positive Allosteric Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedal, Troels; Nielsen, Kent; Olsen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    The dual-analyte responsive behavior of tetraTTF-calix[4]pyrrole receptor 1 has shown to complex electron-deficient planar guests in a 2:1 fashion in the so-called 1,3-alternate conformation. However, stronger 1:1 complexes have been demonstrated with tetraalkylammonium halide salts that defer...... receptor 1 to its so-called cone conformation. Herein, we report the complexation of an electron-deficient planar guest, namely 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (NTCDA, 2), that champions the complexation with 1 resulting in a very high association constant Ka = 3 × 1010 M−2...

  3. Rapid Phospho-Turnover by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Impacts Downstream Signaling and Drug Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiman, Laura B.; Maiwald, Thomas; Conzelmann, Holger; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB1–4) are oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that regulate diverse cellular processes. In this study, we combine measurement and mathematical modeling to quantify phospho-turnover at ErbB receptors in human cells and to determine the consequences for signaling and drug binding. We find that phosphotyrosine residues on ErbB1 have half-lives of a few seconds and therefore turn over 100–1000 times in the course of a typical immediate-early response t...

  4. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magno, Aaron L.; Ingley, Evan; Brown, Suzanne J.; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Ratajczak, Thomas; Ward, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. → The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. → Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. → Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. → Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  5. Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E 1 methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and [ 3 H] MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. [ 3 H] MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10 -9 M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors [IC 50 , approx. 10 -8 M] of [ 3 H] MISO-FA binding. At 10 -5 M, the dinor and tetranor β-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE 1 and 16,16 dimethyl PGE 2 were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF 1 α (10 -6 M) and Hoe 892 (10 -5 M), a stable PGI 2 analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations

  6. Receptor binding characteristics of tritiated misoprostol free acid in enriched canine parietal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, B.S.; Kessler, L.K.; Conway, R.G.; Schoenhard, G.; Stolzenbach, J.; Collins, P.; Kramer, S.; Butchko, G.M.; Bauer, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Misoprostol (MISO) is a synthetic prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 1/ methyl ester with gastric antisecretory and mucosal protective properties. MISO is rapidly de-esterified to misoprostol free acid (MISO-FA) in enriched (65-80%) canine parietal cell preparations. Both forms appear to possess equivalent antisecretory potency and (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA is stable in these preparations. (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding was reversible and saturable with a maximal number of binding sites estimated at 8138 +/- 1893 per cell. The scatchard plot was linear, indicating a single, high affinity receptor population with a dissociation constant of 11 +/- 2.6 x 10/sup -9/ M. Unlabeled MISO-FA and MISO were equally potent inhibitors (IC/sub 50/, approx. 10/sup -8/M) of (/sup 3/H) MISO-FA binding. At 10/sup -5/ M, the dinor and tetranor ..beta..-oxidation metabolites of MISO were weak binding inhibitors. Strict stereospecific binding was shown by MISO stereoisomers, and the 11R, 16S isomer was most active. Both PGE/sub 1/ and 16,16 dimethyl PGE/sub 2/ were potent binding inhibitors, but PGF/sub 1/..cap alpha.. (10/sup -6/ M) and Hoe 892 (10/sup -5/ M), a stable PGI/sub 2/ analog, were weak inhibitors. Neither histamine or cimetidine competed for binding sites. These data indicate the presence of stereospecific E-type prostaglandin receptors in enriched canine parietal cell preparations.

  7. Fatty acid-binding protein 2 Ala54Thr genotype is associated with insulin resistance and leptin levels changes after a high monounsaturated fat diet in obese non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Aller, R; Izaola, O; Gonzalez Sagrado, M; Conde, R

    2013-06-01

    It has been found that the expression of fatty acid binding protein 2 (FABP2) mRNA is under dietary control. This polymorphism was associated with high insulin resistance, and fasting insulin concentrations. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of Thr54 polymorphism in the FABP2 gene on metabolic response, weight loss and serum adipokine levels secondary to a high monounsaturated fat hypocaloric diet. A sample of 122 obese patients was analyzed in a prospective way. The hypocaloric diet had 1342 kcal, 46.6% of carbohydrates, 34.1% of lipids and 19.2% of proteins, with a 67.5% of monounsaturated fats, and lasted 3 months. Fifty-five patients (45.1%) had the genotype Ala54/Ala54 (wild group) and 67 (64.9%) patients a mutant genotype, Ala54/Thr54 (54 patients, 44.3%) or Thr54/Thr54 (13 patients, 10.7%). In wild group, body mass index (-1.5±1.2 kg/m2), weight (-4.1±3.6 kg), fat mass (-3.6±3.3 kg), waist circumference (-4.9±2.9 cm), insulin (-1.7±3.6 mUI/l), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (-0.6±1.8 units) and leptin levels decreased (-7.6±7.1 ng/ml). In mutant group, anthropometric parameters improved, without changes in biochemical parameters. Carriers of Thr54 allele have a different response than wild type obese, with a lack of decrease of insulin levels, leptin levels and HOMA-IR.

  8. Diverse binding modes, same goal: The receptor recognition mechanism of botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most deadly toxins known. They act rapidly in a highly specific manner to block neurotransmitter release by cleaving the soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex at neuromuscular junctions. The extreme toxicity of BoNTs relies predominantly on their neurotropism that is accomplished by recognition of two host receptors, a polysialo-ganglioside and in the majority of cases a synaptic vesicle protein, through their receptor-binding domains. Two proteins, synaptotagmin and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2, have been identified as the receptors for various serotypes of BoNTs. Here, we review recent breakthroughs in the structural studies of BoNT-protein receptor recognitions that highlight a range of diverse mechanisms by which BoNTs manipulate host neuronal proteins for highly specific uptake at neuromuscular junctions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [CDNA cloning of human leptin and its expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen-Yu; Fu, Xiao-Min; Jin, Ai-Hua; Cao, Jiang

    2003-07-01

    To clone cDNA of human leptin gene and obtain leptin protein for future study on leptin binding proteins. The cDNA of human leptin with 6 x his-tag was cloned by over-hang extension PCR protocol using human genomic DNA as template, and subcloned into in vitro expression vector pIVEX2.3MCS, and the fusion protein was expressed in vitro by Rapid Translation System (RTS) (RTS500 cycle primer Kit and RTS500 ProteoMaster of Roche company). The apparent molecular weight(19.46 kD) and the immuno-specificity of the fusion protein were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, and the expressed fusion protein stayed mainly in the supernatant of the reaction mixture in soluble form. This work provides us solid basis for further study on new leptin-associated proteins.

  10. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Improved receptor analysis in PET using a priori information from in vitro binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litton, J.-E.; Hall, H.; Blomqvist, G. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    An accurate determination of non-specific binding is required for the analysis of in vitro and in vivo receptor binding data. For some radioligands the non-specific binding is of the same magnitude as the specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro measurements have shown that the non-specific binding can be different in different brain regions. If this is the case in a PET study for determining B{sub max} and K{sub d}, a correction for the non-specific binding has to be applied. The aim of the present communication is to present a means for determining corrected B{sub max} and K{sub d} with Scatchard analysis using in vitro binding studies. The influence of non-specific binding on the free and specifically bound radioligand is expressed with the aid of a correction factor, which can be calculated from measurable quantities. Introduction of the corrected free and specifically bound radioligand should give binding parameters closer to reality than previously obtained results. (author)

  12. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor-ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The K(d) values...

  13. Nuclear thyroid hormone receptor binding in human mononuclear blood cells after goitre resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E; Blichert-Toft, M

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear thyroxine and triiodothyronine receptor-binding in human mononuclear blood cells were examined in 14 euthyroid persons prior to and 1, 6, 24 and 53 weeks after goitre resection. One week after resection decreased serum T3 from 1.47 nmol/l to 1.14 nmol/l (P less than 0.05), FT4I from 103 a...

  14. The neural cell adhesion molecule binds to fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Lauridsen, Jes B; Berezin, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) can bind to and activate fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). However, there are four major FGFR isoforms (FGFR1-FGFR4), and it is not known whether NCAM also interacts directly with the other three FGFR isoforms. In this study, we show by surface...

  15. Exploring the ATP-binding site of P2X receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry eChataigneau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptors are ATP-gated non-selective cation channels involved in many different physiological processes, such as synaptic transmission, inflammation and neuropathic pain. They form homo- or heterotrimeric complexes and contain three ATP-binding sites in their extracellular domain. The recent determination of X-ray structures of a P2X receptor solved in two states, a resting closed state and an ATP-bound, open-channel state, has provided unprecedented information not only regarding the three-dimensional shape of the receptor, but also on putative conformational changes that couple ATP binding to channel opening. These data provide a structural template for interpreting the huge amount of functional, mutagenesis, and biochemical data collected during more than fifteen years. In particular, the interfacial location of the ATP binding site and ATP orientation have been successfully confirmed by these structural studies. It appears that ATP binds to inter-subunit cavities shaped like open jaws, whose tightening induces the opening of the ion channel. These structural data thus represent a firm basis for understanding the activation mechanism of P2X receptors.

  16. The effect of hyperthyroidism on opiate receptor binding and pain sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmondson, E.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Bonnet, K.A.; Friedhoff, A.J. (New York Univ. School of Medicine, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of thyroid hormone on opiate receptor ligand-binding and pain sensitivity. Specific opiate receptor-binding was performed on brain homogenates of Swiss-Webster mice. There was a significant increase in {sup 3}H-naloxone-binding in thyroxine-fed subjects (hyperthyroid). Scatchard analysis revealed that the number of opiate receptors was increased in hyperthyroid mice (Bmax = 0.238 nM for hyperthyroid samples vs. 0.174 nM for controls). Binding affinity was unaffected (Kd = 1.54 nM for hyperthyroid and 1.58 nM for control samples). When mice were subjected to hotplate stimulation, the hyperthyroid mice were noted to be more sensitive as judged by pain aversion response latencies which were half that of control animals. After morphine administration, the hyperthyroid animals demonstrated a shorter duration of analgesia. These findings demonstrate that thyroxine increases opiate receptor number and native pain sensitivity but decreases the duration of analgesia from morphine.

  17. Binding of N-methylscopolamine to the extracellular domain of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Zimčík, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Jan 16 (2017), č. článku 40381. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * N-methylscopolamine * ligand binding * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  18. Brain serotonin 4 receptor binding is inversely associated with verbal memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbæk, Dea S; Fisher, Patrick M; Ozenne, Brice

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously identified an inverse relationship between cerebral serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT 4R) binding and nonaffective episodic memory in healthy individuals. Here, we investigate in a novel sample if the association is related to affective components of memory, by examining t...

  19. Similar serotonin-2A receptor binding in rats with different coping styles or levels of aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Anniek K. D.; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B.; van Waarde, Aren; Bosker, Fokko J.; Meerlo, Peter; Knudsen, Gitte M.; De Boer, Sietse F.

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in coping style emerge as a function of underlying variability in the activation of a mesocorticolimbic brain circuitry. Particularly serotonin seems to play an important role. For this reason, we assessed serotonin-2A receptor (5-HT2AR) binding in the brain of rats with

  20. Binding of ArgTX-636 in the NMDA receptor ion channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mette H; Andersen, Jacob; Christensen, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) constitute an important class of ligand-gated cation channels that are involved in the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the human brain. Compounds that bind in the NMDAR ion channel and act as blockers are use- and voltage-dependent inhibitor...

