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Sample records for leprosy patients suggested

  1. Quality of life in lepromatous leprosy patients

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    Betül Demir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae bacillus affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy can lead to severe deformities depending on the extent of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of life of patients with lepromatous leprosy. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with lepromatous leprosy and 35 healthy controls were included in the study. The patients were evaluated with the Turkish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. The relationship of quality of life with age, gender, marital status, and the grade of the visual impairment was studied and compared with the healthy controls. Results: Total and all the subgroup DLQI scores were higher in the leprosy group than in the control group (p<0.05. The patients with grade 2 visual impairment were more severely affected by the disease with regard to symptoms/feelings and school/work life as compared to the patients with grade 1 visual impairment (p=0.04, p=0.03, respectively. SF-36 physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, and emotional role functioning scores were statistically lower in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We observed that DLQI scores were lower in patients with lepromatous leprosy than in the control group, while increasing impairment in eyes was found to have a negative impact on quality of life. The SF-36 revealed that physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, emotional role functioning, and mental health were negatively influenced in patients with lepromatous leprosy.

  2. ZINC SERUM LEVEL AND PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONOCYTE COUNT OF MULTIBACILAR LEPROSY PATIENT LOWER THAN PAUCIBACILAR LEPROSY IN RSUP SANGLAH

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    Putu Kurniawan Dhana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc has been known to have important role in the immune system. Zinc deficiency can inhibit activation and production cytokine of Th1 and  may cause cellular immunity dysfunction. This conditon also may cause changes of lymphopoiesis and hematopoiesis also peripheral blood of mononuclear cell as mononuclear fagocyte. The Aim of this study is to know zinc serum status and peripheral blood monocyte count of leprosy patient in Dermato Venerologi policlinic Sanglah hospital Denpasar. This study use cross sectional design. Sample of study take by consecutive sampling with sample size contains 75 patient.  Mean of zinc serum status on multibacillary leprosy patient is 5.66  (SB 11.74 found lower compare to paucibacillary leprosy patient 19.38 (SB 18.21 and statistically significant with P < 0.05. Mean of peripheral blood monocyte count in multibacillary patient is 7.12 (SB 2.53 lower compare to paucibacillary leprosy patient with 7.88 (SB 3.08, but statistically not significant with P > 0.05. Binary logistic analysis show the influence of zinc serum status to probability to have leprosy. This study suggest correction of serum zinc level in leprosy patient through nutritional approach or the granting of a supplement of zinc

  3. Nutritional status of leprosy patients in India.

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    Rao, P S S; John, A S

    2012-01-01

    Across-sectional epidemiological study was carried out at a Leprosy Referral Hospital in Delhi to assess the nutritional status of multibacillary leprosy patients in comparison to the general population using BMI. 150 people affected with multibacillary leprosy were included in the study, of whom 108 (72%) had WHO Grade 2 disability. 100 non leprosy patients were also included as a control group. Socio-demographic and clinical details as well as their height and weight were measured and the BMI computed. The findings clearly showed that under-nutrition (BMI disability made the incidence of under-nutrition more likely. The duration of disease, number of lesions or bacterial index had no impact on the level of nutrition. There may be multiple factors working together to lead to this under-nutrition and these are discussed briefly. If, we aim to provide high quality services with a holistic approach, a mandatory BMI should be calculated for every patient and if under nourished, a qualitative diet summary should be done and suitable nutritional advice given. Further, studies are needed for a better understanding of the occurrence and progression of under-nutrition in leprosy to find efficient ways to combat this problem.

  4. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

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    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  5. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

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    Rohit Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18-70 years, any duration in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40 and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20 and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4, sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3, growth hormone (GH deficiency (n = 2, primary hypogonadism (n = 2 and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006. Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study.

  6. Leprosy

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    ... antibiotic is best for me? Will the treatment cure my leprosy? We caught the leprosy early, but will I have any complications later in my life? Is there any way to heal the sores on my body? Is there anything that can treat the numbness in my feet and hands? Should I have regular eye exams, in case ...

  7. Hepatitis B and C Seroprevalence in Leprosy Patients

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    Türkkan Öztürk Kaygusuz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Leprosy is a contagious chronic granulomatous disease and commonly affects the eyes and the internal organs. Leprosy can be classified according to the level of immune response. Leprosy is a disease that is associated with defects in cellular immunity. This is why we have investigated the leprosy patients that were referred to our hospital for chronic hepatitis B and C co-infections. Methods: Fifty patients who were treated in the leprosy unit of Elazığ Research and Training hospital between the dates of June-December 2011 were enrolled to this descriptive study. Macro ELISA assay was performed for Hepatitis B,C and HIV. Results: Fifty patients who were treated in the leprosy unit of our hospital participated in the study. A total of 8% HBsAg presence was noted. A total of 16 Anti HCV presence was noted in the patient group. Anti HCV positivity was determined at seven of 14 patients with tuberculoid form leprosy (50% and nine of 33 lepromatous leprosy form (27,2%. Conclusion: In conclusion, leprosy patients, especially lepromatous leprosy group, are immunologically vulnerable to HBV and HCV co-infections. Thus, physicians should be aware of HBV coinfections in these patients and education should be given to patients to increase their knowledge regarding risky situations for transmission of the disease. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(3: 114-118

  8. Social acceptance and quality of life of leprosy patient

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    Eyanoer, P. C.

    2018-03-01

    Some of the leprosy patients facing problems in many aspects such as social, economic, cultural and national security. Both the debilitating effects and disfigurements of leprosy, the society tends to stigmatize negatively those suffering from leprosy. The impact of negative stigma on society causes depression and problems in workplace cause difficulty in patient’s daily life. Neuropathic pain disturbs the quality of life of leprosy patients which could become so severe and significant. The neuropathic pain will lower their productivity which later caused difficulties in finding a job. This study was an analytical observational study to identify the correlation between neuropathic pain and quality of life in Leprosy Hospital of Scanning in Medan Belawan. The result showed that there is a correlation between neuropathic pain and disruption of quality of life (p=0.017). In conclusion, the milder the neuropathic pain experienced by persons with leprosy, the less the quality of life will be disturbed.

  9. Psychiatric morbidity among leprosy patients in Teso and Busia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The PM was positively correlated with physical disability and marital status but not with age, sex, education, type of leprosy, or duration of the illness. The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among Kenyan leprosy patients compared to studies carried out in India (56% to 78%). It was high compared to the rate of ...

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus infection among leprosy patients in a leprosy-endemic region of central Brazil

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    José María Hernández Ramos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy and hepatitis B virus (HBV are highly endemic in some regions of the state of Mato Grosso, in central Brazil. The association of leprosy with HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV was assessed using a seroprevalence study and 191 leprosy outpatients were included. Demographic data and the clinical classification of leprosy were recorded. Evidence of previous HBV infection was present in 53 patients (27.7%, 95% confidence interval: 21.9-34.5 and two (1% were HBsAg positive. Five (2.6% had antibodies to HCV. The prevalence of previous exposure to HBV was higher than expected for an adult population in central Brazil. In contrast, the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies was not much higher regarding the age range of participants. HBV markers were associated with a higher number of sex partners and the use of injections without proper sterilisation of the syringes. The number of HBV carriers was small, suggesting that there was no increased likelihood of chronification among these patients.

  11. Models for leprosy. An appraisal of graphic representations of the "spectrum" concept as models and a suggestion for a catastrophe theory model for leprosy.

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    Srinivasan, H

    1984-09-01

    Graphic representations of the spectrum concept of leprosy are examined in some detail as models for this disease. This reveals that this concept is somewhat inadequate and that the spectrum metaphor may itself be inappropriate because, by its very linearity of logic, it may not be able to depict the nonlinear behavior of leprosy properly. The assumptions underlying this concept and their logical consequences, brought out by the graphic representations, include an invariable relation between CMI and BI, identity of one type of leprosy with one specific level of CMI, a fixed sequence of types, and the consequent impossibility of skipping the sequence. However, our experience with leprosy does not bear out these assumptions. Further, development and progress of leprosy from a normal (nonleprous) state cannot be represented in these models. A search for alternative conceptual models therefore appears reasonable and even necessary. The catastrophe theory (a branch of topology in mathematics) describes a number of models for explaining how continuous causes could produce sudden or discontinuous changes. Of the various catastrophe theory models available, the relatively simple "cusp" model appears capable of application to leprosy. This model, as applied here, requires two control factors (identified tentatively as the amount of dead bacilli and the amount of living bacilli or their indicators) and one pattern of behavior, identified as progress towards limited or extensive disease. This model suggests under what conditions leprosy will change from one type to another and whether that will happen gradually or suddenly. It also suggests that for certain values of control factors the disease may manifest in one of two forms of borderline leprosy, and that lesions very similar to start with can progress to quite different states under similar conditions of change. The behavior of leprosy agrees more or less with that suggested by this model. The cusp model thus seems to: a

  12. DISABILITIES OF HANDS, FEET AND EYES IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED LEPROSY PATIENTS IN EASTERN NEPAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPER, A; LUBBERS, WJ; HOGEWEG, M; DESOLDENHOFF, R

    The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude of hand/feet/eye disabilities in newly diagnosed leprosy patients by examining all newly diagnosed leprosy patients who presented at the Eastern Leprosy Control Project (supported by The Netherlands Leprosy Relief Association), made up of a

  13. Determinants and Associated Disability of Leprosy Patients Attending GMLF, Sevagram

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    Meenakshi Khapre

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy, as an oldest disease known to a man and already eliminated from India in 2005, still poses a public health problem with steady new case detection rate. Method: The present study was carried out in Gandhi memorial leprosy foundation, Wardha, with the aim to find out proportion of multibacillary leprosy cases and various grading of disability and factors associated with it in this part of country. All the successive new OPD patients were included in study and examined for type of leprosy and grade of disability if present. Analysis done by Descriptive statistics. Result: 66 % had multibacillary type of leprosy and 44 % the disability. Higher age group, females, illiterate and less educated, unskilled and low income group were mostly affected. Conclusion: high proportion of multibacillary cases and disabilities reflects the need for active thrust to identify new cases.

  14. Development of Hodgkin's disease in a patient with leprosy.

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    Weshler, Z; Leviatan, A; Gordon, R; Kopolovic, J

    1978-01-01

    We present a patient with leprosy who developed Hodgkin's disease of the nodular sclerosing type. There are two previous reports describing the combination of leprosy and Hodgkin's disease in a single patient [3, 9]. Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed 14 months after the complete disappearance of mycobacterium leprae from the skin lesions, under treatment with DDS (diamino-diphenyl-sulfone). Hodgkin's disease was treated by irradiation and chemotherapy. Obstructive jaundice developed which resolved under treatment by irradiation of the hilar area of the liver, chemotherapy and hormones. During two years of immuno-suppressive therapy, without DDS, no exacerbation of the leprosy occurred.

  15. Methemoglobinemia and dapsone levels in patients with leprosy

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    Jose Luiz Fernandes Vieira

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the methemoglobinemia and correlate with dapsone levels in multibacillary leprosy patients under leprosy multi-drug therapy. Thirty patients with laboratory and clinical diagnosis of multibacillary leprosy were enrolled. Dapsone was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and methemoglobinemia by spectrophotometry. The mean dapsone concentrations in male was 1.42 g/mL and in female was 2.42 g/mL. The mean methemoglobin levels in male was 3.09 µg/mL; 191%, and in female was 2.84 ± 1.67%. No correlations were seen between dapsone levels and methemoglobin in male and female patients. Our results demonstrated that the dosage of dapsone in leprosy treatment does not promote a significant methemoglobinemia.

  16. Leprosy among patient contacts: a multilevel study of risk factors.

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    Anna M Sales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing leprosy among the contacts of newly-diagnosed leprosy patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 6,158 contacts and 1,201 leprosy patients of the cohort who were diagnosed and treated at the Leprosy Laboratory of Fiocruz from 1987 to 2007 were included. The contact variables analyzed were sex; age; educational and income levels; blood relationship, if any, to the index case; household or non-household relationship; length of time of close association with the index case; receipt of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BGG vaccine and presence of BCG scar. Index cases variables included sex, age, educational level, family size, bacillary load, and disability grade. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercept was applied. Among the co-prevalent cases, the leprosy-related variables that remained associated with leprosy included type of household contact, [odds ratio (OR = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02, 1.73] and consanguinity with the index case, (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.42-2.51. With respect to the index case variables, the factors associated with leprosy among contacts included up to 4 years of schooling and 4 to 10 years of schooling (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.54-4.79 and 2.40, 95% CI: 1.30-4.42, respectively and bacillary load, which increased the chance of leprosy among multibacillary contacts for those with a bacillary index of one to three and greater than three (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.19-2.17 and OR: 4.07-95% CI: 2.73, 6.09, respectively. Among incident cases, household exposure was associated with leprosy (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.29-2.98, compared with non-household exposure. Among the index case risk factors, an elevated bacillary load was the only variable associated with leprosy in the contacts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Biological and social factors appear to be associated with leprosy among co-prevalent cases, whereas the factors related to the

  17. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

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    Daiane Santos dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70, socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71. Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed.

  18. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

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    dos Santos, Daiane Santos; Duppre, Nadia Cristina; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Hacker, Mariana Andréa

    2013-01-01

    A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70), socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71). Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed. PMID:23690793

  19. Leprosy control in Sri Lanka.

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    Dewapura, D R

    1994-01-01

    Even though health workers have treated all registered cases of leprosy in Sri Lanka with multiple drug therapy since 1982, it continues to be transmitted. The government has launched a social marketing and social mobilization campaign to reduce the incidence of leprosy. It has expanded the network of leprosy services. A national advertising program included mass media ads, posters, stickers on buses, and radio and television serials to create awareness of the early signs of leprosy and to reduce fear to leprosy. Health workers distributed leaflets and booklets to the general public and to new patients. The Anti-Leprosy Campaign of Sri Lanka organized 1-week health education programs for administrative officer, village leaders, religious leaders, teachers, and voluntary workers. Skin camps were set up to detect leprosy cases and to treat minor skin disorders. Teachers received flip charts on leprosy to help them teach colleagues and children about leprosy. All primary level staff, medical officers in hospital staff, and estate medical and paramedical staff have undergone special training on diagnosing leprosy and on reducing their fear of it. Almost every district has at least 1 leprosy control specialist. 2 leprosy control specialists work in those districts where leprosy is endemic Each district has a trained medical laboratory technician, who stains and interprets leprosy smears. In 1992, school, contact, and mass surveys have found 31, 149, and 225 new cases, respectively. Active case findings methods found 16.5% of new cases. 50% of new cases are self- reported, compared to less than 10% in 1989, suggesting increased awareness of early signs of leprosy and a reduced fear of it. 25 more clinics opened in 1991 to meet the demand for leprosy services.

  20. Psychiatric morbidity and pattern of dysfunctions in patients with leprosy

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    Bhatia M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy, being a chronic infectious disease with profound social stigma, remains associated with high psychological mortidity. PURPOSES: To find out the pattern of psychiatric morbidity in leprosy patients and the relationship of various factors with the morbidity. METHODS: Ninty patients attending leprosy clinic were randomly chosen for the study group alongwith 40 patients suffering from acute skin problem other than leprosy as control group. The socio-demographic data were recorded in semi-structural proforma; all patients were given Goldbery Health Questioneaire (GHQ. Patients having GHQ score> 2 was assessed by Disability Assessent Questionaire (DAQ. The psychiatric diagnoses was made according to ICD-10 by W ho0 and physical deformity by W ho 0 Disability Scale. FINDINGS: The mean GHQ score of the study grant was 3.44 and that of control group was 1.62. The mean DAQ score was 45.13. Psychiatric disorder was seen in 44.4% and 7.5% of study group and control group respectively. The psychiatric illness was generalised anoxidy disorder (GAD (27.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosis highly associated with psychiatric mobidity. LIMITATIONS: The findings can not be generalised due to small sample size and clinic-based data.

  1. Tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis as immune restoration disease in a patient with AIDS.

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    Kumar, Shishir; Ghosh, Manab Kumar; Sarkar, Somenath; Mallik, Sudeshna; Biswas, Pradyot Narayan; Saha, Bibhuti

    2012-02-01

    Here we report a unique case of tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis in a 27-year-old female patient with AIDS, suggestive of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced immune restoration disease. After initiation of HAART, the patient presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthetic patch with local nerve thickening, and an increase in her CD4+ T cell count. On further investigations cytomegalovirus retinitis and tuberculoid leprosy were confirmed. To our knowledge no case with such a co-existence has previously been reported. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Patterns of health-seeking behaviour amongst leprosy patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case-control study sought to determine factors influencing the early reporting of leprosy patients to modern treatment units. The Cases were 31 patients presenting with WHO disability grade 2 while controls were 48 patients presenting with grade 0. More than three- quarters (77%) of the cases waited for longer than 1 ...

  3. A comparative study of the quality of life, knowledge, attitude and belief about leprosy disease among leprosy patients and community members in Shantivan Leprosy Rehabilitation centre, Nere, Maharashtra, India

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    Madhavi J Mankar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy a chronic infectious affliction, is a communicable disease that posses a risk of permanent and progressive disability. The associated visible deformities and disabilities have contributed to the stigma and discrimination experienced by leprosy patients, even among those who have been cured. Aims and Objectives: 1 To assess the knowledge, attitude and belief about leprosy in leprosy patients compared with community members. 2 To find the perceived stigma among leprosy patients. 3. To evaluate the quality of life in leprosy patients as compared to community members using WHO Quality of Life assessment questionaire (WHOQOL- BREF. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre, Shantivan, Nere in Panvel Taluka, district Raigad from October - December 2009. A pre-designed and pre-structured questionaire was used to evaluate knowledge, attitude and perceived stigma among leprosy patients and community members. WHO Quality of life questionaire (WHOQOL-BREF was used to assess quality of life in leprosy patients and controls. Data analysis was done with the help of SPSS package. Result: Among the cases and control, 43.13% of cases were aware that leprosy is an infectious disease compared to 20.69% of control. 68.62% of cases had knowledge of hypopigmented patches being a symptom of leprosy compared to the 25.86% in control. There was overall high level of awareness about disease, symptoms, transmission and curability in leprosy patients as compared to control. Among control group, 43.10% of population said that they would not like food to be served by leprosy patients as compared to 13.73% in study group. It was seen that the discrimination was much higher in female leprosy patients as compared to male leprosy patients. The mean quality of life scores for cases was significantly lower than those for control group in physical and psychological domain but not in the social relationship and

  4. Haematological alteration in Leprosy patients treated with dapsone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the haemoglobin concentration (Hb); total white blood cell count (WBC), differential WBC count; platelet count and reticulocyte count in leprosy patients already treated with dapsone. Design: A case-control study. Setting: Specialist Hospital Ossiomo, which is a Leprosarium and Haematology ...

  5. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome among leprosy patients in China.

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    Tian, Weiwei; Shen, Jianping; Zhou, Min; Yan, Liangbin; Zhang, Guocheng

    2012-12-01

    To Study the incidence and clinical characteristics of dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) among MDT-treated leprosy patients from 2006 to 2009 in China. A retrospective survey was carried out throughout China using a specially designed questionnaire. From 2006 to 2009, there were 63 new patients reported to have DHS with an incidence of 1.0%. Among these patients, 13 were complete types of DHS, the others were incomplete ones. The average age of patients with DHS was 38 years and the male to female ratio was 2.15. The average incubation period from taking dapsone to DHS onset was 32.8 days (2-6 weeks). There were 60 (95.2%) patients who presented with various skin lesions, 56 (88.9%) with fever, 40 (63.5%) with hepatic damage and 22 (34.9%) with lymphopathy. Seven patients died with a death rate of 11.1% among all patients with DHS. DHS is a serious adverse event resulted from dapsone. It can occur in a small number of new leprosy patients treated with dapsone containing regimen. Some patients may die of DHS if not taking timely and adequate management. Therefore local doctors should pay an attention to DHS among leprosy patients newly treated with the dapsone-containing MDT regimen.

