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Sample records for leprosy patients suggested

  1. Leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Diana NJ

    2007-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, primarily affecting the peripheral nerves and skin. The World Health Organization field leprosy classification is based on the number of skin lesions: single lesion leprosy (1 lesion), paucibacillary leprosy (2-5 skin lesions), and multibacillary leprosy (> 5 skin lesions).Worldwide, about 720 000 new cases of leprosy are reported each year, and about 2 million people have leprosy related disabilities.

  2. Physical distance, genetic relationship, age, and leprosy classification are independent risk factors for leprosy in contacts of patients with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moet, F Johannes; Pahan, David; Schuring, Ron P; Oskam, Linda; Richardus, Jan H

    2006-02-01

    Close contacts of patients with leprosy have a higher risk of developing leprosy. Several risk factors have been identified, including genetic relationship and physical distance. Their independent contributions to the risk of developing leprosy, however, have never been sufficiently quantified. Logistic-regression analysis was performed on intake data from a prospective cohort study of 1037 patients newly diagnosed as having leprosy and their 21,870 contacts. Higher age showed an increased risk, with a bimodal distribution. Contacts of patients with paucibacillary (PB) leprosy with 2-5 lesions (PB2-5) and those with multibacillary (MB) leprosy had a higher risk than did contacts of patients with single-lesion PB leprosy. The core household group had a higher risk than other contacts living under the same roof and next-door neighbors, who again had a higher risk than neighbors of neighbors. A close genetic relationship indicated an increased risk when blood-related children, parents, and siblings were pooled together. Age of the contact, the disease classification of the index patient, and physical and genetic distance were independently associated with the risk of a contact acquiring leprosy. Contact surveys in leprosy should be not only focused on household contacts but also extended to neighbors and consanguineous relatives, especially when the patient has PB2-5 or MB leprosy.

  3. Blood coagulation abnormalities in multibacillary leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Débora Santos da; Teixeira, Lisandra Antonia Castro; Beghini, Daniela Gois; Ferreira, André Teixeira da Silva; Pinho, Márcia de Berredo Moreira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Ribeiro, Marli Rambaldi; Freire, Monica Di Calafiori; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Tovar, Ana Maria Freire; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Perales, Jonas; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Esquenazi, Danuza; Monteiro, Robson Queiroz; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2018-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection. In 2016, more than 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world, representing the most frequent cause of infectious irreversible deformities and disabilities. In the present work, we demonstrate a consistent procoagulant profile on 40 reactional and non-reactional multibacillary leprosy patients. A retrospective analysis in search of signs of coagulation abnormalities among 638 leprosy patients identified 35 leprosy patients (5.48%) which displayed a characteristic lipid-like clot formed between blood clot and serum during serum harvesting, herein named 'leprosum clot'. Most of these patients (n = 16, 45.7%) belonged to the lepromatous leprosy pole of the disease. In addition, formation of the leprosum clot was directly correlated with increased plasma levels of soluble tissue factor and von Willebrand factor. High performance thin layer chromatography demonstrated a high content of neutral lipids in the leprosum clot, and proteomic analysis demonstrated that the leprosum clot presented in these patients is highly enriched in fibrin. Remarkably, differential 2D-proteomics analysis between leprosum clots and control clots identified two proteins present only in leprosy patients clots: complement component 3 and 4 and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family heavy chain-related protein (IHRP). In agreement with those observations we demonstrated that M. leprae induces hepatocytes release of IHRP in vitro. We demonstrated that leprosy MB patients develop a procoagulant status due to high levels of plasmatic fibrinogen, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, von Willebrand factor and soluble tissue factor. We propose that some of these components, fibrinogen for example, presents potential as predictive biomarkers of leprosy reactions, generating tools for earlier diagnosis and treatment of these events.

  4. Blood coagulation abnormalities in multibacillary leprosy patients.

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    Débora Santos da Silva

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection. In 2016, more than 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world, representing the most frequent cause of infectious irreversible deformities and disabilities.In the present work, we demonstrate a consistent procoagulant profile on 40 reactional and non-reactional multibacillary leprosy patients. A retrospective analysis in search of signs of coagulation abnormalities among 638 leprosy patients identified 35 leprosy patients (5.48% which displayed a characteristic lipid-like clot formed between blood clot and serum during serum harvesting, herein named 'leprosum clot'. Most of these patients (n = 16, 45.7% belonged to the lepromatous leprosy pole of the disease. In addition, formation of the leprosum clot was directly correlated with increased plasma levels of soluble tissue factor and von Willebrand factor. High performance thin layer chromatography demonstrated a high content of neutral lipids in the leprosum clot, and proteomic analysis demonstrated that the leprosum clot presented in these patients is highly enriched in fibrin. Remarkably, differential 2D-proteomics analysis between leprosum clots and control clots identified two proteins present only in leprosy patients clots: complement component 3 and 4 and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family heavy chain-related protein (IHRP. In agreement with those observations we demonstrated that M. leprae induces hepatocytes release of IHRP in vitro.We demonstrated that leprosy MB patients develop a procoagulant status due to high levels of plasmatic fibrinogen, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, von Willebrand factor and soluble tissue factor. We propose that some of these components, fibrinogen for example, presents potential as predictive biomarkers of leprosy reactions, generating tools for earlier diagnosis and treatment of these events.

  5. Leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W Cairns S; Saunderson, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, primarily affecting the peripheral nerves and skin. The WHO field leprosy classification is based on the number of skin lesions: paucibacillary leprosy (1–5 skin lesions), and multibacillary leprosy (more than 5 skin lesions).Worldwide, about 250,000 new cases of leprosy are reported each year, and about 2 million people have leprosy-related disabilities.

  6. Quality of life in lepromatous leprosy patients

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    Betül Demir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae bacillus affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy can lead to severe deformities depending on the extent of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of life of patients with lepromatous leprosy. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with lepromatous leprosy and 35 healthy controls were included in the study. The patients were evaluated with the Turkish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. The relationship of quality of life with age, gender, marital status, and the grade of the visual impairment was studied and compared with the healthy controls. Results: Total and all the subgroup DLQI scores were higher in the leprosy group than in the control group (p<0.05. The patients with grade 2 visual impairment were more severely affected by the disease with regard to symptoms/feelings and school/work life as compared to the patients with grade 1 visual impairment (p=0.04, p=0.03, respectively. SF-36 physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, and emotional role functioning scores were statistically lower in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We observed that DLQI scores were lower in patients with lepromatous leprosy than in the control group, while increasing impairment in eyes was found to have a negative impact on quality of life. The SF-36 revealed that physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, emotional role functioning, and mental health were negatively influenced in patients with lepromatous leprosy.

  7. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

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    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  8. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

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    Rohit Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18-70 years, any duration in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40 and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20 and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4, sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3, growth hormone (GH deficiency (n = 2, primary hypogonadism (n = 2 and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006. Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study.

  9. Leprosy in a patient infected with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtrey, Clare M; Modarres, Hamid; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Rossor, Alexander M; Lockwood, Diana Nj; Reilly, Mary M; Manji, Hadi; Schon, Fred

    2017-04-01

    A 60-year-old Nigerian man, who had lived in Europe for 30 years but had returned home frequently, presented with right frontalis muscle weakness and right ulnar nerve palsy, without skin lesions. Neurophysiology showed a generalised neuropathy with demyelinating features. Blood tests were positive for HIV, with a normal CD4 count. There was nerve thickening both clinically and on MRI. Nerve biopsy showed chronic endoneuritis and perineuritis (indicating leprosy) without visible mycobacteria. His neuropathy continued to deteriorate (lepra reaction) before starting treatment with WHO multidrug therapy, highly active antiretroviral therapy and corticosteroids. There are 10 new cases of leprosy diagnosed annually in the UK. Coinfection with HIV is rare but paradoxically does not usually adversely affect the outcome of leprosy or change treatment. However, permanent nerve damage in leprosy is common despite optimal therapy. Leprosy should be considered in patients from endemic areas who present with mononeuritis multiplex. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Association Analysis Suggests SOD2 as a Newly Identified Candidate Gene Associated With Leprosy Susceptibility.

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    Ramos, Geovana Brotto; Salomão, Heloisa; Francio, Angela Schneider; Fava, Vinícius Medeiros; Werneck, Renata Iani; Mira, Marcelo Távora

    2016-08-01

    Genetic studies have identified several genes and genomic regions contributing to the control of host susceptibility to leprosy. Here, we test variants of the positional and functional candidate gene SOD2 for association with leprosy in 2 independent population samples. Family-based analysis revealed an association between leprosy and allele G of marker rs295340 (P = .042) and borderline evidence of an association between leprosy and alleles C and A of markers rs4880 (P = .077) and rs5746136 (P = .071), respectively. Findings were validated in an independent case-control sample for markers rs295340 (P = .049) and rs4880 (P = .038). These results suggest SOD2 as a newly identified gene conferring susceptibility to leprosy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in leprosy reactions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus coinfection.

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    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; de Souza, Jorge Rodrigues; Macedo, Geraldo Mariano Moraes; Neto, Fernando Octávio Machado Jucá; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that coinfection of leprosy and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not decrease the frequency and intensity of leprosy reactions. However, the immunological aspects of leprosy reactions in coinfected patients remain obscure, with a limited number of studies showing contradictory results. Observational study using tissue samples collected during leprosy reactions from 15 patients coinfected with leprosy and HIV and from 15 patients with leprosy alone. Patients were part of a prior larger cohort study of leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection. Specific antibodies were used to detect IL-1β and IL-6 expression in skin biopsy tissue cells. IL-1β and IL-6 expression was similar between leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection (p>0.05). Coinfected and non-coinfected tissues showed similar levels of IL-1β and IL-6 expression for type 1 reactions. A trend towards increased levels of IL-1β and IL-6 expression was observed in tissue from coinfected patients (p=0.0024). The expression of IL-1β and IL-6 during leprosy reactions did not differ significantly between tissues obtained from leprosy patients with and without HIV coinfection. Therefore, we conclude that HIV coinfection does not affect the immunological pattern of leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Leprosy exposure, infection and disease: a 25-year surveillance study of leprosy patient contacts.

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    Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Duppre, Nadia Cristina; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andréa; Nery, José Augusto; de Matos, Haroldo José

    2012-12-01

    Contact surveillance is a valuable strategy for controlling leprosy. A dynamic cohort study of leprosy contacts was initiated in 1987 at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. The objective of this work was to review the data on the major risk factors leading up to the infectious stage of the disease, estimate incidence rates of leprosy in the cohort and characterise the risk factors for the disease among the contacts under surveillance. The incidence rate of leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients was estimated at 0.01694 cases per person-year in the first five years of follow-up. The following factors were associated with acquiring the disease: (i) not receiving the BCG vaccine, (ii) a negative Mitsuda reaction and (iii) contact with a patient with a multibacillary clinical form of leprosy. The contacts of index patients who had high bacilloscopic index scores > 1 were at especially high risk of infection. The following factors were associated with infection, which was defined as a seropositive reaction for anti-phenolic glicolipid-1 IgM: (i) young age (< 20 years), (ii) a low measured Mitsuda reaction (< 5 mm) and (iii) contact with an index patient who had a high bacilloscopic index. BCG vaccination and re-vaccination were shown to be protective among household contacts. The main conclusions of this study indicate an urgent need for additional leprosy control strategies in areas with a high incidence of the disease.

  13. Leprosy exposure, infection and disease: a 25-year surveillance study of leprosy patient contacts

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    Euzenir Nunes Sarno

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Contact surveillance is a valuable strategy for controlling leprosy. A dynamic cohort study of leprosy contacts was initiated in 1987 at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. The objective of this work was to review the data on the major risk factors leading up to the infectious stage of the disease, estimate incidence rates of leprosy in the cohort and characterise the risk factors for the disease among the contacts under surveillance. The incidence rate of leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients was estimated at 0.01694 cases per person-year in the first five years of follow-up. The following factors were associated with acquiring the disease: (i not receiving the BCG vaccine, (ii a negative Mitsuda reaction and (iii contact with a patient with a multibacillary clinical form of leprosy. The contacts of index patients who had high bacilloscopic index scores > 1 were at especially high risk of infection. The following factors were associated with infection, which was defined as a seropositive reaction for anti-phenolic glicolipid-1 IgM: (i young age (< 20 years, (ii a low measured Mitsuda reaction (< 5 mm and (iii contact with an index patient who had a high bacilloscopic index. BCG vaccination and re-vaccination were shown to be protective among household contacts. The main conclusions of this study indicate an urgent need for additional leprosy control strategies in areas with a high incidence of the disease.

  14. Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seniors, WomenTags: ancient infections, blindness, chronic granulomatous disease, chronic infection, hand and foot deformities, hansen's disease, infections, leprosy, mycobacterium, rashes, skin lesions, testicle damage November 1, 2009 Copyright © American ...

  15. Social acceptance and quality of life of leprosy patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyanoer, P. C.

    2018-03-01

    Some of the leprosy patients facing problems in many aspects such as social, economic, cultural and national security. Both the debilitating effects and disfigurements of leprosy, the society tends to stigmatize negatively those suffering from leprosy. The impact of negative stigma on society causes depression and problems in workplace cause difficulty in patient’s daily life. Neuropathic pain disturbs the quality of life of leprosy patients which could become so severe and significant. The neuropathic pain will lower their productivity which later caused difficulties in finding a job. This study was an analytical observational study to identify the correlation between neuropathic pain and quality of life in Leprosy Hospital of Scanning in Medan Belawan. The result showed that there is a correlation between neuropathic pain and disruption of quality of life (p=0.017). In conclusion, the milder the neuropathic pain experienced by persons with leprosy, the less the quality of life will be disturbed.

  16. DISABILITIES OF HANDS, FEET AND EYES IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPER, A; LUBBERS, WJ; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude of hand/feet/eye disabilities in newly diagnosed leprosy patients by examining all newly diagnosed leprosy patients who presented at the Eastern Leprosy Control Project (supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association), made up of a

  17. Leprosy among patient contacts: a multilevel study of risk factors.

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    Anna M Sales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing leprosy among the contacts of newly-diagnosed leprosy patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 6,158 contacts and 1,201 leprosy patients of the cohort who were diagnosed and treated at the Leprosy Laboratory of Fiocruz from 1987 to 2007 were included. The contact variables analyzed were sex; age; educational and income levels; blood relationship, if any, to the index case; household or non-household relationship; length of time of close association with the index case; receipt of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BGG vaccine and presence of BCG scar. Index cases variables included sex, age, educational level, family size, bacillary load, and disability grade. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercept was applied. Among the co-prevalent cases, the leprosy-related variables that remained associated with leprosy included type of household contact, [odds ratio (OR = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02, 1.73] and consanguinity with the index case, (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.42-2.51. With respect to the index case variables, the factors associated with leprosy among contacts included up to 4 years of schooling and 4 to 10 years of schooling (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.54-4.79 and 2.40, 95% CI: 1.30-4.42, respectively and bacillary load, which increased the chance of leprosy among multibacillary contacts for those with a bacillary index of one to three and greater than three (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.19-2.17 and OR: 4.07-95% CI: 2.73, 6.09, respectively. Among incident cases, household exposure was associated with leprosy (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.29-2.98, compared with non-household exposure. Among the index case risk factors, an elevated bacillary load was the only variable associated with leprosy in the contacts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological and social factors appear to be associated with leprosy among co-prevalent cases, whereas the factors related to the

  18. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

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    Daiane Santos dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70, socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71. Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed.

  19. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daiane Santos; Duppre, Nadia Cristina; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Hacker, Mariana Andréa

    2013-01-01

    A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70), socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71). Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed. PMID:23690793

  20. Tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis as immune restoration disease in a patient with AIDS.

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    Kumar, Shishir; Ghosh, Manab Kumar; Sarkar, Somenath; Mallik, Sudeshna; Biswas, Pradyot Narayan; Saha, Bibhuti

    2012-02-01

    Here we report a unique case of tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis in a 27-year-old female patient with AIDS, suggestive of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced immune restoration disease. After initiation of HAART, the patient presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthetic patch with local nerve thickening, and an increase in her CD4+ T cell count. On further investigations cytomegalovirus retinitis and tuberculoid leprosy were confirmed. To our knowledge no case with such a co-existence has previously been reported. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiographic findings in wrists and hands of patients with leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreto, A.; Montero, F.; Garcia Frasquet, A.; Carpintero, P.

    1998-01-01

    Leprosy, like other neuropathic disorders, can involve the skeleton, affecting both bone and joints, especially those segments that have to withstand weight. To asses the osteoarticular involvement of the wrist and hand in 58 patients with leprosy. The radiographic images of wrist and hand of 58 patients with Hansen's disease were reviewed. The entire spectrum of specific and nonspecific bone lesions described in the literature is presented. Despite the fact that the upper limbs do not have to withstand the weight that the feet and ankles do, radiographic images show that gripping and other common motions can also produce lesions compatible with those of neuropathic arthropathy. (Author) 20 refs

  2. EYE DISEASE IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; SCHIPPER, A; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    To determine the magnitude of eye lesions in newly diagnosed leprosy patients we examined their eyes. The Eastern Leprosy Control Project was supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association; we used the regional clinic in Biratnagar and 5 mobile clinics in surrounding districts as our survey

  3. Patient contact is the major determinant in incident leprosy: implications for future control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, S. M.; Hatta, M.; Klatser, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Notwithstanding the elimination efforts, leprosy control programs face the problem of many leprosy patients remaining undetected. Leprosy control focuses on early diagnosis through screening of household contacts, although this high-risk group generates only a small proportion of all incident cases.

  4. A comparative study of the quality of life, knowledge, attitude and belief about leprosy disease among leprosy patients and community members in Shantivan Leprosy Rehabilitation centre, Nere, Maharashtra, India

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    Madhavi J Mankar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy a chronic infectious affliction, is a communicable disease that posses a risk of permanent and progressive disability. The associated visible deformities and disabilities have contributed to the stigma and discrimination experienced by leprosy patients, even among those who have been cured. Aims and Objectives: 1 To assess the knowledge, attitude and belief about leprosy in leprosy patients compared with community members. 2 To find the perceived stigma among leprosy patients. 3. To evaluate the quality of life in leprosy patients as compared to community members using WHO Quality of Life assessment questionaire (WHOQOL- BREF. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre, Shantivan, Nere in Panvel Taluka, district Raigad from October - December 2009. A pre-designed and pre-structured questionaire was used to evaluate knowledge, attitude and perceived stigma among leprosy patients and community members. WHO Quality of life questionaire (WHOQOL-BREF was used to assess quality of life in leprosy patients and controls. Data analysis was done with the help of SPSS package. Result: Among the cases and control, 43.13% of cases were aware that leprosy is an infectious disease compared to 20.69% of control. 68.62% of cases had knowledge of hypopigmented patches being a symptom of leprosy compared to the 25.86% in control. There was overall high level of awareness about disease, symptoms, transmission and curability in leprosy patients as compared to control. Among control group, 43.10% of population said that they would not like food to be served by leprosy patients as compared to 13.73% in study group. It was seen that the discrimination was much higher in female leprosy patients as compared to male leprosy patients. The mean quality of life scores for cases was significantly lower than those for control group in physical and psychological domain but not in the social relationship and

  5. Pattern of Disabilities among Leprosy Patients in Abia State, Nigeria - a Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeonoro, U U; Aguocha, G U; Madukwe, S O; Nwokeukwu, H I; Nwamoh, U N; Aguocha, B U

    2016-01-01

    Early case detection and prompt treatment have been identified as key strategies for effective control and elimination of leprosy disease. Hence, control efforts should include among others treatment of the disease and disability prevention. This study is aimed at determining prevalence and pattern of disability among leprosy patients treated in a Leprosy Center in Abia State, Nigeria. Records of 287 leprosy patients treated in Uzoakoli Leprosy Center, Abia State between 2002 and 2006 were reviewed and analysed. Findings showed 23 (9.9%) with childhood leprosy, 206 (83.7%) multi-bacillary type and 64 (28.4%) with grade 2 disability among the leprosy cases.Four children (15.4%) presented with grade 2 disability at diagnosis. Prior to treatment 80 (27.9%) had grade 2 disability, while 11 (6.6%) at the end of the treatment.,Based on EHF score 85 patients (50.9%) out 167 patients who completed treatment had impairment before treatment; on completion of treatment 133 (89.9%) of them improved, while 5 (3.4%) deteriorated. The lower limb (92.6%) was the most affected site in the leprosy patients,, while the eye (3.4%) was the leastaffected. The current leprosy control efforts should be intensified to ensure early case detection and prompt treatment in order to reduce the leprosy burden, including disabilities in individuals and community at large.

  6. Presence of viable Mycobacterium leprae in environmental specimens around houses of leprosy patients.

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    Turankar, R P; Lavania, M; Singh, M; Sengupta, U; Siva Sai, Ksr; Jadhav, R S

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, one of the first organisms to be established as the cause for disease in humans. Because of high prevalence pockets of leprosy in the endemic regions, it is necessary to identify the possible sources of M. leprae in the environment and its mode of transmission. Slit skin smears (SSSs) from lesions were collected in 70% ethanol from 50 leprosy cases staying in the leprosy resettlement village and hospital from a high endemic area. One hundred and sixty soil samples were collected from different areas around the leprosy hospital and from the resettlement village of cured leprosy patients where active cases also resided at the time of sample collection. M. leprae specific gene region (RLEP 129 bp) and 16S rRNA targets were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection for the presence and viability of M. leprae. An rpoT region was also amplified to determine presence of numbers of 6 bp tandem repeats. All the SSS samples collected from patients showed three copies of rpoT region (6 bp tandem repeat, an ancient Indian type). Fifty-two soil samples showed presence of M. leprae DNA whereas M. leprae specific 16S rRNA gene was amplified in sixteen of these samples. PCR amplification and fragment length analysis showed 91 bp, i.e., three copies of the rpoT 6 bp tandem repeats from soil samples and similar three copies observed in patient samples. Presence of viable M. leprae in the soil having same rpoT genotype of M. leprae noted in patients suggests that it could be the same strain of M. leprae. M. leprae found in the soil could be the one that is excreted out by the patient. Significance of its viability in the environment and its pathogenicity with respect to transmission needs to be further explored. Findings of this study might provide possible insights for further exploration into understanding transmission patterns in leprosy and also will throw light on identifying

  7. Antioxidant factors, nitric oxide levels, and cellular damage in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Ribeiro Schalcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The immune response caused by Mycobacterium leprae is a risk factor for the development of oxidative stress (OS in leprosy patients. This study aimed to assess OS in leprosy patients before the use of a multidrug therapy. Methods We evaluated the nitric oxide (NO concentration; antioxidant capacity; levels of malondialdehyde, methemoglobin and reduced glutathione; and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD in leprosy patients. Results We observed lower SOD activity in these leprosy patients; however, the NO levels and antioxidant capacity were increased. Conclusions The infectious process in response to M. leprae could primarily be responsible for the OS observed in these patients.

  8. Modeling both of the number of pausibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients by using bivariate poisson regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winahju, W. S.; Mukarromah, A.; Putri, S.

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by bacteria of leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae). Leprosy has become an important thing in Indonesia because its morbidity is quite high. Based on WHO data in 2014, in 2012 Indonesia has the highest number of new leprosy patients after India and Brazil with a contribution of 18.994 people (8.7% of the world). This number makes Indonesia automatically placed as the country with the highest number of leprosy morbidity of ASEAN countries. The province that most contributes to the number of leprosy patients in Indonesia is East Java. There are two kind of leprosy. They consist of pausibacillary and multibacillary. The morbidity of multibacillary leprosy is higher than pausibacillary leprosy. This paper will discuss modeling both of the number of multibacillary and pausibacillary leprosy patients as responses variables. These responses are count variables, so modeling will be conducted by using bivariate poisson regression method. Unit experiment used is in East Java, and predictors involved are: environment, demography, and poverty. The model uses data in 2012, and the result indicates that all predictors influence significantly.

  9. [Dapsone-induced photodermatitis in a patient with leprosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumey, S M

    1988-01-18

    We report on a 60-year-old man suffering from borderline leprosy. He was treated many times with DDS and Clofazimin and underwent the so-called multiple drug treatment (MDT). Under this therapy, the patient developed allergic photodermatitis. Unfortunately his file was lost and, as nobody was informed about his allergic reaction, he was again treated with the preparations mentioned above. Consequently, he responded once more with photodermatitis.

  10. International open trial of uniform multidrug therapy regimen for leprosy patients: Findings & implications for national leprosy programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Ponnaiah; Mehendale, Sanjay M; Nagaraju, Bathyala; Katoch, Kiran; Jamesh, Abdul; Kutaiyan, Ramalingam; Jianping, Shen; Mugudalabetta, Shivakumar; Jadhav, Vitthal; Rajkumar, Prabu; Padma, Jayasree; Kaliaperumal, Kanagasabai; Pannikar, Vijayakumar; Krishnamurthy, Padabettu; Gupte, Mohan D

    2016-10-01

    Uniform therapy for all leprosy patients will simplify leprosy treatment. In this context, we evaluated six-month multidrug therapy (MDT) currently recommended for multibacillary (MB) patients as uniform MDT (U-MDT) in a single-arm open trial under programme conditions. Primary objective was to determine efficacy to prevent five-year cumulative five per cent relapse. Secondary objectives were to assess acceptability, safety and compliance. Newly detected, treatment-naive leprosy patients were enrolled in India (six sites) and P. R. China (two sites). Primary outcome was clinically confirmed relapse of occurrence of one or more new skin patches consistent with leprosy, without evidence of reactions post-treatment. Event rates per 100 person years as well as five-year cumulative risk of relapse, were calculated. A total of 2091 paucibacillary (PB) and 1298 MB leprosy patients were recruited from the 3437 patients screened. Among PB, two relapsed (rate=0.023; risk=0.11%), eight had suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (rate=0.79) and rate of new lesions due toreactions was 0.24 (n=23). Rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 0.39 (n=37), 0.54 (n=51) and 0.03 (n=3), respectively. Among MB, four relapsed (rate=0.07; risk=0.37%) and 16 had suspected ADR (rate=2.64). Rate of new lesions due to reactions among MB was 1.34 (n=76) and rates of neuritis, type 1 and type 2 reactions were 1.37 (n=78), 2.01 (n=114) and 0.49 (n=28), respectively. Compliance to U-MDT was 99 per cent. Skin pigmentation due to clofazimine was of short duration and acceptable. We observed low relapse, minimal ADR and other adverse clinical events. Clofazimine-related pigmentation was acceptable. Evidence supports introduction of U-MDT in national leprosy programmes. [CTRI No: 2012/ 05/ 002696].

  11. Autoimmunity to Tropomyosin-Specific Peptides Induced by Mycobacterium leprae in Leprosy Patients: Identification of Mimicking Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Pathak, Vinay Kumar; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, Umesh D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown earlier that there is a rise in the levels of autoantibodies and T cell response to cytoskeletal proteins in leprosy. Our group recently demonstrated a rise in both T and B cell responses to keratin and myelin basic protein in all types of leprosy patients and their associations in type 1 reaction (T1R) group of leprosy. In this study, we investigated the association of levels of autoantibodies and lymphoproliferation against myosin in leprosy patients across the spectrum and tried to find out the mimicking proteins or epitopes between host protein and protein/s of Mycobacterium leprae . One hundred and sixty-nine leprosy patients and 55 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in the present study. Levels of anti-myosin antibodies and T-cell responses against myosin were measured by ELISA and lymphoproliferation assay, respectively. Using 2-D gel electrophoresis, western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF antibody-reactive spots were identified. Three-dimensional structure of mimicking proteins was modeled by online server. B cell epitopes of the proteins were predicted by BCPREDS server 1.0 followed by identification of mimicking epitopes. Mice of inbred BALB/c strain were hyperimmunized with M. leprae soluble antigen (MLSA) and splenocytes and lymph node cells of these animals were adoptively transferred to naïve mice. Highest level of anti-myosin antibodies was noted in sera of T1R leprosy patients. We observed significantly higher levels of lymphoproliferative response ( p  leprae . We found four mimicking epitopes between these sequences. These data suggest that these mimicking proteins tropomyosin and ATP-dependent Clp protease ATP-binding subunit of M. leprae or more precisely mimicking epitopes (four B cell epitopes) might be responsible for extensive tissue damage during type1 reaction in leprosy.

  12. Thermographic analysis and autonomic response in the hands of patients with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Aretusa Lopes; Costa, Debora Tacon da; Menezes, Ana Luiza Ferro de; Pereira, Janser Moura; Carvalho, Eliane Maria de

    2016-01-01

    Low temperatures and slow blood flow may result from peripheral neuropathy caused by leprosy, and the simple detection of cold fingers could already be a preliminary classification for these patients. To investigate whether infrared thermography would be able to measure this change in temperature in the hands of people with leprosy. The study assessed 17 leprosy patients who were under treatment at the National Reference Center for Sanitary Dermatology and Leprosy, Uberlândia/MG, and 15 people without leprosy for the control group. The infrared camera FLIR A325 and Therma CAM Researcher Professional 2.9 software were used to measure the temperature. The room was air-conditioned, maintaining the temperature at 25°C; the distance between the camera and the limb was 70 cm. The vasomotor reflex of patients was tested by a cold stress on the palm. The study showed a significant interaction between the clinical form of leprosy and temperature, where the control group and the borderline-borderline form revealed a higher initial temperature, while borderline-lepromatous and lepromatous leprosy showed a lower temperature. Regarding vasomotor reflex, lepromatous leprosy patients were unable to recover the initial temperature after cold stress, while those with the borderline-tuberculoid form not only recovered but exceeded the initial temperature. Thermography proved a potential tool to assist in the early detection of neuropathies, helping in the prevention of major nerve damage and the installation of deformities and disabilities that are characteristic of leprosy.

  13. Evaluation of the economic burden of leprosy among migrant and resident patients in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mingzhou; Li, Ming; Zheng, Daocheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Su, Ting; Chen, Yongfeng; Yang, Bin

    2017-12-11

    A lot of time and money was needed during the diagnosis and treatment process of leprosy, the delayed leprosy would also impair the labor capability of patients as well, and these put a heavy burden for the leprosy patients. The migrant leprosy patient is a special group and need more concern. Our goal was to assess the economic burden of leprosy on migrant and resident patient populations in Guangdong province, China. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey from February to July of 2016. A self-designed questionnaire was administered to leprosy patients who: (1) had registered in Leprosy Management Information System in China (LEPMIS) by the end of February 2016, (2) had received multiple drug treatment (MDT) drugs at a local leprosy control institution for three consecutive months or had had at least one physical check in the past half year, and (3) were willing to take part in the investigation and give informed written consent. Demographic characteristics, Financial and disease information, and costs before and after leprosy diagnosis were collected and compared using t-test and χ2 test. A total of 254 participants completed the questionnaires, including 168 males and 86 females. Migrants and residents accounted for 33.9% and 66.1% of patients, respectively. Among migrant patients, the median cost before diagnosis was $131.6 (39.2-450.9), the median yearly cost of leprosy treatment after diagnosis was $300.6 (158.4-868.5), and the median yearly cost of leprosy complications was $69.5 (11-178.4). In comparison, among residents the median yearly costs were $152.4 (30.7-770.9) pre-diagnosis, $309.7 (103.2-1016.7) after diagnosis, and $91.9 (32.6-303.1) for leprosy complications. Base on this, we determined that the median yearly total expense after diagnosis amounted to 15% of migrant and 38% of resident patients' annual income. Leprosy places a heavy economic burden on both migrant and resident leprosy patients and governmental policies and

  14. Correlation between ELISA and ML Flow assays applied to 60 Brazilian patients affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Rozana C.; Lyon, Sandra; Lyon, Ana C.; Grossi, Maria A. F.; Lyon, Silvia H.; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Antunes, Carlos M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Serological tests can be helpful in classifying leprosy patients as having either the paucibacillary or the multibacillary form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between two serological assays, i.e. ML Flow and ELISA, in a population of leprosy patients in Brazil. The

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B and C viruses in patients with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J E F; Morais, V M S; Gonçales, J P; Silva, D M; Coêlho, M R C D

    2017-08-01

    It has been reported a higher seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in leprosy patients than in the general population, but the reasons for these findings are not yet clear. On the other hand, there is evidence that these viruses may influence the onset of leprosy reactional episodes, an important cause of neurological sequelae. This study aimed to determine seroprevalence and risk factors for HBV and HCV in leprosy patients and to investigate its association with leprosy reactions. Patients attended from 2015 to 2016 at a Reference Center in Leprosy in Northeastern region of Brazil, were interviewed, had their records reviewed to investigate biological, clinical, behavioral and socioeconomic factors, and underwent blood sample collection. Biological samples were tested for HBV (HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HBs) and HCV (anti-HCV) serological markers by ELISA and, in anti-HCV positive samples, HCV RNA was screened by real time PCR. SPSS program was used to analyze the data. A total of 403 leprosy patients were included. Although anti-HBc was positive in 14.1%, there was no detection of HBsAg, which contradicts the hypothesis that leprosy patients have immune deficit that make them more prone to chronic HBV infection. Multibacillary leprosy (0.057), health-related work (0.011) and lower educational level (0.035) were associated with anti-HBc positivity. Anti-HCV was positive in 0.5%, with no detection of HCV RNA. No association was identified between anti-HCV and the epidemiological analyzed factors. There was also no association of anti-HBc or anti-HCV with type 1 or type 2 leprosy reactions. Thus, the seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in leprosy patients was similar to that of the general population of Northeastern region of Brazil, and no association of HBV or HCV with leprosy reactions was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of antibodies to both M. leprae PGL-I and MMP-II to recognize leprosy patients at an early stage of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongsheng; Liu, Weijing; Jin, Yali; Yu, Meiwen; Jiang, Haiqin; Tamura, Toshiki; Maeda, Yumi; Makino, Masahiko

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies to phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I and major membrane protein (MMP)-II were evaluated for serodiagnosis of leprosy in Southwest China, and the role in predicting the occurrence of the disease in household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy was examined. Using PGL-I (natural disaccharide-octyl-bovine serum albumin) antigen-based diagnosis (IgM antibodies), we could detect 94.9% of multibacillary (MB) leprosy and 38.9% paucibacillary (PB) leprosy patients, whereas using MMP-II (IgG antibody), 88.1% of MB and 61.1% of PB patients were positive. By combining the 2 tests and considering either test positive as positive, 100% of MB patients and 72.2% of PB patients were found to test positive. Of the HHCs of leprosy, 28.3% and 30% had positive levels of PGL-I and MMP-II Abs, respectively. Seven out of 21 HHCs, who had high Ab titer to either antigen, developed leprosy during the follow-up period of 3 years. These data suggest that the measurement of both anti-PGL-I as well as anti-MMP-II antibodies could facilitate early detection of leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical rehabilitation of leprosy patients discharged home in abia and ebonyi States of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwereji, Ezinne Ezinna; Ahuizi, Eke Reginald; Iheanocho, Okereke Chukwunenye; Enwereji, Kelechi Okechukwu

    2011-11-01

    To examine the extent to which medical coverage is available to discharged leprosy patients in communities. Evidence has shown that after care services, follow-up visits and national disease prevention programs are important components of medical rehabilitation to leprosy patients discharged home after treatment. Denying them accessibility to these services could expose them to multiple disabilities as well as several disease conditions including HIV/AIDS. These adverse health conditions could be averted if health workers extend healthcare services to discharged leprosy patients. This study was conducted to examine the extent to which discharged leprosy patients have access to healthcare services in the communities. All 33 leprosy patients who were fully treated with multi-drug therapy (MDT) and discharged home in the two leprosy settlements in Abia and Ebonyi States of Nigeria were included in this study. The list of discharged leprosy patients studied and their addresses were provided by the leprosy settlements where they were treated. Also, snowball-sampling method was used to identify some of the leprosy patients whose addresses were difficult to locate in the communities. Instruments for data collection were questionnaire, interview guide and checklist. These were administered because respondents were essentially those with no formal education. Analysis of data was done quantitatively and qualitatively. Findings showed that 20 (60.6%) of discharged patients did not receive health programs like HIV/AIDS prevention or family planning. Also, follow-up visits and after-care services were poor. About 14 (42.4%) of the patients live in dirty and overcrowded houses. On the whole, discharged patients were poorly medically rehabilitated (mean score: 4.7±1.1 out of total score of 7). Denying discharged leprosy patients opportunity of accessing health care services could increase prevalence of infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS among them. There is need to extend

  18. Comparison between histopathologic features of leprosy in reaction lesions in HIV coinfected and non-coinfected patients *

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Carla Andr?a Avelar; de Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Mar?lia Brasil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leprosy and HIV are diseases that have a major impact on public health in Brazil. Patients coinfected with both diseases, appear to be at higher risk to develop leprosy reactions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe the histopathological aspects of cutaneous lesions during reactional states in a group of patients with HIV-leprosy ...

  19. Degree of skin denervation and its correlation to objective thermal sensory test in leprosy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Alves Rodrigues Júnior

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is an infectious disease affecting skin and peripheral nerves resulting in increased morbidity and physical deformities. Early diagnosis provides opportune treatment and reduces its complications, relying fundamentally on the demonstration of impaired sensation in suggestive cutaneous lesions. The loss of tactile sensitivity in the lesions is preceded by the loss of thermal sensitivity, stressing the importance of the thermal test in the suspicious lesions approach. The gold-standard method for the assessment of thermal sensitivity is the quantitative sensory test (QST. Morphological study may be an alternative approach to access the thin nerve fibers responsible for thermal sensitivity transduction. The few studies reported in leprosy patients pointed out a rarefaction of thin dermo-epidermal fibers in lesions, but used semi-quantitative evaluation methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work aimed to study the correlation between the degree of thermal sensitivity impairment measured by QST and the degree of denervation in leprosy skin lesions, evaluated by immunohistochemistry anti-PGP 9.5 and morphometry. Twenty-two patients were included. There were significant differences in skin thermal thresholds among lesions and contralateral skin (cold, warm, cold induced pain and heat induced pain. The mean reduction in the density of intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers in lesions was 79.5% (SD = 19.6 and 80.8% (SD = 24.9, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed a good correlation between intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers deficit, but no correlation between these variables and those accounting for the degree of impairment in thermal thresholds, since the thin fibers rarefaction was homogeneously intense in all patients, regardless of the degree of sensory deficit. We believe that the homogeneously intense denervation in leprosy lesions should be objective of further investigations focused on its

  20. Effectiveness of 32 versus 20 weeks of prednisolone in leprosy patients with recent nerve function impairment: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Inge; Post, Erik; Brandsma, Wim; Bowers, Bob; Alam, Khorshed; Shetty, Vanaja; Pai, Vivek; Husain, Sajid; Sigit Prakoeswa, Cita Rosita; Astari, Linda; Hagge, Deanna; Shah, Mahesh; Neupane, Kapil; Tamang, Krishna Bahadur; Nicholls, Peter; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2017-10-01

    While prednisolone is commonly used to treat recent nerve function impairment (NFI) in leprosy patients, the optimal treatment duration has not yet been established. In this "Treatment of Early Neuropathy in Leprosy" (TENLEP) trial, we evaluated whether a 32-week prednisolone course is more effective than a 20-week course in restoring and improving nerve function. In this multi-centre, triple-blind, randomized controlled trial, leprosy patients who had recently developed clinical NFI (leprosy patients. Twenty weeks is therefore the preferred initial treatment duration for leprosy neuropathy, after which likely only a minority of patients require further individualized treatment.

  1. Study of thyroid function, using iodine 131, in leprosy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatit, E.D.; Carvalho, N.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made in a group of 117 leprosy patients in differents clinical conditions, under treatment, in drug rest or virgins of treatment. They were divided in sub-groups for the following tests: the radioiodine uptake of 2-24 hours; neck-thigh ratio; thyrobinding index; protein-bound radioiodine (PB 131 I) levels of plasma. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) Leprosy patients present a low uptake in conjunction with a decrease in the velocity of thyroid clearance in the majority of the cases. Even the remaining presented values within the low limit of normality; 2) In view of these results, the tests were repeated after thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with exogenous TSH, in the sub-group of patients virgin of treatment. With the positive response observed (increase in the uptake, in the neck-thigh ratio and the PB 131 I) the low uptake was considered secondary with regard to a deficit of the endogenous TSH; 3) The TBI and PB 131 I tests were not in sufficient agreement for an appraisal of the phase of organic binding and release of hormone [pt

  2. Leprosy: eradication or cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, S

    1995-01-01

    The National Leprosy Eradication Program (NLEP), launched in 1986, has brought medicine for leprosy to more people than ever before, covering 200 of India's 455 districts. Since 1988, the number of leprosy patients discharged as cured each year has been greater than the number of newly detected, thus moving the country closer to its goal of eradicating leprosy from India. A substantial number of the 3 million people with leprosy in India are likely to come under the coverage of the NLEP. The author, however, argues that the fight against leprosy and the NLEP should be considered in their historical context. Leprosy is therefore used to illustrate how the perhaps interchangeable terms eradication and cure are charged with history and custom. Historically, the focus on eradicating leprosy has had terrible consequences for the patient. In England, perceptions about leprosy are relevant to the situation India, for colonial policy on leprosy was largely derivative. In the 1880s, especially, leprosy excited the public imagination. Asylums adopted segregation and confinement during this period for people with leprosy and the colonial government in India supported that approach from 1882. The author concludes that while the NLEP is laudable, the program must not focus upon eradicating leprosy. It should instead focus upon the leprosy patient, who has for so long been denied and discriminated against. The individual must be placed at the center of any program. Some steps in this direction have been taken.

  3. Autoimmunity to Tropomyosin-Specific Peptides Induced by Mycobacterium leprae in Leprosy Patients: Identification of Mimicking Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itu Singh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt has been shown earlier that there is a rise in the levels of autoantibodies and T cell response to cytoskeletal proteins in leprosy. Our group recently demonstrated a rise in both T and B cell responses to keratin and myelin basic protein in all types of leprosy patients and their associations in type 1 reaction (T1R group of leprosy.ObjectivesIn this study, we investigated the association of levels of autoantibodies and lymphoproliferation against myosin in leprosy patients across the spectrum and tried to find out the mimicking proteins or epitopes between host protein and protein/s of Mycobacterium leprae.MethodologyOne hundred and sixty-nine leprosy patients and 55 healthy controls (HC were enrolled in the present study. Levels of anti-myosin antibodies and T-cell responses against myosin were measured by ELISA and lymphoproliferation assay, respectively. Using 2-D gel electrophoresis, western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF antibody-reactive spots were identified. Three-dimensional structure of mimicking proteins was modeled by online server. B cell epitopes of the proteins were predicted by BCPREDS server 1.0 followed by identification of mimicking epitopes. Mice of inbred BALB/c strain were hyperimmunized with M. leprae soluble antigen (MLSA and splenocytes and lymph node cells of these animals were adoptively transferred to naïve mice.ResultsHighest level of anti-myosin antibodies was noted in sera of T1R leprosy patients. We observed significantly higher levels of lymphoproliferative response (p < 0.05 with myosin in all types of leprosy patients compared to HC. Further, hyperimmunization of inbred BALB/c strain of female mice and rabbit with MLSA revealed that both hyperimmunized rabbit and mice evoked heightened levels of antibodies against myosin and this autoimmune response could be adoptively transferred from hyperimmunized to naïve mice. Tropomyosin was found to be mimicking with ATP-dependent Clp protease ATP

  4. A Study of Selenium in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Partogi

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Selenium serum levels of patients with PB leprosy are higher than patients with MB leprosy, and high bacteriological index in patients with leprosy were correlated with low selenium serum levels.

  5. The quality of life, mental health, and perceived stigma of leprosy patients in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Atsuro; Izutsu, Takashi; Islam, Akramul Md; Maksuda, A N; Kato, Hiroshi; Wakai, Susumu

    2007-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the quality of life (QOL) and general mental health of leprosy patients compared with the general population, and evaluate contributing factors such as socio-economic characteristics and perceived stigma. A total of 189 patients (160 outpatients, 29 inpatients) and 200 controls without leprosy or other chronic diseases were selected from Dhaka district, Bangladesh, using stratified random sampling. A Bangladeshi version of a structured questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics-the Bangla version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment BREF (WHOQOL-BREF)-was used to assess QOL; a Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) was used to evaluate general mental health; the Barthel Index to control activities of daily living (ADL); and the authors' Perceived Stigma Questionnaire was used to assess perceived stigma of patients with leprosy. Medical records were examined to evaluate disability grades and impairment. QOL and general mental health scores of leprosy patients were worse than those of the general population. Multiple regression analysis revealed that factors potentially contributing to the deteriorated QOL of leprosy patients were the presence of perceived stigma, fewer years of education, the presence of deformities, and a lower annual income. Perceived stigma showed the greatest association with adverse QOL. We conclude that there is an urgent need for interventions sensitive to the effects of perceived stigma, gender, and medical conditions to improve the QOL and mental health of Bangladeshi leprosy patients.

  6. Serial measurement of the circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor and its soluble receptors 1 and 2 for monitoring leprosy patients during multidrug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host response to the aetiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae . The induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, primarily through the action of cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 in leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug treatment (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals and to determine their role as putative biomarkers of the severity of leprosy or the treatment response. ELISA was used to measure the levels of these molecules in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis and during and after MDT. Our results showed increases in the serum levels of TNF-α and sTNF-R2 in infected individuals in comparison with controls. The levels of TNF-α, but not sTNF-R2, decreased with treatment. The current results corroborate previous reports of elevated serum levels of TNF-α in leprosy and suggest a role for sTNF-R2 in the control of this cytokine during MDT.

  7. Dental caries and risk indicators for patients with leprosy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Tian, Li-Li; Zhang, Feng-Yi; Bu, Yan-Hong; Feng, Yun-Zhi; Zhou, Hou-De

    2017-02-01

    In leprosy, oral health is often neglected and poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and risk indicators of dental caries in patients with leprosy in China. This cross-sectional, multicentre study included 613 patients with leprosy and 602 control subjects. Based on the established standards of the World Health Organization, we investigated dental caries in cluster samplings from six so-called 'leprosy villages' in three Chinese provinces. Clinical oral examinations were performed and data were reported as decayed (D), missing (M) and filled (F) teeth (DMFT scores). The average DMFT scores were 10.39 in patients with leprosy (D = 4.43; M = 5.94; and F = 0.02) and 4.39 in control individuals (D = 2.29; M = 2.02; F = 0.08). The DMFT scores were statistically significantly different in patients with different ages, educational backgrounds and daily brushing frequency (P leprosy have a high prevalence of severe dental caries. Effective therapy and oral health education should be enhanced for this group of patients. © 2016 The Authors. International Dental Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Dental Federation.

  8. Analysis of Antigens of Mycobacterium leprae by Interaction to Sera IgG, IgM, and IgA Response to Improve Diagnosis of Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avnish; Parkash, Om; Girdhar, Bhawneshwar K.

    2014-01-01

    Till 2010, several countries have declared less than one leprosy patient among population of 10,000 and themselves feeling as eliminated from leprosy cases. However, new leprosy cases are still appearing from all these countries. In this situation one has to be confident to diagnose leprosy. This review paper highlighted already explored antigens for diagnosis purposes and finally suggested better combinations of protein antigens of M. leprae versus immunoglobulin as detector antibody to be useful for leprosy diagnosis. PMID:25101267

  9. Prevalence of Disability and Associated Factors among Registered Leprosy Patients in All Africa Tb and Leprosy Rehabilitation and Training Centre (ALERT), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumet, Tigist; Demissie, Meaza; Bekele, Yonas

    2015-10-01

    Delay in leprosy diagnosis and treatment causes disabilities due to nerve damage, immunological reactions and bacillary infiltration. Leprosy disability leads not only to physical dysfunction and activity limitation but also disrupts social interaction of affected individuals by creating stigma and discrimination. This study was aimed at assessing leprosy disability status in patients registered at All African TB and Leprosy Rehabilitation and Training Centre. Medical records of leprosy patients registered from September 11, 2010 to September 10, 2013 G.C were reviewed. Prevalence of disability calculated, bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval. The overall prevalence of disability was found to be 65.9% from all categories of patients (40.2% Grade I and 25.7% Grade II). The Prevalence among the new category was 62.8% (39.1% Grade 1 and 23.7% Grade 2). Those ageed above 30 years, with duration of symptoms 6-12 months and above 24 months, with sensory loss, nerve damage and reversal reaction were more likely to develop disability. In this study the prevalence of disability, both Grade I and II, is very high. Disability was associated with age, duration of symptom, sensory loss, signs of nerve damage and reversal reaction. These risk factors indicate the existence of delay in diagnosis and treatment of leprosy cases. Therefore, the national leprosy control program should investigate leprosy case detection and diagnosis system in the country and work on improving early case detection and prevention of disability.

  10. Longitudinal assessment of anti-PGL-I serology in contacts of leprosy patients in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardus, Renate A; van der Zwet, Konrad; van Hooij, Anouk; Wilson, Louis; Oskam, Linda; Faber, Roel; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Pahan, David; Alam, Khorshed; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Geluk, Annemieke

    2017-12-01

    Despite elimination efforts, the number of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infected individuals who develop leprosy, is still substantial. Solid evidence exists that individuals living in close proximity to patients are at increased risk to develop leprosy. Early diagnosis of leprosy in endemic areas requires field-friendly tests that identify individuals at risk of developing the disease before clinical manifestation. Such assays will simultaneously contribute to reduction of current diagnostic delay as well as transmission. Antibody (Ab) levels directed against the M.leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) represents a surrogate marker for bacterial load. However, it is insufficiently defined whether anti-PGL-I antibodies can be utilized as prognostic biomarkers for disease in contacts. Particularly, in Bangladesh, where paucibacillary (PB) patients form the majority of leprosy cases, anti-PGL-I serology is an inadequate method for leprosy screening in contacts as a directive for prophylactic treatment. Between 2002 and 2009, fingerstick blood from leprosy patients' contacts without clinical signs of disease from a field-trial in Bangladesh was collected on filter paper at three time points covering six years of follow-up per person. Analysis of anti-PGL-I Ab levels for 25 contacts who developed leprosy during follow-up and 199 contacts who were not diagnosed with leprosy, was performed by ELISA after elution of bloodspots from filter paper. Anti-PGL-I Ab levels at intake did not significantly differ between contacts who developed leprosy during the study and those who remained free of disease. Moreover, anti-PGL-I serology was not prognostic in this population as no significant correlation was identified between anti-PGL-I Ab levels at intake and the onset of leprosy. In this highly endemic population in Bangladesh, no association was observed between anti-PGL-I Ab levels and onset of disease, urging the need for an extended, more specific biomarker

  11. Minocycline in leprosy patients with recent onset clinical nerve function impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Tarun; Arshdeep; Dogra, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    Nerve function impairment (NFI) in leprosy may occur and progress despite multidrug therapy alone or in combination with corticosteroids. We observed improvement in neuritis when minocycline was administered in patients with type 2 lepra reaction. This prompted us to investigate the role of minocycline in recent onset NFI, especially in corticosteroid unresponsive leprosy patients. Leprosy patients with recent onset clinical NFI (Minocycline 100mg/day was given for 3 months to these patients. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with 'restored,' 'improved,' 'stabilized,' or 'deteriorated' NFI. Secondary outcomes included any improvement in nerve tenderness and pain. In this pilot study, 11 patients were recruited. The progression of NFI was halted in all; with 9 out of 11 patients (81.82%) showing ?restored? or ?improved? sensory or motor nerve functions, on assessment with MFT and VMT. No serious adverse effects due to minocycline were observed. Our pilot study demonstrates the efficacy and safety of minocycline in recent onset NFI in leprosy patients. However, larger and long term comparative trials are needed to validate the efficacy of minocycline in leprosy neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on lymphocytes of leprosy patients

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    V.A. Mendonça

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which induces chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease ranges from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous forms, depending on the cellular immune response of the host. Chemokines are thought to be involved in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy, but few studies have investigated the expression of chemokine receptors on leukocytes of leprosy patients. In the present study, we evaluated 21 leprosy patients (M/F: 16/5 with a new diagnosis from the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic of the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais. The control group was composed of 20 healthy members (M/F: 15/5 of the community recruited by means of announcements. The expression of CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4 was investigated by flow cytometry on the surface of peripheral blood lymphocytes. There was a decrease in percentage of CD3+CXCR4+ and CD4+CXCR4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of leprosy patients (median [range], 17.6 [2.7-41.9] and 65.3 [3.9-91.9], respectively compared to the control group (median [range], 43.0 [3.7-61.3] and 77.2 [43.6-93.5], respectively. The percentage of CD4+CXCR4+ was significantly lower in patients with the tuberculoid form (median [range], 45.7 [0.0-83.1] of the disease, but not in lepromatous patients (median [range], 81.5 [44.9-91.9]. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor may play a role in leprosy immunopathogenesis, probably directing cell migration to tissue lesions in tuberculoid leprosy patients.

  13. Problems, acceptance and social inequality: a study of the deformed leprosy patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparty, S N

    1995-09-01

    Though the impact of social inequality on health conditions is widely known, its impact on the chronic and stigmatized disease, leprosy, has received little attention. Deformity sometimes leads to disabilities and to handicaps causing problems to the patient and his family. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the impact of social inequality, prevalent in the form of the caste system in India on the deformed leprosy patients and on their families. This impact was examined in terms of the problems faced by the patients. A sample of 150 deformed patients and their families, drawn from two districts in Tamil Nadu, was selected for the study. About 57% of the deformed patients experienced their deformity as a handicap which caused social and economic problems while the rest did not. Of the three caste groups, the Lower Caste group experienced more severe economic problems while the Upper Caste group faced more social problems. The extent of acceptance of deformed patients in their family varied significantly among those facing and not facing problems due to their deformity. The deformed patients without any handicap were accepted in a large majority of their families (82%) regardless of their caste status. In contrast the deformed but handicapped patients were accepted differentially among the three caste groups with the Upper group accepting them in most of their families (80%) while in the Lower group much less number of families (54%) did. All the families of the deformed but not handicapped patients desired to keep their patients till their death irrespective of their caste status. On the contrary, while all the families in the Upper Caste group expressed their willingness to keep their handicapped patients in the family till their death, 10% in the Middle and 22% in the Lower Caste groups did not want to do so. This suggests the gradual marginalization, rejection and dehabilitation of the affected. Thus, one's caste status can be a broad indicator

  14. Comparison between histopathologic features of leprosy in reaction lesions in HIV coinfected and non-coinfected patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; de Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy and HIV are diseases that have a major impact on public health in Brazil. Patients coinfected with both diseases, appear to be at higher risk to develop leprosy reactions. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the histopathological aspects of cutaneous lesions during reactional states in a group of patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection, compared to patients with leprosy, without coinfection. METHODS Two groups were established: group 1 comprised of 40 patients coinfected with HIV-leprosy; group 2, comprised of 107 patients with leprosy only. Patients presenting reactional states of leprosy had their lesions biopsied and comparatively evaluated. RESULTS Reversal reaction was the most frequent feature in both groups, with dermis edema as the most common histopathological finding. Giant cells were seen in all group 1 histopathological examinations. Dermis edema was the most common finding in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum. CONCLUSION Few histopathological differences were found in both groups, with reversal reaction as the most significant one, although this fact should be analyzed considering the predominant BT clinical form in the coinfected group and BB form in the group without HIV. Larger prospective studies in patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection are needed to confirm and broaden these results. PMID:25672296

  15. Comparison between histopathologic features of leprosy in reaction lesions in HIV coinfected and non-coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro de; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy and HIV are diseases that have a major impact on public health in Brazil. Patients coinfected with both diseases, appear to be at higher risk to develop leprosy reactions. The aim of this study is to describe the histopathological aspects of cutaneous lesions during reactional states in a group of patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection, compared to patients with leprosy, without coinfection. Two groups were established: group 1 comprised of 40 patients coinfected with HIV-leprosy; group 2, comprised of 107 patients with leprosy only. Patients presenting reactional states of leprosy had their lesions biopsied and comparatively evaluated. Reversal reaction was the most frequent feature in both groups, with dermis edema as the most common histopathological finding. Giant cells were seen in all group 1 histopathological examinations. Dermis edema was the most common finding in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum. Few histopathological differences were found in both groups, with reversal reaction as the most significant one, although this fact should be analyzed considering the predominant BT clinical form in the coinfected group and BB form in the group without HIV. Larger prospective studies in patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection are needed to confirm and broaden these results.