  1. Sleep deprivation increases cerebral serotonin 2A receptor binding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, David; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin and its cerebral receptors play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of 24-h total sleep deprivation on the apparent serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) binding capacity in the human brain to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation induces global molecular alterations in the cortical serotonergic receptor system. Volunteers were tested twice with the subtype-selective radiotracer [(18)F]altanserin and positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging of 5-HT(2A)Rs at baseline and after 24 h of sleep deprivation. [(18)F]Altanserin binding potentials were analyzed in 13 neocortical regions of interest. The efficacy of sleep deprivation was assessed by questionnaires, waking electroencephalography, and cognitive performance measurements. Sleep laboratory and neuroimaging center. Eighteen healthy volunteers. Sleep deprivation. A total of 24 hours of sleep deprivation led to a 9.6% increase of [(18)F]altanserin binding on neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptors. Significant region-specific increases were found in the medial inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and anterior cingulate, parietal, sensomotoric, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. This study demonstrates that a single night of total sleep deprivation causes significant increases of 5-HT(2A)R binding potentials in a variety of cortical regions although the increase declines as sleep deprivation continued. It provides in vivo evidence that total sleep deprivation induces adaptive processes in the serotonergic system of the human brain.

  2. The ligand specificities of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I receptor reside in different regions of a common binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, T.; Andersen, A.S.; Wiberg, F.C.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Schaeffer, L.; Balschmidt, P.; Moller, K.B.; Moller, N.P.H. (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1991-05-15

    To identify the region(s) of the insulin receptor and the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor responsible for ligand specificity (high-affinity binding), expression vectors encoding soluble chimeric insulin/IGF-I receptors were prepared. The chimeric receptors were expressed in mammalian cells and partially purified. Binding studies revealed that a construct comprising an IGF-I receptor in which the 68 N-terminal amino acids of the insulin receptor {alpha}-subunit had replaced the equivalent IGF-I receptor segment displayed a markedly increased affinity for insulin. In contrast, the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence is not critical for high-affinity IGF-I binding. It is shown that part of the cysteine-rich domain determines IGF-I specificity. The authors have previously shown that exchanging exons 1, 2, and 3 of the insulin receptor with the corresponding IGF-I receptor sequence results in loss of high affinity for insulin and gain of high affinity for IGF-I. Consequently, it is suggested that the ligand specificities of the two receptors (i.e., the sequences that discriminate between insulin and IGF-I) reside in different regions of a binding site with common features present in both receptors.

  3. Diazepam-bound GABAA receptor models identify new benzodiazepine binding-site ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lars; de Graaf, Chris; Sieghart, Werner; Varagic, Zdravko; Mörzinger, Martina; de Esch, Iwan J P; Ecker, Gerhard F; Ernst, Margot

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines exert their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle-relaxant and sedative-hypnotic properties by allosterically enhancing the action of GABA at GABAA receptors via their benzodiazepine-binding site. Although these drugs have been used clinically since 1960, the molecular basis of this interaction is still not known. By using multiple homology models and an un biased docking protocol, we identified a binding hypothesis for the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine site, which was confirmed by experimental evidence. Moreover, two independent virtual screening approaches based on this structure identified known benzodiazepine-site ligands from different structural classes and predicted potential new ligands for this site. Receptor-binding assays and electrophysiological studies on recombinant receptors confirmed these predictions and thus identified new chemotypes for the benzodiazepine-binding site. Our results support the validity of the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine-binding pocket, demonstrate its suitability for drug discovery and pave the way for structure-based drug design. PMID:22446838

  4. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of [ 125 I]-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of [ 3 H]-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet

  5. Synthesis and receptor binding studies of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.J.; Ciliax, B.J.; Van Dort, M.E.; Gildersleeve, D.; Pirat, J.L.; Young, A.B.; Wieland, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The glutamate analogue N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) binds to a subset of glutamate receptors that are coupled to a voltage-sensitive cation channel. This NMDA-linked channel is the likely binding locus of the potent anticonvulsant MK-801. To develop single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) probes of this brain channel, we synthesized (+/)1-iodo-MK-801 and (+/-)1-[ 125 I]iodo-MK-801. The effect of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 on ligand binding to the NMDA-linked glutamate receptor site was assessed using a rat brain homogenate assay. (+/-)1-Iodo-MK-801 displaced the dissociative anesthetic ligand [ 3 H]N-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([ 3 H]TCP) binding with an IC50 of 1 microM, which is a 10-fold lower binding affinity than that of (+/-)MK-801. In in vivo autoradiographic studies, (+/-)MK-801 failed to block selective uptake of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 in rat brain. These results suggest that (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 may not be a suitable ligand for mapping NMDA-linked glutamate receptor channels

  6. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  7. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  8. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA......, and cytosolic progesterone receptors (PR) measured by LBA were also studied. While ERc concentrations determined by LBA and EIA were highly correlated (r: 0.94), ERc values detected by LBA were approximately twice those found by EIA (median values of ERc: 155 vs. 64 fmol/mg cytosol protein, DCC vs. EIA......). The percentages of ERc positive tumors were 89% by LBA and 77% by EIA. The median fraction of total ER present as ERn was 63%. PR levels correlated positively with ERn concentrations (r: 0.73). We explore possible reasons why greater concentrations of ERc are determined by estradiol binding than by the ER-EIA kit...

  9. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  10. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnig, Marcel; Bufe, Bernd; Kratochwil, Nicole A; Slack, Jay P; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2007-10-12

    Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor activation by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate. Some

  11. Leptin, obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Marcelo Lima de Gusmao; Haynes, William Geoffrey

    2004-03-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Leptin levels are increased in obesity and leptin exhibits cardiovascular actions that may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. We review the sympathetic, renal and vascular actions of leptin and their relevance to cardiovascular disease. Leptin possesses cardio-renal actions potentially contributing to obesity-related hypertension including generalized sympathoactivation. However, given that leptin resistance occurs in obesity, it has been difficult to link hyperleptinemia with hypertension. One possibility is that leptin resistance is confined to the metabolic effects of leptin, with preservation of its sympathoexcitatory actions. Other mechanisms may contribute to the pressor effects of leptin. For instance, angiotensin II induces leptin generation. Leptin also potentiates the pressor effect of insulin. Therefore, interactions between angiotensin II and insulin with leptin could have deleterious cardiovascular effects in obesity. Additionally, leptin appears to stimulate vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and hypertophy. These actions may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, atherosclerosis, and left ventricular hypertrophy. The potential actions of leptin in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular complications of obesity are diverse, despite evidence of leptin resistance to its metabolic actions. However, most information about cardiovascular actions of leptin derives from in-vitro and animal studies. Future research in humans is widely awaited.

  12. Molecular mechanism of AMD3100 antagonism in the CXCR4 receptor: transfer of binding site to the CXCR3 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Jakobsen, Janus S

    2004-01-01

    , respectively. Metal ion binding in the cyclam rings of AMD3100 increased its dependence on Asp(262) and provided a tighter molecular map of the binding site, where borderline mutational hits became clear hits for the Zn(II)-loaded analog. The proposed binding site for AMD3100 was confirmed by a gradual build......-up in the rather distinct CXCR3 receptor, for which the compound normally had no effect. Introduction of only a Glu at position VII:06 and the removal of a neutralizing Lys residue at position VII:02 resulted in a 1000-fold increase in affinity of AMD3100 to within 10-fold of its affinity in CXCR4. We conclude...

  13. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L.; Crouzel, C.; Nutt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, [N-methyl- 11 C]flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (Author)

  14. Solubilization of rat brain phencyclidine receptors in an active binding form that is sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambar, I; Kloog, Y; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-07-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) receptors were successfully solubilized from rat forebrain membranes with 1% sodium cholate. Approximately 58% of the initial protein and 20-30% of the high-affinity PCP binding sites were solubilized. The high affinity toward PCP-like drugs, the stereo-selectivity of the sites, and the sensitivity to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor ligands were preserved. Binding of the potent PCP receptor ligand N-[3H][1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl] piperidine ([3H]TCP) to the soluble receptors was saturable (KD = 35 nM), and PCP-like drugs inhibited [3H]TCP binding in a rank order of potency close to that observed for the membrane-bound receptors; the most potent inhibitors were TCP (Ki = 31 nM) and the anticonvulsant MK-801 (Ki = 50 nM). The NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid inhibited binding of [3H]TCP to the soluble receptors; glutamate or NMDA diminished this inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, the results indicate that the soluble PCP receptor preparation contains the glutamate recognition sites and may represent a single receptor complex for PCP and NMDA, as suggested by electrophysiological data. The successful solubilization of the PCP receptors in an active binding form should now facilitate their purification.

  15. Study on insulin receptor binding characteristics of insulin-IUdR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong; Kuang Anren; Liang Zhenglu; Peng Xian; Zhong Yuguo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: It has been reported that several kinds of tumors express increased insulin receptors and the molecule of insulin can be internalized in cells and enter the nuclei through the mediation of the insulin receptor. The authors investigated the receptor binding characteristics of insulin-IUdR for the possibility of using insulin as carriers for carcinoma targeted therapy by receptor mediation. Methods: IUdR (idoxuridine) was covalently linked to insulin using the bifunctional reagent succinic acid. The insulin-IUdR conjugate was purified by polyacrylamide agarose gel electrophoresis. The human hepatocellular carcinoma specimens confirmed histologically were obtained from patients at surgery and immediately frozen under -80 degree C. Cell membrane fractions were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Competitive displacement of 125 I-insulin with insulin and insulin-IUdR binding to the insulin receptor were carried out. Values of IC 50 and KI were calculated to observe the characteristics of insulin-IUdR binding to the insulin receptor. Results: Insulin-IUdR competed as effectively as insulin with 125 I-insulin for binding to insulin receptors. The values of IC 50 1 and IC 50 2 for insulin-IUdR were (11.50 +- 2.83) nmol/L and (19.35 +- 5.11) nmol/L, respectively; the values of KI1 and KI2 for insulin-IUdR were (11.26 +- 2.65) nmol/L and (19.30 +- 5.02) nmol/L, respectively, while values of IC 50 1 and IC 50 2 for insulin were (5.01 +- 1.24) nmol/L and (17.75 +- 4.86) nmol/L, respectively. The values of KI1 and KI2 for insulin were (4.85 +- 1.12) nmol/L and (17.69 +- 4.81) nmol/L, respectively. Conclusions: Insulin-IUdR could bind with the insulin receptor with high affinity. The result shows that there is a possibility of using insulin as carriers for carcinoma targeted therapy through receptor mediation

  16. A cation-pi interaction in the binding site of the glycine receptor is mediated by a phenylalanine residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Millen, Kat S; Hanek, Ariele P

    2008-01-01

    Cys-loop receptor binding sites characteristically contain many aromatic amino acids. In nicotinic ACh and 5-HT3 receptors, a Trp residue forms a cation-pi interaction with the agonist, whereas in GABA(A) receptors, a Tyr performs this role. The glycine receptor binding site, however, contains...... of fluorinated Phe derivatives using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. The data reveal a clear correlation between the glycine EC(50) value and the cation-pi binding ability of the fluorinated Phe derivatives at position 159, but not at positions 207 or 63, indicating a single cation-pi interaction between...