  6. Antioxidant factors, nitric oxide levels, and cellular damage in leprosy patients

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    Taysa Ribeiro Schalcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The immune response caused by Mycobacterium leprae is a risk factor for the development of oxidative stress (OS in leprosy patients. This study aimed to assess OS in leprosy patients before the use of a multidrug therapy. Methods We evaluated the nitric oxide (NO concentration; antioxidant capacity; levels of malondialdehyde, methemoglobin and reduced glutathione; and the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD in leprosy patients. Results We observed lower SOD activity in these leprosy patients; however, the NO levels and antioxidant capacity were increased. Conclusions The infectious process in response to M. leprae could primarily be responsible for the OS observed in these patients.

  7. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN LEPROSY PATIENTS BY HOMEOPATHIC MEDICINE

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    D. Chakraborty

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis, a major complication of neuropathic feet in leprosy may occur as a result of infiltration of Mycobacterium leprae in the periosteum of bones or due to secondary bacterial infection of chronic plantar ulcer. There is no effective treatment for healing of planter ulcer and osteomyelitis. Keeping in mind of the limitation of conservative treatment, twenty patients who completed with multi drug therapy but suffering from neuropathic foot with ulcer was treated with Mercurius solubilis, a homoeopathic medicine in 200 potency for one year. All these patients had different degrees of osteomyelitic changes and after treatment showed regeneration and remodeling of bones which may be considered as significant improvement. Based on the radiological finding it may be concluded that Mercurius solubilis found to be effective in the treatment of osteomyelitis in leprosy affected patients.

  8. Modeling both of the number of pausibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients by using bivariate poisson regression

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    Winahju, W. S.; Mukarromah, A.; Putri, S.

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by bacteria of leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae). Leprosy has become an important thing in Indonesia because its morbidity is quite high. Based on WHO data in 2014, in 2012 Indonesia has the highest number of new leprosy patients after India and Brazil with a contribution of 18.994 people (8.7% of the world). This number makes Indonesia automatically placed as the country with the highest number of leprosy morbidity of ASEAN countries. The province that most contributes to the number of leprosy patients in Indonesia is East Java. There are two kind of leprosy. They consist of pausibacillary and multibacillary. The morbidity of multibacillary leprosy is higher than pausibacillary leprosy. This paper will discuss modeling both of the number of multibacillary and pausibacillary leprosy patients as responses variables. These responses are count variables, so modeling will be conducted by using bivariate poisson regression method. Unit experiment used is in East Java, and predictors involved are: environment, demography, and poverty. The model uses data in 2012, and the result indicates that all predictors influence significantly.

  9. Orofacial lesions in treated southeast Brazilian leprosy patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M D; Russo, M P; Lemos, J B D; Fernandes, K P S; Bussadori, S K; Corrêa, C T; Martins, M A T

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to clinically evaluate the oral mucosa lesions of leprosy patients during and after multi-drug therapy. Clinical examination, medical and dental history examination was performed in 100 leprosy patients. The results revealed that 71 patients, 50 men and 21 women, exibited oral lesions. The most frequent lesions were: fissured tongue (18 cases), inflammatory papillary hyperplasia (16 cases), chronic atrophic candidiasis (10 cases), fibroma (10 cases), erythematous candidiasis (eight cases), and traumatic ulceration (seven cases). We conclude that leprosy-related lesions are not present in patients undergoing treatment for leprosy, probably due to response to multidrug therapy.

  10. Scabies Among Elderly Korean Patients with Histories of Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungcheol; Lee, Chaeyoung; Park, Seungkyu; Kwon, Hyeon; Kweon, Sun-Seog

    2016-07-06

    A scabies epidemic, traced by the hospital-based surveillance system, was reported in a Korean leprosarium. A total of 200 symptomatic cases were found during 2012-2014 among 570 elderly former leprosy patients. Most of cases were classic type scabies (87%) and aged 75 years and older (72%). Surveillance system for early diagnosis and prompt intervention was applied and the scabies epidemic was controlled effectively in this long-term care facility. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. [Dapsone-induced photodermatitis in a patient with leprosy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumey, S M

    1988-01-18

    We report on a 60-year-old man suffering from borderline leprosy. He was treated many times with DDS and Clofazimin and underwent the so-called multiple drug treatment (MDT). Under this therapy, the patient developed allergic photodermatitis. Unfortunately his file was lost and, as nobody was informed about his allergic reaction, he was again treated with the preparations mentioned above. Consequently, he responded once more with photodermatitis.

  12. Genetic diversity of mycobacterium leprae isolates from Brazilian leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Ura, Somei; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Martínez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2009-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an obligate intracellular parasite. A problem in studying the transmission of leprosy is the small amount of variation in bacterial genomic DNA. The discovery of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) allowed the detection of strain variation in areas with a high prevalence of leprosy. Four genotypes of M. leprae based on three single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) were also discovered to be useful for analysis of the global spread of leprosy. In this present study, we examined the allelic diversity of M. leprae at 16 select VNTR and three SNP loci using 89 clinical isolates obtained from patients mainly from the neighbouring states of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro Brazil. By use of a PCR-RFLP-based procedure that allows the recognition of SNP types 3 and 4 without the need for the more expensive DNA sequencing steps, characterisation of the main M. leprae genotypes was easy. When applied on the study population, it was found that the SNP type 3 is most frequent in these two states of Brazil, and that VNTRs provided further discrimination of the isolates. Two Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) were monomorphic, with the remaining 14 STRs represented by two to 18 alleles. Epidemiological associations with township or state were not evident in this random collection and require further investigations. In phylogenetic trees, branches formed by all 16 STRs clearly separated SNP type 3 organisms from the other types while the allelic patterns of two minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5 were highly correlated with SNP type 3. This strain typing study provide the basis for comparison of M. leprae strain types within Brazil and with those from other countries, and informed selection of genomic markers and methods for future studies.

  13. [Social reproduction of leprosy: a study of patients profile with leprosy in the city of São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helene, Lúcia Maria Frazão; Salum, Maria Josefina Leuba

    2002-01-01

    This study discusses the relationship between work and living conditions among leprosy patients enrolled in the São Paulo municipal public health system in 1996. Social patterns were studied based on the theory of social determination of the health-disease process. The main purpose of the study was to emphasize evidence of the disease determination network, seeking new knowledge to improve public policies on leprosy. Data were gathered from a sample of leprosy patients registered in the city's public health system. Although patients' families are characterized by a common social thread, different work/life possibilities allow for a classification of patients into three social groups. The majority belong to groups that are marginalized from social production, living in areas where social exclusion is more extreme, on the outskirts of the city. If the trends in this study persist, incident leprosy cases will result from the social exclusion of migrants from Brazil's Southeast and Northeast. The study also discusses the position of young people and female patients in the determination network of this infectious disease in the city of São Paulo.

  14. Evaluation of the economic burden of leprosy among migrant and resident patients in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mingzhou; Li, Ming; Zheng, Daocheng; Wang, Xiaohua; Su, Ting; Chen, Yongfeng; Yang, Bin

    2017-12-11

    A lot of time and money was needed during the diagnosis and treatment process of leprosy, the delayed leprosy would also impair the labor capability of patients as well, and these put a heavy burden for the leprosy patients. The migrant leprosy patient is a special group and need more concern. Our goal was to assess the economic burden of leprosy on migrant and resident patient populations in Guangdong province, China. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey from February to July of 2016. A self-designed questionnaire was administered to leprosy patients who: (1) had registered in Leprosy Management Information System in China (LEPMIS) by the end of February 2016, (2) had received multiple drug treatment (MDT) drugs at a local leprosy control institution for three consecutive months or had had at least one physical check in the past half year, and (3) were willing to take part in the investigation and give informed written consent. Demographic characteristics, Financial and disease information, and costs before and after leprosy diagnosis were collected and compared using t-test and χ2 test. A total of 254 participants completed the questionnaires, including 168 males and 86 females. Migrants and residents accounted for 33.9% and 66.1% of patients, respectively. Among migrant patients, the median cost before diagnosis was $131.6 (39.2-450.9), the median yearly cost of leprosy treatment after diagnosis was $300.6 (158.4-868.5), and the median yearly cost of leprosy complications was $69.5 (11-178.4). In comparison, among residents the median yearly costs were $152.4 (30.7-770.9) pre-diagnosis, $309.7 (103.2-1016.7) after diagnosis, and $91.9 (32.6-303.1) for leprosy complications. Base on this, we determined that the median yearly total expense after diagnosis amounted to 15% of migrant and 38% of resident patients' annual income. Leprosy places a heavy economic burden on both migrant and resident leprosy patients and governmental policies and

  15. Correlation between ELISA and ML Flow assays applied to 60 Brazilian patients affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Rozana C.; Lyon, Sandra; Lyon, Ana C.; Grossi, Maria A. F.; Lyon, Silvia H.; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Antunes, Carlos M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Serological tests can be helpful in classifying leprosy patients as having either the paucibacillary or the multibacillary form. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between two serological assays, i.e. ML Flow and ELISA, in a population of leprosy patients in Brazil. The

  16. Degree of skin denervation and its correlation to objective thermal sensory test in leprosy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Alves Rodrigues Júnior

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is an infectious disease affecting skin and peripheral nerves resulting in increased morbidity and physical deformities. Early diagnosis provides opportune treatment and reduces its complications, relying fundamentally on the demonstration of impaired sensation in suggestive cutaneous lesions. The loss of tactile sensitivity in the lesions is preceded by the loss of thermal sensitivity, stressing the importance of the thermal test in the suspicious lesions approach. The gold-standard method for the assessment of thermal sensitivity is the quantitative sensory test (QST. Morphological study may be an alternative approach to access the thin nerve fibers responsible for thermal sensitivity transduction. The few studies reported in leprosy patients pointed out a rarefaction of thin dermo-epidermal fibers in lesions, but used semi-quantitative evaluation methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work aimed to study the correlation between the degree of thermal sensitivity impairment measured by QST and the degree of denervation in leprosy skin lesions, evaluated by immunohistochemistry anti-PGP 9.5 and morphometry. Twenty-two patients were included. There were significant differences in skin thermal thresholds among lesions and contralateral skin (cold, warm, cold induced pain and heat induced pain. The mean reduction in the density of intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers in lesions was 79.5% (SD = 19.6 and 80.8% (SD = 24.9, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed a good correlation between intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers deficit, but no correlation between these variables and those accounting for the degree of impairment in thermal thresholds, since the thin fibers rarefaction was homogeneously intense in all patients, regardless of the degree of sensory deficit. We believe that the homogeneously intense denervation in leprosy lesions should be objective of further investigations focused on its

  17. Investigation of neuropathic pain in treated leprosy patients in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haroun, O. M; Hietaharju, A.; Bizuneh, E.; Brandsma, J.W.; Tesfaye, F.; Haanpää, M.; Rice, A.S.; Lockwood, D.N.

    2012-01-01

    Pain can be a significant problem for treated leprosy patients. It can be nociceptive due to tissue inflammation occurring during episodes of immune mediated reactions, or neuropathic due to leprosy affecting the somatosensory system. There are sparse epidemiological data on the prevalence and

  18. Hemolytic anemia in patients receiving daily dapsone for the treatment of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deps, Patricia; Guerra, Patrícia; Nasser, Sofia; Simon, Marisa

    2012-09-01

    Multidrug therapy for leprosy is currently done with dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. Dapsone is known to cause hemolytic anemia (HA) and this adverse event during MDT seems to be more frequent than reported. The aim of this report is to discuss and grade HA due to dapsone during MDT treatment for leprosy. This is a retrospective study of 194 leprosy patients from a Leprosy Control Programme Unit in Vit6ria-ES, Brazil. HA was observed in 48 (24.7%) patients and occurred within the first 3 months in 51% of these. Mean hematocrit levels fell from 38.5 to 31.5 and hemoglobin from 12.8 to 10.3. Dapsone used in the MDT regime for leprosy decreases the hematocrit and hemoglobin levels due to a low grade hemolysis, which can result in significant anemia.

  19. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Wilian Batista E Sá

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS.In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1 the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS, as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB, first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM. All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05.Dynamometry performance of the patients' most affected hand (MAH, was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031, confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy.Decreased sensory-motor function induced by

  20. Study of thyroid function, using iodine 131, in leprosy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatit, E.D.; Carvalho, N.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made in a group of 117 leprosy patients in differents clinical conditions, under treatment, in drug rest or virgins of treatment. They were divided in sub-groups for the following tests: the radioiodine uptake of 2-24 hours; neck-thigh ratio; thyrobinding index; protein-bound radioiodine (PB 131 I) levels of plasma. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) Leprosy patients present a low uptake in conjunction with a decrease in the velocity of thyroid clearance in the majority of the cases. Even the remaining presented values within the low limit of normality; 2) In view of these results, the tests were repeated after thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with exogenous TSH, in the sub-group of patients virgin of treatment. With the positive response observed (increase in the uptake, in the neck-thigh ratio and the PB 131 I) the low uptake was considered secondary with regard to a deficit of the endogenous TSH; 3) The TBI and PB 131 I tests were not in sufficient agreement for an appraisal of the phase of organic binding and release of hormone [pt

  1. IFN-γ +875 microsatellite polymorphism as a potential protection marker for leprosy patients from Amazonas state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G A V; Santos, M P; Mota-Passos, I; Boechat, A L; Malheiro, A; Naveca, F G; de Paula, L

    2012-11-01

    Polymorphisms present in the first intron of IFN-γ may have an important role in the regulation of the immune response, which could have functional consequences for gene transcription. Leprosy patients are characterized by different immune responses in different clinical forms. We investigated a possible association of the +874 polymorphism and CA repeats present in the first intron of IFN-γ with susceptibility to leprosy and with the manifestation of the different clinical forms. Nucleotide sequencing was performed with samples from 108 leprosy patients and 113 controls subjects, as well as immunophenotyping of CD(4)(+), CD(8)(+) and CD(69)(+) T cells by flow cytometry. The data showed that there were no significant differences between patients and control subjects, as well as according classification of Ridley-Jopling. However, the A/A genotype was significantly increased in paucibacillary patients (p=0.028) and the microsatellite encoding 16 CA repeats were significantly associated with paucibacillary compared to multibacillary patients (p=0.019). Individuals homozygous for the +874 A allele, the mean level of CD(4)(+) and CD(69)(+) T cells was higher. Our data suggest that polymorphisms present in the first intron of IFN-γ are not associated with susceptibility to leprosy, nevertheless, the +874 polymorphism and the CA repeats number encoded in IFN-γ gene may be related to a higher cellular immune response in patients and are consistently more frequently detected in PB patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of social skills training for reduction of self-perceived stigma in leprosy patients in rural India--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Valsa; Longmore, Miriam; Ebenezer, Mannam; Richard, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of social skills training in leprosy patients to raise self-esteem and reduce self-perceived stigma. Five leprosy patients were given 10 day-long group-sessions of social skills training over 3 weeks. Training involved: identification of the emotions and concerns of patients when interacting socially; analysis of positive and negative social interactions and non-verbal and verbal skills training. Role-plays, videos and live models were used. Self-esteem and a reduction in self-perceived stigma were assessed qualitatively before and after training using semi-structured interviews. Assessment of change was scored under the indicators: self-perception, family, wider community and job. Patients were assessed for displaying new ways of interacting with people and changes in expectations for the future. Qualitative analysis of the interviews before and after training suggested that social skills training could raise the self-esteem of leprosy patients and combat self-perceived stigma. Increase in self-esteem, as evident through the verbal interactions with the interviewers and behavioural changes in the community, were noted in the majority of patients. Social skills training along with counseling may be able to increase the self-esteem of leprosy patients, and so be a useful part of leprosy rehabilitation schemes to try and combat the stigma of leprosy.

  3. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of pDynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased sensory

  4. Nodular melanoma in trophic ulceration of a leprosy patient: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J; Shi, C; Jing, Z; Liu, Y

    2016-05-01

    Non-healing chronic trophic ulceration is very common in leprosy patients. Marjolin's ulcer consists of the malignant transformation of a chronic ulcerative lesion. Nodular melanoma developing from Marjolin's ulcer, caused by a trophic ulceration of a leprosy patient, is very rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Due to the disguised presentation of these malignancies within trophic ulceration lesions in leprosy, neoplastic transformation is frequently overlooked, leading to misdiagnosed and delayed treatment. This paper reports a case of an 83-year-old man with lepromatous leprosy and chronic ulceration on the foot for 22 years. Over a period of 2 months, the ulcer enlarged, turned black, and became more painful. The patient underwent regional excision and immunotherapy after the diagnosis of malignant nodular melanoma. After 9 months follow-up, no metastasis was found. There were no external sources of funding for this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

  5. Serial measurement of the circulating levels of tumour necrosis factor and its soluble receptors 1 and 2 for monitoring leprosy patients during multidrug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host response to the aetiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae . The induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, primarily through the action of cytokines. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 in leprosy patients at different stages of multidrug treatment (MDT in comparison with non-infected individuals and to determine their role as putative biomarkers of the severity of leprosy or the treatment response. ELISA was used to measure the levels of these molecules in 30 healthy controls and 37 leprosy patients at the time of diagnosis and during and after MDT. Our results showed increases in the serum levels of TNF-α and sTNF-R2 in infected individuals in comparison with controls. The levels of TNF-α, but not sTNF-R2, decreased with treatment. The current results corroborate previous reports of elevated serum levels of TNF-α in leprosy and suggest a role for sTNF-R2 in the control of this cytokine during MDT.

  6. Problems, acceptance and social inequality: a study of the deformed leprosy patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparty, S N

    1995-09-01

    Though the impact of social inequality on health conditions is widely known, its impact on the chronic and stigmatized disease, leprosy, has received little attention. Deformity sometimes leads to disabilities and to handicaps causing problems to the patient and his family. In this paper an attempt has been made to understand the impact of social inequality, prevalent in the form of the caste system in India on the deformed leprosy patients and on their families. This impact was examined in terms of the problems faced by the patients. A sample of 150 deformed patients and their families, drawn from two districts in Tamil Nadu, was selected for the study. About 57% of the deformed patients experienced their deformity as a handicap which caused social and economic problems while the rest did not. Of the three caste groups, the Lower Caste group experienced more severe economic problems while the Upper Caste group faced more social problems. The extent of acceptance of deformed patients in their family varied significantly among those facing and not facing problems due to their deformity. The deformed patients without any handicap were accepted in a large majority of their families (82%) regardless of their caste status. In contrast the deformed but handicapped patients were accepted differentially among the three caste groups with the Upper group accepting them in most of their families (80%) while in the Lower group much less number of families (54%) did. All the families of the deformed but not handicapped patients desired to keep their patients till their death irrespective of their caste status. On the contrary, while all the families in the Upper Caste group expressed their willingness to keep their handicapped patients in the family till their death, 10% in the Middle and 22% in the Lower Caste groups did not want to do so. This suggests the gradual marginalization, rejection and dehabilitation of the affected. Thus, one's caste status can be a broad indicator

  7. Dental caries and risk indicators for patients with leprosy in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yue; Tian, Li-Li; Zhang, Feng-Yi; Bu, Yan-Hong; Feng, Yun-Zhi; Zhou, Hou-De

    2017-02-01

    In leprosy, oral health is often neglected and poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and risk indicators of dental caries in patients with leprosy in China. This cross-sectional, multicentre study included 613 patients with leprosy and 602 control subjects. Based on the established standards of the World Health Organization, we investigated dental caries in cluster samplings from six so-called 'leprosy villages' in three Chinese provinces. Clinical oral examinations were performed and data were reported as decayed (D), missing (M) and filled (F) teeth (DMFT scores). The average DMFT scores were 10.39 in patients with leprosy (D = 4.43; M = 5.94; and F = 0.02) and 4.39 in control individuals (D = 2.29; M = 2.02; F = 0.08). The DMFT scores were statistically significantly different in patients with different ages, educational backgrounds and daily brushing frequency (P caries. Effective therapy and oral health education should be enhanced for this group of patients. © 2016 The Authors. International Dental Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Dental Federation.