  16. Survey on child leprosy patients and problems resulted from the disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liangbin; Shen, Jianping; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Guocheng

    2015-03-01

    To understand the situation of child leprosy patients in the low prevalence situation pertaining in China. A retrospective survey by questionnaire was carried out in all 32 provinces of mainland of China in 2011. All data concerning child cases detected from January 2005 to December 2009 were collected by professional health workers working at county level. During the study, only 165 questionnaires were collected for analysis. Among 165 child cases, 96 were boys, 69 were girls with an average age of 11-7 years old. 80% of child cases were members of families with other leprosy affected people. 145 (85%) child cases took their MDT secretly (nobody outside the family knew the child suffered from leprosy), and three (1.8%) children died, one each from dapsone syndrome, suicide and severe pneumonia. During follow-up, four child cases developed new disability increasing the Grade 2 disability rate to 13.3% (22/165). At end of the study, 8.2% of children had discontinued their study at school, and 7.5% had moved to a remote place to do casual work, while 6.3% stayed at home. 31% of child patients thought that leprosy caused a negative impact on their daily life. Two children had a hostile attitude toward society due to the stigma caused by leprosy. In both high and low endemic areas, as long as there is an infectious source of leprosy in the family, there is a possibility for children to develop leprosy. Contact surveys should be done to detect early disease, especially when there are children in the household.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of a chemoprophylactic intervention with single dose rifampicin in contacts of new leprosy patients.

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    Willemijn J Idema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With 249,007 new leprosy patients detected globally in 2008, it remains necessary to develop new and effective interventions to interrupt the transmission of M. leprae. We assessed the economic benefits of single dose rifampicin (SDR for contacts as chemoprophylactic intervention in the control of leprosy. METHODS: We conducted a single centre, double blind, cluster randomised, placebo controlled trial in northwest Bangladesh between 2002 and 2007, including 21,711 close contacts of 1,037 patients with newly diagnosed leprosy. We gave a single dose of rifampicin or placebo to close contacts, with follow-up for four years. The main outcome measure was the development of clinical leprosy. We assessed the cost effectiveness by calculating the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER between the standard multidrug therapy (MDT program with the additional chemoprophylaxis intervention versus the standard MDT program only. The ICER was expressed in US dollars per prevented leprosy case. FINDINGS: Chemoprophylaxis with SDR for preventing leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients is cost-effective at all contact levels and thereby a cost-effective prevention strategy. In total, $6,009 incremental cost was invested and 38 incremental leprosy cases were prevented, resulting in an ICER of $158 per one additional prevented leprosy case. It was the most cost-effective in neighbours of neighbours and social contacts (ICER $214, slightly less cost-effective in next door neighbours (ICER $497 and least cost-effective among household contacts (ICER $856. CONCLUSION: Chemoprophylaxis with single dose rifampicin given to contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients is a cost-effective intervention strategy. Implementation studies are necessary to establish whether this intervention is acceptable and feasible in other leprosy endemic areas of the world.

  18. Iodine metabolism in leprosy patients (examination with a method of whole-body radiometry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balybin, E.S.

    1986-01-01

    A method of whole-body radiometry was used to study iodine metabolism in 47 patients with lepromatous leprosy. Disorders were found in 1/3 of the cases. The level of organic iodine in the body was the most informative of all iodine metabolism indices. In the active stage of leprosy it was twice as low, on an average, as the normal one, in the stage of incomplete and stable regression it rose not reaching, however, the values of healthy persons. The content of iodine in the thyroid of leprosy patients showed a tendency to a rise starting from the active stage, however it was only in the stages of incomplete and stable regression that it significantly exceeded the normal level. The data obtained should be considered during therapy of lepers to predict and control an unfavorable complication like specific polyneuritis

  19. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands - stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.; van Brakel, W.H.; de Vries, H.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  20. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands--stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Brakel, W.H. Van; Vries, H.J. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  1. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands--stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Roos; van Brakel, Wim H.; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  2. Leprosy reversal reaction as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Mariana Dias [UNIFESP; Porro, Adriana Maria [UNIFESP; Maeda, Solange Miki [UNIFESP; Gomes, Elimar Elias [UNIFESP; Yoshioka, Marcia Cristina Naomi [UNIFESP; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria Simões e Silva [UNIFESP; Tomimori, Jane [UNIFESP

    2008-01-01

    We report 2 instances in which reactional borderline leprosy manifested itself as an immune reconstitution phenomenon in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We discuss the clinical, laboratory-based, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of both patients. Furthermore, we review similar reports from the literature.

  3. Leprosy reversal reaction as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Mariana D; Porro, Adriana M; Maeda, Solange M; Gomes, Elimar E; Yoshioka, Márcia C N; Enokihara, Mílvia M S S; Tomimori, Jane

    2008-03-15

    We report 2 instances in which reactional borderline leprosy manifested itself as an immune reconstitution phenomenon in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. We discuss the clinical, laboratory-based, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of both patients. Furthermore, we review similar reports from the literature.

  4. Evaluation of oral and periodontal status of leprosy patients in Dindigul district

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    S A Jacob Raja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: After the introduction of the multidrug therapy, the incidence of leprosy is decreasing every year. However, periodontal complaints are commonly seen in these patients due to compromised immunity and impaired oral hygiene. The aim of the present study is to assess the oral and periodontal status of the leprosy patients in Dindigul district. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 62 patients treated in a leprosy center at Dindigul district. Among these, 22 (35.5% were female patients and 40 were male patients (64.5%. Age ranges between 40 and 70 with the mean age being 52. Facial changes, periodontal status, dental caries, attrition, tooth loss, plaque index (Silness and Loe, and calculus component of oral hygiene index-simplified were assessed. Results: Majority of the patients presented with loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, saddle nose, ocular involvement, and leonine facies. Gingival recession (54.8% was a predominant finding followed by tooth loss (69.5%, mobility (60.86%, attrition (56%, chronic pulpitis (34.7%, and dental caries (26%. Most of the patients had severe periodontitis. Conclusions: Compromised immunity and altered autonomy pave way for many dental complaints such as periodontitis and deposits in tooth with poor oral hygiene. Awareness about the oral health problems and reinforcement of oral hygiene should be insisted to the leprosy patients to prevent further morbidity.

  5. Molecular detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium leprae from Indian leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Mallika; Singh, Itu; Turankar, Ravindra P; Ahuja, Madhvi; Pathak, Vinay; Sengupta, Utpal; Das, Loretta; Kumar, Archana; Darlong, Joydeepa; Nathan, Rajeev; Maseey, Asha

    2018-03-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms for any infectious disease is a public health concern. Global efforts to control leprosy by intensive chemotherapy have led to a significant decrease in the number of registered patients. Currently recommended control measures for treating leprosy with multidrug therapy (MDT) were designed to prevent the spread of dapsone-resistant Mycobacterium leprae strains. Here we report the identification of MDR M. leprae from relapse leprosy patients from endemic regions in India. Resistance profiles to rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin of the isolated strains were confirmed by identification of mutations in genes previously shown to be associated with resistance to each drug. Between 2009-2016, slit-skin smear samples were collected from 239 relapse and 11 new leprosy cases from hospitals of The Leprosy Mission across India. DNA was extracted from the samples and was analysed by PCR targeting the rpoB, folP and gyrA genes associated with resistance to rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin, respectively, in M. leprae. M. leprae Thai-53 (wild-type) and Zensho-4 (MDR) were used as reference strains. Fifteen strains showed representative mutations in at least two resistance genes. Two strains showed mutations in all three genes responsible for drug resistance. Seven, seven and one strain, respectively, showed mutations in genes responsible for rifampicin and dapsone resistance, for dapsone and ofloxacin resistance and for rifampicin and ofloxacin resistance. This study showed the emergence of MDR M. leprae in MDT-treated leprosy patients from endemic regions of India. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SOCIAL PARTICIPATION OF DIABETES AND EX-LEPROSY PATIENTS IN THE NETHERLANDS AND PATIENT PREFERENCE FOR COMBINED SELF-CARE GROUPS

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    Henry John Christiaan De Vries

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier we showed that neuropathic complications limit social participation of ex-leprosy patients, even in a non-endemic leprosy setting like the Netherlands. Self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients can strengthen self-worth of participants, prevent further handicap, and enable the exchange of coping strategies. For non-endemic leprosy settings with a very low rate of leprosy patients a self-care group exclusively for (exleprosy patients is not likely to be feasible. A combined group with patients facing comparable morbidity would be more efficient than disease specific self-care groups. Here, we studied the comparability in social constraints of diabetic patients and ex-leprosy patients. Moreover, we investigated if combined self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients and diabetic patients would be desirable and acceptable for possible participants.Methods: Social participation was studied based on in-depth interviews and Participation Scale information collected from 41 diabetic patients and compared with the data of 31 ex-leprosy patients from a prior study. Moreover, we made an inventory of potential strengths and limitations and attitudes towards combined self-care groups for diabetic patients with neuropathy.Results: The following themes emerged among diabetic patients: disease confrontation, dependency, conflict with partner or relatives, feelings of inferiority, stigma, abandoning social activities, fear of the future, lack of information and hiding the disease. These themes were very similar to those voiced by the previously interviewed ex-leprosy patients. The latter more often mentioned stigma and disease ignorance among Dutch health care workers. Whereas ex-leprosy patients perceived stigma on multiple fronts, diabetic patients only mentioned feeling inferior. Diabetic patients experienced some form of participation restriction in 39% of the cases as opposed to 71% of the ex-leprosy patients. Diabetic patients did

  7. Bone island and leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpintero, P.; Garcia-Frasquet, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cordoba University, Medical School, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Tarradas, E. [Department of Imaging, Cordoba University, Medical School, Cordoba (Spain); Logrono, C. [Department of Dermatology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Carrascal, A. [Department of Radiology, Infanta Elena Hospital, Huelva (Spain); Carreto, A. [Department of Radiology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain)

    1998-06-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen`s disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen`s disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen`s disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen`s disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen`s disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  8. Bone island and leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpintero, P.; Garcia-Frasquet, A.; Tarradas, E.; Logrono, C.; Carrascal, A.; Carreto, A.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen's disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen's disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen's disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen's disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen's disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.)

  9. Increased IL-35 producing Tregs and CD19+IL-35+ cells are associated with disease progression in leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, Mohd; Saini, Chaman; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Khanna, Neena; Rao, D N

    2017-03-01

    The clinical forms of leprosy consist of a spectrum that reflects the host's immune response to the M. leprae; it provides an ideal model to study the host pathogen interaction and immunological dysregulation in humans. IL-10 and TGF-β producing Tregs are high in leprosy patients and responsible for immune suppression and M. leprae specific T cells anergy. In leprosy, involvement of IL-35 producing Tregs and Bregs remain unstudied. To study the role of IL-35 producing Tregs and Bregs in the human leprosy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients were isolated and stimulated with M. leprae antigen (MLCwA) for 48h. Intracellular cytokine IL-35 was evaluated in CD4 + CD25 + Tregs, CD19 + cells by FACS. Expression of PD-1 on CD4 + CD25 + Tregs, CD19 + cells and its ligand (PD-L1) on B cells, CD11c cells were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS). Serum IL-35 level was estimated by ELISA. The frequency of IL-35 producing Tregs and Bregs cells were found to be high in leprosy patients (pleprosy patients. This study point out a shift in our understanding of the immunological features that mediate and regulate the immune suppression and the disease progression in leprosy patients with a new paradigm (IL-35 producing Tregs and Bregs) that is beyond TGF-β and IL-10 producing Treg cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Socio-demographic characteristics, types and Slit Skin Smear (SSS) of the leprosy patients: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, U K; Mohammad, Q D; Uddin, M J; Chowdhury, R N; Bhattacharjee, M; Mondol, G; Roy, N

    2014-07-01

    This study was aimed to identify the socio-demographic profile, to know the types and to find out the Slit Skin Smear (SSS) result associated with leprosy. It was a descriptive type of cross sectional study. Total 62 patients having clinical features of leprosy, attending in Department of Neurology of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH) and Mymensingh Tuberculosis and Leprosy Hospital, Mymensingh from January 2010 to December 2011 were included. Patients underwent a detailed clinical evaluation followed by laboratory investigations. Out of 62 cases, the results showed that the mean age of leprosy patients were 37.8±14.6 years with the age range 12-80 years and the peak incidence was between 20-40 years. The frequency of male and female was 70.9% and 29.1% respectively with M: F of 2.4:1. From rural area 74.2% leprosy patients and 25.8% patients were from urban area and mainly day-labours (25.8%) and housewife (24.2%) by occupation. Married was 87.1% of patients and 12.9% were unmarried. Twenty one percent (21%) leprosy patients were found contact with leprosy. It was observed in this study that, 35.5% patients were PB (Pauci Bacillary) group and 64.5% of the patients were in MB (Multi Bacillary) group. Lepromatous Leprosy (LL) patients were (17.7%) and Borderline Lepromatous (BL) patients were (11.3%). Patients with Tuberculoid Type (TT) were (3.2%) and patients with Borderline Tuberculoid (BT) were (61.3%). The result of Slit skin smear (SSS) examination was negative in 59.7% patients and positive in 40.3%.

  11. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas da Silva Muniz

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. METHODS: This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. RESULTS: The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (p<0.05 in participants' post-intervention performance and satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology devices may be useful therapeutic tools to enhance autonomy/independence and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

  12. Patients' Perceptions on the Performance of a Local Health System to Eliminate Leprosy, Paraná State, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Touso, Michelle Mosna; Rodrigues, Ludmila Barbosa Bandeira; Yamamura, Mellina; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Dessunti, Elma Mathias; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Neto, Marcelino Santos; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Silveira, Tatiane Ramos dos Santos; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background In Brazil, leprosy has been listed among the health priorities since 2006, in a plan known as the “Pact for life” (Pacto pela Vida). It is the sole country on the American continent that has not reached the global goal of disease elimination. Local health systems face many challenges to achieve this global goal. The study aimed to investigate how patients perceive the local health system's performance to eliminate leprosy and whether these perceptions differ in terms of the patients' income. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was conducted in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil. Interviews were performed with the leprosy patients. The local health system was assessed through a structured and adapted tool, considering the domains judged as good quality of health care. The authors used univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and nineteen patients were recruited for the study, 50.4% (60) of them were male, 54.0% (64) were between 42 and 65 years old and 66.3% (79) had finished elementary school. The results showed that patients used the Primary Health Care service near their place of residence but did not receive the leprosy diagnosis there. Important advances of this health system were verified for the elimination of leprosy, verifying protocols for good care delivery to the leprosy patients, but these services did not develop collective health actions and did not engage the patients' family members and community. Conclusions/Significance The patients' difficulty was observed to have access to the diagnosis and treatment at health services near their homes. Leprosy care is provided at the specialized level, where the patients strongly bond with the teams. The care process is individual, with limited perspectives of integration among the health services for the purpose of case management and social mobilization of the community to the leprosy problem. PMID:25412349

  13. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  14. The additional benefit of the ML Flow test to classify leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Illarramendi, Ximena; Teles, Rose B; Penna, Maria Lucia F; Nery, José Augusto C; Sales, Anna Maria; Oskam, Linda; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2009-08-01

    The use of the skin lesion counting classification leads to both under and over diagnosis of leprosy in many instances. Thus, there is a need to complement this classification with another simple and robust test for use in the field. Data of 202 untreated leprosy patients diagnosed at FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was analyzed. There were 90 patients classified as PB and 112 classified as MB according to the reference standard. The BI was positive in 111 (55%) patients and the ML Flow test in 116 (57.4%) patients. The ML Flow test was positive in 95 (86%) of the patients with a positive BI. The lesion counting classification was confirmed by both BI and ML Flow tests in 65% of the 92 patients with 5 or fewer lesions, and in 76% of the 110 patients with 6 or more lesions. The combination of skin lesion counting and the ML Flow test results yielded a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 87% for MB classification, and correctly classified 86% of the patients when compared to the standard reference. A considerable proportion of the patients (43.5%) with discordant test results in relation to standard classification was in reaction. The use of any classification system has limitations, especially those that oversimplify a complex disease such as leprosy. In the absence of an experienced dermatologist and slit skin smear, the ML Flow test could be used to improve treatment decisions in field conditions.

  15. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

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    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based molecular typing of M. leprae from multicase families of leprosy patients and their surroundings to understand the transmission of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turankar, R P; Lavania, M; Chaitanya, V S; Sengupta, U; Darlong, J; Darlong, F; Siva Sai, K S R; Jadhav, R S

    2014-03-01

    The exact mode of transmission of leprosy is not clearly understood; however, many studies have demonstrated active transmission of leprosy around a source case. Families of five active leprosy cases and their household contacts were chosen from a high endemic area in Purulia. Fifty-two soil samples were also collected from different areas of their houses. DNA was extracted from slit-skin smears (SSS) and soil samples and the Mycobacterium leprae-specific RLEP (129 bp) region was amplified using PCR. Molecular typing of M. leprae was performed for all RLEP PCR-positive samples by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and confirmation by DNA sequencing. SSS of these five patients and six out of the total 28 contacts were PCR positive for RLEP whereas 17 soil samples out of 52 showed the presence of M. leprae DNA. SNP typing of M. leprae from all RLEP PCR-positive subjects (patients and smear-positive contacts) and 10 soil samples showed the SNP type 1 genotype. M. leprae DNA from the five leprosy patients and the six contacts was further subtyped and the D subtype was noted in all patients and contacts, except for one contact where the C subtype was identified. Typing followed by subtyping of M. leprae clearly revealed that either the contacts were infected by the patients or both patients and contacts had the same source of infection. It also revealed that the type of M. leprae in the soil in the inhabited areas where patients resided was also of the same type as that found in patients. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  17. Radiographic bone changes in multibacillary leprosy patients in Aburof mission clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, El Rayah Mohamed

    1996-08-01

    Leprosy is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease, caused by M. leprae. It is one of the most seriously disabling and economically important disease. In Sudan it affects about 20 thousands people. In this study 60 patients of MB leprosy were included. Historry and physical examination were carried out for each patient. BI was done for all patients and were subjected to x-ray investigations of the paranasal sinuses, hands and feet. 85%(51) of these patients were found to have radiographic changes in paranasal sinuses, 35 patients with mucosal thickening and 16 with diffuse opacified sinuses. 86.7% (52) of those patients were found to have radiographic bone changes in their hand and feet. 23.6% and 75.4% were found with specific and non-specific bone changes in their hands and feet respectively. A spectrum of radiographic bone changes was found in the hands and feet including; destruction, fractures, phalangeal resoption, distal phalangeal tapering, flexion deformities, osteoarthritic changes, charcot's joints, osteoporosis cystic bone changes and enlarged nutrient bone foramina. The majority of patients with radiographic changes in the paranasal sinsuses, hands and feet, were found to have long duration of the disease and more bacterial load. The disability in hands and feet is the major risk factor in bone affection in MB leprosy. (Author)

  18. Social Stigma In Leprosy

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    Mahjabeen Alam

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a disease associated with a strong social stigma and fear. This is due to the disfigurations and crippling which it causes, resulting in socio-eco­nomic hardships for the victims. Also, misconcep­tions and erroneous beliefs about leprosy abound, even now, and in almost all the sections of the popu­lation. The human and social impact and the age - old prejudices against the disease add insult to injury. Even the law, and media have played a very damaging role for the leprosy patients by perpetuating the stigma of leprosy. The strategy for elimination of leprosy must specially stress on the psycho-social aspects of the disease and also the rehabilitation of the leprosy patient in the home, work place and society. There is absolutely no need to regard leprosy as ‘special’ and the well - being of leprosy patients should become an integral part of the general health services of the community.

  19. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Lucas da Silva; Amaral, Irmara Géssica Santos; Dias, Thiago da Silva; Rodrigues, Jorge Lopes

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT) devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (pgrade 2 disabilities.

  20. Mycobacterial r32-kDa antigen-specific T-cell responses correlate with successful treatment and a heightened anti-microbial response in human leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Devalraju, Kamakshi Prudhula; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Sunder, Sharada Ramaseri; Adiraju, Kameswara Rao; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Anandaraj, M P J S; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Immunological characterization of mycobacterial peptides may help not only in the preparation of a vaccine for leprosy but also in developing in vitro T-cell assays that could perhaps be used as an in vitro correlate for treatment outcome. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the use of Mycobacterium bovis recombinant 32-kDa protein (r32-kDa) antigen-stimulated T-cell assay as a surrogate marker for treatment outcome and monitor vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated anti-microbial responses during multidrug therapy (MDT) in leprosy. Newly diagnosed tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy patients were enrolled and followed up during their course of MDT at 6 and 12 months. IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-23 levels in culture supernatants and expression of VDR, TLR2, LL37 and DEFB in r32-kDa-stimulated PBMCs were measured. Controls comprised household contacts (HHCs) and healthy endemic subjects (HCs). Significant differences were observed in the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, VDR and anti-microbial peptides LL37 and DEFB after treatment and when compared with that of HHCs and HCs, respectively. These findings suggest that responses to r32-kDa antigen reflect an improved immunological and anti-microbial response in leprosy patients during therapy, thereby indicating its potential use as an immune correlate in the treatment of leprosy patients. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Nailfold capillaroscopy in leprosy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Adma Silva; Pizzol, Vanessa Irusta dal; Fritsch, Scheila; Fonseca, Gabriela Poglia; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Muller, Carolina de Souza; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dalombo

    2016-01-01

    Due to mounting evidences of interaction between Hansen's bacilli with endothelial cells and the paucity of studies addressing the presence of nailfold capillaroscopic alterations in patients with Hansen's disease, a study was carried out in order to verify the presence of capillaroscopic alterations in patients with leprosy in its various forms and its correlation with clinical parameters. Ten patients were evaluated at a specialized university service. Sixty percent of those had some capillaroscopic change, such as micro-hemorrhages, ectatic, bushy and corkscrew capillaries. Such changes were unspecific, which suggests there is not a specific pattern for this disease. PMID:27828654

  2. Nailfold capillaroscopy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adma Silva de; Pizzol, Vanessa Irusta Dal; Fritsch, Scheila; Fonseca, Gabriela Poglia; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Muller, Carolina de Souza; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dalombo

    2016-01-01

    Due to mounting evidences of interaction between Hansen's bacilli with endothelial cells and the paucity of studies addressing the presence of nailfold capillaroscopic alterations in patients with Hansen's disease, a study was carried out in order to verify the presence of capillaroscopic alterations in patients with leprosy in its various forms and its correlation with clinical parameters. Ten patients were evaluated at a specialized university service. Sixty percent of those had some capillaroscopic change, such as micro-hemorrhages, ectatic, bushy and corkscrew capillaries. Such changes were unspecific, which suggests there is not a specific pattern for this disease.

  3. Histologic responses in sixty multibacillary leprosy patients inoculated with autoclaved Mycobacterium leprae and live BCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, W M; McDougall, A C; Fleury, R N; Neves, R; Reyes, O; Binford, C H

    1988-06-01

    Sixty lepromatous or borderline lepromatous patients were submitted to immunotherapy with a mixture of autoclaved Mycobacterium leprae and BCG. The histopathologic findings in skin biopsy specimens taken before and after immunotherapy were evaluated independently by six histopathologists in a workshop setting. Their pooled observations on diagnosis and classification were analyzed to assess the histopathologic changes following various periods of immunotherapy. Expressing the results as the average value of five to six independent observations, there were changes in classification of reversal or upgrading toward the tuberculoid end of the leprosy spectrum in 90.5% of the patients initially classified as lepromatous (LL), and in 83.3% of those initially classified as borderline lepromatous (BL). The histopathologic findings amply support the clinical, bacteriologic and immunological changes following immunotherapy from LL or BL, to BL, mid-borderline (BB) or even borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy.

  4. Clinicohistopathological correlation of leprosy

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    A Shrestha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a chronic infectious granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It is a spectral disease which is classified into five groups according to Ridley and Jopling based on clinical, histological, microbiological and immunological criteria. Adequate clinical information combined with bacilloscopy and histopathology is helpful not only in classification of different types of leprosy but also useful for management of the cases.METHOD: 50 cases of leprosy were examined and clinical data was recorded. Slit skin smears were stained with Ziehl Neelsen stain. Skin biopsy was stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin stain and Fite Farraco stain was performed to demonstrate acid fast bacilli. All patients were classified according to Ridley & Jopling classification. Clinico-histopathological correlation was done. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16.0.RESULTS: Most common histological type of leprosy was tuberculoid leprosy seen in 19(38% cases followed by indeterminate leprosy. Overall clinico-histopathological correlation was seen in 39.58%. The correlation was highest in indeterminate and histoid leprosy (100% followed by lepromatous leprosy (66.66 %% and tuberculoid leprosy (50%. Slit skin smear showed bacilli in 12 out of 48 cases (25% while biopsy showed bacilli in 16 out of 48 cases (33.3%.CONCLUSION: In the present study, clinical diagnosis did not correlate with histopathological diagnosis significantly (p value=0.04159. The study emphasizes the role of histopathological and bacilloscopic examination to aid the clinical diagnosis for accurate typing of leprosy cases then better management of the patient.

  5. Progress towards a leprosy-free country: The experience of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Awaidy, Salah T

    2017-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) released the Global Leprosy Strategy 2016-2020 towards a leprosy-free world. The author described the progress made towards the elimination of leprosy and suggested recommendations for the acceleration towards a Leprosy-free country according to WHO laid out criterion. Case record review of Leprosy patients managed between the years 1992 to 2015 were registered and analyzed. Data were collected from annual reports of the Ministry of Health including demographics, classification of leprosy new cases, relapse, childhood, grades of disability (GD) and multidrug therapy (MDT) completion rates. Leprosy prevalence rate declined from 1.64 to 0.09 per 10,000 population during the period 1992 and 2015 (pOman as they left the country shortly after diagnosis of leprosy due to a very short term contract, discretionary employment practices by the employers and prefer to go home to complete their treatment. Oman has met the elimination goals and made great strides towards becoming a leprosy-free country. However, challenges such as improving surveillance system efficiency and sensitivity for detecting timely leprosy cases, as well as foreign-born workers are still a major concerns.

  6. Prevalence of autoantibodies against cellular antigens in patients with HIV and leprosy coinfection in the Amazon region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichara, Clea Nazaré Carneiro; Bichara, Carlos David Araújo; Tostes, Camila; Povoa, Marinete Marins; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2017-06-01

    Infectious agents can activate self-reactive T cells. In general, infections trigger various mechanisms, including a lack of auto-tolerance, induction of costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells, and molecular simulation, in addition to cross-reactions between microbial antigens and self-antigens. HIV and leprosy coinfections lead to self-immunity with the production of autoantibodies. However, not enough data on the immune behaviour associated with this coinfection are available. Therefore, this study focused on the detection of autoantibodies against cellular antigens (AACA) in individuals with HIV and leprosy coinfection in the Amazon region. Patients were distributed into four groups according to their infections: (i) coinfection with HIV and leprosy (n = 23), (ii) infection with leprosy (n = 33), (iii) infection with HIV/AIDS (n = 25), and (iv) healthy blood donor controls (n = 100). AACA were identified by indirect immunofluorescence and the samples were tested using a commercial diagnosis kit containing the antinuclear antibody HEp-2. Morphologically, all stages of cell division were assessed in addition to the morphological features associated with the nuclear matrix, nucleolus, mitotic spindle, and cytoplasm. There was a high prevalence of AACA in the coinfection group (47.8%, n = 11) when compared with the control group of healthy blood donors (2.0%). The results showed predominantly cytoplasmic staining in all groups analysed, and no difference was observed between the presence or absence of AACA and the leprosy forms (paucibacillary and multibacillary) in the coinfection group. The results of this study show that despite the tendency of coinfected patients to have higher levels of autoantibodies, no correlation was observed between clinical and laboratorial variables and morbidity associated with HIV and leprosy coinfections or the levels of AACA in the serum of coinfected patients. These data are important to elucidate

  7. Social participation of diabetes and ex-leprosy patients in the Netherlands and patient preference for combined self-care groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Henry J C; de Groot, Roos; van Brakel, Wim H

    2014-01-01

    Earlier, we showed that neuropathic complications limit social participation of ex-leprosy patients, even in a non-endemic leprosy setting like the Netherlands. Self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients can strengthen self-worth of participants, prevent further handicap, and enable the exchange of coping strategies. For non-endemic leprosy settings with a very low rate of leprosy patients, a self-care group exclusively for (ex)leprosy patients is not likely to be feasible. A combined group with patients facing comparable morbidity would be more efficient than disease-specific self-care groups. Here, we studied the comparability in social constraints of diabetic patients and ex-leprosy patients. Moreover, we investigated if combined self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients and diabetic patients would be desirable and acceptable for possible participants. Social participation was studied based on in-depth interviews and Participation Scale information collected from 41 diabetic patients and compared with the data of 31 ex-leprosy patients from a prior study. Moreover, we made an inventory of potential strengths and limitations and attitudes toward combined self-care groups for diabetic patients with neuropathy. The following themes emerged among diabetic patients: disease confrontation, dependency, conflict with partner or relatives, feelings of inferiority, stigma, abandoning social activities, fear of the future, lack of information, and hiding the disease. These themes were very similar to those voiced by the previously interviewed ex-leprosy patients. The latter more often mentioned stigma and disease ignorance among Dutch health care workers. Whereas ex-leprosy patients perceived stigma on multiple fronts, diabetic patients only mentioned feeling inferior. Diabetic patients experienced some form of participation restriction in 39% of the cases as opposed to 71% of the ex-leprosy patients. Diabetic patients did acknowledge the comparability with leprosy as far as

  8. Mycobacterium leprae is identified in the oral mucosa from paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado de Abreu, M A M; Roselino, A M; Enokihara, M; Nonogaki, S; Prestes-Carneiro, L E; Weckx, L L M; Alchorne, M M A

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, the nasal mucosa is considered as the principal route of transmission for the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. The objective of this study was to identify M. leprae in the oral mucosa of 50 untreated leprosy patients, including 21 paucibacillary (PB) and 29 multibacillary (MB) patients, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), with antibodies against bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and phenolic glycolipid antigen-1 (PGL-1), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with MntH-specific primers for M. leprae, and to compare the results. The material was represented by 163 paraffin blocks containing biopsy samples obtained from clinically normal sites (including the tongue, buccal mucosa and soft palate) and visible lesions anywhere in the oral mucosa. All patients and 158 available samples were included for IHC study. Among the 161 available samples for PCR, 110 had viable DNA. There was viable DNA in at least one area of the oral mucosa for 47 patients. M. leprae was detected in 70% and 78% of patients using IHC and PCR, respectively, and in 94% of the patients by at least one of the two diagnostic methods. There were no differences in detection of M. leprae between MB and PB patients. Similar results were obtained using anti-BCG and anti-PGL-1 antibodies, and immunoreactivity occurred predominantly on free-living bacteria on the epithelial surface, with a predilection for the tongue. Conversely, there was no area of predilection according to the PCR results. M. leprae is present in the oral mucosa at a high frequency, implicating this site as a potential means of leprosy transmission. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. Sural artery perforator flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression for recurrent foot ulcer in leprosy patients

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    Ismail, Hossam El-din Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensory loss and alteration of the shape of the foot make the foot liable to trauma and pressure, and subsequently cause more callus formation, blisters, and ulcers. Foot ulcers usually are liable to secondary infection as cellulitis or osteomyelitis, and may result in amputations. Foot ulcers are a major problem and a major cause of handicaps in leprosy patients. The current study is to present our clinical experience and evaluate the use of sural flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression (PTND in recurrent foot ulcers in leprosy patients.Patient and methods: A total number of 9 patients were suffering from chronic sequelae of leprosy as recurrent foot ulcers. All the patients were reconstructed with the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression from September 2012 to August 2015. Six patients were male and three were female with a mean age of 39.8 years (range, 30–50 years. All the soft tissue defects were in the weight-bearing area of the inside of the foot. The flap sizes ranged from 15/4 to 18/6 cm. Mean follow-up period was 21.2 months (range, 35–2 months.Results: All the flaps healed uneventfully. There was no major complication as total flap necrosis. Only minor complications occurred which were treated without surgical intervention except in two patients who developed superficial necrosis of the skin paddle. Surgical debridement was done one week later. The flap was completely viable after surgery, and the contour of the foot was restored. We found that an improvement of sensation occurred in those patients in whom the anesthesia started one year ago or less and no sensory recovery in patient in whom the anesthesia had lasted for more than two years.Conclusion: The reverse sural artery flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression provides a reliable method for recurrent foot soft tissue reconstruction in leprosy patients with encouraging

  10. "I Wasted 3 Years, Thinking It's Not a Problem": Patient and Health System Delays in Diagnosis of Leprosy in India: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuvel, Thirumugam; Govindarajulu, Srinivas; Isaakidis, Petros; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Rokade, Vasudev; Singh, Rajbir; Kamble, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, leprosy is one of the major causes of preventable disability. India contributes to 60% of global leprosy burden. With increasing numbers of leprosy with grade 2 disability (visible disability) at diagnosis, we aimed to determine risk factors associated with grade 2 disability among new cases and explore patients and providers' perspectives into reasons for late presentation. This was an explanatory mixed-methods study where the quantitative component, a matched case-control design, was followed by a qualitative component. A total of 70 cases (grade 2 disability) and 140 controls (grade 0) matched for age and sex were randomly sampled from new patients registered between January 2013-January 2015 in three districts of Maharashtra (Mumbai, Thane and Amaravati) and interviewed using a structured close ended questionnaire. Eight public health care providers involved in leprosy care and 7 leprosy patients were purposively selected (maximum variation sampling) and interviewed using a structured open-ended interview schedule. Among cases, overall median (IQR) diagnosis delay in months was 17.9(7-30); patient and health system delay was 7(4-16.5) and 5.5(0.9-12.5) respectively; this was significantly higher than the delay in controls. Reasons for delayed presentation identified by the quantitative and qualitative data were: poor awareness of leprosy symptoms, first health care provider visited being private practitioners who were not aware about provision of free leprosy treatment at public health care facilities, reduced engagement and capacity of the general health care system in leprosy control. Raising awareness in communities and health care providers regarding early leprosy symptoms, engagement of private health care provider in early leprosy diagnosis and increasing capacity of general health system staff, especially targeting high endemic areas that are hotspots for leprosy transmission may help in reducing diagnosis delays.

  11. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

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    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  12. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7), multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7), and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (n = 6) or reversal reaction (RR) (n = 4) and controls (n = 5) were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, pleprosy patients (p = leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions of these patients. This should be regarded as an important factor in M. leprae nerve damage pathology.

  13. HLA Alleles are Genetic Markers for Susceptibility and Resistance towards Leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Frías-Castro, Luis Octavio; Romero-Quintana, Geovanni; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Arambula Meraz, Eliakym; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Khader, Shabaana Abdul; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2017-01-01

    Despite the use of multidrug therapy, leprosy remains endemic in some countries. The association of several human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and gene polymorphisms with leprosy has been demonstrated in many populations, but the major immune contributors associated to the spectrum of leprosy have not been defined yet. In this study, genotyping of HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles was performed in leprosy patients (n = 113) and control subjects (n = 117) from the region with the highest incidence for the disease in México. The odds of developing leprosy and lepromatous subtype were 2.12- and 2.74-fold higher in carriers of HLA-A*28, and 2.48- and 4.14-fold higher for leprosy and dimorphic subtype in carriers of DQB1*06. Interestingly, DQB1*07 was overrepresented in healthy individuals, compared to patients with leprosy (OR = 0.08) and the lepromatous subtype (OR = 0.06). These results suggest that HLA-A*28 is a marker for predisposition to leprosy and the lepromatous subtype and DQB1*06 to leprosy and the dimorphic subtype, while DQB1*07 might be a resistance marker in this Mestizo population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  14. Leprosy in Pregnancy: Obstetric Diligence is the Key

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    Rupali Bhatia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy in pregnancy is a rarely encountered event. Out of the 2000 patients detected of leprosy annually, two to three are pregnant women and majority of them are diagnosed in the third trimester. We, hereby, report a case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with Type I lepromatous reaction in a 26-year-old pregnant woman in early second trimester with a large raised red coloured lesion over the forehead and six other small lesions involving the trunk and limbs with reduced sensory perception over involved skin. Occurrence of leprosy in an obstetric patient belonging to low prevalence area of India is infrequent especially in the post elimination era. However, we do need to have a high index of suspicion in lesions suggestive of the disease.

  15. Morphea simulating paucibacillary leprosy clinically and histopathologically

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    José Saulo Torres Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinically and histopathologically paucibacillary leprosy shows similar features with initial morphea. In this case we report a 24 yr-old male patient who presented to our dermatology department with diagnosed paucibacillary leprosy by his local dermatologist, and confirmed by perineurovascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the histopathological exam. On physical examination we found new plaque lesions that were suggestive of morphea with alteration of sensitivity. A new biopsy was performed showing sclerotic superficial dermis with thickening of the collagen bundles in deep dermis and linear arrays lymphocytic infiltrate between the collagen bundles that confirm the diagnosis of morphea.

  16. Leprosy of the Larynx: A Case Report

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    Mansoureh Momen Heravi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an ancient deforming disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which is still poorly understood and often feared by the general public and even by some in the health care professions Fortunately, the outlook for patients has dramatically improved over the last three decades with the introduction of multi-drug treatment and management strategies that have somewhat diminished the stigma of this diagnosis. We report a rare case of leprosy of larynx. A 45 year old man presented with complaints cough, dyspnea and hoarseness since many years ago. Because of demonstration of acid fast bacilli in smear of his sputum, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was made and anti tuberculosis treatment was initiated. But he developed fever and his symptoms exacerbated. In examination there was a tender erythematous nodule on right supraclavicular region, loss of eyebrows and lashes and disseminated hyper and hypo pigmented cutaneous lesions on abdomen, thorax, back with normal chest x ray. Laryngoscopy to rule out laryngeal tuberculosis was done and granulomatous lesion was seen. Laryngeal and skin biopsy was performed which numerous acid fast bacilli, macrophages and foamy cells suggestive of lepromatous leprosy were demonstrated in both specimens. Treatment was started on multi bacillary regime of WHO multidrug therapy. In conclusion, this report highlights the importance of systemic involvement in lepromatous leprosy especially when the initial presentation is laryngitis or respiratory symptoms. Laryngeal leprosy may mistaken with tuberculosis laryngitis due to respiratory problems and existence of acid fast bacilli in respiratory secretions.

  17. Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae from patients with leprosy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Zhang, Q; Sun, Y; Wang, C; Zhang, Y; Fu, X; Chen, M; Zhou, G; Yu, X; Wang, J; Liu, H; Zhang, F

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies of drug resistance have shown that mutations in the drug resistance-determining region (DRDR) in the Folp1, RpoB and GyrA genes of Mycobacterium leprae are responsible for resistance to dapsone, rifampin and ofloxacin, respectively. To investigate the prevalence of mutations in genes associated with drug resistance in M. leprae isolates from patients with leprosy in Shandong Province. The DRDR in the FolP1, RpoB and GyrA genes was analysed by direct sequencing of the PCR product from 85 isolates of M. leprae sampled from patients with leprosy in Shandong, China. Sequencing results were obtained for FolP1, RpoB and GyrA in 67, 57 and 81 of the 85 samples, with mutation rates of 1.5% (1/67), 8.8% 5/57 and 25.9% (21/81). Three multidrug-resistant samples were found among the new cases: one had a mutation in both Folp1 and RpoB, while the other two had a mutation in both RpoB and GyrA. Primary resistance appears to be to either single drugs or combinations of two drugs. The resistance rate to dapsone seems to be low. To our knowledge, this is the first case of multidrug-resistant M. leprae from China. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Comparison of Effectiveness between Rifampicin Ofloxin-Minocycline Regimen and Multidrug Therapy-World Health Organization in Multibacillary Leprosy Patients

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    Octawyana Moestopo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug therapy (MDT which is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO for multibacillary (MB leprosy patients has some side effects; it is given in 12 doses over 12-18 months. Patients who refuse or are contraindicated in undertaking MDT-WHO can be given alternative rifampicin-ofloxacin-minocycline (ROM regimen for 24 months, whose side effects are less but more expensive. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness between ROM and MDT-WHO regimen in the first 12 months based on the derivation in morphological index (MI of acid-fast bacilli (AFB in MB leprosy patient. Methods: This was an observational analytical study with retrospective cohort method. Data was collected from medical records of MB leprosy patients in the Medical Record Installation and Morbus Hansen Clinic, Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. The overall derivation in MI in 12 months was assessed according to the type of therapy undertaken by the patient. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U Test. Results: A total of 59 data were selected out of 800 data of new leprosy patients based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among those, 20 patients were treated by ROM and 39 by MDT-WHO. Derivation of MI occurred among both groups, but ROM regimen had higher percentage (94.83% compared with MDT-WHO regimen (79.57% with p value=0.003 (p <0.05. Conclusions: ROM regimen has better effectiveness than MDT-WHO regimen in the first 12 months in MB leprosy patients.

  19. Mast cell heterogeneity and anti-inflammatory annexin A1 expression in leprosy skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maurício B; Mimura, Kallyne K O; Freitas, Aline A; Hungria, Emerith M; Sousa, Ana Lúcia O M; Oliani, Sonia M; Stefani, Mariane M A

    2018-03-29

    Mast cells (MCs) have important immunoregulatory roles in skin inflammation. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory protein that can be expressed by mast cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, epithelial and T cells. This study investigated MCs heterogeneity and ANXA1 expression in human dermatoses with special emphasis in leprosy. Sixty one skin biopsies from 2 groups were investigated: 40 newly diagnosed untreated leprosy patients (18 reaction-free, 11 type 1 reaction/T1R, 11 type 2 reaction/T2R); 21 patients with other dermatoses. Tryptase/try+ and chymase/chy + phenotypic markers and toluidine blue stained intact/degranulated MC counts/mm 2 were evaluated. Try + /chy + MCs and ANXA1 were identified by streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunostaining and density was reported. In leprosy, degranulated MCs outnumbered intact ones regardless of the leprosy form (from tuberculoid/TT to lepromatous/LL), leprosy reactions (reactional/reaction-free) and type of reaction (T1R/T2R). Compared to other dermatoses, leprosy skin lesions showed lower numbers of degranulated and intact MCs. Try + MCs outnumbered chy + in leprosy lesions (reaction-free/reactional, particularly in T2R), but not in other dermatoses. Compared to other dermatoses, ANXA1 expression, which is also expressed in mast cells, was higher in the epidermis of leprosy skin lesions, independently of reactional episode. In leprosy, higher MC degranulation and differential expression of try + /chy + subsets independent of leprosy type and reaction suggest that the Mycobacterium leprae infection itself dictates the inflammatory MCs activation in skin lesions. Higher expression of ANXA1 in leprosy suggests its potential anti-inflammatory role to maintain homeostasis preventing tissue and nerve damage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibodies to sulfatide in leprosy and leprosy reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, E.; de Vlieger, M.; Brand, A.; Klatser, P. R.; Ottenhoff, T. H.

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies to sulfatide have been reported in various demyelinating peripheral polyneuropathies. We have investigated the diagnostic value of these antibodies in leprosy. Anti-sulfatide IgM in leprosy patients was not significantly elevated. High anti-sulfatide IgG titers were observed in

  1. Leprosy Associated with Atypical Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Nicaragua and Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lucrecia Acosta; Caballero, Nelson; Fuentes, Lesny Ruth; Muñoz, Pedro Torres; Gómez Echevarría, Jose Ramón; López, Montserrat Pérez; Bornay Llinares, Fernando Jorge; Stanford, John L; Stanford, Cynthia A; Donoghue, Helen D

    2017-10-01

    In Central America, few cases of leprosy have been reported, but the disease may be unrecognized. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and histology. Preliminary field work in Nicaragua and Honduras found patients, including many children, with skin lesions clinically suggestive of atypical cutaneous leishmaniasis or indeterminate leprosy. Histology could not distinguish these diseases although acid-fast organisms were visible in a few biopsies. Lesions healed after standard antimicrobial therapy for leprosy. In the present study, patients, family members, and other community members were skin-tested and provided nasal swabs and blood samples. Biopsies were taken from a subgroup of patients with clinical signs of infection. Two laboratories analyzed samples, using local in-house techniques. Mycobacterium leprae , Leishmania spp. and Leishmania infantum were detected using polymerase chain reactions. Mycobacterium leprae DNA was detected in blood samples and nasal swabs, including some cases where leprosy was not clinically suspected. Leishmania spp. were also detected in blood and nasal swabs. Most biopsies contained Leishmania DNA and coinfection of Leishmania spp. with M. leprae occurred in 33% of cases. Mycobacterium leprae DNA was also detected and sequenced from Nicaraguan and Honduran environmental samples. In conclusion, leprosy and leishmaniasis are present in both regions, and leprosy appears to be widespread. The nature of any relationship between these two pathogens and the epidemiology of these infections need to be elucidated.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and stigma experienced by leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India (2013-2023

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    Swapan Kumar Kolay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India in terms of their knowledge, attitudes and the stigma they have experienced. Method: This cross-sectional study included 101 registered Leprosy patients, in a single leprosy treatment centre between April, 2012 - June, 2013. The data collection tool (a pre tested close-ended questionnaire was based on leprosy related socio-demographic variables, knowled geregarding different kinds of problems and issues experienced by the patients/participants. The investigators collected the data in face to face interviews and house hold visit. Results: Overall the majority of the respondents (85.1% were between 16 and 60 years of age. 74.3% were males, 80.2% were married, and 54.5% were literate. The majority (67.3% articulated positive knowledge about transmission of the disease, 75.3% knew that numbness of hands is an early symptom, 88.12% that it is curable, 91.1% had untreated deformities. Experiences reported included disturbed marital relationships (90.1% or social life (94.1%, loss of employment (54.5%, isolation with the sitation to talk to people (29.7%, family members not sharing food (94.1%; being forced to leave the family (54.45%. Health education interventions improved the knowledge of 91.1% of participants. Multi-Bacillary leprosy was higher in newly registered cases with higher disabilities in the hands and feet (60.4%, eyes (29.7%. 9.9% of WHO grade-2 disabilities were due to a delayed diagnosis. 67.5% of the patients/participants with some form of disability had experienced a delay in diagnosis up to 12 months. Conclusion: The study noted that the tribal people were affected by leprosy not only in terms of the physical problems, but also by the stigmatization that affects their social participation. These need to be addressed by the progress of the national leprosyp rogram.Keywords: Leprosy, social stigma, disability grading, India

  3. Health-related quality of life evaluated by Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 in pediatric leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neder, Luciana; van Weelden, Marlon; Viola, Gabriela Ribeiro; Lourenço, Daniela Mencaroni; Len, Claudio A; Silva, Clovis A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) in pediatric leprosy patients. A cross-sectional study included 47 leprosy patients and 45 healthy subjects. The HRQL was measured by Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL 4.0), and evaluated physical, emotional, social and school domains. The leprosy patients were classified by Ridley and Jopling classification criteria and assessed according to clinical musculoskeletal manifestations, laboratory and radiographic examinations. The median of current age was similar in leprosy patients and controls [12(6-18) vs. 15(5-18)years, p = 0.384], likewise the frequencies of female gender (p = 0.835) and middle/lower Brazilian socio-economic classes (p = 1.0). The domain school activities according the child-self report was significantly lower in leprosy patients compared to controls in the age group of 13-18 years [75(45-100) vs. 90(45-100), p = 0.021]. The other domains were alike in both groups (p > 0.05). At least one musculoskeletal manifestation (arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia) was observed in 15% of leprosy patients and none in controls (p = 0.012). Further comparison between all leprosy patients showed that the median of the physical capacity domain [81.25(50-100) vs. 98.44(50-100), p = 0.036] and school activities domain by child-self report [60(50-85) vs. 80(45-100), p = 0.042] were significantly lower in patients with musculoskeletal manifestations compared to patients without these manifestations. No differences were evidenced between the other HRQL parameters in both groups, reported by patients and parents (p > 0.05). Reduced physical capacity and school activities domains were observed in pediatric leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Simple and fast lateral flow test for classification of leprosy patients and identification of contacts with high risk of developing leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bührer-Sékula, S.; Smits, H. L.; Gussenhoven, G. C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Amador, S.; Fujiwara, T.; Klatser, P. R.; Oskam, L.

    2003-01-01

    The interruption of leprosy transmission is one of the main challenges for leprosy control programs since no consistent evidence exists that transmission has been reduced after the introduction of multidrug therapy. Sources of infection are primarily people with high loads of bacteria with or

  5. Effectiveness of single dose rifampicin in preventing leprosy in close contacts of patients with newly diagnosed leprosy: cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moet, F. Johannes; Pahan, David; Oskam, Linda; Richardus, Jan H.; van Brakel, Wim H.; Klatser, Paul R.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Smith, W. Cairns S.; Withington, Steve G.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Schuring, Ron P.; Faber, Roel; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis using a single dose of rifampicin to prevent leprosy in close contacts. DESIGN: Single centre, double blind, cluster randomised, placebo controlled trial. SETTING: Leprosy control programme in two districts of northwest Bangladesh with a

  6. The GATA3 gene is involved in leprosy susceptibility in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Priscila; da Silva, Weber Laurentino; de Oliveira Gimenez, Bruna Beatriz; Vallezi, Keren Bastos; Moraes, Milton Ozório; de Souza, Vânia Niéto Brito; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy outcome is a complex trait and the host-pathogen-environment interaction defines the emergence of the disease. Host genetic risk factors have been successfully associated to leprosy. The 10p13 chromosomal region was linked to leprosy in familial studies and GATA3 gene is a strong candidate to be part of this association. Here, we tested tag single nucleotide polymorphisms at GATA3 in two case-control samples from Brazil comprising a total of 1633 individuals using stepwise strategy. The A allele of rs10905284 marker was associated with leprosy resistance. Then, a functional analysis was conducted and showed that individuals carrying AA genotype express higher levels of GATA-3 protein in lymphocytes. So, we confirmed that the rs10905284 is a locus associated to leprosy and influences the levels of this transcription factor in the Brazilian population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Challenges beyond elimination in leprosy.

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    Naaz, Farah; Mohanty, Partha Sarathi; Bansal, Avi Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Gupta, Umesh Datta

    2017-01-01

    Every year >200,000 new leprosy cases are registered globally. This number has been fairly stable over the past 8 years. The World Health Organization has set a target to interrupt the transmission of leprosy globally by 2020. It is important, in terms of global action and research activities, to consider the eventuality of multidrug therapy (MDT) resistance developing. It is necessary to measure disease burden comprehensively, and contact-centered preventive interventions should be part of a global elimination strategy. Drug resistance is the reduction in effectiveness of a drug such as an antimicrobial or an antineoplastic in curing a disease or condition. MDT has proven to be a powerful tool in the control of leprosy, especially when patients report early and start prompt treatment. Adherence to and its successful completion is equally important. This paper has reviewed the current state of leprosy worldwide and discussed the challenges and also emphasizes the challenge beyond the elimination in leprosy.

  8. Effectiveness of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis in preventing leprosy in patient contacts: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Silvana Margarida Benevides; Yonekura, Tatiana; Ignotti, Eliane; Oliveira, Larissa Bertacchini de; Takahashi, Juliana; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Individuals in contact with patients who have leprosy have an increased risk of disease exposure, which reinforces the need for chemoprophylactic measures, such as the use of rifampicin. The objective of the review was to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis for contacts with patients with leprosy, and to synthesize the best available evidence on the experience and acceptability of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis as reported by the contacts and health professionals involved in the treatment of leprosy or Hansen's disease. In the quantitative component, individuals in contact with leprosy patients were included. In the qualitative component, in addition to contacts, health professionals who were in the practice of treating leprosy were included. The quantitative component considered as an intervention rifampicin at any dose, frequency and mode of administration, and rifampicin combination regimens.The qualitative component considered as phenomena of interest the experience and acceptability of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis. The quantitative component considered experimental and observational studies whereas the qualitative component considered studies that focused on qualitative data, including but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and action-research. The quantitative component considered studies that reported on outcomes such as the development of clinical leprosy in the contacts of patients who had leprosy, incidence rates, adverse effects and safety/harmful effects of the intervention. A three-step strategy for published and unpublished literature was used. The search for published studies included: PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature; and Google Scholar and EVIPnet for unpublished

  9. Interrogative suggestibility in patients with conversion disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, J; Lucas, P A; Ron, M A

    1997-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased interrogative suggestibility may contribute to the shaping and maintaining of conversions symptoms. Interrogative suggestibility was measured in 12 patients with conversion disorder and 10 control patients with confirmed neurological disease matched for age, premorbid intelligence, and as closely as possible in terms of their neurological symptoms to the patients with conversion disorder. Our observations do not support the contention that individual differences in interrogative suggestibility are of importance in the etiology of conversion disorders.

  10. Understanding non-compliance with WHO-multidrug therapy among leprosy patients in Assam, India

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    Sumit Kar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was undertaken to assess the adherence to World Health Organization (WHO-multidrug therapy (MDT and its successful completion by the leprosy patients and the extent of such defaulting, its correlates and reasons. Design: Retrograde cohort analysis was conducted during the first quarter of 2007 from the cases registered for WHO-MDT treatment during 2002 to 2005 in Kamrup district of Assam, India. Results: A total of 254 leprosy cases reflected the treatment seeking behavior of registered cases during the study period. Majority of the cases were from urban areas and defaulter rate higher in urban areas. The study group consisted of 60.63% males and 39.37% females.. Both the compliance and default was higher in the age group of 16 to 30 years. Majority of defaulters (32.28% had passed the high school leaving certificate examination had per capita monthly income between Rs 500 - 749 (30.71% and belonged to social class IV (33.86% and V (30.71%. Significant statistical association was found between gender, literacy status, per capita income per month and socioeconomic status with treatment outcome. On analysis for the reasons of defaulting treatment; majority (33.07% defaulted treatment due to loss of occupational hours when they come for receiving drugs at health center, 25.98% defaulted due to adverse reactions of drugs and 18.11% feared social stigma among major causes. Conclusions: The causes of defaulting treatment were related to gender, educational status, income as well as social class, or some combination of these. Recommendations, on strategic interventions to obviate the cause for noncompliance, were presented.

  11. Health information system model for monitoring treatment and surveillance for leprosy patients in indonesia (case study in Pekalongan District, Central Java, Indonesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmani, Enny; Kurniadi, Arif; Hsu, Chien Yeh

    2013-01-01

    After India and Brazil, Indonesia has the third highest incidence/prevalence of leprosy in the world. Every year thousands of new cases and case with grade-2 disability are reported and, while the recovery rate lingers only 80-90 %. Therefore, more than 10 % of leprosy patients drop out of treatment and can be a source of new infections in the community. Our research was aimed at determining apparent difficulties in the leprosy control program as well as how a health information system (HIS) could assist the Indonesian leprosy control program. We used qualitative method with deep interview and observation of document. One of the difficulties which the Indonesian leprosy control program faces is discontinuity of patient's data due to rotating staff as well as the treatment monitoring and queries patients which should be monitored after treatment has ceased. Technology implementation is feasible through short message service (sms) reminders and web base applications. The leprosy control program urgently needs to implement continuous monitoring and recording of patients because of the particular characteristics of this contagious disease.

  12. The Use of Assistive Technology to Promote Care of the Self and Social Inclusion in Patients with Sequels of Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is about the contribution of occupational therapy inside a rehabilitation group, and we focus on the autonomy of patients with disabilities due to leprosy. There are few studies on the use of assistive technology by leprosy patients; to our knowledge, none of them aim to have a subjective approach of care. Our purpose was to analyze the repercussions of assistive technology on autonomy of care of the self in patients with sequels of leprosy. Methods A qualitative, descriptive exploratory study with a semi-structured interview and a field observation as a research method was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015 at a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Findings Eight patients from the service of Occupational Therapy were interviewed, and 44 hours of observation were performed. Interviews followed a semi-structured script and a field journal was used to take notes. Analysis was conducted by the hermeneutic approach. Costs were obtained after a global cost analysis of the fixed and variable expenses and direct and indirect costs to the manufactured products with an amount of 100 dollars. Results were grouped according to the following categories: contribution of the adapted devices for the care of the self and feelings and sensations provoked by the use of self-help devices. The reports revealed feelings, perceptions and meaningful contents about the social, familiar and individual dimensions, also the stigma coupled with leprosy. However, forms of re-signification were elaborated. Conclusions Assistive technology empowers the subject to perform care of the self and promotes social inclusion. PMID:27124408

  13. Subcutaneous Cyst due to Medicopsis romeroi in a Diabetic Lepromatous Leprosy Patient: An Interesting Case Report and Review from India

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    Bhawna Sharma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Medicopsis romeroi (M. romeroi (syn. Pyrenochaeta romeroi is a rare melanized fungus causing subcutaneous/localized invasive phaeohyphomycosis in immunocompromised patients. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohypho-mycotic cyst caused by M.romeroi in a diabetic male with lepromatous leprosy. Molecular identification was performed by sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS region and D1/D2 region of Large Ribosomal Subunit (LSU.