  17. Decreased frontal serotonin 5-HT2a receptor binding index in deliberate self-harm patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audenaert, K.; Laere, K. van; Dierckx, R.A.; Dumont, F.; Slegers, G.; Mertens, J.; Heeringen, C. van

    2001-01-01

    Studies of serotonin metabolites in body fluids in attempted suicide patients and of post-mortem brain tissue of suicide victims have demonstrated the involvement of the serotonergic neurotransmission system in the pathogenesis of suicidal behaviour. Recently developed neuroimaging techniques offer the unique possibility of investigating in vivo the functional characteristics of this system. In this study the 5-HT 2a receptor population of patients who had recently attempted suicide was studied by means of the highly specific radio-iodinated 5-HT 2a receptor antagonist 4-amino-N-[1-[3-(4-fluorophenoxy)propyl]-4-methyl-4-piperidinyl] -5-iodo-2-methox ybenzamide or 123 I-5-I-R91150. Nine patients who had recently (1-7 days) attempted suicide and 12 age-matched healthy controls received an intravenous injection of 185 MBq 123 I-5-I-R91150 and were scanned with high-resolution brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Stereotactic realigned images were analysed semi-quantitatively using predefined volumes of interest. Serotonin binding capacity was expressed as the ratio of specific to non-specific activity. The cerebellum was used as a measure of non-specific activity. An age-dependent 5-HT 2a binding index was found, in agreement with previous literature. Deliberate self-harm patients had a significantly reduced mean frontal binding index after correction for age (P=0.002) when compared with controls. The reduction was more pronounced among deliberate self-injury patients (DSI) (P 2a serotonin receptor system in attempted suicide patients who are free of drugs influencing the serotonergic system shows in vivo evidence of a decreased frontal binding index of the 5-HT 2a receptor, indicating a decrease in the number and/or in the binding affinity of 5-HT 2a receptors. (orig.)

  18. A camelid single-domain antibody neutralizes botulinum neurotoxin A by blocking host receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guorui; Lam, Kwok-ho; Weisemann, Jasmin; Peng, Lisheng; Krez, Nadja; Perry, Kay; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Dong, Min; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng (BCH); (Cornell); (Tufts CTSI); (UCI); (MHH)

    2017-08-07

    Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2). Previously, we identified a potent neutralizing antitoxin against BoNT/A1 termed ciA-C2, derived from a camelid heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH). In this study, we demonstrate that ciA-C2 prevents BoNT/A1 intoxication by inhibiting its binding to neuronal receptor SV2. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structure of ciA-C2 in complex with the receptor-binding domain of BoNT/A1 (HCA1) at 1.68 Å resolution. The structure revealed that ciA-C2 partially occupies the SV2-binding site on HCA1, causing direct interference of HCA1 interaction with both the N-glycan and peptide-moiety of SV2. Interestingly, this neutralization mechanism is similar to that of a monoclonal antibody in clinical trials, despite that ciA-C2 is more than 10-times smaller. Taken together, these results enlighten our understanding of BoNT/A1 interactions with its neuronal receptor, and further demonstrate that inhibiting toxin binding to the host receptor is an efficient countermeasure strategy.

  19. Mechanism of the G-protein mimetic nanobody binding to a muscarinic G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-03-20

    Protein-protein binding is key in cellular signaling processes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein-protein binding, however, are challenging due to limited timescales. In particular, binding of the medically important G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with intracellular signaling proteins has not been simulated with MD to date. Here, we report a successful simulation of the binding of a G-protein mimetic nanobody to the M 2 muscarinic GPCR using the robust Gaussian accelerated MD (GaMD) method. Through long-timescale GaMD simulations over 4,500 ns, the nanobody was observed to bind the receptor intracellular G-protein-coupling site, with a minimum rmsd of 2.48 Å in the nanobody core domain compared with the X-ray structure. Binding of the nanobody allosterically closed the orthosteric ligand-binding pocket, being consistent with the recent experimental finding. In the absence of nanobody binding, the receptor orthosteric pocket sampled open and fully open conformations. The GaMD simulations revealed two low-energy intermediate states during nanobody binding to the M 2 receptor. The flexible receptor intracellular loops contribute remarkable electrostatic, polar, and hydrophobic residue interactions in recognition and binding of the nanobody. These simulations provided important insights into the mechanism of GPCR-nanobody binding and demonstrated the applicability of GaMD in modeling dynamic protein-protein interactions.

  20. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  1. Increased potency and binding of mazindol to putative brain anorectic receptors in obesity-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, B E; Brown, K L; Vincent, G

    1994-12-30

    A class of sodium-sensitive, low affinity binding sites in the brain recognizes [3H]mazindol (MAZ). Competition for [3H]MAZ binding at these sites correlates with the anorectic potency of various phenethylamine drugs suggesting that these might be anorectic binding sites. Here [3H]MAZ binding, in the absence of sodium, was assessed by quantitative receptor autoradiography in rat brain. Binding was saturable, widespread and heterogenous with Kd = 3-229 microM and Bmax = 0.64-21.9 nmol/mg protein in various brain areas. By saturation studies, highest binding was in the somatosensory cortex, central amygdalar nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Hypothalamic subnuclei had intermediate and the piriform cortex had low binding. Rats were identified as prone to develop (DIO-prone) or resist (DR-prone) diet-induced obesity by their low vs. high 24 h urine norepinephrine excretion, respectively. While similar in body weight and basal 30 min intake of 4% sucrose, DIO-prone rats had 28% greater inhibition of sucrose intake by 3 mg/kg MAZ, i.p. (86 +/- 5%) than DR-prone rats (67 +/- 6%; P = 0.05). DIO-prone rats also had 23-55% higher levels of 10 nM [3H]MAZ binding in various hypothalamic and amygdalar nuclei, the somatosensory, piriform and gustatory cortices and thalamus. Given their greater sensitivity the highest dose of MAZ used and their higher binding of MAZ to putative brain anorectic receptors, DIO-prone rats might have a deficiency of an endogenous satiety factor which could predispose them to develop obesity when challenged with high energy, high sucrose diets.

  2. 2'-C-Methyl analogues of selective adenosine receptor agonists: synthesis and binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, P; Cappellacci, L; Marchetti, S; Trincavelli, L; Martini, C; Mazzoni, M R; Lucacchini, A; Grifantini, M

    1998-05-07

    2'-C-Methyl analogues of selective adenosine receptor agonists such as (R)-PIA, CPA, CCPA, NECA, and IB-MECA were synthesized in order to further investigate the subdomain that binds the ribose moiety. Binding affinities of these new compounds at A1 and A2A receptors in bovine brain membranes and at A3 in rat testis membranes were determined and compared. It was found that the 2'-C-methyl modification resulted in a decrease of the affinity, particularly at A2A and A3 receptors. When such modification was combined with N6-substitutions with groups which induce high potency and selectivity at A1 receptors, the high affinity was retained and the selectivity was increased. Thus, 2-chloro-2'-C-methyl-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (2'-Me-CCPA), which displayed a Ki value of 1.8 nM at A1 receptors, was selective for A1 vs A2A and A3 receptors by 2166- and 2777-fold, respectively, resulting in one of the most potent and A1-selective agonists so far known. In functional assay, this compound inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity with an IC50 value of 13.1 nM, acting as a full agonist.

  3. The mu1, mu2, delta, kappa opioid receptor binding profiles of methadone stereoisomers and morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Christensen, C B; Christrup, Lona Louring

    1995-01-01

    The binding affinities of racemic methadone and its optical isomers R-methadone and S-methadone were evaluated for the opioid receptors mu1, mu2, delta and kappa, in comparison with that of morphine. The analgesic R-methadone had a 10-fold higher affinity for mu1 receptors than S-methadone (IC50 3.......0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively). At the mu2 receptor, the IC50 value of R-methadone was 6.9 nM and 88 nM for S-methadone, respectively. As expected, R-methadone had twice the affinity for mu1 and mu2 receptors than the racemate. All of the compounds tested had low affinity for the delta and kappa...... receptors. This result suggests that S-methadone does not essentially contribute to opioid effect of racemic methadone. R-methadone has a receptor binding profile which resembles that of morphine....

  4. Decreased frontal serotonin2A receptor binding in antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans; Erritzoe, David; Andersen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    , in vivo studies of serotonin(2A) binding report conflicting results, presumably because sample sizes have been small or because schizophrenic patients who were not antipsychotic-naive were included. Furthermore, the relationships between serotonin(2A) binding, psychopathology, and central neurocognitive......Postmortem investigations and the receptor affinity profile of atypical antipsychotics have implicated the participation of serotonin(2A) receptors in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Most postmortem studies point toward lower cortical serotonin(2A) binding in schizophrenic patients. However...

  5. Novel coumarin glycoside and phenethyl vanillate from Notopterygium forbesii and their binding affinities for opioid and dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongze; Xu, Wei; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Lee, David Y W

    2008-03-15

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of Notopterygium forbesii has resulted in the isolation of one new coumarin glycoside and one new phenethyl vanillate, together with seventeen known compounds. The structures of these compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods. These compounds were evaluated for their binding affinities to the opioid and dopamine receptors, and falcarindiol showed weak binding affinities to opioid receptors and moderate affinity for D1 receptor (K(i)=192+/-6 nM).

  6. Identification of Fc Gamma Receptor Glycoforms That Produce Differential Binding Kinetics for Rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jerrard M; Frostell, Asa; Karlsson, Robert; Müller, Steffen; Martín, Silvia Míllan; Pauers, Martin; Reuss, Franziska; Cosgrave, Eoin F; Anneren, Cecilia; Davey, Gavin P; Rudd, Pauline M

    2017-10-01

    Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) bind the Fc region of antibodies and therefore play a prominent role in antibody-dependent cell-based immune responses such as ADCC, CDC and ADCP. The immune effector cell activity is directly linked to a productive molecular engagement of FcγRs where both the protein and glycan moiety of antibody and receptor can affect the interaction and in the present study we focus on the role of the FcγR glycans in this interaction. We provide a complete description of the glycan composition of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expressed human Fcγ receptors RI (CD64), RIIa Arg131/His131 (CD32a), RIIb (CD32b) and RIIIa Phe158/Val158 (CD16a) and analyze the role of the glycans in the binding mechanism with IgG. The interactions of the monoclonal antibody rituximab with each FcγR were characterized and we discuss the CHO-FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 and CHO-FcγRI interactions and compare them to the equivalent interactions with human (HEK293) and murine (NS0) produced receptors. Our results reveal clear differences in the binding profiles of rituximab, which we attribute in each case to the differences in host cell-dependent FcγR glycosylation. The glycan profiles of CHO expressed FcγRI and FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 were compared with the glycan profiles of the receptors expressed in NS0 and HEK293 cells and we show that the glycan type and abundance differs significantly between the receptors and that these glycan differences lead to the observed differences in the respective FcγR binding patterns with rituximab. Oligomannose structures are prevalent on FcγRI from each source and likely contribute to the high affinity rituximab interaction through a stabilization effect. On FcγRI and FcγRIIIa large and sialylated glycans have a negative impact on rituximab binding, likely through destabilization of the interaction. In conclusion, the data show that the IgG1-FcγR binding kinetics differ depending on the glycosylation of the FcγR and further support a

  7. Takifugu rubripes cation independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor: Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the IGF-II binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ajith Kumar; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2018-01-31

    Mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor mediated lysosomal clearance of insulin-like growth factor-II is significantly associated with the evolution of placental mammals. The protein is also referred to as the IGF-II receptor. Earlier studies suggested relatively low binding affinity between the receptor and ligand in prototherian and metatherian mammals. In the present study, we cloned the IGF-II binding domain of the early vertebrate fugu fish and expressed it in bacteria. A 72000Da truncated receptor containing the IGF-II binding domain was obtained. Analysis of this protein (covering domains 11-13 of the CIMPR) for its affinity to fish and human IGF-II by ligand blot assays and ELISA showed that the expressed receptor can specifically bind to both fish and human IGF-II. Additionally, a peptide-specific antibody raised against the region of the IGF-II binding domain also was able to recognize the IGF-II binding regions of mammalian and non-mammalian cation independent MPR protein. These interactions were further characterized by Surface Plasma resonance support that the receptor binds to fish IGF-II, with a dissociation constant of 548nM. Preliminary analysis suggests that the binding mechanism as well as the affinity of the fish and human receptor for IGF-II may have varied according to different evolutionary pressures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Differential binding and transcriptional behaviour of two highly related orphan receptors, ROR alpha(4) and ROR beta(1).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gawlas, K.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-inducible transcription factors that can be classified into two major groups according to their DNA-binding properties. Members of the first group bind to DNA as dimers, either homo- or heterodimers; members of the second group are also able to bind as monomers. While

  9. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  10. Characterization of the differential coregulator binding signatures of the Retinoic Acid Receptor subtypes upon (ant)agonist action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miro Estruch, Ignacio; Melchers, Diana; Houtman, René; Haan, de Laura H.J.; Groten, John P.; Louisse, Jochem; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic Acid Receptor alpha (RARα/NR1B1), Retinoic Acid Receptor beta (RARβ/NR1B2) and Retinoic Acid Receptor gamma (RARγ/NR1B3) are transcription factors regulating gene expression in response to retinoids. Within the RAR genomic pathways, binding of RARs to coregulators is a key intermediate

  11. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga

    2008-01-01

    was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding...... with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion......The chaperone calreticulin has been suggested to function as a C1q and collectin receptor. The interaction of calreticulin with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was investigated by solid-phase binding assays. Calreticulin showed saturable and time-dependent binding to recombinant MBL, provided that MBL...