  8. Survey on child leprosy patients and problems resulted from the disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liangbin; Shen, Jianping; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Guocheng

    2015-03-01

    To understand the situation of child leprosy patients in the low prevalence situation pertaining in China. A retrospective survey by questionnaire was carried out in all 32 provinces of mainland of China in 2011. All data concerning child cases detected from January 2005 to December 2009 were collected by professional health workers working at county level. During the study, only 165 questionnaires were collected for analysis. Among 165 child cases, 96 were boys, 69 were girls with an average age of 11-7 years old. 80% of child cases were members of families with other leprosy affected people. 145 (85%) child cases took their MDT secretly (nobody outside the family knew the child suffered from leprosy), and three (1.8%) children died, one each from dapsone syndrome, suicide and severe pneumonia. During follow-up, four child cases developed new disability increasing the Grade 2 disability rate to 13.3% (22/165). At end of the study, 8.2% of children had discontinued their study at school, and 7.5% had moved to a remote place to do casual work, while 6.3% stayed at home. 31% of child patients thought that leprosy caused a negative impact on their daily life. Two children had a hostile attitude toward society due to the stigma caused by leprosy. In both high and low endemic areas, as long as there is an infectious source of leprosy in the family, there is a possibility for children to develop leprosy. Contact surveys should be done to detect early disease, especially when there are children in the household.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a chemoprophylactic intervention with single dose rifampicin in contacts of new leprosy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemijn J Idema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With 249,007 new leprosy patients detected globally in 2008, it remains necessary to develop new and effective interventions to interrupt the transmission of M. leprae. We assessed the economic benefits of single dose rifampicin (SDR for contacts as chemoprophylactic intervention in the control of leprosy. METHODS: We conducted a single centre, double blind, cluster randomised, placebo controlled trial in northwest Bangladesh between 2002 and 2007, including 21,711 close contacts of 1,037 patients with newly diagnosed leprosy. We gave a single dose of rifampicin or placebo to close contacts, with follow-up for four years. The main outcome measure was the development of clinical leprosy. We assessed the cost effectiveness by calculating the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER between the standard multidrug therapy (MDT program with the additional chemoprophylaxis intervention versus the standard MDT program only. The ICER was expressed in US dollars per prevented leprosy case. FINDINGS: Chemoprophylaxis with SDR for preventing leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients is cost-effective at all contact levels and thereby a cost-effective prevention strategy. In total, $6,009 incremental cost was invested and 38 incremental leprosy cases were prevented, resulting in an ICER of $158 per one additional prevented leprosy case. It was the most cost-effective in neighbours of neighbours and social contacts (ICER $214, slightly less cost-effective in next door neighbours (ICER $497 and least cost-effective among household contacts (ICER $856. CONCLUSION: Chemoprophylaxis with single dose rifampicin given to contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients is a cost-effective intervention strategy. Implementation studies are necessary to establish whether this intervention is acceptable and feasible in other leprosy endemic areas of the world.

  10. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands - stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.; van Brakel, W.H.; de Vries, H.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  11. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands--stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Roos; van Brakel, Wim H.; de Vries, Henry J. C.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  12. Social implications of leprosy in the Netherlands--stigma among ex-leprosy patients in a non-endemic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, R. de; Brakel, W.H. Van; Vries, H.J. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, leprosy is a rare and non-endemic disease, still occurring as an 'import disease'. Moreover a considerable group of people affected by leprosy, originating mainly from the former Dutch colonies, suffer from neuropathic complications. This study investigates the social

  13. Association of TNF -1031 C/C as a potential protection marker for leprosy development in Amazonas state patients, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G A V; Ramasawmy, R; Boechat, A L; Morais, A C; Carvalho, B K S; Sousa, K B A; Souza, V C; Cunha, M G S; Barletta-Naveca, R H; Santos, M P; Naveca, F G

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphisms present in the TNF promoter region has shown to influence the gene transcription. Leprosy displays different clinical manifestations according to the immune responses of the individual infected with Mycobacterium leprae. In this study, we evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) -238 G/A (rs361525), -308 G/A (rs1800629), -857 C/T (rs1799724), -863 A/C (rs1800630) and -1031 T/C (rs1799964) in the promoter region of the TNF to see whether these SNPs influence host-susceptibility to leprosy and the different clinical manifestation. Nucleotide sequencing was performed with DNA samples from 108 leprosy patients and 253 control subjects. An association between -1031 C/C genotype and protection from leprosy was observed when leprosy patients were compared to controls (OR 0.11; 95% CI=0.01-0.82; p=0.012). The -857 C/T genotype may be associated with susceptibility to leprosy (OR=1.81; 95% CI=1.09-3.00; p=0.028). Similar genotype and allele frequencies for the SNPs -308 G/A and -238 G/A were observed between leprosy patients and control subjects. Altogether, TNF polymorphisms in the promoter region may be predictive of leprosy outcome. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of oral and periodontal status of leprosy patients in Dindigul district

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    S A Jacob Raja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: After the introduction of the multidrug therapy, the incidence of leprosy is decreasing every year. However, periodontal complaints are commonly seen in these patients due to compromised immunity and impaired oral hygiene. The aim of the present study is to assess the oral and periodontal status of the leprosy patients in Dindigul district. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 62 patients treated in a leprosy center at Dindigul district. Among these, 22 (35.5% were female patients and 40 were male patients (64.5%. Age ranges between 40 and 70 with the mean age being 52. Facial changes, periodontal status, dental caries, attrition, tooth loss, plaque index (Silness and Loe, and calculus component of oral hygiene index-simplified were assessed. Results: Majority of the patients presented with loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, saddle nose, ocular involvement, and leonine facies. Gingival recession (54.8% was a predominant finding followed by tooth loss (69.5%, mobility (60.86%, attrition (56%, chronic pulpitis (34.7%, and dental caries (26%. Most of the patients had severe periodontitis. Conclusions: Compromised immunity and altered autonomy pave way for many dental complaints such as periodontitis and deposits in tooth with poor oral hygiene. Awareness about the oral health problems and reinforcement of oral hygiene should be insisted to the leprosy patients to prevent further morbidity.

  15. Lack of Association of the Polymorphisms IL-17A (−197G/A) and IL-17F (+7488A/G) with Multibacillary Leprosy in Mexican Patients

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    Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; Estrada-García, Iris; Granados, Julio; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Pérez-Suárez, Thalía Gabriela; Salazar, Ma. Isabel; Pérez-Lucas, Riky Luis; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Torres-Carrillo, Nora Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by the intracellular acid-fast bacilli Mycobacterium leprae; it has been determined that genetic factors of the host play an important role in the disease susceptibility. Thus, in this case-control study, we evaluated the possible association between the IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs and susceptibility to leprosy disease in Mexican population. Methods. Seventy-five leprosy patients and sixty-nine control subjects were included. Both SNPs were genotyped with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results. We found nonsignificant differences in genotype and allele frequencies related to IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs in MB as well as subclinical forms of leprosy disease versus healthy individuals. Conclusions. Since the sample size is not large enough, it is difficult to sustain an association of susceptibility to leprosy with genotypes or allele frequencies of IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780), suggesting that IL-17 polymorphisms have no significant role in the genetic susceptibility to development of this disease in the Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:25431761

  16. The diagnosis of leprosy among patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy without cutaneous lesions: a follow-up study

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    SKACEL MICHAEL

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-four patients with neuritic leprosy were individually followed for periods ranging from 4 months to almost 4 years for the purpose of ascertaining the presence and/ or absence of leprosy. The neural symptoms presented were sensory impairment (41, parasthesia (28, nerve enlargement (22, nerve tenderness (20, paresia (20, amyotrophy (8. Leprosy was diagnosed in ten out of the total number of patients studied. Leprosy was confirmed by the appearance of reactional neuritis (4, reversal reaction (2, biopsy of the hypoesthesic area (3 and the appearance of non-reactional cutaneous lesion. We reported an experience in the diagnosis of neuritic leprosy and its most frequent clinical presentation with which clinicians have to be acquainted. We can also state that the clinical follow-up was an effective strategy for the diagnosis of the disease when diagnostic facilities are not available or have not confirmed the diagnosis.

  17. SOCIAL PARTICIPATION OF DIABETES AND EX-LEPROSY PATIENTS IN THE NETHERLANDS AND PATIENT PREFERENCE FOR COMBINED SELF-CARE GROUPS

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    Henry John Christiaan De Vries

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earlier we showed that neuropathic complications limit social participation of ex-leprosy patients, even in a non-endemic leprosy setting like the Netherlands. Self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients can strengthen self-worth of participants, prevent further handicap, and enable the exchange of coping strategies. For non-endemic leprosy settings with a very low rate of leprosy patients a self-care group exclusively for (exleprosy patients is not likely to be feasible. A combined group with patients facing comparable morbidity would be more efficient than disease specific self-care groups. Here, we studied the comparability in social constraints of diabetic patients and ex-leprosy patients. Moreover, we investigated if combined self-care groups for ex-leprosy patients and diabetic patients would be desirable and acceptable for possible participants.Methods: Social participation was studied based on in-depth interviews and Participation Scale information collected from 41 diabetic patients and compared with the data of 31 ex-leprosy patients from a prior study. Moreover, we made an inventory of potential strengths and limitations and attitudes towards combined self-care groups for diabetic patients with neuropathy.Results: The following themes emerged among diabetic patients: disease confrontation, dependency, conflict with partner or relatives, feelings of inferiority, stigma, abandoning social activities, fear of the future, lack of information and hiding the disease. These themes were very similar to those voiced by the previously interviewed ex-leprosy patients. The latter more often mentioned stigma and disease ignorance among Dutch health care workers. Whereas ex-leprosy patients perceived stigma on multiple fronts, diabetic patients only mentioned feeling inferior. Diabetic patients experienced some form of participation restriction in 39% of the cases as opposed to 71% of the ex-leprosy patients. Diabetic patients did

  18. Bone island and leprosy

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    Carpintero, P.; Garcia-Frasquet, A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cordoba University, Medical School, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Tarradas, E. [Department of Imaging, Cordoba University, Medical School, Cordoba (Spain); Logrono, C. [Department of Dermatology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain); Carrascal, A. [Department of Radiology, Infanta Elena Hospital, Huelva (Spain); Carreto, A. [Department of Radiology, Reina Sofia University Hospital, Cordoba (Spain)

    1998-06-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen`s disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen`s disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen`s disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen`s disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen`s disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs.

  19. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities

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    Lucas da Silva Muniz

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. METHODS: This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. RESULTS: The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (p<0.05 in participants' post-intervention performance and satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology devices may be useful therapeutic tools to enhance autonomy/independence and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

  20. Brazilian clinical trial of uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients: the correlation between clinical disease types and adverse effects

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    Heitor de Sá Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to verify the correlation between leprosy types and the adverse effects of treatment drugs. This quantitative, prospective, nested study was developed at the Dona Libânia Dermatology Centre in Fortaleza, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2007-November 2008. During this period, 818 leprosy patients were diagnosed and began treatment. Forty patients with tuberculoid leprosy (TT were selected. Twenty patients followed a standard therapy of dapsone and rifampicin and 20 were administered dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine (U-MDT. Twenty patients with borderline lepromatous (BL and lepromatous leprosy (LL were also selected and treated with U-MDT. All of the subjects received six doses. With the exception of haemolytic anaemia, there was a low incidence of adverse effects in all the groups. We did not observe any differences in the incidence of haemolytic anaemia or other side effects across groups of patients with TT, BL or LL treated with U-MDT.

  1. Retrospective histopathological classification of 1,108 skin biopsies from patients clinically suspected of having leprosy from Bahia, Northeast Brazil

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    Barbosa Júnior Aryon de Almeida

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a retrospective histopathological classification carried out under laboratory conditions by the method of Ridley & Jopling of 1,108 skin biopsies from patients clinically suspected of having leprosy from Bahia, Northeast Brazil.

  2. Neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity in patients with treated leprosy: a cross-sectional prevalence study in Mumbai.

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    Estrella Lasry-Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8% had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%, tingling (68.2%, hypoesthesia to touch (81.2% and pinprick (72.7%. Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based molecular typing of M. leprae from multicase families of leprosy patients and their surroundings to understand the transmission of leprosy.

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    Turankar, R P; Lavania, M; Chaitanya, V S; Sengupta, U; Darlong, J; Darlong, F; Siva Sai, K S R; Jadhav, R S

    2014-03-01

    The exact mode of transmission of leprosy is not clearly understood; however, many studies have demonstrated active transmission of leprosy around a source case. Families of five active leprosy cases and their household contacts were chosen from a high endemic area in Purulia. Fifty-two soil samples were also collected from different areas of their houses. DNA was extracted from slit-skin smears (SSS) and soil samples and the Mycobacterium leprae-specific RLEP (129 bp) region was amplified using PCR. Molecular typing of M. leprae was performed for all RLEP PCR-positive samples by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and confirmation by DNA sequencing. SSS of these five patients and six out of the total 28 contacts were PCR positive for RLEP whereas 17 soil samples out of 52 showed the presence of M. leprae DNA. SNP typing of M. leprae from all RLEP PCR-positive subjects (patients and smear-positive contacts) and 10 soil samples showed the SNP type 1 genotype. M. leprae DNA from the five leprosy patients and the six contacts was further subtyped and the D subtype was noted in all patients and contacts, except for one contact where the C subtype was identified. Typing followed by subtyping of M. leprae clearly revealed that either the contacts were infected by the patients or both patients and contacts had the same source of infection. It also revealed that the type of M. leprae in the soil in the inhabited areas where patients resided was also of the same type as that found in patients. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  4. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

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    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  5. Radiographic bone changes in multibacillary leprosy patients in Aburof mission clinic

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    Mustafa, El Rayah Mohamed

    1996-08-01

    Leprosy is an infectious, chronic granulomatous disease, caused by M. leprae. It is one of the most seriously disabling and economically important disease. In Sudan it affects about 20 thousands people. In this study 60 patients of MB leprosy were included. Historry and physical examination were carried out for each patient. BI was done for all patients and were subjected to x-ray investigations of the paranasal sinuses, hands and feet. 85%(51) of these patients were found to have radiographic changes in paranasal sinuses, 35 patients with mucosal thickening and 16 with diffuse opacified sinuses. 86.7% (52) of those patients were found to have radiographic bone changes in their hand and feet. 23.6% and 75.4% were found with specific and non-specific bone changes in their hands and feet respectively. A spectrum of radiographic bone changes was found in the hands and feet including; destruction, fractures, phalangeal resoption, distal phalangeal tapering, flexion deformities, osteoarthritic changes, charcot's joints, osteoporosis cystic bone changes and enlarged nutrient bone foramina. The majority of patients with radiographic changes in the paranasal sinsuses, hands and feet, were found to have long duration of the disease and more bacterial load. The disability in hands and feet is the major risk factor in bone affection in MB leprosy. (Author)

  6. The influence of assistive technology on occupational performance and satisfaction of leprosy patients with grade 2 disabilities.

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    Muniz, Lucas da Silva; Amaral, Irmara Géssica Santos; Dias, Thiago da Silva; Rodrigues, Jorge Lopes

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the feasibility of assistive technology (AT) devices to improve leprosy patients' occupational performances and satisfaction. This is a pretest-posttest design study. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was used to assess the occupational performance and satisfaction of five leprosy participants with grade 2 disabilities before and after ten 45-minute interventions using assistive technology devices. The data showed a statistically significant 7-point average improvement (pgrade 2 disabilities.

  7. Mycobacterial r32-kDa antigen-specific T-cell responses correlate with successful treatment and a heightened anti-microbial response in human leprosy patients.

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    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Devalraju, Kamakshi Prudhula; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Sunder, Sharada Ramaseri; Adiraju, Kameswara Rao; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Anandaraj, M P J S; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Immunological characterization of mycobacterial peptides may help not only in the preparation of a vaccine for leprosy but also in developing in vitro T-cell assays that could perhaps be used as an in vitro correlate for treatment outcome. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the use of Mycobacterium bovis recombinant 32-kDa protein (r32-kDa) antigen-stimulated T-cell assay as a surrogate marker for treatment outcome and monitor vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated anti-microbial responses during multidrug therapy (MDT) in leprosy. Newly diagnosed tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy patients were enrolled and followed up during their course of MDT at 6 and 12 months. IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-17 and IL-23 levels in culture supernatants and expression of VDR, TLR2, LL37 and DEFB in r32-kDa-stimulated PBMCs were measured. Controls comprised household contacts (HHCs) and healthy endemic subjects (HCs). Significant differences were observed in the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, VDR and anti-microbial peptides LL37 and DEFB after treatment and when compared with that of HHCs and HCs, respectively. These findings suggest that responses to r32-kDa antigen reflect an improved immunological and anti-microbial response in leprosy patients during therapy, thereby indicating its potential use as an immune correlate in the treatment of leprosy patients. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Structural and functional changes in the microcirculation of lepromatous leprosy patients - Observation using orthogonal polarization spectral imaging and laser Doppler flowmetry iontophoresis

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    Treu, Curt; de Souza, Maria das Graças Coelho; Lupi, Omar; Sicuro, Fernando Lencastre; Maranhão, Priscila Alves; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Bouskela, Eliete

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection of skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae and is considered the main infectious cause of disability worldwide. Despite the several studies regarding leprosy, little is known about its effects on microvascular structure and function in vivo. Thus, we have aimed to compare skin capillary structure and functional density, cutaneous vasomotion (spontaneous oscillations of arteriolar diameter), which ensures optimal blood flow distribution to skin capillaries) and cutaneous microvascular blood flow and reactivity between ten men with lepromatous leprosy (without any other comorbidity) and ten age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Orthogonal polarization spectral imaging was used to evaluate skin capillary morphology and functional density and laser Doppler flowmetry to evaluate blood flow, vasomotion and spectral analysis of flowmotion (oscillations of blood flow generated by vasomotion) and microvascular reactivity, in response to iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. The contribution of different frequency components of flowmotion (endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac) was not statistically different between groups. However, endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilatations elicited by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside iontophoresis, respectively, were significantly reduced in lepromatous leprosy patients compared to controls, characterizing the existence of microvascular dysfunction. These patients also presented a significant increase in the number of capillaries with morphological abnormalities and in the diameters of the dermal papilla and capillary bulk when compared to controls. Our results suggest that lepromatous leprosy causes severe microvascular dysfunction and significant alterations in capillary structure. These structural and functional changes are probably induced by exposure of the microvascular bed to chronic inflammation evoked by

  9. Sural artery perforator flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression for recurrent foot ulcer in leprosy patients

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    Ismail, Hossam El-din Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sensory loss and alteration of the shape of the foot make the foot liable to trauma and pressure, and subsequently cause more callus formation, blisters, and ulcers. Foot ulcers usually are liable to secondary infection as cellulitis or osteomyelitis, and may result in amputations. Foot ulcers are a major problem and a major cause of handicaps in leprosy patients. The current study is to present our clinical experience and evaluate the use of sural flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression (PTND in recurrent foot ulcers in leprosy patients.Patient and methods: A total number of 9 patients were suffering from chronic sequelae of leprosy as recurrent foot ulcers. All the patients were reconstructed with the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression from September 2012 to August 2015. Six patients were male and three were female with a mean age of 39.8 years (range, 30–50 years. All the soft tissue defects were in the weight-bearing area of the inside of the foot. The flap sizes ranged from 15/4 to 18/6 cm. Mean follow-up period was 21.2 months (range, 35–2 months.Results: All the flaps healed uneventfully. There was no major complication as total flap necrosis. Only minor complications occurred which were treated without surgical intervention except in two patients who developed superficial necrosis of the skin paddle. Surgical debridement was done one week later. The flap was completely viable after surgery, and the contour of the foot was restored. We found that an improvement of sensation occurred in those patients in whom the anesthesia started one year ago or less and no sensory recovery in patient in whom the anesthesia had lasted for more than two years.Conclusion: The reverse sural artery flap with posterior tibial neurovascular decompression provides a reliable method for recurrent foot soft tissue reconstruction in leprosy patients with encouraging

  10. Leprosy Reactions in Patients Coinfected with HIV: Clinical Aspects and Outcomes in Two Comparative Cohorts in the Amazon Region, Brazil.