  14. Evaluation of rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in relation to rheumatological manifestations in patients with leprosy from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionello, Carla Fontoura; Rosa Utiyama, Shirley Ramos; Radominski, Sebastião Cézar; Stahlke, Ewalda; Stinghen, Servio Tulio; de Messias-Reason, Iara Jose

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy patients may present several osteoarticular complaints, which require further evaluation of inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, an adequate clinical assessment in addition to testing for rheumatoid factors (RF) and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), can be useful in order to establish the correct diagnosis. In this study, the relation of RF and anti-CCP with rheumatological manifestations was evaluated in 97 leprosy patients from Southern Brazil. The results were compared to RA patients and healthy controls from the same geographical area and ethnic background. Neuropathy was observed in 71.1% and arthritis in 35.1% of the leprosy patients. A high frequency of RF positivity was observed among the leprosy patients (41.2%, 40/97), with RF immunoglobulin A (IgA) significantly associated with arthritis (OR = 7.9, 95% CI = 1.5-40.6 P = 0.008). Anti-CCP was observed in 9.3% (9/97) of the patients, with anti-CCP2 being the most frequent subtype. Only 4.1% (4/97) of the patients were RF and anti-CCP concomitantly positive. RF IgM showed a significant association with leprosy when compared to healthy controls (P leprosy in patients from the same geographical area and ethnic background (anti-CCP2 OR = 38.6; 95% CI = 16.49-90.26; P leprosy with other inflammatory diseases, such as RA, clinical and laboratorial evaluation of affected patients must be carefully assessed in order to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. The involvement of endothelial mediators in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Maria Renata Sales; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Nogueira, Maria Esther Salles

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that requires better understanding since it continues to be a significant health problem in many parts of the world. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes regarded as the central etiology of nerve damage in the disease. The activation of endothelium is a relevant phenomenon to be investigated in leprosy reactions. The present study evaluated the expression of endothelial factors in skin lesions and serum samples of leprosy patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin samples and serum measurements of VCAM-1, VEGF, tissue factor and thrombomodulin were performed in 77 leprosy patients and 12 controls. We observed significant increase of VCAM-1 circulating levels in non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.0009). The immunostaining of VEGF and tissue factor was higher in endothelium of non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02 for both) than healthy controls. Patients with type 1 reaction presented increased thrombomodulin serum levels, compared with non-reactional leprosy (p = 0.02). In type 2 reaction, no significant modifications were observed for the endothelial factors investigated. The anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of the endotfhelial factors may play key-roles in the pathogenesis of leprosy and should be enrolled in studies focusing on alternative targets to improve the management of leprosy and its reactions.

  16. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I determination using blood collection on filter paper in leprosy patients

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    TOMIMORI-YAMASHITA Jane

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 70 leprosy patients and 20 normal individuals, comparing the traditional sera collection method and the finger prick blood with the conservation on filter paper for specific antibodies against the native phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I from Mycobacterium leprae. The finger prick blood dried on filter paper was eluated in phosphate buffer saline (PBS containing 0.5% gelatin. The classical method for native PGL-I was performed for these eluates, and compared with the antibody determination for sera. It was observed that there is a straight correlation comparing these two methods; although the titles found for the eluates were lower than those obtained for serology. This blood collection method could be useful for investigation of new leprosy cases in field, specially in contacts individuals.

  17. Dehabilitation in the era of elimination and rehabilitation: a study of 100 leprosy patients from a tertiary care hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Divya; Khaitan, Binod K; Khanna, Neena; Sagar, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    To study the clinical profile of leprosy patients; to assess dehabilitation in leprosy patients and to study the factors affecting dehabilitation. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was carried out on 100 leprosy patients visiting the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi between February 2009 and February 2010. Demographic and clinical data were collected and subjects were administered the 52-item Anandaraj Dehabilitation scale which measures the negative impact of leprosy on family relationships, vocational condition, social interaction and self-esteem. The mean patient age was 30.9 years, 81% were males, 51% were at the lepromatous end of the spectrum, 87% had multibacillary leprosy, 22% each had Type 1 and Type 2 reactions, 22% had Grade 1 disability and 39% had Grade 2 disability. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 20 months. On the Anandaraj scale, 23% had high levels of dehabilitation; on an average, scores were in the range of medium level dehabilitation. Nearly 80% of patients avoided meeting friends, one-third hid the diagnosis from their families and worried about losing their jobs due to the disease, while around a quarter avoided sexual relations, used separate utensils and avoided touching children. Over 40% of unmarried patients faced matrimonial difficulty due to leprosy. Anxiety and guilt were common and incidence of suicidal ideas was much higher than the lifetime incidence in general population. Lack of education, Type 2 reactions, Grade 2 disability and lower age were predictors of greater dehabilitation. Dehabilitation of leprosy patients continues in this post-elimination era of rehabilitation. A large segment of preventable disability and resultant dehabilitation is likely being missed. There is an urgent need for corrective and preventive measures.

  18. National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP

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    Shetty Sushant

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the history of the growth and development of our National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP. The aims, strategy, means of eradication, the organizational structure have been discussed. Since the beginning of this programme, the prevalence rate and disability rate have shown a sharp decline. The number of cases detected and under treatment have also increased. The achievement made has been possible due to an excellent organization of leprosy relief work under NLEP with the active cooperation of the non- governmental organizations. Now that leprosy is on the decline, the need of education and rehabilitation of patients assumes a greater importance.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of slit skin smears in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveed, T.; Shaikh, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of slit skin smears in clinically suspected patients of leprosy using histopathology as gold standard. Study Design: Validation study Place and Duration of Study: Study was carried out at Rawalpindi Leprosy Hospital, Dermatology Department Military Hospital (MH) and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from 18th August 2012 to 18 Feb 2013. Methods: Appropriate technical and ethical approval for the study and patient consent were obtained. All suspected patients of leprosy of any age and either gender having typical hypo-aesthetic or anesthetic, erythematous or hypo-pigmented scaly skin lesions on any part of body were included in this study. All patients who have already received treatment for leprosy, patients with pure neural leprosy, patient not giving their consent for skin biopsy and patients with lepra reactions were excluded from this study. Forty eight patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were included in the study. Sample size had been calculated by using WHO sample size calculator taking confidence level 95%, absolute precision required 14% and anticipated population proportion 40%. Non-probability consecutive sampling technique was used to collect sample. Results: The results of the study revealed that out of 48 clinically suspected patients of leprosy skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis in 34 patients (70.8%) and the slit skin smear had diagnostic accuracy of 68.75% with sensitivity 55.8% and specificity and positive predictive value of 100%. Conclusion: Study suggested that although slit skin smears are rapid and inexpensive method of diagnosis but their diagnostic accuracy is low. (author)

  20. Association of a new FCN3 haplotype with high ficolin-3 levels in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Fabiana Antunes; Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Bini, Valéria Bumiller; Gonçalves, Letícia Boslooper; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; Messias-Reason, Iara Jose de

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system, leading to a high disability rate and social stigma. Previous studies have shown a contribution of genes encoding products of the lectin pathway of complement in the modulation of the susceptibility to leprosy; however, the ficolin-3/FCN3 gene impact on leprosy is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate if FCN3 polymorphisms (rs532781899: g.1637delC, rs28362807: g.3524_3532insTATTTGGCC and rs4494157: g.4473C>A) and ficolin-3 serum levels play a role in the susceptibility to leprosy. We genotyped up to 190 leprosy patients (being 114 (60%) lepromatous), and up to 245 controls with sequence-specific PCR. We also measured protein levels using ELISA in 61 leprosy and 73 controls. FCN3 polymorphisms were not associated with disease, but ficolin-3 levels were higher in patients with FCN3 *2B1 (CinsA) haplotype (p = 0.032). Median concentration of ficolin-3 was higher in leprosy per se (26034 ng/mL, p = 0.005) and lepromatous patients (28295 ng/mL, p = 0.016) than controls (18231 ng/mL). In addition, high ficolin-3 levels (>33362 ng/mL) were more common in leprosy per se (34.4%) and in lepromatous patients (35.5%) than controls (19.2%; p = 0.045 and p = 0.047, respectively). Our results lead us to suggest that polymorphisms in the FCN3 gene cooperate to increase ficolin-3 concentration and that it might contribute to leprosy susceptibility by favoring M. leprae infection.

  1. Correlation between therapy and lipid profile of leprosy patients: is there a higher risk for developing cardiovascular diseases after treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rosalba V G; de Araújo, Rafael S; Aarão, Tinara L S; da Silva Costa, Paulo Diovanne; Sousa, Jorge R; Quaresma, Juarez A S

    2017-05-01

    The impact of leprosy reduces health-related quality of life of affected patients, interfering with different factors such as nutrition. This study investigated the lipid profile, nutritional status, and risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients who underwent leprosy treatment in Brazil. Eighty-four adult patients of both genders ranging in age from 20 to 60 years and diagnosed with paucibacillary (PB) or multibacillary (MB) leprosy were selected after undergoing multidrug treatment. The following data were collected: sociodemographic and clinical data; food intake; anthropometric measures (weight, height, and waist circumference); and lipid profile components (total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], and triglycerides). Among the study population, there was a predominance of males (65.48%) aged 50 to 60 years, patients with an income of 248-496 American dollars (63.10%), patients who completed elementary school (65.48%), inactive patients (76.19%), non-smokers (46.43%), and non-drinking patients (69.05%). The levels (mean ± standard deviation) of total cholesterol were 193.8 ± 29.4 mg/dL in the PB form and 203.5 ± 41.7 mg/dL in the MB form. The mean LDL-c was 116.9 ± 22.7 mg/dL in PB patients and 121 ± 31.3 mg/dL in MB patients. Mean triglyceride levels were 123.4 ± 45.2 mg/dL in the PB form and 147.4 ± 88.9 mg/dL in the MB form. The evaluation of nutritional status showed that 41.67% of the patients were eutrophic, while 55.96% had excess weight. Food intake was significantly associated with HDL-c in male patients (P = 0.0264) and with triglycerides in patients above the ideal weight (P = 0.0049). The risk of acquiring CVDs was observed to be high due to patients' excess weight and increased waist circumference. This study will guide clinicians in the adequate treatment of patients with leprosy in order to avoid adverse cardiovascular

  2. Lepromatous leprosy: A rare presentation in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Sally; Modi, Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy (Hansen's disease) is caused by the obligate intracellular organism Mycobacterium leprae. It is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease transmitted through close contact. The latest current data shows that in 2010, eleven new cases of leprosy were reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in Australia. We report the case of a patient with untreated chronic lepromatous leprosy diagnosed in Queensland, 2012. Delay in diagnosis may have been due to the rarity of this condition.

  3. Lepromatous leprosy: A rare presentation in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Barkla

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is caused by the obligate intracellular organism Mycobacterium leprae. It is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease transmitted through close contact. The latest current data shows that in 2010, eleven new cases of leprosy were reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in Australia. We report the case of a patient with untreated chronic lepromatous leprosy diagnosed in Queensland, 2012. Delay in diagnosis may have been due to the rarity of this condition.

  4. Lepromatous leprosy: A rare presentation in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Barkla; Sunny Modi

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy (Hansen’s disease) is caused by the obligate intracellular organism Mycobacterium leprae. It is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease transmitted through close contact. The latest current data shows that in 2010, eleven new cases of leprosy were reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in Australia. We report the case of a patient with untreated chronic lepromatous leprosy diagnosed in Queensland, 2012. Delay in diagnosis may have been due to the rarity ...

  5. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

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    Ernesto Prado Montes de Oca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease.

  6. Nailfold capillaroscopy in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Adma Silva de; Pizzol,Vanessa Irusta dal; Fritsch,Scheila; Fonseca,Gabriela Poglia; Mulinari-Brenner,Fabiane Andrade; Muller,Carolina de Souza; Ottoboni,Vanessa Cristhine Dalombo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Due to mounting evidences of interaction between Hansen's bacilli with endothelial cells and the paucity of studies addressing the presence of nailfold capillaroscopic alterations in patients with Hansen's disease, a study was carried out in order to verify the presence of capillaroscopic alterations in patients with leprosy in its various forms and its correlation with clinical parameters. Ten patients were evaluated at a specialized university service. Sixty percent of those had s...

  7. Cutaneous lesions sensory impairment recovery and nerve regeneration in leprosy patients

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    Ximena Illarramendi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the mechanisms that enable peripheral neurons to regenerate after nerve injury in order to identify methods of improving this regeneration. Therefore, we studied nerve regeneration and sensory impairment recovery in the cutaneous lesions of leprosy patients (LPs before and after treatment with multidrug therapy (MDT. The skin lesion sensory test results were compared to the histopathological and immunohistochemical protein gene product (PGP 9.5 and the p75 nerve growth factor receptors (NGFr findings. The cutaneous neural occupation ratio (CNOR was evaluated for both neural markers. Thermal and pain sensations were the most frequently affected functions at the first visit and the most frequently recovered functions after MDT. The presence of a high cutaneous nerve damage index did not prevent the recovery of any type of sensory function. The CNOR was calculated for each biopsy, according to the presence of PGP and NGFr-immunostained fibres and it was not significantly different before or after the MDT. We observed a variable influence of MDT in the recovery from sensory impairment in the cutaneous lesions of LPs. Nociception and cold thermosensation were the most recovered sensations. The recovery of sensation in the skin lesions appeared to be associated with subsiding inflammation rather than with the regenerative activity of nerve fibres.

  8. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months’ follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves

  9. Historical Overview of Leprosy Control in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldarraín-Chaple, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Leprosy, an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, affects the nervous system, skin, internal organs, extremities and mucous membranes. Biological, social and environmental factors influence its occurrence and transmission. The first effective treatments appeared in 1930 with the development of dapsone, a sulfone. The main components of a control and elimination strategy are early case detection and timely administration of multidrug therapy. OBJECTIVES Review the history of leprosy control in Cuba, emphasizing particularly results of the National Leprosy Control Program, its modifications and influence on leprosy control. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION The historiological method was applied using document review, complemented by interviews with experts on leprosy and its control. Archived documents, medical records, disease prevalence censuses conducted since 1942, and incidence and prevalence statistics for 1960-2015 from the Ministry of Public Health's National Statistics Division were reviewed. Reports and scientific literature published on the Program and the history of leprosy in Cuba were also reviewed. DEVELOPMENT Leprosy has been documented in Cuba since 1613. In 1938, the Leprosy Foundation was created with ten dispensaries nationwide for diagnosis and treatment. The first National Leprosy Control Program was established in 1962, implemented in 1963 and revised five times. In 1972, leper colonies were closed and treatment became ambulatory. In 1977, rifampicin was introduced. In 1988, the Program instituted controlled, decentralized, community-based multidrug treatment and established the criteria for considering a patient cured. In 2003, it included actions aimed at early diagnosis and prophylactic treatment of contacts. Since 2008, it prioritizes actions directed toward the population at risk, maintaining five-year followup with dermatological and neurological examination. Primary health care carries out diagnostic and treatment

  10. Innate Immune Responses in Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Schmitz, Veronica; Silva, Bruno Jorge de Andrade; Dias, André Alves; de Souza, Beatriz Junqueira; de Mattos Barbosa, Mayara Garcia; de Almeida Esquenazi, Danuza; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2018-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease that may present different clinical forms depending on host immune response to Mycobacterium leprae. Several studies have clarified the role of various T cell populations in leprosy; however, recent evidences suggest that local innate immune mechanisms are key determinants in driving the disease to its different clinical manifestations. Leprosy is an ideal model to study the immunoregulatory role of innate immune molecules and its interaction with nervous system, which can affect homeostasis and contribute to the development of inflammatory episodes during the course of the disease. Macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and keratinocytes are the major cell populations studied and the comprehension of the complex networking created by cytokine release, lipid and iron metabolism, as well as antimicrobial effector pathways might provide data that will help in the development of new strategies for leprosy management. PMID:29643852

  11. “I Wasted 3 Years, Thinking It’s Not a Problem”: Patient and Health System Delays in Diagnosis of Leprosy in India: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajulu, Srinivas; Isaakidis, Petros; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Rokade, Vasudev; Singh, Rajbir; Kamble, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Background Worldwide, leprosy is one of the major causes of preventable disability. India contributes to 60% of global leprosy burden. With increasing numbers of leprosy with grade 2 disability (visible disability) at diagnosis, we aimed to determine risk factors associated with grade 2 disability among new cases and explore patients and providers’ perspectives into reasons for late presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings This was an explanatory mixed-methods study where the quantitative component, a matched case-control design, was followed by a qualitative component. A total of 70 cases (grade 2 disability) and 140 controls (grade 0) matched for age and sex were randomly sampled from new patients registered between January 2013-January 2015 in three districts of Maharashtra (Mumbai, Thane and Amaravati) and interviewed using a structured close ended questionnaire. Eight public health care providers involved in leprosy care and 7 leprosy patients were purposively selected (maximum variation sampling) and interviewed using a structured open-ended interview schedule. Among cases, overall median (IQR) diagnosis delay in months was 17.9(7–30); patient and health system delay was 7(4–16.5) and 5.5(0.9–12.5) respectively; this was significantly higher than the delay in controls. Reasons for delayed presentation identified by the quantitative and qualitative data were: poor awareness of leprosy symptoms, first health care provider visited being private practitioners who were not aware about provision of free leprosy treatment at public health care facilities, reduced engagement and capacity of the general health care system in leprosy control. Conclusions Raising awareness in communities and health care providers regarding early leprosy symptoms, engagement of private health care provider in early leprosy diagnosis and increasing capacity of general health system staff, especially targeting high endemic areas that are hotspots for leprosy transmission may

  12. Leprosy type 1 reactions and erythema nodosum leprosum

    OpenAIRE

    Kahawita,Indira P.; Walker,Stephen L.; Lockwood,Diana N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy reactions are a major cause of nerve damage and morbidity in a significant proportion of leprosy patients. Reactions are immunologically mediated and can occur even after successful completion of multi-drug therapy. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of leprosy type 1 reactions, erythema nodosum leprosum and silent neuropathy.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA copy number, but not haplogroup, confers a genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

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    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally eroded genome. The high level of inactivation of gene function in M. leprae, including many genes in its metabolic pathways, has led to a dependence on host energy production and nutritional products. We hypothesized that host cellular powerhouse--the mitochondria--may affect host susceptibility to M. leprae and the onset of clinical leprosy, and this may be reflected by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA background and mtDNA copy number. METHODS: We analyzed the mtDNA sequence variation of 534 leprosy patients and 850 matched controls from Yunnan Province and classified each subject by haplogroup. mtDNA copy number, taken to be proportional to mtDNA content, was measured in a subset of these subjects (296 patients and 231 controls and 12 leprosy patients upon diagnosis. RESULTS: Comparison of matrilineal components of the case and control populations revealed no significant difference. However, measurement of mtDNA copy number showed that lepromatous leprosy patients had a significantly higher mtDNA content than controls (P = 0.008. Past medical treatments had no effect on the alteration of mtDNA copy number. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggested that mtDNA content, but not haplogroup, affects leprosy and this influence is limited to the clinical subtype of lepromatous leprosy.

  14. A comparison of stigma among patients with leprosy in rural Tanzania and urban United States: a role for public health in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Neda; Black, David S; Rea, Thomas H

    2013-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, which causes peripheral insensitivity and disfigurements of the skin, limbs, and digits. Social stigma is a common consequence of leprosy and may differ according to level of physical disfigurement and geographic location. The objective of this study was to assess social stigma encountered by patients with leprosy in clinical settings located in rural Tanzania and urban USA and to compare the social stigma reported in these regions.   A total of 56 respondents were recruited from one leprosy inpatient facility in Shirati, Tanzania (n = 28), and one outpatient clinic in Los Angeles, USA (n = 28). Cross-sectional data were obtained from face-to-face interviews, which were conducted with respondents at each clinic location. Measures of perceived stigma were assessed in family relationship, vocational, social interaction, and interpersonal contexts.   Patients in Tanzania, as compared with those in the USA, reported significantly higher levels of stigma in family relationship and vocational contexts. Tanzanian patients also reported higher levels of stigma in social interaction and self-esteem contexts, but these differences were marginally significant and may reflect the small sample size.   Leprosy-related social stigma is a major problem in regions of both developed and developing countries; however, patients with leprosy in developing countries reported higher levels of stigma in four social contexts. A public health role in dermatology is discussed as an agent of early diagnosis, control, and education in order to reduce social stigma and promote social rehabilitation. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. Use of short tandem repeat sequences to study Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients in Malawi and India.

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    Saroj K Young

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate understanding of the transmission of Mycobacterium leprae makes it difficult to predict the impact of leprosy control interventions. Genotypic tests that allow tracking of individual bacterial strains would strengthen epidemiological studies and contribute to our understanding of the disease.Genotyping assays based on variation in the copy number of short tandem repeat sequences were applied to biopsies collected in population-based epidemiological studies of leprosy in northern Malawi, and from members of multi-case households in Hyderabad, India. In the Malawi series, considerable genotypic variability was observed between patients, and also within patients, when isolates were collected at different times or from different tissues. Less within-patient variability was observed when isolates were collected from similar tissues at the same time. Less genotypic variability was noted amongst the closely related Indian patients than in the Malawi series.Lineages of M. leprae undergo changes in their pattern of short tandem repeat sequences over time. Genetic divergence is particularly likely between bacilli inhabiting different (e.g., skin and nerve tissues. Such variability makes short tandem repeat sequences unsuitable as a general tool for population-based strain typing of M. leprae, or for distinguishing relapse from reinfection. Careful use of these markers may provide insights into the development of disease within individuals and for tracking of short transmission chains.

  16. Genetics of leprosy reactions: an overview

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    Vinicius Fava

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 (T1R and Type-2 (T2R leprosy reactions (LR, which affect up to 50% of leprosy patients, are aggressive inflammatory episodes of sudden onset and highly variable incidence across populations. LR are often diagnosed concurrently with leprosy, but more frequently occur several months after treatment onset. It is not uncommon for leprosy patients to develop recurring reactional episodes; however, they rarely undergo both types of LR. Today, LR are the main cause of permanent disabilities associated with leprosy and represent a major challenge in the clinical management of leprosy patients. Although progress has been made in understanding the immunopathology of LR, the factors that cause a leprosy patient to suffer from LR are largely unknown. Given the impact that ethnic background has on the risk of developing LR, host genetic factors have long been suspected of contributing to LR. Indeed, polymorphisms in seven genes [Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2, nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain containing 2, vitamin D receptor, natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1, C4B and interleukin-6] have been found to be associated with one or more LR outcomes. The identification of host genetic markers with predictive value for LR would have a major impact on nerve damage control in leprosy. In this review, we present the recent advances achieved through genetic studies of LR.

  17. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy

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    Nadja de Lima Santana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Leprosy or hansen’s disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host’s immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. METHODS Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551, TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099 and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911. A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. FINDINGS Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2. Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. MAIN CONCLUSIONS All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host’s production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  18. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nadja de Lima; Rêgo, Jamile Leão; Oliveira, Joyce Moura; de Almeida, Lucas Frederico; Braz, Marcos; Machado, Lídia Maria Medeiros; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Castellucci, Léa Cristina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy or hansen’s disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host’s immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR) variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. METHODS Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551), TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099) and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911). A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. FINDINGS Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2). Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. MAIN CONCLUSIONS All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host’s production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:28327786

  19. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nadja de Lima; Rêgo, Jamile Leão; Oliveira, Joyce Moura; Almeida, Lucas Frederico de; Braz, Marcos; Machado, Lídia Maria Medeiros; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Castellucci, Léa Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy or hansen's disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host's immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR) variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551), TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099) and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911). A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2). Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host's production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  20. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

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    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Woman' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung Jun [Institute for Leprosy Research, KLCA, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases.

  1. Radiologic changes of ulcerated foot in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Eun Joo; Chung, Eun Chul; Rhee, Chung Sik; Choi, Sung Jun

    1990-01-01

    There are radiologically characteristic bone changes on the foot and tarsus in leprosy. The bone changes are primarily due to Mycobacterium leprae infection and secondarily to the injurious effect, such as trauma, and infection on the denervated tissue. 117 bone changes of 100 leprosy patients with plantar ulcerations from Jan. 1984 to Oct. 1989 in the Korean Leprosy Control Center were analyzed. Male to female ratio was about 2 : 1 and the most prevalent age was 41 to 60 years, and according to Ridley-Jopling's classification. L-type was most common (46%). One hundred and eleven cases (94.9%) showed bone changes, suggesting high incidence of bone changes in patients with plantar ulcers. Specific findings were observed in two cases(1.7%). One hundred and nine cases showed nonspecific bone changes, which were osteomyelitis(23.1%), neurotrophic changes(39.3%), periostitis(5.1%) and arthritis(12.8%). Extensive bone involvement was seen in neurotrophic changes involving forefoot and metatarsal in 22 of 46 cases, and in secondary changes involving metatarsal bone in 23, tarsus in 20 of 49 cases

  2. Histopathological examination of nerve samples from pure neural leprosy patients: obtaining maximum information to improve diagnostic efficiency

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    Sérgio Luiz Gomes Antunes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve biopsy examination is an important auxiliary procedure for diagnosing pure neural leprosy (PNL. When acid-fast bacilli (AFB are not detected in the nerve sample, the value of other nonspecific histological alterations should be considered along with pertinent clinical, electroneuromyographical and laboratory data (the detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA with polymerase chain reaction and the detection of serum anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 antibodies to support a possible or probable PNL diagnosis. Three hundred forty nerve samples [144 from PNL patients and 196 from patients with non-leprosy peripheral neuropathies (NLN] were examined. Both AFB-negative and AFB-positive PNL samples had more frequent histopathological alterations (epithelioid granulomas, mononuclear infiltrates, fibrosis, perineurial and subperineurial oedema and decreased numbers of myelinated fibres than the NLN group. Multivariate analysis revealed that independently, mononuclear infiltrate and perineurial fibrosis were more common in the PNL group and were able to correctly classify AFB-negative PNL samples. These results indicate that even in the absence of AFB, these histopathological nerve alterations may justify a PNL diagnosis when observed in conjunction with pertinent clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data.

  3. Histopathological examination of nerve samples from pure neural leprosy patients: obtaining maximum information to improve diagnostic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sérgio Luiz Gomes; Chimelli, Leila; Jardim, Márcia Rodrigues; Vital, Robson Teixeira; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Corte-Real, Suzana; Hacker, Mariana Andréa Vilas Boas; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2012-03-01

    Nerve biopsy examination is an important auxiliary procedure for diagnosing pure neural leprosy (PNL). When acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are not detected in the nerve sample, the value of other nonspecific histological alterations should be considered along with pertinent clinical, electroneuromyographical and laboratory data (the detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA with polymerase chain reaction and the detection of serum anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 antibodies) to support a possible or probable PNL diagnosis. Three hundred forty nerve samples [144 from PNL patients and 196 from patients with non-leprosy peripheral neuropathies (NLN)] were examined. Both AFB-negative and AFB-positive PNL samples had more frequent histopathological alterations (epithelioid granulomas, mononuclear infiltrates, fibrosis, perineurial and subperineurial oedema and decreased numbers of myelinated fibres) than the NLN group. Multivariate analysis revealed that independently, mononuclear infiltrate and perineurial fibrosis were more common in the PNL group and were able to correctly classify AFB-negative PNL samples. These results indicate that even in the absence of AFB, these histopathological nerve alterations may justify a PNL diagnosis when observed in conjunction with pertinent clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data.

  4. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

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    Nawal Bahia El Idrissi

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC. Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7, multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7, and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL (n = 6 or reversal reaction (RR (n = 4 and controls (n = 5 were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively, with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively. In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively. The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions

  5. Identification of an antigenic domain on Mycobacterium leprae protein antigen 85B, which is specifically recognized by antibodies from patients with leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filley, E.; Thole, J. E.; Rook, G. A.; Nagai, S.; Waters, M.; Drijfhout, J. W.; Rinke de Wit, T. F.; de Vries, R. R.; Abou-Zeid, C.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three overlapping 15-oligomer peptides covering the 30-kDa protein antigen 85B of Mycobacterium leprae were tested by ELISA to identify epitopes recognized by human antibodies. Serum samples from patients with lepromatous leprosy (LL) reacted mainly with peptides comprising amino acid regions

  6. Application of the SRQ20 and the protocol of psychological assessment in patients with leprosy in a Reference Centre in Brazil.

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    Cunha, Marília Aparecida De Souza; Antunes, Douglas Eulálio; Da Silveira, Ricardo Wagner Machado; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to apply the protocol of psychological assessment (PAP) and the SRQ-20 to analyse the psychological profile of 130 leprosy patients, in order to evaluate the incidence of Common Mental Disorders (CMD), and screen patients with higher risk of psychological distress. The following results were found in the PAP: 31.53%, 23.8% and 16.9% reported an unsatisfactory childhood, adolescence and adulthood, respectively; 31.53% are afraid of being discriminated against and 16.9% experienced discrimination. Also, 13.07% reported drastic life changes due to leprosy; 29.23% have low self-esteem, 31.53% have real fear and 22.3% have phantasmal fear. In the SRQ-20, the prevalence of CMDs was 32.3%, with the majority being female, married, with low education (primary education), low self-esteem, and with a drastic change in life. Conclusion: This is one of the few studies on the psychological profile of leprosy patients demonstrating the importance of the application of investigative technologies in psychopathological screening, aiming on adherence to treatment and psychotherapy planning. Furthermore, it provides support for reflection on the integrality of healthcare for leprosy patients and the importance of psychologists in health teams.

  7. US and MR imaging of peripheral nerves in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.; Gandolfo, N.; Bertolotto, M.; Bianchi, S.; Fiallo, P.; Nunzi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyze peripheral nerves with ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) in leprosy and assess the role of imaging in leprosy patients. Results. Leprosy nerves were classified into three groups based on imaging appearance: group I consisted of 17 normal-appearing nerves; group II, of 30 enlarged nerves with fascicular abnormalities; group III, of 11 nerves with absent fascicular structure. Group II nerves were from patients subjected to reversal reactions; 75% of patients with group III nerves had a history of erythema nodosum leprosum. Nerve compression in osteofibrous tunnels was identified in 33% of group II and 18% of group III nerves. Doppler US and MR imaging were 74% and 92% sensitive in identifying active reactions, based on detection of endoneural color flow signals, long T2 and Gd enhancement. In 64% of cases, follow-up studies showed decreased color flow and Gd uptake after steroids and decompressive surgery.Conclusions. US and MR imaging are able to detect nerves abnormalities in leprosy. Active reversal reactions are indicated by endoneural color flow signals as well as by an increased T2 signal and Gd enhancement. These signs would suggest rapid progression of nerve damage and a poor prognosis unless antireactional treatment is started. (orig.)

  8. US and MR imaging of peripheral nerves in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, C. [Department of Radiology ' ' R' ' , DICMI, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Cattedra di Radiologia ' ' R' ' , Universita di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E.; Gandolfo, N. [Department of Radiology ' ' R' ' , DICMI, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bianchi, S. [Division de Radiodiagnostic. Hopital Cantonal Huniversitaire, Rue Micheli du Crest, Geneva (Switzerland); Fiallo, P.; Nunzi, E. [Department of Tropical Medicine, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2000-03-30

    Objective. To analyze peripheral nerves with ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) in leprosy and assess the role of imaging in leprosy patients. Results. Leprosy nerves were classified into three groups based on imaging appearance: group I consisted of 17 normal-appearing nerves; group II, of 30 enlarged nerves with fascicular abnormalities; group III, of 11 nerves with absent fascicular structure. Group II nerves were from patients subjected to reversal reactions; 75% of patients with group III nerves had a history of erythema nodosum leprosum. Nerve compression in osteofibrous tunnels was identified in 33% of group II and 18% of group III nerves. Doppler US and MR imaging were 74% and 92% sensitive in identifying active reactions, based on detection of endoneural color flow signals, long T2 and Gd enhancement. In 64% of cases, follow-up studies showed decreased color flow and Gd uptake after steroids and decompressive surgery.Conclusions. US and MR imaging are able to detect nerves abnormalities in leprosy. Active reversal reactions are indicated by endoneural color flow signals as well as by an increased T2 signal and Gd enhancement. These signs would suggest rapid progression of nerve damage and a poor prognosis unless antireactional treatment is started. (orig.)

  9. Leprosy reactions: the effect of gender and household contacts

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    Giuseppe Mastrangelo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Various host-related factors have been reported as relevant risk factors for leprosy reactions. To support a new hypothesis that an antigenic load in local tissues that is sufficient to trigger the immune response may come from an external supply of Mycobacterium leprae organisms, the prevalence of reactional leprosy was assessed against the number of household contacts. The number of contacts was ascertained at diagnosis in leprosy patients coming from an endemic area of Brazil. The prevalence of reactions (patients with reactions/total patients was fitted by binomial regression and the risk difference (RD was estimated with a semi-robust estimation of variance as a measure of effect. Five regression models were fitted. Model 1 included only the main exposure variable "number of household contacts"; model 2 included all four explanatory variables ("contacts", "fertile age", "number of skin lesions" and "bacillary index" that were found to be associated with the outcome upon univariate analysis; models 3-5 contained various combinations of three predictors. Male and female patients were analyzed separately. In females, household contacts were a significant predictor for leprosy reactions in model 1 [crude RD = 0.06; 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.01; 0.12] and model 5 (RD = 0.05; CI = 0.02; 0.09, which included contacts, bacillary index and skin lesions as predictors. Other models were unsatisfactory because the joint presence of fertile age and bacillary index was a likely source of multicollinearity. No significant results were obtained for males. The likely interpretation of our findings might suggest that in female patients, leprosy reactions may be triggered by an external spreading of M. leprae by healthy carrier family members. The small number of observations is an obvious limitation of our study which requires larger confirmatory studies.

  10. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Credit: NIAID Some classic histopathologic changes ... as Mycobacterium leprae . Why Is the Study of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) a Priority for NIAID? At the ...

  11. Clinical characteristics and outcome in multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients treated with 12 months WHO MDT-MBR: a retrospective analysis of 730 patients from a leprosy clinic at a tertiary care hospital of Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; Narang, Tarun; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Kumar, Bhushan

    2013-03-01

    Shortened (12 months) multidrug multibacillary regimen (MDT MBR) was implemented in India in 1998, however there is yet a paucity of crucial data on its long-term outcome. To assess the efficacy of 12 months MDT MBR in multibacillary (MB) patients at our centre. This was a retrospective study undertaken analysing the clinic records of 1210 patients registered at the leprosy clinic of our institute from 1999 to 2010. 730 MB patients were treated with 12 months MDT MBR over this period. High bacillary index (BI) > or = 3 + was observed in 313 patients at the time of registration. Four hundred and one (54.9%) patients experienced lepra reactions. Recurrent ENL was observed in only 14 patients which manifested even after 5 years of stopping treatment. Clinico-histological correlation was noted in 361 (49.5%) patients. During follow up period ranging from 9 months to 10 years, nearly all patients had clearance of skin lesions including histopathological/bacteriological improvement. Only 13 (1.7%) patients relapsed. All patients responded well with 12 months MDT MBR without significant side effects. The overall relapse rate was only 1.7%. Thus, the recommendation for 12 months MDT MBR for all MB patients is robust and operationally practical, a decision which seems logical.

  12. Analysis of the leprosy agents Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis in four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiang Y; Aung, Fleur M; Choon, Siew Eng; Werner, Betina

    2014-10-01

    To differentiate the leprosy agents Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis and correlate them with geographic distribution and clinicopathologic features. Species-specific polymerase chain reactions were used to detect each bacillus in archived skin biopsy specimens from patients with leprosy from Brazil (n = 52), Malaysia (n = 31), Myanmar (n = 9), and Uganda (n = 4). Findings were correlated with clinical and pathologic data. Etiologic species was detected in 46 of the 52 Brazilian patients, including 36 patients with M leprae, seven with M lepromatosis, and three with both bacilli. The seven patients with sole M lepromatosis all had tuberculoid leprosy, whereas only nine of the 36 patients infected with M leprae exhibited this type, and the rest were lepromatous (P leprae and two with M lepromatosis. Of the Malaysian and Ugandan patients, only M leprae was detected in 27 of the 31 Malaysians and two of the four Ugandans. The leprosy agents vary in geographic distribution. Finding M lepromatosis in Brazil and Myanmar suggests wide existence of this newly discovered species. The leprosy manifestations likely vary with the etiologic agents. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  13. Sociodemographic and epidemiological profile of leprosy patients in an endemic region in Brazil

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    Ronald Jefferson Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Hansen's disease is high in overlooked populations. METHODS: Data of Hansen's disease cases reported in the information system of the Department of Informatics, Brazilian Unified Health System, from 2013 to 2014 were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 434 studied cases of Hansen's disease, the female sex (52.5%, adult age (73.7%, low educational level (61.8%, and multibacillary form were associated with higher prevalence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Hansen's disease is more frequent among female adults with a low educational level, and the prevalence of multibacillary leprosy reflects disease detection at late stages.

  14. Nerve Damage in Young Patients with Leprosy Diagnosed in an Endemic Area of the Brazilian Amazon: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Sabrina Sampaio; Pires, Carla Avelar; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2017-06-01

    To describe nerve damage and its association with clinical and epidemiologic characteristics in young patients with leprosy diagnosed in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon. All 45 patients with leprosy younger than 15 years of age and diagnosed at a health referral unit in northern Brazil were invited to participate in a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytical study. Subjects were submitted to a templated simple neurologic examination of the peripheral nerves and answered a structured questionnaire. Of 41 cases, referral was the mode of detection in 33 participants (80.5%); 19 (46.3%) had been seen by 3 or more physicians to obtain a diagnosis, and 26 (63.4%) had received other diagnoses. The interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was more than 1 year in 30 cases (73.2%). Borderline leprosy was the predominant clinical form (48.8%); 63.4% of the participants had multibacillary leprosy, 31.7% had nerve damage, and 17.1% exhibited disabilities. The following variables showed a statistically significant association (P???.05) with nerve damage at diagnosis: home visit by the community health worker, number of doctors seen, number of skin lesions (>5), and lesions along the path of nerve trunks. Centralized healthcare, a low frequency of home visits by community health workers, and the difficulty in diagnosing leprosy in children are factors that contribute to late treatment initiation and an increased risk of peripheral nerve damage. In addition, multiple skin lesions and lesions along the path of nerve trunks require rigorous monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of ML0314c of Mycobacterium leprae and deciphering its role in the immune response in leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurkamajit; Sharma, Aashish; Narang, Tarun; Dogra, Sunil; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2018-02-15

    Mycobacterium leprae has a reduced genome size due to the reductive evolution over a long period of time. Lipid metabolism plays an important role in the life cycle and pathogenesis of this bacterium. In comparison to 26 lip genes (Lip A-Z) of M. tuberculosis, M. leprae retained only three orthologs indicating their importance in its life cycle. ML0314c (LipU) is one of them. It is conserved throughout the mycobacterium species. Bioinformatics analysis showed the presence of an α/β hydrolase fold and 'GXSXG' characteristic of the esterases/lipases. The gene was expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. It showed preference towards short chain esters with pNP-acetate as the preferred substrate. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 45°C and pH8.0. ML0314c protein was stable between temperatures ranging from 20 to 60°C and pH5.0-8.0, i.e., relatively acidic and neutral conditions. The active site residues predicted bioinformatically were confirmed to be Ser168, Glu267, and His297 by site directed mutagenesis. E-serine, DEPC and Tetrahydrolipstatin (THL) completely inhibited the activity of ML0314c. The protein was localized in cell wall and extracellular medium. Several antigenic epitopes were predicted in ML0314c. Protein elicited strong humoral immune response in leprosy patients, whereas, a reduced immune response was observed in the relapsed cases. No humoral response was observed in treatment completed patients. Overexpression of ml0314c in the surrogate host M. smegmatis showed marked difference in the colony morphology and growth rate. In conclusion, ML0314c is a secretary carboxyl esterase that could modulate the immune response in leprosy patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

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    Luciana Neder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia, musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis, and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were performed in leprosy patients. Results: At least one musculoskeletal manifestation was observed in 14% of leprosy patients and in none of the controls. Five leprosy patients had asymmetric polyarthritis of small hands joints. Nerve function impairment was observed in 22% of leprosy patients, type 1 leprosy reaction in 18%, and silent neuropathy in 16%. None of the patients and controls presented musculoskeletal pain syndromes, and the frequencies of all antibodies and cyoglobulins were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Further analysis of leprosy patients demonstrated that the frequencies of nerve function impairment, type 1 leprosy reaction, and silent neuropathy were significantly observed in patients with versus without musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0036, p = 0.0001, and p = 0.309, respectively, as well as multibacillary subtypes in leprosy (86% vs. 42%, p = 0.045. The median of physicians' visual analog scale (VAS, patients' VAS, pain VAS, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ were significantly higher in leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0001, p = 0.002, p = 0002, and p = 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify musculoskeletal manifestations associated with nerve dysfunction in pediatric leprosy patients. Hansen's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymmetric arthritis, especially in endemic regions.

  17. Evaluation of Three Mycobacterium leprae Monoclonal Antibodies in Mucus and Lymph Samples from Ziehl-Neelsen Stain Negative Leprosy Patients and their Household Contacts in an Indian Community

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    Nora Cardona-Castro

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucus and lymph smears collected from leprosy patients (9 and their household contacts (44 in the Caño Mochuelo Indian Reservation, Casanare, Colombia, were examined with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb against Mycobacterium leprae. The individuals studied were: 5 borderline leprosy (BB patients, 4 with a lepromatous leprosy (LL, all of whom were undergoing epidemiological surveillance after treatment and 44 household contacts: 21 of the LL and 23 contacts of the BB patients. The MoAb were reactive with the following M. leprae antigens: 65 kd heat shock protein, A6; soluble antigen G7 and complete antigen, E11. All the samples were tested with each of the MoAb using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique and 3,3 diaminobenzidine as chromogen. The patients and household contacts studied were all recorded as Ziehl-Neelsen stain negative. The MoAb which showed optimal reaction was G7, this MoAb permited good visualization of the bacilli. Five patients with BB diagnosis and one with LL were positive for G7; of the BB patients' household contacts, 9 were positive for G7; 7 of the LL patients' household contacts were positive for the same MoAb. MoAb G7 allowed the detection of bacillar Mycobacterium spp. compatible structures in both patients and household contacts. G7 permited the visualization of the complete bacillus and could be used for early diagnosis and follow-up of the disease in patients.

  18. Genetic variants of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes are not associated with leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ling; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), which has massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. Accumulating evidence showed a crucial role of mitochondria in metabolism and innate immunity. We hypothesized that the mitochondrial-related antimicrobial/antiviral immune genes MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), MITA (mediator of IRF3 activation) and MFN2 (mitofusin 2) would confer a risk to leprosy. In this study, we performed a case-control study to analyze 11 tag and/or non-synonymous SNPs of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes in 527 leprosy patients and 583 healthy individuals, and directly sequenced the three genes in 80 leprosy patients with a family history from Yunnan, Southwest China. We found no association between these SNPs and leprosy (including its subtypes) based on the frequencies of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes between the cases and controls. There was also no enrichment of potential pathogenic variants of the three genes in leprosy patients. Our results suggested that genetic variants of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes might not affect the susceptibility to leprosy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabonomics reveals drastic changes in anti-inflammatory/pro-resolving polyunsaturated fatty acids-derived lipid mediators in leprosy disease.

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    Julio J Amaral

    Full Text Available Despite considerable efforts over the last decades, our understanding of leprosy pathogenesis remains limited. The complex interplay between pathogens and hosts has profound effects on host metabolism. To explore the metabolic perturbations associated with leprosy, we analyzed the serum metabolome of leprosy patients. Samples collected from lepromatous and tuberculoid patients before and immediately after the conclusion of multidrug therapy (MDT were subjected to high-throughput metabolic profiling. Our results show marked metabolic alterations during leprosy that subside at the conclusion of MDT. Pathways showing the highest modulation were related to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA metabolism, with emphasis on anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving omega-3 fatty acids. These results were confirmed by eicosanoid measurements through enzyme-linked immunoassays. Corroborating the repertoire of metabolites altered in sera, metabonomic analysis of skin specimens revealed alterations in the levels of lipids derived from lipase activity, including PUFAs, suggesting a high lipid turnover in highly-infected lesions. Our data suggest that omega-6 and omega-3, PUFA-derived, pro-resolving lipid mediators contribute to reduced tissue damage irrespectively of pathogen burden during leprosy disease. Our results demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive metabonomic approach for identifying potential contributors to disease pathology that may facilitate the development of more targeted treatments for leprosy and other inflammatory diseases.

  20. Gallium-67 scintigraphy in borderline lepromatous leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouratidis, B.; Lomas, F.E.

    1993-01-01

    A middle aged woman with a pyrexia of unknown origin was shown to have borderline lepromatous leprosy. Early gallium-67 scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the subcutaneous tissues of the face and thighs. As a result of these findings skin biopsy was obtained from the right thigh which gave a diagnosis of borderline lepromatous leprosy. The authors have been unable to find other reports of gallium-67 scintigraphy in leprosy but the pattern of gallium-67 distribution should suggest the diagnosis. 5 refs., 1 fig

  1. Characteristics of pregnant and lactating women with leprosy

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    Paula Sacha Frota Nogueira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The clinical characteristics of women who conceive during leprosy and the association between leprosy and pregnancy are not well known. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 49 pregnant or lactating women diagnosed with leprosy in 2011. RESULTS: The patients had a clinical dimorphous form of leprosy (44.9%, no physical incapacity at diagnosis (87.5%, and no complications in either the patient or infant (33.4%. In 36.3% of cases, leprosy symptoms were presented in the last trimester of pregnancy, and in 31.9% of patients were in the first trimester of lactation. CONCLUSIONS: The association between leprosy and pregnancy should be routinely investigated, particularly in endemic areas.

  2. Pauci- and Multibacillary Leprosy: Two Distinct, Genetically Neglected Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschignard, Jean; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Orlova, Marianna; Cobat, Aurélie; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    After sustained exposure to Mycobacterium leprae, only a subset of exposed individuals develops clinical leprosy. Moreover, leprosy patients show a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that extend from the paucibacillary (PB) to the multibacillary (MB) form of the disease. This “polarization” of leprosy has long been a major focus of investigation for immunologists because of the different immune response in these two forms. But while leprosy per se has been shown to be under tight human genetic control, few epidemiological or genetic studies have focused on leprosy subtypes. Using PubMed, we collected available data in English on the epidemiology of leprosy polarization and the possible role of human genetics in its pathophysiology until September 2015. At the genetic level, we assembled a list of 28 genes from the literature that are associated with leprosy subtypes or implicated in the polarization process. Our bibliographical search revealed that improved study designs are needed to identify genes associated with leprosy polarization. Future investigations should not be restricted to a subanalysis of leprosy per se studies but should instead contrast MB to PB individuals. We show the latter approach to be the most powerful design for the identification of genetic polarization determinants. Finally, we bring to light the important resource represented by the nine-banded armadillo model, a unique animal model for leprosy. PMID:27219008

  3. Childhood leprosy: a retrospective descriptive study from Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India.

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    Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Binitha, Manikoth Payyanadan; Riyaz, Najeeba; Ambooken, Betsy; Mariyath, Olasseri Kalathingal Reena; George, Biju; Janardhanan, Anisha Kanhirangattil; Sherjeena, Pentam Veli Beegum

    2014-06-01

    To assess the profile and describe the clinical presentations and complications of childhood leprosy in a tertiary care hospital in North Kerala, South India during 2003-2012 and to analyse any change in the age-sex profile and the clinical pattern of leprosy in children below the age of 15 years over the 10-year study period. A retrospective descriptive study of children less than 15 years of age diagnosed with leprosy and registered for treatment in a tertiary care institution from 2003 to 2012. Demographic, clinical, investigative and treatment data were collected using a pre-set proforma. 138 (12.1%) of the total 1143 leprosy cases registered for treatment during the 10-year period were below 15 years of age. The 10-year study period witnessed a statistically insignificant decrease in the new childhood leprosy cases registered for treatment in our tertiary care institution. The majority of cases belonged to the 6-12 year age group (61.6%) with a male predominance. Borderline tuberculoid (BT) was the commonest clinical type (65.9%) followed by indeterminate leprosy (18.8%); 101 patients required paucibacillary (PB) and 37 needed multibacillary (MB) treatment. The number of patients requiring MB treatment showed a statistically significant increase and there was a significant decline in number of cases requiring PB treatment. During the entire study period no Type 2 lepra reaction was documented in patients below Hema 15 years and only two patients manifested Type 1 reaction. Ten (7.2%) out of the 138 patients were cases of relapse. There was a clear female predilection among relapse cases with the majority belonging to the adolescent age. Childhood leprosy still contributes to a significant proportion of the total case load denoting the continuing active horizontal transmission of leprosy. The rise in number of patients with more extensive disease in the background of declining disease prevalence is suggestive of the delay in diagnosis and treatment. A high

  4. Is there a role for rifampicin, ofloxacin and minocycline (ROM) therapy in the treatment of leprosy? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Setia, Maninder S; Shinde, Santosh S; Jerajani, Hemangi R; Boivin, Jean-François

    2011-12-01

    A combination of rifampicin, ofloxacin and minocycline (ROM) is one of the newer recommendations for treatment of leprosy. We performed a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies that had evaluated the efficacy of ROM therapy in treatment of paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients. Studies were identified by searching the PubMed, Embase, LILACS and Cochrane databases. Data were abstracted from all relevant studies, and fixed effects models were used to calculate the summary estimate of effect in paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients. Six studies comparing ROM therapy to multidrug therapy and eight studies that evaluated the effect of ROM therapy alone (no comparison group) were included in the review and meta-analysis. The combined estimate for single dose ROM vs. multidrug therapy in paucibacillary leprosy patients suggested that ROM was less effective than multidrug therapy in these patients [relative risk: 0.91, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.86-0.97]. However, the combined estimate for multiple doses of ROM vs. multidrug therapy in multibacillary leprosy patients suggested that ROM was as effective as multidrug therapy in reducing bacillary indices in these patients (proportion change: -4%, 95% CI -31% to 23%). No major side effects were reported in either the ROM or the multidrug treatment groups. Single-dose ROM therapy was less effective than multidrug therapy in paucibacillary patients. However, there are insufficient data to come to a valid conclusion on the efficacy of multidose ROM therapy in multibacillary leprosy, and additional studies with ROM therapy in multibacillary leprosy are needed. Furthermore, multiple doses may be considered as another alternative even for paucibacillary patients, and randomised controlled trials of this therapy may be useful to understand its contribution in the treatment and control of leprosy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The demographic and clinical characteristics of leprosy in Saudi Arabia.

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    Alotaibi, Mohammad H; Bahammam, Salman A; Ur Rahman, Saeed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A; Hassan, Imad S; Alothman, Adel F; Alkayal, Abdulkareem M

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Although the occurrence of leprosy has declined in Saudi Arabia, it has not yet been eradicated. To our knowledge, this descriptive retrospective study is the first to assess the clinical presentation of leprosy at the time of diagnosis in Saudi Arabia. All study subjects were leprosy patients admitted to Ibn Sina hospital, the only referral hospital for leprosy in Saudi Arabia, between January 2000 and May 2012. A total of 164 subjects, the majority of whom (65%) were between 21 and 50 years of age, were included, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.8:1. Of these 164 patients, 63% were Saudis, and 77% of all admitted patients were from the western region. Lepromatous leprosy was observed most frequently (33%), and 31% of cases had a positive history of close contact with leprosy. At the time of diagnosis, 84% of all subjects presented with skin manifestation. The prevalence of neurological deficit at the time of diagnosis was 87%. Erythema nodosum leprosum (E.N.L.) developed in only 10% of all subjects. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical characteristics pertaining to each type of leprosy in the region, and training courses in caring for and diagnosing patients with leprosy should be organized for health workers. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Current knowledge attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers about leprosy in Assam, India

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    Sumit Kar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is associated with serious morbidity and is a disease of public health concern because of the case load and the social stigma attached to the disease. Aim: To understand the knowledge of, and attitudes towards, leprosy amongst healthcare providers in Assam, India. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted during March to June 2007 in different health institutions of the Kamrup district of Assam. Results: Among the program managers interviewed, only half were organizing training sessions, and 37.5% were involved in supervision of the program activities at the periphery level. Among the program managers who were involved with leprosy elimination, only half were organizing training session and 37.5% were involved in supervision of the program activities at the periphery level. Medical officers consistently demonstrated higher knowledge about leprosy, followed by health supervisors and multipurpose workers (MPWs, including nursing staff. Regarding training status with regard to leprosy, 90% of medical officers, 80% of health supervisors and around 87% of MPWs (83% of male MPWs and 89% of female MPWs had attended training programs on leprosy. Regarding WHO MDT, 80% of health supervisors, 84.8% of male MPWs and 86.2% of female MPWs had an idea of MDT and treatment duration of various categories of patients. Conclusions: These observations suggest that there appear to be adequate knowledge and positive behavior among healthcare providers with regard to leprosy in this part of India. However, there is still a need to organize training programs at regular intervals to train new recruits, as well as reinforce and update the knowledge of those already trained.

  7. Fine needle aspiration cytology in leprosy

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    Prasad PVS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory diagnosis of leprosy by slit skin smear and skin biopsy is simple but both techniques have their own limitations. Slit skin smear is negative in paucibacillary cases whereas skin biopsy is an invasive technique. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC from skin lesions in leprosy with subsequent staining with May-Grunwald-Giemsa (MGG stain has been found useful. Aim: To evaluate the possible role of cytology in classifying leprosy patients. Methods: Seventy-five untreated cases of leprosy attending the outpatient department were evaluated. Smears were taken from their skin lesions and stained using the MGG technique. Skin biopsy was also done from the lesions, which was compared with cytology smears. Results: A correlation of clinical features with FNAC was noticed in 87.5% of TT, 92.1% of BT, 81% of BL, and 66% of LL cases. Correlation of clinical with histopathological diagnoses revealed 12.5% specificity in TT leprosy, 55.3% in BT, 52.4% in BL and 50% in LL, and 100% in neuritic and histoid leprosy cases. Both correlations were found to be statistically significant by paired t test analysis. Thus, it was possible to distinguish the tuberculoid types by the presence of epithelioid cells and the lepromatous types by the presence of lymphocytes and foamy macrophages. Conclusion: FNAC may be used to categorize the patients into paucibacillary and multibacillary types, but is not a very sensitive tool to classify the patients across the Ridley-Jopling spectrum.

  8. Leprosy in Medieval Denmark--osteological and epidemiological analyses.

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    Boldsen, Jesper L

    2009-12-01

    have been less common in North Scandinavia than in South Scandinavia, and there are some indications that leprosy was much more common in the Sámi population than in the North population of North Scandinavia. It is suggested that the rapid and early decline of leprosy in the towns was caused by the breaking of chains of infection by institutionalizing the most affected sufferers from leprosy. In rural communities it is suggested that the later decline of leprosy was brought about by a natural vaccination with the active substance in the Calmette vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis.

  9. The oral cavity in leprosy: what clinicians need to know.

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    Rodrigues, G A; Qualio, N P; de Macedo, L D; Innocentini, Lmar; Ribeiro-Silva, A; Foss, N T; Frade, Mac; Motta, Acf

    2017-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, a bacillus that has a tropism for skin and peripheral nerves. Leprosy treatment is based on a multidrug therapy established by the World Health Organization in 1982 and, despite its widespread use, Brazil ranks second worldwide in numbers of cases. Oral involvement in leprosy has been poorly described in the literature, and few studies have shown that although the bacillus is found in mucosa, specific leprosy lesions are rare and affect patients with advanced stages of the disease. This review aimed to assess the literature on oral manifestations in leprosy and the aspects involving oral cavity in leprosy pathogenesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Integrative analyses of leprosy susceptibility genes indicate a common autoimmune profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection in the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The development of leprosy depends on genetic background and the immune status of the host. However, there is no systematic view focusing on the biological pathways, interaction networks and overall expression pattern of leprosy-related immune and genetic factors. To identify the hub genes in the center of leprosy genetic network and to provide an insight into immune and genetic factors contributing to leprosy. We retrieved all reported leprosy-related genes and performed integrative analyses covering gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, protein-protein interaction network, and evolutionary analyses. A list of 123 differentially expressed leprosy related genes, which were enriched in activation and regulation of immune response, was obtained in our analyses. Cross-disorder analysis showed that the list of leprosy susceptibility genes was largely shared by typical autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus and arthritis, suggesting that similar pathways might be affected in leprosy and autoimmune diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) and positive selection analyses revealed a co-evolution network of leprosy risk genes. Our analyses showed that leprosy associated genes constituted a co-evolution network and might undergo positive selection driven by M. leprae. We suggested that leprosy may be a kind of autoimmune disease and the development of leprosy is a matter of defect or over-activation of body immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

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    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties.