  12. Glucocorticoid Receptor Binding Induces Rapid and Prolonged Large-Scale Chromatin Decompaction at Multiple Target Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair W. Jubb

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids act by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which binds to specific motifs within enhancers of target genes to activate transcription. Previous studies have suggested that GRs can promote interactions between gene promoters and distal elements within target loci. In contrast, we demonstrate here that glucocorticoid addition to mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages produces very rapid chromatin unfolding detectable by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH at loci associated with GR binding. Rapid chromatin decompaction was generally not dependent on transcription at those loci that are known to be inducible in both mouse and human macrophages and was sustained for up to 5 days following ligand removal. Chromatin decompaction was not dependent upon persistent GR binding, which decayed fully after 24 hr. We suggest that sustained large-scale chromatin reorganization forms an important part of the response to glucocorticoid and might contribute to glucocorticoid sensitivity and resistance.

  13. 3D-QSAR model of flavonoids binding at benzodiazepine site in GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Liu, T; Gu, J; Luo, X; Ji, R; Cao, Y; Xue, H; Wong, J T; Wong, B L; Pei, G; Jiang, H; Chen, K

    2001-06-07

    With flavone as a structural template, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and ab initio calculations were performed on a series of flavonoids. A reasonable pharmacophore model was built through CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses and electrostatic potential calculations. A plausible binding mode for flavonoids with GABA(A) receptors was rationalized. On the basis of the commonly recognized binding site, the specific S1 and S2 subsites relating to substituent positions were proposed. The different binding affinities could be explained according to the frontier orbitals and electrostatic potential (ESP) maps. The ESP could be used as a novel starting point for designing more selective BZ-binding-site ligands.

  14. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely ....... Thus, we here describe [C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT receptors in the human brain.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 30 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.68.......[C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely...... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...

  15. Comparison of the Hershberger assay and androgen receptor binding assay of twelve chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Sawaki, Masakuni; Noda, Shoji; Muroi, Takako; Takakura, Saori; Mitoma, Hideo; Sakamoto, Satoko; Nakai, Makoto; Yakabe, Yoshikuni

    2004-02-15

    We performed the Hershberger assay of 12 chemicals based on the OECD draft protocol. The chemicals tested by the Hershberger assay were phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, atrazine, and spironolactone. Phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester are phthalates; diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol are estrogenic chemicals; tamoxifen is partial estrogen receptor antagonist with mainly estrogenic properties; 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone is an androgen derivatives; dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane is a reference androgen antagonistic chemical; cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone have an androgenic steroid structure and are known as androgen antagonistic chemicals; and atrazine is a reference endocrine disruptor. We also subjected these chemicals to the receptor binding assay for androgen. A clear androgen agonistic effect was detected in 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, and an androgen antagonistic effect was observed in five chemicals: cyproterone acetate, spironolactone, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane. By contrast, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone were positive in the receptor binding assay for androgen. Three estrogenic chemicals, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, and tamoxifen, were negative in the Hershberger assay with receptor binding affinity. On the other hand, the Hershberger assays of three phthalates were performed at the same dosages, and the results showed androgen antagonistic affinity only

  16. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-01-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PEG 2 ) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its α subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G 0 ) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the α subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G 0 . The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G 0 and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of [ 3 H]PGE 2 binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G 0 in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla

  17. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  18. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  19. Rapid phospho-turnover by receptor tyrosine kinases impacts downstream signaling and drug binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Laura B; Maiwald, Thomas; Conzelmann, Holger; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2011-09-02

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB1-4) are oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that regulate diverse cellular processes. In this study, we combine measurement and mathematical modeling to quantify phospho-turnover at ErbB receptors in human cells and to determine the consequences for signaling and drug binding. We find that phosphotyrosine residues on ErbB1 have half-lives of a few seconds and therefore turn over 100-1000 times in the course of a typical immediate-early response to ligand. Rapid phospho-turnover is also observed for EGF-activated ErbB2 and ErbB3, unrelated RTKs, and multiple intracellular adaptor proteins and signaling kinases. Thus, the complexes formed on the cytoplasmic tail of active receptors and the downstream signaling kinases they control are highly dynamic and antagonized by potent phosphatases. We develop a kinetic scheme for binding of anti-ErbB1 drugs to receptors and show that rapid phospho-turnover significantly impacts their mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Muscarinic receptor binding increases in anterior thalamus and cingulate cortex during discriminative avoidance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, B.A.; Gabriel, M.; Vogt, L.J.; Poremba, A.; Jensen, E.L.; Kubota, Y.; Kang, E.

    1991-01-01

    Training-induced neuronal activity develops in the mammalian limbic system during discriminative avoidance conditioning. This study explores behaviorally relevant changes in muscarinic ACh receptor binding in 52 rabbits that were trained to one of five stages of conditioned response acquisition. Sixteen naive and 10 animals yoked to criterion performance served as control cases. Upon reaching a particular stage of training, the brains were removed and autoradiographically assayed for 3H-oxotremorine-M binding with 50 nM pirenzepine (OxO-M/PZ) or for 3H-pirenzepine binding in nine limbic thalamic nuclei and cingulate cortex. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding increased in the parvocellular division of the anterodorsal nucleus early in training when the animals were first exposed to pairing of the conditional and unconditional stimuli. Elevated binding in this nucleus was maintained throughout subsequent training. In the parvocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVp), OxO-M/PZ binding progressively increased throughout training, reached a peak at the criterion stage of performance, and returned to control values during extinction sessions. Peak OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp was significantly elevated over that for cases yoked to criterion performance. In the magnocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVm), OxO-M/PZ binding was elevated only during criterion performance of the task, and it was unaltered in any other limbic thalamic nuclei. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding was also elevated in most layers in rostral area 29c when subjects first performed a significant behavioral discrimination. Training-induced alterations in OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp and layer Ia of area 29c were similar and highly correlated

  1. Mapping of the vitronectin-binding site on the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Ploug, Michael

    2007-01-01

    a comprehensive alanine-scanning library of purified single-site uPAR mutants (244 positions tested). Interestingly, the five residues identified as "hot spots" for vitronectin binding form a contiguous epitope consisting of two exposed loops connecting the central fourstranded beta-sheet in uPAR domain I (Trp(32...... the intriguing possibility that the canonical receptor and inhibitor for uPA (uPAR and PAI-1) may have reached a convergent solution for binding to the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin....

  2. Serotonin receptor binding affinities of several hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Liebowitz, S M; Mack, E C

    1978-08-01

    Hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues are known to affect serotonergic systems both in vivo and in vitro. Using a rat stomach fundus model, the 5-HT receptor binding affinities of several of these analogues were determined and compared. The most behaviorally potent analogues examined, DOB, DOM, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, were found to possess rather high affirmities (pA2 = 7.35, 7.12, and 7.08, respectively) for the 5-HT receptors of the model system.

  3. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    With the appropriate radiolabeled tracers, positron emission tomography (PET) enables in vivo human brain imaging of markers for neurotransmission, including neurotransmitter synthesis, receptors, and transporters. Whereas structural imaging studies have provided compelling evidence that the human...... variability in cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding as measured with [(18)F]altanserin PET imaging. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.67 for dizygotic and 0.87 for monozygotic twin pairs. For comparison, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 in a group of six male healthy subjects...

  4. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  5. Divalent cations regulate glucagon binding. Evidence for actions on receptor-N/sub s/ complexes and on receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, K.E.; Kolhatkar, A.A.; Maki, R.G.; Donner, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Mg 2+ or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on 125 I-glucagon binding to rat liver plasma membranes have been characterized. In the absence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), maximal binding of 125 I-glucagon occurs in the absence of added Mg 2+ . Addition of EDTA or Mg 2+ diminishes binding in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of GTP, maximal binding occurs in the presence of 2.5 mM Mg 2+ while EDTA or higher concentrations of Mg 2+ diminish binding. Response to exogenous Mg 2+ or EDTA depends on the concentration of Mg 2+ in the membranes and may vary with the method used for membrane isolation. In the absence of GTP, 40 mM Mg 2+ or 5 mM EDTA diminishes receptor affinity for hormone and the fraction of 125 I-glucagon in high molecular weight receptor-N/sub s/ complexes without affecting site number. Thus, while GTP promotes disaggregation of recepton-N/sub s/ complexes, Mg 2+ or EDTA diminishes the affinity with which these species bind hormone. In the presence of GTP, hormone binds to lower affinity, low molecular weight receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/. Binding site affinity is diminished by 40 mM Mg 2+ or 5 mM EDTA and increased by 0.5 mM Mg 2+ without significantly changing the amount of 125 I-glucagon in high molecular weight receptor-N/sub s/ complexes. The ability of Mg 2+ to alter binding to receptors uncoupled from N/sub s/ suggests the presence of a cation binding site in the glucagon receptor. Thus, divalent cations also affect the sensitivity of hormone-receptor-regulatory protein complexes to GTP-induced disaggregation

  6. High resolution crystal structures of the receptor-binding domain of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and FA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R. Davies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The binding specificity of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs is primarily a consequence of their ability to bind to multiple receptors at the same time. BoNTs consist of three distinct domains, a metalloprotease light chain (LC, a translocation domain (HN and a receptor-binding domain (HC. Here we report the crystal structure of HC/FA, complementing an existing structure through the modelling of a previously unresolved loop which is important for receptor-binding. Our HC/FA structure also contains a previously unidentified disulphide bond, which we have also observed in one of two crystal forms of HC/A1. This may have implications for receptor-binding and future recombinant toxin production.

  7. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uyen B. Chu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sigma-2 receptor (S2R is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1 a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+-pentazocine, and (2 a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF. Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380. To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively, as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM. These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes.

  8. Structure-dependent binding and activation of perfluorinated compounds on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lianying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); College of Life Science, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Ren, Xiao-Min; Wan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Guo, Liang-Hong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt lipid metabolism and even induce cancer in rodents through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Lines of evidence showed that PPARα was activated by PFCs. However, the information on the binding interactions between PPARγ and PFCs and subsequent alteration of PPARγ activity is still limited and sometimes inconsistent. In the present study, in vitro binding of 16 PFCs to human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγ-LBD) and their activity on the receptor in cells were investigated. The results showed that the binding affinity was strongly dependent on their carbon number and functional group. For the eleven perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), the binding affinity increased with their carbon number from 4 to 11, and then decreased slightly. The binding affinity of the three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) was stronger than their PFCA counterparts. No binding was detected for the two fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs). Circular dichroim spectroscopy showed that PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. In dual luciferase reporter assays using transiently transfected Hep G2 cells, PFCs acted as hPPARγ agonists, and their potency correlated with their binding affinity with hPPARγ-LBD. Molecular docking showed that PFCs with different chain length bind with the receptor in different geometry, which may contribute to their differences in binding affinity and transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Binding affinity between PFCs and PPARγ was evaluated for the first time. • The binding strength was dependent on fluorinated carbon chain and functional group. • PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. • PFCs could act as hPPARγ agonists in Hep G2 cells.