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    Carla Andréa Avelar Pires

    Full Text Available Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, can lead to scarring and deformities. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, a lymphotropic virus with high rates of replication, leads to cell death in various stages of infection. These diseases have major social and quality of life costs, and although the relevance of their comorbidity is recognized, several aspects are still not fully understood.Two cohorts of patients with leprosy in an endemic region of the Amazon were observed. We compared 40 patients with leprosy and HIV (Group 1 and 107 leprosy patients with no comorbidity (Group 2 for a minimum of 2 years. Group 1 predominantly experienced the paucibacillary classification, accounting for 70% of cases, whereas Group 2 primarily experienced the multibacillary classification (80.4% of cases. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of leprosy reactions among the two groups (37.5% for Group 1 vs. 56.1% for Group 2, and the most frequent reaction was Type 1. The appearance of Group 1 patients' reversal reaction skin lesions was consistent with each clinical form: typically erythematous and infiltrated, with similar progression as those patients without HIV, which responded to prednisone. Patients in both groups primarily experienced a single episode (73.3% in Group 1 and 75% in Group 2, and Group 1 had shorter reaction periods (≤3 months; 93.3%, moderate severity (80%, with 93.3% of the patients in the state of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and 46.7% presenting the reaction at the time of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.This study used a large sample and makes a significant contribution to the clinical outcomes of patients in the reactive state with comorbid HIV and leprosy. The data indicate that these diseases, although concurrent, have independent courses.

  11. Gender differential on characteristics and outcome of leprosy patients admitted to a long-term care rural hospital in South-Eastern Ethiopia

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    Ramos José M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In previous studies, women are less aware of causation and symptoms of leprosy and have less access to health care coverage than men, thus contributing to their delay in seeking for treatment. We assess the gender differences in leprosy cases admitted to a rural referral hospital in Ethiopia for 7 and a half years. Methods Retrospective data of the leprosy patients admitted to referral hospital were collected using leprosy admission registry books from September 2002 to January 2010. Variables were entered in an Excel 97 database. Results During the period of study, 839 patients with leprosy were admitted; 541 (64.5% were male, and 298 (35.6% female. Fifteen per cent of female patients, and 7.3% of male patients were paucibacillary leprosy cases while 84.8% of female patients and 92.7% of males were multibacillary leprosy cases (p Conclusions Female patients with leprosy admitted to hospital were younger, had a different profile of admission and a higher mortality rate than male ones.

  12. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

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    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  13. Reduction of plantar pressures in leprosy patients by using custom made shoes and total contact insoles.

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    Tang, Simon Fuk-Tan; Chen, Carl P C; Lin, Shih-Cherng; Wu, Chih-Kuan; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Cheng, Shun-Ping

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe whether our custom made shoes and total contact insoles can effectively increase the plantar contact areas and reduce peak pressures in patients with leprosy. In the rehabilitation laboratory of a tertiary medical center. Six male and two female leprosy patients were recruited in this study. In this study, parameters related to foot pressures were compared between these patients wearing commercial available soft-lining kung-fu shoes and our custom made shoes with total contact insoles. The custom made shoes were made with larger toe box and were able to accommodate both the foot and the insoles. Custom made total contact insoles were made with the subtalar joints under neutral and non-weight-bearing positions. The insole force measurement system of Novel Pedar-X (Novel, Munich, Germany) was used to measure the plantar forces. The parameters of contact area (cm(2)), peak plantar pressures (kPa), contact time (s), and pressure time integral (kPa s) were measured. There were significant contact area increases in the right and left foot heel areas, left medial arch, and second to fifth toes after wearing the custom made shoes and insoles. There were significant decreases in peak plantar pressures in bilateral heels, left lateral midfoot, bilateral second to fourth metatarsal areas, and left fifth metatarsal head after wearing the custom made shoes and insoles (pshoes and total contact insoles were proven to be effective in increasing contact areas and decreasing peak pressures in plantar surfaces, and may therefore be a feasible treatment option in preventing leprosy patients from developing plantar ulcers. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in leprosy patients undergoing neural mobilization treatment

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    Larissa Sales Téles Véras

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the neural mobilization technique on electromyography function, disability degree, and pain in patients with leprosy. METHODS: A sample of 56 individuals with leprosy was randomized into an experimental group, composed of 29 individuals undergoing treatment with neural mobilization, and a control group of 27 individuals who underwent conventional treatment. In both groups, the lesions in the lower limbs were treated. In the treatment with neural mobilization, the procedure used was mobilization of the lumbosacral roots and sciatic nerve biased to the peroneal nerve that innervates the anterior tibial muscle, which was evaluated in the electromyography. RESULTS: Analysis of the electromyography function showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in the experimental group in both the right (Δ%=22.1, p=0.013 and the left anterior tibial muscles (Δ%=27.7, p=0.009, compared with the control group pre- and post-test. Analysis of the strength both in the movement of horizontal extension (Δ%right=11.7, p=0.003/Δ%left=27.4, p=0.002 and in the movement of back flexion (Δ%right=31.1; p=0.000/Δ%left=34.7, p=0.000 showed a significant increase (p<0.05 in both the right and the left segments when comparing the experimental group pre- and post-test. The experimental group showed a significant reduction (p=0.000 in pain perception and disability degree when the pre- and post-test were compared and when compared with the control group in the post-test. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosy patients undergoing the technique of neural mobilization had an improvement in electromyography function and muscle strength, reducing disability degree and pain.

  15. Vitamin D receptor expression levels determine the severity and complexity of disease progression among leprosy reaction patients

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    D. Mandal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the roles of vitamin D and its receptor, VDR, in the progression of leprosy. The majority of individuals with leprosy from Kolkata, India, with a type 1 or type 2 reaction have low levels of vitamin D3 in serum samples. Interestingly, individuals with a type 2 reaction associated with neuritis/erythema nodosum leprosum had very low VDR mRNA expression levels, ranging from 5% to 10%, compared to that of healthy control subjects; these patients also had a high bacilli index, ranging from 3+ to 5+. This is the first report to indicate that VDR expression levels may determine the complexity and severity of the progression of leprosy.

  16. [Epidemiological profile of leprosy patients in the extreme south of Santa Catarina between 2001 and 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melão, Suelen; Blanco, Luis Felipe De Oliveira; Mounzer, Nage; Veronezi, Carlos Cassiano Denipotti; Simões, Priscyla Waleska Targino de Azevedo

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest diseases of humanity and persists as a serious public health problem. Brazil has the highest incidence and second highest prevalence. In the Americas, it accounts for 93% of the cases, according to World Health Organization data from 2008. The objective of this study was to ascertain the profile of leprosy patients in the municipalities of the Association of Municipalities of the Carboniferous Region (AMREC), over the period from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2007. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study carried out in the AMREC region in Santa Catarina, Brazil. The sample was of census type, in which all the patients notified were analyzed. 54 patients were analyzed, among whom 57% were female and 42.6% were male. The most prevalent age group was from 30 to 39 years old (31.5%) and 79.6% had white skin color. The occupation was unknown in 51 cases, as was bacilloscopy in 98%. The tuberculoid and Virchowian forms each presented a frequency of 27.8%. The coefficient of detection observed in the municipalities ranged from low to very high. Neither multibacillary nor paucibacillary forms predominated in the analysis, nor any specific clinical form. Nevertheless, it is known that cases are being diagnosed late because of the low percentage of indeterminate cases, with predominance among females. Added to this, the information on the notification forms is sparse, which makes it impossible to show the realities of the study population.

  17. Leprosy in Pregnancy: Obstetric Diligence is the Key

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali Bhatia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy in pregnancy is a rarely encountered event. Out of the 2000 patients detected of leprosy annually, two to three are pregnant women and majority of them are diagnosed in the third trimester. We, hereby, report a case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with Type I lepromatous reaction in a 26-year-old pregnant woman in early second trimester with a large raised red coloured lesion over the forehead and six other small lesions involving the trunk and limbs with reduced sensory perception over involved skin. Occurrence of leprosy in an obstetric patient belonging to low prevalence area of India is infrequent especially in the post elimination era. However, we do need to have a high index of suspicion in lesions suggestive of the disease.

  18. Morphea simulating paucibacillary leprosy clinically and histopathologically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Saulo Torres Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinically and histopathologically paucibacillary leprosy shows similar features with initial morphea. In this case we report a 24 yr-old male patient who presented to our dermatology department with diagnosed paucibacillary leprosy by his local dermatologist, and confirmed by perineurovascular lymphocytic infiltrate in the histopathological exam. On physical examination we found new plaque lesions that were suggestive of morphea with alteration of sensitivity. A new biopsy was performed showing sclerotic superficial dermis with thickening of the collagen bundles in deep dermis and linear arrays lymphocytic infiltrate between the collagen bundles that confirm the diagnosis of morphea.

  19. Leprosy of the Larynx: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Momen Heravi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an ancient deforming disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which is still poorly understood and often feared by the general public and even by some in the health care professions Fortunately, the outlook for patients has dramatically improved over the last three decades with the introduction of multi-drug treatment and management strategies that have somewhat diminished the stigma of this diagnosis. We report a rare case of leprosy of larynx. A 45 year old man presented with complaints cough, dyspnea and hoarseness since many years ago. Because of demonstration of acid fast bacilli in smear of his sputum, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was made and anti tuberculosis treatment was initiated. But he developed fever and his symptoms exacerbated. In examination there was a tender erythematous nodule on right supraclavicular region, loss of eyebrows and lashes and disseminated hyper and hypo pigmented cutaneous lesions on abdomen, thorax, back with normal chest x ray. Laryngoscopy to rule out laryngeal tuberculosis was done and granulomatous lesion was seen. Laryngeal and skin biopsy was performed which numerous acid fast bacilli, macrophages and foamy cells suggestive of lepromatous leprosy were demonstrated in both specimens. Treatment was started on multi bacillary regime of WHO multidrug therapy. In conclusion, this report highlights the importance of systemic involvement in lepromatous leprosy especially when the initial presentation is laryngitis or respiratory symptoms. Laryngeal leprosy may mistaken with tuberculosis laryngitis due to respiratory problems and existence of acid fast bacilli in respiratory secretions.

  20. A profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1986-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mariana A; Sales, Anna M; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nery, Jose A; Duppre, Nadia C; Bastos, Francisco I; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2012-06-01

    To analyze a profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in metropolitan Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over a period of more than two decades, and the subgroup of nationally registered leprosy cases from the same residential area, as well as all registered cases statewide. An observational, descriptive analysis was carried out for patients treated from 1986 to 2007 at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic (Ambulatório Souza Araújo, ASA), a national referral center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) that serves clients from the city of Rio de Janeiro and other municipalities in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro State. Demographic and clinical data for the subgroup of leprosy cases registered with Brazil's National Disease Notification System (Sistema Nacional de Informação de Agravos de Notificação, SINAN) between 2001 and 2007 and residing in the same municipalities as the ASA patients, and for all registered cases statewide, were also analyzed. Among the ASA patients, there was a decrease in average family income (from 3.9 to 2.7 times the minimum salary between the periods 1998-2002 and 2003-2007); the proportion of multibacillary (MB) patients (from 52.7% to 46.9%); and the proportion of patients younger than 15 years old (from 12.8% to 8.7%). Among the MB patients, the average initial and final bacilloscopic indices were significantly higher in 2003-2007. Compared with the SINAN cases, more ASA cases involved disability and were younger than 15 years old. Patients living with leprosy in the metropolitan area of the state of Rio de Janeiro belong to the most deprived social strata and have not benefited from the overall improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Brazil.

  1. Gender differential on characteristics and outcome of leprosy patients admitted to a long-term care rural hospital in South-Eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, José M; Martínez-Martín, Miguel; Reyes, Francisco; Lemma, Deriba; Belinchón, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2012-10-04

    In previous studies, women are less aware of causation and symptoms of leprosy and have less access to health care coverage than men, thus contributing to their delay in seeking for treatment. We assess the gender differences in leprosy cases admitted to a rural referral hospital in Ethiopia for 7 and a half years. Retrospective data of the leprosy patients admitted to referral hospital were collected using leprosy admission registry books from September 2002 to January 2010. Variables were entered in an Excel 97 database. During the period of study, 839 patients with leprosy were admitted; 541 (64.5%) were male, and 298 (35.6%) female. Fifteen per cent of female patients, and 7.3% of male patients were paucibacillary leprosy cases while 84.8% of female patients and 92.7% of males were multibacillary leprosy cases (p<0.001). Female leprosy patients were younger than male ones (median: 36 versus 44 years) (p<0.001). In the multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR]: 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96-0.98; p<0.001), admission for cardiovascular diseases (OR: 7.6, 95% CI: 1.9-29.3; p=0.004), admission for gastroenteritis (OR: 14.0; 95% CI: 1.7-117; p=0.02), admission from out patients clinic (OR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.1-4.01; p=0.02), and mortality as final outcome (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2-8.0; p=0.02) were independently associated with female gender. Female patients with leprosy admitted to hospital were younger, had a different profile of admission and a higher mortality rate than male ones.

  2. Curing the stigma of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Joy

    2005-06-01

    The stigma of leprosy is a real phenomenon in many people's lives that affects their physical, psychological, social and economical well-being. There are many causes for this damaging image of leprosy. There is no one easy answer to dispelling this image; it is something that has to be done in partnership with communities and patients. Many papers document the effects of stigma, but few discuss or trial solutions. Education and media campaigns counteract false beliefs about leprosy and raise awareness of new advances in the field. Leprosy care is increasingly provided in an integrated setting showing patients and their communities that leprosy is not a disease apart. Physical and socio-economic rehabilitation is worthwhile in restoring self worth and status in the community and helps patients to find employment. Group counselling can allow those with leprosy to talk about their feelings and experiences to empower one another. Gradually attitudes towards leprosy are changing, but there is still much to be done if the underlying menace of stigma is to be dealt with. We as health professionals must be prepared to make the first move and give that first touch. Certainly more research is needed. In the highly endemic countries the road to elimination may yet be long. Perhaps with effort we will one day be able not only to treat the disease, but also to cure the stigma of leprosy, and make that road an easier one.

  3. Leprosy Associated with Atypical Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Nicaragua and Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lucrecia Acosta; Caballero, Nelson; Fuentes, Lesny Ruth; Muñoz, Pedro Torres; Gómez Echevarría, Jose Ramón; López, Montserrat Pérez; Bornay Llinares, Fernando Jorge; Stanford, John L; Stanford, Cynthia A; Donoghue, Helen D

    2017-10-01

    In Central America, few cases of leprosy have been reported, but the disease may be unrecognized. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and histology. Preliminary field work in Nicaragua and Honduras found patients, including many children, with skin lesions clinically suggestive of atypical cutaneous leishmaniasis or indeterminate leprosy. Histology could not distinguish these diseases although acid-fast organisms were visible in a few biopsies. Lesions healed after standard antimicrobial therapy for leprosy. In the present study, patients, family members, and other community members were skin-tested and provided nasal swabs and blood samples. Biopsies were taken from a subgroup of patients with clinical signs of infection. Two laboratories analyzed samples, using local in-house techniques. Mycobacterium leprae , Leishmania spp. and Leishmania infantum were detected using polymerase chain reactions. Mycobacterium leprae DNA was detected in blood samples and nasal swabs, including some cases where leprosy was not clinically suspected. Leishmania spp. were also detected in blood and nasal swabs. Most biopsies contained Leishmania DNA and coinfection of Leishmania spp. with M. leprae occurred in 33% of cases. Mycobacterium leprae DNA was also detected and sequenced from Nicaraguan and Honduran environmental samples. In conclusion, leprosy and leishmaniasis are present in both regions, and leprosy appears to be widespread. The nature of any relationship between these two pathogens and the epidemiology of these infections need to be elucidated.

  4. Coinfection of leprosy and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Seema; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Manandhar, Bhawani; Nepali, Pankaj Bahadur

    2018-03-15

    Leprosy and tuberculosis (TB) are endemic to India, however, their coinfection is not frequently encountered in clinical practice. Here, we report a 32-year-old female patient who presented with a history of high-grade intermittent fever, cough and painless skin lesions since a month, along with bilateral claw hand (on examination). The haematological profile was suggestive of anaemia of chronic disease, chest radiograph showed consolidation, sputum smears were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and skin slit smear confirmed leprosy. The patient was prescribed WHO recommended multidrug therapy for multibacillary leprosy with three drugs. Additionally, prednisolone was added to her regimen for 2 weeks to treat the type 2 lepra reaction. For treatment of TB, she was placed on the standard 6-month short course chemotherapy. She was lost to follow-up, and attempts were made to contact her. Later, it came to our notice that she had discontinued medications and passed away 3 months after diagnosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Knowledge, attitude and stigma experienced by leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India (2013-2023

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    Swapan Kumar Kolay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study leprosy patients in tribal concentrated Bastar district of Chhattisgarh, India in terms of their knowledge, attitudes and the stigma they have experienced. Method: This cross-sectional study included 101 registered Leprosy patients, in a single leprosy treatment centre between April, 2012 - June, 2013. The data collection tool (a pre tested close-ended questionnaire was based on leprosy related socio-demographic variables, knowled geregarding different kinds of problems and issues experienced by the patients/participants. The investigators collected the data in face to face interviews and house hold visit. Results: Overall the majority of the respondents (85.1% were between 16 and 60 years of age. 74.3% were males, 80.2% were married, and 54.5% were literate. The majority (67.3% articulated positive knowledge about transmission of the disease, 75.3% knew that numbness of hands is an early symptom, 88.12% that it is curable, 91.1% had untreated deformities. Experiences reported included disturbed marital relationships (90.1% or social life (94.1%, loss of employment (54.5%, isolation with the sitation to talk to people (29.7%, family members not sharing food (94.1%; being forced to leave the family (54.45%. Health education interventions improved the knowledge of 91.1% of participants. Multi-Bacillary leprosy was higher in newly registered cases with higher disabilities in the hands and feet (60.4%, eyes (29.7%. 9.9% of WHO grade-2 disabilities were due to a delayed diagnosis. 67.5% of the patients/participants with some form of disability had experienced a delay in diagnosis up to 12 months. Conclusion: The study noted that the tribal people were affected by leprosy not only in terms of the physical problems, but also by the stigmatization that affects their social participation. These need to be addressed by the progress of the national leprosyp rogram.Keywords: Leprosy, social stigma, disability grading, India

  6. Ophthalmic Presentations in Leprosy Patients in (South-Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other findings were cataract 24.6%; pterygium 24.6%; refractive errors 21.6%; glaucoma 12.3%; age- related macular degeneration 4.6%; presumed toxoplasmosis 1.2%; optic atrophy 1.2% and squint 0.6%.A total of 10.5% of patients were blind and 39.8% visually impaired. Cataract accounted for 55.6% blindness.

  7. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome in a lepromatous leprosy patient--A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilanes, Maria Catalina; Palacio, Adriana Lucia; Chellini, Patricia Rocha; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Rego, Juliana Gonçalves

    2015-06-01

    Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) can be classified as a 'drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms' (DRESS). It has a variable course, it is not dose dependent and may present with different clinical and laboratory abnormalities. In some cases it may be fatal. We describe a 31 year old man with lepromatous leprosy in whom DHS developed 4 weeks after initiation of World Health Organization multibacillary multidrug therapy (dapsone, clofazimine and rifampin). He had fever, dehydration, diffuse rash, pain on abdominal palpation and inguinal painless lymph nodes. Severe anaemia, abnormal liver function and hyperbilirubinaemia were also found. The patient was treated with prednisone 50 mg daily. There was gradual improvement in the clinical and laboratory signs. We encourage health professionals to be aware of the risk of DHS and to have in mind the development of investigative studies related to HLA and MHC in these patients.