  12. Leprosy in the Bible.

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    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the biblical term tzaraat has referred to leprosy. In fact, the disease or diseases described under this name have no relationship to leprosy, as it was known in the Middle Ages or today; moreover, the term referred not only to skin disease, but also to the state of the ritual impurity and punishment for the sins. Although the real nature of tzaraat remains unknown, the differential diagnosis might include the following: Psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, favus, dermatophyte infections, nummular dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, crusted scabies, syphilis, impetigo, sycosis barbae, alopecia areata, furuncles, scabies, neurodermatitis, scarlet fever, lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, folliculitis decalvans, morphea, sarcoidosis, and lichen planopilaris. Leprosy became interchangeable with the biblical leprosy due to two inaccurate translations: The Hebrew tzaraat was first translated into Greek as leprosy in the sixth century, and later, the word leprosy was translated into Arabic as lepra in the ninth century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Leprosy in a High-Risk Community Setting in Sri Lanka.

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    Dabrera, Thushani Marie Elizabeth; Tillekeratne, L Gayani; Fernando, M S Nilanthi; Kasturiaratchi, S T Kaushlya; Østbye, Truls

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is caused by the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus. Pockets of high endemicity remain in a number of countries including Sri Lanka, in spite of the fact that elimination has been achieved at the national level. In 2012, in a village in the Puttlam district, dermatologists reported an increase in individuals with leprosy. This village had been established in the 1990s for people displaced from Northern Sri Lanka during a civil war. A comprehensive household survey was conducted by district health officials from June to July 2012, and all household members present during the survey period were examined for leprosy lesions. Patients with suspected leprosy were referred to a dermatology clinic for clinical or pathological confirmation. The prevalence of leprosy was high (511 per 10 000 population). Household contact with another patient with leprosy increased the risk of leprosy (odds ratio = 6.69; P leprosy at bay in high-risk communities.

  14. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil

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    Amanda Nogueira Brum Fontes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23, Pernambuco (n = 41, Rio de Janeiro (n = 22 and Rondônia (RO (n = 78. All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1% yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  15. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy

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    André Flores Braga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. lepraewas lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy.

  16. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, André Flores; Moretto, Daniela Ferraz; Gigliotti, Patrícia; Peruchi, Mariela; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Iyer, Anand; Das, Pranab Kumar; Souza, Vânia Nieto Brito de

    2015-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs) using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL)-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL) leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. leprae was lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy.

  17. Drug therapy of leprosy

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    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of the IL6 and NOD2 genes are risk factors for inflammatory reactions in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Marques, Carolinne; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Illaramendi, Ximena; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana de Andréa; Barbosa, Mayara Garcia de Mattos; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Pacheco, Antonio Guilherme; Moraes, Milton Ozório

    2017-07-01

    The pathways that trigger exacerbated immune reactions in leprosy could be determined by genetic variations. Here, in a prospective approach, both genetic and non-genetic variables influencing the amount of time before the development of reactional episodes were studied using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, and the genetic effect was estimated by the Cox proportional-hazards regression model. In a sample including 447 leprosy patients, we confirmed that gender (male), and high bacillary clinical forms are risk factors for leprosy reactions. From the 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the 8 candidate genes genotyped (TNF/LTA, IFNG, IL10, TLR1, NOD2, SOD2, and IL6) we observed statistically different survival curves for rs751271 at the NOD2 and rs2069845 at the IL6 genes (log-rank p-values = 0.002 and 0.023, respectively), suggesting an influence on the amount of time before developing leprosy reactions. Cox models showed associations between the SNPs rs751271 at NOD2 and rs2069845 at IL6 with leprosy reactions (HRGT = 0.45, p = 0.002; HRAG = 1.88, p = 0.0008, respectively). Finally, IL-6 and IFN-γ levels were confirmed as high, while IL-10 titers were low in the sera of reactional patients. Rs751271-GT genotype-bearing individuals correlated (p = 0.05) with lower levels of IL-6 in sera samples, corroborating the genetic results. Although the experimental size may be considered a limitation of the study, the findings confirm the association of classical variables such as sex and clinical forms with leprosy, demonstrating the consistency of the results. From the results, we conclude that SNPs at the NOD2 and IL6 genes are associated with leprosy reactions as an outcome. NOD2 also has a clear functional pro-inflammatory link that is coherent with the exacerbated responses observed in these patients.

  19. Turn-over of Stratijm Corneum in Leprosy

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    R P Okhandiar

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratum corneum showed increased proliferative activity on the patches of leprosy as evidenced by a significantly fast stratum corneum turnover time (p 0.001 measured by fluorescent staining technic with dansyl chloride. These findings suggest imperfect keratinization on the patches of leprosy leading to formation of structurally weak stratum corneum.

  20. Leprosy: current situation, clinical and laboratory aspects, treatment history and perspective of the uniform multidrug therapy for all patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Rossilene Conceição da Silva; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Penna, Maria Lúcia F; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Talhari, Sinésio

    2017-01-01

    In this review, the most relevant and current epidemiological data, the main clinical, laboratory and therapeutical aspects of leprosy are presented. Detailed discussion of the main drugs used for leprosy treatment, their most relevant adverse effects, evolution of the therapeutic regimen, from dapsone as a monotherapy to the proposed polychemotherapy by World Health Organization (WHO) can be found in this CME. We specifically highlight the drug acceptability, reduction in treatment duration and the most recent proposal of a single therapeutic regimen, with a fixed six months duration, for all clinical presentations, regardless of their classification.

  1. A study of oxidative stress in paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy

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    Jyothi P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study and assessment of oxidative stress plays a significant role in the arena of leprosy treatment. Once the presence of oxidative stress is proved, antioxidant supplements can be provided to reduce tissue injury and deformity. Aim: To study oxidative stress in paucibacillary (PB and multibacillary (MB leprosy and to compare it with that in a control group. Methods: Fifty-eight untreated leprosy patients (23 PB and 35 MB cases were studied and compared with 58 healthy controls. Superoxide dismutase (SOD level as a measure of antioxidant status; malondialdehyde (MDA level, an indicator of lipid peroxidation; and MDA/SOD ratio, an index of oxidative stress were estimated in the serum. Results: The SOD level was decreased in leprosy patients, especially in MB leprosy. The MDA level was increased in PB and MB leprosy. The MDA/SOD ratio was significantly elevated in MB patients. There was a steady increase in this ratio along the spectrum from tuberculoid to lepromatous leprosy (LL. Conclusion: There is increased oxidative stress in MB leprosy, especially in LL. This warrants antioxidant supplements to prevent tissue injury.

  2. Evaluation of cellular phenotypes implicated in immunopathogenesis and monitoring immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV/leprosy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem Beatriz Wagner; Sales, Anna Maria; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; de Oliveira, Ariane Leite; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR). However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%), dropping significantly (p<0,05) during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%). Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells interesting tool identifying HIV/leprosy individuals at risk for IRIS/RR. So, a

  3. Evaluation of cellular phenotypes implicated in immunopathogenesis and monitoring immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV/leprosy cases.

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    Carmem Beatriz Wagner Giacoia-Gripp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR. However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%, dropping significantly (p<0,05 during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%. Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells

  4. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae strains from a region of high endemic leprosy prevalence in India.

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    Lavania, Mallika; Jadhav, Rupendra; Turankar, Ravindra P; Singh, Itu; Nigam, Astha; Sengupta, U

    2015-12-01

    Leprosy is still a major health problem in India which has the highest number of cases. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been proposed as tools of strain typing for tracking the transmission of leprosy. However, empirical data for a defined population from scale and duration were lacking for studying the transmission chain of leprosy. Seventy slit skin scrapings were collected from Purulia (West Bengal), Miraj (Maharashtra), Shahdara (Delhi), and Naini (UP) hospitals of The Leprosy Mission (TLM). SNP subtyping and MLVA on 10 VNTR loci were applied for the strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae. Along with the strain typing conventional epidemiological investigation was also performed to trace the transmission chain. In addition, phylogenetic analysis was done on variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) data sets using sequence type analysis and recombinational tests (START) software. START software performs analyses to aid in the investigation of bacterial population structure using multilocus sequence data. These analyses include data summary, lineage assignment, and tests for recombination and selection. Diversity was observed in the cross-sectional survey of isolates obtained from 70 patients. Similarity in fingerprinting profiles observed in specimens of cases from the same family or neighborhood locations indicated a possible common source of infection. The data suggest that these VNTRs including subtyping of SNPs can be used to study the sources and transmission chain in leprosy, which could be very important in monitoring of the disease dynamics in high endemic foci. The present study strongly indicates that multi-case families might constitute epidemic foci and the main source of M. leprae in villages, causing the predominant strain or cluster infection leading to the spread of leprosy in the community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Th9 cytokines response and its possible implications in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; Pagliari, Carla; de Almeida, Dandara Simone Maia; Barros, Luiz Fernando Lima; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; Dias, Leonidas Braga; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2017-06-01

    Leprosy is an infectious-contagious disease whose clinical evolution depends on the interaction of the infectious agent with the immune response of the host, leading to a clinical spectrum that ranges from lepromatous leprosy (susceptibility, LL) to tuberculoid leprosy (resistance, TT). The immune response profile will depend on the pattern of cytokine production and on the activity of macrophages during infection. Classically, the clinical evolution of leprosy has been associated with Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, but the role of new cytokine profiles such as T helper 9 (Th9) remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the tissue expression profile of these cytokines, a cross-sectional study was conducted using a sample of 30 leprosy skin lesion biopsies obtained from patients with leprosy, 16 TT and 14 lepromatous LL. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant difference in interleukin (IL)-9, IL-4 transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-10 levels between the two groups. IL-9 was more expressed in TT lesions compared with LL lesions. Higher expression of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β was observed in LL compared with TT. IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β tended to be negatively correlated with the expression of IL-9, indicating a possible antagonistic activity in tissue. The results suggest that Th9 lymphocytes may be involved in the response to Mycobacterium leprae , positively or negatively regulating microbicidal activity of the local immune system in the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Pretty leprosy: Another face of Hansen’s disease! A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prem Anand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pretty leprosy is one of the rare severe forms of lepromatous leprosy. It is a reaction pattern that occurs in untreated pure primitive diffuse lepromatous leprosy or lepromatous leprosy. The skin of the patient is diffusely infiltrated and shiny, so that natural wrinkles are obliterated. It generates a moist and myxoedematous complexion imparting a healthy aspect to the patient. Thus the disease got the name. In this review we have reviewed almost all available literature to point more light toward the clinical variant pretty leprosy. A search was made in PubMed central to know the availability of information about pretty leprosy, but the response was nil for pretty leprosy. 37 articles were spotted in PubMed media on Lucioleprosy; 3 review articles are present and the rest were case reports.

  7. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Cardona-Castro

    Full Text Available Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers, Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  8. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  9. Spatial and temporal epidemiology of Mycobacterium leprae infection among leprosy patients and household contacts of an endemic region in Southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicchio, Mariana V C; Araujo, Sergio; Martins, Lorraine C; Pinheiro, Andressa V; Pereira, Daniela C; Borges, Angélica; Antunes, Douglas E; Barreto, Josafá G; Goulart, Isabela Maria B

    2016-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that remains a public health problem in low- and middle-income countries. Household contacts of leprosy patients (HHCs) have increased risk of developing disease and are important links in the chain of transmission of Mycobacterium leprae. Based on epidemiological and operational factors, the global elimination strategy depends on the geographic stratification of endemic areas to intensify control activities. The purpose of the study was to integrate epidemiological indicators and serology into the spatial and temporal analysis of M. leprae infection, in order to understanding of the dynamics of transmission, essential information for the control of leprosy. Using location-based technologies and epidemiological data obtained from leprosy cases (N=371) and HHCs (N=53), during a 11year period (2004-2014), we explored the spatial and temporal distribution of diagnosed cases: stratified according their disease manifestation; and of subclinical infection among HHCs: determined by serology (anti-PGL-I ELISA and anti-NDO-LID rapid lateral-flow test); in order to assess the distribution pattern of the disease and the areas of greatest risk of illness, in a highly endemic municipality (Ituiutaba, MG) in the southeast region of Brazil. Seropositivity among HHCs was: 17% (9/53) for anti-PGL-I ELISA; and 42% for the NDO-LID rapid lateral-flow test. Forty-nine percent of the contacts were seropositive to at least one of the immunological tests. We observed substantial spatial heterogeneity of cases throughout the urban perimeter. Even so, four main clusters of patients and three main clusters of subclinical infection were identified. Spatio-temporal epidemiology associated to serological assessment can identify high-risk areas imbedded within the overall epidemic municipality, to prioritize active search of new cases as well support prevention strategies in these locations of greater disease burden and transmission. Such techniques should

  10. Presence of Mycobacterium leprae DNA and PGL-1 antigen in household contacts of leprosy patients from a hyperendemic area in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, J D; Rivas, P M S; Mendes, M B P; Soares, R E P; Costa, G C; Nascimento, F R F; Paiva, M F L; Aquino, D M C; Figueireido, I A; Santos, A M; Pereira, S R F

    2015-11-19

    Leprosy is a highly infectious disease endemic to underdeveloped countries. In Maranhão State, Northeastern Brazil, the hyperendemic rate of 56.11 cases/100,000 inhabitants increased the necessity of better understanding the epidemiological profile of this population, particularly regarding efficient methods for evaluating individuals residing with diagnosed patients to understand disease transmission and the risk of infection. In this study, we examined the percentage of contacts with positive indices for Mycobacterium leprae DNA and phenol-glycolipid-1 antigen (PGL-1). PGL-1 was analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the ML-Flow test, and polymerase chain reaction of oral and nasal secretions of 808 leprosy contacts from Maranhão. PGL-1 was detected in 14.0% of patients and differed by operational classification of the index case (P leprae DNA in 5.6% of oral samples and 4.6% of nasal tissues, and 87% of subjects resided with high bacillary load patients. This study reinforces the efficacy of combining molecular and serological techniques to identify potential bacillus carriers in the asymptomatic stage of infection, such as in household contacts, highlighting the importance of these meth-ods for monitoring hyperendemic populations.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition occurs worldwide, but is most common in India, Brazil, and other areas with warm climates. Between ... the differential clinical outcomes of leprosy. Infect Dis Poverty. 2017 Feb 6;6(1):5. doi: 10. ...

  12. The stigma and prejudice of leprosy: influence on the human condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Carloni, Maria Emília Oliveira Gomes; Rovida, Tânia Adas Saliba; Martins, Ronald Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the knowledge, feelings and perceptions involving patients affected by leprosy, as a better understanding of these factors may be useful to decrease the stigma and prejudice associated with the condition. The study cohort consisted of 94 patients who underwent treatment for leprosy at the Health Units in the City of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (MT), Brazil. The study questionnaire included items to collect information on socio-demographic data, knowledge about the disease, stigma, prejudice, self-esteem and quality of life of leprosy patients. Bivariate analyses were used to assess the data based on the chi-square test with a 5% significance threshold. The results revealed that the study population consisted predominantly of males (55.3%) with an income between 1 and 3 times the minimum wage (67%). The survey respondents reported that the most significant difficulties related to the treatment were the side effects (44.7%) and the duration of the treatment (28.7%). A total of 72.3% of the subjects were knowledgeable about the disease, of whom 26.6% had the leprosy reaction. Stigma and prejudice were cited by 93.6% of the participants. Based on the responses, 40.4% of patients reported being depressed and sad, and 69.1% of the subjects encountered problems at work after being diagnosed. A total of 45.7% of the patients rated their quality of life between bad and very bad. Our results suggest that leprosy causes suffering in patients beyond pain and discomfort and greatly influences social participation.

  13. The stigma and prejudice of leprosy: influence on the human condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To analyze the knowledge, feelings and perceptions involving patients affected by leprosy, as a better understanding of these factors may be useful to decrease the stigma and prejudice associated with the condition. METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 94 patients who underwent treatment for leprosy at the Health Units in the City of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (MT, Brazil. The study questionnaire included items to collect information on socio-demographic data, knowledge about the disease, stigma, prejudice, self-esteem and quality of life of leprosy patients. Bivariate analyses were used to assess the data based on the chi-square test with a 5% significance threshold. RESULTS: The results revealed that the study population consisted predominantly of males (55.3% with an income between 1 and 3 times the minimum wage (67%. The survey respondents reported that the most significant difficulties related to the treatment were the side effects (44.7% and the duration of the treatment (28.7%. A total of 72.3% of the subjects were knowledgeable about the disease, of whom 26.6% had the leprosy reaction. Stigma and prejudice were cited by 93.6% of the participants. Based on the responses, 40.4% of patients reported being depressed and sad, and 69.1% of the subjects encountered problems at work after being diagnosed. A total of 45.7% of the patients rated their quality of life between bad and very bad. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that leprosy causes suffering in patients beyond pain and discomfort and greatly influences social participation.

  14. Anti-PGL1 salivary IgA/IgM, serum IgG/IgM, and nasal Mycobacterium leprae DNA in individuals with household contact with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito e Cabral, Paula; Júnior, José Evandro Cunha; de Macedo, Alexandre Casimiro; Alves, Alexandre Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Thially Braga; Brito e Cabral, Tereza Cristina; Gondim, Ana Paula Soares; Pinto, Maria Isabel Moraes; Oseki, Karen Tubono; Camara, Lilia Maria Carneiro; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida Tiemi

    2013-11-01

    Leprosy household contacts represent a group at high risk of developing the disease. The aim of this study was to detect Mycobacterium leprae subclinical infection in this group through serological and molecular parameters. Serum anti-PGL1 IgG/IgM and salivary anti-PGL1 IgA/IgM was investigated using an ELISA, and nasal carriage of M. leprae DNA was detected by PCR, in leprosy household contacts of paucibacillary (PB) and multibacillary (MB) household leprosy patients (n=135), their index cases (n=30), and in persons living in a low endemic city (n=17). Salivary anti-PGL1 IgA and IgM and serum anti-PGL1 IgG showed good correlation comparing contacts and index cases (p0.05). A high frequency of anti-PGL1 IgM positivity was found in IgG-negative samples (pleprae DNA was found in the nasal swabs of nine out of the 85 MB household leprosy contacts (10.6%) and in three out of the 50 PB household leprosy contacts (6.0%). We strongly suggest that serum IgG/IgM and salivary anti-PGL1 IgA/IgM measurements are used to follow leprosy household contacts. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Update on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, F; Cambau, E; Aubry, A

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease that has now been reported for more than 2000 years. The leprosy elimination goal set by the World Health Organization (WHO), i.e. a global prevalence rate Leprosy is a specific infection: (i) it is a chronic infection primarily affecting the skin and peripheral nerves, (ii) Mycobacterium leprae is one of the last bacterial species of medical interest that cannot be cultured in vitro (mainly because of its reductive genome evolution), and (iii) transmission and pathophysiological data is still limited. The various presentations of the disease (Ridley-Jopling and WHO classifications) are correlated with the patient's immune response, bacillary load, and by the delay before diagnosis. Multidrug therapy (dapsone, rifampicin, with or without clofazimine) has been recommended since 1982 as the standard treatment of leprosy; 6 months for patients presenting with paucibacillary leprosy and 12 months for patients presenting with multibacillary leprosy. The worldwide use of leprosy drugs started in the 1980s and their free access since 1995 contributed to the drastic decline in the number of new case patients. Resistant strains are however emerging despite the use of multidrug therapy; identifying and monitoring resistance is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caring and Curing Since 1894 National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program Caring and Curing Since 1894 A genetic ... Louisiana New York Texas The National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program The National Hansen's Disease Program is the ...

  17. Effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, E; Julious, S; Salome, A; Jennifer, G; John, A S; Kannan, L; Richard, J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional comparative study was to find the effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy. Data were collected, using a pretested questionnaire, from the first year and third year students of a School of Nursing attached to a leprosy specialty hospital and also from a comparable School of Nursing attached to a general hospital. The results showed that trainees acquired more knowledge on leprosy during training in both schools of nursing. However, those trained in leprosy hospital environment had higher knowledge and attitude scores than those trained in general hospital environment. The attitude of the trainees attached to leprosy hospital was favourable even before they had formal training in leprosy. Those trained in the general hospital showed more favourable attitude after training compared to before training. School of Nursing attached to leprosy hospital provided an atmosphere conducive to learning and understanding more about leprosy. The trainees retained what was learnt because of regular association with patients affected by leprosy. For employment in hospital or community based services or research related to leprosy, nurses trained in a leprosy hospital would have added value of knowledge and attitude.

  18. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Ulnar nerve sonography in leprosy neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Liu, Da-Yue; Lei, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a half-year history of right forearm sensory and motor dysfunction. Ultrasound imaging revealed definite thickening of the right ulnar nerve trunk and inner epineurium, along with heterogeneous hypoechogenicity and unclear nerve fiber bundle. Color Doppler exhibited a rich blood supply, which was clearly different from the normal ulnar nerve presentation with a scarce blood supply. The patient subsequently underwent needle aspiration of the right ulnar nerve, and histopathological examination confirmed that granulomatous nodules had formed with a large number of infiltrating lymphocytes and a plurality of epithelioid cells in the fibrous connective tissues, with visible atypical foam cells and proliferous vascularization, consistent with leprosy. Our report will familiarize readers with the characteristic sonographic features of the ulnar nerve in leprosy, particularly because of the decreasing incidence of leprosy in recent years.

  20. [Combination drug therapy in leprosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio de las Aguas, J

    1983-01-01

    The importance of polichemotherapy in multibacilar leprosy (LL and LD) in patients without any previous therapy as in those diagnosticated and under monotherapy most of all in the resistance patients is presented. Sulphones, clofazimine and rifampicine are selected as first rate drugs and protionamide-etionamide as second rate drugs. The therapy plans with the association of two and three drugs and the convenience of continuing indefinitely with at least one of the drugs are presented insisting on the advantages of the clofazimine-sulphones and rifampicine-sulphones associations. The necessity of immunotherapy for recover of celular immunity against the bacilus, is the only form of preventing relapses and drug resistance.

  1. Evaluation of patients with symptoms suggestive of chronic polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, L; Smith, T; Havsager, A M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic yield and to describe the spectrum of diagnosis encountered by evaluation of patients with symptoms suggestive of chronic polyneuropathy. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 198 patients referred to a department of neurology...... with symptoms suggestive of polyneuropathy. The evaluation included nerve conduction studies with near-nerve technique, quantitative examination of temperature sensation, blood tests, chest x-rays, and skin biopsies as well as diagnostic tests for differential diagnoses. RESULTS: Polyneuropathy was found in 147......%), drugs (5%), connective tissue disease (3%), and a number of less frequent conditions. A previously undiagnosed condition was found in 30% of the patients with polyneuropathy. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of patients with symptoms suggestive of polyneuropathy reveals a high fraction of patients with previously...

  2. ASSESSMENT OF PATIENTS’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Jezus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a contagious, long-term infection, which manifests dermatological and neurological symptoms and signs, being considered an endemic, widespread disease, regarded as a serious health problem in Brazil. Early diagnosis of leprosy and its proper treatment prevents disease from progressing, avoiding physical disabilities, which are frequent as the infection evolves, and constitute a major cause of stigma, leading the patient to social isolation. This study aimed to verify the patient's perceptions regarding Hansen's disease diagnosis, seeking to contribute to the prevention of physical disabilities. It was carried out in Sinop in the State of Mato Grosso, being classified as a qualitative research approach. Patients diagnosed with leprosy, enrolled for annual treatment in Nações Basic Health Unity (Unidade de Saúde Básica Nações, took part in the research. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews, and the results were analyzed in categories, these being, the implications on the patients’ self-esteem after diagnosis of leprosy; patients’ perceptions of treatment and changes in socioeconomic status after leprosy. It is worth noting that leprosy as a public health issue does not restrict to the immense amount of cases and its potential to cause physical disability, which interferes in the psychosocial context, should be taken into consideration. It is valid to point out that leprosy affects several aspects of the pacient’s life, including their physical, mental and social well-being, requiring a holistic and humane nursing care.

  3. Differential expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86, CD28, CD152 and PD-1 correlates with the host-parasite outcome in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Palermo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a spectral disease exhibiting two polar sides, namely, lepromatous leprosy (LL characterised by impaired T-cell responses and tuberculoid leprosy in which T-cell responses are strong. Proper T-cell activation requires signalling through costimulatory molecules expressed by antigen presenting cells and their ligands on T-cells. We studied the influence of costimulatory molecules on the immune responses of subjects along the leprosy spectrum. The expression of the costimulatory molecules was evaluated in in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of lepromatous and tuberculoid patients and healthy exposed individuals (contacts. We show that LL patients have defective monocyte CD86 expression, which likely contributes to the impairment of the antigen presentation process and to patients anergy. Accordingly, CD86 but not CD80 blockade inhibited the lymphoproliferative response to Mycobacterium leprae. Consistent with the LL anergy, there was reduced expression of the positive signalling costimulatory molecules CD28 and CD86 on the T-cells in these patients. In contrast, tuberculoid leprosy patients displayed increased expression of the negative signalling molecules CD152 and programmed death-1 (PD-1, which represents a probable means of modulating an exacerbated immune response and avoiding immunopathology. Notably, the contacts exhibited proper CD86 and CD28 expression but not exacerbated CD152 or PD-1 expression, suggesting that they tend to develop a balanced immunity without requiring immunosuppressive costimulatory signalling.

  4. Can social marketing approaches change community attitudes towards leprosy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wendy

    2006-06-01

    This essay explores how the concept of social marketing can be employed to change attitudes towards leprosy. Firstly, the concept of social marketing is discussed, then the attitudes that people have about leprosy, the stigma that people with leprosy and their families may face, and the detrimental effects that this can have on their lives. The effect of knowledge and education on attitudes towards leprosy is discussed, as this can be a key component of social marketing campaigns. Various methods of social marketing used to change attitudes and reduce stigma are examined, such as mass media campaigns, school based education, methods which involve community leaders, and the integration and improvement of leprosy services. Principles of social marketing which can lead to the success of campaigns such as incorporating local beliefs are emphasized. The success of the social marketing campaign in Sri Lanka is described, which aimed to remove the fear of leprosy, and to encourage patients to seek and comply with treatment. Finally, it is argued that social marketing, used correctly, can be highly effective at changing community attitudes towards leprosy, reducing stigma and improving the lives of patients, who become able to seek treatment sooner as they lose their fear of stigmatization.

  5. [Leprosy: stigma and prejudice lived by institucionalized patients in Santa Catarina State, Brazil (1940-1960)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Miriam Süssking; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Costa, Eliani; Gregório, Vitória Regina Petters; Koerich, Ana Maria Espíndola; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes

    2008-01-01

    This study is a qualitative research with a socio-historic approach whose objective was to know the prejudice and stigma lived by the institutionalized patients/residents with hanseniase. To achieve this goal, three patients were intervewed who lived in a colony hospital during the research period, utilizing the oral history method. Data were collected and were further analysed, utilizing the stigma referencial. The results indicated that after the entry in the institution, these patients got their family bonds broken, lost their rights as citizens, regarding the situation, they took upon a new life, in a new environment. Concluding that, the nosocomial isolation for a long period of time (years of confinement and dismissal), caused the symbolic death of many patients that lived with the hope to cohabit with family and/or society.

  6. Characterization of MicroRNA Expression Profiles and Identification of Potential Biomarkers in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Karina T O S; Souza, Renan P; Assis, Marieta T A; Araújo, Marcelo G; Locati, Massimo; Jesus, Amélia M R; Dias Baptista, Ida M F; Lima, Cristiano X; Teixeira, Antônio L; Teixeira, Mauro M; Soriani, Frederico M

    2017-05-01

    Leprosy is an important cause of disability in the developing world. Early diagnosis is essential to allow for cure and to interrupt transmission of this infection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important factors for host-pathogen interaction and they have been identified as biomarkers for various infectious diseases. The expression profile of 377 microRNAs were analyzed by TaqMan low-density array (TLDA) in skin lesions of tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy patients as well as skin specimens from healthy controls. In a second step, 16 microRNAs were selected for validation experiments with reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) in skin samples from new individuals. Principal-component analysis followed by logistic regression model and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed to evaluate the diagnostic potential of selected miRNAs. Four patterns of differential expression were identified in the TLDA experiment, suggesting a diagnostic potential of miRNAs in leprosy. After validation experiments, a combination of four miRNAs (miR-101, miR-196b, miR-27b, and miR-29c) was revealed as able to discriminate between healthy control and leprosy patients with 80% sensitivity and 91% specificity. This set of miRNAs was also able to discriminate between lepromatous and tuberculoid patients with a sensitivity of 83% and 80% specificity. In this work, it was possible to identify a set of miRNAs with good diagnostic potential for leprosy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in leprosy | Chewoolkar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to ...

  8. Is drug-resistant Mycobacterium leprae a real cause for concern?: First approach to molecular monitoring of multibacillary Colombian patients with and without previous leprosy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Martha Inírida; Colorado, Claudia Lucía; Torres, José Fernando; León, Clara Inés

    2014-04-01

    There is no information in Colombia on Mycobacterium leprae primary and secondary drug resistance in regards to the WHO-multidrug therapy regime. On the other hand, public health authorities around the world have issued various recommendations, one of which prompts for the immediate organization of resistance surveillance through simple molecular methods. To determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance to rifampicin, ofloxacin and dapsone in untreated and previously treated patients at the Centro Dermatológico Federico Lleras Acosta during the 1985-2004 period. We conducted a retrospective study which included multibacillary patient biopsies through elective sampling: 381 of them from new patients and 560 from previously treated patients. Using a microtome, we obtained six slides from each skin biopsy preserved in paraffin, and we extracted M. leprae DNA. We amplified three molecular targets through PCR and obtained the patterns of drug resistance to dapsone, rifampicin and ofloxacin by reverse hybridization. Finally, we collected epidemiological, clinical and demographical data for analyses. From 941 samples under study, 4.14% of them were resistant to one or more drugs, and 5.77 and 3.04% had resistant genotypes in new and previously treated patients, respectively. Total resistance for each drug was 0.43% for dapsone, 3.19% for rifampicin and 1.17% for ofloxacin. We found statistically significant differences for rifampicin and for the total population when comparing the results from untreated versus previously treated patients. Two thirds of the resistant samples were resistant to rifampicin alone or combined. The standard multidrug therapy schemes continue being effective for leprosy cases; however, it is necessary to guarantee adherence and regularity. Surveillance to drug resistance in new and previously treated leprosy cases should be established.

  9. Borderline lepromatous leprosy with neurofibromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of leprosy with neurofibromatosis is rare both the diseases present with nerve thickening and skin lesions (patches and nodules. The coexistence of neurofibroma with borderline tuberculoid, lepromatous, histoid, and neuritic leprosy has been reported in the past. We report here a case of borderline lepromatous leprosy coexisting with neurofibromatosis in a 60 year-old male, who presented with neurofibromata and nerve thickening. Histopathology of skin biopsy from the leprosy and neurofibroma nodules confirmed the diagnosis of leprosy and neurofibroma.

  10. T-cell regulation in lepromatous leprosy.

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    Kidist Bobosha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB. Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae, lepromatous leprosy (LL patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1 responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8% gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1% remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02 numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL.

  11. A CLINICAL STUDY OF PLANTAR ULCERS IN LEPROSY

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    Lilakumari Subramoniam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Deformity prevention is one of the top priorities in leprosy elimination programme. Plantar ulcer and foot deformities are commonly seen in leprosy patients causing considerable physical disability. This can be prevented by early and regular MDT, proper practice of feet care, correction of deformities and management of infections. The study was to assess the above factors contributing to the development and recurrences of plantar ulcers among our leprosy patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS 66 leprosy patients with plantar ulcers were evaluated for delay of treatment, practice of feet care, site of ulcer, concomitant deformities and bone changes. Identification of infective agent is done by culture and sensitivity test. RESULTS Majority of patients belonged to the borderline spectrum. Delay in starting anti-leprosy treatment ranged from 2 months to 12 years. The main reasons for the delay in treatment are the patients ignored the lesions because they are asymptomatic or treatment with other modalities like homeo/ayurvedic drugs. 92% of patients studied were not practicing feet care. Common site of ulcer was beneath the heads of metatarsals and big toe. Foot drop was seen in 15% and claw toes in 33%. Osteomyelitis observed in 20% of patients. Common pathogen isolated was staphylococcus seen in 75% of cases followed by Streptococcus and Klebsiella. 50% of Staphylococci isolated were found to be penicillin resistant. CONCLUSION The occurrence of plantar ulcers and its complications are not an inevitable sequelae of leprosy and is totally preventable if appropriate measures are undertaken.

  12. Leprosy - one of the many forgotten tropical diseases.

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    Zwolska, Zofia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa

    2017-02-14

    Leprosy or Hansen disease is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium leprae. The large number of undetected cases (2000-2012 years 4 mln people) remains a threat to the elimination of leprosy. Leprosy is an unheard in Poland and generally is considered a condition so "exotic" that it is not worth to spend more attention to it. Forgotten disease in developed countries still thrives in an environment of poor and uneducated. Regardless of the conclusion that in the 21st century none infectious disease should not be treated as a disease on the designated regions of the world, other than our own, it should be recalled that the M. leprae was discovered in Europe, where for many years there were leprosaria and still infectious hospitals in Great Brittan, France or Spain get patients suspected of leprosy. The mobility of the inhabitants of the globe caused by wars, ethnic conflicts or a simple tourism causes that any infectious disease can not be treated as solely limited to distant us regions. The best proof of this were the viral diseases, formerly found in only in Asia or Africa, and currently transmitted to Europe [1]. At any moment, we can stand up against the problem of diagnostics of humans toward leprosy. Many medical reports indicate that leprosy as a disease with many symptoms encountered difficulties in its diagnosis. Only the experience of medical professionals and good microbiological diagnosis may speed up the diagnosis of leprosy.

  13. Pride and prejudice--identity and stigma in leprosy work.

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    Harris, Kristine

    2011-06-01

    This article sets out to expand the way stigma, and those affected by it, are understood within leprosy discourse and to apply these insights to the analysis of the experiences of leprosy workers. The term stigma is often used simply as shorthand for 'negative social experience'. However, to reduce the negative aspects of complex everyday life experiences to a single word is often overly simplistic and can serve to objectify, rather than illuminate, the experiences of those affected. This article argues that in order to understand the lived experience of stigma we must come to understand stigma as an ongoing, dialectical social process and develop an approach to stigma that analytically separates stigma from its negative social consequences. The article applies these insights to data collected during 14 months of fieldwork with front-line leprosy workers in India, which suggests that falling leprosy prevalence rates and a rapidly changing policy landscape have led to leprosy workers feeling marginalised and stigmatised within their own organisation. The article argues that, rather than seeing stigma merely as a negative process in which leprosy workers are passive victims, we must recognise that stigma also plays a key role in the creation and maintenance of leprosy workers' identity and is utilised as a strategic tool in the struggle for influence between different groups within the organisation. Finally, the article argues for the benefit of expanding our understanding of stigma across public health and of applying these insights to designing future interventions.

  14. Host Lipid Mediators in Leprosy: The Hypothesized Contributions to Pathogenesis

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    Carlos A. M. Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of clinical forms observed in leprosy and its pathogenesis are dictated by the host’s immune response against Mycobacterium leprae, the etiological agent of leprosy. Previous results, based on metabolomics studies, demonstrated a strong relationship between clinical manifestations of leprosy and alterations in the metabolism of ω3 and ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, and the diverse set of lipid mediators derived from PUFAs. PUFA-derived lipid mediators provide multiple functions during acute inflammation, and some lipid mediators are able to induce both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses as determined by the cell surface receptors being expressed, as well as the cell type expressing the receptors. However, little is known about how these compounds influence cellular immune activities during chronic granulomatous infectious diseases, such as leprosy. Current evidence suggests that specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPMs are involved in the down-modulation of the innate and adaptive immune response against M. leprae and that alteration in the homeostasis of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators versus SPMs is associated with dramatic shifts in the pathogenesis of leprosy. In this review, we discuss the possible consequences and present new hypotheses for the involvement of ω3 and ω6 PUFA metabolism in the pathogenesis of leprosy. A specific emphasis is placed on developing models of lipid mediator interactions with the innate and adaptive immune responses and the influence of these interactions on the outcome of leprosy.

  15. Leprosy Specific Orofacial Aspects

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    Vathsala Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic infection caused by Mycobactenum leprae, GHA- Hansen first identified the organism in 1873, so called Hansen disease. Mycobacterium leprae is a bacillus that presents a peculiar tropism for the skin and peripheral nerves. The upper airway has a great importance as a route of M. Leprae infection. The clinical spectrum of leprosy ranges from the tuberculoid form (TT to the disseminative and progressive lepromatous form (LL. Cell-mediated immunity is considered to be the crucial defence against the disease and the magnitude of this immunity defines the extent of the disease- Facial lesions in leprosy can occur in all form of the disease and also in lepra reaction, oral lesions are rare but, when present, occur in the lepromatous form

  16. Reactional state and nutritional profile among leprosy patients in the primary health care system, Greater Vitória, Espírito Santo State, Brazil Estado reacional e perfil nutricional em portadores de hanseníase acompanhados na rede de atenção primária à saúde da Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brasil

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    Rosa Maria Natalli Montenegro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy may present acute/subacute inflammatory processes (leprosy reactions. The study characterized the reactional states of patients at health clinics in Vitória, Espírito Santo State, Brazil, and associated them with sociodemographic factors and clinical/nutritional variables. between January and December 2009, longitudinal follow-up of patients with leprosy continued until leprosy reactions occurred or patients completed 6 months of multidrug therapy. Of the 151 patients participating, 78 (51.7% were females, 48 (31.8% had 5 to 8 years schooling, 93 (61.6% worked and earned from 1 to 3 minimum wages, and 55 (36.4 % had leprosy reactions, but with no statistical association to socioeconomic characteristics or nutritional status. However, absence of reaction was more common in the low-weight group, suggesting a trend in this group to protection from the reaction (p = 0.0906. The study found no association between nutritional status and leprosy reaction.A hanseníase pode apresentar processos inflamatórios agudos/subagudos (reações hansênicas. Os objetivos foram caracterizar os estados reacionais de pacientes de Unidades de Saúde da Grande Vitória (Espírito Santo, Brasil e associá-los aos fatores sociodemográficos e a variáveis clínicas/nutricionais. Estudo longitudinal, de monitoramento de portadores de hanseníase acompanhados até o aparecimento da reação hansênica ou até 6 meses iniciais da poliquimioterapia, de janeiro a dezembro de 2009. Participaram 151 pacientes, sendo 78 (51,7% femininos; 48 (31,8% estudaram de cinco a oito anos; 93 (61,6% trabalhavam e ganhavam de um a três salários mínimos; 55 (36,4% apresentaram reação hansênica, sem associação estatística às características socioeconômicas nem ao estado nutricional. Porém, a ausência de reação foi maior no grupo baixo peso, sugerindo neste grupo tendência na proteção da reação (p = 0,0906. No estudo não houve associação do estado

  17. Study of serum lipids in leprosy

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    Gupta Anju

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty fresh and untreated patients of leprosy constituted the study group. Fifty, age and sex matched healthy individuals formed the controls. Ridly and Jopling system of classification was used in the study. Majority i.e 21 cases were of BT group, 12 of BB, 7 of BL, 9 of LL and one case was of TT leprosy. The serum triglyceride level was lower than normal in TT, showed no alteration in BT or BB and was insignificantly increased in bL and LL patients. The total cholesterol was lowerthan normal in TT, showed no alteration in BT or BB and was insignificantly increased in Bland LL patients. The total cholesterol was lower than normal in TT, whereas in BT, BB, BL and LL groups the levels were statistically decreased. The HDL cholesterol was within normal range in TT, significantly decreased in BT and LL patients, showed no significant alteration in BB and was insignificantly decreased in BL group. The LDL cholesterol in TT was low but was not so low statistically when compared with the controls, whereas in BT, BB, BL and LL groups the levels were statistically decreased. The VLDL cholesterol was within normal range in TT and BT, was raised insignificantly in 3 of 12 cases of BB, was within normal range in BL and in LL leprosy it was raised in one out of 9 cases. In the absence of any derangement of liver function tests, it can be concluded that leprosy per se leads to alterations in lipid metabolism. However, no correlation could be established between the group/type of leprosy, bacterial indices and levels of different lipid fractions in the present study.

  18. Disability prevention and management in leprosy: A field experience

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    Ganapati R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Bombay Leprosy Project has conducted operational research into cost effective ways of using therapeutic management for prevention of disabilities (POD. The goal of achieving this are broadly divided as 1 prevention of impairments and disabilities [POID] and 2 prevention of worsening of disabilities [POWD]. About 33-56% of newly registered leprosy patients already have clinically detectable nerve function impairment [NFI], often no longer amenable to MDT. An analysis of 892 leprosy cases treated with WHO-MDT stresses the need to focus attention on leprosy patients having > 5 skin lesions and multiple nerve thickening. Assessment of 454 disabled leprosy patients after 4 years indicated that the compliance for the services offered was good and it helped to improve the disability status in more than 50% of patients. In terms of effectiveness of the services, it was found to be effective in preventing worsening of deformities in hands and healing of trophic ulcers in feet. The methodology adopted has also helped us to develop an operational research model about the necessity to systematize the assistance and support to be given if the services can be routed through a public health facility. Because of the large numbers of leprosy patients with disability living in this region and the limited resources available, the services have to be targeted towards those who are most in need. The major advantage of such community based program is an attempt to eliminate the social stigma in the patients′ families and the education of the community.

  19. The challenge of producing skin test antigens with minimal resources suitable for human application against a neglected tropical disease; leprosy.

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    Becky L Rivoire

    Full Text Available True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3-10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens. In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial.

  20. The challenge of producing skin test antigens with minimal resources suitable for human application against a neglected tropical disease; leprosy.

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    Rivoire, Becky L; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A; Brennan, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3-10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial.

  1. Leprosy reactions in postelimination stage: the Bangladesh experience.

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    Mowla, M R; Ara, S; Mizanur Rahman, A F M; Tripura, S P; Paul, S

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy reactions are immunologically mediated conditions and a major cause of disability before, during and after multidrug therapy (MDT). Little data have been published on the epidemiology of leprosy reactions in Bangladesh. To describe the pattern and prevalence of leprosy reactions in the postelimination stage. A descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out in Chittagong Medical College Hospital using the registered records of patients in the period between 2004 and 2013. Of the 670 patients with leprosy, 488 (73.38%) were males and 182 (27.37%) were females. The prevalence of reaction was in 300 (44.78%) patients with a male:female ratio of 3.55 : 1. The age-specific cumulative reaction cases at >40 years were 115 (38.33%) among all age groups. The prevalence of reaction was found to be in 166 (55.33%) patients for the reversal reaction, 49 (16.57%) for the erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) and 85 (28.33%) for the neuritis. Borderline tuberculoid was most common (106, 35.33%)in the reversal reaction group, while lepromatous leprosy was most common (37, 12.33%) in ENL group. More than half of the patients (169, 56.33%) had reactions at the time of presentations, while 85 (28.33%) and 46 (15.33%) patients developed reaction during and after MDT, respectively. The reversal reaction group presented with ≥six skin lesions in 96 (57.83%) patients and ≥two nerve function impairments (NFIs) in 107 (64.46%) patients. The ENL was present chiefly as papulo-nodular lesions in 45 (91.84%) patients followed by pustule-necrotic lesions in four (8.16%), neuritis in 33 (67.35%), fever in 24 (48.98%), lymphadenitis in six (12.24%), arthritis in five (10.20%) and iritis in two (4.08%). Bacterial index ≥3 had been demonstrated in 34 (60.71%) patients in ENL group. The incidence of leprosy reaction seemed to be more than three times common in borderline tuberculoid (52.33%) group than in lepromatous leprosy (14%) group. Reactions with NFI and disability

  2. Leprosy trends at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India, from 2008 to 2015.

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    Muthuvel, Thirumugam; Isaakidis, Petros; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kattuppara, Lucy; Singh, Rajbir; Govindarajulu, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important cause of preventable disabilities. After the advent of multidrug therapy, new leprosy cases have come down dramatically. Despite this achievement, India, which contributes 60% of the global leprosy burden, faces some challenges to eliminate the disease, including active transmission in the community and delayed diagnosis of leprosy patients. The objectives of the study were 1) to determine sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed adults and children (less than 15 years) with leprosy and their trends over time (2008-2015) and 2) to describe the profile of surgical procedures among leprosy patients registered for reconstructive surgeries during 2006-2015. Retrospective descriptive study was conducted involving a record review of new patients with leprosy registered in Vimala Dermatological Centre, Mumbai. A total of 578 new leprosy cases were registered in the hospital during 2008-2015. There has been a steady increase in the trend of child cases (less than 15 years) registered in the facility (from 3% in 2008 to 18% in 2015), x 2 =12.11, p< 0.01. The majority of the patients (68%) were migrants of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Targeting children and migrants and ensuring early diagnosis and treatment initiation are essential components for leprosy elimination in an urban metropolis in India.

  3. Job of the Bible: leprosy or scabies?

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    Appelboom, Thierry; Cogan, Elie; Klastersky, Jean

    2007-04-01

    Proposing a medical diagnosis a posteriori of a person who died a long time ago is not as impossible as it sounds if sufficient medical history is available.A whole book of the Bible is devoted to Job and his trials. The diagnosis of leprosy has been generally accepted by medieval commentators because the verses of the Book speak of ulcers disseminated over the skin, and also because leprosy is an exemplary sanction imposed by way of example by God to punish those who have committed a sin. In this paper, we have taken the different verses with a medical content from the Book of Job, and reconstructed the clinical picture as if the patient had turned up in the 21st century in order to see if the diagnosis of leprosy may be called into question, and to discuss the limits of the medico-historic approach. The clinical picture of the disease consists of deterioration in the general condition, with widespread pain, confusion, skin eruptions, bilious vomiting, and so on. Under these conditions, if Job did exist, and if the retrospective medical history is reliable, the most likely diagnosis is that of scabies rather than leprosy. Copyright (c) 2007 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  4. Leprosy and Armadillos

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-18

    Dr. Richard Truman, Chief of the National Hansen’s Disease Program Laboratory Research Branch, discusses leprosy and armadillos.  Created: 2/18/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/18/2016.

  5. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

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    Reibel, Florence; Chauffour, Aurélie; Brossier, Florence; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients. Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71). Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31) or from French overseas territories (n = 36) where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4) was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33), followed by type 3 (n = 17), type 4 (n = 11) and type 2 (n = 6). SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka) and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion) not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements. The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a) concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France) or (b) more likely random in regions where diverse

  6. Severe type 1 upgrading leprosy reaction in a renal transplant recipient: a paradoxical manifestation associated with deficiency of antigen-specific regulatory T-cells?

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    Vieira, Ana Paula; Trindade, Maria Angela Bianconcini; de Paula, Flávio Jota; Sakai-Valente, Neusa Yurico; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Lemos, Francine Brambate Carvalhinho; Benard, Gil

    2017-04-24

    Due to its chronic subclinical course and large spectrum of manifestations, leprosy often represents a diagnostic challenge. Even with proper anti-mycobacteria treatment, leprosy follow up remains challenging: almost half of leprosy patients may develop reaction episodes. Leprosy is an infrequent complication of solid organ transplant recipients. This case report illustrates the challenges in diagnosing and managing leprosy and its reactional states in a transplant recipient. A 53-year-old man presented 34 months after a successful renal transplantation a borderline-tuberculoid leprosy with signs of mild type 1 upgrading reaction (T1R). Cutaneous manifestations were atypical, and diagnosis was only made when granulomatous neuritis was found in a cutaneous biopsy. He was successfully treated with the WHO recommended multidrug therapy (MDT: rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine). However he developed a severe T1R immediately after completion of the MDT but no signs of allograft rejection. T1R results from flare-ups of the host T-helper-1 cell-mediated immune response against Mycobacterium leprae antigens in patients with immunologically unstable, borderline forms of leprosy and has been considered an inflammatory syndrome in many aspects similar to the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (IRS). The T1R was successfully treated by increasing the prednisone dose without modifying the other immunosuppressive drugs used for preventing allograft rejection. Immunological study revealed that the patient had a profound depletion of both in situ and circulating regulatory T-cells and lack of expansion of the Tregs upon M. leprae stimulation compared to T1R leprosy patients without iatrogenic immunosuppression. Our case report highlights that leprosy, especially in the transplant setting, requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and the contribution of histopathology. It also suggests that the development of upgrading inflammatory syndromes such as T1R can occur

  7. Exploratory urinary metabolomics of type 1 leprosy reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayboroda, Oleg A; van Hooij, Anouk; Derks, Rico; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Dijkman, Karin; Khadge, Saraswoti; Thapa, Pratibha; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Hagge, Deanna A; Geluk, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and nerves. Although curable with multidrug therapy, leprosy is complicated by acute inflammatory episodes called reactions, which are the major causes of irreversible neuropathy in leprosy that occur before, during, and even after treatment. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactions reduces the risk of permanent disability. This exploratory study investigated whether urinary metabolic profiles could be identified that correlate with early signs of reversal reactions (RR). A prospective cohort of leprosy patients with and without reactions and endemic controls was recruited in Nepal. Urine-derived metabolic profiles were measured longitudinally. Thus, a conventional area of biomarker identification for leprosy was extended to non-invasive urine testing. It was found that the urinary metabolome could be used to discriminate endemic controls from untreated patients with mycobacterial disease. Moreover, metabolic signatures in the urine of patients developing RR were clearly different before RR onset compared to those at RR diagnosis. This study indicates that urinary metabolic profiles are promising host biomarkers for the detection of intra-individual changes during acute inflammation in leprosy and could contribute to early treatment and prevention of tissue damage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathogen-Specific Epitopes as Epidemiological Tools for Defining the Magnitude of Mycobacterium leprae Transmission in Areas Endemic for Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John S.; Hacker, Mariana A. V. B.; Costa, Luciana S.; Carvalho, Fernanda M.; Geluk, Annemieke; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J.; Pontes, Maria A. A.; Gonçalves, Heitor S.; de Morais, Janvier P.; Bandeira, Tereza J. P. G.; Pessolani, Maria C. V.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Pereira, Geraldo M. B.

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, comparative genomic analysis has allowed the identification of Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes with potential application for the diagnosis of leprosy. In a previous study, 58 synthetic peptides derived from these sequences were tested for their ability to induce production of IFN-γ in PBMC from endemic controls (EC) with unknown exposure to M. leprae, household contacts of leprosy patients and patients, indicating the potential of these synthetic peptides for the diagnosis of sub- or preclinical forms of leprosy. In the present study, the patterns of IFN-γ release of the individuals exposed or non-exposed to M. leprae were compared using an Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and the most promising M. leprae peptides for the identification of exposed people were selected. This subset of M. leprae-specific peptides allowed the differentiation of groups of individuals from sites hyperendemic for leprosy versus those from areas with lower level detection rates. A progressive reduction in the IFN-γ levels in response to the peptides was seen when contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients were compared to other less exposed groups, suggesting a down modulation of IFN-γ production with an increase in bacillary load or exposure to M. leprae. The data generated indicate that an IFN-γ assay based on these peptides applied individually or as a pool can be used as a new tool for predicting the magnitude of M. leprae transmission in a given population. PMID:22545169

  9. Common variants in the PARL and PINK1 genes increase the risk to leprosy in Han Chinese from South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Feng, Jia-Qi; Li, Guo-Dong; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-11-23

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. We hypothesized that mitochondrial genes PARL and PINK1 would confer risk to leprosy. Thirteen tag SNPs of PARL and PINK1 were analyzed in 3620 individuals with or without leprosy from China. We also sequenced the entire exons of PARL, PINK1 and PARK2 in 80 patients with a family history of leprosy by using the next generation sequencing technology (NGS). We found that PARL SNP rs12631031 conferred a risk to leprosy (P adjusted  = 0.019) and multibacillary leprosy (MB, P adjusted  = 0.020) at the allelic level. rs12631031 and rs7653061 in PARL were associated with leprosy and MB (dominant model, P adjusted  leprosy at the genotypic level (P adjusted  = 0.004). We confirmed that common variants in PARL and PINK1 were associated with leprosy in patients underwent NGS. Furthermore, PARL and PINK1 could physically interact with each other and were involved in the highly connected network formed by reported leprosy susceptibility genes. Together, our results showed that PARL and PINK1 genetic variants are associated with leprosy.

  10. Immunohistological Analysis of In Situ Expression of Mycobacterial Antigens in Skin Lesions of Leprosy Patients Across the Histopathological Spectrum : Association of Mycobacterial Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid-I (PGL-I) with Leprosy Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen, Claudia; Faber, William; Klatser, Paul; Buffing, Anita; Naafs, Ben; Das, Pranab

    1999-01-01

    The presence of mycobacterial antigens in leprosy skin lesions was studied by immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) and to cross-reactive mycobacterial antigens of 36 kd, 65 kd, and lipoarabinomannan (LAM). The staining patterns with MAb to 36 kd and 65 kd were heterogeneous and were also seen in the lesions of other skin diseases. The in situ staining of PGL-I and LAM was seen only in ...

  11. Gender and leprosy: case studies in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varkevisser, C.M.; Lever, P.; Alubo, O.; Burathoki, K.; Idawani, C.; Moreira, T.M.A.; Patrobas, P.; Yulizar, M.

    2009-01-01

    There appear to be regional differences in gender ratios of leprosy patients being diagnosed and treated. In Asian countries, more men than women are registered whilst in Africa female patients outnumber males. The Netherlands Leprosy Relief (NLR) therefore initiated research into factors underlying

  12. Avaliação da expressão de interleucina 1 beta (IL-1β e antagonista do receptor de interleucina 1 (IL-1Ra em pacientes com hanseníase Evaluation of the expression of interleukin 1 beta(IL-1β and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A hanseníase é uma doença infectocontagiosa espectral que acompanha-se por uma série de eventos imunológicos desencadeados pela resposta do hospedeiro frente ao agente etiológico, o Mycobacterium leprae. Evidências sugerem que a indução e manutenção da resposta imune/inflamatória na hanseníase estão vinculadas a interações de múltiplas células e fatores solúveis, particularmente através da ação de citocinas. Nesse estudo, foram mensurados níveis de IL-1β e IL-1Ra de 37 casos novos de hanseníase acompanhados ao longo do tratamento e 30 controles sadios pelo teste ELISA. A coleta de sangue periférico foi realizada em quatro tempos para os casos de hanseníase (pré-tratamento com PQT, 2ª dose, 6ª dose e pós-PQT e em único momento para os controles. Na comparação dos níveis das moléculas de casos no pré-PQT e controles, houve diferença estatisticamente significativa somente para IL-1β. Nossos resultados sugerem a participação dessa citocina no processo imune/inflamatório.Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host's response to the etiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae. Evidence suggests that the induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, mainly through the action of cytokines. The ELISA test was used to measure the levels of IL-1β and IL-1Ra in 37 new leprosy patients followed-up during treatment and 30 healthy controls. Peripheral blood was collected four times during the treatment of leprosy patients (MDT pretreatment, 2nd dose, 6th dose and post-MDT, and only once from the controls. The comparison of molecular levels in pre-MDT patients and controls showed a statistically significant difference for IL-1β. The results suggest the participation of this cytokine in the genesis of the immune/inflammatory process.

  13. DNA amplification for detection of leprosy and assessment of efficacy of leprosy chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampirapap, K.; Singtham, N.; Klatser, P. R.; Wiriyawipart, S.

    1998-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae was applied to fresh skin biopsies and slit-skin smears from 122 untreated leprosy patients. The PCR positivity rates in biopsies were 95.6% in multibacillary (MB) cases and 44.2% in paucibacillary (PB) cases. Following 1

  14. Waardenburg′s Syndrome with Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S.N Reddy

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare association of Waardenburg′s syndrome and tuberculoid leprosy in a 13-year-old patient is described. This is an unrecorded feature in the literature. These two disorders are quite unrelated entities and their occurrence in the same patient is a casual one. All the classical features of Waardenburg′s syndrome except deafness were present and the disease manifested as an isolated case in the family. The pertinent literature is briefly reviewed.