  9. Binding and Signaling Studies Disclose a Potential Allosteric Site for Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid CB2Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Varani, Katia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Angelats, Edgar; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Oyarzabal, Julen; Canela, Enric I; Lanciego, José L; Nadal, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Borea, Pier Andrea; Franco, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action of cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa L., is not completely understood. First assumed that the compound was acting via cannabinoid CB 2 receptors (CB 2 Rs) it is now suggested that it interacts with non-cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs); however, CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of any GPCR. To search for alternative explanations, we tested CBD as a potential allosteric ligand of CB 2 R. Radioligand and non-radioactive homogeneous binding, intracellular cAMP determination and ERK1/2 phosphorylation assays were undertaken in heterologous systems expressing the human version of CB 2 R. Using membrane preparations from CB 2 R-expressing HEK-293T (human embryonic kidney 293T) cells, we confirmed that CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of the human CB 2 R where the synthetic cannabinoid, [ 3 H]-WIN 55,212-2, binds. CBD was, however, able to produce minor but consistent reduction in the homogeneous binding assays in living cells using the fluorophore-conjugated CB 2 R-selective compound, CM-157. The effect on binding to CB 2 R-expressing living cells was different to that exerted by the orthosteric antagonist, SR144528, which decreased the maximum binding without changing the K D . CBD at nanomolar concentrations was also able to significantly reduce the effect of the selective CB 2 R agonist, JWH133, on forskolin-induced intracellular cAMP levels and on activation of the MAP kinase pathway. These results may help to understand CBD mode of action and may serve to revisit its therapeutic possibilities.

  10. Binding and Signaling Studies Disclose a Potential Allosteric Site for Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Martínez-Pinilla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of action of cannabidiol (CBD, the main non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa L., is not completely understood. First assumed that the compound was acting via cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2Rs it is now suggested that it interacts with non-cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; however, CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of any GPCR. To search for alternative explanations, we tested CBD as a potential allosteric ligand of CB2R. Radioligand and non-radioactive homogeneous binding, intracellular cAMP determination and ERK1/2 phosphorylation assays were undertaken in heterologous systems expressing the human version of CB2R. Using membrane preparations from CB2R-expressing HEK-293T (human embryonic kidney 293T cells, we confirmed that CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of the human CB2R where the synthetic cannabinoid, [3H]-WIN 55,212-2, binds. CBD was, however, able to produce minor but consistent reduction in the homogeneous binding assays in living cells using the fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157. The effect on binding to CB2R-expressing living cells was different to that exerted by the orthosteric antagonist, SR144528, which decreased the maximum binding without changing the KD. CBD at nanomolar concentrations was also able to significantly reduce the effect of the selective CB2R agonist, JWH133, on forskolin-induced intracellular cAMP levels and on activation of the MAP kinase pathway. These results may help to understand CBD mode of action and may serve to revisit its therapeutic possibilities.

  11. Receptor binding profiles and behavioral pharmacology of ring-substituted N,N-diallyltryptamine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Landon M; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Halberstadt, Adam L

    2018-02-27

    Substantial effort has been devoted toward understanding the psychopharmacological effects of tryptamine hallucinogens, which are thought to be mediated by activation of 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors. Recently, several psychoactive tryptamines based on the N,N-diallyltryptamine (DALT) scaffold have been encountered as recreational drugs. Despite the apparent widespread use of DALT derivatives in humans, little is known about their pharmacological properties. We compared the binding affinities of DALT and its 2-phenyl-, 4-acetoxy-, 4-hydroxy-, 5-methoxy-, 5-methoxy-2-methyl-, 5-fluoro-, 5-fluoro-2-methyl-, 5-bromo-, and 7-ethyl-derivatives at 45 receptor and transporter binding sites. Additionally, studies in C57BL/6 J mice examined whether these substances induce the head twitch response (HTR), a 5-HT 2A receptor-mediated response that is widely used as a behavioral proxy for hallucinogen effects in humans. Most of the test drugs bound to serotonin receptors, σ sites, α 2 -adrenoceptors, dopaminergic D 3 receptors, histaminergic H 1 receptors, and the serotonin transporter. DALT and several of the ring-substituted derivatives were active in the HTR assay with the following rank order of potency: 4-acetoxy-DALT > 5-fluoro-DALT > 5-methoxy-DALT > 4-hydroxy-DALT > DALT > 5-bromo-DALT. 2-Phenyl-DALT, 5-methoxy-2-methyl-DALT, 5-fluoro-2-methyl-DALT, and 7-ethyl-DALT did not induce the HTR. HTR potency was not correlated with either 5-HT 1A or 5-HT 2A receptor binding affinity, but a multiple regression analysis indicated that 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors make positive and negative contributions, respectively, to HTR potency (R 2  = 0.8729). In addition to supporting the established role of 5-HT 2A receptors in the HTR, these findings are consistent with evidence that 5-HT 1A activation by tryptamine hallucinogens buffers their effects on HTR. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 0 C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17β-[ 3 H]estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins

  13. Adrenergic Agonists Bind to Adrenergic-Receptor-Like Regions of the Mu Opioid Receptor, Enhancing Morphine and Methionine-Enkephalin Binding: A New Approach to “Biased Opioids”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Root-Bernstein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence demonstrates functional interactions between the adrenergic and opioid systems in a diversity of tissues and organs. While some effects are due to receptor and second messenger cross-talk, recent research has revealed an extracellular, allosteric opioid binding site on adrenergic receptors that enhances adrenergic activity and its duration. The present research addresses whether opioid receptors may have an equivalent extracellular, allosteric adrenergic binding site that has similar enhancing effects on opioid binding. Comparison of adrenergic and opioid receptor sequences revealed that these receptors share very significant regions of similarity, particularly in some of the extracellular and transmembrane regions associated with adrenergic binding in the adrenergic receptors. Five of these shared regions from the mu opioid receptor (muOPR were synthesized as peptides and tested for binding to adrenergic, opioid and control compounds using ultraviolet spectroscopy. Adrenergic compounds bound to several of these muOPR peptides with low micromolar affinity while acetylcholine, histamine and various adrenergic antagonists did not. Similar studies were then conducted with purified, intact muOPR with similar results. Combinations of epinephrine with methionine enkephalin or morphine increased the binding of both by about half a log unit. These results suggest that muOPR may be allosterically enhanced by adrenergic agonists.

  14. Analysis of binding centers in nicotinic receptors with the aid of synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasheverov, I E; Kryukova, E V; Kudryavtsev, D S; Ivanov, I A; Egorova, N V; Zhmak, M N; Spirova, E N; Shelukhina, I V; Odinokov, A V; Alfimov, M V; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-09-01

    We studies the receptor-binding specificity of the synthetic peptide HAP (High Affinity Peptide) and its analogues, which are regarded as a model of the orthosteric site nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using radioligand analysis, electrophysiology tests, and calcium imaging, we assessed the ability of HAP to interact with nAChR antagonists: long α-neurotoxins and α-conotoxins. A high affinity of HAP for α-bungarotoxin and the absence of its interaction with α-cobratoxin and α-conotoxins was found. The synthesized analogues of HAP in general retained the properties of the original peptide. Thus, HAP cannot be a model of a ligand-binding site.

  15. Structural proof of a dimeric positive modulator bridging two identical AMPA receptor-binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Birgitte Høiriis; Harpsøe, Kasper; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen

    2007-01-01

    have dramatically increased potencies, more than three orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding monomers. Dimer (R,R)-2a was cocrystallized with the GluR2-S1S2J construct, and an X-ray crystallographic analysis showed (R,R)-2a to bridge two identical binding pockets on two neighboring GluR2......Dimeric positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically in electrophysiological experiments. The designed compounds are dimers of arylpropylsulfonamides and have been constructed without a linker. The monomeric...... arylpropylsulfonamides were derived from known modulators and target the cyclothiazide-binding site at the AMPA receptors. The three stereoisomers--R,R, meso, and S,S--of the two constructed dimers were prepared, and in vitro testing showed the R,R forms to be the most potent stereoisomers. The biarylpropylsulfonamides...

  16. The molecular mechanism of leptin secretion and expression induced by aristolochic acid in kidney fibroblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptin is a peptide hormone playing pivotal role in regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Growing evidence has suggested the pro-inflammatory and fibrogenic properties of leptin. In addition, patients with renal fibrosis have higher level of plasma leptin, which was due to the increased leptin production. Aristolochic acid (AA is a botanical toxin characterized to associate with the development of renal fibrosis including tubulointerstitial fibrosis. However, whether leptin is upregulated to participate in AA-induced kidney fibrosis remain completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, leptin expression was increased by sublethal dose of AA in kidney fibroblast NRK49f determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. Data from real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that leptin was upregulated by AA at transcriptional level. DNA binding activity of CCAAT enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α, one of the transcription factors for leptin gene, was enhanced in DNA affinity precipitation assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. Knockdown of C/EBP α expression by small interfering RNA markedly reduced AA-induced leptin expression. Moreover, AA promoted Akt interaction with p-PDK1, and increased phosphorylated activation of Akt. Akt knockdown, and inhibition of Akt signaling by LY294002 and mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced leptin expression. Furthermore, treatment of LY294002 or rapamycin significantly suppressed AA-induced C/EBP α DNA-binding activity. These results suggest that Akt and C/EBP α activation were involved in AA-regulated leptin expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate the first that AA could induce secretion and expression of fibrogenic leptin in kidney fibroblasts, which reveal potential involvement of leptin in the progression of kidney fibrosis in aristolochic acid nephropathy.

  17. Leptin as regulator of pulmonary immune responses: involvement in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooy, Juanita H J; Ubags, Niki D J; Brusselle, Guy G; Tavernier, Jan; Suratt, Benjamin T; Joos, Guy F; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bracke, Ken R

    2013-08-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone, recognized as a critical mediator of the balance between food intake and energy expenditure by signalling through its functional receptor (Ob-Rb) in the hypothalamus. Structurally, leptin belongs to the long-chain helical cytokine family, and is now known to have pleiotropic functions in both innate and adaptive immunity. The presence of the functional leptin receptor in the lung together with evidence of increased airspace leptin levels arising during pulmonary inflammation, suggests an important role for leptin in lung development, respiratory immune responses and eventually pathogenesis of inflammatory respiratory diseases. The purpose of this article is to review our current understanding of leptin and its functional role on the different resident cell types of the lung in health as well as in the context of three major respiratory conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three...... specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor interfaces....... by introduction of three point mutations, R104H, L112Q, and M114T, into the binding pocket of Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (Ls-AChBP). Cocrystallization with two agonists possessing distinct pharmacologic profiles, NS3920 [1-(6-bromopyridin-3-yl)-1,4-diazepane] and NS3573 [1-(5-ethoxypyridin-3...