  8. Health-related quality of life evaluated by Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 in pediatric leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neder, Luciana; van Weelden, Marlon; Viola, Gabriela Ribeiro; Lourenço, Daniela Mencaroni; Len, Claudio A; Silva, Clovis A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) in pediatric leprosy patients. A cross-sectional study included 47 leprosy patients and 45 healthy subjects. The HRQL was measured by Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL 4.0), and evaluated physical, emotional, social and school domains. The leprosy patients were classified by Ridley and Jopling classification criteria and assessed according to clinical musculoskeletal manifestations, laboratory and radiographic examinations. The median of current age was similar in leprosy patients and controls [12(6-18) vs. 15(5-18)years, p = 0.384], likewise the frequencies of female gender (p = 0.835) and middle/lower Brazilian socio-economic classes (p = 1.0). The domain school activities according the child-self report was significantly lower in leprosy patients compared to controls in the age group of 13-18 years [75(45-100) vs. 90(45-100), p = 0.021]. The other domains were alike in both groups (p > 0.05). At least one musculoskeletal manifestation (arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia) was observed in 15% of leprosy patients and none in controls (p = 0.012). Further comparison between all leprosy patients showed that the median of the physical capacity domain [81.25(50-100) vs. 98.44(50-100), p = 0.036] and school activities domain by child-self report [60(50-85) vs. 80(45-100), p = 0.042] were significantly lower in patients with musculoskeletal manifestations compared to patients without these manifestations. No differences were evidenced between the other HRQL parameters in both groups, reported by patients and parents (p > 0.05). Reduced physical capacity and school activities domains were observed in pediatric leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Simple and fast lateral flow test for classification of leprosy patients and identification of contacts with high risk of developing leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bührer-Sékula, S.; Smits, H. L.; Gussenhoven, G. C.; van Leeuwen, J.; Amador, S.; Fujiwara, T.; Klatser, P. R.; Oskam, L.

    2003-01-01

    The interruption of leprosy transmission is one of the main challenges for leprosy control programs since no consistent evidence exists that transmission has been reduced after the introduction of multidrug therapy. Sources of infection are primarily people with high loads of bacteria with or

  10. Evaluation of Mycobacterium leprae antigens in the serological monitoring of a clofazimine-based chemotherapeutic study of dapsone resistant lepromatous leprosy patients in Cebu, Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, J. T.; Hirsch, D. S.; Fajardo, T. T.; Cellona, R. V.; Abalos, R. M.; de la Cruz, E. C.; Madarang, M. G.; de Wit, M. Y.; Klatser, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one dapsone resistant lepromatous leprosy patients receiving clofazimine based therapy were serologically monitored throughout their 5-year period of treatment. Sequentially collected sera were used to examine 4 Mycobacterium leprae antigens to evaluate their usefulness in ELISA's for

  11. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvelise T. Morato-Conceicao

    2016-03-01

    patients with type 2 leprosy reactions might be due to the consumption of UA to neutralize the enhanced production of oxygen- and nitrogen-reactive species that occurs during type 2 reactions. The maintenance of the reduced levels in the follow-up assessments may indicate persistence of oxidative stress in the initial post-treatment stages, despite improved clinical conditions. The results of this study suggest that serum UA may play an antioxidative role during type 2 leprosy reactions.

  12. Anti-phospholipid syndrome in seven leprosy patients with thrombotic events on corticosteroid and/or thalidomide regimen: insights on genetic and laboratory profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernal, Sebastian; Brochado, Maria Jose Franco; Bueno-Filho, Roberto; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Corticosteroids and/or thalidomides have been associated with thromboembolism events (TBE) in multibacillary (MB) leprosy. This report aimed to determine genetic and laboratory profiles associated with leprosy and TBE. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), coagulation-related exams, prothrombin and Leiden's factor V mutations, and ß2-glycoprotein-I (ß2GPI) Val247Leu polymorphism were assessed. Six out of seven patients with leprosy were treated with prednisone and/or thalidomide during TBE and presented at least one positive aPL. All patients presented ß2GPI polymorphism, and one showed prothrombin mutation. Corticosteroid or thalidomide adverse effects and aPL and ß2GPI polymorphisms may cause TBE in patients with MB leprosy.

  13. Identification of primary drug resistance to rifampin in Mycobacterium leprae strains from leprosy patients in Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Mejía, Matilde Del Carmen; Porto Dos Santos, Maísa; Villarouco da Silva, George Allan; da Motta Passos, Isabella; Naveca, Felipe Gomes; Souza Cunha, Maria da Graça; Moraes, Milton Ozório; de Paula, Lucia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms in the folp1, gyrA, and rpoB genes in leprosy patients treated in Amazonas State, Brazil. Among 197 slit-skin smear samples from untreated or relapsed patients, we found three cases of primary resistance to rifampin and one confirmed case of multidrug resistance. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis in preventing leprosy in patient contacts: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Silvana Margarida Benevides; Yonekura, Tatiana; Ignotti, Eliane; Oliveira, Larissa Bertacchini de; Takahashi, Juliana; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Individuals in contact with patients who have leprosy have an increased risk of disease exposure, which reinforces the need for chemoprophylactic measures, such as the use of rifampicin. The objective of the review was to synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis for contacts with patients with leprosy, and to synthesize the best available evidence on the experience and acceptability of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis as reported by the contacts and health professionals involved in the treatment of leprosy or Hansen's disease. In the quantitative component, individuals in contact with leprosy patients were included. In the qualitative component, in addition to contacts, health professionals who were in the practice of treating leprosy were included. The quantitative component considered as an intervention rifampicin at any dose, frequency and mode of administration, and rifampicin combination regimens.The qualitative component considered as phenomena of interest the experience and acceptability of rifampicin chemoprophylaxis. The quantitative component considered experimental and observational studies whereas the qualitative component considered studies that focused on qualitative data, including but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and action-research. The quantitative component considered studies that reported on outcomes such as the development of clinical leprosy in the contacts of patients who had leprosy, incidence rates, adverse effects and safety/harmful effects of the intervention. A three-step strategy for published and unpublished literature was used. The search for published studies included: PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature; and Google Scholar and EVIPnet for unpublished

  15. Retrospective active case finding in Cambodia: An innovative approach to leprosy control in a low-endemic country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürst, Thomas; Cavaliero, Arielle; Lay, Sambath; Dayer, Chrystel; Chan, Saren; Smrekar, Ajda; So, Visal; Barth-Jaeggi, Tanja; Steinmann, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Currently, leprosy control relies on the clinical diagnosis of leprosy and the subsequent administration of multidrug therapy (MDT). However, many health workers are not familiar with the cardinal signs of leprosy, particularly in low-endemic settings including Cambodia. In response, a new approach to early diagnosis was developed in the country, namely retrospective active case finding (RACF) through small mobile teams. In the frame of RACF, previously diagnosed leprosy patients are traced and their contacts screened through "drives". According to the available records, 984 of the 1,463 (67.3%) index patients diagnosed between 2001 and 2010 and registered in the national leprosy database were successfully traced in the period 2012-2015. Migration (8.4%), death (6.7%), operational issues (1.6%) and unidentified other issues (16.0%) were the main reasons for non-traceability. A total of 17,134 contacts of traced index patients (average: 2.2 household members and 15.2 neighbors) and another 7,469 contacts of the untraced index patients could be screened. Among them, 264 new leprosy patients were diagnosed. In the same period, 1,097 patients were diagnosed through the routine passive case detection system. No change was observed in the relation between the rate at which new patients were identified and the number of years since the diagnosis of the index patient. Similar to leprosy patients diagnosed through passive case detection, the leprosy patients detected through RACF were predominantly adult males. However, the fraction of PB leprosy patients was higher among the patients diagnosed through RACF, suggesting relatively earlier diagnosis. It appears that RACF is a feasible option and effective in detecting new leprosy patients among contacts of previously registered patients. However, a well-maintained national leprosy database is essential for successful contact tracing. Hence, passive case detection in the frame of routine leprosy surveillance is a precondition

  16. Evaluation of qPCR-based assays for leprosy diagnosis directly in clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Nóbrega Martinez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased reliability and efficiency of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR makes it a promising tool for performing large-scale screening for infectious disease among high-risk individuals. To date, no study has evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of different qPCR assays for leprosy diagnosis using a range of clinical samples that could bias molecular results such as difficult-to-diagnose cases. In this study, qPCR assays amplifying different M. leprae gene targets, sodA, 16S rRNA, RLEP and Ag 85B were compared for leprosy differential diagnosis. qPCR assays were performed on frozen skin biopsy samples from a total of 62 patients: 21 untreated multibacillary (MB, 26 untreated paucibacillary (PB leprosy patients, as well as 10 patients suffering from other dermatological diseases and 5 healthy donors. To develop standardized protocols and to overcome the bias resulted from using chromosome count cutoffs arbitrarily defined for different assays, decision tree classifiers were used to estimate optimum cutoffs and to evaluate the assays. As a result, we found a decreasing sensitivity for Ag 85B (66.1%, 16S rRNA (62.9%, and sodA (59.7% optimized assay classifiers, but with similar maximum specificity for leprosy diagnosis. Conversely, the RLEP assay showed to be the most sensitive (87.1%. Moreover, RLEP assay was positive for 3 samples of patients originally not diagnosed as having leprosy, but these patients developed leprosy 5-10 years after the collection of the biopsy. In addition, 4 other samples of patients clinically classified as non-leprosy presented detectable chromosome counts in their samples by the RLEP assay suggesting that those patients either had leprosy that was misdiagnosed or a subclinical state of leprosy. Overall, these results are encouraging and suggest that RLEP assay could be useful as a sensitive diagnostic test to detect M. leprae infection before major clinical manifestations.

  17. Health information system model for monitoring treatment and surveillance for leprosy patients in indonesia (case study in Pekalongan District, Central Java, Indonesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmani, Enny; Kurniadi, Arif; Hsu, Chien Yeh

    2013-01-01

    After India and Brazil, Indonesia has the third highest incidence/prevalence of leprosy in the world. Every year thousands of new cases and case with grade-2 disability are reported and, while the recovery rate lingers only 80-90 %. Therefore, more than 10 % of leprosy patients drop out of treatment and can be a source of new infections in the community. Our research was aimed at determining apparent difficulties in the leprosy control program as well as how a health information system (HIS) could assist the Indonesian leprosy control program. We used qualitative method with deep interview and observation of document. One of the difficulties which the Indonesian leprosy control program faces is discontinuity of patient's data due to rotating staff as well as the treatment monitoring and queries patients which should be monitored after treatment has ceased. Technology implementation is feasible through short message service (sms) reminders and web base applications. The leprosy control program urgently needs to implement continuous monitoring and recording of patients because of the particular characteristics of this contagious disease.

  18. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Lepromatous Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Wadhwa

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardio-vascular, autonomic functions were studied in 20 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 20 healthy adult controls Autonomic dysfunction was observed in the form of abnormal response in heart rate on standing 3 (15% carotid artery pressure 7 (35%. Valsalva manoeuvre 5 (25% and mental stress 3 (15% in the leprosy patients. Response of blood pressure to standing and cold pressure test was seen in 2 (10% and 7 (359o patients respectively.

  19. Subcutaneous Cyst due to Medicopsis romeroi in a Diabetic Lepromatous Leprosy Patient: An Interesting Case Report and Review from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Sharma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Medicopsis romeroi (M. romeroi (syn. Pyrenochaeta romeroi is a rare melanized fungus causing subcutaneous/localized invasive phaeohyphomycosis in immunocompromised patients. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohypho-mycotic cyst caused by M.romeroi in a diabetic male with lepromatous leprosy. Molecular identification was performed by sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS region and D1/D2 region of Large Ribosomal Subunit (LSU.

  20. The Use of Assistive Technology to Promote Care of the Self and Social Inclusion in Patients with Sequels of Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is about the contribution of occupational therapy inside a rehabilitation group, and we focus on the autonomy of patients with disabilities due to leprosy. There are few studies on the use of assistive technology by leprosy patients; to our knowledge, none of them aim to have a subjective approach of care. Our purpose was to analyze the repercussions of assistive technology on autonomy of care of the self in patients with sequels of leprosy. Methods A qualitative, descriptive exploratory study with a semi-structured interview and a field observation as a research method was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015 at a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Findings Eight patients from the service of Occupational Therapy were interviewed, and 44 hours of observation were performed. Interviews followed a semi-structured script and a field journal was used to take notes. Analysis was conducted by the hermeneutic approach. Costs were obtained after a global cost analysis of the fixed and variable expenses and direct and indirect costs to the manufactured products with an amount of 100 dollars. Results were grouped according to the following categories: contribution of the adapted devices for the care of the self and feelings and sensations provoked by the use of self-help devices. The reports revealed feelings, perceptions and meaningful contents about the social, familiar and individual dimensions, also the stigma coupled with leprosy. However, forms of re-signification were elaborated. Conclusions Assistive technology empowers the subject to perform care of the self and promotes social inclusion. PMID:27124408

  1. Leprosy and Social Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Feenstra-Gols (Sabiena G.)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractParliament yesterday passed a private member’s bill to repeal the Lepers Act 1898 that segregated leprosy patients from society and their families. This is the first time a private bill has got through the House during the tenure of the present Awami Leagueled government. Ruling party

  2. Leprosy mimicry of lupus vulgaris and misdiagnosis of leprosy--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, B C; Bandyopadhyay, G

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy and tuberculosis (TB) both are still rampant in India. Leprosy predominantly presents through skin manifestations whereas cutaneous manifestations of TB though not so frequent but are not rare. Lupus vulgaris (LV), the commonest of all cutaneous manifestations of TB, mimics leprosy very closely and may prompt the examiner to misdiagnose leprosy, especially, by health workers (HW), in a field situation, where leprosy is diagnosed and treated on clinical basis alone as per NLEP guidelines. Because of existing stigmata, such wrong diagnosis can put the patient and the party under psychological stress and creates unnecessary complications.

  3. Anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I determination using blood collection on filter paper in leprosy patients

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    TOMIMORI-YAMASHITA Jane

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied 70 leprosy patients and 20 normal individuals, comparing the traditional sera collection method and the finger prick blood with the conservation on filter paper for specific antibodies against the native phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I from Mycobacterium leprae. The finger prick blood dried on filter paper was eluated in phosphate buffer saline (PBS containing 0.5% gelatin. The classical method for native PGL-I was performed for these eluates, and compared with the antibody determination for sera. It was observed that there is a straight correlation comparing these two methods; although the titles found for the eluates were lower than those obtained for serology. This blood collection method could be useful for investigation of new leprosy cases in field, specially in contacts individuals.

  4. Should nutritional status evaluation be included in the initial needs assessment of leprosy patients with disability prior to socio-economic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, M; Diffey, B; Jacob, A J; Vaz, M

    2001-06-01

    Because of the large numbers of leprosy patients with disability and the limited resources available, it is important that socio-economic rehabilitation (SER) is targeted towards those who are most in need. Towards this purpose, current assessments of leprosy patients prior to initiating SER include the evaluation of income, assets and household possessions. Conspicuously absent is the nutritional assessment of the patient. In the absence of weight loss associated with illness, population studies indicate that undernutrition reflects poor socio-economic conditions. In this study of 151 cured leprosy patients with disability, 57% of the patients were found to be undernourished using body mass index (kg/m2) derived from body weight and height, and 10% of the patients were severely undernourished (grade III). Undernutrition in the patients was poorly though significantly correlated with personal income (r = 0.18, P nutritional status evaluation by anthropometry as part of the initial screening of leprosy patients prior to instituting SER. We believe that this simple and objective evaluation can add to the assessment of 'threat' of economic deprivation or actual economic 'dislocation', and thus help in the prioritization of leprosy patients for SER.

  5. Screening for mental disorders in leprosy patients: comparing the internal consistency and screening properties of HADS and GHQ-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Vesile; Stewart, Robert; Sagduyu, Afsin

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the internal consistency and screening properties of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in Turkish patients with leprosy. The two screening instruments and a fully structured diagnostic interview (CIDI) were administered to 65 people drawn from all leprosy inpatient units in Turkey between March and June of 2001. The scales were evaluated using Cronbach's alpha and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses. For each scale, criterion validity was assessed for any psychiatric disorder, depressive disorder and anxiety disorder. The Cronbach alpha coefficients for the GHQ-12 and HADS were 0.84 and 0.81 respectively. For detecting any psychiatric disorder, the optimal cut-off for the GHQ-12 was 4/5 (sensitivity 0.82, specificity 0.62). The optimal cut-off for the HADS total score was 12/13 (sensitivity 0.80, specificity 0.77). The results indicate that the General Health Questionnaire-12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale have satisfactory internal consistency, and performed well to a similar extent for detecting psychiatric disorders in leprosy patients.

  6. Cutaneous lesions sensory impairment recovery and nerve regeneration in leprosy patients

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    Ximena Illarramendi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the mechanisms that enable peripheral neurons to regenerate after nerve injury in order to identify methods of improving this regeneration. Therefore, we studied nerve regeneration and sensory impairment recovery in the cutaneous lesions of leprosy patients (LPs before and after treatment with multidrug therapy (MDT. The skin lesion sensory test results were compared to the histopathological and immunohistochemical protein gene product (PGP 9.5 and the p75 nerve growth factor receptors (NGFr findings. The cutaneous neural occupation ratio (CNOR was evaluated for both neural markers. Thermal and pain sensations were the most frequently affected functions at the first visit and the most frequently recovered functions after MDT. The presence of a high cutaneous nerve damage index did not prevent the recovery of any type of sensory function. The CNOR was calculated for each biopsy, according to the presence of PGP and NGFr-immunostained fibres and it was not significantly different before or after the MDT. We observed a variable influence of MDT in the recovery from sensory impairment in the cutaneous lesions of LPs. Nociception and cold thermosensation were the most recovered sensations. The recovery of sensation in the skin lesions appeared to be associated with subsiding inflammation rather than with the regenerative activity of nerve fibres.

  7. Lucio Leprosy with Lucio's phenomenon, digital gangrene and anticardiolipin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunzie, Enrico; Ortega Cabrera, L V; Macanchi Moncayo, F M; Ortega Espinosa, P F; Clapasson, A; Massone, C

    2014-09-01

    Lucio's phenomenon (LPh) is considered a necrotizing panvasculitis and a variant of leprosy Type 2 reaction, clinically characterised by necrotic-haemorrhagic lesions on the extremities and trunk. LPh is observed in diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL or Lucio-Latapí leprosy). This is a distinct form of lepromatous leprosy (LL) reported mainly in Mexico. Anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) has been rarely described in LPh. We report a case of Lucio-Latapí leprosy with LPh observed in a patient from the province of El Oro in Ecuador, who presented clinical manifestations of long standing DLL (non-nodular infiltration of the skin, collapse of the nasal pyramid, madarosis, atrophy of the earlobes), of LPh (necrotic-haemorrhagic macules with irregular shapes) and of APS (necrosis of the right big and second toe). Histopathology showed perineural and periadnexal foamy macrophages with numerous bacilli (diagnostic of LL) in the subcutis, a mild lobular panniculitis with a large subcutaneous vessel infiltrated by macrophages in the wall (typical of LPh) and vessels of the superficial and mid dermis occluded by thrombi but without signs of vasculitis (typical of occlusive vasculopathy as in APS). Our observations suggest that some cases of LPh may be associated with APS. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL) and lupus anticoagulant (LA) should be tested in patients with LPh because this may have therapeutic implications.