  15. Neuropathic pain in leprosy: symptom profile characterization and comparison with neuropathic pain of other etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicher, Irina; Stump, Patrick Raymond Nicolas Andre Ghislain; Harnik, Simone Bega; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Alves; Baccarelli, Rosemari; Marciano, Lucia H S C; Ura, Somei; Virmond, Marcos C L; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies reported a high prevalence of neuropathic pain in leprosy, being especially present in "pharmacologically cured" patients. The presence of neuropathic pain in leprosy poses a supplementary burden in patient's quality of life, daily activities, and mood. The aim of this study was to assess whether neuropathic pain in leprosy has similar symptom profile as neuropathic pain of other etiologies and to retrospectively assess the efficacy of neuropathic pain medications regularly prescribed to leprosy. Leprosy and nonleprosy patients had their neuropathic pain characterized by the neuropathic pain symptom inventory (NPSI, ranges from 0 to 100, with 100 being the maximal neuropathic pain intensity) in a first visit. In a second visit, leprosy patients who had significant pain and received pharmacological treatment in the first evaluation were reassessed (NPSI) and had their pain profile and treatment response further characterized, including information on drugs prescribed for neuropathic pain and their respective pain relief. The pain characteristics based on NPSI did not significantly differ between leprosy and nonleprosy neuropathic pain patients in visit 1 after correction for multiple analyses, and cluster analyses confirmed these findings (ie, no discrimination between leprosy and nonleprosy groups; Pearson χ2 = 0.072, P = 0.788). The assessment of pain relief response and the drugs taken by each patient, linear regression analysis showed that amitriptyline, when effective, had the highest percentage of analgesic relief. Neuropathic pain in leprosy is as heterogeneous as neuropathic pain of other etiologies, further supporting the concept that neuropathic pain is a transetiological entity. Neuropathic pain in leprosy may respond to drugs usually used to control pain of neuropathic profile in general, and amitriptiline may constitute a potential candidate drug for future formal clinical trials aimed at controlling neuropathic pain in leprosy.

  16. A randomized controlled trial to compare cure and relapse rate of paucibacillary multidrug therapy with monthly rifampicin, ofloxacin, and minocycline among paucibacillary leprosy patients in Agra District, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study cure rate and relapse rate of standard World Health Organization paucibacillary multidrug therapy (PB-MDT with monthly rifampicin, ofloxacin, and minocycline for six months (ROM-6 among paucibacillary leprosy patients. Methods: A total of 268 patients, detected during active search in Agra district during 2001-2004, who had paucibacillary (PB leprosy having 1-5 skin lesions and/or one nerve thickening/tenderness, were allocated, using random number tables, to two treatment groups; PB-MDT and ROM-6. On the first day of the month, dose of PB-MDT and of the ROM were given under supervision for 6 months. After completion of drug therapy, patients were followed every 6 months for first 5 years and later annually for next 3 years for monitoring disease status, cure rates, reactions and relapses. Cηi σθuαρε test was used to compare relapse rates. Results: The cure rate at 2 years was 99% in ROM-6 and 97.0% in PB-MDT group, of those who completed treatment and the difference was statistically not significant. At 5 years, only 88 patients in PB-MDT group and 90 patients in ROM-6 group could be followed; all were observed to be cured. However, during the period of 5-8 years, 3 of 67 patients in PB-MDT group and 1 of 73 in ROM-6 group were observed to have relapsed. In all, 10 relapses were noted (3 in ROM-6 and 7 in PB-MDT group giving a relapse rate of 1.10/100 person years in PB-MDT and 0.435/100 person years in ROM groups (P = 0.053 ; statistically not significant. Of the 10 relapses, 5 occurred within 5 years (3 in PB-MDT group and 2 in ROM-6, 4 during 5-8 years (3 in PB-MDT and 1 in ROM-6, and 1 occurred in MDT group after 8 years. Limitation: A number of patients were lost to follow up after release from treatment and thus actual number of relapses in the study could not be assessed. Additionally, diagnosis was purely clinical and histology could not be done for reasons related to functional difficulties in the field

  17. Tarsal bone disintegration in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverson, G.; Warren, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Tarsal bone disintegration is characterised by fragmentation and progressive collapse of one or more tarsal bones. It occurs in 10% of leprosy patients, and is responsible for many severe foot deformities associated with this disease. The main cause is micro-traumata, but sensory impairment, sepsis and osteoporosis are predisposing factors. In this series of 400 consecutive patients the talus and navicular were involved most frequently (72% of 119 tarsal lesions). Treatment, including prolonged immobilisation of the foot, results in dense sclerosis of the affected bone, and leaves a functional limb. Initial radiological features include bone fragmentation, calcified fragments in adjacent soft tissues, linear fractures, progressive compression and deformity of the affected bone, loss of density of the affected bone and flattening of the longitudinal plantar arch. Illustrative case histories are presented, and the differential diagnosis discussed. (author)

  18. Study Of Socio- Economic Factors In Relation To Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Mahjabeen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: what are the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy and their implications? Objectives: (i To study the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy.(ii To assess the impact of disease on patients’ job/income. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting and Participants: Patients attending the dermatology OPD, J.N. Medical college hospital, A.M.U., Aligarh. Sample size: 200 leprosy patients. Study variables: education, occupation, social class, incapacitation, change in job, reduction in income. Statically analysis: Chi-square test Results: 46% of the leprosy patients were illiterate. A large majority of patients (78% were involved in heavy manual work as farmers and labourers. 68.5% patients belonged to low social classes (IV and V. More males (26.3% suffered from incapacitation than females (8.5%. 2.5% patients lost their job or were unable to work and 11.5% had to change their jobs due to the disease or disability caused by it. 17.5% patients had a history of reduction in their income after occurrence of leprosy.

  19. Estudio de resistencia a la rifampicina y la dapsona en tres pacientes con recurrencia de lepra Study of rifampin and dapsone resistance in three patients with recurring leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin Hernández

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Detectar la presencia de cepas de Mycobacterium leprae resistentes a la rifampicina y la dapsona en tres pacientes con recurrencia de lepra y sospecha clínica de resistencia antimicrobiana, mediante la aplicación de técnicas moleculares. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo retrospectivo en tres pacientes multibacilares del Sanatorio de Agua de Dios, Cundinamarca, Colombia, que habían presentado recidivas de lepra documentadas por su historia clínica, baciloscopia y biopsia. Se obtuvieron biopsias de lesiones cutáneas que se procesaron para la extracción y purificación del ADN bacilar. Se amplificaron regiones de los genes rpoB y folP1 asociadas con la resistencia antimicrobiana, mediante la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa "touch-down" y se secuenciaron los productos amplificados mediante el método de Sanger. RESULTADOS: Se detectó una mutación puntual en el nucleótido 1367 del gen rpoB en dos de las muestras estudiadas. No se encontró la mutación estudiada en el gen folP1 en ninguno de los tres pacientes. CONCLUSIONES: La mutación identificada demostró la presencia de bacilos de M. leprae resistentes a la rifampicina en dos de los tres pacientes estudiados con recurrencia de la enfermedad. No se detectó la mutación indicadora de resistencia a la dapsona en ninguno de los tres pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence of rifampin- and dapsone-resistant strains of Mycobacterium leprae in three patients with recurring leprosy and clinically-suspected antimicrobial resistance through molecular techniques. METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted of three multibacillary patients at the "Agua de Dios" Sanitarium in Cundinamarca, Colombia, that presented leprosy relapses that were documented by medical history, bacilloscopy, and biopsy. Biopsies were taken of the skin lesions and the bacteria were subject to DNA extraction and purification. Regions of the rpoB and folP1 genes associated with

  20. Bone changes in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mende, B.; Stein, G.; Kreysel, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    Bone lesions is a frequent organic manifestation in leprosy. Osseal destructions caused by granulomatous process induced by M. leprae are so-called specific lesions in contrast to non specific lesions based on nerval or arterial diseases. The specific osseal alterations are characterized by cystic brightenings in roentgenograms while non specific osseal changes show absorption to bone structure as akroosterolysis and osteoporosis. Typical radiologic findings in different stages of mutilation are demonstrated.

  1. Bone changes in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mende, B.; Stein, G.; Kreysel, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    Bone lesions is a frequent organic manifestation in leprosy. Osseal destructions caused by granulomatous process induced by M. leprae are so-called specific lesions in contrast to non specific lesions based on nerval or arterial diseases. The specific osseal alterations are characterized by cystic brightenings in roentgenograms while non specific osseal changes show absorption to bone structure as akroosterolysis and osteoporosis. Typical radiologic findings in different stages of mutilation are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  2. Factors Contributing to the Delay in Diagnosis and Continued Transmission of Leprosy in Brazil – An Explorative, Quantitative, Questionnaire Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Mary; GalAn, Noêmi; Teasdale, Katherine; Prado, Renata; Amar, Harpreet; Rays, Marina S.; Roberts, Lesley; Siqueira, Pedro; de Wildt, Gilles; Virmond, Marcos; Das, Pranab K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a leading cause of preventable disability worldwide. Delay in diagnosis of patients augments the transmission of infection, and allows progression of disease and more severe disability. Delays in diagnosis greater than ten years have been reported in Brazil. To reduce this delay, it is important to identify factors that hinder patients from presenting to doctors, and those that delay doctors from diagnosing patients once they have presented. This study aimed to explore factors associated with the delayed diagnosis of leprosy in Brazil. Methodology/ Principal Findings This is an exploratory study using a self-constructed questionnaire delivered to patients attending three leprosy referral clinics across three states in Brazil. Data were analysed to determine associations between variables and the time taken for participants to present to the health-service, and between variables and the time taken for doctors to diagnose participants once they had presented. Participants who suspected they had leprosy but feared community isolation were 10 times more likely to wait longer before consulting a doctor for their symptoms (OR 10.37, 95% CI 2.18–49.45, p = 0.003). Participants who thought their symptoms were not serious had a threefold greater chance of waiting longer before consulting than those who did (OR 3.114, 95% CI 1.235–7.856, p = 0.016). Forty-two point six per cent of participants reported initially receiving a diagnosis besides leprosy. These had a three times greater chance of receiving a later diagnosis of leprosy compared to those not misdiagnosed or not given a diagnosis (OR 2.867, 95% CI 1.288–6.384, p = 0.010). Conclusions/ Significance This study implies a need for patient education regarding leprosy symptoms and the reduction of stigma to encourage patients to present. The high rate of misdiagnosis reported suggests a need to increase clinician suspicion of leprosy. Further education regarding disease symptoms in medical

  3. Socio-Economic and Health Status of Leprosy Affected Person: A Study in Jharkhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, N

    2015-01-01

    The study has been conducted in the Potka Block of East Singhbhum district of the state of Jharkhand. The district is mainly dominated by indigenous tribes, such as, Santhal, Munda, Ho, Bhumiz, Kharia, and Sabar. The unit of analysis of the study was an individual. The objectives were to: a) Understand the socio-economic and health status of LAP, b) Know the health seeking behavior and problems faced by the LAP, c) Assess the utilization of the programs related to Leprosy eradication in the study area and d), Suggest various measures for improving the socio-economic and health status of LAP. Fifty Leprosy affected persons (LAP) from the Potka block; comprising of 20% of LAP of that area have been selected as the study sample by using the method of Multi-Stage Random Sampling, with equal representation of men and women. The LAPs included leprosy patients, leprosy treated people and their family members. 39/50 (78%) of the respondents are illiterates and only 3/11 (6%) among the literate population have crossed matriculation and above. This seems to have resulted in the respondent's low level of awareness about the disease, resulting in delayed treatment. 14/25 (56%) percent of female and 13/25 (52%) of male respondents are considered untouchable by their natal families, thus forced to stay in congested leprosy colonies resulting in other social and health related issues. It was observed that leprosy cured children,and also children of LAP are being denied admission iany school, due to the social stigma attached to it. 27/50 (54%)of leprosy patients and leprosy cured people (mostly with visible deformities) were found to practice begging as their sole means of livelihood. Many LAPs are also engaged in cultivation and small scale business particularly among the rural population. An amount of gender disparity was also observed in the employment pattern among the LAPs. Among the, respondents 15/25 (60%) of the females are beggars as compared to 12/25 (48%) of the male

  4. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Truman, Richard W; Goulart, Isabela Maria B; Vissa, Varalakshmi; Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suffys, Philip; Fontes, Amanda B; Rosa, Patricia S; Scollard, David M; Williams, Diana L

    2017-06-01

    Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM) analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens. The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR), rifampin (rpoB DRDR) and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR) was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB) and 55 paucibacillary (PB) cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA) were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7%) and PB (35/55; 63.3%) patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues or archival Fite's stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172), formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues (n = 36) or archival Fite's stained slides (n = 3) were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST analysis. The HRM-based assay was also able to

  5. T helper cells in leprosy: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Chaman; Tarique, Mohd; Rai, Reeta; Siddiqui, Anisuddin; Khanna, Neena; Sharma, Alpana

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy is an ancient disease caused by gram positive, rod shaped bacilli called Mycobacterium leprae. Patients present with varied clinico-pathological disease depending on the host immune response to Mycobacterium leprae. Thus tuberculoid (TT) and lepromatous (LL) patients represent two ends of a spectrum where the former shows limited disease, high T cell mediate immune (CMI) response and low antibody (HI) levels in serum. In contrast the latter has low T cell and high humoral immune response i.e antibody levels. The mechanisms underlying these differences have been investigated intensely; however, there is no consensus on the primary immunological basis. Over three decades, Th1 and Th2 paradigm were thought to underling tuberculoid and lepromatous disease respectively. However many patients were shown to have mixed Th1/Th2 pattern of (IFN-γ/IL-4) cytokines. The present review was undertaken with a view to understand the T cells and cytokine dysregulation in leprosy. In recent years the sub classes of T cells that are Regulatory in nature (Treg) have been implicated in immune diseases where they were shown to suppress T cell functions. Additionally Th17 cells secreting IL-17A, IL17F, were implicated in immune inflammation. Taken together these regulatory cells may play a part in influencing immune responses in leprosy. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient satisfaction and suggestions for improvement of remote ICD monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Larsen, Mie Christa Jensen; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study aim was to evaluate patient acceptance and content with remote follow-up (FU) of their implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and to estimate patients' wish for changes in remote follow-up routines. METHODS: Four hundred seventy-four ICD patients at the device follow-up c...

  7. Estimation of serum level of interleukin-17 and interleukin-4 in leprosy, towards more understanding of leprosy immunopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combating Mycobacterium leprae is known to be via T-helper1 response. However, other T-helper effector cells; T-helper17 and T-helper2; play a role, particularly in the context of disease type. Aims: We aimed to evaluate serum levels of interleukin (IL-17 (T-helper17 cytokine and IL-4 (T-helper2 cytokine in untreated patients with different types of leprosy, compared to controls. Methods: Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, serum IL-17 and IL-4 levels were estimated in 43 leprotic patients and 43 controls. Patients were divided into six groups; tuberculoid, borderline cases, lepromatous, erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL, type 1 reactional leprosy, and pure neural leprosy. Patients were also categorized according to bacillary load and the presence or absence of reactions. Results: Serum IL-17 was significantly lower in cases (4-61.5 pg/mL; median 19, compared to controls (26-55 pg/mL; median 36 (P < 0.001, and was significantly lower in each type of leprosy compared to controls, with the lowest level in lepromatous leprosy (4-61.5 pg/mL; median 12.5. Significantly elevated serum IL-4 was found in patients (1.31-122.4 pg/mL; median 2.31 compared to controls (1.45-5.72 pg/mL; median 2.02 (P = 0.008, with the highest level among lepromatous leprosy patients (2-87.2 pg/mL; median 28.9, and the lowest in type 1 reactional leprosy (1.4-2.5 pg/mL; median 1.87 (P = 0.006. Conclusion: Defective secretion of IL-17 is related to disease acquisition as well as progression toward lepromatous pole in leprosy patients. The overproduction of IL-4 in patients with lepromatous leprosy may infer their liability to develop ENL. Nevertheless, the small number of the studied population is a limitation.

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography in Pure Neuritic Leprosy: First Experience Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele R. Colonna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five years after both right ulnar and median nerve decompression for paraesthesias and palsy, a patient, coming from Nigeria but living in Italy, came to our unit claiming to have persistent pain and combined median and ulnar palsy. Under suspicion of leprosy, skin and left sural nerve biopsy were performed. Skin tests were negative, but Schwann cells resulted as positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB, leading to the diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy (PNL. The patient was given PB multidrug therapy and recovered from pain in two months. After nine months both High Resolution Ultrasonography (HRUS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI were performed, revealing thickening of the nerves. Since demyelination is common in PNL, the Authors started to use Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography (DTIT to get better morphological and functional data about myelination than does the traditional imaging. DTIT proved successful in showing myelin discontinuity, reorganization, and myelination, and the Authors suggest that it can give more information about the evolution of the disease, as well as further indications for surgery (nerve decompression, nerve transfers, and babysitting for distal effector protection, and should be added to traditional imaging tools in leprosy.

  9. [Study of leprosy at the "Emilio d'Audinot" polyclinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Núñez, M; Mora Castillo, N; Abijana Damien, G

    1993-01-01

    A study on the prevalence of leprosy is performed in "Emilio Daudinot" polyclinics, Guantanamo. The behaviour of leprosy according to clinical manifestations and results showing that lepromatous leprosy is the most frequent form, as well as the number of positive patients and the ones who present reactional status, are reported. The clinical course according to skin and general manifestations is analyzed, and it was determined that the greatest number of cases improved with treatment. Likewise, it was found that the greatest number of positive patients require a 1-4 year period for becoming negative. The immunologic status of cases studied according to the different clinical forms is reported and it was observed that the greatest number of cases are immunologically depressed which agrees with the fact that most of patients have the lepromatous form. Nurses play a very important role for the control and treatment of these patients.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Three Leprosy Case Detection Methods in Northern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenduka, Charles; Post, Erik; John, Steven; Suraj, Abdulkarim; Namadi, Abdulahi; Onwujekwe, Obinna

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite several leprosy control measures in Nigeria, child proportion and disability grade 2 cases remain high while new cases have not significantly reduced, suggesting continuous spread of the disease. Hence, there is the need to review detection methods to enhance identification of early cases for effective control and prevention of permanent disability. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of three leprosy case detection methods in Northern Nigeria to identify the most cost-effective approach for detection of leprosy. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out to evaluate the additional benefits of using several case detection methods in addition to routine practice in two north-eastern states of Nigeria. Primary and secondary data were collected from routine practice records and the Nigerian Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Programme of 2009. The methods evaluated were Rapid Village Survey (RVS), Household Contact Examination (HCE) and Traditional Healers incentive method (TH). Effectiveness was measured as number of new leprosy cases detected and cost-effectiveness was expressed as cost per case detected. Costs were measured from both providers' and patients' perspectives. Additional costs and effects of each method were estimated by comparing each method against routine practise and expressed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). All costs were converted to the U.S. dollar at the 2010 exchange rate. Univariate sensitivity analysis was used to evaluate uncertainties around the ICER. Results The ICER for HCE was $142 per additional case detected at all contact levels and it was the most cost-effective method. At ICER of $194 per additional case detected, THs method detected more cases at a lower cost than the RVS, which was not cost-effective at $313 per additional case detected. Sensitivity analysis showed that varying the proportion of shared costs and subsistent wage for valuing unpaid time did not significantly change the

  11. Leprosy in Puerto Rico: insight into the new millennia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín, Diana C; Candelario, Nicole; Carrasquillo, Osward Y; Figueroa, Luz; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined the elimination of the disease as a global prevalence of less than one case per 10,000 population. However, disease transmission is an ongoing worldwide public health concern, as evidenced by the more than 220,000 new cases diagnosed each year. This study is an update of the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico for the period of 2000-2014. A retrospective analysis of data was obtained from the Tropical Disease Clinic (TDC) of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Sixty-three new cases of leprosy are detailed in this study. Disease incidence and prevalence were 1.65 and 5.26 per 100,000 inhabitants (of the island of Puerto Rico), respectively, and an average of 4.2 new cases per year. Most of the male patients in the study suffered from lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.026). In all, 47 (74.6%) patients had been born in Puerto Rico, and 29 (46%) had an affected family member or were in close contact with someone with leprosy. Compared to those of previous studies, these results demonstrate a decrease in both the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico over the past 15 years. The relatively high prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico means that it remains endemic on the island. Concerted efforts must be undertaken to achieve the goal of the elimination of this old and stigmatized disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Pushpendra; Loughry, W.J.; Lockhart, J. Mitchell; Inman, W. Barry; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Pena, Maria T.; Marcos, Luis A.; Scollard, David M.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are naturally infected with Mycobacterium leprae and have been implicated in zoonotic transmission of leprosy. Early studies found this disease mainly in Texas and Louisiana, but armadillos in the southeastern United States appeared to be free of infection. We screened 645 armadillos from 8 locations in the southeastern United States not known to harbor enzootic leprosy for M. leprae DNA and antibodies. We found M. leprae–infected armadillos at each location, and 106 (16.4%) animals had serologic/PCR evidence of infection. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism variable number tandem repeat genotyping/genome sequencing, we detected M. leprae genotype 3I-2-v1 among 35 armadillos. Seven armadillos harbored a newly identified genotype (3I-2-v15). In comparison, 52 human patients from the same region were infected with 31 M. leprae types. However, 42.3% (22/52) of patients were infected with 1 of the 2 M. leprae genotype strains associated with armadillos. The geographic range and complexity of zoonotic leprosy is expanding. PMID:26583204

  13. Living with Parkinson's disease: priorities for research suggested by patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, K; Dauwerse, L; Hendrikx, A; Leedekerken, J W; Abma, T A

    2014-08-01

    To describe a study in which patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were engaged to list priorities for research to complement the professionals' research agenda. The study was conducted by researchers and people with PD or relatives. Interviews and focus groups were held to develop a research agenda from patients' perspectives. A questionnaire was completed by patients to prioritize the research topics. Voiceover group meetings and meetings with the advisory group were organized to obtain feedback on the research process and to deliberate the preliminary findings. Finally, dialog meetings were organized with stakeholders to discuss the agenda and to achieve a shared research agenda. Patients prioritized 18 research themes. Top priorities included fundamental research, research on medication, coping, family & relations and good care. Patients asked for applied and multidisciplinary research. Professionals and charitable funding bodies acknowledged the importance of such research but did not feel capable of judging such proposals. Patients furthermore asked for more attention to be paid to living with the illness in the here-and-now to complement fundamental research. The patients' research agenda can be used to match research with patients' needs and to adapt the clinical support of professionals to patients' wishes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A historical overview of leprosy epidemiology and control activities in Amazonas, Brazil

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    Carolina Cunha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an ancient infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to comparative genomics studies, this disease originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. The Europeans and North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. In Brazil, this disease arrived with the colonizers who disembarked at the first colonies, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Recife, at the end of the sixteenth century, after which it was spread to the other states. In 1854, the first leprosy cases were identified in State of Amazonas in the north of Brazil. The increasing number of leprosy cases and the need for treatment and disease control led to the creation of places to isolate patients, known as leprosaria. One of them, Colonia Antônio Aleixo was built in Amazonas in 1956 according to the most advanced recommendations for isolation at that time and was deactivated in 1979. The history of the Alfredo da Matta Center (AMC, which was the first leprosy dispensary created in 1955, parallels the history of leprosy in the state. Over the years, the AMC has become one of the best training centers for leprosy, general dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases in Brazil. In addition to being responsible for leprosy control programs in the state, the AMC has carried out training programs on leprosy diagnosis and treatment for health professionals in Manaus and other municipalities of the state, aiming to increase the coverage of leprosy control activities. This paper provides a historical overview of leprosy in State of Amazonas, which is an endemic state in Brazil.

  15. Epidemiology of leprosy in Cumanayagua (2006-2011: retrospective cohort study

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    Ana Isabel Fernández Juviel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hansen's disease is currently a health problem in the municipality of Cumanayagua. Objective. To describe the epidemiology of this condition. Methods. Retrospective, descriptive study of leprosy in the Municipality of Cumanayagua, Cuba, from 2006 to 2011. Study universe are all cases occurring during this period and are consistent with the sample. Data were obtained from the Municipal Center for Hygiene and Epidemiology records, as well as from the survey conducted by the National Leprosy Control for each new case. The results were analyzed with SPSS 15.0, and are presented in tables. Results. Incidence was silent during prolonged periods of the study phase with a marked rise in in 2009. Females were affected most by leprosy during the selected study period reaching 54.2% of the total sample. Indeterminate leprosy and tuberculoid leprosy predominated, with respective rates of 37.5% and 29.1%. In 41.6% of leprosy patients, over a year elapsed between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis. 83.3% of patients spontaneously went to the doctor for diagnosis while only 4.2% were diagnosed through contact tracing. Multibacillary leprosy prevailed in 62.5% of cases. Conclusion. In 2009, there was evidence of a significant increase in the incidence of leprosy in the municipality under study reaching a rate of 15.0 per 100,000 inhabitants.

  16. Leprosy, a Pleitropic infectious disease: a challenging diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal El Meniawy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of 22-year-old man who was suffering from epididymo-orchitis for more than 2 years. Several months after the onset of the condition, the patient developed bilateral upper-limb and lower-limb numbness and tingling sensation with hypothesia, which was further complicated by nonhealing foot ulcer, arthralgia, and generalized maculopapular skin rash. The patient was initially managed as rheumatoid arthritis associated with vasculitis, which was later diagnosed as lepromatous leprosy. Musculoskeletal complaints are not exclusive to only autoimmune diseases; it can also be observed in several disorders, such as infectious diseases. It is challenging for any physician to properly diagnose patients with leprosy as differentiating leprosy from other systemic rheumatic disease is pivotal.

  17. Leprosy. An update: definition, pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelmann, K; González González, S E; Salas-Alanis, J C; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves and is still endemic in various regions of the world. Clinical presentation depends on the patient's immune status at the time of infection and during the course of the disease. Leprosy is associated with disability and marginalization. Diagnosis is clinical and is made when the patient has at least 1 of the following cardinal signs specified by the World Health Organization: hypopigmented or erythematous macules with sensory loss; thickened peripheral nerves; or positive acid-fast skin smear or skin biopsy with loss of adnexa at affected sites. Leprosy is treated with a multidrug combination of rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone. Two main regimens are used depending on whether the patient has paucibacillary or multibacillary disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Common variants of OPA1 conferring genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang-Lin; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Onset of leprosy was highly affected by host nutritional condition and energy production, (partially) due to genomic loss and parasitic life style of M. leprae. The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) gene plays an essential role in mitochondria, which function in cellular energy supply and innate immunity. To investigate the potential involvement of OPA1 in leprosy. We analyzed 7 common genetic variants of OPA1 in 1110 Han Chinese subjects with and without leprosy, followed by mRNA expression profiling and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We observed positive associations between OPA1 variants rs9838374 (Pgenotypic=0.003) and rs414237 (Pgenotypic=0.002) with lepromatous leprosy. expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis showed that the leprosy-related risk allele C of rs414237 is correlated with lower OPA1 mRNA expression level. Indeed, we identified a decrease of OPA1 mRNA expression in both with patients and cellular model of leprosy. In addition, the PPI analysis showed that OPA1 protein was actively involved in the interaction network of M. leprae induced differentially expressed genes. Our results indicated that OPA1 variants confer risk of leprosy and may affect OPA1 expression, mitochondrial function and antimicrobial pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Active search for leprosy and other skin diseases in school children from Agua de Dios, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gerzaín; González, Rosalba; Gonzalez, Deysy; Granados, Carolina; Pinto, Rafael; Herrera, Hilda; Gutiérrez, Luisa F; Hernández, Elkin; López, Fernando; Gómez, Yenny

    2007-01-01

    Actively searching for leprosy, other skin diseases and BCG vaccination scars amongst school children from Agua de Dios, the municipality having the highest prevalence of leprosy in Colombia. A clinical examination of the children was carried out by nurses, interns, general practitioners and experts on leprosy. Skin smear tests and skin biopsies were performed when the clinical findings suggested leprosy. Anti-phenolic glycolipid antibodies in blood were determined in special cases. 86 % of the 2 844 school children were examined; 833 had skin diseases and 16 % of these required evaluation by specialists. Four new cases of paucibacillary leprosy, two indeterminate and two primary polyneuritic cases were found. Pediculosis capitis, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor, hypopigmented nevus, insect bites and miliaria were frequently detected. BCG vaccination scars were absent in 387 children; following several logistical problems, they were vaccinated. Four children had signs of childhood abuse. An 11-year-old girl presented hypopigmented mycosis fungoides. All diseases and conditions found were treated. The community received information regarding the results, emphasising the importance of an early diagnosis of leprosy. The incidence of leprosy found (16/10,000) was 123 times higher than the rest of the country's incidence. It is advisable to continue clinical examinations in Agua de Dios and research into risk factors for acquiring leprosy.

  20. Radiological changes in the paranasal sinuses in lepromatous leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, R.P.E.

    1979-01-01

    In view of the high incidence of nasal involvement in lepromatous leprosy and the production of a highly infectious discharge from the nasal mucosa, it seemed pertinent to investigate the paranasal sinuses whose lining greatly increase the surface area of mucous membrane in the upper respiratory tract. Sinus radiographs were taken of 16 patients diagnosed, clinically and bacteriologically, as having lepromatous leprosy with nasal involvement. All 16 patients showed radiological abnormalities which are summarized. The most constant finding was mucosal thickening of the maxillary antra. The significance of these results is discussed. Sinus X-rays, while not diagnostic for leprosy may give additional information to both the leprologist and the ENT surgeon. (author)

  1. Simultaneous analysis of multiple T helper subsets in leprosy reveals distinct patterns of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Tregs markers expression in clinical forms and reactional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Michelle de Campos Soriani; Marques, Heloisa; Binelli, Larissa Sarri; Malange, Mariana Silva Vieira; Devides, Amanda Carreira; Silva, Eliane Aparecida; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vincenzi; Ghidella, Cassio Cesar; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Belone, Andrea de Farias Fernandes; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro

    2017-12-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Previous studies have demonstrated that the difference among clinical forms of leprosy can be associated with the immune response of patients, mainly by T helper (Th) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Then, aiming at clarifying the immune response, the expression of cytokines related to Th1, Th2, Th17 and Tregs profiles were evaluated by qPCR in 87 skin biopsies from leprosy patients. Additionally, cytokines and anti-PGL-1 antibodies were determined in serum by ELISA. The results showed that the expression of various targets (mRNA) related to Th1, Th2, Th17 and Tregs were significantly modulated in leprosy when compared with healthy individuals, suggesting the presence of a mixed profile. In addition, the targets related to Th1 predominated in the tuberculoid pole and side and Th2 and Tregs predominated in the lepromatous pole and side; however, Th17 targets showed a mixed profile. Concerning reactional events, Tregs markers were decreased and IL-15 was increased in reversal reaction and IL-17F, CCL20 and IL-8 in erythema nodosum leprosum, when compared with the respective non-reactional leprosy patients. Additionally, ELISA analysis demonstrated that IL-22, IL-6, IL-10 and anti-PGL-1 antibody levels were significantly higher in the serum of patients when compared with healthy individuals, and IL-10 and anti-PGL-1 antibodies were also increased in the lepromatous pole and side. Together, these results indicate that Th1, Th2 and Th17 are involved in the determination of clinical forms of leprosy and suggest that decreased Tregs activity may be involved in the pathogenesis of reactional events.

  2. [Emergency care of vertigo patients: suggestions for efficient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Takei, Yasuhiko; Matsuda, Takeaki; Karaho, Takehiro; Morita, Masahiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    Some diseases in which persons show vertigo or dizziness may be life-threatening, regardless of symptom severity, and require careful attention. These include diseases of the inner ear, central nervous system, and cardiovascular manifestation. In May 2006, a group in charge of primary emergency consultation began work enabling physicians to treat vertigo patients more efficiently and safely, as detailed in this report. Of the 173 persons with vertigo hospitalized from January 2004 to March 2008, six had cerebrovascular manifestations clarified only after hospitalization, underscoring the importance of careful examination, especially of those 75 years of age older, having continuous headache, having severe trunk ataxia despite apparently mild eye nystagmus, or reporting a history of high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or ischemic heart disease.

  3. Inheritance and heritability of resistance to citrus leprosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianel, Marinês; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Cristofani, Mariângela; Filho, Oliveiro Guerreiro; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Rodrigues, Vandeclei; Astúa-Monge, Gustavo; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic inheritance of resistance to leprosis, the most important viral disease of citrus in Brazil, was characterized through the phenotypic assessment of 143 hybrids resulting from crosses between tangor 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata) and sweet orange 'Pêra' (C. sinensis), considered to be resistant and susceptible to the disease, respectively. All plants were grafted onto Rangpur lime (C. limonia) and inoculated with Citrus leprosis virus, cytoplasmic type through the infestation with viruliferous mites, Brevipalpus phoenicis. The experiments were arranged in a completely randomized block design with 10 replicates. Incidence and severity of the disease in leaves and stems as well as plant growth parameters (plant height and stem diameter) were recorded for 3 years after the infestation with the viruliferous mites. The average values of all variables were analyzed using principal component analysis, discriminant factorial analysis, estimation of the clonal repeatability coefficients, and frequency of the distributions of the average values for each measured variable. The principal component analysis resulted in the identification of at least two groups with resistance and susceptibility to leprosis, respectively. About 99% of all hybrids were correctly classified according to the discriminant factorial analysis. The broad-sense heritability coefficients for characteristics associated with incidence and severity of leprosis ranged from 0.88 to 0.96. The data suggest that the inheritance of resistance to leprosis may be controlled by only a few genes.

  4. Distinct Roles of Th17 and Th1 Cells in Inflammatory Responses Associated with the Presentation of Paucibacillary Leprosy and Leprosy Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M B; de Oliveira, D T; Cazzaniga, R A; Varjão, C S; Dos Santos, P L; Santos, M L B; Correia, C B; Faria, D R; Simon, M do V; Silva, J S; Dutra, W O; Reed, S G; Duthie, M S; de Almeida, R P; de Jesus, A R

    2017-07-01

    It is well established that helper T cell responses influence resistance or susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae infection, but the role of more recently described helper T cell subsets in determining severity is less clear. To investigate the involvement of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of leprosy, we determined the immune profile with variant presentations of leprosy. Firstly, IL-17A, IFN-γ and IL-10 were evaluated in conjunction with CD4 + T cell staining by confocal microscopy of lesion biopsies from tuberculoid (TT) and lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients. Secondly, inflammatory cytokines were measured by multiplex assay of serum samples from Multibacillary (MB, n = 28) and Paucibacillary (PB, n = 23) patients and household contacts (HHC, n = 23). Patients with leprosy were also evaluated for leprosy reaction occurrence: LR+ (n = 8) and LR- (n = 20). Finally, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analysed by flow cytometry used to determine the phenotype of cytokine-producing cells. Lesions from TT patients were found to have more CD4 + IL-17A + cells than those from LL patients. Higher concentrations of IL-17A and IL-1β were observed in serum from PB than MB patients. The highest serum IFN-γ concentrations were, however, detected in sera from MB patients that developed leprosy reactions (MB LR + ). Together, these results indicate that Th1 cells were associated with both the PB presentation and also with leprosy reactions. In contrast, Th17 cells were associated with an effective inflammatory response that is present in the PB forms but were not predictive of leprosy reactions in MB patients. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  5. Malassezia pachydermatis fungemia in an adult with multibacillary leprosy

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    Jorge Roman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia pachydermatis is a relatively rare agent of bloodstream infections. We describe an unusual case of Malassezia fungemia in an adult patient hospitalized for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was also found to have multibacillary leprosy. Treatment of the patient required extensive medical management but resulted in a good outcome.

  6. Comparison of bacillary index on slit skin smear with bacillary index of granuloma in leprosy and its relevance to present therapeutic regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendhil M Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the world moves toward elimination of leprosy, persistence of infective cases in endemic pockets remains a significant problem. The use of clinical criteria to decide the paucibacillary (PB versus multibacillary (MB regimens has greatly simplified therapy at the field setting. However, a small but significant risk of under-treatment of so-called "PB" cases which actually have significant bacillary load exists. This study was undertaken to assess this risk and compare two methods of assessment of bacillary load, namely bacillary index on slit skin smear (BIS versus bacillary index of granuloma (BIG. Aims: To compare BIS with BIG on skin biopsy in consecutive untreated cases of leprosy. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted over a period of 12 months, wherein new untreated patients with leprosy were consecutively recruited. After a thorough clinical examination, each patient underwent slit skin smear (SSS where the BIS was calculated. The same patient also underwent a skin biopsy from a clinical lesion where, the BIG was calculated. SSS and skin biopsy for BIS and BIG respectively were repeated for all patients at the end of therapy for comparison. All patients received therapy according to World Health Organization-Multidrug Therapy Guidelines. Results: The BIG was positive in all cases where the BIS was positive. Significantly, BIG was positive in three cases of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with <5 lesions who received PB regimen, whereas the BIS was negative in all three cases. Conclusion: This study suggests that BIG may be a better indicator of the true bacillary load in leprosy as compared to BIS. Its role in management is significant, at least in tertiary care centers to prevent "under-treatment" of so called PB cases, which may actually warrant MB regimens.

  7. Leprosy in Denmark 1980-2010: a review of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Huma; Nielsen, Susanne D; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2016-01-05

    Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic and progressive granulomatous disease affecting mainly the skin and the peripheral nervous system. If left unrecognized, the infection can lead to permanent nerve damage and disability. The clinical presentation depends on the immune response of the patient and can result in a wide spectrum of symptoms. Leprosy is a rare encounter in Scandinavia but remains endemic in some parts of the world, with some areas reporting an increasing incidence. We performed a retrospective record review of leprosy cases in Denmark from 1980 to 2010 with the purpose of presenting the most common geographical, demographic and clinical findings and to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of patients with leprosy. In total 15 cases were reviewed. The majority (87%) of leprosy patients in Denmark were born in South- and Southeast Asia, and were presumed to have contracted the infection in their countries of origin. Patients were predominately young males (mean age: 28.6 years). Anaesthetic skin lesion with or without nerve enlargement were the most common clinical presentations (73%). Immunological leprosy reactions were seen in 40% of the cases. Diagnoses were based on clinical findings and skin biopsies. Treatment length varied but all patients received multidrug regimens. Leprosy should be kept in mind when encountering patients with suspicious skin lesions originating from leprosy endemic areas or with history of travel or work in the tropics. Due to the long incubation period with symptoms presenting long after immigration or return, clinicians often do not have the diagnosis in mind. The wide spectrum of symptoms and immunological reactions further complicates the diagnostic process. Treatment of leprosy and the complicated immunological reactions, which frequently accompanies the infection, should be performed in collaboration with a specialist.

  8. Liver Function Tests in Tuberculoid Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Korane

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 24 patients with untreated tuberculoid leprosy were taken up for study, They were the same group of patients in whom the authors have earlier reported involvement of liver in 85 % cases. Five healthy controls, studied also belonged to the same series. Liver function tests included prothrombin time, serum bilirubin, zinc sulphate turbidity, serum proteins and serum transaminases. No significant alterations in the liver function were observed. This is because the changes in the liver were so minimal and focal that they were not reflected in the various liver function tests.

  9. Community knowledge, perceptions and attitudes regarding leprosy in rural Cameroon: The case of Ekondotiti and Mbonge health districts in the South-west Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Zoung-Kanyi; Njamnshi, Theophilus Ngeh; Njih, Irine Ngani-Nformi; Pluschke, Gerd; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2018-01-01

    Background Although leprosy is one of the oldest diseases known to humanity, it remains largely misunderstood. Misconceptions about leprosy lead to stigma towards people with the disease. This study aimed at exploring the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes regarding leprosy in rural Cameroon. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional community survey of 233 respondents aged 15–75 years, free from leprosy, and living in two rural health districts of the South-west Region of Cameroon. A questionnaire designed to evaluate knowledge, perceptions and attitudes about leprosy was used. Binary logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of negative attitudes. Results About 82% of respondents had heard about, and 64.4% knew someone with leprosy. Information on leprosy was mainly from community volunteers (40.6%), friends (38.0%), and the media (24%). Only 19.7% of respondents knew the cause of leprosy, and a considerable proportion linked it to a spell (25.3%), unclean blood (15.5%) and heredity (14.6%). About 72% knew that leprosy is curable and 86.3% would advise medical treatment. Attitudes towards leprosy patients were generally negative. Only 42% would shake hands, 32.6% would share the same plate, and 28.3% and 27% respectively, would allow their child to play or marry a person with leprosy. Furthermore, only 33.9% approved of participation of leprosy patients, and 42.9% of their employment. Independent predictors of negative attitudes were: the belief that leprosy is a curse; is caused by a germ; and having seen a leprosy patient. The negative attitudes were dampened by: the beliefs that leprosy is a punishment, is hereditary and is due to poor personal hygiene. Conclusion An awareness intervention using community volunteers and the media, with information on the cause of leprosy, its clinical manifestations and curability, and sensitization messages correcting the misconceptions and beliefs regarding leprosy, could improve the community

  10. Estudo comparativo entre reação de Mitsuda e antígenos leucocitários humanos em pacientes hansenianos Comparative study between the Mitsuda test and the human leukocyte antigens in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Covolo de Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, propomos comparar o teste cutâneo de Mitsuda e os alelos HLA-DR2/HLA-DR3 e HLA-DQ1 relacionados com as formas clínicas da hanseníase em 176 pacientes (50 TT, 50 LL e 76 B. Os resultados obtidos não revelaram associação entre reação de Mitsuda e os alelos HLA nas formas clínicas isoladas; no entanto, quando analisados de acordo com a resposta ao teste de Mitsuda, associação significativa foi encontrada entre os pacientes Mitsuda negativos e HLA-DQ1 (p=0,002. Não foi observada associação entre reação de Mitsuda positiva e alelos HLA-DR2/DR3. Concluímos que existe importante participação do alelo HLA-DQ1 na ausência de resposta ao teste de Mitsuda. Sugerimos estudos mais específicos para este alelo.In this study, we aimed to compare the Mitsuda skin test with the alleles HLA-DR2/HLA-DR3 and HLA-DQ1, in relation to the clinical forms of leprosy in 176 patients (50 TT, 50 LL and 76 B. The results obtained did not reveal any association between the Mitsuda reaction and the HLA alleles in the clinical forms isolated. However, when analyzed according to Mitsuda test response, a significant association was found between patients with negative Mitsuda reaction and HLA-DQ1 (p=0.002. No association was observed between positive Mitsuda reaction and the HLA-DR2/DR3 alleles. We concluded that the allele HLA-DQ1 has an important participation when there is no response to the Mitsuda test. We suggest that more specific studies should be developed on this allele.

  11. Manual for Training Leprosy Rehabilitation Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayoshi; Eason, Alice L.

    The purpose of this manual is to introduce the general concepts and techniques in leprosy rehabilitation to physical therapy aides. Because of the lack of well-trained, qualified, physical therapists, the committee on leprosy rehabilitation considers it necessary to publish a teaching manual outlining leprosy rehabilitation for those who work with…

  12. Leprosy trends in Zambia 1991-2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapata, Nathan; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Grobusch, Martin Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-01-01

    To document leprosy trends in Zambia over the past two decades to ascertain the importance of leprosy as a health problem in Zambia. Retrospective study covering the period 1991-2009 of routine national leprosy surveillance data, published national programme review reports and desk reviews of

  13. Diet-Related Risk Factors for Leprosy: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Inge; van Muiden, Lisanne; Alam, Khorshed; Bowers, Robert; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Kispotta, Kolpona; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Food shortage was associated with leprosy in two recent studies investigating the relation between socioeconomic factors and leprosy. Inadequate intake of nutrients due to food shortage may affect the immune system and influence the progression of infection to clinical leprosy. We aimed to identify possible differences in dietary intake between recently diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects. Methods In a leprosy endemic area of Bangladesh, newly diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic situation, health and diet. Dietary intakes were recorded with a 24-hour recall, from which a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS) was calculated. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was filled out for every participant. Using logistic regression, a univariate, block wise multivariate, and an integrated analysis were carried out. Results 52 leprosy cases and 100 control subjects were included. Food shortage was more common, dietary diversity was lower and household food insecurity was higher in the patient group. Patients consumed significantly less items from the DDS food groups ‘Meat and fish’ and ‘Other fruits and vegetables.’ Lower food expenditure per capita, lower BMI, lower DDS and absence of household food stocks are the main factors associated with an increased risk of having leprosy. Conclusion Low income families have only little money to spend on food and consequently have a low intake of highly nutritious non-rice foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Development of clinical leprosy could be explained by deficiencies of the nutrients that these foods normally provide. PMID:25965879

  14. CD4+, CD8+, CD3+ cell counts and CD4+/CD8+ ratio among patients with mycobacterial diseases (leprosy, tuberculosis), HIV infections, and normal healthy adults: a comparative analysis of studies in different regions of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tahziba; Kulshreshtha, K K; Yadav, V S; Katoch, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the CD4+, CD8+, CD3+ cell counts and the CD4/CD8 ratio among normal healthy controls (adults and children), leprosy patients (without any complications and during reactional states), TB patients (with and without HIV), and HIV-positive patients (early infection and full-blown AIDS) and correlated the changes with disease progression. In our study, it was observed that among adults, CD4+ cell counts ranged from 518-1098, CD8+ from 312-952, whereas CD4/CD8 ratio from 0.75-2.30. Among children, both CD4+ and CD8+ cells were more and the CD4/CD8 ratio varied from 0.91-3.17. With regard to leprosy patients, we observed that CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower among PB (pauci-bacillary) and MB (multi-bacillary) patients. CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.99 ± 0.28 among PB patients while the ratio was lower, 0.78 ± 0.20, among MB patients. CD4+ cell counts were raised during RR (reversal reactions) and ENL (erythema nodosum leprosum) among the PB and MB patients whereas the CD8+ cell counts were lower among PB and MB patients. CD4/CD8 ratio doubled during reactional episodes of RR and ENL. Among the HIV-negative tuberculosis (TB) patients, both the CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts were found to be less and the CD4/CD8 ratio varied between 0.53-1.75. Among the HIV-positive TB patients and HIV-positive patients, both the CD4+ and CD8+ cells were very less and ratio drops significantly. In the initial stages of infection, as CD4+ counts drop, an increase in the CD8+ cell counts was observed and the ratio declines. In full-blown cases, CD4+ cell counts were very low, 3-4 to 54 cells, CD8+ cells from 12-211 and the ratio drops too low. This study is the first of its kind in this region of the country and assumes importance since no other study has reported the values of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte counts among patients with mycobacterial diseases (leprosy and TB), HIV infections along with normal healthy individuals of the region, and correlation with clinical

  15. Vitiligo occurring after thyroidectomy at sites of leprosy lesions

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    George Anuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old female patient developed vitiligo at the previous sites of treated leprosy immediately after thyroidectomy. A neurological factor in association with thyroid dysfunction is considered as the possible aetiology of vitiligo in this case.

  16. Contested Histories and Happiness: Leprosy literature in Japan

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    K. M. Tanaka

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available At the turn of the twentieth century, the Japanese government passed a series of laws targeting people diagnosed with Hansen’s Disease (leprosy. As a result, many patients were quarantined in public leprosaria, often for life. In order to cope with both the diagnosis of a heavily stigmatized illness and a lifetime in isolation, patients began to write. The works produced by sufferers became so popular that by the mid-1930s their writing was referred to as a distinct literary genre, “leprosy literature.” Studies of leprosy literature have focused on its depiction of human rights violations, struggles with the illness, and the difficulty of life in quarantine. However, patient writing in the 1930s also reveals the multiple ways in which patients found happiness within the institution. In this sense, leprosy literature is also a site of translation, revealing the negotiations of hospital life involving hospital and medical authorities, patients, leprosy relief groups, and government policies. Residents of the leprosaria represent happiness in multiple ways depending on their conception of their illness and life in the leprosaria. For some patients, the institution itself was a source of happiness in that their illness was stigmatized to the degree that life outside the hospital became unbearable. Other writers chafed at life in the hospital; the translation of happiness in their writing is a more complex process. This paper takes these diverse processes of translation as its starting point and examines the multiple ways in which patients conceived of health and happiness within the confines of hospital life. 

  17. Leprosy reactions: coinfections as a possible risk factor

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    Ana Carolina F. Motta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the frequency of coinfections in leprosy patients and whether there is a relationship between the presence of coinfections and the development of leprosy reactional episodes. METHOD: A cross-sectional study based on an analysis of the medical records of the patients who were treated at the Leprosy Clinics of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, was conducted from 2000 to 2010. Information was recorded regarding the age, sex, clinical status, WHO classification, treatment, presence of reactions and coinfections. Focal and systemic infections were diagnosed based on the history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between the leprosy reactions and the patients' gender, age, WHO classification and coinfections. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-five patients were studied. Most of these patients were males (155/225 = 68.8% of an average age of 49.31±15.92 years, and the most prevalent clinical manifestation was the multibacillary (MB form (n = 146, followed by the paucibacillary (PB form (n = 79. Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL was more prevalent (78/122 = 63.9% than the reversal reaction (RR (44/122 = 36.1%, especially in the MB patients (OR 5.07; CI 2.86-8.99; p<0.0001 who exhibited coinfections (OR 2.26; CI 1.56-3.27; p,<0.0001. Eighty-eight (88/225 = 39.1% patients exhibited coinfections. Oral coinfections were the most prevalent (40/88 = 45.5%, followed by urinary tract infections (17/88 = 19.3%, sinusopathy (6/88 = 6.8%, hepatitis C (6/88 = 6.8%, and hepatitis B (6/88 = 6.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Coinfections may be involved in the development and maintenance of leprosy reactions.

  18. Towards leprosy elimination by 2020: forecasts of epidemiological indicators of leprosy in Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina that is a pioneer in leprosy elimination

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    Elisa Petri de Odriozola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina with endemic leprosy, has improved its epidemiological indicators, however, a study of the dynamics over time is lacking. OBJECTIVES We analysed data of 1308 leprosy patients between 1991 to 2014, and the forecast for 2020. METHODS Descriptive statistics and stepwise Bayesian model selection were performed. Forecasts were made using the median of 100,000 projections using the parameters calculated via Monte Carlo methods. RESULTS We found a decreasing number of new leprosy cases (-2.04 cases/year; this decrease is expected to continue by an estimated 20.28 +/- 10.00 cases by 2020, evidenced by a sustained decline in detection rate (from 11 to 2.9/100,000 inhabitants. Age groups that were most affected were 15-44 (40.13% and 45-64 (38.83% year olds. Multibacillary forms (MB predominated (70.35% and while gradually declining, between 10 and 30% developed disability grade 2 (DG2 (0.175 (0.110 - 0.337 DG2/MB cases, with a time delay between 0 to 15 years (median = 0. The proportion of MB clinic forms and DG2 increased and will continuously increase in the short term (0.036 +/- 0.018 logit (MB/total of cases. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Corrientes is on the way to eliminating leprosy by 2020, however the increased proportion of MB clinical forms and DG2 signals a warning for disease control efforts.

  19. Towards leprosy elimination by 2020: forecasts of epidemiological indicators of leprosy in Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina that is a pioneer in leprosy elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, Elisa Petri de; Quintana, Ana María; González, Victor; Pasetto, Roque Antonio; Utgés, María Eugenia; Bruzzone, Octavio Augusto; Arnaiz, María Rosa

    2017-06-01

    Corrientes, a province of northeastern Argentina with endemic leprosy, has improved its epidemiological indicators, however, a study of the dynamics over time is lacking. We analysed data of 1308 leprosy patients between 1991 to 2014, and the forecast for 2020. Descriptive statistics and stepwise Bayesian model selection were performed. Forecasts were made using the median of 100,000 projections using the parameters calculated via Monte Carlo methods. We found a decreasing number of new leprosy cases (-2.04 cases/year); this decrease is expected to continue by an estimated 20.28 +/- 10.00 cases by 2020, evidenced by a sustained decline in detection rate (from 11 to 2.9/100,000 inhabitants). Age groups that were most affected were 15-44 (40.13%) and 45-64 (38.83%) year olds. Multibacillary forms (MB) predominated (70.35%) and while gradually declining, between 10 and 30% developed disability grade 2 (DG2) (0.175 (0.110 - 0.337) DG2/MB cases), with a time delay between 0 to 15 years (median = 0). The proportion of MB clinic forms and DG2 increased and will continuously increase in the short term (0.036 +/- 0.018 logit (MB/total of cases). Corrientes is on the way to eliminating leprosy by 2020, however the increased proportion of MB clinical forms and DG2 signals a warning for disease control efforts.

  20. Study of the profile of the neurotrophin BDNF in new leprosy cases before, during and after multidrug therapy

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    Rosane Dias Costa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin involved in the survival of neurons and growth and differentiation of dendrites and axons. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate plasma levels of BDNF of leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug therapy (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals. Plasma levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at diagnosis, during and after MDT. Plasma levels of BDNF tended to be higher in control subjects in comparison with leprosy patients, but this difference does not reach statistical significance. Interestingly, BDNF levels changed following MDT, achieving statistical difference only at the 2nd dose of MDT. These results indicate that BDNF may not be a surrogate marker of leprosy infection and/or related neuropathy. Further research is needed to investigate the meaning of BDNF level changes following leprosy treatment.

  1. Recent food shortage is associated with leprosy disease in Bangladesh: a case-control study.

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    Sabiena G Feenstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is remaining prevalent in the poorest areas of the world. Intensive control programmes with multidrug therapy (MDT reduced the number of registered cases in these areas, but transmission of Mycobacterium leprae continues in most endemic countries. Socio-economic circumstances are considered to be a major determinant, but uncertainty exists regarding the association between leprosy and poverty. We assessed the association between different socio-economic factors and the risk of acquiring clinical signs of leprosy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a case-control study in two leprosy endemic districts in northwest Bangladesh. Using interviews with structured questionnaires we compared the socio-economic circumstances of recently diagnosed leprosy patients with a control population from a random cluster sample in the same area. Logistic regression was used to compare cases and controls for their wealth score as calculated with an asset index and other socio-economic factors. The study included 90 patients and 199 controls. A recent period of food shortage and not poverty per se was identified as the only socio-economic factor significantly associated with clinical manifestation of leprosy disease (OR 1.79 (1.06-3.02; p = 0.030. A decreasing trend in leprosy prevalence with an increasing socio-economic status as measured with an asset index is apparent, but not statistically significant (test for a trend: OR 0.85 (0.71-1.02; p = 0.083. CONCLUSIONS: Recent food shortage is an important poverty related predictor for the clinical manifestation of leprosy disease. Food shortage is seasonal and poverty related in northwest Bangladesh. Targeted nutritional support for high risk groups should be included in leprosy control programmes in endemic areas to reduce risk of disease.

  2. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  3. Expression and cytokine secretion in the states of immune reactivation in leprosy

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    Sampaio E.P.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The human response to this pathogen exhibits intriguing aspects which are up to now not well understood. The present study discusses the probable mechanisms involved in T cell-specific unresponsiveness observed in lepromatous patients. Analysis of the cytokine profile either in blood leukocytes or in skin specimens taken from leprosy lesions indicates that some parameters of Th1 immune response are present in lepromatous patients under reactional states

  4. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M.; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S.; Soares, Cleverson T.; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM

  5. Gender and leprosy: case studies in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkevisser, Corlien M; Lever, Peter; Alubo, Ogoh; Burathoki, Kamala; Idawani, Cut; Moreira, Tatiana M A; Patrobas, Phillip; Yulizar, Media

    2009-03-01

    There appear to be regional differences in gender ratios of leprosy patients being diagnosed and treated. In Asian countries, more men than women are registered whilst in Africa female patients outnumber males. The Netherlands Leprosy Relief (NLR) therefore initiated research into factors underlying these regional gender differences. Between 1997 and 1999, leprosy control teams in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil supported by social/public health scientists, conducted comparative exploratory research. They looked at three groups of potential explanatory factors: biological, socio-cultural/economic and service-related. The studies were partially quantitative (analysis of the records of patients who according to prescription could have completed treatment) and partially qualitative (interviews/focus group discussions with patients, their relatives, community members and health staff on perceptions of leprosy, its socio-economic consequences, treatment and cure). Biological factors appeared similar in the four countries: irrespective of the M/F ratio, more men than women were registered with multibacillary (MB) leprosy. Strong traditions, the low status of women, their limited mobility, illiteracy and poor knowledge of leprosy appeared to be important sociocultural factors explaining why women were under reporting. Yet, accessible, well reputed services augmented female participation and helped to diminish stigma, which in three out of the four societies seemed greater for women than for men. These positive effects could still be higher if the services would enhance community and patient education with active participation of patients and ex-patients themselves.

  6. Factors contributing to delay in diagnosis and start of treatment of leprosy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholls, P.G.; Chhina, N; Aaen, Karen Bro

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our research was to identify factors contributing to delay in diagnosis and start of treatment in leprosy, focussing on patients' narratives of help-seeking behaviour. Our research took place in Purulia, West Bengal, India and in Nilphamari, northern Bangladesh. Between January...... and August 2000, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 104 patients that explored each individual's narrative of help-seeking behaviour and the context of beliefs and attitudes towards leprosy. Subsequently we surveyed 356 patients currently receiving treatment for leprosy and recorded specific...... aspects of each help-seeking action and their reports of local beliefs and attitudes towards leprosy. Delay was estimated from time of first symptoms through to start of effective treatment (mean 18 months, median 9 months in Purulia and mean 20 months, median 12 months in Nilphamari). The number of help...