  19. ``In silico'' study of the binding of two novel antagonists to the nociceptin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Longa, Stefano; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2018-02-01

    Antagonists of the nociceptin receptor (NOP) are raising interest for their possible clinical use as antidepressant drugs. Recently, the structure of NOP in complex with some piperidine-based antagonists has been revealed by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a multi-flexible docking (MF-docking) procedure, i.e. docking to multiple receptor conformations extracted by preliminary molecular dynamics trajectories, together with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations have been carried out to provide the binding mode of two novel NOP antagonists, one of them selective (BTRX-246040, formerly named LY-2940094) and one non selective (AT-076), i.e. able to inactivate NOP as well as the classical µ- k- and δ-opioid receptors (MOP KOP and DOP). According to our results, the pivotal role of residue D1303,32 (upper indexes are Ballesteros-Weinstein notations) is analogous to that enlighten by the already known X-ray structures of opioid receptors: binding of the molecules are predicted to require a slight readjustment of the hydrophobic pocket (residues Y1313,33, M1343,36, I2195,43, Q2806,52 and V2836,55) in the orthosteric site of NOP, accommodating either the pyridine-pyrazole (BTRX-246040) or the isoquinoline (AT-076) moiety of the ligand, in turn allowing the protonated piperidine nitrogen to maximize interaction (salt-bridge) with residue D1303,32 of the NOP, and the aromatic head to be sandwiched in optimal π-stacking between Y1313,33 and M1343,36. The QM/MM optimization after the MF-docking procedure has provided the more likely conformations for the binding to the NOP receptor of BTRX-246040 and AT-076, based on different pharmacophores and exhibiting different selectivity profiles. While the high selectivity for NOP of BTRX-246040 can be explained by interactions with NOP specific residues, the lack of selectivity of AT-076 could be associated to its ability to penetrate into the deep hydrophobic pocket of NOP, while retaining a

  20. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  1. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  2. The Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and regulates cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Horner, Michael A.; Pardee, Keith; Liu, Suya; King-Jones, Kirst; Lajoie, Gilles; Edwards, Aled; Krause, Henry M.; Thummel, Carl S.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis is required to maintain normal cellular function and avoid the deleterious effects of hypercholesterolemia. Here we show that the Drosophila DHR96 nuclear receptor binds cholesterol and is required for the coordinate transcriptional response of genes that are regulated by cholesterol and involved in cholesterol uptake, trafficking, and storage. DHR96 mutants die when grown on low levels of cholesterol and accumulate excess cholesterol when maintained on a high-choleste...

  3. Insulin-Insulin-like Growth Factors Hybrids as Molecular Probes of Hormone:Receptor Binding Specificity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, Květoslava; Chrudinová, Martina; Povalová, Anna; Selicharová, Irena; Collinsová, Michaela; Vaněk, Václav; Brzozowski, A. M.; Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 21 (2016), s. 2903-2913 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alanine scanning mutagenesis * high-affinity binding * type 1 IGF receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.biochem.6b00140

  4. CINPA1 binds directly to constitutive androstane receptor and inhibits its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Chai, Sergio C; Wright, William C; Singh, Aman; Alexandra Casal, Morgan; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Lee, Richard E; Griffin, Patrick R; Chen, Taosheng

    2018-03-31

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that regulate the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters. CAR activation promotes drug elimination, thereby reducing therapeutic effectiveness, or causes adverse drug effects via toxic metabolites. CAR inhibitors could be used to attenuate these adverse drug effects. CAR and PXR share ligands and target genes, confounding the understanding of the regulation of receptor-specific activity. We previously identified a small-molecule inhibitor, CINPA1, that inhibits CAR (without activating PXR at lower concentrations) by altering CAR-coregulator interactions and reducing CAR recruitment to DNA response elements of regulated genes. However, solid evidence was not presented for the direct binding of CINPA1 to CAR. In this study, we demonstrate direct interaction of CINPA1 with the CAR ligand-binding domain (CAR-LBD) and identify key residues involved in such interactions through a combination of biophysical and computational methods. We found that CINPA1 resides in the ligand-binding pocket to stabilize the CAR-LBD in a more rigid, less fluid state. Molecular dynamics simulations, together with our previously reported docking model, enabled us to predict which CAR residues were critical for interactions with CINPA1. The importance of these residues for CINPA1 binding were then validated by directed mutations and testing the mutant CAR proteins in transcription reporter and coregulatory interaction assays. We demonstrated strong hydrogen bonding of CINPA1 with N165 and H203 and identified other residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with CINPA1. Overall, our data confirm that CINPA1 directly binds to CAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ubiquitin-coated nanodiamonds bind to autophagy receptors for entry into the selective autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Qiu, Wei-Ru; Naveen Raj, Emmanuel; Liu, Huei-Fang; Huang, Hou-Syun; Lin, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chien-Jen; Chen, Ting-Hua; Chen, Chinpiao; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chao, Jui-I

    2017-01-02

    Selective macroautophagy/autophagy plays a pivotal role in the processing of foreign pathogens and cellular components to maintain homeostasis in human cells. To date, numerous studies have demonstrated the uptake of nanoparticles by cells, but their intracellular processing through selective autophagy remains unclear. Here we show that carbon-based nanodiamonds (NDs) coated with ubiquitin (Ub) bind to autophagy receptors (SQSTM1 [sequestosome 1], OPTN [optineurin], and CALCOCO2/NDP52 [calcium binding and coiled-coil domain 2]) and are then linked to MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) for entry into the selective autophagy pathway. NDs are ultimately delivered to lysosomes. Ectopically expressed SQSTM1-green fluorescence protein (GFP) could bind to the Ub-coated NDs. By contrast, the Ub-associated domain mutant of SQSTM1 (ΔUBA)-GFP did not bind to the Ub-coated NDs. Chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, prevented the ND-containing autophagosomes from fusing with lysosomes. Furthermore, autophagy receptors OPTN and CALCOCO2/NDP52, involved in the processing of bacteria, were found to be involved in the selective autophagy of NDs. However, ND particles located in the lysosomes of cells did not induce mitotic blockage, senescence, or cell death. Single ND clusters in the lysosomes of cells were observed in the xenografted human lung tumors of nude mice. This study demonstrated for the first time that Ub-coated nanoparticles bind to autophagy receptors for entry into the selective autophagy pathway, facilitating their delivery to lysosomes.

  6. Form, symmetry and packing of biomacromolecules. III. Antigenic, receptor and contact binding sites in picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A

    2011-03-01

    The relation between serotype differentiation and crystallographic symmetry, revealed by the contact fingerprint diagrams investigated in Part II [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 312-326] for the human rhinovirus, is extended to the Picornaviridae family. The approach, outlined in Part I [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 301-311] and Part II for biomacromolecules packed in a crystal and based on concepts such as packing lattice, kissing points and crystal-packing parameters, can directly be applied to the picornaviruses. In particular, the contact fingerprint diagrams of 20 different virus strains have been derived. In these cases, as for the rhinovirus, these diagrams are serotype/strain specific, justifying the name fingerprint. The molecular basis for the serotype variability, and the associated conservation requirements, is usually analysed by considering antigenic sites, where capsid residues bind with antibodies, and receptor sites, where other residues bind with molecular receptors of the host cell membrane. Both the antigenic variation and the receptor conservation allow repeated infection of the host cells of the given animals. The graphical description of these sites is usually done by footprints and roadmap diagrams, mapping properties of the capsid surface and using the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid. The alternative fingerprint diagrammatic description, based on the crystal symmetry, adopted in Part II for the contact sites, where a capsid is bound to the next one in the crystal packing, is extended to the antigenic and receptor binding sites. Again, the antigenic/receptor fingerprints are specific, at least for the nine picornaviruses investigated so far, despite the more than a factor of ten larger coarse graining with respect to the corresponding footprint and roadmap diagrams. The latter are based on a grid spacing of about 2 Å, whereas the spacing implied by the packing-lattice approximation adopted in fingerprints varies typically from 20 to

  7. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor: Molecular Mechanism of Ligand Binding and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Carpenter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise the P1 class of purinergic receptors and belong to the largest family of integral membrane proteins in the human genome, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. ARs are classified into four subtypes, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, which are all activated by extracellular adenosine, and play central roles in a broad range of physiological processes, including sleep regulation, angiogenesis and modulation of the immune system. ARs are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathophysiological conditions, including sleep disorders, cancer, and dementia, which has made them important targets for structural biology. Over a decade of research and innovation has culminated with the publication of more than 30 crystal structures of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR, making it one of the best structurally characterized GPCRs at the atomic level. In this review we analyze the structural data reported for A2AR that described for the first time the binding of mode of antagonists, including newly developed drug candidates, synthetic and endogenous agonists, sodium ions and an engineered G protein. These structures have revealed the key conformational changes induced upon agonist and G protein binding that are central to signal transduction by A2AR, and have highlighted both similarities and differences in the activation mechanism of this receptor compared to other class A GPCRs. Finally, comparison of A2AR with the recently solved structures of A1R has provided the first structural insight into the molecular determinants of ligand binding specificity in different AR subtypes.

  8. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependant manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE 2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE 2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE 2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin

  9. Binding and uptake of transferrin-bound liposomes targeted to transferrin receptors of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinea, Manuela; Dragomir, Elena; Manduteanu, Ileana; Simionescu, Maya

    2002-07-01

    The use of liposomes as carriers for site-specific delivery is an attractive strategy, especially for the vascular endothelium that by position is an accessible target for drug and gene delivery via the blood circulation. The aim of this study was to detect whether liposomes coupled to transferrin (Tf)-bound and are taken up by aortic endothelial cells (EC) following the pathway of Tf interaction with transferrin receptors, reportedly expressed on their cell membrane. To this purpose, small unilamellar liposomes of different compositions, either classical (C) or sterically stabilized (SS), have been prepared, characterized and coupled with transferrin (Tf-liposomes). To assess the binding and uptake, cultured EC were incubated with fluorescently labelled Tf-liposomes for various times intervals (from 5 min to 24 h) at 4 and 37 degrees C, and further investigated by flow cytometry, fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that: (i) binding of Tf-liposomes to EC was specific; (ii) the EC binding of SS-Tf-liposomes was lower than that of C-Tf-liposomes; and (iii) after 30 min of incubation, both C- and SS-Tf-liposomes appeared localized in the acidic compartments of the cells. Together, the data indicate that transferrin-bound liposomes are specifically taken up by EC by a receptor-mediated mechanism employing the pathway of surface-exposed Tf receptors.

  10. Structural Determinants for the Binding of Morphinan Agonists to the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Cong

    Full Text Available Atomistic descriptions of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR noncovalently binding with two of its prototypical morphinan agonists, morphine (MOP and hydromorphone (HMP, are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Subtle differences between the binding modes and hydration properties of MOP and HMP emerge from the calculations. Alchemical free energy perturbation calculations show qualitative agreement with in vitro experiments performed in this work: indeed, the binding free energy difference between MOP and HMP computed by forward and backward alchemical transformation is 1.2±1.1 and 0.8±0.8 kcal/mol, respectively, to be compared with 0.4±0.3 kcal/mol from experiment. Comparison with an MD simulation of μOR covalently bound with the antagonist β-funaltrexamine hints to agonist-induced conformational changes associated with an early event of the receptor's activation: a shift of the transmembrane helix 6 relative to the transmembrane helix 3 and a consequent loss of the key R165-T279 interhelical hydrogen bond. This finding is consistent with a previous proposal suggesting that the R165-T279 hydrogen bond between these two helices indicates an inactive receptor conformation.