  8. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:27828650

  9. HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles in patients from the south of Brazil: markers for leprosy susceptibility and resistance

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    Peixoto Paulo R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies have shown that the genetic factors of the host play a role in the variability of clinical response to infection caused by M. leprae. With the purpose of identifying genes of susceptibility, the present study investigated the possible role of HLA-DRB1 and DQA1/DQB1 alleles in susceptibility to leprosy, and whether they account for the heterogeneity in immune responses observed following infection in a Southern Brazilian population. Methods One hundred and sixty-nine leprosy patients and 217 healthy controls were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and reverse hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and sequence-specific primers(One Lambda®, CA, USA. Results There was a positive association of HLA-DRB1*16 (*1601 and *1602 with leprosy per se (7.3% vs. 3.2%, P = 0.01, OR = 2.52, CI = 1.26–5.01, in accord with previous serological studies, which showed DR2 as a marker of leprosy. Although, HLA-DQA1*05 frequency (29.8% vs. 20.9%, P = 0.0424, OR = 1.61, CI = 1.09–2.39 was higher in patients, and HLA-DQA1*02 (3.0% vs. 7.5%, P = 0.0392, OR = 0.39, CI = 0.16 – 0.95 and HLA-DQA1*04 (4.0% vs. 9.1%, P = 0.0314, OR = 0.42, CI = 0.19 – 0.93 frequencies lower, P-values were not significant after the Bonferroni's correction. Furthermore, HLA-DRB1*1601 (9.0% vs. 1.8%; P = 0.0016; OR = 5.81; CI = 2.05–16.46 was associated with susceptibility to borderline leprosy compared to control group, and while HLA-DRB1*08 (11.2% vs. 1.2%; P = 0.0037; OR = 12.00; CI = 1.51 – 95.12 was associated with susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy, when compared to tuberculoid leprosy, DRB1*04 was associated to protection. Conclusion These data confirm the positive association of HLA-DR2 (DRB1*16 with leprosy per se, and the protector effect of DRB1*04 against lepromatous leprosy in Brazilian patients.

  10. Historical Overview of Leprosy Control in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldarraín-Chaple, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Leprosy, an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, affects the nervous system, skin, internal organs, extremities and mucous membranes. Biological, social and environmental factors influence its occurrence and transmission. The first effective treatments appeared in 1930 with the development of dapsone, a sulfone. The main components of a control and elimination strategy are early case detection and timely administration of multidrug therapy. OBJECTIVES Review the history of leprosy control in Cuba, emphasizing particularly results of the National Leprosy Control Program, its modifications and influence on leprosy control. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION The historiological method was applied using document review, complemented by interviews with experts on leprosy and its control. Archived documents, medical records, disease prevalence censuses conducted since 1942, and incidence and prevalence statistics for 1960-2015 from the Ministry of Public Health's National Statistics Division were reviewed. Reports and scientific literature published on the Program and the history of leprosy in Cuba were also reviewed. DEVELOPMENT Leprosy has been documented in Cuba since 1613. In 1938, the Leprosy Foundation was created with ten dispensaries nationwide for diagnosis and treatment. The first National Leprosy Control Program was established in 1962, implemented in 1963 and revised five times. In 1972, leper colonies were closed and treatment became ambulatory. In 1977, rifampicin was introduced. In 1988, the Program instituted controlled, decentralized, community-based multidrug treatment and established the criteria for considering a patient cured. In 2003, it included actions aimed at early diagnosis and prophylactic treatment of contacts. Since 2008, it prioritizes actions directed toward the population at risk, maintaining five-year followup with dermatological and neurological examination. Primary health care carries out diagnostic and treatment

  11. A comparison of stigma among patients with leprosy in rural Tanzania and urban United States: a role for public health in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Neda; Black, David S; Rea, Thomas H

    2013-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, which causes peripheral insensitivity and disfigurements of the skin, limbs, and digits. Social stigma is a common consequence of leprosy and may differ according to level of physical disfigurement and geographic location. The objective of this study was to assess social stigma encountered by patients with leprosy in clinical settings located in rural Tanzania and urban USA and to compare the social stigma reported in these regions.   A total of 56 respondents were recruited from one leprosy inpatient facility in Shirati, Tanzania (n = 28), and one outpatient clinic in Los Angeles, USA (n = 28). Cross-sectional data were obtained from face-to-face interviews, which were conducted with respondents at each clinic location. Measures of perceived stigma were assessed in family relationship, vocational, social interaction, and interpersonal contexts.   Patients in Tanzania, as compared with those in the USA, reported significantly higher levels of stigma in family relationship and vocational contexts. Tanzanian patients also reported higher levels of stigma in social interaction and self-esteem contexts, but these differences were marginally significant and may reflect the small sample size.   Leprosy-related social stigma is a major problem in regions of both developed and developing countries; however, patients with leprosy in developing countries reported higher levels of stigma in four social contexts. A public health role in dermatology is discussed as an agent of early diagnosis, control, and education in order to reduce social stigma and promote social rehabilitation. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Genetics of leprosy reactions: an overview

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    Vinicius Fava

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 (T1R and Type-2 (T2R leprosy reactions (LR, which affect up to 50% of leprosy patients, are aggressive inflammatory episodes of sudden onset and highly variable incidence across populations. LR are often diagnosed concurrently with leprosy, but more frequently occur several months after treatment onset. It is not uncommon for leprosy patients to develop recurring reactional episodes; however, they rarely undergo both types of LR. Today, LR are the main cause of permanent disabilities associated with leprosy and represent a major challenge in the clinical management of leprosy patients. Although progress has been made in understanding the immunopathology of LR, the factors that cause a leprosy patient to suffer from LR are largely unknown. Given the impact that ethnic background has on the risk of developing LR, host genetic factors have long been suspected of contributing to LR. Indeed, polymorphisms in seven genes [Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2, nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain containing 2, vitamin D receptor, natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1, C4B and interleukin-6] have been found to be associated with one or more LR outcomes. The identification of host genetic markers with predictive value for LR would have a major impact on nerve damage control in leprosy. In this review, we present the recent advances achieved through genetic studies of LR.

  13. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy

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    Nadja de Lima Santana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Leprosy or hansen’s disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host’s immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. METHODS Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551, TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099 and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911. A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. FINDINGS Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2. Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. MAIN CONCLUSIONS All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host’s production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  14. Histopathological examination of nerve samples from pure neural leprosy patients: obtaining maximum information to improve diagnostic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sérgio Luiz Gomes; Chimelli, Leila; Jardim, Márcia Rodrigues; Vital, Robson Teixeira; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Corte-Real, Suzana; Hacker, Mariana Andréa Vilas Boas; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2012-03-01

    Nerve biopsy examination is an important auxiliary procedure for diagnosing pure neural leprosy (PNL). When acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are not detected in the nerve sample, the value of other nonspecific histological alterations should be considered along with pertinent clinical, electroneuromyographical and laboratory data (the detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA with polymerase chain reaction and the detection of serum anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 antibodies) to support a possible or probable PNL diagnosis. Three hundred forty nerve samples [144 from PNL patients and 196 from patients with non-leprosy peripheral neuropathies (NLN)] were examined. Both AFB-negative and AFB-positive PNL samples had more frequent histopathological alterations (epithelioid granulomas, mononuclear infiltrates, fibrosis, perineurial and subperineurial oedema and decreased numbers of myelinated fibres) than the NLN group. Multivariate analysis revealed that independently, mononuclear infiltrate and perineurial fibrosis were more common in the PNL group and were able to correctly classify AFB-negative PNL samples. These results indicate that even in the absence of AFB, these histopathological nerve alterations may justify a PNL diagnosis when observed in conjunction with pertinent clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data.

  15. Utility of measuring serum levels of anti-PGL-I antibody, neopterin and C-reactive protein in monitoring leprosy patients during multi-drug treatment and reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E. A.; Iyer, A.; Ura, S.; Lauris, J. R.; Naafs, B.; Das, P. K.; Vilani-Moreno, F.

    2007-01-01

    To verify the validity of measuring the levels of Mycobacterium leprae-specific anti-phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I antibody, neopterin, a product of activated macrophages, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, in serial serum samples from patients for monitoring the leprosy spectrum

  16. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance

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    P Narasimha Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 links) Encyclopedia: Leprosy Health Topic: Mycobacterial Infections Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hansen's disease Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID): Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) Educational Resources (8 ...

  18. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Leprosy Research Priorities for research in leprosy today include genetic probes for molecular epidemiology, and new ... Career Stage Postdocs' Guide to Gaining Independence Small Business Programs Compare NIAID’s Small Business Programs High-Priority ...

  19. Clinical characteristics and outcome in multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients treated with 12 months WHO MDT-MBR: a retrospective analysis of 730 patients from a leprosy clinic at a tertiary care hospital of Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; Narang, Tarun; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Kumar, Bhushan

    2013-03-01

    Shortened (12 months) multidrug multibacillary regimen (MDT MBR) was implemented in India in 1998, however there is yet a paucity of crucial data on its long-term outcome. To assess the efficacy of 12 months MDT MBR in multibacillary (MB) patients at our centre. This was a retrospective study undertaken analysing the clinic records of 1210 patients registered at the leprosy clinic of our institute from 1999 to 2010. 730 MB patients were treated with 12 months MDT MBR over this period. High bacillary index (BI) > or = 3 + was observed in 313 patients at the time of registration. Four hundred and one (54.9%) patients experienced lepra reactions. Recurrent ENL was observed in only 14 patients which manifested even after 5 years of stopping treatment. Clinico-histological correlation was noted in 361 (49.5%) patients. During follow up period ranging from 9 months to 10 years, nearly all patients had clearance of skin lesions including histopathological/bacteriological improvement. Only 13 (1.7%) patients relapsed. All patients responded well with 12 months MDT MBR without significant side effects. The overall relapse rate was only 1.7%. Thus, the recommendation for 12 months MDT MBR for all MB patients is robust and operationally practical, a decision which seems logical.

  20. Sociodemographic and epidemiological profile of leprosy patients in an endemic region in Brazil

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    Ronald Jefferson Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The incidence of Hansen's disease is high in overlooked populations. METHODS: Data of Hansen's disease cases reported in the information system of the Department of Informatics, Brazilian Unified Health System, from 2013 to 2014 were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 434 studied cases of Hansen's disease, the female sex (52.5%, adult age (73.7%, low educational level (61.8%, and multibacillary form were associated with higher prevalence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Hansen's disease is more frequent among female adults with a low educational level, and the prevalence of multibacillary leprosy reflects disease detection at late stages.

  1. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neder, Luciana; Rondon, Daniel A; Cury, Silvana S; Silva, Clovis A da

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia), musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis), and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were performed in leprosy patients. At least one musculoskeletal manifestation was observed in 14% of leprosy patients and in none of the controls. Five leprosy patients had asymmetric polyarthritis of small hands joints. Nerve function impairment was observed in 22% of leprosy patients, type 1 leprosy reaction in 18%, and silent neuropathy in 16%. None of the patients and controls presented musculoskeletal pain syndromes, and the frequencies of all antibodies and cyoglobulins were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Further analysis of leprosy patients demonstrated that the frequencies of nerve function impairment, type 1 leprosy reaction, and silent neuropathy were significantly observed in patients with versus without musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0036, p = 0.0001, and p = 0.309, respectively), as well as multibacillary subtypes in leprosy (86% vs. 42%, p = 0.045). The median of physicians' visual analog scale (VAS), patients' VAS, pain VAS, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) were significantly higher in leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0001, p = 0.002, p = 0002, and p = 0.001, respectively). This was the first study to identify musculoskeletal manifestations associated with nerve dysfunction in pediatric leprosy patients. Hansen's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymmetric arthritis, especially in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

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    Luciana Neder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia, musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis, and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were performed in leprosy patients. Results: At least one musculoskeletal manifestation was observed in 14% of leprosy patients and in none of the controls. Five leprosy patients had asymmetric polyarthritis of small hands joints. Nerve function impairment was observed in 22% of leprosy patients, type 1 leprosy reaction in 18%, and silent neuropathy in 16%. None of the patients and controls presented musculoskeletal pain syndromes, and the frequencies of all antibodies and cyoglobulins were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Further analysis of leprosy patients demonstrated that the frequencies of nerve function impairment, type 1 leprosy reaction, and silent neuropathy were significantly observed in patients with versus without musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0036, p = 0.0001, and p = 0.309, respectively, as well as multibacillary subtypes in leprosy (86% vs. 42%, p = 0.045. The median of physicians' visual analog scale (VAS, patients' VAS, pain VAS, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ were significantly higher in leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0001, p = 0.002, p = 0002, and p = 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify musculoskeletal manifestations associated with nerve dysfunction in pediatric leprosy patients. Hansen's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymmetric arthritis, especially in endemic regions.

  3. Evaluation of Three Mycobacterium leprae Monoclonal Antibodies in Mucus and Lymph Samples from Ziehl-Neelsen Stain Negative Leprosy Patients and their Household Contacts in an Indian Community

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    Nora Cardona-Castro

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucus and lymph smears collected from leprosy patients (9 and their household contacts (44 in the Caño Mochuelo Indian Reservation, Casanare, Colombia, were examined with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb against Mycobacterium leprae. The individuals studied were: 5 borderline leprosy (BB patients, 4 with a lepromatous leprosy (LL, all of whom were undergoing epidemiological surveillance after treatment and 44 household contacts: 21 of the LL and 23 contacts of the BB patients. The MoAb were reactive with the following M. leprae antigens: 65 kd heat shock protein, A6; soluble antigen G7 and complete antigen, E11. All the samples were tested with each of the MoAb using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase technique and 3,3 diaminobenzidine as chromogen. The patients and household contacts studied were all recorded as Ziehl-Neelsen stain negative. The MoAb which showed optimal reaction was G7, this MoAb permited good visualization of the bacilli. Five patients with BB diagnosis and one with LL were positive for G7; of the BB patients' household contacts, 9 were positive for G7; 7 of the LL patients' household contacts were positive for the same MoAb. MoAb G7 allowed the detection of bacillar Mycobacterium spp. compatible structures in both patients and household contacts. G7 permited the visualization of the complete bacillus and could be used for early diagnosis and follow-up of the disease in patients.

  4. Uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients in Brazil (U-MDT/CT-BR: Results of an open label, randomized and controlled clinical trial, among multibacillary patients.

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    Gerson Oliveira Penna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy control is based on early diagnosis and multidrug therapy. For treatment purposes, leprosy patients can be classified as paucibacillary (PB or multibacillary (MB, according to the number of skin lesions. Studies regarding a uniform treatment regimen (U-MDT for all leprosy patients have been encouraged by the WHO, rendering disease classification unnecessary.An independent, randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted from 2007 to 2015 in Brazil, compared main outcomes (frequency of reactions, bacilloscopic index trend, disability progression and relapse rates among MB patients treated with a uniform regimen/U-MDT (dapsone+rifampicin+clofazimine for six months versus WHO regular-MDT/R-MDT (dapsone+rifampicin+clofazimine for 12 months. A total of 613 newly diagnosed, untreated MB patients with high bacterial load were included. There was no statistically significant difference in Kaplan-Meyer survival function regarding reaction or disability progression among patients in the U-MDT and R-MDT groups, with more than 25% disability progression in both groups. The full mixed effects model adjusted for the bacilloscopic index average trend in time showed no statistically significant difference for the regression coefficient in both groups and for interaction variables that included treatment group. During active follow up, four patients in U-MDT group relapsed representing a relapse rate of 2.6 per 1000 patients per year of active follow up (95% CI [0·81, 6·2] per 1000. During passive follow up three patients relapsed in U-MDT and one in R-MTD. As this period corresponds to passive follow up, sensitivity analysis estimated the relapse rate for the entire follow up period between 2·9- and 4·5 per 1000 people per year.Our results on the first randomized and controlled study on U-MDT together with the results from three previous studies performed in China, India and Bangladesh, support the hypothesis that UMDT is an acceptable option to be

  5. PROTEIN OXIDATION AND ANTIOXIDANT VITAMINS IN LEPROSY

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Girish

    2011-01-01

    Methods: Total 30 leprosy cases were studied. Patients were subjected to various tests like, serum protein carbonyl as an index of protein oxidation, while serum Vitamin C and Vitamin E levels as endogenous antioxidants.Aims The presence of carbonyl groups in proteins has been used as a marker of ROS-mediated protein oxidation. The present work was undertaken to study the importance of endogenous antioxidants like Vitamin C and vitamin E in different types of leprosy patients.Results: An i...

  6. Hypopigmented macules: leprosy, atopy or pityriasis versicolor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massone, C; Cavalchini, A; Clapasson, A; Nunzi, E

    2010-12-01

    Lepromatous leprosy (LL) represents the highest infective and multibacillary form of leprosy. Clinical manifestations are consequent to the haematogenous spread of bacilli and include macules, plaques and nodules in a symmetric distribution or a diffuse infiltration of the skin. LL may mimic many different inflammatory and neoplastic skin diseases and in a small percentage of patients, skin manifestation may be atypical. This article reports the case of a South American child with LL presenting with symmetrically distributed hypopigmented macules previously misdiagnosed as pytiriasis alba, atopic dermatitis and pityriasis versicolor. Atopy and pityriasis versicolor are common skin conditions that can be also observed in leprosy patients and that can masquerade the diagnosis of LL, especially if occurring in dark skin. Dermatologists in Europe should be aware of this unusual form of presentation of leprosy and must take in mind Hansen disease in the differential diagnosis in patients coming from endemic areas.

  7. Genetic variants of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes are not associated with leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ling; Li, Xiao-An; Yu, Xiu-Feng; Long, Heng; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), which has massive genomic decay and dependence on host metabolism. Accumulating evidence showed a crucial role of mitochondria in metabolism and innate immunity. We hypothesized that the mitochondrial-related antimicrobial/antiviral immune genes MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), MITA (mediator of IRF3 activation) and MFN2 (mitofusin 2) would confer a risk to leprosy. In this study, we performed a case-control study to analyze 11 tag and/or non-synonymous SNPs of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes in 527 leprosy patients and 583 healthy individuals, and directly sequenced the three genes in 80 leprosy patients with a family history from Yunnan, Southwest China. We found no association between these SNPs and leprosy (including its subtypes) based on the frequencies of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes between the cases and controls. There was also no enrichment of potential pathogenic variants of the three genes in leprosy patients. Our results suggested that genetic variants of the MAVS, MITA and MFN2 genes might not affect the susceptibility to leprosy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Josafá G; Salgado, Claudio G

    2010-08-10

    Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing of these patients. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of patients with leprosy sequelae was performed at the reference unit in sanitary dermatology of the state of Pará in Brazil. We conducted anamnesis, identification of the regions affected by the lesions and measurement of ulcer depth and surface area. After that, we performed a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one patients with ulcers related to leprosy were evaluated, twenty-five of them were randomly assigned to a low level laser therapy group or a control group. Patients were treated 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures were ulcer surface area, ulcer depth and the pressure ulcer scale for healing score (PUSH). Ninety-seven ulcers were identified, with a mean (SD) duration of 97.6 (111.7) months, surface area of 7.3 (11.5) cm2, and depth of 6.0 (6.2) mm. Statistical analysis of the data determined that there were no significant differences in the variables analyzed before and after treatment with low level laser therapy. Ulcers in patients with leprosy remain a major source of economic and social losses, even many years after they have been cured of M. leprae infection. Our results indicate that it is necessary to develop new and more effective therapeutic tools, as low level laser therapy did not demonstrate any additional benefits to ulcer healing with the parameters used in this study. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00860717.

  9. Lepromatous leprosy of histoid type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annigeri S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoid leprosy is a variant of lepromatous leprosy, which develops as a result of resistance to dapsone monotherapy. Here we report two cases of lepromatous leprosy of histoid type, one with typical and another with atypical presentations.

  10. Clinical oxidative stress during leprosy multidrug therapy: impact of dapsone oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalcher, Taysa Ribeiro; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Coleman, Michael D; Batista Júnior, João; Salgado, Claudio G; Vieira, Jose Luiz F; Romão, Pedro R T; Oliveira, Fabio R; Monteiro, Marta Chagas

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the oxidative stress in leprosy patients under multidrug therapy (MDT; dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin), evaluating the nitric oxide (NO) concentration, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, glutathione (GSH) levels, total antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation, and methemoglobin formation. For this, we analyzed 23 leprosy patients and 20 healthy individuals from the Amazon region, Brazil, aged between 20 and 45 years. Blood sampling enabled the evaluation of leprosy patients prior to starting multidrug therapy (called MDT 0) and until the third month of multidrug therapy (MDT 3). With regard to dapsone (DDS) plasma levels, we showed that there was no statistical difference in drug plasma levels between multibacillary (0.518±0.029 µg/mL) and paucibacillary (0.662±0.123 µg/mL) patients. The methemoglobin levels and numbers of Heinz bodies were significantly enhanced after the third MDT-supervised dose, but this treatment did not significantly change the lipid peroxidation and NO levels in these leprosy patients. In addition, CAT activity was significantly reduced in MDT-treated leprosy patients, while GSH content was increased in these patients. However, SOD and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity levels were similar in patients with and without treatment. These data suggest that MDT can reduce the activity of some antioxidant enzyme and influence ROS accumulation, which may induce hematological changes, such as methemoglobinemia in patients with leprosy. We also explored some redox mechanisms associated with DDS and its main oxidative metabolite DDS-NHOH and we explored the possible binding of DDS to the active site of CYP2C19 with the aid of molecular modeling software.