  7. Negligible risk of inducing resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with single-dose rifampicin as post-exposure prophylaxis for leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieras, Liesbeth; Anthony, Richard; van Brakel, Wim; Bratschi, Martin W; van den Broek, Jacques; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Cavaliero, Arielle; Kasang, Christa; Perera, Geethal; Reichman, Lee; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Saunderson, Paul; Steinmann, Peter; Yew, Wing Wai

    2016-06-08

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for leprosy is administered as one single dose of rifampicin (SDR) to the contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. SDR reduces the risk of developing leprosy among contacts by around 60 % in the first 2-3 years after receiving SDR. In countries where SDR is currently being implemented under routine programme conditions in defined areas, questions were raised by health authorities and professional bodies about the possible risk of inducing rifampicin resistance among the M. tuberculosis strains circulating in these areas. This issue has not been addressed in scientific literature to date. To produce an authoritative consensus statement about the risk that SDR would induce rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis, a meeting was convened with tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy experts. The experts carefully reviewed and discussed the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and risk factors for the development of (multi) drug-resistance in M. tuberculosis with a view to the special situation of the use of SDR as PEP for leprosy. They concluded that SDR given to contacts of leprosy patients, in the absence of symptoms of active TB, poses a negligible risk of generating resistance in M. tuberculosis in individuals and at the population level. Thus, the benefits of SDR prophylaxis in reducing the risk of developing leprosy in contacts of new leprosy patients far outweigh the risks of generating drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  8. Association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms with leprosy reactions in northern Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Amit; Biswas, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Ekata; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Kamal, Raj; Arora, Mamta; Sagar, Harish; Natarajan, Mohan; Bhagyawant, Sameer S; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja

    2017-07-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy that affects mainly skin and nerves. Polymorphisms of certain genes are substantiated to be associated with the susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. The present investigation addressed the association of Nitric Oxide Synthase2 gene polymorphisms and leprosy in a population from northern part of India. A total of 323 leprosy cases and 288 healthy controls were genotyped for four NOS2 promoter variants (rs1800482, rs2779249, rs8078340 and rs2301369) using FRET technology in Real Time PCR. None of these SNPs in promoter sites was associated with susceptibility/resistance to leprosy. NOS2 rs1800482 was found to be monomorphic with GG genotype. However, NOS2-1026T allele was observed to be in higher frequency with leprosy cases (BL and LL) who were not suffering from any reactional episodes compared to cases with ENL reaction {OR=0.30, 95% CI (0.10-0.86), p=0.024}. NOS2-1026GT genotype was more prevalent in cases without reaction (BT, BB and BL) compared to RR reactional patients {OR=0.38, 95% CI (0.17-0.86), p=0.02}. Although haplotype analysis revealed that no haplotype was associated with leprosy susceptibility/resistance with statistical significance, GTG haplotype was noted to be more frequent in healthy controls. These SNPs are observed to be in linkage disequilibrium. Although, these SNPs are not likely to influence leprosy vulnerability, -1026G>T SNP was indicated to have noteworthy role in leprosy reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid Quantitative Serological Test for Detection of Infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the Causative Agent of Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagon, Marivic F.; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M.; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections. PMID:24478496

  10. Leprosy Mimicking Common Rheumatologic Entities: A Trial for the Clinician in the Era of Biologics

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    Deepak Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis, which make up the lion’s share of cases attending a rheumatology clinic, are relatively easy to diagnose. However, when an entity of infective aetiology like leprosy known to be a great mimic of different autoimmune conditions presents with features similar to these, the possibility of it being diagnosed at the outset is very slim indeed. The ease with which the diagnosis of leprosy can be missed assumes sinister proportions as the use of disease modifying agents can have deleterious effects in these patients. In the era of increasing availability and use of biologic disease modifying agents, it is imperative not only to actively rule out the presence of leprosy but also to make it a part of the prebiologic screening of patients in whom biologics are being planned to be administered, especially in leprosy endemic areas.

  11. Oral coinfection can stress peripheral lymphocyte to inflammatory activity in leprosy

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    Ana Carolina Fragoso Motta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated the intracellular profile of interleukin-2 (IL-2, interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin-10 (IL-10 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from leprosy patients based on oral infections presence to determine whether these coinfections could be associated with pro-inflammatory activity in leprosy. METHODS: Leprosy patients regardless of clinical form and specific leprosy treatment (n=38 were divided into two groups: Group I - leprosy patients with oral infections (n=19, and Group II - leprosy patients without oral infections (n=19. Non-leprosy patients presenting oral infections were assigned to the control Group (n=10. Intracellular IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ production was evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS before and 7 days after controlling the oral infection in the Group I, before and 7 days after dental prophylaxis in the Group II, and during oral infection process in control Group. RESULTS: Low percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes bearing IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ were observed in the Group I and Group II at baseline and 7 days after therapy or prophylaxis compared to controls. Group I showed reduced percentages of IL-4 at baseline and 7 days after therapy compared to controls, or at baseline of Group II, and the Group II showed reduced percentages of CD3+ cells bearing IL-4 compared to control. An increase of the percentages of CD3+cells bearing IL-4 was observed in the Group I after the oral infections treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of oral infections favors the intracellular cytokines expression and, probably, the inflammatory reaction operating as a stimulatory signal triggering the leprosy reactions.

  12. Lupus and leprosy: beyond the coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F M; Gomez, V E; Albuquerque, E M N; Klumb, E M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2015-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that presents an increased susceptibility to infections which may trigger reactivation. Disease flares have been mostly associated with parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, EBV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections, but it is probable that many other agents may also induce innate and adaptive immune system stimulation including the production of autoantibodies as ANA, anti nDNA and anti-ß2-GPI mainly in lepromatous leprosy. Mycobacterium leprae not only may determine symptoms that mimic lupus flares, including autoantibodies production, but could also act as a trigger for lupus reactivation; however, its association is still not fully explored. As demonstrated for tuberculosis, it is quite possible that molecular mimicry may also be involved in the interface of these two diseases. Some studies reported shared epitopes among idiotypes derived from 8E7 and TH9 lepromatous antibodies and those obtained from SLE patients, and it could partially explain the triggering phenomenon of SLE caused by M. leprae. We report and discuss three Brazilian patients whose disease was inactive and presented disease flares concurrently with the diagnosis of leprosy.

  13. BCG and Adverse Events in the Context of Leprosy

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    Renate Richardus

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNotwithstanding its beneficial immunoprophylactic outcomes regarding leprosy and childhood TB, BCG vaccination may cause adverse events, particularly of the skin. However, this local hyper-immune reactivity cannot be predicted before vaccination, nor is its association with protection against leprosy known. In this study we investigated the occurrence of adverse events after BCG (revaccination in contacts of leprosy patients and analyzed whether the concomitant systemic anti-mycobacterial immunity was associated with these skin manifestations.MethodsWithin a randomized controlled BCG vaccination trial in Bangladesh, 14,828 contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients received BCG vaccination between 2012 and 2017 and were examined for adverse events 8 to 12 weeks post-vaccination. From a selection of vaccinated contacts, venous blood was obtained at follow-up examination and stimulated with Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae antigens in overnight whole-blood assays (WBA. M. leprae phenolic glycolipid-I-specific antibodies and 32 cytokines were determined in WBAs of 13 individuals with and 13 individuals without adverse events after vaccination.ResultsOut of the 14,828 contacts who received BCG vaccination, 50 (0.34% presented with adverse events, mainly (80% consisting of skin ulcers. Based on the presence of BCG scars, 30 of these contacts (60% had received BCG in this study as a booster vaccination. Similar to the pathological T-cell immunity observed for tuberculoid leprosy patients, contacts with adverse events at the site of BCG vaccination showed elevated IFN-γ levels in response to M. leprae-specific proteins in WBA. However, decreased levels of sCD40L in serum and GRO (CXCL1 in response to M. leprae simultaneously indicated less T-cell regulation in these individuals, potentially causing uncontrolled T-cell immunity damaging the skin.ConclusionSkin complications after BCG vaccination present surrogate markers for protective

  14. Histoid leprosy: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous inflammation primarily of the peripheral nervous system, skin, and reticuloendothelial system caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It presents clinically as an erythematous or hypopigmented anesthetic patch and a thickened and/or tender cutaneous nerve trunk. Leprosy is also called Hansen disease. Leprosy is a great imitator of other skin diseases, and it can present with different morphological lesions, which is why an expert eye is needed to diagnose it. One of the important clinical presentations of leprosy is histoid leprosy, which is very difficult to diagnose due to different clinical and histopathological findings that mimic, e.g., a fibromatous disorder. Histoid leprosy is a very rare clinicopathological variant of leprosy. It is clinically characterized by skin-colored, soft, succulent nodules, and plaques on apparently normal skin and histologically by a dense bundle of histiocytes arranged in storiform. Though histoid leprosy is a very rare type of leprosy, the higher load of lepra bacilli in these cases makes it a concern as a reservoir for leprosy. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. A clinico-epidemiological study of pediatric leprosy in the urban leprosy center of a tertiary care institute

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    Sukumaran Pradeep Nair

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed a prevalence of 6.65% of pediatric leprosy cases. BT was the most common type of leprosy, and the prevalence of lepromatous leprosy, lepra reactions, and deformity was low.

  16. Leprae reaction resembling rheumatologic disease as presenting feature of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, Hazlyna; Taib, Tarita; Zain, Mollyza Mohd; Ch'ng, Shereen

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae with predominant involvement of skin and nerves. We present a 70-year-old man with leprosy whose initial presentation resembled rheumatologic disease, due to leprae reaction. He presented with an 8-week history of worsening neuropathic pain in the right forearm, associated with necrotic skin lesions on his fingers that had ulcerated. Physical examination revealed two tender necrotic ulcers at the tip of the right middle finger and the dorsal aspect of the left middle finger. The patient had right wrist tenosynovitis and right elbow bursitis. Apart from raised inflammatory markers, the investigations for infection, connective tissue disease, vasculitis, thromboembolic disease and malignancy were negative. During the fourth week of hospitalization, we noticed a 2-cm hypoesthetic indurated plaque on the right inner arm. Further examination revealed thickened bilateral ulnar, radial and popliteal nerves. A slit skin smear was negative. Two skin biopsies and a biopsy of the olecranon bursa revealed granulomatous inflammation. He was diagnosed with paucibacillary leprosy with neuritis. He responded well to multidrug therapy and prednisolone; his symptoms resolved over a few weeks. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing a case of leprosy with atypical presentation in a non-endemic country. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

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    José Antonio Armani Paschoal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1% of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3% were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease.

  18. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, José Antonio Armani; Paschoal, Vania Del'Arco; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ismael, Manuela Gallo y Sanches; Sichieri, Eduvaldo Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1%) of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3%) were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease. PMID:24288467

  19. Critical analysis: use of polymerase chain reaction to diagnose leprosy

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    Flaviane Granero Maltempe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leprosy is a neglected tropical disease and an important public health problem, especially in developing countries. It is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which has a predilection for the skin and peripheral nerves. Although it has low sensitivity, slit-skin smear (SSS remains the conventional auxiliary laboratory technique for the clinical diagnosis of leprosy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is a molecular biology technique that holds promise as a simple and sensitive diagnostic tool. In the present study, the performance of two PCR methods, using different targets, PCR-LP and PCR-P, were compared with SSS with regard to leprosy diagnosis in a reference laboratory. M. leprae DNA was extracted from 106 lymph samples of 40 patients who had clinical suspicion of leprosy. The samples were subjected to both PCR techniques and SSS. Amplification of the human b-globin gene was used as PCR inhibitor control. The specificity of both PCR techniques was 100%, and sensitivity was 0.007 and 0.015 µg/ml for PCR-LP and PCR-P, respectively. No significant difference was found between either the PCR-LP or PCR-P results and SSS results (p > 0.05. Although PCR is not yet a replacement for SSS in the diagnosis of leprosy, this technique may be used as an efficient auxiliary tool for early detection of the disease, especially in endemic regions. This strategy may also be useful in cases in which SSS results are negative (e.g., in paucibacillary patients and cases in which skin biopsy cannot be performed.

  20. Analysis of antibody and cytokine markers for leprosy nerve damage and reactions in the INFIR cohort in India.

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    Rupendra Jadhav

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The ILEP Nerve Function Impairment in Reaction (INFIR is a cohort study designed to identify predictors of reactions and nerve function impairment (NFI in leprosy.Antibodies to mycobacteria, nerve components and serum cytokine were measured as potential markers for their possible association with reactions and NFI.303 newly diagnosed leprosy patients from two centres in North India were enrolled. Antibodies to PGL-1, LAM (IgG1 and IgG3, ceramide, S100 and TNFα levels were measured using ELISA techniques.S-100, PGL IgG and IgM antibody levels were lowest in patients with BT leprosy and highest in patients with lepromatous leprosy. LAM IgG1 and LAM IgG3 antibody levels were highest in patients with BL leprosy. Ceramide antibody levels were not correlated with type of leprosy. Levels of all the antibodies tested and TNF α were lowest in patients with only skin reaction. PGL IgM antibody levels were elevated in patients with skin reactions and NFI. Old sensory NFI is associated with significant elevation of PGL IgG, LAM IgG and S100 antibody levels.These results reveal that the antibody response to mycobacterial antigens, nerve antigens and cytokines are in a dynamic flux and could collectively contribute to NFI in leprosy. The association of multiple markers with old NFI may indicate the contribution of different pathological processes.

  1. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

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    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  2. Educating for early diagnosis of leprosy in the municipality of Mato Grosso Rondonópolis

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    Débora Aparecida da Silva Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rondonópolis-MT has shown high rates of leprosy cases, leading to the need for preventive educational activities. The extension project "Leprosy: Early diagnosis is the solution" is carried out in partnership with the Health Department for 4 years with the Nursing Course UFMT / ICEN / CUR. This article aimed to describe the realization of educational activities on prevention of leprosy in the areas of health facilities, in-service education, lectures in schools and participation in joint efforts between March 2014 and March 2015. The audience were 1764 residents, in addition to students and professionals schools and health teams. They were referred 22 suspected cases and confirmed 11 new, professional training and schools. This citizenship action, the project significantly contributed to the early diagnosis of leprosy and the public health of the city. It is suggested that new projects are undertaken to promote the quality of primary care, encouraging the participation of academia through the university extension.

  3. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

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    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  4. Lepromatous Leprosy of Prepuce- A Case Report

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    Kalpana R. Sulhyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is commonly seen over cooler parts of the body and very rarely found over external genitalia because of their warm temperature.We report a case of lepromatous leprosy of prepuce in a 79 years old male who presented with phimosis. Local examination revealed anodule over prepuce and the clinical diagnosis was carcinoma of penis. This case highlights that leprosy should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of penile lesions.

  5. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae for better understanding of leprosy transmission in Fortaleza, Northeastern Brazil.

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    Fontes, Amanda N B; Lima, Luana N G C; Mota, Rosa M S; Almeida, Rosa L F; Pontes, Maria A; Gonçalves, Heitor de S; Frota, Cristiane C; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Brennan, Patrick J; Guimaraes, Ricardo J P S; Kendall, Carl; Kerr, Ligia R F S; Suffys, Philip N

    2017-12-01

    Leprosy is endemic in large part of Brazil with 28,761 new patients in 2015, the second largest number worldwide and reaches 9/10.000 in highly endemic regions and 2.7/10.000 in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeast Brazil. For better understanding of risk factors for leprosy transmission, we conducted an epidemiologic study supplemented by 17 locus VNTR and SNP 1-4 typing of Mycobacterium leprae in skin biopsy samples from new multibacillary (MB) patients diagnosed at a reference center in 2009 and 2010. Among the 1,519 new patients detected during the study period, 998 (65.7%) were MB and we performed DNA extraction and genotyping on 160 skin biopsy samples, resulting in 159 (16%) good multilocus VNTR types. Thirty-eight of these patients also provided VNTR types from M. leprae in nasal swabs. The SNP-Type was obtained for 157 patients and 87% were of type 4. Upon consideration all VNTR markers, 156 different genotypes and three pairs with identical genotypes were observed; no epidemiologic relation could be observed between individuals in these pairs. Considerable variability in differentiating index (DI) was observed between the different markers and the four with highest DI [(AT)15, (TA)18, (AT)17 and (GAA)21] frequently demonstrated differences in copy number when comparing genotypes from both type of samples. Excluding these markers from analysis resulted in 83 genotypes, 20 of which included 96 of the patients (60.3%). These clusters were composed of two (n = 8), three (n = 6), four (n = 1), five (n = 2), six (n = 1), 19 (n = 1) and 23 (n = 23) individuals and suggests that recent transmission is contributing to the maintenance of leprosy in Fortaleza. When comparing epidemiological and clinical variables among patients within clustered or with unique M. leprae genotypes, a positive bacterial index in skin biopsies and knowledge of working with someone with the disease were significantly associated with clustering. A tendency to belong to a cluster was

  6. Spatial clustering and local risk of leprosy in São Paulo, Brazil.

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    Antônio Carlos Vieira Ramos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the detection rate is decreasing, the proportion of new cases with WHO grade 2 disability (G2D is increasing, creating concern among policy makers and the Brazilian government. This study aimed to identify spatial clustering of leprosy and classify high-risk areas in a major leprosy cluster using the SatScan method.Data were obtained including all leprosy cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2013. In addition to the clinical variable, information was also gathered regarding the G2D of the patient at diagnosis and after treatment. The Scan Spatial statistic test, developed by Kulldorff e Nagarwalla, was used to identify spatial clustering and to measure the local risk (Relative Risk-RR of leprosy. Maps considering these risks and their confidence intervals were constructed.A total of 434 cases were identified, including 188 (43.31% borderline leprosy and 101 (23.28% lepromatous leprosy cases. There was a predominance of males, with ages ranging from 15 to 59 years, and 51 patients (11.75% presented G2D. Two significant spatial clusters and three significant spatial-temporal clusters were also observed. The main spatial cluster (p = 0.000 contained 90 census tracts, a population of approximately 58,438 inhabitants, detection rate of 22.6 cases per 100,000 people and RR of approximately 3.41 (95%CI = 2.721-4.267. Regarding the spatial-temporal clusters, two clusters were observed, with RR ranging between 24.35 (95%CI = 11.133-52.984 and 15.24 (95%CI = 10.114-22.919.These findings could contribute to improvements in policies and programming, aiming for the eradication of leprosy in Brazil. The Spatial Scan statistic test was found to be an interesting resource for health managers and healthcare professionals to map the vulnerability of areas in terms of leprosy transmission risk and areas of underreporting.

  7. Spatial clustering and local risk of leprosy in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Yamamura, Mellina; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Uchoa, Severina Alice da Costa; Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Fiorati, Regina Célia; Queiroz, Ana Angélica Rêgo de; Belchior, Aylana de Souza; Dos Santos, Danielle Talita; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Alves, Luana Seles; Berra, Thaís Zamboni; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    Although the detection rate is decreasing, the proportion of new cases with WHO grade 2 disability (G2D) is increasing, creating concern among policy makers and the Brazilian government. This study aimed to identify spatial clustering of leprosy and classify high-risk areas in a major leprosy cluster using the SatScan method. Data were obtained including all leprosy cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2013. In addition to the clinical variable, information was also gathered regarding the G2D of the patient at diagnosis and after treatment. The Scan Spatial statistic test, developed by Kulldorff e Nagarwalla, was used to identify spatial clustering and to measure the local risk (Relative Risk-RR) of leprosy. Maps considering these risks and their confidence intervals were constructed. A total of 434 cases were identified, including 188 (43.31%) borderline leprosy and 101 (23.28%) lepromatous leprosy cases. There was a predominance of males, with ages ranging from 15 to 59 years, and 51 patients (11.75%) presented G2D. Two significant spatial clusters and three significant spatial-temporal clusters were also observed. The main spatial cluster (p = 0.000) contained 90 census tracts, a population of approximately 58,438 inhabitants, detection rate of 22.6 cases per 100,000 people and RR of approximately 3.41 (95%CI = 2.721-4.267). Regarding the spatial-temporal clusters, two clusters were observed, with RR ranging between 24.35 (95%CI = 11.133-52.984) and 15.24 (95%CI = 10.114-22.919). These findings could contribute to improvements in policies and programming, aiming for the eradication of leprosy in Brazil. The Spatial Scan statistic test was found to be an interesting resource for health managers and healthcare professionals to map the vulnerability of areas in terms of leprosy transmission risk and areas of underreporting.

  8. Utility of Fite-Faraco stain for both mast cell count and bacillary index in skin biopsies of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatura, K R; Sangeetha, S

    2012-01-01

    To assess the utility of a single stain for both mast cell count and bacillary index (BI), 50 skin-biopsie patients were stained with Fite-Faraco (FF) stain, viewed under oil immersion and BI calculated using the Ridley's logarithmic scale, and mast cells counted as the number of cells per mm2. Mean mast cell count per mm2 at the tuberculoid pole was lowest in TT 7.9 and highest in BT 14.23. At the lepromatous end, it was highest in BL 9.21, while in LL it was 8.23. Highest counts were seen in the borderline types overall. The correlation coefficient between histopathological diagnosis and BI is 0.822 which is a positive correlation to a significant degree. The correlation coefficient between histopathological diagnosis and mast cell count was found to be -0.17, which is a negative correlation but not to a significant degree. FF stain was utilised to visualise both bacilli for estimation of BI and mast cells for mast cell count, a seldom attempted feature in literature.

  9. Diagnostic challenges of single plaque-like lesion paucibacillary leprosy

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    Raquel Rodrigues Barbieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of single-lesion paucibacillary leprosy remains a challenge. Reviews by expert dermatopathologists and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR results obtained from 66 single-plaque biopsy samples were compared. Histological findings were graded as high (HP, medium (MP or low (LP probability of leprosy or other dermatopathy (OD. Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes were detected using qPCR. The biopsies of 47 out of 57 clinically diagnosed patients who received multidrug therapy were classified as HP/MP, eight of which were qPCR negative. In the LP/OD (n = 19, two out of eight untreated patients showed positive qPCR results. In the absence of typical histopathological features, qPCR may be utilised to aid in final patient diagnosis, thus reducing overtreatment and delay in diagnosis.

  10. The oral mucosa in leprosy: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice; Neto Pimentel, Dalva Regina; Hirata, Cleonice Hitomi Watashi; de Avelar Alchorne, Maurício Mota

    2006-01-01

    Multibacillary leprosy may involve the oral mucosa, with or without apparent lesions. There are few studies that deal with this issue in the era of multidrug therapy. To assess the frequency of oral mucosa involvement in multibacillary leprosy patients. A transversal study with twenty non-treated multibacillary leprosy patients. The patients were treated in Dracena, São Paulo, between 2000 and 2002. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was carried out. All patients were submitted to jugal mucosa, soft palate and tongue biopsies, in altered or in pre-established sites. The cross-sections were stained by techniques of hematoxilin-eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen. Granuloma and alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli findings determined the specific histopathological involvement. The study involved 19 patients with an average of 2.5 years of disease progression. Specific histopathological involvement occurred in the tongue and soft palate of one lepromatous patient with an apparently normal oral mucosa. (1) Clinical alterations in the oral mucosa does not imply disease involvement, it is necessary to have histopathological confirmation. (2) Apparent specific clinical alterations are rare. (3) The clinically normal oral mucosa can show specific histopathological involvement.

  11. Early detection of leprosy by examination of household contacts, determination of serum anti-PGL-1 antibodies and consanguinity

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    Renata Bazan-Furini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional clinical trial in which the serum anti-phenolic glycolipid (anti-PGL-1 antibodies were analysed in household contacts (HHC of patients with leprosy as an adjunct early leprosy diagnostic marker was conducted. The families of 83 patients underwent clinical examination and serum anti-PGL1 measurement using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 320 HHC, 98 were contacts of lepromatous leprosy (LL, 80 were contacts of borderline lepromatous (BL, 28 were contacts of borderline (BB leprosy, 54 were contacts of borderline tuberculoid (BT, 40 were contacts of tuberculoid (TT and 20 were contacts of indeterminate (I leprosy. Consanguinity with the patients was determined for 232 (72.5% HHC. Of those 232 contacts, 183 had linear consanguinity. Forty-nine HHC had collateral consanguinity. Fifty-eight contacts (18.1% tested positive for anti-PGL1 antibodies. The number of seropositive contacts based on the clinical forms of the index case was 17 (29.3% for LL, 15 (25.9% for BL, one (1.7% for BB, 14 (24.1% for BT, three (5.2% for TT and eight (13.7% for I. At the one year follow-up, two (3.4% of these seropositive contacts had developed BT leprosy. The results of the present study indicate that the serum anti-PGL-1 IgM antibody may be useful for evaluating antigen exposure and as a tool for an early leprosy diagnosis in HHC.

  12. A retrospective study of the epidemiology of leprosy in Cebu: an eleven-year profile.

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    Pauline F D Scheelbeek

    notification in children has remained stable, suggesting transmission is still on-going. It is unclear why many years of good MDT-coverage and a gradual decline in CNR have not been accompanied by evidence of reduced transmission, especially beyond a certain threshold level of case notification. We believe that a new approach to leprosy control is required to tackle transmission more directly. The most promising approach may involve chemoprophylaxis and/or immunoprophylaxis interventions, targeted at high risk (urban areas and groups such as household contacts, followed by a different approach once decline in CNR starts to level off. Identified clusters and trends can form the starting point for implementing this approach.

  13. Mycobacterium leprae–host-cell interactions and genetic determinants in leprosy: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Souza Salles, Jorgenilce; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae in which susceptibility to the mycobacteria and its clinical manifestations are attributed to the host immune response. Even though leprosy prevalence has decreased dramatically, the high number of new cases indicates active transmission. Owing to its singular features, M. leprae infection is an attractive model for investigating the regulation of human immune responses to pathogen-induced disease. Leprosy is one of the most common causes of nontraumatic peripheral neuropathy worldwide. The proportion of patients with disabilities is affected by the type of leprosy and delay in diagnosis. This article briefly reviews the clinical features as well as the immunopathological mechanisms related to the establishment of the different polar forms of leprosy, the mechanisms related to M. leprae–host cell interactions and prophylaxis and diagnosis of this complex disease. Host genetic factors are summarized and the impact of the development of interventions that prevent, reverse or limit leprosy-related nerve impairments are discussed. PMID:21366421

  14. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management.

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    Fabri, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho; Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Vieira, Nayara Figueiredo; Bueno, Isabela de Caux; Rodrigues, Rayssa Nogueira; Monteiro, Thayenne Barrozo Mota; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Duthie, Malcolm S; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2016-04-01

    An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I), ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1), and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID). From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management.

  15. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management

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    Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho Fabri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I, ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1, and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID. From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management.

  16. [Leprosy in children in the region of Thiès, Senegal: study determining whether or not it is a signal of recrudescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioussé, Pauline; Dione, Haby; Bammo, Mariama; Gueye, Ndiaga; Diallo, Thierno Abdoul Aziz; Seck, Fatou; Gueye, Ramatoulaye Diagne; Dieng, Mame Thierno; Fall, Fatma Sarr; Diop, Moustapha; Diop, Bernard Marcel; Ka, Mamadou Mourtalla

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious and transmissible disease. According to the WHO, the number of new cases of leprosy in children in Senegal has risen moderately since 2013. This study aimed to analyze the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary features of leprosy in children in the geographical areas of two social rehabilitation villages in the region of Thiès. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 3 years (2013-2015). All new cases of Hansen's disease aged 0 -15 years were included. Over the three year period, 39 children were included in the study, with a boy predominance (n=23, 59%). Among these children, 27 (66.7%) came from a social rehabilitation village for leprosy patients. One family member was affected by leprosy in 27 cases (69.2%). More than half of the children (23 cases, 58.9%) had multibacillary leprosy (lepromatous-lepromatous). All children underwent a 12-month treatment, at the end of which thirty-six (92.3%) children were healed. Leprosy is still present in Senegal despite the efforts made by the national programme to combat leprosy. In the light of these results, it is important to emphasize the role of active screening strategy targeted to children, which seems to have shown its effectiveness in the region. Early detection, contact tracing and early treatment are important factors in the reduction of the contagiousity of leprosy.

  17. Illness perceptions of leprosy-cured individuals in Surinam with residual disfigurements - "I am cured, but still I am ill".

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaren, Mark Ac; Reyme, Melinda; Lawrence, Maggie; Menke, Jack; Kaptein, Ad A

    2017-06-01

    Objective Leprosy has rarely been the subject of health psychology research despite its substantial impact. Our aim was to explore illness perceptions in patients and their health care providers in Surinam. The Common Sense Model (CSM) was the guiding theoretical model. Design Patients with biomedically cured leprosy and their health care providers completed the B-IPQ and took part in semi-structured interviews. The literature on illness perceptions in patients with leprosy was reviewed. Main outcome measures Patients' B-IPQ scores were compared with samples of patients with other (chronic) illnesses, and with health care providers completing the questionnaire as if they were visibly disfigured patients. Quotations from the semi-structured interviews were used to contextualise the illness perceptions. Results Patients' B-IPQ scores reflected the chronic nature of leprosy and were comparable with those with other chronic illnesses. Health care providers perceived leprosy to have a greater negative impact than did the patients. Perceived understanding of causes differed considerably between patients and health care providers. Conclusion Leprosy continues to be experienced as an illness with major psychological and social consequences such as stigmatisation, even after biomedical cure. Interventions that target patients, health care providers, and society at large may help reduce perceived shame and stigma. The CSM is a helpful theoretical model in studying this population.

  18. Great auricular nerve involvement in leprosy: Scope for misdiagnosis

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    Ramesh V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with neuritis of the great auricular nerve (GAN have been reported. Two patients seen by physicians and an otolaryngologist had prominent and tender cord along the neck with facial edema and history of fainting attack in one, and erythema and hyperaesthesia of the ear in the other simulating vascular occlusion, which were confirmed to be leprosy in Type 1 reaction by the dermatologist. In the third, cold abscess in the nerve that had persisted after anti-leprosy treatment was mistaken as tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis by a surgeon since aspiration had revealed acid-fast bacilli. The probable reasons for misdiagnosis include rarity of involvement of the GAN and its proximity to main blood vessels, and the need for careful interpretation of laboratory results.

  19. Anti-natural octyl disaccharide-leprosy IDRI diagnostic (NDO-LID) antibodies as indicators of leprosy reactions and neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Coll, Héctor; Muñoz, Mónica; Camilo Beltrán, Juan; Duthie, Malcolm S; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy is a complex infectious and neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Nerve damage is related to immunological hypersensitivity responses known as leprosy reactions (LRs). Diagnostic tools to predict LRs are not available. We hypothesized that natural octyl disaccharide-leprosy IDRI diagnostic (NDO-LID) would be helpful as an indicator of LRs and neuritis. To assess the utility of NDO-LID in indicating reactions, ELISA were used to detect specific antibodies in serum samples from 80 Colombian leprosy patients (40 with and 40 without history of LRs). Responses were detected using a range of detection reagents detecting IgG, IgM or both isotypes. Patients with a history of LRs had an increased seropositivity rate for anti-NDO-LID antibodies compared to patients without (anti-NDO-LID protein A [p=0.02], IgG anti-NDO-LID [p=0.01] and IgM anti-NDO-LID [p=0.01]). Further analyses of patients with a history of LRs indicated that both seropositivity rate and magnitude of responses were elevated among patients with neuritis versus those without neuritis (anti-NDO-LID protein A [p=0.03], IgG anti-NDO-LID [p=0.001] and IgM anti-NDO-LID [p=0.06]). Our data indicate that testing for serum anti-NDO-LID antibodies can be a useful screen to identify patients at risk of developing LRs and neuritis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. MDT-MB therapy in paucibacillary leprosy: A clinicopathological assessment

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    Prasad P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommends treatment regimens for paucibacillary (PB and multibacillary (MB leprosy, which differ in their duration and components. Hence accurate classification of the disease is required. To overcome difficulties in classification Uniform Multi Drug Therapy (U-MDT has been recommended. AIM : To evaluate the benefit of adding clofazimine to paucibacillary regimens in leprosy patients by measuring clinical and histological resolution. METHODS: Forty-four paucibacillary patients were included in the study. Twenty-two patients were given MDT-PB regimen and the remaining MDT-MB regimen for six months . Skin biopsies were done before the commencement and at the end of treatment. Clinical and histological resolutions were measured according to the standard criteria a laid down. The results were analyzed using Fishers′ test and Crammers′ V test. RESULTS: Clinical improvement was observed in 90.9% in the MB group as compared to 27.3% in the PB group. Regression in the nerve swelling was observed in 70% in the MB group and in 37.5% in the PB group while histological resolution was observed in 72.8% and 54.5% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of clofazimine helps to resolve leprosy lesions both clinically and histologically, thus justifying the concept of Uniform MDT regimen for all patients.

  1. miRNome Expression Analysis Reveals New Players on Leprosy Immune Physiopathology

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    Claudio Guedes Salgado

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy remains as a public health problem and its physiopathology is still not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA non-coding that can interfere with mRNA to regulate gene expression. A few studies using DNA chip microarrays have explored the expression of miRNA in leprosy patients using a predetermined set of genes as targets, providing interesting findings regarding the regulation of immune genes. However, using a predetermined set of genes restricted the possibility of finding new miRNAs that might be involved in different mechanisms of disease. Thus, we examined the miRNome of tuberculoid (TT and lepromatous (LL patients using both blood and lesional biopsies from classical leprosy patients (LP who visited the Dr. Marcello Candia Reference Unit in Sanitary Dermatology in the State of Pará and compared them with healthy subjects. Using a set of tools to correlate significantly differentially expressed miRNAs with their gene targets, we identified possible interactions and networks of miRNAs that might be involved in leprosy immunophysiopathology. Using this approach, we showed that the leprosy miRNA profile in blood is distinct from that in lesional skin as well as that four main groups of genes are the targets of leprosy miRNA: (1 recognition and phagocytosis, with activation of immune effector cells, where the immunosuppressant profile of LL and immunoresponsive profile of TT are clearly affected by miRNA expression; (2 apoptosis, with supportive data for an antiapoptotic leprosy profile based on BCL2, MCL1, and CASP8 expression; (3 Schwann cells (SCs, demyelination and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT, supporting a role for different developmental or differentiation gene families, such as Sox, Zeb, and Hox; and (4 loss of sensation and neuropathic pain, revealing that RHOA, ROCK1, SIGMAR1, and aquaporin-1 (AQP1 may be involved in the loss of sensation or leprosy pain, indicating possible new therapeutic targets

  2. Household expenditure on leprosy outpatient services in the Indian health system: A comparative study.

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    Anuj Tiwari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a major public health problem in many low and middle income countries, especially in India, and contributes considerably to the global burden of the disease. Leprosy and poverty are closely associated, and therefore the economic burden of leprosy is a concern. However, evidence on patient's expenditure is scarce. In this study, we estimate the expenditure in primary care (outpatient by leprosy households in two different public health settings.We performed a cross-sectional study, comparing the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli with the Umbergaon block of Valsad, Gujrat, India. A household (HH survey was conducted between May and October, 2016. We calculated direct and indirect expenditure by zero inflated negative binomial and negative binomial regression. The sampled households were comparable on socioeconomic indicators. The mean direct expenditure was USD 6.5 (95% CI: 2.4-17.9 in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 5.4 (95% CI: 3.8-7.9 per visit in Umbergaon. The mean indirect expenditure was USD 8.7 (95% CI: 7.2-10.6 in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 12.4 (95% CI: 7.0-21.9 in Umbergaon. The age of the leprosy patients and type of health facilities were the major predictors of total expenditure on leprosy primary care. The higher the age, the higher the expenditure at both sites. The private facilities are more expensive than the government facilities at both sites. If the public health system is enhanced, government facilities are the first preference for patients.An enhanced public health system reduces the patient's expenditure and improves the health seeking behaviour. We recommend investing in health system strengthening to reduce the economic burden of leprosy.

  3. Household expenditure on leprosy outpatient services in the Indian health system: A comparative study.

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    Tiwari, Anuj; Suryawanshi, Pramilesh; Raikwar, Akash; Arif, Mohammad; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Leprosy is a major public health problem in many low and middle income countries, especially in India, and contributes considerably to the global burden of the disease. Leprosy and poverty are closely associated, and therefore the economic burden of leprosy is a concern. However, evidence on patient's expenditure is scarce. In this study, we estimate the expenditure in primary care (outpatient) by leprosy households in two different public health settings. We performed a cross-sectional study, comparing the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli with the Umbergaon block of Valsad, Gujrat, India. A household (HH) survey was conducted between May and October, 2016. We calculated direct and indirect expenditure by zero inflated negative binomial and negative binomial regression. The sampled households were comparable on socioeconomic indicators. The mean direct expenditure was USD 6.5 (95% CI: 2.4-17.9) in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 5.4 (95% CI: 3.8-7.9) per visit in Umbergaon. The mean indirect expenditure was USD 8.7 (95% CI: 7.2-10.6) in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 12.4 (95% CI: 7.0-21.9) in Umbergaon. The age of the leprosy patients and type of health facilities were the major predictors of total expenditure on leprosy primary care. The higher the age, the higher the expenditure at both sites. The private facilities are more expensive than the government facilities at both sites. If the public health system is enhanced, government facilities are the first preference for patients. An enhanced public health system reduces the patient's expenditure and improves the health seeking behaviour. We recommend investing in health system strengthening to reduce the economic burden of leprosy.

  4. Expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, tryptophan aspartate-containing coat protein, leprae lipoarabinomannan, and phenolic glycolipid-1 on the failure of the phagolysosome process in macrophages of leprosy patients as a viability marker of Mycobacterium leprae.

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    Prakoeswa, Cita Rosita Sigit; Wahyuni, Ratna; Iswahyudi; Adriaty, Dinar; Yusuf, Irawan; Sutjipto; Agusni, Indropo; Izumi, Shinzo

    2016-06-01

    Phagolysosome process in macrophage of leprosy patients' is important in the early phase of eliminating Mycobacterium leprae invasion. This study was to clarify the involvement of Rab5, Rab7, and trytophan aspartate-containing coat protein (TACO) from host macrophage and leprae lipoarabinomannan (Lep-LAM) and phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) from M. leprae cell wall as the reflection of phagolysosome process in relation to 16 subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) M. leprae as a marker of viability of M. leprae. Using a cross sectional design study, skin biopsies were obtained from 47 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy at Dr Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. RNA isolation and complementary DNA synthesis were performed. Samples were divided into two groups: 16S rRNA M. leprae-positive and 16S rRNA M. leprae-negative. The expressions of Rab5, Rab7, TACO, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 were assessed with an immunohistochemistry technique. Using Mann-Whitney U analysis, a significant difference in the expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 was found (p.05). Spearman analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between the score of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 and the score of 16S rRNA M. leprae (pleprae infection, Rab5, Rab7, and Lep-LAM play important roles in the failure of phagolysosome process via a membrane trafficking pathway, while PGL-1 plays a role via blocking lysosomal activities. These inventions might be used for the development of an early diagnostic device in the future. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

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    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Leprosy Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (LPEP) programme: Study protocol for evaluating the feasibility and impact on case detection rates of contact tracing and single dose rifampicin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth-Jaeggi, T. (Tanja); Steinmann, P. (Peter); Mieras, L. (Liesbeth); W.H. van Brakel (Wim); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); Tiwari, A. (Anuj); Bratschi, M. (Martin); Cavaliero, A. (Arielle); Vander Plaetse, B. (Bart); Mirza, F. (Fareed); Aerts, A. (Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The reported number of new leprosy patients has barely changed in recent years. Thus, additional approaches or modifications to the current standard of passive case detection are needed to interrupt leprosy transmission. Large-scale clinical trials with single dose

  7. Imported and autochthonous leprosy presenting in Madrid (1989-2015): A case series and review of the literature.

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    Norman, Francesca F; Fanciulli, Chiara; Pérez-Molina, José-Antonio; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy remains infrequent in non-endemic areas. The objective of this study was to describe the cases of leprosy reviewed at a referral unit for imported diseases in Europe and to compare these findings with published data on imported leprosy. Cases of leprosy evaluated at a referral centre are described and salient features of autochthonous and imported cases are compared. A review of the literature on imported leprosy was performed. During the study period, 25 patients with leprosy were followed-up (10 were autochthonous cases and 15 were considered to be imported). Regarding imported cases, the majority were diagnosed in Latin American immigrants (10/15, 67%), mean age was 42 years, there were no differences in gender distribution, estimated average time from arrival in Spain to first visit at the unit was 3 years and from symptom onset to diagnosis was 2 years. Over 80% of imported cases had multibacillary disease and over one third of patients had been previously diagnosed with leprosy. One third had received alternate incorrect diagnoses initially, leprosy completed standard therapy and were considered cured and over one third were lost to follow-up. Leprosy remains a complex disease for healthcare professionals unfamiliar with this infection. Manifestations are polymorphic so misdiagnoses and consequent delays in diagnosis are not infrequent and may lead to resulting disabilities. Early diagnosis and management are essential to prevent sequelae and possible transmission. Improving access to health care, especially for vulnerable groups, would be necessary to advance in the control of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Amiloidose e insuficiência renal crônica terminal associada à hanseníase Amyloidosis and end-stage renal disease associated with leprosy

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    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Júnior

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available O envolvimento renal na hanseníase é diverso, incluindo glomerulonefrites, amiloidose e nefrite túbulo-intersticial. Um homem de 58 anos foi admitido com edema de membros inferiores e dispnéia. Na admissão, havia retenção de escórias nitrogenadas, anemia, hipercalemia e acidose metabólica, com necessidade de hemodiálise. Referia história de hanseníase virchoviana. Foi realizada biopsia renal, compatível com amiloidose. O paciente evoluiu estável, sem recuperação da função renal, permanecendo em tratamento hemodialítico. A hanseníase deve ser investigada em todo paciente com perda de função renal, sobretudo naqueles que apresentam lesões cutâneas ou outras manifestações sugestivas de hanseníase.Renal involvement in leprosy includes glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis and tubulointerstitial nephritis. A 58-year-old man was admitted with complaints of lower limb edema and dyspnea. At admission, nitrogen retention, anemia, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis were observed, requiring hemodialysis. The patient had a history of lepromatous leprosy. A renal biopsy was performed that was compatible with amyloidosis. The patient had a stable outcome, but without renal function recovery and remained on regular hemodialysis. Leprosy should be investigated in every patient with renal function loss, particularly in those with cutaneous lesions or other manifestations suggestive of leprosy.

  9. Household costs of leprosy reactions (ENL in rural India.

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    David J Chandler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL is a common immune-mediated complication of lepromatous (LL and borderline lepromatous (BL leprosy. Most patients experience chronic or multiple acute ENL over many years during an economically active period of their lives. Understanding the economic burden of ENL is essential to provide effective patient support, yet this area has not been investigated.Ninety-one patients with LL or BL leprosy attending a leprosy hospital in Purulia district of West Bengal, India, were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Cases (n = 53 were identified as those who had one or more episodes of ENL within the last 3 years. Controls (n = 38 had LL or BL leprosy but no history of ENL. Data were collected on household income, direct and indirect costs, and coping strategies.The total household cost was Rs 1543 per month or 27.9% (IQR 13.2-52.6 of monthly household income for cases, and Rs 237 per month or 4.9% (IQR 1.7-13.4 of monthly household income for controls. Indirect costs accounted for 65% of total household costs for cases. Direct costs accounted for the remaining 35% of household costs, and resulted almost entirely from treatment-seeking in the private sector. Total household costs exceeded 40% of household income for 37.7% of cases (n = 20 and 2.6% of controls (n = 1 [1 USD = 59 INR].Households affected by ENL face significant economic burden and are at risk of being pushed further into poverty. Health policy should acknowledge the importance of private sector provision and the significant contribution to total household costs of lost productivity (indirect cost. Further work is needed to explore this area and identify solutions.

  10. Integration of leprosy services into the General Health Service in Sri Lanka: overcoming challenges to implementation in a remote district.

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    Wijesinghe, Thushanthi S; Wijesinghe, Pushpa Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Sri Lanka took a policy decision to integrate leprosy services into the general health services (GHS) in 1999. This paper aims to summarize the emergence of new, specific challenges and how they were overcome during the integration of leprosy services to the GHS in a remote, leprosy endemic district in Sri Lanka. In this article, the regional epidemiologist as the team leader describes the principles used for transition to an effective integrated model of leprosy services from a centralized leprosy control model in the district. In addition, rationale for integration is viewed from the epidemiological and operational perspectives. National and district leprosy epidemiological data from secondary sources are also reviewed for corroborating the effectiveness of integration. Challenges surfaced were mainly related to the transfer of ownership of the programme, selection of appropriate service providing institutions easily accessible to clients, sustainability of leprosy services at the GHS, ensuring participation of all stakeholders in capacity building programmes and co-ordination of patient care in the absence of a dermatologist in the district. An empowered district team leader with specified roles and responsibilities, his sound technical and managerial know how and ability to translate 'team work' concept to practice were found to be essential for successful implementation of integration. Decision-making powers at the district level and flexibility to introduce new, area-specific changes to the centrally prepared core activities of integration were also vital to overcome locally surfaced challenges.

  11. Measurement of some biophysical parameters in skin lesions of leprosy

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    A B Gupta

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Transepidermal water loss (TEWL, high frequency electrical conductance (HFC and the hydration state index (HSI were measured in sldn lesions of 30 paucibacillary leprosy patients and compared with the contralateral uninvolved skin. While the TEWL, HFC and HSI all showed lower values in the lesion site, as compared to the contralateral skin sites, the differences between the two sets of values significant in HFC and. HSI only at 2% and 1% level respectively. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.69 was found to eidst between these two parameters. The parameters correlate well with the known reduced sweating in skin lesions of TT and BT leprosy and may therefore be considered as good objective parameters to confirm hypohydrosis in suspected skin lesions ofleprosy.

  12. Evaluation of Cellular Phenotypes Implicated in Immunopathogenesis and Monitoring Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV/Leprosy Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem Beatriz Wagner; Sales, Anna Maria; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; de Oliveira, Ariane Leite; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Background It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR). However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. Methods/Principal Findings Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%), dropping significantly (pleprosy individuals at risk for IRIS/RR. So, a comparative investigation to leprosy patients at RR should be conducted. PMID:22205964

  13. PCR-based techniques for leprosy diagnosis: from the laboratory to the clinic.

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    Alejandra Nóbrega Martinez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In leprosy, classic diagnostic tools based on bacillary counts and histopathology have been facing hurdles, especially in distinguishing latent infection from active disease and diagnosing paucibacillary clinical forms. Serological tests and IFN-gamma releasing assays (IGRA that employ humoral and cellular immune parameters, respectively, are also being used, but recent results indicate that quantitative PCR (qPCR is a key technique due to its higher sensitivity and specificity. In fact, advances concerning the structure and function of the Mycobacterium leprae genome led to the development of specific PCR-based gene amplification assays for leprosy diagnosis and monitoring of household contacts. Also, based on the validation of point-of-care technologies for M. tuberculosis DNA detection, it is clear that the same advantages of rapid DNA detection could be observed in respect to leprosy. So far, PCR has proven useful in the determination of transmission routes, M. leprae viability, and drug resistance in leprosy. However, PCR has been ascertained to be especially valuable in diagnosing difficult cases like pure neural leprosy (PNL, paucibacillary (PB, and patients with atypical clinical presentation and histopathological features compatible with leprosy. Also, the detection of M. leprae DNA in different samples of the household contacts of leprosy patients is very promising. Although a positive PCR result is not sufficient to establish a causal relationship with disease outcome, quantitation provided by qPCR is clearly capable of indicating increased risk of developing the disease and could alert clinicians to follow these contacts more closely or even define rules for chemoprophylaxis.

  14. Opening a Can of Worms: Leprosy Reactions and Complicit Soil-Transmitted Helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagge, Deanna A; Parajuli, Pawan; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Rana, Divya R S J B; Thapa, Ruby; Neupane, Kapil D; Nicholls, Peter; Adams, Linda B; Geluk, Annemieke; Shah, Mahesh; Napit, Indra B

    2017-09-01

    >94% of new annual leprosy cases are diagnosed in populations co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminths (STH). STH can profoundly dysregulate host immune responses towards Th2 bias, which can be restored over time after deworming. We hypothesize that STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction (denoted as simply "reaction" herein) occurrence within a co-endemic population. A cohort study was performed on a cohort of Nepalese leprosy patients across treatment and diagnostic classifications who were screened by routine fecal smear microscopy and multiplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Ascaris lumbricoides (Al), Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss), Ancyclostoma duodenale (Ad) and Necator americanus (Na). Among 145 patients, 55% were positive for ≥1 STH (STH+): 34% Al+, 18% Ss+, 17% Ad+and 5% Na+. Significant inverse STH and reaction relationships were evidenced by the bulk of cases: 63% reaction-negative were STH+ of total cases (p=0.030) while 65% reaction-positive were STH- in new cases (96; p=0.023). Strikingly, the majority of STH+ were reaction-negative, even when considering each species: 59% Al+, 60% Ss+, 62% Ad+and 67% Na+of new leprosy cases. Absence of STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction at diagnosis within a co-endemic population. This is likely due to immune reconstitution effects after deworming or interruption of chronic STH-mediated immune dysregulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. [Leprosy, a pillar of human genetics of infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschignard, J; Scurr, E; Alcaïs, A

    2013-06-01

    Despite a natural reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae limited to humans and free availability of an effective antibiotic treatment, more than 200,000 people develop leprosy each year. This disease remains a major cause of disability and social stigma worldwide. The cause of this constant incidence is currently unknown and indicates that important aspects of the complex relationship between the pathogen and its human host remain to be discovered. An important contribution of host genetics to susceptibility to leprosy has long been suggested to account for the considerable variability between individuals sustainably exposed to M. leprae. Given the inability to cultivate M. leprae in vitro and in the absence of relevant animal model, genetic epidemiology is the main strategy used to identify the genes and, consequently, the immunological pathways involved in protective immunity to M. leprae. Recent genome-wide studies have identified new pathophysiological pathways which importance is only beginning to be understood. In addition, the prism of human genetics placed leprosy at the crossroads of other common diseases such as Crohn's disease, asthma or myocardial infarction. Therefore, novel lights on the pathogenesis of many common diseases could eventually emerge from the detailed understanding of a disease of the shadows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic diversity in Mycobacterium leprae isolates from leprosy cases in South India.

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    Das, Madhusmita; Chaitanya, V Sundeep; Kanmani, K; Rajan, Lakshmi; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2016-11-01

    The Objective of this study was to identify the strain diversity of Mycobacterium leprae in terms of SNP types and subtypes stratified as per genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms, in clinical isolates of leprosy patients from a tertiary care leprosy center in South India. Further, the associations of SNP types with clinical outcomes in leprosy were also investigated. DNA was extracted from excisional skin biopsies of a total of 172 newly diagnosed untreated leprosy patients from a clinic in Tamil Nadu, in south India, that also serves patients from neighboring states. All the leprosy patients were those who voluntarily reported at the clinic during the study period of one year i.e., 2015. Clinical and histopathological details were collected at diagnosis and leprosy was confirmed through bacteriological smear examination and PCR for M. leprae specific RLEP region. SNP types and subtypes were determined by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing of PCR products. M. leprae specific RLEP gene amplification was achieved in 160 out of 172 patients. Among 160 specimens 118(73.75%) were type 1 and 42 (26.25%) were type 2 and on subtyping it was noted that 88/160 (55.00%) were 1D, 25/160 (15.62%) 1C, 5/160 (3.12%) 1A, 33/160 (20.62%) 2G and 9/160 (5.62%) were 2H. Our results indicated that subtype 1D is predominant in the south Indian population. We also noted 2G, 1C and 1A in the patient sample tested. Additionally we identified subtype 2H for the first time in India. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Estudo comparativo preliminar entre os alongamentos proprioceptivo e estático passivo em pacientes com seqüelas de hanseníase Preliminary comparative study between proprioceptive and passive static stretching in patients with leprosy sequelae

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    Augusto Floricel Diaz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste estudo foi comparar a aplicação de alongamento estático passivo e alongamento proprioceptivo no tratamento de seqüelas de hanseníase. Doze pacientes com essas seqüelas participaram da pesquisa, separados aleatoriamente em dois grupos: o grupo FNP, tratado com facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva, e o grupo AEP, com alongamento estático passivo. Ambos realizaram dez sessões de alongamentos, sendo submetidos à avaliação inicial e final nas quais foram aplicados o questionário SF-36, mensuradas a amplitude de movimento (ADM do punho e tornozelo, testados os reflexos e a sensibilidade. No grupo FNP foi observada melhora na ADM do tornozelo e em três domínios do SF-36; no grupo AEP, em cinco domínios do SF-36. Quando comparados os grupos, o FNP obteve melhora significativa na extensão do punho, dorsiflexão e plantiflexão em relação ao AEP. A facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva parece ser um método mais eficaz para ganhar alongamento muscular e ADM de tornozelo e punho em pacientes com seqüelas de hanseníase. Não foi observada relação entre acréscimo na ADM e melhora na qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde nos pacientes dos dois grupos.The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two kinds of stretching - passive, static stretching, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF - in patients with leprosy sequel. Twelve patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the PNF group and the SS group, that was submitted to static stretching. Both groups attended ten stretching sessions, being submitted to initial and final evaluations in which were assessed: health-related quality of life, by means of he SF-36 questionnaire; ankle and wrist range of motion (ROM; and sensitivity and reflex testing. Improvements in ankle movement and in three SF-36 domains were observed in PNF group; and in five SF-36 domains in SS group. PNF group showed better improvement in wrist extension and

  18. Surgical treatment of type I neuritis in a teenage boy with borderline tuberculoid leprosy

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    Christiane Salgado Sette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbation of the immune response against Mycobacterium leprae can lead to neuritis, which is commonly treated via immunosuppression with corticosteroids. Early neurolysis may be performed concurrently, especially in young patients with a risk of functional sequelae. We report the case of a young patient experienced intense pain in the left elbow one year after the treatment of tuberculoid-tuberculoid leprosy. The pain was associated with paresthesias in the ulnar edge and left ulnar claw. After evaluation, the diagnosis was changed to borderline tuberculoid leprosy accompanied with neuritis of the left ulnar nerve. Early neurolysis resulted in rapid reduction of the pain and recovery of motor function.

  19. Perceived Stigma towards Leprosy among Community Members Living Close to Nonsomboon Leprosy Colony in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehler, Nils; Adhikar, Bipin; Raut, Shristi; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Chapman, Robert Sedgwick

    2015-01-01

    Background Interpretation of Leprosy as a sickness differs among society. The set of beliefs, knowledge and perceptions towards a disease play a vital role in the construction of stigma towards a disease. The main purpose of this study was to explore the extent and correlates of the perceived stigma towards leprosy in the community living close to the leprosy colony in Non Somboon region of Khon Kaen Province of Thailand. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 257 leprosy unaffected community participants, above the age of 18 who were living close to the Leprosy colony in Non Somboon region of Thailand. Each participant was asked a questionnaire containing characteristics of the participants in terms of socio-demographic background and knowledge regarding the disease. In addition perceived stigma towards leprosy was measured using EMIC (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue) questionnaire. Results Among EMIC items, shame or embarrassment in the community due to leprosy was felt by 54.5%, dislike to buy food from leprosy affected persons were 49.8% and difficulty to find work for leprosy affected persons were perceived by 47.1%. Higher total EMIC score was found in participants age 61 years or older (p = 0.021), staying longer in the community (p = 0.005), attending fewer years of education (p = 0.024) and who were unemployed (p = 0.08). Similarly, perceptions about leprosy such as difficult to treat (p = 0.015), severe disease (p = 0.004) and punishment by God (p = 0.011) were significantly associated with higher perceived stigma. Conclusions Perceived stigma towards leprosy was found highest among participants with age 61 years or older, longer duration of stay in community close to the leprosy colony, lower duration of education and participants who were unemployed had higher perceived stigma. Similarly, participants with perceptions of leprosy such as difficult to treat, severe disease and punishment by God had higher perceived stigma towards

  20. Performance of general health workers in leprosy control activities at public health facilities in Amhara and Oromia States, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeje, Tadiye; Negera, Edessa; Kebede, Eshetu; Hailu, Tsegaye; Hassen, Ismaile; Lema, Tsehainesh; Yamuah, Lawrence; Shiguti, Birru; Fenta, Melkamu; Negasa, Megersa; Beyene, Demissew; Bobosha, Kidist; Aseffa, Abraham

    2016-04-07

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease of public health importance and one of the leading causes of permanent physical disability. Nevertheless, the drop in prevalence following multidrug therapy has resulted in the neglect of leprosy. The annual incidence of leprosy has remained the same in Ethiopia since decades with more than 76% of the reported new cases coming from Oromia and Amhara Regional States. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and skill of general health workers in leprosy control activities at public health facilities in Oromia and Amhara Regional States. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2011 to February 2012 at different public health facilities in selected eight zones in Oromia and Amhara Regional States. A multistage sampling method was used to obtain representative samples. High and low endemic zones for leprosy were included in the study in both regional states. Data were collected from general health workers through a structured self-administered questionnaire and at on-site assessment of their performance. Baseline socio-demographic data, health workers' attitude towards leprosy and their knowledge and skill in the management of leprosy were assessed. Bloom's cut off point was used to describe the knowledge and practical skills of the respondents while Likert's scale was used for attitude assessment. A total of 601 general health workers responsible for leprosy control activities at public health facilities were included in knowledge and attitude assessment and 83 of them were subjected to practical evaluation, with on-site observation of how they handle leprosy patients. These included medical doctors (4%), health officers and nurses with Bachelor degree in Science (27%), clinical nurses with diploma (66%) and health assistants (2.8%). The median age of the respondents was 26.0 years and females made up of 45%. Generally the knowledge and skills of the respondents were found to be poor while attitude

  1. Is Leprosy Control In Urban Slums Possible ? - A Study In Bombay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapati R

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of community-based leprosy control operations spanning almost a decade in two locations, a small self settled leprosy colony (I of about 800 subjects as well as a large slum (II with a population of about 20,000 in the metropolitan city of Bombay are compared. New case detection through survey in location I and voluntary reporting in location II during the period 1982-86 is taken as an index of the impact of the intervention, which consisted of field based administration of multi-drug therapy. Though the leprosy colony concentrates an abnormal reservoir of infectious cases in a small population, it was relatively easier to achieve success in reducing the transmission rate through field-based chemotherapy programme. The same degree of success however, could not be achieved in a normal slum. Health care delivery system in relation to leprosy eradication at the grass-root levels has to be planned giving maximum importance to cost-effective methods of identification of multi-bacillary leprosy patients and monitoring their movements carefully during the treatment phase.