  11. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  12. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  13. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  14. The development of a high-content screening binding assay for the smoothened receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Weilin Tiger; Xie, Wensheng; Truong, Maggie; Will, Matthew; Turunen, Brandon; Zuercher, William J; McMillan, Lynette; Li, Hu; Hornberger, Keith R; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Ames, Robert S; Kallal, Lorena A

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the development of an image-based high-content screening (HCS) binding assay for the seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptor Smoothened (Smo) is described. Using BacMam-based gene delivery of Smo, BODIPY-cyclopamine as a fluorescent probe, and a confocal imaging system, a robust 384-well assay that could be used for high-throughput compound profiling activities was developed. The statistically robust HCS binding assay was developed through optimization of multiple parameters, including cell transduction conditions, Smo expression levels, the image analysis algorithm, and staining procedures. Evaluation of structurally diverse compounds, including functional Smo activators, inhibitors, and related analogs, demonstrated good compound potency correlations between high-content imaging binding, membrane fluorescence polarization binding, and gene reporter assays. Statistical analysis of data from a screening test set of compounds at a single 10-µM concentration suggested that the high-content imaging Smo binding assay is amenable for use in hit identification. The 384-well HCS assay was rapidly developed and met statistical assay performance targets, thus demonstrating its utility as a fluorescent whole-cell binding assay suitable for compound screening and profiling.

  15. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta 8 THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta- 8 THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [ 3 H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta- 8 THC ([ 3 H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [ 3 H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [ 3 H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  16. Adenovirus coxsackie adenovirus receptor-mediated binding to human erythrocytes does not preclude systemic transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, L A; Moreno, R; Calderón, H; Alemany, R

    2016-12-01

    There is great skepticism in the capability of adenovirus vectors and oncolytic adenoviruses to reach specific organs or tumors upon systemic administration. Besides antibodies, the presence of CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor) in human erythrocytes has been postulated to sequester CAR-binding adenoviruses, commonly used in gene therapy and oncolytic applications. The use of non-CAR-binding fibers or serotypes has been postulated to solve this limitation. Given the lack of integrins in erythrocytes and therefore of internalization of the CAR-bound virus, we hypothesized that the interaction of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) with CAR in human erythrocytes could be reversible. In this work, we have studied the effects of Ad5 interaction with human erythrocytes via CAR. Although erythrocyte binding was observed, it did not reduce viral transduction of tumor cells in vitro after long-term incubations. Transplantation of human erythrocytes into nude mice did not reduce Ad5 extravasation and transduction of liver and human xenograft tumors after systemic administration. These findings indicate that despite human erythrocytes are able to bind to Ad5, this binding is reversible and does not prevent extravasation and organ transduction after systemic delivery. Thus, the poor bioavailability of systemically delivered CAR-binding adenoviruses in humans is likely due to other factors such as liver sequestration or neutralizing antibodies.

  17. Modelling of the binding site of the human m1 muscarinic receptor: Experimental validation and refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Hélène; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Schreuder, Herman; Hoflack, , Jan; Hibert, Marcel; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1997-07-01

    Our model of the human m1 muscarinic receptor has been refined on the basis of the recently published projection map of bovine rhodopsin. The refined model has a slightly different helix arrangement, which reveals the presence of an extra hydrophobic pocket located between helices 3, 4 and 5. The interaction of series of agonists and antagonists with the m1 muscarinic receptor has been studied experimentally by site-directed mutagenesis. In order to account for the observed results, three-dimensional models of m1 ligands docked in the target receptor are proposed. Qualitatively, the obtained models are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Agonists and partial agonists have a relatively small size. They can bind to the same region of the receptor using, however, different anchoring receptor residues. Antagonists are usually larger molecules, filling almost completely the same pocket as agonists. They can usually produce much stronger interactions with aromatic residues. Experimental data combined with molecular modelling studies highlight how subtle and diverse receptor-ligand interactions could be.

  18. Molecular cloning, characterization and evolutionary analysis of leptin gene in Chinese giant salamander, Andrias davidianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Hai-feng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is an important hormone possessing diverse physiological roles in mammals and teleosts. However, it has been characterized only in a few amphibian species, and its evolutions are still under debate. Here, the full length of the leptin (Adlep cDNA of Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus, an early diverging amphibian species, is characterized and according to the results of the primary sequence analysis, tertiary structure reconstruction and phylogenetic analysis is confirmed to be an ortholog of mammalian leptin. An intron was identified between the coding exons of A. davidianus leptin, which indicated that the leptin is present in the salamander genome and contains a conserved gene structure in vertebrates. Adlep is widely distributed but expression levels vary among different tissues, with highest expression levels in the muscle. Additionally, the leptin receptor and other genes were mapped to three known leptin signaling pathways, suggesting that the leptin signaling pathways are present in A. davidianus. Phylogenetic topology of leptins are consistent with the generally accepted evolutionary relationships of vertebrates, and multiple leptin members found in teleosts seem to be obtained through a Cluopeocephala-specific gene duplication event. Our results will lay a foundation for further investigations into the physiological roles of leptin in A. davidianus.

  19. Enhanced pulmonary leptin expression in patients with severe COPD and asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooy, J H J; Drummen, N E A; van Suylen, R J; Cloots, R H E; Möller, G M; Bracke, K R; Zuyderduyn, S; Dentener, M A; Brusselle, G G; Hiemstra, P S; Wouters, E F M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by an abnormal inflammatory reaction of the lungs involving activation of epithelial cells. Leptin is a pleiotropic cytokine important in the regulation of immune responses via its functional receptor Ob-Rb. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that severe COPD is associated with increased leptin expression in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry for leptin was performed on peripheral lung specimens from 20 patients with COPD (GOLD stage 4), 14 asymptomatic ex-smokers and 13 never smokers. Leptin and Ob-Rb mRNA expression were determined by rtPCR in cultured primary bronchial epithelial cells and primary type II pneumocytes. NCI-H292 and A549 cell lines were used to study functional activation of leptin signalling. Leptin immunoreactivity in lung tissue was observed in bronchial epithelial cells, type II pneumocytes, macrophages (tissue/alveolar) and interstitial lymphocytic infiltrates. rtPCR analysis confirmed pulmonary leptin and Ob-Rb mRNA expression in primary bronchial epithelial cells and pneumocytes. Leptin-expressing bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages were markedly higher in patients with severe COPD and ex-smokers than in never smokers (pleptin and Ob-Rb (pLeptin induced phosphorylation of STAT3 in both NCI-H292 and A549 cells. Leptin expression is increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages of ex-smokers with or without severe COPD compared with never smokers. A functional leptin signalling pathway is present in lung epithelial cells.

  20. Comparitive Study of Serum Leptin Levels in Diabetic Obese Patients and Non-Diabetic Obese Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    M Afkhami-Ardakani; J Mohiti-Ardakani; H Sedghi

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Leptin was first discovered from the "Ob Gene" by Friedwan and co-workers in 1994. It is a small peptide with 167 amino acids and molecular weight of 16 Kd . It is secreted by adipose tissues. Leptin has two type of receptors in Hypothalamus and other tissues including muscles, liver and intestines. Leptin inhibits neuropeptide Y resulting in decreased appetite and on the other hand increases the basic metabolic rate of the body resulting in homeostasis of body energy. Insulin v...

  1. Effect of receptor binding specificity on the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of influenza virus A H1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Cao, Weiping; Pappas, Claudia; Liu, Feng; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2018-01-01

    The biological basis for the poor immunogenicity of unadjuvanted avian influenza A virus vaccines in mammals is not well understood. Here, we mutated the hemagglutinin (HA) of two H1N1 virus vaccines to determine whether virus receptor binding specificity contributes to the low immunogenicity of avian influenza virus vaccines. Mutations were introduced into the HA of an avian influenza virus, A/Duck/New York/15024–21/96 (Dk/96) which switched the binding preference from α2,3- to α2,6-linked sialic acid (SA). A switch in receptor specificity of the human A/South Carolina/1/18 (SC/18) virus generated a mutant virus with α2,3 SA (avian) binding preference. Inactivated vaccines were generated and administered to mice and ferrets intramuscularly. We found that the vaccines with human receptor binding preference induced slightly higher antibody titers and cell-mediated immune responses compared to their isogenic viruses with avian receptor binding specificity. Upon challenge with DK/96 or SC18 virus, differences in lung virus titers between the vaccine groups with different receptor-binding specificities were minimal. Overall, our data suggest that receptor binding specificity contributes only marginally to the immunogenicity of avian influenza vaccines and that other factors may also be involved. PMID:25078114

  2. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  3. Histamine type I (H1) receptor radioligand binding studies on normal T cell subsets, B cells, and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, W.; Doyle, K.; Rocklin, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A single, specific binding site for [ 3 H]pyrilamine on normal human T helper, T suppressor, B cells, and monocytes was documented. The binding of the radioligand to its receptor is reversible with cold H 1 antagonist, saturates at 40 to 60 nM, and binding equilibrium is achieved in 2 to 4 min. Using a computer program (Ligand), the authors calculated the dissociation constants, binding capacities, and numbers of receptors per cell for each of the different cell types. Monocytes were found to have the highest affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine, followed by T helper cells, B cells and T suppressor cells (K/sub D/ = 44.6 +/- 49.4 nM). T suppressor cells were found to express the higher number of H 1 receptors per cell followed by B cells, T helper cells, and monocytes. The binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine increased over a 48-hr period, whereas the number of receptors per T cell was essentially unchanged. In contrast, T cells stimulated with Con A or PHA were shown to have a greater than fourfold increase in the number of receptors per cell, whereas the binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine decreased over the 48-hr period. Although the function of H 1 receptors on T cells, B cells, and monocytes has not been completely defined, this receptor has the potential of playing an important role in the modulating the immune response

  4. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding is increased in patients with Tourette's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugbøl, Steven; Pinborg, Lars H.; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data have suggested that abnormalities in the serotonergic neurotransmissions in frontal-subcortical circuits are involved in Tourette's syndrome. To test the hypothesis that the brain's 5-HT2A receptor binding is increased in patients with Tourette's syndrome, PET imaging...... was performed. Twenty adults with Tourette's syndrome and 20 healthy control subjects were investigated with PET-[18F]altanserin using a bolus-infusion protocol. Regions of interest were delineated automatically on co-registered MRI images, and partial volume-corrected binding parameters were extracted from...... the PET images. Comparison between control subjects and Tourette's syndrome patients showed increased specific [18F]altanserin binding, not only in the a-priori selected brain regions hypothesized to be involved in Tourette's syndrome, but also post-hoc analysis showed a global up-regulation when testing...

  5. Ligand Binding Affinities of Arctigenin and Its Demethylated Metabolites to Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Hattori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (−-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (−-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL by Eubacterium (E. sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (−-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (−-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC50 value of (2R,3R-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10−4 M.

  6. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  7. New insights into the GABAA receptor structure and orthosteric ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Frølund, Bente Flensborg; Bruun, Anne Techau

    2011-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A) Rs) are ligand gated chloride ion channels that mediate overall inhibitory signaling in the CNS. A detailed understanding of their structure is important to gain insights in, e.g., ligand binding and functional properties of this pharmaceutically important target....... Homology modeling is a necessary tool in this regard because experimentally determined structures are lacking. Here we present an exhaustive approach for creating a high quality model of the a(1) ß(2) ¿(2) subtype of the GABA(A) R ligand binding domain, and we demonstrate its usefulness in understanding......, and its stability in molecular dynamics (MD) compared with that of the two homologous crystal structures. We then combined the model with extensive structure-activity relationships available from two homologous series of orthosteric GABA(A) R antagonists to create a detailed hypothesis for their binding...