  11. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Josaf? G; Salgado, Claudio G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT...

  12. Agreement Between the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 Questions and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Questionnaires to Classify Neuropathic Pain among Patients with Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Jamilly C. V.; Santos, Victor S.; Gurgel, Ricardo Q.; Santana, Julianne C. V.; Reis, Francisco P.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Feitosa, Vera L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) often occurs during the course of leprosy, and screening tools to differentiate NP from non-NP are often used. However, their performance varies in different settings. The most frequently used scales are the Douleur Neuropathique in 4 questions (DN4) and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) questionnaires. Thus, we conducted a study to evaluate the agreement between DN4 and LANSS questionnaires to classify NP in 195 leprosy patients attending two reference centers in Sergipe, Brazil. The DN4 and LANSS classified 166 and 110 patients, respectively, as having NP. One hundred and seven (54.8%) were classified as NP by both questionnaires; 59 (30.2%) solely by the DN4 questionnaire and three (1.5%) solely by the LANSS. The agreement of the questionnaires was 66.2% (weak agreement, Kappa = 0.30). Although both questionnaires identified a high proportion of NP, the development of more robust instruments is necessary to ensure the accuracy of diagnosis of leprosy patients classified as having NP. PMID:27458041

  13. Leprosy in the Bible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the biblical term tzaraat has referred to leprosy. In fact, the disease or diseases described under this name have no relationship to leprosy, as it was known in the Middle Ages or today; moreover, the term referred not only to skin disease, but also to the state of the ritual impurity and punishment for the sins. Although the real nature of tzaraat remains unknown, the differential diagnosis might include the following: Psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, favus, dermatophyte infections, nummular dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, crusted scabies, syphilis, impetigo, sycosis barbae, alopecia areata, furuncles, scabies, neurodermatitis, scarlet fever, lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, folliculitis decalvans, morphea, sarcoidosis, and lichen planopilaris. Leprosy became interchangeable with the biblical leprosy due to two inaccurate translations: The Hebrew tzaraat was first translated into Greek as leprosy in the sixth century, and later, the word leprosy was translated into Arabic as lepra in the ninth century. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Leprosy in a High-Risk Community Setting in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrera, Thushani Marie Elizabeth; Tillekeratne, L Gayani; Fernando, M S Nilanthi; Kasturiaratchi, S T Kaushlya; Østbye, Truls

    2016-10-01

    Leprosy is caused by the Mycobacterium leprae bacillus. Pockets of high endemicity remain in a number of countries including Sri Lanka, in spite of the fact that elimination has been achieved at the national level. In 2012, in a village in the Puttlam district, dermatologists reported an increase in individuals with leprosy. This village had been established in the 1990s for people displaced from Northern Sri Lanka during a civil war. A comprehensive household survey was conducted by district health officials from June to July 2012, and all household members present during the survey period were examined for leprosy lesions. Patients with suspected leprosy were referred to a dermatology clinic for clinical or pathological confirmation. The prevalence of leprosy was high (511 per 10 000 population). Household contact with another patient with leprosy increased the risk of leprosy (odds ratio = 6.69; P < .001). Continued vigilance is needed to keep leprosy at bay in high-risk communities.

  15. availability of childhood social services in leprosy settlements

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    career goals in life. The response to this question was used to assess the extent to which the children of leprosy patients intend to improve their means of livelihood ... (16.7%) of others in Oyo and 1(6.7%) in Abia were nursing babies. Table 1. Free education for children of leprosy patients by State. Enjoyed free education.

  16. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nogueira Brum Fontes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23, Pernambuco (n = 41, Rio de Janeiro (n = 22 and Rondônia (RO (n = 78. All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1% yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  17. Clinical manifestations of leprosy after BCG vaccination: An observational study in Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richardus (Renate); C.R. Butlin (C. Ruth); K. Alam (Khorshed); K. Kundu (Kallyan); A. Geluk (Annemieke); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Although BCG is used as a vaccine against tuberculosis, it also protects against leprosy. Previous evaluation over 18 years of an intervention of two doses BCG for 3536 household contacts of leprosy patients showed that 28 (23%) out of 122 contacts diagnosed with leprosy,

  18. HISTORY OF LEPROSY

    OpenAIRE

    Hanumanthayya; Manjunath; Anisha; Nida; Minakshi

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest and most dreaded diseases, which has tormented humans throughout history, leaving lasting impressions on religion, literature and art. If history is traced, evidence of leprosy is found in all the four Yugas of Hindu religion, quotes of Jesus in Bible of Christianity and verses of Prophet in Muslim religion.

  19. HISTORY OF LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumanthayya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is one of the oldest and most dreaded diseases, which has tormented humans throughout history, leaving lasting impressions on religion, literature and art. If history is traced, evidence of leprosy is found in all the four Yugas of Hindu religion, quotes of Jesus in Bible of Christianity and verses of Prophet in Muslim religion.

  20. Project REENCONTRO: ethical aspects of genetic identification in families separated by the compulsory isolation of leprosy patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Claudia Lee Williams; Biondi, Flávia Costa; Maricato, Glaucia Cristina; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experience of a team of geneticists, working in partnership with a Brazilian social movement aimed at promoting the rights of victims of Hansen's disease. These university researchers propose to use DNA test results to ascertain kinship connections and thereby reunite families that were sundered apart by draconian state policies of the mid-twentieth century that decreed the forced segregation of leprosy patients and the institutionalization of their children. The team's aim is to help revert stigma and reinforce positive group identity as well as to facilitate judicial claims to moral and financial reparation from the Brazilian state. We will discuss how, notwithstanding the voluntary nature of tests, mediated at all times through the social movement, the geneticists take care to follow clear ethical guidelines in the collection and stocking of DNA samples as well as in the devolution of test results. The subsequent inclusion of anthropologists in the team brings to the fore new ethical dilemmas ranging from procedures in field research to the possible consequences of research results.

  1. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  2. Leprosy control in the post leprosaria abolition years in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was administered to all patients with leprosy seen at the four leprosy clinics in Anambra State in a face-to-face interview. The questions covered among other items, the clinic attendance behavior and the single most important reason for absenteeism in the previous year. The total and individual reasons for ...

  3. A study of social status of people with disabilities due to leprosy in desert part of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S P

    2011-09-01

    Leprosy is a stigmatized disease in our society. Ninety-eight disabled leprosy patients were studied in areas of Pokaran CHC and Ramdeora PHC of Jaisalmer district. About ninety-five per cent (94.6%) leprosy patients were found discarded by their life partners due to disabilities. A positive relationship was found between social stigma and deformity due to disease. IEC need to be done at community level also for changing attitude and behaviour towards leprosy patients.

  4. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto Josafá G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT on wound healing of these patients. Methods Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of patients with leprosy sequelae was performed at the reference unit in sanitary dermatology of the state of Pará in Brazil. We conducted anamnesis, identification of the regions affected by the lesions and measurement of ulcer depth and surface area. After that, we performed a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one patients with ulcers related to leprosy were evaluated, twenty-five of them were randomly assigned to a low level laser therapy group or a control group. Patients were treated 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures were ulcer surface area, ulcer depth and the pressure ulcer scale for healing score (PUSH. Results Ninety-seven ulcers were identified, with a mean (SD duration of 97.6 (111.7 months, surface area of 7.3 (11.5 cm2, and depth of 6.0 (6.2 mm. Statistical analysis of the data determined that there were no significant differences in the variables analyzed before and after treatment with low level laser therapy. Conclusions Ulcers in patients with leprosy remain a major source of economic and social losses, even many years after they have been cured of M. leprae infection. Our results indicate that it is necessary to develop new and more effective therapeutic tools, as low level laser therapy did not demonstrate any additional benefits to ulcer healing with the parameters used in this study. Trial Registration The trial was registered at Clinical

  5. Pretty leprosy: Another face of Hansen’s disease! A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prem Anand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pretty leprosy is one of the rare severe forms of lepromatous leprosy. It is a reaction pattern that occurs in untreated pure primitive diffuse lepromatous leprosy or lepromatous leprosy. The skin of the patient is diffusely infiltrated and shiny, so that natural wrinkles are obliterated. It generates a moist and myxoedematous complexion imparting a healthy aspect to the patient. Thus the disease got the name. In this review we have reviewed almost all available literature to point more light toward the clinical variant pretty leprosy. A search was made in PubMed central to know the availability of information about pretty leprosy, but the response was nil for pretty leprosy. 37 articles were spotted in PubMed media on Lucioleprosy; 3 review articles are present and the rest were case reports.

  6. Skin Tests for Evaluation of Cell Mediated Immunity in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Mallya

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mesate,d immune (CMI response to lepromin and dinitrochloro benzene (DNCB was evaluatt-d in 60 freshly detected leprosy cases. It was observed that 70%, ( 28 of 40 of the pa across tie leprosy spectrum except LL cases revealed delayed hypersensitivity to DNCB as -against 42.5% (1-7 of 40 to lepromin. DNCB test was found superior to lepromin test to measure CMI because of its simplicity and easy interpretation of skin reactivity. It detected CMI in 40% of BL cases who were lepromin negative. Grading of skin reactivity showed a program decrease in delayed hypersensitivity across the spectrum of leprosy from TT to LL. It can be concluded that there is no gross impairment of non-specific CMI in leprosy patients other than LL cases and this non-specific CMI depression correlates well with Ridley-Jopling clinical scale of leprosy.

  7. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Cardona-Castro

    Full Text Available Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers, Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  8. The stigma and prejudice of leprosy: influence on the human condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To analyze the knowledge, feelings and perceptions involving patients affected by leprosy, as a better understanding of these factors may be useful to decrease the stigma and prejudice associated with the condition. METHODS: The study cohort consisted of 94 patients who underwent treatment for leprosy at the Health Units in the City of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (MT, Brazil. The study questionnaire included items to collect information on socio-demographic data, knowledge about the disease, stigma, prejudice, self-esteem and quality of life of leprosy patients. Bivariate analyses were used to assess the data based on the chi-square test with a 5% significance threshold. RESULTS: The results revealed that the study population consisted predominantly of males (55.3% with an income between 1 and 3 times the minimum wage (67%. The survey respondents reported that the most significant difficulties related to the treatment were the side effects (44.7% and the duration of the treatment (28.7%. A total of 72.3% of the subjects were knowledgeable about the disease, of whom 26.6% had the leprosy reaction. Stigma and prejudice were cited by 93.6% of the participants. Based on the responses, 40.4% of patients reported being depressed and sad, and 69.1% of the subjects encountered problems at work after being diagnosed. A total of 45.7% of the patients rated their quality of life between bad and very bad. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that leprosy causes suffering in patients beyond pain and discomfort and greatly influences social participation.

  9. The stigma and prejudice of leprosy: influence on the human condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Garbin, Artênio José Ísper; Carloni, Maria Emília Oliveira Gomes; Rovida, Tânia Adas Saliba; Martins, Ronald Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the knowledge, feelings and perceptions involving patients affected by leprosy, as a better understanding of these factors may be useful to decrease the stigma and prejudice associated with the condition. The study cohort consisted of 94 patients who underwent treatment for leprosy at the Health Units in the City of Cuiabá, Mato Grosso (MT), Brazil. The study questionnaire included items to collect information on socio-demographic data, knowledge about the disease, stigma, prejudice, self-esteem and quality of life of leprosy patients. Bivariate analyses were used to assess the data based on the chi-square test with a 5% significance threshold. The results revealed that the study population consisted predominantly of males (55.3%) with an income between 1 and 3 times the minimum wage (67%). The survey respondents reported that the most significant difficulties related to the treatment were the side effects (44.7%) and the duration of the treatment (28.7%). A total of 72.3% of the subjects were knowledgeable about the disease, of whom 26.6% had the leprosy reaction. Stigma and prejudice were cited by 93.6% of the participants. Based on the responses, 40.4% of patients reported being depressed and sad, and 69.1% of the subjects encountered problems at work after being diagnosed. A total of 45.7% of the patients rated their quality of life between bad and very bad. Our results suggest that leprosy causes suffering in patients beyond pain and discomfort and greatly influences social participation.

  10. CATASTROPHIC ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME IN LEPROSY

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    Dr. Vaibhav Chewoolkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to mesenteric venous thrombosis as a part of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and later on succumbed. We thereby wish to highlight the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this potentially fatal condition in patients with infections.

  11. Serum anti-phenolic glycolipid-1 IgA correlates to IgM isotype in leprosy patients: a possible candidate for seroepidemiological surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, Alexandre C; Guimarães, Juliana A; Rodrigues, Raphael O; Araújo, Thiago D V; Tavares, Clodis M; Cabral, Paula B; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Nagao-Dias, Aparecida T

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare serum anti-phenolic glycolipid-1 IgA, IgG, and IgM levels in leprosy patients and controls. Analysis of anti-PGL-1 IgA, IgG, or IgM in serum samples from multibacillary (MB, n=32) and paucibacillary (PB, n=22) leprosy patients, and in non-endemic controls (n=17), using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A strong correlation between serum IgM and IgA isotypes was found (r=.745, PVPN) predictive values were estimated for each isotype. For IgA, the VPP and VPN were, respectively, 100.0% (87.0%-100.0%; 95% confidence interval) and 38.7% (24.4%-54.5%); for IgG, 100% (87.0%-100.0%) and 28.8% (17.8%-42.1%), respectively; and for IgM, 95.2% (83.8%-99.4%) and 51.7% (32.5%-70.6%), respectively. Despite the limiting factors, anti-PGL1 IgA correlates to IgM levels and it could be considered as a possible laboratorial tool to be also used, for instance, in serological follow-up studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, E; Julious, S; Salome, A; Jennifer, G; John, A S; Kannan, L; Richard, J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional comparative study was to find the effects of environment and education on knowledge and attitude of nursing students towards leprosy. Data were collected, using a pretested questionnaire, from the first year and third year students of a School of Nursing attached to a leprosy specialty hospital and also from a comparable School of Nursing attached to a general hospital. The results showed that trainees acquired more knowledge on leprosy during training in both schools of nursing. However, those trained in leprosy hospital environment had higher knowledge and attitude scores than those trained in general hospital environment. The attitude of the trainees attached to leprosy hospital was favourable even before they had formal training in leprosy. Those trained in the general hospital showed more favourable attitude after training compared to before training. School of Nursing attached to leprosy hospital provided an atmosphere conducive to learning and understanding more about leprosy. The trainees retained what was learnt because of regular association with patients affected by leprosy. For employment in hospital or community based services or research related to leprosy, nurses trained in a leprosy hospital would have added value of knowledge and attitude.

  13. Negligible risk of inducing resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with single-dose rifampicin as post-exposure prophylaxis for leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieras, L. (Liesbeth); R. Anthony (Richard); W.H. van Brakel (Wim); Bratschi, M.W. (Martin W.); van den Broek, J. (Jacques); Cambau, E. (Emmanuelle); Cavaliero, A. (Arielle); Kasang, C. (Christa); Perera, G. (Geethal); Reichman, L. (Lee); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); P. Saunderson (Paul); Steinmann, P. (Peter); Yew, W.W. (Wing Wai)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPost-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for leprosy is administered as one single dose of rifampicin (SDR) to the contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. SDR reduces the risk of developing leprosy among contacts by around 60 % in the first 2-3 years after receiving SDR. In countries where

  14. ASSESSMENT OF PATIENTS’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Jezus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a contagious, long-term infection, which manifests dermatological and neurological symptoms and signs, being considered an endemic, widespread disease, regarded as a serious health problem in Brazil. Early diagnosis of leprosy and its proper treatment prevents disease from progressing, avoiding physical disabilities, which are frequent as the infection evolves, and constitute a major cause of stigma, leading the patient to social isolation. This study aimed to verify the patient's perceptions regarding Hansen's disease diagnosis, seeking to contribute to the prevention of physical disabilities. It was carried out in Sinop in the State of Mato Grosso, being classified as a qualitative research approach. Patients diagnosed with leprosy, enrolled for annual treatment in Nações Basic Health Unity (Unidade de Saúde Básica Nações, took part in the research. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews, and the results were analyzed in categories, these being, the implications on the patients’ self-esteem after diagnosis of leprosy; patients’ perceptions of treatment and changes in socioeconomic status after leprosy. It is worth noting that leprosy as a public health issue does not restrict to the immense amount of cases and its potential to cause physical disability, which interferes in the psychosocial context, should be taken into consideration. It is valid to point out that leprosy affects several aspects of the pacient’s life, including their physical, mental and social well-being, requiring a holistic and humane nursing care.

  15. Can social marketing approaches change community attitudes towards leprosy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wendy

    2006-06-01

    This essay explores how the concept of social marketing can be employed to change attitudes towards leprosy. Firstly, the concept of social marketing is discussed, then the attitudes that people have about leprosy, the stigma that people with leprosy and their families may face, and the detrimental effects that this can have on their lives. The effect of knowledge and education on attitudes towards leprosy is discussed, as this can be a key component of social marketing campaigns. Various methods of social marketing used to change attitudes and reduce stigma are examined, such as mass media campaigns, school based education, methods which involve community leaders, and the integration and improvement of leprosy services. Principles of social marketing which can lead to the success of campaigns such as incorporating local beliefs are emphasized. The success of the social marketing campaign in Sri Lanka is described, which aimed to remove the fear of leprosy, and to encourage patients to seek and comply with treatment. Finally, it is argued that social marketing, used correctly, can be highly effective at changing community attitudes towards leprosy, reducing stigma and improving the lives of patients, who become able to seek treatment sooner as they lose their fear of stigmatization.

  16. [Leprosy: stigma and prejudice lived by institucionalized patients in Santa Catarina State, Brazil (1940-1960)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Miriam Süssking; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Costa, Eliani; Gregório, Vitória Regina Petters; Koerich, Ana Maria Espíndola; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes

    2008-01-01

    This study is a qualitative research with a socio-historic approach whose objective was to know the prejudice and stigma lived by the institutionalized patients/residents with hanseniase. To achieve this goal, three patients were intervewed who lived in a colony hospital during the research period, utilizing the oral history method. Data were collected and were further analysed, utilizing the stigma referencial. The results indicated that after the entry in the institution, these patients got their family bonds broken, lost their rights as citizens, regarding the situation, they took upon a new life, in a new environment. Concluding that, the nosocomial isolation for a long period of time (years of confinement and dismissal), caused the symbolic death of many patients that lived with the hope to cohabit with family and/or society.

  17. Borderline lepromatous leprosy with neurofibromatosis

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    Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence of leprosy with neurofibromatosis is rare both the diseases present with nerve thickening and skin lesions (patches and nodules. The coexistence of neurofibroma with borderline tuberculoid, lepromatous, histoid, and neuritic leprosy has been reported in the past. We report here a case of borderline lepromatous leprosy coexisting with neurofibromatosis in a 60 year-old male, who presented with neurofibromata and nerve thickening. Histopathology of skin biopsy from the leprosy and neurofibroma nodules confirmed the diagnosis of leprosy and neurofibroma.

  18. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in leprosy | Chewoolkar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome is an acute and life threatening variant of antiphospholipid syndrome with a high mortality rate. Many infections are known to be accompanied by the thrombotic manifestations of this syndrome. We came across a patient of leprosy who developed bowel ischaemia secondary to ...