  2. National sample survey to assess the new case disease burden of leprosy in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Katoch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A national sample survey of leprosy was undertaken in partnership with Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR institutions, National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP, Panchayati Raj members, and treated leprosy patients to detect new cases of leprosy in India. The objectives of the survey were to estimate the new leprosy case load; record both Grade 1 and Grade 2 disabilities in the new cases; and to assess the magnitude of stigma and discrimination prevalent in the society. A cluster based, cross-sectional survey involving all States was used for the door-to-door survey using inverse sampling methodology. Rural and urban clusters were sampled separately. The population screened for detecting 28 new cases in rural and 30 in urban clusters was enumerated, recorded and analyzed. Data capture and analysis in different schedules were the main tools used. For quality control three tiers of experts were utilized for the confirmation of cases and disabilities. Self-stigma was assessed in more than half of the total new patients detected with disabilities by the approved questionnaire. A different questionnaire was used to assess the stigma in the community. A population of 14,725,525 (10,302,443 rural; 4,423,082 urban was screened and 2161 new cases - 1300 paucibacillary (PB and 861 multibacillary (MB were detected. New case estimates for leprosy was 330,346 (95% Confidence limits, 287,445-380,851. Disabilities observed in these cases were 2.05/100,000 population and 13.9 per cent (302/2161 in new cases. Self-stigma in patients with disabilities was reduced, and the patients were well accepted by the spouse, neighbour, at workplace and in social functions.

  3. Risk Factors for Leprosy Reactions in Three Endemic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, David M.; Martelli, Celina M. T.; Stefani, Mariane M. A.; Maroja, Maria de Fatima; Villahermosa, Laarni; Pardillo, Fe; Tamang, Krishna B.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain risk factors for complications (reactions or neuritis) in leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis in three leprosy-endemic countries. Newly diagnosed patients were enrolled in Brazil, the Philippines, and Nepal, and risk factors for reactions and neuritis were assessed using a case-control approach: “cases” were patients with these complications, and controls were patients without complications. Of 1,972 patients enrolled in this study, 22% had complications before treatment. Type 1 reaction was diagnosed in 13.7% of patients, neuritis alone in 6.9.%, and type 2 reaction in 1.4%. The frequency of these complications was higher in Nepal, in lepromatous patients, in males, and in adults versus children. Reactions and neuritis were seen in patients at diagnosis, before treatment was started. Reactions were seen in adults and children, even in patients with only a single lesion. Neuritis was often present without other signs of reaction. Reactions and neuritis were more likely to occur in lepromatous patients, and were more likely to be seen in adults than in children. PMID:25448239

  4. Impact of PGL-I seropositivity on the protective effect of BCG vaccination among leprosy contacts: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia C Düppre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contacts of leprosy patients are at increased risk of developing leprosy and need to be targeted for early diagnosis. Seropositivity to the phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has been used to identify contacts who have an increased risk of developing leprosy. In the present study, we studied the effect of seropositivity in patient contacts, on the risk of developing leprosy, stratified by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG vaccination after index case diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Leprosy contacts were examined as part of the surveillance programme of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute Leprosy Outpatient Clinic in Rio de Janeiro. Demographic, social, epidemiological and clinical data were collected. The presence of IgM antibodies to PGL-I in sera and BCG vaccination status at the time of index case diagnosis were evaluated in 2,135 contacts. During follow-up, 60 (2.8%; 60/2,135 leprosy cases were diagnosed: 41 among the 1,793 PGL-I-negative contacts and 19 among the 342 PGL-I-positive contacts. Among PGL-I-positive contacts, BCG vaccination after index case diagnosis increased the adjusted rate of developing clinical manifestations of leprosy (Adjusted Rate Ratio (aRR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.8-8.2 compared with the PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts (aRR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.2-8.1. The incidence density was highest during the first year of follow-up for the PGL-I-positive vaccinated contacts. However, all of those contacts developed PB leprosy, whereas most MB cases (4/6 occurred in PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts. CONCLUSION: Contact examination combined with PGL-I testing and BCG vaccination remain important strategies for leprosy control. The finding that rates of leprosy cases were highest among seropositive contacts justifies targeting this specific group for close monitoring. Furthermore, it is recommended that PGL-I-positive contacts and contacts with a high familial bacteriological index

  5. Impact of PGL-I Seropositivity on the Protective Effect of BCG Vaccination among Leprosy Contacts: A Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düppre, Nádia C.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Sales, Anna M.; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nery, José Augusto C.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Bührer-Sékula, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background Contacts of leprosy patients are at increased risk of developing leprosy and need to be targeted for early diagnosis. Seropositivity to the phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has been used to identify contacts who have an increased risk of developing leprosy. In the present study, we studied the effect of seropositivity in patient contacts, on the risk of developing leprosy, stratified by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination after index case diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Leprosy contacts were examined as part of the surveillance programme of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute Leprosy Outpatient Clinic in Rio de Janeiro. Demographic, social, epidemiological and clinical data were collected. The presence of IgM antibodies to PGL-I in sera and BCG vaccination status at the time of index case diagnosis were evaluated in 2,135 contacts. During follow-up, 60 (2.8%; 60/2,135) leprosy cases were diagnosed: 41 among the 1,793 PGL-I-negative contacts and 19 among the 342 PGL-I-positive contacts. Among PGL-I-positive contacts, BCG vaccination after index case diagnosis increased the adjusted rate of developing clinical manifestations of leprosy (Adjusted Rate Ratio (aRR) = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.8–8.2) compared with the PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts (aRR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.2–8.1). The incidence density was highest during the first year of follow-up for the PGL-I-positive vaccinated contacts. However, all of those contacts developed PB leprosy, whereas most MB cases (4/6) occurred in PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts. Conclusion Contact examination combined with PGL-I testing and BCG vaccination remain important strategies for leprosy control. The finding that rates of leprosy cases were highest among seropositive contacts justifies targeting this specific group for close monitoring. Furthermore, it is recommended that PGL-I-positive contacts and contacts with a high familial bacteriological index, regardless of

  6. Multidrug therapy for leprosy: a game changer on the path to elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cairns S; Aerts, Ann; Saunderson, Paul; Kawuma, Joseph; Kita, Etsuko; Virmond, Marcos

    2017-09-01

    Leprosy is present in more than 100 countries, where it remains a major cause of peripheral neuropathy and disability. Attempts to eliminate the disease have faced various obstacles, including characteristics of the causative bacillus Mycobacterium leprae: the long incubation period, limited knowledge about its mode of transmission, and its poor growth on culture media. Fortunately, the leprosy bacillus is sensitive to several antibiotics. The first antibiotic to be widely used for leprosy treatment was dapsone in the 1950s, which had to be taken over several years and was associated with increasing bacterial resistance. Therefore, in 1981, WHO recommended that all registered patients with leprosy should receive combination therapy with three antibiotics: rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone. Global implementation of this highly effective multidrug therapy took about 15 years. In 1985, 5·3 million patients were receiving multidrug therapy; by 1991, this figure had decreased to 3·1 million (a decrease of 42%) and, by 2000, to 597 232 (a decrease of almost 90%). This reduction in the number of patients registered for treatment was due to shortening of the treatment regimen and achievement of 100% coverage with multidrug therapy. This achievement, which owed much to WHO and the donors of the multidrug therapy components, prompted WHO in 1991 to set a global target of less than one case per 10 000 population by 2000 to eliminate the disease as a public health problem. All but 15 countries achieved this target. Since 2000, about 250 000 new cases of leprosy have been detected every year. We believe an all-out campaign by a global leprosy coalition is needed to bring that figure down to zero. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. national jalma institute for leprosy & other mycobacterial diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. NATIONAL JALMA INSTITUTE FOR LEPROSY & OTHER MYCOBACTERIAL DISEASES : MAJOR THRUST AREAS. LEPROSY : Understanding the disease better using electrophysiological, immunological, molecular and electron-microscopic tools. Developing better ...

  8. Specific antigen serologic tests in leprosy: implications for epidemiological surveillance of leprosy cases and household contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Coelho, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2017-09-01

    There is a lack of straightforward tests for field application and known biomarkers for predicting leprosy progression in infected individuals. The aim was to analyse the response to infection by Mycobacterium leprae based on the reactivity of specific antigens: natural disaccharide linked to human serum albumin via an octyl (NDOHSA), a semisynthetic phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I); Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (LID-1) and natural disaccharide octyl - Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (NDOLID). The study population consisted of 130 leprosy cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 and 277 household contacts. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyse the reactivity of antibodies against NDOHSA, LID-1 and NDOLID. The samples and controls were tested in duplicate, and the antibody titer was expressed as an ELISA index. Data collection was made by home visits with application of questionnaire and dermatological evaluation of all household contacts to identify signs and symptoms of leprosy. Significant differences in the median ELISA results were observed among leprosy cases in treatment, leprosy cases that had completed treatment and household contacts. Higher proportions of seropositivity were observed in leprosy cases in treatment. Seropositivity was also higher in multibacillary in relation to paucibacillary, with the difference reaching statistical significance. Lower titers were observed among cases with a longer treatment time or discharge. For household contacts, the differences according to the clinical characteristics of the leprosy index case were less pronounced than expected. Other factors, such as the endemicity of leprosy, exposure outside the residence and genetic characteristics, appeared to have a greater influence on the seropositivity. Serologic tests could be used as auxiliary tools for determining the operational classification, in addition to identifying infected individuals

  9. Primary neural leprosy: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garbino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors proposed a systematic review on the current concepts of primary neural leprosy by consulting the following online databases: MEDLINE, Lilacs/SciELO, and Embase. Selected studies were classified based on the degree of recommendation and levels of scientific evidence according to the “Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine”. The following aspects were reviewed: cutaneous clinical and laboratorial investigations, i.e. skin clinical exam, smears, and biopsy, and Mitsuda's reaction; neurological investigation (anamnesis, electromyography and nerve biopsy; serological investigation and molecular testing, i.e. serological testing for the detection of the phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-I and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; and treatment (classification criteria for the definition of specific treatment, steroid treatment, and cure criteria.

  10. ELISA-based assay of immunoglobulin G antibodies against mammalian cell entry 1A (Mce1A) protein: a novel diagnostic approach for leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Filipe R; Takenami, Iukary; Cavalcanti, Maurílio Al; Riley, Lee W; Arruda, Sérgio

    2017-12-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. Because leprosy diagnosis is complex and requires professional expertise, new tools and methodologies are needed to detect cases in early stages and prevent transmission. The M. leprae genome contains mce1A, which encodes a putative mammalian cell entry protein (Mce1A). We hypothesised that the presence of Mce1A on the cell surface could be detected by the host's immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibody responses against the Mce1A protein in leprosy patients, household contacts of patients, and the general population to present an addition tool for leprosy diagnosis. A cross-sectional study involving 89 volunteers [55 leprosy cases, 12 household contacts (HHC) and 22 endemic controls (EC)] was conducted at Couto Maia Hospital, in Salvador, Bahia (BA), Brazil. The median anti-Mce1A IgA was significantly higher in multibacillary (MB) and paucibacillary (PB) cases than in EC (p leprosy cases, IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay sensitivity and specificity were 92.7% and 97.1%, respectively. IgG positivity was confirmed in 92.1% and 94.1% of MB and PB patients, respectively. This novel diagnostic approach presents an easy, non-invasive, and inexpensive method for leprosy screening, which may be applicable in endemic areas.

  11. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the advent of new developmental tools to augment diagnostic accuracy for leprosy. However, it should be emphasized that for new diagnostic methods to be developed, a greater commitment on the part of the health care system regarding research is urgently needed.

  12. The impact of leprosy on health-related quality of life

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    Anselmo Alves Lustosa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leprosy is a potentially disabling infectious disease that evolves into emotional issues due to the prejudice that persists about the illness. The endemic has declined substantially with multidrug therapy (MDT in the 80's; however, new demands associated with the reduction of stigma and the improvement of the affected people's quality of life have emerged. In Brazil, leprosy is still a public health problem. Piauí is the second state in the Northeast in prevalence and detection, and Teresina is a hyperendemic city. This study aimed to analyze the health-related quality of life (HRQoL of people in treatment for leprosy in Teresina/PI. METHODS: An observational study was conducted using the SF-36 (a specific questionnaire for assessing quality of life, which sought the determinants of poor quality of life among people with leprosy, outlining the sociodemographic, clinical, and epidemiological characteristics of the 107 patients interviewed. RESULTS: The correlations between the variables showed five determinants of HRQoL: late diagnosis, multibacillary forms, reactions, disability diagnosis grade II, and prejudice. The profile of the participants showed that leprosy still affects the lower social classes in historically endemic areas, causing high percentages of secondary injuries that compromise the work capacity and quality of life of the affected people, perpetuating the stigma associated with the disease. CONCLUSIONS: The study reinforces the need to implement more effective strategies of disease control, due to the development of severe and disabling forms of leprosy is directly related to poor HRQoL in the same cured patient.

  13. Leprosy Sufferers' Perception Of Social Stigma As A Determinant Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at relating leprosy sufferers perception of social stigma to their lifestyles. Eighty leprosy affected persons comprising males and females drawn from Delta State Government Tuberculosis and Leprosy Referral Center participated in this study. A focus group discussion schedule containing information about ...

  14. Leprosy and the eye a review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: 1. To update knowledge on the current trends in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of leprosy 2. To highlight the ocular complications associated with leprosy. Methodology:Current literature on various aspects of leprosy research obtained from the Internet and supplemented by available journals ...

  15. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas K.; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures...... group was crossed over to the working memory suggestion and showed superior improvement. By the end of the study, both groups reached a performance level at or above the healthy population mean with standardized mean differences between 1.55 and 2.03 relative to the passive control group. We conclude...... that, if framed correctly, hypnotic suggestion can effectively improve working memory following acquired brain injury. The speed and consistency with which this improvement occurred, indicate that there may be a residual capacity for normal information processing in the injured brain....

  16. IL-12 and IL-23 modulate plasticity of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in human Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, Mohd; Saini, Chaman; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Khanna, Neena; Sharma, Alpana; Rao, D N

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy is a bacterial disease caused by M. leprae. Its clinical spectrum reflects the host's immune response to the M. leprae and provide an ideal model to investigate the host pathogen interaction and immunological dysregulation. Tregs are high in leprosy patients and responsible for immune suppression of the host by producing IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines. In leprosy, plasticity of Tregs remain unstudied. This is the first study describing the conversion of Tregs into Th1-like and Th17-like cells using in vitro cytokine therapy in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leprosy patients were isolated and stimulated with M. leprae antigen (MLCwA), rIL-12 and rIL-23 for 48h. Expression of FoxP3 in CD4 + CD25 + Tregs, intracellular cytokines IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-17 in Tregs cells were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) after stimulation. rIL-12 treatment increases the levels of pStat4 in Tregs and IFN-γ production. In the presence of rIL-23, pStat3 + and IL-17A + cells increase. rIL-12 and r-IL-23 treatment downregulated the FoxP3 expression, IL-10 and TGF-β production by Tregs and enhances the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86). In conclusion rIL-12 converts Tregs into IFN-γ producing cells through STAT-4 signaling while rIL-23 converts Tregs into IL-17 producing cells through STAT-3 signaling in leprosy patients. This study may helpful to provide a new avenue to overcome the immunosuprression in leprosy patients using in vitro cytokine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation and Monitoring of Mycobacterium leprae Transmission in Household Contacts of Patients with Hansen's Disease in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Beltran-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy in Colombia is in a stage of post elimination-since 1997, prevalence of the disease is less than 1/10000. However, the incidence of leprosy has remained stable, with 400-500 new cases reported annually, with MB leprosy representing 70% of these case and 10% having grade 2 disability. Thus, leprosy transmission is still occurring, and household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy patients are a population at high risk of contracting and suffering from the effects of the disease during their lifetime. We performed a cross-sectional study with the aim of evaluating leprosy transmission within Family Groups (FGs) from four Colombian departments: Antioquia, Bolívar, Córdoba and Sucre. This study included 159 FGs formed by 543 HHCs; 45 FGs were monitored twice, first in 2003 and again in 2012. Migration, forced displacement by violence, loss of contact with the health center and the lack of an agreement to participate in the second monitoring were the primary reasons not all FGs were tested a second time. In each HHC, a clinical examination was performed, epidemiological data recorded, the bacillary index determined, DNA was isolated for M. leprae detection by nested PCR and IgM anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) titers were inspected. Further, DNA from M. leprae isolates were typed and compared among FGs. Twenty-two (4.1%) of the 543 HHCs had IgM anti-PGL-I positive antibody titers, indicating infection. Nasal swabs (NS) taken from 113 HHCs were tested by RLEP PCR; 18 (16%) were positive for M. leprae DNA and two new leprosy cases were detected among the HHCs. Of the confirmed HHCs with leprosy, it was possible to genotype the bacterial strains from both the index case and their HHCs. We found that the genotype of these two strains agreed at 9 markers, showing the individuals to be infected by the same strain, indicating familiar transmission. HHCs of leprosy patients not only are a high-risk population for M. leprae infection, they can act as M. leprae carriers and

  18. Viability of Mycobacterium leprae in the environment and its role in leprosy dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Partha Sarathi; Naaz, Farah; Katara, Dheeraj; Misba, Lama; Kumar, Dilip; Dwivedi, Deepak Kumar; Tiwari, Amit Kumar; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Bansal, Avi Kumar; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Katoch, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a public health concern in certain countries, including India. Although the prevalence of the disease has fallen drastically over time, new cases continue to occur at nearly the same rate in many regions. Several endemic pockets have been observed in India and elsewhere. The precise dynamics of leprosy transmission are still not clearly understood. Both live bacilli as well as M. leprae DNA have been detected in the soil and water of endemic areas; they possibly play an important role in disease transmission. To study the occurrence of viable M. leprae in environmental samples collected from areas of residence of patients with active leprosy. The study was conducted on 169 newly diagnosed leprosy patients in Ghatampur, Uttar Pradesh, India. Soil and water samples were collected from their areas of residence using a standardized protocol. An equal number of soil and water samples were also collected from non-patient areas of the same or adjoining villages. The environmental samples collected from the patients surroundings were subjected to 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis after obtaining informed consent. About a quarter of the environmental samples collected from patient areas, (25.4% of soil samples and 24.2% of water samples) were found to be positive for specific 16S ribosomal RNA genes of M. leprae. Environmental samples collected from non-patient areas were all found negative for M. leprae 16S ribosomal RNA genes. The major limitation of the study was that the sample size was small. The study demonstrated the presence of viable strains of M. leprae in skin smear samples of paucibacillary patients and multibacillary patients, as well as in the environmental samples obtained from around their houses. This could play an important role in the continued transmission of leprosy.

  19. Autophagy Is an Innate Mechanism Associated with Leprosy Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Priscila Ribeiro; Ferreira, Helen; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Côrte-Real, Suzana; da Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Fabri, Mario; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that may present different clinical forms according to the immune response of the host. Levels of IFN-γ are significantly raised in paucibacillary tuberculoid (T-lep) when compared with multibacillary lepromatous (L-lep) patients. IFN-γ primes macrophages for inflammatory activation and induces the autophagy antimicrobial mechanism. The involvement of autophagy in the immune response against Mycobacterium leprae remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrated by different autophagic assays that LC3-positive autophagosomes were predominantly observed in T-lep when compared with L-lep lesions and skin-derived macrophages. Accumulation of the autophagic receptors SQSTM1/p62 and NBR1, expression of lysosomal antimicrobial peptides and colocalization analysis of autolysosomes revealed an impairment of the autophagic flux in L-lep cells, which was restored by IFN-γ or rapamycin treatment. Autophagy PCR array gene-expression analysis revealed a significantly upregulation of autophagy genes (BECN1, GPSM3, ATG14, APOL1, and TPR) in T-lep cells. Furthermore, an upregulation of autophagy genes (TPR, GFI1B and GNAI3) as well as LC3 levels was observed in cells of L-lep patients that developed type 1 reaction (T1R) episodes, an acute inflammatory condition associated with increased IFN-γ levels. Finally, we observed increased BCL2 expression in L-lep cells that could be responsible for the blockage of BECN1-mediated autophagy. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated that dead, but not live M. leprae can induce autophagy in primary and lineage human monocytes, and that live mycobacteria can reduce the autophagy activation triggered by dead mycobacteria, suggesting that M. leprae may hamper the autophagic machinery as an immune escape mechanism. Together, these results indicate that autophagy is an important innate mechanism associated with the M. leprae control in skin macrophages. PMID:28056107

  20. Communication failures in patient sign-out and suggestions for improvement: a critical incident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, V; Johnson, J; Lovinger, D; Humphrey, H J; Meltzer, D O

    2005-12-01

    The transfer of care for hospitalized patients between inpatient physicians is routinely mediated through written and verbal communication or "sign-out". This study aims to describe how communication failures during this process can lead to patient harm. In interviews employing critical incident technique, first year resident physicians (interns) described (1) any adverse events or near misses due to suboptimal preceding patient sign-out; (2) the worst event due to suboptimal sign-out in which they were involved; and (3) suggestions to improve sign-out. All data were analyzed and categorized using the constant comparative method with independent review by three researchers. Twenty six interns caring for 82 patients were interviewed after receiving sign-out from another intern. Twenty five discrete incidents, all the result of communication failures during the preceding patient sign-out, and 21 worst events were described. Inter-rater agreement for categorization was high (kappa 0.78-1.00). Omitted content (such as medications, active problems, pending tests) or failure-prone communication processes (such as lack of face-to-face discussion) emerged as major categories of failed communication. In nearly all cases these failures led to uncertainty during decisions on patient care. Uncertainty may result in inefficient or suboptimal care such as repeat or unnecessary tests. Interns desired thorough but relevant face-to-face verbal sign-outs that reviewed anticipated issues. They preferred legible, accurate, updated, written sign-out sheets that included standard patient content such as code status or active and anticipated medical problems. Communication failures during sign-out often lead to uncertainty in decisions on patient care. These may result in inefficient or suboptimal care leading to patient harm.

  1. Assessment of the sensory and physical limitations imposed by leprosy in a Brazilian Amazon Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Yolette Urbano Pauxis Aben-Athar

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION Leprosy often results in sensory and physical limitations. This study aimed to evaluate these limitations using a quantitative approach in leprosy patients in Belém (Pará, Brazil. METHODS This epidemiological, cross-sectional study measured the sensory impairment of smell and taste through the use of a questionnaire and evaluated activity limitations of daily life imposed by leprosy through the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA Scale. Data were collected from 84 patients and associations between the degree of disability and clinical and epidemiological characteristics were assessed. RESULTS The majority of patients were men (64.3%, married (52.4%, age 31-40 years old (26.2%, had primary education (50%, and were independent laborers (36.9%. The multibacillary operational classification (81%, borderline clinical form (57.1%, and 0 degrees of physical disability (41.7% were predominant. SALSA scores ranged from 17 to 59 points, and being without limitations was predominant (53.6%. The risk awareness score ranged from 0 to 8, with a score of 0 (no awareness of risk being the most common (56%. Evaluation of smell and taste sensory sensitivities revealed that 70.2% did not experience these sensory changes. Patients with leprosy reactions were 7 times more likely to develop activity limitations, and those who had physical disabilities were approximately four times more likely to develop a clinical picture of activity limitations. CONCLUSIONS Most patients showed no sensory changes, but patients with leprosy reactions were significantly more likely to develop activity limitations. Finally, further studies should be performed, assessing a higher number of patients to confirm the present results.

  2. From genome-based in silico predictions to ex vivo verification of leprosy diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, Annemieke; Spencer, John S.; Bobosha, Kidist; Pessolani, Maria C. V.; Pereira, Geraldo M. B.; Banu, Sayera; Honoré, Nadine; Reece, Stephen T.; MacDonald, Murdo; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Ranjit, Chaman; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Zewdie, Martha; Aseffa, Abraham; Hussain, Rabia; Stefani, Mariane M.; Cho, Sang-Nae; Oskam, Linda; Brennan, Patrick J.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of hundreds of thousands of new cases of leprosy every year suggests that transmission of Mycobacterium leprae infection still continues. Unfortunately, tools for identification of asymptomatic disease and/or early-stage M. leprae infection (likely sources of transmission) are lacking.

  3. Leprosy type 1 reactions and erythema nodosum leprosum Reações hansênicas do tipo 1 e eritema nodoso hansênico

    OpenAIRE

    Indira P. Kahawita; Stephen L. Walker; Diana N.J. Lockwood

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy reactions are a major cause of nerve damage and morbidity in a significant proportion of leprosy patients. Reactions are immunologically mediated and can occur even after successful completion of multi-drug therapy. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of leprosy type 1 reactions, erythema nodosum leprosum and silent neuropathy.As reações hansênicas são a principal causa de dano e morbidade neural em grande parte dos pacientes hansênicos. São imunomediadas ...

  4. qPCR detection of Mycobacterium leprae in biopsies and slit skin smear of different leprosy clinical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle de Campos Soriani Azevedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy, whose etiological agent is Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic infectious disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of leprosy is based on clinical evaluation, whereas histopathological analysis and bacilloscopy are complementary diagnostic tools. Quantitative PCR (qPCR, a current useful tool for diagnosis of infectious diseases, has been used to detect several pathogens including Mycobacterium leprae. The validation of this technique in a robust set of samples comprising the different clinical forms of leprosy is still necessary. Thus, in this study samples from 126 skin biopsies (collected from patients on all clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy and 25 slit skin smear of leprosy patients were comparatively analyzed by qPCR (performed with primers for the RLEP region of M. leprae DNA and routine bacilloscopy performed in histological sections or in slit skin smear. Considering clinical diagnostic as the gold standard, 84.9% of the leprosy patients were qPCR positive in skin biopsies, resulting in 84.92% sensitivity, with 84.92 and 61.22% positive (PPV and negative (NPV predictive values, respectively. Concerning bacilloscopy of histological sections (BI/H, the sensitivity was 80.15% and the PPV and NPV were 80.15 and 44.44%, respectively. The concordance between qPCR and BI/H was 87.30%. Regarding the slit skin smear, 84% of the samples tested positive in the qPCR. Additionally, qPCR showed 100% specificity, since all samples from different mycobacteria, from healthy individuals, and from other granulomatous diseases presented negative results. In conclusion, the qPCR technique for detection of M. leprae using RLEP primers proved to be specific and sensitive, and qPCR can be used as a complementary test to diagnose leprosy irrespective of the clinical form of disease.

  5. qPCR detection of Mycobacterium leprae in biopsies and slit skin smear of different leprosy clinical forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Michelle de Campos Soriani; Ramuno, Natália Mortari; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vincenzi; Tassa, Mônica; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Belone, Andrea de Faria Fernandes; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro

    Leprosy, whose etiological agent is Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic infectious disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of leprosy is based on clinical evaluation, whereas histopathological analysis and bacilloscopy are complementary diagnostic tools. Quantitative PCR (qPCR), a current useful tool for diagnosis of infectious diseases, has been used to detect several pathogens including Mycobacterium leprae. The validation of this technique in a robust set of samples comprising the different clinical forms of leprosy is still necessary. Thus, in this study samples from 126 skin biopsies (collected from patients on all clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy) and 25 slit skin smear of leprosy patients were comparatively analyzed by qPCR (performed with primers for the RLEP region of M. leprae DNA) and routine bacilloscopy performed in histological sections or in slit skin smear. Considering clinical diagnostic as the gold standard, 84.9% of the leprosy patients were qPCR positive in skin biopsies, resulting in 84.92% sensitivity, with 84.92 and 61.22% positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values, respectively. Concerning bacilloscopy of histological sections (BI/H), the sensitivity was 80.15% and the PPV and NPV were 80.15 and 44.44%, respectively. The concordance between qPCR and BI/H was 87.30%. Regarding the slit skin smear, 84% of the samples tested positive in the qPCR. Additionally, qPCR showed 100% specificity, since all samples from different mycobacteria, from healthy individuals, and from other granulomatous diseases presented negative results. In conclusion, the qPCR technique for detection of M. leprae using RLEP primers proved to be specific and sensitive, and qPCR can be used as a complementary test to diagnose leprosy irrespective of the clinical form of disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient spontaneous engraftment of CD34 hematopoietic cord blood stem cells as seen in peripheral blood: treatment of leprosy patients with anemia by placental umbilical cord whole blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, N

    2006-01-01

    Cord blood, because of its rich mix of fetal and adult hemoglobin, high platelet and white blood cell (WBC) counts, and a plasma filled with cytokine and growth factors, as well as its hypoantigenic nature and altered metabolic profile, has all the potential of a real and safe alternative to adult blood transfusion. Our experience of 74 units (50 ml-146 ml mean, 86 ml +/- 7.6 ml SD, median 80 ml, mean packed cell volume 48 +/- 4.1 SD, mean percent hemoglobin concentration 16.2 g/dl +/- 1.8 g/dl of placental umbilical cord whole blood collection (from 1 April 1999) after lower uterine cesarean section (LUCS) from consenting mothers and transfusion of the same to 16 informed, consenting patients with percent plasma hemoglobin 8 g/dl or less, is presented here. After collection the blood was immediately preserved in the refrigerator and transfused within 72 hours of collection. Fifteen males and one female, aged 12-72 yrs (mean 48.4 yrs) participated: five cases were pausibacillary type (PB) and 11 cases were multibacillary type (MB). The clinical spectrum of the cases varied widely from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous type and one patient presented with gangrene of the leg preceding an auto amputation which was infested with maggots. Each case was approved by the institutional ethical committee and received two to eight units of freshly collected placental umbilical cord blood in one transfusion without encountering any clinical, immunological or non-immunological reaction. Seven days after completion of the placental umbilical cord blood transfusion, the peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (CD34) estimation revealed a rise from the pretransfusion base level (.09%), varying from 3.6% to 16.2%, in 75% of the cases, without provoking any clinical graft vs host reaction in any of the leprosy victims. This value returned to normal within three months in most cases.

  7. Leprosy Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (LPEP) programme: study protocol for evaluating the feasibility and impact on case detection rates of contact tracing and single dose rifampicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth-Jaeggi, Tanja; Steinmann, Peter; Mieras, Liesbeth; van Brakel, Wim; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Tiwari, Anuj; Bratschi, Martin; Cavaliero, Arielle; Vander Plaetse, Bart; Mirza, Fareed; Aerts, Ann

    2016-11-17

    The reported number of new leprosy patients has barely changed in recent years. Thus, additional approaches or modifications to the current standard of passive case detection are needed to interrupt leprosy transmission. Large-scale clinical trials with single dose rifampicin (SDR) given as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to contacts of newly diagnosed patients with leprosy have shown a 50-60% reduction of the risk of developing leprosy over the following 2 years. To accelerate the uptake of this evidence and introduction of PEP into national leprosy programmes, data on the effectiveness, impact and feasibility of contact tracing and PEP for leprosy are required. The leprosy post-exposure prophylaxis (LPEP) programme was designed to obtain those data. The LPEP programme evaluates feasibility, effectiveness and impact of PEP with SDR in pilot areas situated in several leprosy endemic countries: India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Tanzania. Complementary sites are located in Brazil and Cambodia. From 2015 to 2018, contact persons of patients with leprosy are traced, screened for symptoms and assessed for eligibility to receive SDR. The intervention is implemented by the national leprosy programmes, tailored to local conditions and capacities, and relying on available human and material resources. It is coordinated on the ground with the help of the in-country partners of the International Federation of Anti-Leprosy Associations (ILEP). A robust data collection and reporting system is established in the pilot areas with regular monitoring and quality control, contributing to the strengthening of the national surveillance systems to become more action-oriented. Ethical approval has been obtained from the relevant ethics committees in the countries. Results and lessons learnt from the LPEP programme will be published in peer-reviewed journals and should provide important evidence and guidance for national and global policymakers to strengthen current

  8. Leprosy - evolution of the path to eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Narang, Tarun; Kumar, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is among the world's oldest and most dreaded diseases and it has been synonymous with stigma and discrimination due to the hideous deformities it produced, mystery around its aetiology and transmission and lack of any effective remedy till recently. Leprosy control started with the use of chaulmoogra oil and for the last three decades, multi drug therapy (MDT) has been our main tool against leprosy. In the last two decades, the reported global prevalence of active leprosy infection has dropped by almost 90 per cent by the combined efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO), local governments, health professionals, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), however, a parallel drop in the incidence or new case detection rate (NCDR) has not occurred. From 1994 through 2011, more than 100,000 new cases are being detected annually, of whom maximum case load is from India. There is need for research on tools for early diagnosis, short and effective treatment, and prevention of deformities and disabilities. Evaluating the role of immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis will also lead us to better understanding of their mode of action. Further molecular analysis of Mycobacterium leprae genome may provide the requisite basis for all this. The current reality is that there is a need to sustain and provide quality leprosy services to all persons through general health services, including good referral system. All these provisions in the integrated health care approach will go a long way in further reducing the stigma. Efforts need to be made to reduce deformity through early detection, self care, physiotherapy and reconstructive surgery and developing sound surveillance systems. With all the remarkable achievements in the fight against leprosy, the stage is now set for the final assault. It is hoped that with the efforts of all the stake holders and strong political will, the disease will be eradicated in the near future. PMID:23481049

  9. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  10. Muscle involvement in leprosy: study of the anterior tibial muscle in 40 patients Alterações musculares na lepra: estudo do músculo tibial anterior em 40 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINEU CESAR WERNECK

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of skeletal striated muscle in leprosy is considered secondary due to peripheral neuropathy, but some studies point it to a primary muscle lesion. In order to investigate the muscle involvement in leprosy, we studied 40 patients (lepromatous 23, tuberculoid 13, borderline 2 and indeterminate 2. The motor nerve conduction of the peroneal nerves had a reduction of the velocity, decreased compound muscle action potential and sometimes absence of potentials. The electromyographic study of the anterior tibial muscle showed signs of recent and chronic denervation in 77.5% of the cases and no myopathic potentials. The anterior tibial muscle biopsy revealed denervation in 45% of the cases, interstitial inflammatory myopathy in 30% and mixed (myopathic and neuropathic pattern in 12.5%. Acid fast bacillus was detected in 25% of the cases, always in the interstitial tissue. Inflammatory reaction was present in the interstitial space and in patients with the lepromatous type. The histological findings clearly defined the presence of the so-called "Leprous Interstitial Myositis" on the top of denervation signs.O envolvimento do músculo estriado na lepra é considerado secundário à lesão dos nervos periféricos, mas alguns estudos relataram acometimento muscular primário. A fim de verificar esta controvérsia estudamos 40 pacientes com lepra, sendo 23 da forma lepromatosa, 13 da tuberculoide, 2 borderline e 2 indeterminada. Realizamos a neurocondução do nervo peroneiro, junto com eletromiografia e biópsia do músculo tibial anterior. Encontramos redução de velocidade de condução, da amplitude e algumas vezes ausência de potenciais no nervo peroneiro. A eletromiografia do tibial anterior mostrou sinais de desinervação recente e crônica em 77,5% dos casos e não foi encontrada evidência de padrão "miopático". A biópsia do músculo tibial anterior revelou desinervação em 45% dos casos, miopatia inflamatória intersticial em

  11. Elimination of Leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elimination of Leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an ... the scientific (the natural history of leprosy at the present state of knowledge), ... the relationship between leprosy and poverty, prevention of disabilities, lack of a reliable ...

  12. Interventions for skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinar, Liv Merete; Forsetlund, Louise; Bjørndal, Arild; Lockwood, Diana

    2008-07-16

    More than three million persons are disabled by leprosy worldwide. The main complication of sensory nerve damage is neuropathic ulceration, particularly of the feet. In this review we explored interventions that can prevent and treat secondary damage to skin and limbs. To assess the effects of self-care, dressings and footwear in preventing and healing secondary damage to the skin in persons affected by leprosy. We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (April 2008), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008), MEDLINE (from 2003 to April 2008), EMBASE (from 2005 to April 2008), CINAHL (1982-2006) and LILACS (1982- April 2008 ) as well as online registers of ongoing trials (April 2008). Randomised controlled trials involving anyone with leprosy and damage to peripheral nerves treated with any measures designed to prevent damage with the aim of healing existing ulcers and preventing development of new ulcers. Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. Eight trials with a total of 557 participants were included. The quality of the trials was generally poor. The interventions and outcome measures were diverse. Although three studies that compared zinc tape to more traditional dressings found some benefit, none of these showed a statistically significant effect. One trial indicated that topical ketanserin had a better effect on wound healing than clioquinol cream or zinc paste, RR was 6.00 (95% CI 1.45 to 24.75). We did not combine the results of the two studies that compared topical phenytoin to saline dressing, but both studies found statistically significant effects in favour of phenytoin for healing of ulcer (SMD -2.34; 95% CI -3.30 to -1.39; and SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.20 to 0.39). Canvas shoes were not much better than PVC-boots, and double rocker shoes did not promote healing much more than below-knee plasters. One study suggested that topical ketanserin is more effective than clioquinol cream

  13. Serologic follow-up of IgG responses against recombinant mycobacterial proteins ML0405, ML2331 and LID-1 in a leprosy hyperendemic area in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Rada

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a slowly evolving disease that occurs mainly in adults. In this study, the Mamaría Village, state of Portuguesa was selected because it had one of the highest prevalence rates (13.25% of leprosy cases in 1997. Between 1998-2004, 20.2% of the 89 cases registered in this village were less than 15 years old and 61.8% were males. Pau-cibacillary (PB lesions were the predominant clinical forms identified, although also multibacillary (MB forms were found. Additionally, 76% of the patients were bacteriologically negative. At the time of diagnosis, 75% of the patients presented with grade 0 disabilities, 23% with grade 1 and 2% with grade 2. Serum samples were collected from 18 PB and 15 MB patients, in addition to 14 family contacts, at the beginning and end of treatment. All the groups were re-evaluated during a three-year period (2008-2011. The proteins used for evaluation were ML0405, ML2331 and LID-1. These mycobacterial proteins were highly specific for Mycobacterium leprae and the IgG responses decreased in both MB and PB patients during multidrug treatment. Our results suggest that these antigens could be used as markers for successful treatment of non-reactional lepromatous patients.

  14. Neurological Manifestations in Leprosy: A Study in Tribal Community of Hill Tracts

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    Ahmed Tanjimul Islam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease having major burden on humans over thousands of years. If untreated, it results in permanent damage to various systems and organs. So we designed this study to evaluate the neurological complications in early stage in adult leprosy patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of neurological manifestations among adult leprosy patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional hospital-based study on 85 adult tribal leprosy patients was conducted in a district level health care facility from January to December 2014 using simple, direct, standardized questionnaire including history and neurological examinations. Results: The commonest age group affected was 18–30 years (62.4%. Male group was predominant (68.2%. Majority cases (66% had multibacillary leprosy. At first visit 72.7% cases with neurological findings could not be diagnosed correctly by primary health care personnel. More than six months were required for correct diagnosis in 61.2% cases. Numbness was the commonest (74.5% neurological symptom. In upper limb, motor findings were predominant with wasting in 50.9% cases. In lower limb, sensory findings were predominant with stock pattern sensory impairment being the commonest (56.4%. Ulnar nerve was the commonest peripheral nerve to enlarge with tenderness. Facial nerve was the commonest cranial nerve involved. All cases with multiple cranial nerves involvement were of multibacillary type. Due to physical disability 92.7% cases lost their jobs. Conclusion: In this study neurological involvement was found associated with severe disability.

  15. WHO Multidrug Therapy for Leprosy: Epidemiology of Default in Treatment in Agra District, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Girdhar, Anita; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Girdhar, Bhuwneswar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study the magnitude of default, time of default, its causes, and final clinical outcome. Methods. Data collected in active surveys in Agra is analyzed. Patients were given treatment after medical confirmation and were followed up. The treatment default and other clinical outcomes were recorded. Results. Patients who defaulted have comparable demographic characteristics. However, among defaulters more women (62.7% in PB, 42.6% in MB) were seen than those in treatment completers (PB 52.7% and MB 35.9%). Nerve involvement was high in treatment completers: 45.7% in PB and 91.3% in MB leprosy. Overall default rate was lower (14.8%) in ROM than (28.8%) in standard MDT for PB leprosy (χ 1 2 = 11.6, P = 0.001) and also for MB leprosy: 9.1% in ROM compared to 34.5% in MDT (χ 1 2 = 6.0, P = 0.015). Default rate was not different (28.8% versus 34.5%, P > 0.05) in both types of leprosy given MDT. Most patients defaulted at early stage of treatment and mainly due to manageable side effects. Conclusion. The default in standard MDT both for PB and MB leprosy was observed to be significantly higher than in ROM treatment. Most defaults occurred at early stage of treatment and major contribution of default is due to side effects like drowsiness, weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, and so forth, related to poor general health. Although about half of the defaulters were observed to be cured 2.2% in PB-MDT and 10.9% of MB-MDT developed disability. This is an issue due to default. Attempts are needed to increase treatment compliance. The use of specially designed disease related health education along with easily administered drug regimens may help to reduce default. PMID:25705679

  16. Assistência de enfermagem ao portador de Hanseníase: abordagem transcultural Asistencia de enfermería al portador de Lepra: abordaje transcultural Nursing assistance to a Leprosy-infected patient: transcultural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando José Guedes da Silva Júnior

    2008-11-01

    com la lepra de forma culturalmente satisfactória.This is a case study, developed in a health center in Teresina-PI, which dealt with the issue of nursing assistance given to a patient with Multibacillary Leprosy, focusing on the Transcultural Nursing care, Diagnosis and Nursing Interventions according to NANDA Taxonomy II. A semi-structured interview and participant observation were carried out, which enabled data collection handled according to normative patterns, values and daily practices, ways of popular care and cares required in the professional system. In this study, we realized that nursing assistance planning aimed, especially, to contribute on the disease treatment support, reducing potential risks and using preservation, negotiation and re-standardization of the professional system. We also observed the support to the treatment and the development of self care turned to leprosy in a culturally satisfactory way.

  17. Leprosy and the adaptation of human toll-like receptor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny H Wong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7 x 10(-8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20-0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9 x 10(-14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35-0.54. The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases.

  18. Begotten of Corruption? Bioarchaeology and "othering" of leprosy in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins Schug, Gwen

    2016-12-01

    Leprosy is strongly stigmatized in South Asia, being regarded as a manifestation of extreme levels of spiritual pollution going back through one or more incarnations of the self. Stigma has significant social consequences, including surveillance, exclusion, discipline, control, and punishment; biologically speaking, internalized stigma also compounds the disfigurement and disability resulting from this disease. Stigma results from an othering process whereby difference is recognized, meaning is constituted, and eventually, sufferers may be negatively signified and marked for exclusion. This paper traces the history of leprosy's stigmatization in South Asia, using archaeology and an exegesis of Vedic texts to examine the meaning of this disease from its apparent zero-point-when it first appears but before it was differentiated and signified-in the mature Indus Age. Results suggest that early in the second millennium BCE, leprosy was perceived as treatable and efforts were apparently made to mitigate its impact on the journey to the afterworld. Ignominy to the point of exclusion does not emerge until the first millennium BCE. This paper uses archaeology to create an effective history of stigma for leprosy, destabilizing what is true about this disease and its sufferers in South Asia today. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of Children and Adolescents with Leprosy Admitted Over 16 Years at a Rural Hospital in Ethiopia: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, José M; Ortiz-Martínez, Sonia; Lemma, Deriba; Petros, Matheus M; Ortiz-Martínez, Carmen; Tesfamariam, Abraham; Reyes, Francisco; Belinchón, Isabel

    2018-06-01

    To analyse differences in children and adolescents aged ≤18 years admitted to the leprosy ward in a rural Ethiopian hospital >16 years. We retrospectively collected data from leprosy admission registry books on patients with leprosy who were admitted to a referral hospital from September 2000 to September 2016. There were 2129 admissions for leprosy during the study period: 180 (8.4%) patients were s ≤ 18 years old. Of these, 98 (54.4%) were male and 82 (45.6%) were female. The proportion of new diagnoses in children and adolescents was 31.7%, significantly higher than in adults (11.7%; p < 0.001). There were also significant differences in the prevalence of lepromatous ulcers (46.9 vs. 61.7%), leprosy reaction (29.4 vs. 13.0%) and neuritis (16.9 vs.5.3%) between these age groups. There were more new diagnoses, leprosy reactions and neuritis, and fewer lepromatous ulcers, in children and adolescents compared with adults, with younger patients being referred more frequently to reference centres.

  20. Association of Taq I, Fok I and Apa I polymorphisms in Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) gene with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Suryadevara, Naveen Chandra; Shinde, Vidya Gouri; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Jain, Suman; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Anandaraj, M P J S

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is a transacting transcription factor which mediates immunomodulatory function and plays a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses through its ligand and polymorphisms in VDR gene may affect its regulatory function. To investigate the association of three VDR gene polymorphisms (TaqI rs731236, FokI rs2228570 and ApaI rs7975232) with leprosy. The study group includes 404 participants of which 222 were leprosy patients (paucibacillary=87, multibacillary=135) and 182 healthy controls. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP technique. Statistical analysis was performed using SNP Stats and PLINK software. The VDR FokI (rs2228570) ff genotype, ApaI (rs7975232) AA, Aa genotype and haplotype T-f-a, T-F-A were positively associated with leprosy when compared to healthy controls. The two variants at Fok and Apa positions in VDR gene are significantly associated with leprosy. Genotypes at FokI (ff), ApaI (aa) and haplotype (T-F-a, T-f-a) may contribute to the risk of developing leprosy by altering VDR phenotype/levels subsequently modulation of immune response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Control Actions on Leprosy in Primary Health Care in a Brazilian Capital: Profile of Professionals and Users

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    Anselmo Alves Lustosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: analyze  profile of users of primary health care services affected by leprosy, as well as the medical professionals and nurses responsible for the follow - up of these patients.   Methods: This is a field study that surveyed the socioeconomic and clinical profile of 26 patients affected by leprosy, attended at the municipal health units of the urban area of ​​Teresina-PI, as well as the professional profile and clinical practices of 15 physicians and 19 nurses responsible for the follow-up of these patients. Results: It was observed a profile of people affected by leprosy, characterized by: individuals aged 50 years or more; predominantly male; with low schooling and income. The clinical characteristics reveal a high prevalence of multibacillary cases of leprosy and with a significant diagnosis of some degree of physical disability. Regarding the profile of the professionals and their clinical behaviors, it was verified that the majority had post-graduation and a long time of experience in primary health care and leprosy control actions, however, it has been shown that they do not always put into practice all actions necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Conclusions: The profile of patients with leprosy treated at the municipal health units in the urban area of Teresina was similar to that found in other Brazilian territories, thus evidencing the need to implement public social support policies and more effective diagnostic and therapeutic follow-up practices by reduce the high rates of endemicity of the disease.

  2. Social stigma as an epidemiological determinant for leprosy elimination in Cameroon

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    Dickson S. Nsagha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries of the world according to the WHO, but the social stigma to the disease is still very high. The present study was performed to investigate the role of social stigma as a determinant for leprosy elimination in a leprosy endemic region of Cameroon. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to investigate leprosy social stigma among lepers, their contacts and a control group consisting of patients attending a health facility for reasons other than leprosy. Informed consent was sought and gained prior to starting the study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews identified three types of stigma: lack of self-esteem, tribal stigma and complete rejection by society. From the 480 structured questionnaires administered, there were overall positive attitudes to lepers among the study population and within the divisions (P=0.0. The proportion of participants that felt sympathetic with deformed lepers was 78.1% [95% confidence interval (CI: 74.4-81.8%] from a total of 480. Three hundred and ninety nine (83.1% respondents indicated that they could share a meal or drink at the same table with a deformed leper (95% CI: 79.7-86.5%. Four hundred and three (83.9% participants indicated that they could have a handshake and embrace a deformed leper (95% CI: 80.7-87.3%. A total of 85.2% (95.0% CI: 81.9-88.4% participants affirmed that they could move with a deformed leper to the market or church. A high proportion of 71.5% (95.0% CI: 67.5%-75.5% participants stated that they could offer a job to a deformed leper. The results indicate that Menchum division had the lowest mean score of 3.3 on positive attitudes to leprosy compared with Mezam (4.1 and Boyo (4.8 divisions. The high proportion of positive attitudes among the participants and in different divisions is a positive indicator that the elimination of leprosy social stigma is progressing

  3. Social stigma as an epidemiological determinant for leprosy elimination in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson S.; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Z.K.; Nsagha, Sarah M.; Njunda, Anna L.; Assob, Jules C.N.; Tabah, Earnest N.; Bamgboye, Elijah A.; Oyediran, Alain Bankole O.O.; Nde, Peter F.; Njamnshi, Alfred K.

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries of the world according to the WHO, but the social stigma to the disease is still very high. The present study was performed to investigate the role of social stigma as a determinant for leprosy elimination in a leprosy endemic region of Cameroon. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to investigate leprosy social stigma among lepers, their contacts and a control group consisting of patients attending a health facility for reasons other than leprosy. Informed consent was sought and gained prior to starting the study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews identified three types of stigma: lack of self-esteem, tribal stigma and complete rejection by society. From the 480 structured questionnaires administered, there were overall positive attitudes to lepers among the study population and within the divisions (P=0.0). The proportion of participants that felt sympathetic with deformed lepers was 78.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 74.4–81.8%] from a total of 480. Three hundred and ninety nine (83.1%) respondents indicated that they could share a meal or drink at the same table with a deformed leper (95% CI: 79.7–86.5%). Four hundred and three (83.9%) participants indicated that they could have a handshake and embrace a deformed leper (95% CI: 80.7–87.3%). A total of 85.2% (95.0% CI: 81.9–88.4%) participants affirmed that they could move with a deformed leper to the market or church. A high proportion of 71.5% (95.0% CI: 67.5%–75.5%) participants stated that they could offer a job to a deformed leper. The results indicate that Menchum division had the lowest mean score of 3.3 on positive attitudes to leprosy compared with Mezam (4.1) and Boyo (4.8) divisions. The high proportion of positive attitudes among the participants and in different divisions is a positive indicator that the elimination of leprosy social stigma is progressing

  4. Social stigma as an epidemiological determinant for leprosy elimination in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson S; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Z K; Nsagha, Sarah M; Njunda, Anna L; Assob, Jules C N; Tabah, Earnest N; Bamgboye, Elijah A; Oyediran, Alain Bankole O O; Nde, Peter F; Njamnshi, Alfred K

    2011-03-01

    Leprosy has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries of the world according to the WHO, but the social stigma to the disease is still very high. The present study was performed to investigate the role of social stigma as a determinant for leprosy elimination in a leprosy endemic region of Cameroon. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to investigate leprosy social stigma among lepers, their contacts and a control group consisting of patients attending a health facility for reasons other than leprosy. Informed consent was sought and gained prior to starting the study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews identified three types of stigma: lack of self-esteem, tribal stigma and complete rejection by society. From the 480 structured questionnaires administered, there were overall positive attitudes to lepers among the study population and within the divisions (P=0.0). The proportion of participants that felt sympathetic with deformed lepers was 78.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 74.4-81.8%] from a total of 480. Three hundred and ninety nine (83.1%) respondents indicated that they could share a meal or drink at the same table with a deformed leper (95% CI: 79.7-86.5%). Four hundred and three (83.9%) participants indicated that they could have a handshake and embrace a deformed leper (95% CI: 80.7-87.3%). A total of 85.2% (95.0% CI: 81.9-88.4%) participants affirmed that they could move with a deformed leper to the market or church. A high proportion of 71.5% (95.0% CI: 67.5%-75.5%) participants stated that they could offer a job to a deformed leper. The results indicate that Menchum division had the lowest mean score of 3.3 on positive attitudes to leprosy compared with Mezam (4.1) and Boyo (4.8) divisions. The high proportion of positive attitudes among the participants and in different divisions is a positive indicator that the elimination of leprosy social stigma is progressing in the

  5. Evaluation of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR with Slit Skin Smear Examination (SSS to Confirm Clinical Diagnosis of Leprosy in Eastern Nepal.

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    Shraddha Siwakoti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in slit skin smear (SSS is a gold standard technique for the leprosy diagnosis. Over recent years, molecular diagnosis by using PCR has been increasingly used as an alternative for its diagnosis due to its higher sensitivity. This study was carried out for comparative evaluation of PCR and SSS microscopy in a cohort of new leprosy cases diagnosed in B. P. Koirala Institute of health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal.In this prospective crossectional study, 50 new clinically diagnosed cases of leprosy were included. DNA was extracted from SSS and PCR was carried out to amplify 129 bp sequence of M. leprae repetitive element. Sensitivity of SSS and PCR was 18% and 72% respectively. Improvement of 54% case detection by PCR clearly showed its advantage over SSS. Furthermore, PCR could confirm the leprosy diagnosis in 66% of AFB negative cases indicating its superiority over SSS. In the paucibacillary (PB patients, whose BI was zero; sensitivity of PCR was 44%, whereas it was 78% in the multibacillary patients.Our study showed PCR to be more sensitive than SSS microscopy in diagnosing leprosy. Moreover, it explored the characteristic feature of PCR which detected higher level of early stage(PB cases tested negative by SSS. Being an expensive technique, PCR may not be feasible in all the cases, however, it would be useful in diagnosis of early cases of leprosy as opposed to SSS.

  6. Evaluation of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with Slit Skin Smear Examination (SSS) to Confirm Clinical Diagnosis of Leprosy in Eastern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwakoti, Shraddha; Rai, Keshav; Bhattarai, Narayan Raj; Agarwal, Sudha; Khanal, Basudha

    2016-12-01

    Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in slit skin smear (SSS) is a gold standard technique for the leprosy diagnosis. Over recent years, molecular diagnosis by using PCR has been increasingly used as an alternative for its diagnosis due to its higher sensitivity. This study was carried out for comparative evaluation of PCR and SSS microscopy in a cohort of new leprosy cases diagnosed in B. P. Koirala Institute of health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. In this prospective crossectional study, 50 new clinically diagnosed cases of leprosy were included. DNA was extracted from SSS and PCR was carried out to amplify 129 bp sequence of M. leprae repetitive element. Sensitivity of SSS and PCR was 18% and 72% respectively. Improvement of 54% case detection by PCR clearly showed its advantage over SSS. Furthermore, PCR could confirm the leprosy diagnosis in 66% of AFB negative cases indicating its superiority over SSS. In the paucibacillary (PB) patients, whose BI was zero; sensitivity of PCR was 44%, whereas it was 78% in the multibacillary patients. Our study showed PCR to be more sensitive than SSS microscopy in diagnosing leprosy. Moreover, it explored the characteristic feature of PCR which detected higher level of early stage(PB) cases tested negative by SSS. Being an expensive technique, PCR may not be feasible in all the cases, however, it would be useful in diagnosis of early cases of leprosy as opposed to SSS.