  8. Identification of novel allosteric modulator binding sites in NMDA receptors: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Lucas T; Costa, Blaise M

    2015-09-01

    The dysfunction of N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a subtype of glutamate receptors, is correlated with schizophrenia, stroke, and many other neuropathological disorders. However, not all NMDAR subtypes equally contribute towards these disorders. Since NMDARs composed of different GluN2 subunits (GluN2A-D) confer varied physiological properties and have different distributions in the brain, pharmacological agents that target NMDARs with specific GluN2 subunits have significant potential for therapeutic applications. In our previous research, we have identified a family of novel allosteric modulators that differentially potentiate and/or inhibit NMDARs of differing GluN2 subunit composition. To further elucidate their molecular mechanisms, in the present study, we have identified four potential binding sites for novel allosteric modulators by performing molecular modeling, docking, and in silico mutations. The molecular determinants of the modulator binding sites (MBS), analysis of particular MBS electrostatics, and the specific loss or gain of binding after mutations have revealed modulators that have strong potential affinities for specific MBS on given subunits and the role of key amino acids in either promoting or obstructing modulator binding. These findings will help design higher affinity GluN2 subunit-selective pharmaceuticals, which are currently unavailable to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Receptor binding and cell-mediated metabolism of [125I]monoiodoglucagon by isolated canine hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagopian, W.A.; Tager, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    A reverse-phase HPLC method has been developed to purify 125 I-labeled products resulting from the chloramine-T-based iodination of glucagon. In addition the products [( 125 I)iodoTyr 10 13 ]glucagon, [( 125 I)iodoTyr 13 ]glucagon, and [( 125 I)iodoTyr 10 ]glucagon) have been used to study the receptor binding of glucagon and the cell-mediated metabolism of the hormone by isolated canine hepatocytes. It was concluded that (a) not withstanding apparent differences in affinities exhibited by the three peptides, the interactions with the glucagon receptor are functionally equivalent, and (b) the cell-mediated metabolism of receptor-bound glucagon involves the formation of hormone-derived peptides in which the biologically important NH 2 -terminal region of the hormone has been modified by limited proteolytic cleavage

  10. Structural combination of established 5-HT(2A) receptor ligands: new aspects of the binding mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Vasko; Herth, Matthias M; Santini, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    MH.MZ, MDL 100907, and altanserin are structurally similar 4-benzoyl-piperidine derivatives and are well accommodated to receptor interaction models. We combined structural elements of different high-affinity and selective 5-HT(2A) antagonists, as MH.MZ, altanserin, and SR 46349B, to improve......) with a moderate affinity toward the 5-HT(2A) receptor (K(i) = 57 nm). The remarkably reduced affinity of other compounds (4a), (4b), and (4c) (K(i) = 411, 360 and 356 nm respectively) indicates that MH.MZ can only bind to the 5-HT(2A) receptor with the p-fluorophenylethyl residue in a sterically restricted...

  11. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  12. Sexually dimorphic development and binding characteristics of NMDA receptors in the brain of the platyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Yablonsky-Alter, E.; Banerjee, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated age- and gender-specific variations in properties of the glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in a freshwater teleost, the platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus). Prior localization of the immunoreactive (ir)-R1 subunit of the NMDAR protein (R1) in cells of the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a primary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus in the platyfish, suggests that NMDAR, as in mammals, is involved in modulation of the platyfish brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis. The current study shows that the number of cells in the NOR displaying ir-R1 is significantly increased in pubescent and mature female platyfish when compared to immature and senescent animals. In males, there is no significant change in ir-R1 expression in the NOR at any time in their lifespan. The affinity of the noncompetitive antagonist ((3)H)MK-801 for the NMDAR is significantly increased in pubescent females while maximum binding of ((3)H)MK-801 to the receptor reaches a significant maximum in mature females. In males, both MK-801 affinity and maximum binding remain unchanged throughout development. This is the first report of gender differences in the association of NMDA receptors with neuroendocrine brain areas during development. It is also the first report to suggest NMDA receptor involvement in the development of the BPG axis in a nonmammalian vertebrate. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Leptin Enhances NR2B-mediated NMDA Responses Via a MAPK-dependent Process in Cerebellar Granule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, A. J.; Wallace, L; Durakoglugil, D; Harvey, J.

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that the hormone leptin regulates energy balance via its actions in the hypothalamus. However, evidence is accumulating that leptin plays a key role in numerous CNS functions. Indeed, leptin receptors are expressed in many extrahypothalamic brain regions, with high levels found in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In the hippocampus, leptin has been shown to facilitate NMDA receptor function and modulate synaptic plasticity. A role for leptin in cerebellar function is also indicated as leptin-deficient rodents display reduced mobility that is unrelated to obesity. Here we show that leptin receptor immunolabeling can be detected in cultured cerebellar granule cells, being expressed at the somatic plasma membrane and also concentrated at synapses. Furthermore, leptin facilitated NR2B NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in cerebellar granule cells via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway. These findings provide the first direct evidence for a cellular action of leptin in cerebellar neurons. In addition, given that NMDA receptor activity in the cerebellum is crucial for normal locomotor function, these data also have important implications for the potential role of leptin in the control of movement. PMID:16413128

  14. Structural Basis of Native CXCL7 Monomer Binding to CXCR2 Receptor N-Domain and Glycosaminoglycan Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CXCL7, a chemokine highly expressed in platelets, orchestrates neutrophil recruitment during thrombosis and related pathophysiological processes by interacting with CXCR2 receptor and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG. CXCL7 exists as monomers and dimers, and dimerization (~50 μM and CXCR2 binding (~10 nM constants indicate that CXCL7 is a potent agonist as a monomer. Currently, nothing is known regarding the structural basis by which receptor and GAG interactions mediate CXCL7 function. Using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the binding of CXCL7 monomer to the CXCR2 N-terminal domain (CXCR2Nd that constitutes a critical docking site and to GAG heparin. We found that CXCR2Nd binds a hydrophobic groove and that ionic interactions also play a role in mediating binding. Heparin binds a set of contiguous basic residues indicating a prominent role for ionic interactions. Modeling studies reveal that the binding interface is dynamic and that GAG adopts different binding geometries. Most importantly, several residues involved in GAG binding are also involved in receptor interactions, suggesting that GAG-bound monomer cannot activate the receptor. Further, this is the first study that describes the structural basis of receptor and GAG interactions of a native monomer of the neutrophil-activating chemokine family.

  15. Correlation of the leptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finucane, F; Luan, J; Wareham, N

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Obesity is the dominant cause of insulin resistance. In adult humans it is characterised by a combination of adipocyte hypertrophy and, to a lesser extent, adipocyte hyperplasia. As hypertrophic adipocytes secrete more leptin and less adiponectin, the plasma leptin......:adiponectin ratio (LAR) has been proposed as a potentially useful measure of insulin resistance and vascular risk. We sought to assess the usefulness of the LAR as a measure of insulin resistance in non-diabetic white adults. METHODS: Leptin and adiponectin levels were measured in 2,097 non-diabetic individuals...... from the Ely and European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR) Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Risk (RISC) study cohorts. LAR was compared with fasting insulin and HOMA-derived insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) in all individuals and with the insulin sensitivity index...

  16. Acetylcholine promotes binding of α-conotoxin MII at α3 β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambasivarao, Somisetti V; Roberts, Jessica; Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Slingsby, Jason G; Rohleder, Conrad; Mallory, Chris; Groome, James R; McDougal, Owen M; Maupin, C Mark

    2014-02-10

    α-Conotoxin MII (α-CTxMII) is a 16-residue peptide with the sequence GCCSNPVCHLEHSNLC, containing Cys2-Cys8 and Cys3-Cys16 disulfide bonds. This peptide, isolated from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus magus, is a potent and selective antagonist of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). To evaluate the impact of channel-ligand interactions on ligand-binding affinity, homology models of the heteropentameric α3β2-nAChR were constructed. The models were created in MODELLER with the aid of experimentally characterized structures of the Torpedo marmorata-nAChR (Tm-nAChR, PDB ID: 2BG9) and the Aplysia californica-acetylcholine binding protein (Ac-AChBP, PDB ID: 2BR8) as templates for the α3- and β2-subunit isoforms derived from rat neuronal nAChR primary amino acid sequences. Molecular docking calculations were performed with AutoDock to evaluate interactions of the heteropentameric nAChR homology models with the ligands acetylcholine (ACh) and α-CTxMII. The nAChR homology models described here bind ACh with binding energies commensurate with those of previously reported systems, and identify critical interactions that facilitate both ACh and α-CTxMII ligand binding. The docking calculations revealed an increased binding affinity of the α3β2-nAChR for α-CTxMII with ACh bound to the receptor, and this was confirmed through two-electrode voltage clamp experiments on oocytes from Xenopus laevis. These findings provide insights into the inhibition and mechanism of electrostatically driven antagonist properties of the α-CTxMIIs on nAChRs. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Specificity of Signal-Binding via Non-AHL LuxR-Type Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a typical communication system among Gram-negative bacteria used to control group-coordinated behavior via small diffusible molecules dependent on cell number. The key components of a quorum sensing system are a LuxI-type synthase, producing acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signaling molecules, and a LuxR-type receptor that detects AHLs to control expression of specific target genes. Six conserved amino acids are present in the signal-binding domain of AHL-sensing LuxR-type proteins, which are important for ligand-binding and -specificity as well as shaping the ligand-binding pocket. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR-type regulators without a cognate LuxI synthase, referred to as LuxR solos. The two LuxR solos PluR and PauR from Photorhabdus luminescens and Photorhabdus asymbiotica, respectively, do not sense AHLs. Instead PluR and PauR sense alpha-pyrones and dialkylresorcinols, respectively, and are part of cell-cell communication systems contributing to the overall virulence of these Photorhabdus species. However, PluR and PauR both harbor substitutions in the conserved amino acid motif compared to that in AHL sensors, which appeared to be important for binding the corresponding signaling molecules. Here we analyze the role of the conserved amino acids in the signal-binding domain of these two non-AHL LuxR-type receptors for their role in signal perception. Our studies reveal that the conserved amino acid motif alone is essential but not solely responsible for ligand-binding.

  18. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-01-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17β to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17α-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ERα subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17β, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17α-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the α subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  19. Leptin effects on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokhbehsaim, Marjan; Keser, Sema; Nogueira, Andressa Vilas Boas; Jäger, Andreas; Jepsen, Søren; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Bourauel, Christoph; Eick, Sigrun; Deschner, James

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is increasing throughout the globe and characterized by excess adipose tissue, which represents a complex endocrine organ. Adipose tissue secrets bioactive molecules called adipokines, which act at endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine levels. Obesity has recently been shown to be associated with periodontitis, a disease characterized by the irreversible destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, that is, periodontium, and also with compromised periodontal healing. Although the underlying mechanisms for these associations are not clear yet, increased levels of proinflammatory adipokines, such as leptin, as found in obese individuals, might be a critical pathomechanistic link. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of leptin on the regenerative capacity of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and also to study the local leptin production by these cells. Leptin caused a significant downregulation of growth (TGFβ1, and VEGFA) and transcription (RUNX2) factors as well as matrix molecules (collagen, and periostin) and inhibited SMAD signaling under regenerative conditions. Moreover, the local expression of leptin and its full-length receptor was significantly downregulated by inflammatory, microbial, and biomechanical signals. This study demonstrates that the hormone leptin negatively interferes with the regenerative capacity of PDL cells, suggesting leptin as a pathomechanistic link between obesity and compromised periodontal healing.

  20. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats

    2007-01-01

    and EmtinB directly stimulated neurite outgrowth and promoted survival in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, expression and surface localization of megalin, a known MT receptor, and the related lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) are demonstrated in cerebellar...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...... to surface receptors belonging to the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, such as megalin and LRP, thereby activating signal transduction pathways resulting in neurite outgrowth and survival....

  1. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a membrane protein comprised of three extracellular domains. In order to study the importance of this domain organization in the ligand-binding process of the receptor we subjected a recombinant, soluble uPAR (suPAR) to specific proteolytic...

  2. A characteristic back support structure in the bisphenol A-binding pocket in the human nuclear receptor