  7. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

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    Arthur da Silva Neumann

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  8. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae) with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Arthur da Silva; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Ferreira, Jéssica da Silva; Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Macedo, Rafael Enrique; Oliveira, José Henrique; Teixeira, Raquel Lima de Figueiredo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Suffys, Philip Noel; Oliveira, Pedro L; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  9. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A; Österroos, A; Hassan, S; Gullbo, J; Rickardson, L; Jarvius, M; Nygren, P; Fryknäs, M; Höglund, M; Larsson, R

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC 1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  10. Molecular Evidence for the Aerial Route of Infection of Mycobacterium leprae and the Role of Asymptomatic Carriers in the Persistence of Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio; Freitas, Larissa Oliveira; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes

    2016-12-01

    Leprosy persists as a public health problem. The chain of transmission and mechanism of infection are not completely understood. In the current study, we investigated the route of infection and of disease onset, from airway exposure, colonization, and bloodstream dissemination.  Mycobacterium leprae DNA was detected through quantitative polymerase chain reaction in nasal vestibule, nasal turbinate mucosa, and peripheral blood samples, along with anti-phenolic glycolipid I serology and skin tests from the same individual, from 113 leprosy patients and 104 household contacts of patients (HHCs). Bivariate statistics and multiple correspondence analysis were employed.  The rates of DNA positivity among patients were 66.4% (75 of 113) for nasal swab samples, 71.7% (81 of 113) for nasal turbinate biopsy samples, 19.5% (22 of 113) for blood samples, with seropositivity of 62.8% (71 of 113 samples) and with increasing incidences toward the multibacillary pole of the clinical spectrum. Positivity among HHCs were as follows: 49% (51 of 104) for nasal swab samples, 53.8% (56 of 104) for nasal biopsy samples, 6.7% (7 of 104) for blood samples, and 18.3% (19 of 104 samples) for anti-phenolic glycolipid I serology. During the follow-up of 5-7 years, out of 104 HHCs, 7 developed leprosy (6.7%). Risk for the disease outcome was estimated by comparing results in HHCs who develop leprosy with those not affected. Neither nasal passage nor mucosa positivity was determinant of later disease onset; however, blood presence increased the risk for disease development (relative risk/positive likelihood ratio, 5.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-23.62), as did seropositivity (positive likelihood ratio, 3.69 [1.67-8.16]; relative risk, 5.97 [1.45-24.5]).  Our findings strongly suggest that the aerosol route of infection and transmission is predominant and that HHCs contribute to the infection risk to themselves and probably to others. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  11. Current Situation of Leprosy in India and its Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2018-01-01

    The global leprosy situation has changed significantly over the last four decades after the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) in 1982 with a reduction in prevalence from over 5 million cases in the mid-1980s to less than 200,000 at the end of 2016. The programme in India also saw a reduction from a prevalence rate of 57.8/10,000 in 1983 to less than 1/10,000 by the end of 2005 when India declared to have reached the World Health Organization (WHO) target of elimination as a public health problem. Post 2005, major changes in the programme were made by the National leprosy eradication programme (NLEP) and the global leprosy programme, which may have affected the new case detection (NCD), disability, and child leprosy trends, which continue to show no appreciable regression. This article reviews the current global and Indian leprosy scenario to bring out its achievements and successes, including the impact of Leprosy Case Detection Campaigns (LCDC) on leprosy numbers. The basis and expected benefits of recent introduction of chemo and immune-prophylaxis in the programme are also discussed. It also discusses the shortcomings, the areas of concern, and the need for an inclusive strategy in the Indian leprosy programme that includes an intersectoral collaboration within the country for reaching the desired goal of leprosy eradication.

  12. Leprosy: ongoing medical and social struggle in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhiem; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hong Phan, Hai; Tam Tran, Tinh

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, leprosy had been prominent in 33 countries worldwide, and Vietnam was ranked among the top 14 endemic countries. The leprosy situation in Vietnam was reviewed as a sample of the worldwide ongoing medical and social struggle to assess the need for continued support for leprosy control activities and for social programs of integration of leprosy victims into the community. A search was conducted of official Vietnamese publications, World Health Organization documents, major electronic databases, and popular leprosy Web sites; as well, notes from visits to local leprosy clinics and interviews with health workers were checked. Important achievements were realized through national determination and international collaboration. In contrast with the impressive performance statistics at the national level, and despite strong government efforts for leprosy control, the results obtained at the province-city and district-commune levels still exhibit deficiencies in case detection, treatment, and socioeconomic integration of leprosy victims. The struggle to eliminate such a complex and destructive infectious disease as leprosy does not end with the cure. Deep-seated medical and social problems remain. These problems are best solved through community-based approaches.

  13. Mycobacterium leprae DNA in peripheral blood may indicate a bacilli migration route and high-risk for leprosy onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, E M; Araujo, S; Lobato, J; Neves, A F; Costa, A V; Gonçalves, M A; Goulart, L R; Goulart, I M B

    2014-05-01

    Leprosy epidemiological studies have been restricted to Mycobacterium leprae DNA detection in nasal and oral mucosa samples with scarce literature on peripheral blood. We present the largest study applying quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection of M. leprae DNA in peripheral blood samples of 200 untreated leprosy patients and 826 household contacts, with results associated with clinical and laboratory parameters. To detect M. leprae DNA a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting the M. leprae ML0024 genomic region was performed. The ML0024 qPCR in blood samples detected the presence of bacillus DNA in 22.0% (44/200) of the leprosy patients: 23.2% (16/69) in paucibacillary (PB), and 21.4% (28/131) in multibacillary (MB) patients. Overall positivity among contacts was 1.2% (10/826), with similar percentages regardless of whether the index case was PB or MB. After a follow-up period of 7 years, 26 contacts have developed leprosy. Comparing the results of healthy contacts with those that become ill, ML0024 qPCR positivity at the time of diagnosis of their index case represented an impressive 14.78-fold greater risk for leprosy onset (95% CI 3.6-60.8; p <0.0001). In brief, contacts with positive PCR in blood at diagnosis of index cases are at higher risk of later leprosy onset and this marker might be combined with other prognostic markers for management of contacts, which requires further studies. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  14. Retraso en el diagnóstico de lepra como factor pronóstico de discapacidad en una cohorte de pacientes en Colombia, 2000 - 2010 Delay in leprosy diagnosis as a predictor of disability in a cohort of patients in Colombia, 2000 - 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Inírida Guerrero

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar los factores pronósticos de la presencia de discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico de lepra en una cohorte de pacientes colombianos de 2000 a 2010. MÉTODOS: Estudio analítico y observacional descriptivo de una cohorte retrospectiva de pacientes ingresados con diagnóstico de lepra en el Centro Dermatológico Federico Lleras Acosta, de Bogotá, Colombia, entre 2000 y 2010. Se realizó el análisis descriptivo de las variables y se identificaron factores pronósticos de la presencia de discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico mediante análisis simple y multifactorial (modelo de riesgos proporcionales de Cox; se calcularon las razones de riesgo (hazard ratio para cada uno de los factores incluidos en el modelo. RESULTADOS: El tiempo entre los primeros síntomas y el diagnóstico en los 333 pacientes de la cohorte fue en promedio 2,9 años; 32,3% de ellos tenían algún grado de discapacidad, especialmente en los pies. Hubo una mayor proporción de retraso en el diagnóstico y discapacidad en hombres que en mujeres y en pacientes con lepra multibacilar que con paucibacilar. La discapacidad se asoció significativamente con demoras ≥ 1 año en el diagnóstico, edad ≥ 30 años, índice baciloscópico inicial ≥ 2, lepra multibacilar y proceder de Cundinamarca o Santander. Los factores protectores fueron ser del sexo femenino, tener algún grado de escolaridad y residir en Boyacá. CONCLUSIONES: El tiempo entre los primeros síntomas y el diagnóstico constituye el factor pronóstico clave de la discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico de lepra. Se recomienda reforzar la búsqueda activa de personas infectadas y promover el diagnóstico precoz.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate predictive factors of disability at time of leprosy diagnosis in a cohort of Colombian patients, from 2000 to 2010. METHODS: Descriptive and analytical observational study of a retrospective cohort of patients admitted with a leprosy diagnosis to the Centro

  15. Study Suggests Smaller Melanoma Excision Margins May Be Option for Some Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A randomized controlled trial of patients with stage IIA–C cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2-mm found that a 2-cm surgical resection margin is sufficient and is as safe for patients as a 4-cm margin.

  16. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA for 36kDa protein in urine from leprosy patients: a preliminary report Detecção do DNA do Mycobacterium leprae para proteína 36 kDa na urina de pacientes com hanseníase: relato preliminar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Parkash

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We have searched for Mycobacterium leprae DNA for 36kDa protein in urine using a M. leprae specific PCR technique. A limited number of 16 patients (of which 11 belonged to lepromatous leprosy and five to tuberculoid leprosy and eight healthy individuals were included for the present study. The number of urine samples positive by PCR were 36.4% (4/11 in lepromatous patients and 40% (2/5 in tuberculoid patients. None of the samples from healthy individuals was positive. To our knowledge, the results indicate, for the first time, the presence of M. leprae DNA in urine from leprosy patients. Another important finding obtained out of the study is that amongst treated patients 66.6% (4/6 were positive whereas amongst untreated only 20% (2/10 were positive. From the present indicative data it appears that treatment improves the PCR results with urine as a sample. Thus, the approach could prove to be useful for monitoring the treatment response of individual patients and needs to be further evaluated with a large number of patients.Pesquisamos o DNA do Mycobacterium leprae para proteína 36 kDa na urina usando a técnica do PCR específica para M. leprae. Um número limitado de 16 pacientes (dos quais 11 tinham hanseníase multibacilar e cinco hanseníase paucibacilar e oito indivíduos saudáveis foram incluídos neste estudo. O número de amostras de urina positivas pelo PCR foi de 36,4% (4/11 em pacientes com hanseníase multibacilar e 40% (2/5 em pacientes com hanseníase paucibacilar. Nenhuma das amostras de indivíduos saudáveis foi positiva. Até onde chega o nosso conhecimento, os resultados indicam, pela primeira vez, a presença de DNA do M. leprae na urina de pacientes com hanseníase. Outro fato importante obtido através do exame é que entre os pacientes tratados 66.6% (4/6 eram positivos enquanto entre os não tratados somente 20% (2/10 foram positivos. Pelos presentes dados indicativos parece que o tratamento melhora os resultados do

  17. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jaramillo, José Luis; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Rojas-Morales, Lourdes; López-Buenfil, José Abel; Morales-Galván, Oscar; Chavarín-Palacio, Claudio; Ramírez-Pool, José Abrahán; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV) and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants. PMID:25004279

  18. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cruz-Jaramillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants.

  19. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  20. Association of leprosy with HLA-DR2 in a Southern Brazilian population

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    Visentainer J.E.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between HLA specificities and leprosy was investigated in a Southern Brazilian population. One hundred and twenty-one patients and 147 controls were typed for HLA-A, B, Cw, DR and DQ. Patients were subdivided into the following subgroups, according to clinical, histological and immunological criteria: lepromatous (N = 55, tuberculoid (N = 32, dimorphous (N = 20, and indeterminate (N = 14. The frequencies of HLA specificities were compared between the total group of patients and controls, and between the same controls and each subgroup of patients. After correction of the probabilities, deviations were not significant, except for the DR2 specificity, which presented a frequency of 44.2% in the total group of patients and 56.3% in the subgroup of individuals with the tuberculoid form of the disease, compared to 23.3% in the controls. Stratified analysis showed that the increased DR2 frequency in the total group of patients was due to the subgroups with the tuberculoid and dimorphous forms. The relative risk of tuberculoid leprosy for DR2-positive individuals was 4.2, and the etiologic fraction of DR2 was 0.429. In conclusion, a positive association of the DR2 specificity with the tuberculoid form of leprosy, but not with the lepromatous, dimorphous, or indeterminate forms, was demonstrated in this Southern Brazilian population

  1. Interruption of persistent exposure to leprosy combined or not with recent BCG vaccination enhances the response to Mycobacterium leprae specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Marques; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista

    2017-05-01

    Household contacts of multibacillary leprosy patients (HCMB) constitute the group of individuals at the highest risk of developing leprosy. Early diagnosis and treatment of their index cases combined with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunization remain important strategies adopted in Brazil to prevent HCMB from evolving into active disease. In the present study, we assessed the impact of these measures on the immune response to Mycobacterium leprae in HCMB. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HCMB (n = 16) were obtained at the beginning of leprosy index case treatment (T0). At this time point, contacts were vaccinated (n = 13) or not (n = 3) in accordance with their infancy history of BCG vaccination and PBMCs were recollected at least 6 months later (T1). As expected, a significant increase in memory CD4 and CD8 T cell frequencies responsive to M. leprae whole-cell sonicate was observed in most contacts. Of note, higher frequencies of CD4+ T cells that recognize M. leprae specific epitopes were also detected. Moreover, increased production of the inflammatory mediators IL1-β, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ, MIP1-β, and MCP-1 was found at T1. Interestingly, the increment in these parameters was observed even in those contacts that were not BCG vaccinated at T0. This result reinforces the hypothesis that the continuous exposure of HCMB to live M. leprae down regulates the specific cellular immune response against the pathogen. Moreover, our data suggest that BCG vaccination of HCMB induces activation of T cell clones, likely through "trained immunity", that recognize M. leprae specific antigens not shared with BCG as an additional protective mechanism besides the expected boost in cell-mediated immunity by BCG homologues of M. leprae antigens.

  2. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy: A manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected person

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    Mukhopadhyay Partha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome describes a collection of inflammatory disorders associated with paradoxical deterioration of various pre-existing processes following start of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. Leprosy as an opportunistic infection in immune reconstitution syndrome has been rarely reported in literature. A case of a 30-year-old HIV positive man with extrapulmonary tuberculosis of left foot on HAART having developed borderline tuberculoid leprosy as opportunistic infection in immune reconstitution syndrome has been reported.

  3. Cytokine and Protein Markers of Leprosy Reactions in Skin and Nerves: Baseline Results for the North Indian INFIR Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Diana N. J.; Suneetha, Lavanya; Sagili, Karuna Devi; Chaduvula, Meher Vani; Mohammed, Ismail; van Brakel, Wim; Smith, W. C.; Nicholls, Peter; Suneetha, Sujai

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies investigating the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of leprosy have either been on only small numbers of patients or have not combined clinical and histological data. The INFIR Cohort study is a prospective study of 303 new multibacillary leprosy patients to identify risk factors for reaction and nerve damage. This study characterised the cellular infiltrate in skin and nerve biopsies using light microscopic and immunohistochemical techniques to identify any association of cytokine markers, nerve and cell markers with leprosy reactions. Methodology/Principal Findings TNF-α, TGF-β and iNOS protein in skin and nerve biopsies were detected using monoclonal antibody detection immunohistochemistry techniques in 299 skin biopsies and 68 nerve biopsies taken from patients at recruitment. The tissues were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, modified Fite Faraco, CD68 macrophage cell marker and S100. Conclusions/Significance Histological analysis of the biopsies showed that 43% had borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy, 27% borderline lepromatous leprosy, 9% lepromatous leprosy, 13% indeterminate leprosy types and 7% had no inflammation. Forty-six percent had histological evidence of a Type 1 Reaction (T1R) and 10% of Erythema Nodosum Leprosum. TNF-α was detected in 78% of skin biopsies (181/232), iNOS in 78% and TGF-β in 94%. All three molecules were detected at higher levels in patients with BT leprosy. TNF-α was localised within macrophages and epithelioid cells in the granuloma, in the epidermis and in dermal nerves in a few cases. TNF-α, iNOS and TGF-β were all significantly associated with T1R (p<0.001). Sixty-eight nerve biopsies were analysed. CD68, TNF-α and iNOS staining were detectable in 88%, 38% and 28% of the biopsies respectively. The three cytokines TNF-α, iNOS and TGF-β detected by immunohistochemistry showed a significant association with the presence of skin reaction. This study is the first to demonstrate an

  4. Clinical, bacteriological, and histopathological characteristics of newly detected children with leprosy: A population based study in a defined rural and urban area of Maharashtra, Western India

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    Vanaja P Shetty

    2013-01-01

    transmission, and highlight implications on individual patients and the community. Key Message: Most of the cases were paucibacillary (62%. A large proportion of children (49% had SSL and (55% had it on the face followed by arms and leg (27% and trunk (17%. The mean duration of symptoms exceeded one year which can be attributed to poor knowledge of leprosy or barriers in access to health care or its utilization.

  5. Hanseníase em menores de quinze anos no município de Paracatu, MG (1994 a 2001 Leprosy in patients under fifteen years of age in the city of Paracatu-MG (1994 to 2001

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    Isaias Nery Ferreira

    2005-03-01

    actions due to the high rates of detection and prevalence of the condition, especially among children under fifteen years of age. In 1998 and 1999, an information program was implemented in order to provide explanations on the signs and symptoms of the disease to a population of 8,000 students, in order to improve the detection rate of the disease in children under fifteen years of age, given Paracatu was classified as a hyper-endemic city between 1997 and 2001. A descriptive study was carried out comprising forty-five patients diagnosed and treated in Paracatu between 1994 and 2001. Fifty-three percent of diagnoses were in male children, 75.5% of the cases being between ten and fourteen years of age; individuals had less years of schooling than what would be expected for their ages; 84% of the population lived in the urban area. All patients included (100% were new cases, of which 56% were multibacillary forms, mainly the Dimorph clinical form (potentially infectious, followed by the Undetermined (30.8% and Tuberculoid (13.2% forms. All were treated according to standard procedures, with a 100% cure rate. During treatment 24% of patients presented reactions, and 9% did after being discharged. Twenty-two percent of patients were diagnosed with some degree of disability, and 13% presented some degree of disability upon discharge (a rate considered high. Sixty-two percent of patients had contact with other Hansen's disease bearers, and only 15.5% of these contacts had two BCG vaccine scars. Leprosy is a serious public health problem in the city studied, and the work accomplished with students was primary to increase case detection.

  6. Patient reported outcomes in pediatric oncology practice: suggestions for future usage by parents and pediatric oncologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, S. A.; Engelen, V. E.; Haverman, L.; Caron, H. N.; Hoogerbrugge, P. M.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Egeler, R. M.; Grootenhuis, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in adults have shown patient reported outcomes (PROs) to be effective in enhancing patient-physician communication and discussion of Health Related Quality of Life outcomes. Although less studied, positive results have been demonstrated in children. A PRO-intervention needs to be

  7. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

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    Michal Barak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient’s survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient’s airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients.

  8. Novel bandlike signal abnormality suggestive of heterotopia in patient with a KCNQ1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Devinsky, Orrin; M Shepherd, Timothy

    2017-12-01

    Malformations of cortical development are associated with epilepsy and cognitive dysfunction, and can occur in patients with SCN1A ion channel mutations. We report a novel and subtle bandlike subcortical heterotopia on integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging ( PET-MRI) in a patient with treatment-resistant epilepsy due to a de novo KCNQ1 frameshift mutation. Our case highlights the potential for other channel mutations to cause both epilepsy and cortical malformations. Further scrutiny of high contrast resolution MRI studies is warranted for patients with KCNQ1 and other epilepsy genes to further define their extended phenotype.

  9. Global elimination of leprosy by 2020: are we on track?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Blok (David); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Every year more than 200,000 new leprosy cases are registered globally. This number has been fairly stable over the past 8 years. WHO has set a target to interrupt the transmission of leprosy globally by 2020. The aim of this study is to investigate whether this target,

  10. Increased plantar foot pressure in persons affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Frederik J.; van Schie, Carine H.; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R.; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Although foot pressure has been reported to be increased in people affected by leprosy, studies on foot pressure and its determinants are limited. Therefore, the aim was to assess barefoot plantar foot pressure and to identify clinical determinants of increased plantar foot pressure in leprosy

  11. Autochthonous Leprosy without Armadillo Exposure, Eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendini, Tina; Levis, William

    2017-11-01

    Autochthonous leprosy has been reported in New York City, where there are no wild armadillos. Recent autochthonous cases also have been reported in Georgia and Florida and blamed on armadillos, including cases with no known armadillo exposure. International migration needs to be considered as a cause of autochthonous leprosy.

  12. The History, Biology and Medical Aspects of Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichman, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Presents information about the history, biology, and medical aspects of leprosy, including its description in historical documents, its cause and effects, statistics on its prevalence, and various attempts at treatment. Notes that leprosy is one of the few infectious diseases that, although treatable with medication, remains incurable. Contains 30…

  13. An Employee With Undiagnosed Leprosy: Are Other Employees at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann R

    2017-07-01

    MJ is a janitor working in an office building for the past 5 years. He sustained a third-degree burn with a secondary infection and was sent to the county hospital. He was diagnosed with leprosy. The employees in the office building were concerned with the risk of transmission. This article reviews leprosy, and implications for occupational health nurses are discussed.

  14. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis

  15. Mucormycosis and chromoblastomycosis occurring in a patient with leprosy type 2 reaction under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy Mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com reação hansênica tipo II sob terapia prolongada com corticosteróide e talidomida

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    Flávia Machado Alves Basílio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is an uncommon fungal infection caused by Mucorales. It frequently occurs in patients with neutropenia, diabetes, malignancy and on corticoid therapy. However, it is rare in patients with AIDS. Clinical disease can be manifested in several forms. The case reported illustrates the rare occurrence of chromoblastomycosis and mucormycosis in an immunosuppressed patient with multibacillary leprosy, under prolonged corticosteroid and thalidomide therapy to control leprosy type 2 reaction. Neutrophil dysfunction, thalidomide therapy and work activities are some of the risk factors in this case. Chromoblastomycosis was treated by surgical excision and mucormycosis with amphotericin B. Although the prognosis of mucormycosis is generally poor, in the reported case the patient recovered successfully. This case should alert dermatologists to possible opportunistic infections in immunosuppressed patients.Mucormicose é uma infecção fúngica incomum causada por Mucorales. Ocorre frequentemente em pacientes com neutropenia, diabetes, corticoterapia e condições malignas. Porém, é rara em pacientes com AIDS. A doença pode apresentar-se em diferentes formas. Este caso ilustra a rara ocorrência de mucormicose e cromoblastomicose em um paciente com hanseníase multibacilar, que estava sendo tratado com prednisona e talidomida devido a eritema nodoso (reação hansênica tipo II. Disfunção de neutrófilos, uso de talidomida e atividades profissionais são alguns fatores de risco neste caso. A cromoblastomicose foi tratada por excisão cirúrgica e a mucormicose com anfotericina B. Embora o prognóstico da mucormicose seja ruim, neste caso o tratamento foi bem sucedido. Este caso alerta dermatologistas para a possibilidade de infecções oportunistas em pacientes imunossuprimidos.

  16. Caring for 'Very Important Patients'--Ethical Dilemmas and Suggestions for Practical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandre, David; Clever, Sarah; Farber, Neil J; Hughes, Mark T; Redstone, Paul; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani

    2016-02-01

    The care of Very Important Patients (VIPs) is different from other patients because they may receive greater access, attention, and resources from health care staff. Although the term VIP is used regularly in the medical literature and is implicitly understood, in practice it constitutes a wide and heterogeneous group of patients that have a strong effect on health care providers. We define a VIP as a very influential patient whose individual attributes and characteristics (eg, social status, occupation, position), coupled with their behavior, have the potential to significantly influence a clinician's judgment or behavior. Physicians, celebrities, the politically powerful, and philanthropists, may all become VIPs in the appropriate context. The quality of care may be inferior because health care professionals may deviate from standard practices when caring for them. Understanding the common features among what may otherwise be very different groups of patients can help health care providers manage ethical concerns when they arise. We use a series of vignettes to demonstrate how VIPs behavior and status can influence a clinician's judgment or actions. Appreciating the ethical principles in these varied circumstances provides health care professionals with the tools to manage ethical conflicts that arise in the care of VIPs. We conclude each vignette with guidance for how health care providers and administrators can manage the ethical concern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Current approaches and future directions in the treatment of leprosy

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    Worobec SM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sophie M WorobecDepartment of Dermatology, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: This review surveys current treatments and future treatment trends in leprosy from a clinical perspective. The World Health Organization provides a multidrug treatment regimen that targets the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus which causes leprosy. Several investigational drugs are available for the treatment of drug-resistant M. leprae. Future directions in leprosy treatment will focus on: the molecular signaling mechanism M. leprae uses to avoid triggering an immune response; prospective studies of the side effects experienced during multiple-drug therapy; recognition of relapse rates post-completion of designated treatments; combating multidrug resistance; vaccine development; development of new diagnostic tests; and the implications of the recent discovery of a genetically distinct leprosy-causing bacillus, Mycobacterium lepromatosis.Keywords: epidemiology, leprosy, Hansen’s disease, multidrug resistance, multidrug therapy

  18. Seclusion and restraint in psychiatry: patients' experiences and practical suggestions on how to improve practices and use alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Joffe, Grigori; Putkonen, Hanna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hane, Kimmo; Holi, Matti; Välimäki, Maritta

    2012-01-01

    This study explored psychiatric inpatients' experiences of, and their suggestions for, improvement of seclusion/restraint, and alternatives to their use in Finland. The data were collected by focused interviews (n= 30) and were analyzed with inductive content analysis. Patients' perspectives received insufficient attention during seclusion/restraint processes. Improvements (e.g., humane treatment) and alternatives (e.g., empathetic patient-staff interaction) to seclusion/restraint, as suggested by the patients, focused on essential parts of nursing practice but have not been largely adopted. Patients' basic needs have to be met, and patient-staff interaction has to also continue during seclusion/restraint. Providing patients with meaningful activities, planning beforehand, documenting the patients' wishes, and making patient-staff agreements reduce the need for restrictions and offer alternatives for seclusion/restraint. Service users must be involved in all practical development. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interventions for skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy

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    Liv Merete Reinar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND More than three million persons are disabled by leprosy worldwide. The main complication of sensory nerve damage is neuropathic ulceration, particularly of the feet. In this review we explored interventions that can prevent and treat secondary damage to skin and limbs. OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of self-care, dressings and footwear in preventing and healing secondary damage to the skin in persons affected by leprosy. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (April 2008, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008, MEDLINE (from 2003 to April 2008, EMBASE (from 2005 to April 2008, CINAHL (1982-2006 and LILACS (1982- April 2008 as well as online registers of ongoing trials (April 2008. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials involving anyone with leprosy and damage to peripheral nerves treated with any measures designed to prevent damage with the aim of healing existing ulcers and preventing development of new ulcers. Data collection and analysis: Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS Eight trials with a total of 557 participants were included. The quality of the trials was generally poor. The interventions and outcome measures were diverse. Although three studies that compared zinc tape to more traditional dressings found some benefit, none of these showed a statistically significant effect. One trial indicated that topical ketanserin had a better effect on wound healing than clioquinol cream or zinc paste, RR was 6.00 (95% CI 1.45 to 24.75. We did not combine the results of the two studies that compared topical phenytoin to saline dressing, but both studies found statistically significant effects in favour of phenytoin for healing of ulcer (SMD -2.34; 95% CI -3.30 to -1.39; and SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.20 to 0.39. Canvas shoes were not much better than PVC-boots, and double rocker shoes did not promote healing

  20. The spatial distribution of leprosy cases during 15 years of a leprosy control program in Bangladesh: An obsersvational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, E.A.J.; pahan, D.; Chowdhury, S.K.; Richardus, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background - An uneven spatial distribution of leprosy can be caused by the influence of geography on the distribution of risk factors over the area, or by population characteristics that are heterogeneously distributed over the area. We studied the distribution of leprosy cases detected by a

  1. Polymorphism N248S in the Human Toll-Like Receptor 1 Gene Is Related to Leprosy and Leprosy Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuring, Ron P.; Hamann, Lutz; Faber, William R.; Pahan, David; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Schumann, Ralf R.; Oskam, Linda

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the association between a polymorphism of a key innate immunity receptor, Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) N248S, and susceptibility to leprosy and its clinical presentation. TLR1 N248S has been shown elsewhere to diminish TLR1 signaling and subsequent leprosy disease. The homozygous

  2. Suggestion of the manual exposure condition guideline for reducing patient dose in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions after exposure to digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis were analyzed. The examinations for the ACR phantom were done using manual exposure, not auto exposure, to examine image discrimination and patient dose. As a result, the following results were derived: In the CC exposure , the kVp was 2kVp higher while mAs decreased to 58.6% for the 3D tomography. Such result showed an approximate decrease of 60mAs. At that time, the patients Average Glandular Dose (AGD) was 1.65mGy in 2D and 1.87mGy in 3D; thus, AGD of 3D was shown to have about 1.13 times higher. The result of the manual exposure revealed a reduced mAs of up to 80%; there was no effect in the assessment standard in terms of image discrimination, resulting in more than 10 points. When mAs was reduced to 80% in the manual exposure for ACR phantom, AGD was decreased to 0.66mGy. The diagnostic values of images were maintained and patients dose was reduced in the manual exposure in the AEC condition for 3D. Since the use of 3D has recently increased, using the manual exposure has been recommended in this study to improve the diagnostic value, while, simultaneously reducing patients dose.

  3. Genotype-Property Patient-Phenotype Relations Suggest that Proteome Exhaustion Can Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases remain poorly understood as search continues for the perceived pathogenic protein species. Previously, variants in Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1) causing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) were found to destabilize and reduce net charge, suggesting a pathogen...

  4. A Missense LRRK2 Variant Is a Risk Factor for Excessive Inflammatory Responses in Leprosy.

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    Vinicius M Fava

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the epidemiological setting, a variable proportion of leprosy patients will suffer from excessive pro-inflammatory responses, termed type-1 reactions (T1R. The LRRK2 gene encodes a multi-functional protein that has been shown to modulate pro-inflammatory responses. Variants near the LRRK2 gene have been associated with leprosy in some but not in other studies. We hypothesized that LRRK2 was a T1R susceptibility gene and that inconsistent association results might reflect different proportions of patients with T1R in the different sample settings. Hence, we evaluated the association of LRRK2 variants with T1R susceptibility.An association scan of the LRRK2 locus was performed using 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Evidence of association was evaluated in two family-based samples: A set of T1R-affected and a second set of T1R-free families. Only SNPs significant for T1R-affected families with significant evidence of heterogeneity relative to T1R-free families were considered T1R-specific. An expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis was applied to evaluate the impact of T1R-specific SNPs on LRRK2 gene transcriptional levels.A total of 18 T1R-specific variants organized in four bins were detected. The core SNP capturing the T1R association was the LRRK2 missense variant M2397T (rs3761863 that affects LRRK2 protein turnover. Additionally, a bin of nine SNPs associated with T1R were eQTLs for LRRK2 in unstimulated whole blood cells but not after exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigen.The results support a preferential association of LRRK2 variants with T1R. LRRK2 involvement in T1R is likely due to a pathological pro-inflammatory loop modulated by LRRK2 availability. Interestingly, the M2397T variant was reported in association with Crohn's disease with the same risk allele as in T1R suggesting common inflammatory mechanism in these two distinct diseases.

  5. Cytokine polymorphism in patients with migraine: some suggestive clues of migraine and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim Arda; Ozge, Aynur; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Edgünlü, Tuba Gökdoğan; Cakmak, Sema Erol; Yalin, Osman Ozgür

    2010-04-01

    There are contrasting results obtained in migraineurs concerning the levels and the role of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, the association of the occurrence and clinical characteristics of migraine with the polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) -308 G/A (rs1800629), interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) +4845 G/T (rs17561), IL-1beta+3953 C/T (rs1143634) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist variable number tandem repeat (IL-1RA VNTR) genes were studied. We also investigated the genetic linkage between these genes. Sixty-seven patients with migraine without aura (MwoA) and 96 unrelated, age- and sex-matched migraine-free, healthy control subjects from the same geographic area were investigated. We observed significant differences in the genotypic distribution of the TNF-alpha-308 G/A and IL-1beta+3953 C/T polymorphism for migraineurs compared with controls (P = 0.004). Frequency of the TNF-alpha-308 GG genotype was higher in the control group than MwoA group (82.1% vs 55.2%). Differences in the distribution of the allele frequencies were also observed, being the TNF-alpha-308 G allele overrepresented in control group and TNF-alpha-308 A allele in MwoA group. In addition, there was a significant increase of the IL-1beta+3953 T allele in MwoA cases compared with controls (P = 0.004). In conclusion, the present results indicate the possible contribution of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta gene polymorphisms to migraine headache generation in MwoA patients.

  6. Positividade sorológica antiPGL-I em contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares de hanseníase em área urbana Seropositivity with anti-PGL-I of household and neighbours contacts of leprosy patients in an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lucena Sampaio Calado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Pesquisas atuais buscam avaliar a prevalência de pessoas infectadas pelo M. leprae, bem como o valor preditivo dos testes utilizados, em meio aos quais está a sorologia, que detecta anticorpos contra um antígeno específico da parede do Mycobacterium leprae, o glicolipídio fenólico (PGL-I. OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a taxa de infecção em contatos intra e peridomiciliares, e a relação de soropositividade com sexo, idade e grupo multibacilar/paucibacilar. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Inquérito soroepidemiológico em contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares dos casos notificados como hanseníase entre 1998 e 2002, no segundo distrito do Município de Duque de Caxias, RJ, utilizando o teste sorológico rápido de fluxo lateral ou ML Flow. RESULTADOS: Em 390 domicílios de casos de hanseníase foram identificados 2.130 contatos, e submetidos à sorologia 1.866 (12,4% de perda. A soropositividade foi de 15,7% (292/1.866, sendo 15,8% no domicílio e 15,6% no peridomicílio. Também não houve diferença na relação entre soropositividade e sexo e em maiores e menores de 15 anos. Observou-se diferença significativa na soropositividade de contatos de casos de hanseníase MB (67,5%, duas vezes maior do que a dos casos de PB (32,5%. DISCUSSÃO / CONCLUSÃO: Nas condições de moradia da periferia urbana de área endêmica devem ser submetidos igualmente à vigilância epidemiológica os contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares.BACKGROUND: Actually many studies have been made to evaluate the predictive value of tests that identify patients infected by Mycobacterium leprae. Among then, the serology that determinates the presence o M. leprae specific antibody. OBJECTIVES: To know the infections tax among households and direct neighbours contacts, establish soropositivity relationship according to sex, household/ neighbour, age and classification of leprosy of the index case (paucibacillary x multibacillary. PATIENTS AND METHODS: seroepidemiological

  7. Association of the solute carrier family 11 member 1 gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to leprosy in a Brazilian sample

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    Maria José Franco Brochado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1/solute carrier family 11 member 1 gene (Nramp1/Slc11a1 is a gene that controls the susceptibility of inbred mice to intracellular pathogens. Polymorphisms in the human Slc11a1/Nramp1 gene have been associated with host susceptibility to leprosy. This study has evaluated nine polymorphisms of the Slc11a1/Nramp1 gene [(GTn, 274C/T, 469+14G/C, 577-18G/A, 823C/T, 1029 C/T, 1465-85G/A, 1703G/A, and 1729+55del4] in 86 leprosy patients (67 and 19 patients had the multibacillary and the paucibacillary clinical forms of the disease, respectively, and 239 healthy controls matched by age, gender, and ethnicity. The frequency of allele 2 of the (GTn polymorphism was higher in leprosy patients [p = 0.04, odds ratio (OR = 1.49], whereas the frequency of allele 3 was higher in the control group (p = 0.03; OR = 0.66. Patients carrying the 274T allele (p = 0.04; OR = 1.49 and TT homozygosis (p = 0.02; OR = 2.46, such as the 469+14C allele (p = 0.03; OR = 1.53 of the 274C/T and 469+14G/C polymorphisms, respectively, were more frequent in the leprosy group. The leprosy and control groups had similar frequency of the 577-18G/A, 823C/T, 1029C/T, 1465-85G/A, 1703G/A, and 1729+55del4 polymorphisms. The 274C/T polymorphism in exon 3 and the 469+14G/C polymorphism in intron 4 were associated with susceptibility to leprosy, while the allele 2 and 3 of the (GTn polymorphism in the promoter region were associated with susceptibility and protection to leprosy, respectively.

  8. Correlation between occurrence of leprosy and fossil fuels: role of fossil fuel bacteria in the origin and global epidemiology of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, A N; Dastidar, S G

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of correlative data on the global distribution of leprosy, its bacteria metabolizing fossil fuels (FF), and the FF themselves, the origin of leprosy in the world as a whole, and in the leprosy-free countries, in particular, as indigenous cases, appeared to be primarily due to a soil-to-man, and secondarily due to a man-to-man infection. These findings helped to elucidate similar problems of animal leprosies and nocardial diseases.

  9. Leprosy in Denmark 1980-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, Huma; Nielsen, Susanne D.; Bygbjerg, Ib C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic and progressive granulomatous disease affecting mainly the skin and the peripheral nervous system. If left unrecognized, the infection can lead to permanent nerve damage and disability. The clinical presentation depends on the immune...... or with history of travel or work in the tropics. Due to the long incubation period with symptoms presenting long after immigration or return, clinicians often do not have the diagnosis in mind. The wide spectrum of symptoms and immunological reactions further complicates the diagnostic process. Treatment...

  10. Feline leprosy due to Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Carolyn R; Malik, Richard; Globan, Maria; Reppas, George; McCowan, Christina; Fyfe, Janet A

    2017-07-01

    This paper, the second in a series of three on 'feline leprosy', provides a detailed description of disease referable to Mycobacterium lepraemurium, the most common cause of feline leprosy worldwide. Cases were sourced retrospectively and prospectively for this observational study, describing clinical, geographical and molecular microbiological data for cats definitively diagnosed with M lepraemurium infection. A total of 145 cases of feline leprosy were scrutinised; 114 'new' cases were sourced from the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory records, veterinary pathology laboratories or veterinarians, and 31 cases were derived from six published studies. Sixty-five cats were definitively diagnosed with M lepraemurium infection. Typically, cats were 1-3 years of age when first infected, with a male gender predilection. Affected cats were generally systemically well. All had outdoor access. Lesions tended to consist of one or more cutaneous/subcutaneous nodules, typically located on the head and/or forelimbs, possibly reflecting the most likely locations for a rodent bite as the site of inoculation for organisms. Nodules had the propensity to ulcerate at some stage in the clinical course. The cytological and histological picture varied from tuberculoid, with relatively low bacterial numbers, to lepromatous with moderate to high bacterial numbers. Treatment was varied, although most cats underwent surgical resection of lesions with adjunctive medical therapy, most often using a combination of oral clarithromycin and rifampicin. Prognosis for recovery was generally good, and in two cases there was spontaneous remission without the requirement for medical intervention. Untreated cats continued to enjoy an acceptable quality of life despite persistence of the disease, which extended locally but had no apparent tendency to disseminate to internal organs. M lepraemurium causes high bacterial index (lepromatous) or low bacterial index (tuberculoid) feline

  11. Is disability in leprosy still a burden? A cross-sectional study in a rural block in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Dinesh Kumar; Muthunarayanan, Logaraj

    2018-01-01

    Leprosy, a disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is an important cause of preventable disability. The present cross-sectional study was undertaken among leprosy-affected persons in a rural block in Kanchipuram District, Tamil Nadu, India in the year 2013. The sample included treatment completed leprosy affected persons ≥18 y of age. Persons with difficulty in cognition and those who were not willing to participate in the study were excluded. Subjects were also graded for any deformities of the body using World Health Organization (WHO) disability grading. The present study, carried out among 171 people affected with leprosy in a rural block, showed the lifetime prevalence of disability was 88.3% (95% confidence interval 83.4 to 93.1). The mean age of the study participants was 61.58±12.31 y with almost equal distribution of males (49.7%) and females (50.3%). WHO disability grading showed that 147 (86%) of the subjects were grade 2 (visible deformity) while only 4 (2.3%) were grade 1. It was found that education, occupation, income and duration since diagnosis had statistical significance with disability. Disability was observed more in males and the most common type of deformity was hand and foot deformity. Further studies are needed to assess those patients who completed treatment and recommends periodic neurological assessment of those in treatment.

  12. A Website to Improve Asthma Care by Suggesting Patient Questions for Physicians: Qualitative Analysis of User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Blanch, Danielle C; Mui, Sarah; Lawless, Heather; Manocchia, Michael; Rosen, Rochelle K; Pietropaoli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in the United Sates, yet despite the existence of national guidelines, nearly three fourths of patients with asthma do not have adequate control and clinical adherence to guidelines is low. While there are many reasons for this, physician inertia with respect to treatment change is partly to blame. Research suggests that patients who ask for specific tests and treatments are more likely to receive them. Objectives This study investigated the impact and experience of using an interactive patient website designed to give patients individual feedback about their condition and to suggest tailored questions for patients to ask their physician. The website was designed to be used prior to a physician visit, to increase the likelihood that patients would receive recommended tests and treatments. Methods A total of 37 adult patients with asthma participated in semi-structured telephone interviews aimed at eliciting information about their experiences with the website. Transcripts were coded using qualitative data analysis techniques and software. Themes were developed from subsets of codes generated through the analysis. In addition, 26 physicians were surveyed regarding their impressions of the website. Results Opportunities exist for improving website feedback, although the majority of both patient and physician respondents held favorable opinions about the site. Two major themes emerged regarding patients’ experiences with the website. First, many patients who used the website had a positive shift in their attitudes regarding interactions with their physicians. Second, use of the website prompted patients to become more actively involved in their asthma care. No patient reported any negative experiences as a result of using the website. Physicians rated the website positively. Conclusions Patients perceived that the interactive website intervention improved communication and interaction with their

  13. Unexpectedly high leprosy seroprevalence detected using a random surveillance strategy in midwestern Brazil: A comparison of ELISA and a rapid diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frade, Marco Andrey C; de Paula, Natália A; Gomes, Ciro M; Vernal, Sebastian; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Lugão, Helena B; de Abreu, Marilda M M; Botini, Patrícia; Duthie, Malcolm S; Spencer, John S; Soares, Rosa Castália F R; Foss, Norma T

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy diagnosis is mainly based on clinical evaluation, although this approach is difficult, especially for untrained physicians. We conducted a temporary campaign to detect previously unknown leprosy cases in midwestern Brazil and to compare the performance of different serological tests. A mobile clinic was stationed at the main bus terminal in Brasília, Brazil. Volunteers were quizzed and given a clinical exam to allow categorization as either patients, known contacts of patients or non-contacts, and blood was collected to determine anti-PGL-I and anti-LID-1 antibody titers by ELISA and by the NDO-LID rapid test. New cases of leprosy and the impact of performing this broad random surveillance strategy were evaluated. Accuracy values and concordance between the test results were evaluated among all groups. Four hundred thirty-four individuals were evaluated, and 44 (10.1%) were diagnosed with leprosy. Borderline forms were the most frequent presentation. Both tests presented higher positivity in those individuals with multibacillary disease. Serological tests demonstrated specificities arround 70% for anti-PGL-1 and anti-LID ELISA; and arround 40% for NDO-LID. Sensitivities ranged from 48 to 62%. A substantial agreement between NDO-LID and ELISA with concomitant positive results was found within leprosy patients (Kappa index = 0.79 CI95% 0.36-1.22). The unexpectedly high leprosy prevalence in this population indicates ongoing community-based exposure to Mycobacterium leprae antigens and high rates of subclinical infection. All tests showed low specificity and sensitivity values and therefore cannot be considered for use as stand-alone diagnostics. Rather, considering their positivity among MB patients and non-patients, these tests can be considered effective tools for screening and identifying individuals at high risk who might benefit from regular monitoring.

  14. availability of childhood social services in leprosy settlements

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    Data were analyzed with Stat Pac Gold package. Results: ... German leprosy Relief Association, international. Christian ... government of Nigeria have for years provided material and .... others in several activities including sports. Children's.

  15. LEPROSY NEPHROPATHY: A REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES

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    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, highly incapacitating, and with systemic involvement in some cases. Renal involvement has been reported in all forms of the disease, and it is more frequent in multibacillary forms. The clinical presentation is variable and is determined by the host immunologic system reaction to the bacilli. During the course of the disease there are the so called reactional states, in which the immune system reacts against the bacilli, exacerbating the clinical manifestations. Different renal lesions have been described in leprosy, including acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, secondary amyloidosis and pyelonephritis. The exact mechanism that leads to glomerulonephritis in leprosy is not completely understood. Leprosy treatment includes rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Prednisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to control acute immunological episodes.

  16. Exploratory urinary metabolomics of type 1 leprosy reactions

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    Oleg. A. Mayboroda

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates that urinary metabolic profiles are promising host biomarkers for the detection of intra-individual changes during acute inflammation in leprosy and could contribute to early treatment and prevention of tissue damage.

  17. Clinical-epidemiological characterization of leprosy cases with physical disabilities

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    Gleciane Costa de Sousa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the clinical-epidemiological profile of cases of multibacillary leprosy, diagnosed with physical disabilities. Methods: this is a cross-sectional and retrospective study. The sample consisted of 276 cases of diagnosed leprosy. Results: leprosy mainly affects males, of brown skin color, low education and with a mean age of 51.96 years old (standard deviation, SD=20.33 years old. The Virchowian and dimorphic clinical forms are mainly responsible for the transmission of the disease and the development of physical disabilities. Decreased or lost sensation in hands and feet, trophic ulcers and traumatic injuries, as well as clawed hands were the physical disabilities prevalent in the study. Conclusion: the cases with physical disabilities are predominantly affected by multibacillary clinical forms, and they can be inferred in the maintenance of the transmission chain and the late detection of severe forms of leprosy.

  18. Global elimination of leprosy by 2020: are we on track?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, David J; De Vlas, Sake J; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-10-22

    Every year more than 200,000 new leprosy cases are registered globally. This number has been fairly stable over the past 8 years. WHO has set a target to interrupt the transmission of leprosy globally by 2020. The aim of this study is to investigate whether this target, interpreted as global elimination, is feasible given the current control strategy. We focus on the three most important endemic countries, India, Brazil and Indonesia, which together account for more than 80 % of all newly registered leprosy cases. We used the existing individual-based model SIMCOLEP to predict future trends of leprosy incidence given the current control strategy in each country. SIMCOLEP simulates the spread of M. leprae in a population that is structured in households. Current control consists of passive and active case detection, and multidrug therapy (MDT). Predictions of leprosy incidence were made for each country as well as for one high-endemic region within each country: Chhattisgarh (India), Pará State (Brazil) and Madura (Indonesia). Data for model quantification came from: National Leprosy Elimination Program (India), SINAN database (Brazil), and Netherlands Leprosy Relief (Indonesia). Our projections of future leprosy incidence all show a downward trend. In 2020, the country-level leprosy incidence has decreased to 6.2, 6.1 and 3.3 per 100,000 in India, Brazil and Indonesia, respectively, meeting the elimination target of less than 10 per 100,000. However, elimination may not be achieved in time for the high-endemic regions. The leprosy incidence in 2020 is predicted to be 16.2, 21.1 and 19.3 per 100,000 in Chhattisgarh, Pará and Madura, respectively, and the target may only be achieved in another 5 to 10 years. Our predictions show that although country-level elimination is reached by 2020, leprosy is likely to remain a problem in the high-endemic regions (i.e. states, districts and provinces with multimillion populations), which account for most of the cases in a

  19. Tuberculoid leprosy masquerading as systemic lupus erythematosus: an interesting observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Vijay; Kumavat, Shrikant; Pawar, Manoj; Desai, Dipti

    2017-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infectious multisystem disease that may present with protean manifestations. It mimics many systemic and dermatological disorders. Here we report a case in which an elderly female presented with malar rash, intermittent fever, and arthralgia. Her diagnosis was significantly delayed due to a close clinical resemblance to systemic lupus erythematosus. It is important to be aware of such manifestations of leprosy and improve awareness of it in clinicians to avoid misdiagnosis and delay in treatment.

  20. Association between the degree of physical impairment from leprosy and dependence in activities of daily living among the elderly in a health unit in the State of Minas Gerais.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alisson da Costa; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Ferreira, Maria Aparecida Alves; Ribeiro, Marco Túlio de Freitas

    2014-01-01

    In addition to the common alterations and diseases inherent in the aging process, elderly persons with a history of leprosy are particularly vulnerable to dependence because of disease-related impairments. determine whether physical impairment from leprosy is associated with dependence among the elderly. An analytical cross-sectional study of elderly individuals with a history of leprosy and no signs of cognitive impairment was conducted using a database from a former leprosy colony-hospital. The patients were evaluated for dependence in the basic activities of daily living (BADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), respectively) and subjected to standard leprosy physical disability grading. Subsequently, descriptive and univariate analyses were conducted, the latter using Pearson's chi-squared test. A total of 186 elderly persons were included in the study. Of these individuals, 53.8% were women, 49.5% were older than 75 years of age, 93% had four or less years of formal education, 24.2% lived in an institution for the long-term care of the elderly (ILTC), and 18.3% had lower limb amputations. Among those evaluated, 79.8% had visible physical impairments from leprosy (grade 2), 83.3% were independent in BADL, and 10.2% were independent in IADL. There was a higher impairment grade among those patients who were IADL dependent (p=0.038). The leprosy physical impairment grade is associated with dependence for IADL, creating the need for greater social support and systematic monitoring by a multidisciplinary team. The results highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of leprosy to prevent physical impairment and dependence in later years.

  1. A profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1986-2007 Perfil de los enfermos tratados en un servicio nacional de remisión de pacientes ambulatorios con lepra en Río de Janeiro, Brasil, 1986-2007

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    Mariana A. Hacker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze a profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in metropolitan Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over a period of more than two decades, and the subgroup of nationally registered leprosy cases from the same residential area, as well as all registered cases statewide. METHODS: An observational, descriptive analysis was carried out for patients treated from 1986 to 2007 at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic (Ambulatório Souza Araújo, ASA, a national referral center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz that serves clients from the city of Rio de Janeiro and other municipalities in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro State. Demographic and clinical data for the subgroup of leprosy cases registered with Brazil's National Disease Notification System (Sistema Nacional de Informação de Agravos de Notificação, SINAN between 2001 and 2007 and residing in the same municipalities as the ASA patients, and for all registered cases statewide, were also analyzed. RESULTS: Among the ASA patients, there was a decrease in average family income (from 3.9 to 2.7 times the minimum salary between the periods 1998-2002 and 2003-2007; the proportion of multibacillary (MB patients (from 52.7% to 46.9%; and the proportion of patients younger than 15 years old (from 12.8% to 8.7%. Among the MB patients, the average initial and final bacilloscopic indices were significantly higher in 2003-2007. Compared with the SINAN cases, more ASA cases involved disability and were younger than 15 years old. CONCLUSIONS: Patients living with leprosy in the metropolitan area of the state of Rio de Janeiro belong to the most deprived social strata and have not benefited from the overall improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Brazil.OBJETIVO: Analizar el perfil de los enfermos tratados en un servicio nacional de remisión de pacientes ambulatorios con lepra ubicado en la zona

  2. Leprosy and the testis La lepra y el testículo

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    Fernando López

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Damage of testicles is frequent in lepromatous leprosy worsen by the presence of erythema nodosum leprosum.
    Objective. One patient is presented who developed lepromatous leprosy and erythema nodosum leprosum with important testicular compromise.
    Material and methods. A 28 year old man patient who had lepromatous leprosy since his 22 was studied. During a polychemotherapy treatment for the lepromatous leprosy, he presented chronic erythema nodosum leprosum that affected both testicles and did not respond to the conventional treatment. A left orchidectomy was practiced to treat the persistent pain.
    Results. The extracted testis evidenced the following findings: tubular atrophy, remarkable fibrosis, cumulus of foamy macrophages without rods, focal Leydig cell hyperplasia, linfocitary and granulomatous arteritis and endarteritis of small and medium size vessels. These changes were also observed in the epididymis. Two years after the polychemoterapy and the orchidectomy, the patient revealed azoospermy, normal total testosterone, discretely diminished free testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. No loss of libido or sexual activity. We reviewed general concepts about erythema nodosum leprosum and the pathologic changes produced by leprosy in the testis.
    Conclusion. Lepromatous leprosy may lead to hypogonadism. This should be considered by the leprosy programs in order to avoid and treat the consequences of the possible hypogonadism.
    Introducción. La afección testicular es frecuente en la lepra lepromatosa, daño que se incrementa cuando cursa con eritema nodoso leproso.
    Objetivo. Presentar un paciente con lepra lepromatosa y eritema nodoso leproso con severo compromiso testicular.
    Materiales y métodos. Estudiamos un hombre de 28 años con lepra lepromatosa desde los 22, que durante el tratamiento con poliquimioterapia para la lepra presentó eritema nodoso

  3. Limited activity and social participation after hospital discharge from leprosy treatment in a hyperendemic area in north Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Dias Monteiro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neural damages are among the main factors that contribute to physical disability in leprosy. Systematic monitoring using a broad physical, psychological and social approach is necessary. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to characterize the limitation of activity and social participation and its correlation with disabilities and/or impairment in individuals after being discharged from a multidrug leprosy therapy. METHOD: A cross-sectional study conducted in Araguaína, state of Tocantins, which is a leprosy hyperendemic municipality. We included cases of patients who were discharged from treatment considered as cured from January 2004 to December 2009. We performed dermatological examination and applied the Screening Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA and social participation scales. RESULTS: We included 282 individuals (mean age: 45.8 years old. The paucibacillary operational classification was more common (170; 60.3%. The eye-hand-foot score ranged from 0 to 12 (mean: 0.7. A total of 84 (29.8% individuals presented limited activity. A slight restriction in social participation occurred in 18 (6.3% cases. There was a statistically significant correlation between activity limitation, age (r = 0.40; p < 0.0001 and degree of functional limitation (r = 0.54; p < 0.0001, as well as of restricted social participation, activity limitation (r = 0.56, p < 0.0001 and functional limitations (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Functional limitation due to leprosy had an impact on the conduct of activities and social participation after the discharge from a leprosy treatment. The association between Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness and participation scales will assist in designing evidence-based assistance measures.

  4. Learning from a leprosy project in Indonesia: making mindsets explicit for stigma reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.M.H.; Lusli, M.M.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Miranda Galarza, H.B.; van Brakel, W.H.; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2015-01-01

    International attention for disability recognises that it plays an important role in persistent poverty. Leprosy can cause preventable disability. Stigma associated with leprosy often has greater implications for people affected than physical impairments. The Stigma Assessment and Reduction of

  5. AZALEP a randomized controlled trial of azathioprine to treat leprosy nerve damage and Type 1 reactions in India: Main findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Diana N J; Darlong, Joydeepa; Govindharaj, Pitchaimani; Kurian, Royce; Sundarrao, Pamidipani; John, Annamma S

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy Type 1 reactions are difficult to treat and only 70% of patients respond to steroid treatment. Azathioprine has been used as an immune-suppressant and we tested its efficacy in treating leprosy T1R. Randomised controlled trial adding azathioprine to steroid treatment for leprosy reactions. This trial was conducted in four leprosy hospitals in India. Patients with a new leprosy Type 1 reaction affecting either skin or nerve were recruited. They were given a 20 week course of oral prednisolone either with placebo or azathioprine 50mg for 24, 36 or 48 weeks. Outcomes were measured using a verified combined clinical reaction severity score (CCS) and the score difference between baseline and end of study calculated. An intention to treat analysis was done on the 279 patients who had an outcome. 345 patients were recruited, 145 were lost due to adverse events, loss to follow up or death. 36% needed extra steroids due to a recurrence of their skin and/or nerve reaction. 76% of patients had improvements in their CCS the end of the study, 22% had no change and 1.1% deteriorated. Adding azathioprine to steroid treatment did not improve CCS. So the improvements were attributable to treatment with steroids. We analysed the skin, sensory and motor scores separately and found that skin improvement contributed most with 78.9% of patients having skin improvement, azathioprine treatment for 48 weeks improved sensory scores it also improved motor scores but so did treatment with prednisolone alone. We identified significant adverse effects attributable to steroid treatment. When azathioprine and Dapsone were given together significant numbers of patients developed significant anaemia. Azathioprine is not recommended for the treatment of leprosy reactions and does not improve steroid treatment. Recurrent reactions are a major challenge. We have also identified that 65% of patients with sensory and 50% with motor nerve damage do not improve. Future studies should test giving

  6. Leprosy type 1 reactions and erythema nodosum leprosum Reações hansênicas do tipo 1 e eritema nodoso hansênico

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    Indira P. Kahawita

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy reactions are a major cause of nerve damage and morbidity in a significant proportion of leprosy patients. Reactions are immunologically mediated and can occur even after successful completion of multi-drug therapy. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathology and treatment of leprosy type 1 reactions, erythema nodosum leprosum and silent neuropathy.As reações hansênicas são a principal causa de dano e morbidade neural em grande parte dos pacientes hansênicos. São imunomediadas e podem ocorrer mesmo após o término bem sucedido da poliquimioterapia. Esta revisão enfoca a epidemiologia, a patologia e o tratamento das reações hansênicas do tipo 1, do eritema nodoso hansênico e da neuropatia silenciosa.

  7. Measurement of Change in the Knowledge and Attitude about Leprosy in Physiotherapy Students Undergoing Intensive One Week Training in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakashkumar, M D; Ebenezer, M; Richard, J

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease that causes not only physical problems, but also mental and social prob