  19. Serum neopterin as a marker for reactional states in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlinck, F. F.; Klatser, P. R.; Walsh, D. S.; Bos, J. D.; Walsh, G. P.; Faber, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    Reactions, a relatively common phenomenon among leprosy patients in treatment, require early detection and proper management to prevent serious sequelae. It is generally accepted that reactional states are immunologically mediated and, as such, usually improve with immunomodulatory treatments such

  20. Leprosy Specific Orofacial Aspects

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    Vathsala Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic infection caused by Mycobactenum leprae, GHA- Hansen first identified the organism in 1873, so called Hansen disease. Mycobacterium leprae is a bacillus that presents a peculiar tropism for the skin and peripheral nerves. The upper airway has a great importance as a route of M. Leprae infection. The clinical spectrum of leprosy ranges from the tuberculoid form (TT to the disseminative and progressive lepromatous form (LL. Cell-mediated immunity is considered to be the crucial defence against the disease and the magnitude of this immunity defines the extent of the disease- Facial lesions in leprosy can occur in all form of the disease and also in lepra reaction, oral lesions are rare but, when present, occur in the lepromatous form

  1. Leprosy - one of the many forgotten tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolska, Zofia; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa

    2017-02-14

    Leprosy or Hansen disease is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium leprae. The large number of undetected cases (2000-2012 years 4 mln people) remains a threat to the elimination of leprosy. Leprosy is an unheard in Poland and generally is considered a condition so "exotic" that it is not worth to spend more attention to it. Forgotten disease in developed countries still thrives in an environment of poor and uneducated. Regardless of the conclusion that in the 21st century none infectious disease should not be treated as a disease on the designated regions of the world, other than our own, it should be recalled that the M. leprae was discovered in Europe, where for many years there were leprosaria and still infectious hospitals in Great Brittan, France or Spain get patients suspected of leprosy. The mobility of the inhabitants of the globe caused by wars, ethnic conflicts or a simple tourism causes that any infectious disease can not be treated as solely limited to distant us regions. The best proof of this were the viral diseases, formerly found in only in Asia or Africa, and currently transmitted to Europe [1]. At any moment, we can stand up against the problem of diagnostics of humans toward leprosy. Many medical reports indicate that leprosy as a disease with many symptoms encountered difficulties in its diagnosis. Only the experience of medical professionals and good microbiological diagnosis may speed up the diagnosis of leprosy.

  2. Leprosy – one of the many forgotten tropical diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Zwolska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy or Hansen disease is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium leprae. The large number of undetected cases (2000-2012 years 4 mln people remains a threat to the elimination of leprosy. Leprosy is an unheard in Poland and generally is considered a condition so “exotic” that it is not worth to spend more attention to it. Forgotten disease in developed countries still thrives in an environment of poor and uneducated. Regardless of the conclusion that in the 21st century none infectious disease should not be treated as a disease on the designated regions of the world, other than our own, it should be recalled that the M. leprae was discovered in Europe, where for many years there were leprosaria and still infectious hospitals in Great Brittan, France or Spain get patients suspected of leprosy. The mobility of the inhabitants of the globe caused by wars, ethnic conflicts or a simple tourism causes that any infectious disease can not be treated as solely limited to distant us regions. The best proof of this were the viral diseases, formerly found in only in Asia or Africa, and currently transmitted to Europe [1]. At any moment, we can stand up against the problem of diagnostics of humans toward leprosy. Many medical reports indicate that leprosy as a disease with many symptoms encountered difficulties in its diagnosis. Only the experience of medical professionals and good microbiological diagnosis may speed up the diagnosis of leprosy.

  3. Pride and prejudice--identity and stigma in leprosy work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kristine

    2011-06-01

    This article sets out to expand the way stigma, and those affected by it, are understood within leprosy discourse and to apply these insights to the analysis of the experiences of leprosy workers. The term stigma is often used simply as shorthand for 'negative social experience'. However, to reduce the negative aspects of complex everyday life experiences to a single word is often overly simplistic and can serve to objectify, rather than illuminate, the experiences of those affected. This article argues that in order to understand the lived experience of stigma we must come to understand stigma as an ongoing, dialectical social process and develop an approach to stigma that analytically separates stigma from its negative social consequences. The article applies these insights to data collected during 14 months of fieldwork with front-line leprosy workers in India, which suggests that falling leprosy prevalence rates and a rapidly changing policy landscape have led to leprosy workers feeling marginalised and stigmatised within their own organisation. The article argues that, rather than seeing stigma merely as a negative process in which leprosy workers are passive victims, we must recognise that stigma also plays a key role in the creation and maintenance of leprosy workers' identity and is utilised as a strategic tool in the struggle for influence between different groups within the organisation. Finally, the article argues for the benefit of expanding our understanding of stigma across public health and of applying these insights to designing future interventions.

  4. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  5. Study of serum lipids in leprosy

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    Gupta Anju

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty fresh and untreated patients of leprosy constituted the study group. Fifty, age and sex matched healthy individuals formed the controls. Ridly and Jopling system of classification was used in the study. Majority i.e 21 cases were of BT group, 12 of BB, 7 of BL, 9 of LL and one case was of TT leprosy. The serum triglyceride level was lower than normal in TT, showed no alteration in BT or BB and was insignificantly increased in bL and LL patients. The total cholesterol was lowerthan normal in TT, showed no alteration in BT or BB and was insignificantly increased in Bland LL patients. The total cholesterol was lower than normal in TT, whereas in BT, BB, BL and LL groups the levels were statistically decreased. The HDL cholesterol was within normal range in TT, significantly decreased in BT and LL patients, showed no significant alteration in BB and was insignificantly decreased in BL group. The LDL cholesterol in TT was low but was not so low statistically when compared with the controls, whereas in BT, BB, BL and LL groups the levels were statistically decreased. The VLDL cholesterol was within normal range in TT and BT, was raised insignificantly in 3 of 12 cases of BB, was within normal range in BL and in LL leprosy it was raised in one out of 9 cases. In the absence of any derangement of liver function tests, it can be concluded that leprosy per se leads to alterations in lipid metabolism. However, no correlation could be established between the group/type of leprosy, bacterial indices and levels of different lipid fractions in the present study.

  6. Disability prevention and management in leprosy: A field experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapati R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Bombay Leprosy Project has conducted operational research into cost effective ways of using therapeutic management for prevention of disabilities (POD. The goal of achieving this are broadly divided as 1 prevention of impairments and disabilities [POID] and 2 prevention of worsening of disabilities [POWD]. About 33-56% of newly registered leprosy patients already have clinically detectable nerve function impairment [NFI], often no longer amenable to MDT. An analysis of 892 leprosy cases treated with WHO-MDT stresses the need to focus attention on leprosy patients having > 5 skin lesions and multiple nerve thickening. Assessment of 454 disabled leprosy patients after 4 years indicated that the compliance for the services offered was good and it helped to improve the disability status in more than 50% of patients. In terms of effectiveness of the services, it was found to be effective in preventing worsening of deformities in hands and healing of trophic ulcers in feet. The methodology adopted has also helped us to develop an operational research model about the necessity to systematize the assistance and support to be given if the services can be routed through a public health facility. Because of the large numbers of leprosy patients with disability living in this region and the limited resources available, the services have to be targeted towards those who are most in need. The major advantage of such community based program is an attempt to eliminate the social stigma in the patients′ families and the education of the community.

  7. Leprosy and Armadillos

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-18

    Dr. Richard Truman, Chief of the National Hansen’s Disease Program Laboratory Research Branch, discusses leprosy and armadillos.  Created: 2/18/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/18/2016.

  8. Job of the Bible: leprosy or scabies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelboom, Thierry; Cogan, Elie; Klastersky, Jean

    2007-04-01

    Proposing a medical diagnosis a posteriori of a person who died a long time ago is not as impossible as it sounds if sufficient medical history is available.A whole book of the Bible is devoted to Job and his trials. The diagnosis of leprosy has been generally accepted by medieval commentators because the verses of the Book speak of ulcers disseminated over the skin, and also because leprosy is an exemplary sanction imposed by way of example by God to punish those who have committed a sin. In this paper, we have taken the different verses with a medical content from the Book of Job, and reconstructed the clinical picture as if the patient had turned up in the 21st century in order to see if the diagnosis of leprosy may be called into question, and to discuss the limits of the medico-historic approach. The clinical picture of the disease consists of deterioration in the general condition, with widespread pain, confusion, skin eruptions, bilious vomiting, and so on. Under these conditions, if Job did exist, and if the retrospective medical history is reliable, the most likely diagnosis is that of scabies rather than leprosy. Copyright (c) 2007 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  9. The challenge of producing skin test antigens with minimal resources suitable for human application against a neglected tropical disease; leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky L Rivoire

    Full Text Available True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3-10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens. In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial.

  10. Opening a Can of Worms: Leprosy Reactions and Complicit Soil-Transmitted Helminths

    OpenAIRE

    Deanna A. Hagge; Pawan Parajuli; Chhatra B. Kunwar; Divya R.S.J.B. Rana; Ruby Thapa; Kapil D. Neupane; Peter Nicholls; Linda B. Adams; Annemieke Geluk; Mahesh Shah; Indra B. Napit

    2017-01-01

    Background > 94% of new annual leprosy cases are diagnosed in populations co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminths (STH). STH can profoundly dysregulate host immune responses towards Th2 bias, which can be restored over time after deworming. We hypothesize that STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction (denoted as simply “reaction” herein) occurrence within a co-endemic population. Methods A cohort study was performed on a cohort of Nepalese leprosy patients across treatment and d...

  11. Leprosy trends at a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India, from 2008 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuvel, Thirumugam; Isaakidis, Petros; Shewade, Hemant Deepak; Kattuppara, Lucy; Singh, Rajbir; Govindarajulu, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important cause of preventable disabilities. After the advent of multidrug therapy, new leprosy cases have come down dramatically. Despite this achievement, India, which contributes 60% of the global leprosy burden, faces some challenges to eliminate the disease, including active transmission in the community and delayed diagnosis of leprosy patients. The objectives of the study were 1) to determine sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of newly diagnosed adults and children (less than 15 years) with leprosy and their trends over time (2008-2015) and 2) to describe the profile of surgical procedures among leprosy patients registered for reconstructive surgeries during 2006-2015. Retrospective descriptive study was conducted involving a record review of new patients with leprosy registered in Vimala Dermatological Centre, Mumbai. A total of 578 new leprosy cases were registered in the hospital during 2008-2015. There has been a steady increase in the trend of child cases (less than 15 years) registered in the facility (from 3% in 2008 to 18% in 2015), x 2 =12.11, p< 0.01. The majority of the patients (68%) were migrants of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Targeting children and migrants and ensuring early diagnosis and treatment initiation are essential components for leprosy elimination in an urban metropolis in India.

  12. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Reibel

    Full Text Available Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients.Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71. Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31 or from French overseas territories (n = 36 where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4 was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33, followed by type 3 (n = 17, type 4 (n = 11 and type 2 (n = 6. SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements.The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France or (b more likely random in regions where

  13. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Florence; Chauffour, Aurélie; Brossier, Florence; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients. Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71). Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31) or from French overseas territories (n = 36) where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4) was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33), followed by type 3 (n = 17), type 4 (n = 11) and type 2 (n = 6). SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka) and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion) not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements. The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a) concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France) or (b) more likely random in regions where diverse

  14. Multibacillary leprosy mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta-Baas, G; Hernández-Cabrera, M F; Barile-Fabris, L A; Romero-Figueroa, M del S; Arenas-Guzmán, R

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious chronic disease with a wide range of clinical and serological manifestations. We report a case of a woman presenting with a malar rash, painless oral ulcers, photosensitivity, arthritis, positive antinuclear antibodies test and leuko-lymphopenia. Our case illustrates an unusual presentation of leprosy initially diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After the confirmation of multibacillary leprosy and multidrug therapy recommended by the World Health Organization, a good clinical response was observed. Recognition of rheumatic manifestations in leprosy is important as they may be confused with SLE. A literature review is presented to encourage clinicians to consider leprosy as a differential diagnosis. Specifically in patients with unusual rheumatic manifestations and persistent skin lesions, and when neurological symptoms are present. Leprosy has not been eradicated, so misdiagnosis can be frequent. It is necessary to increase medical practitioner awareness in order start proper treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Waardenburg′s Syndrome with Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S.N Reddy

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare association of Waardenburg′s syndrome and tuberculoid leprosy in a 13-year-old patient is described. This is an unrecorded feature in the literature. These two disorders are quite unrelated entities and their occurrence in the same patient is a casual one. All the classical features of Waardenburg′s syndrome except deafness were present and the disease manifested as an isolated case in the family. The pertinent literature is briefly reviewed.

  16. Avaliação da expressão de interleucina 1 beta (IL-1β e antagonista do receptor de interleucina 1 (IL-1Ra em pacientes com hanseníase Evaluation of the expression of interleukin 1 beta(IL-1β and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra in leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Dias Costa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A hanseníase é uma doença infectocontagiosa espectral que acompanha-se por uma série de eventos imunológicos desencadeados pela resposta do hospedeiro frente ao agente etiológico, o Mycobacterium leprae. Evidências sugerem que a indução e manutenção da resposta imune/inflamatória na hanseníase estão vinculadas a interações de múltiplas células e fatores solúveis, particularmente através da ação de citocinas. Nesse estudo, foram mensurados níveis de IL-1β e IL-1Ra de 37 casos novos de hanseníase acompanhados ao longo do tratamento e 30 controles sadios pelo teste ELISA. A coleta de sangue periférico foi realizada em quatro tempos para os casos de hanseníase (pré-tratamento com PQT, 2ª dose, 6ª dose e pós-PQT e em único momento para os controles. Na comparação dos níveis das moléculas de casos no pré-PQT e controles, houve diferença estatisticamente significativa somente para IL-1β. Nossos resultados sugerem a participação dessa citocina no processo imune/inflamatório.Leprosy is an infectious and contagious spectral disease accompanied by a series of immunological events triggered by the host's response to the etiologic agent, Mycobacterium leprae. Evidence suggests that the induction and maintenance of the immune/inflammatory response in leprosy are linked to multiple cell interactions and soluble factors, mainly through the action of cytokines. The ELISA test was used to measure the levels of IL-1β and IL-1Ra in 37 new leprosy patients followed-up during treatment and 30 healthy controls. Peripheral blood was collected four times during the treatment of leprosy patients (MDT pretreatment, 2nd dose, 6th dose and post-MDT, and only once from the controls. The comparison of molecular levels in pre-MDT patients and controls showed a statistically significant difference for IL-1β. The results suggest the participation of this cytokine in the genesis of the immune/inflammatory process.

  17. Study Of Socio- Economic Factors In Relation To Leprosy

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    Alam Mahjabeen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: what are the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy and their implications? Objectives: (i To study the socio-economic factors in relation to leprosy.(ii To assess the impact of disease on patients’ job/income. Study design: Cross-sectional. Setting and Participants: Patients attending the dermatology OPD, J.N. Medical college hospital, A.M.U., Aligarh. Sample size: 200 leprosy patients. Study variables: education, occupation, social class, incapacitation, change in job, reduction in income. Statically analysis: Chi-square test Results: 46% of the leprosy patients were illiterate. A large majority of patients (78% were involved in heavy manual work as farmers and labourers. 68.5% patients belonged to low social classes (IV and V. More males (26.3% suffered from incapacitation than females (8.5%. 2.5% patients lost their job or were unable to work and 11.5% had to change their jobs due to the disease or disability caused by it. 17.5% patients had a history of reduction in their income after occurrence of leprosy.

  18. Estudio de resistencia a la rifampicina y la dapsona en tres pacientes con recurrencia de lepra Study of rifampin and dapsone resistance in three patients with recurring leprosy

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    Elkin Hernández

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Detectar la presencia de cepas de Mycobacterium leprae resistentes a la rifampicina y la dapsona en tres pacientes con recurrencia de lepra y sospecha clínica de resistencia antimicrobiana, mediante la aplicación de técnicas moleculares. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo retrospectivo en tres pacientes multibacilares del Sanatorio de Agua de Dios, Cundinamarca, Colombia, que habían presentado recidivas de lepra documentadas por su historia clínica, baciloscopia y biopsia. Se obtuvieron biopsias de lesiones cutáneas que se procesaron para la extracción y purificación del ADN bacilar. Se amplificaron regiones de los genes rpoB y folP1 asociadas con la resistencia antimicrobiana, mediante la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa "touch-down" y se secuenciaron los productos amplificados mediante el método de Sanger. RESULTADOS: Se detectó una mutación puntual en el nucleótido 1367 del gen rpoB en dos de las muestras estudiadas. No se encontró la mutación estudiada en el gen folP1 en ninguno de los tres pacientes. CONCLUSIONES: La mutación identificada demostró la presencia de bacilos de M. leprae resistentes a la rifampicina en dos de los tres pacientes estudiados con recurrencia de la enfermedad. No se detectó la mutación indicadora de resistencia a la dapsona en ninguno de los tres pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence of rifampin- and dapsone-resistant strains of Mycobacterium leprae in three patients with recurring leprosy and clinically-suspected antimicrobial resistance through molecular techniques. METHODS: A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted of three multibacillary patients at the "Agua de Dios" Sanitarium in Cundinamarca, Colombia, that presented leprosy relapses that were documented by medical history, bacilloscopy, and biopsy. Biopsies were taken of the skin lesions and the bacteria were subject to DNA extraction and purification. Regions of the rpoB and folP1 genes associated with

  19. Stigma in leprosy: miles to go!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A; Kushwaha, A S; Kotwal, A; Sanghi, S; Verma, A K

    2010-01-01

    No disease has been more closely associated with stigma than leprosy such that it has become a metaphor for stigma. Stigma has been difficult to measure and little research has been done on this issue. Stigma reduction has not been an important component of anti-leprosy program. The study was undertaken to measure the stigma associated with leprosy by using P scale which is used for assessing participation restriction of those affected by the disease. This comparative questionnaire based study was carried out in two sets of patients. Two groups of 30 patients each were studied. First group belonged to a Government run Leprosarium and group two from a tertiary care skin and leprosy centre. The study used the Participation (P) scale and data was collected by interviewing the patients. Participation restriction was defined as any score equal to and more than 13. Participation restriction was observed in 27 (90%) cases of group 1while participation restriction was present in only 7 (23.3%) subjects of group 2. It was observed that mean score of participation restriction in group 1 was quite high at 31.9 while it was only 8.3 for group 2. The participation restriction was directly related to the duration of disease and the grade of disability. Longer the duration of disease, greater was the likelihood of restriction. The participation restriction was found to be negatively correlated with the education. Recommendation about prevention of disability would require program about early diagnosis of nerve damage and subsequent action at the patient-family-community level and health care providers.

  20. Factors Contributing to the Delay in Diagnosis and Continued Transmission of Leprosy in Brazil – An Explorative, Quantitative, Questionnaire Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Mary; GalAn, Noêmi; Teasdale, Katherine; Prado, Renata; Amar, Harpreet; Rays, Marina S.; Roberts, Lesley; Siqueira, Pedro; de Wildt, Gilles; Virmond, Marcos; Das, Pranab K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a leading cause of preventable disability worldwide. Delay in diagnosis of patients augments the transmission of infection, and allows progression of disease and more severe disability. Delays in diagnosis greater than ten years have been reported in Brazil. To reduce this delay, it is important to identify factors that hinder patients from presenting to doctors, and those that delay doctors from diagnosing patients once they have presented. This study aimed to explore factors associated with the delayed diagnosis of leprosy in Brazil. Methodology/ Principal Findings This is an exploratory study using a self-constructed questionnaire delivered to patients attending three leprosy referral clinics across three states in Brazil. Data were analysed to determine associations between variables and the time taken for participants to present to the health-service, and between variables and the time taken for doctors to diagnose participants once they had presented. Participants who suspected they had leprosy but feared community isolation were 10 times more likely to wait longer before consulting a doctor for their symptoms (OR 10.37, 95% CI 2.18–49.45, p = 0.003). Participants who thought their symptoms were not serious had a threefold greater chance of waiting longer before consulting than those who did (OR 3.114, 95% CI 1.235–7.856, p = 0.016). Forty-two point six per cent of participants reported initially receiving a diagnosis besides leprosy. These had a three times greater chance of receiving a later diagnosis of leprosy compared to those not misdiagnosed or not given a diagnosis (OR 2.867, 95% CI 1.288–6.384, p = 0.010). Conclusions/ Significance This study implies a need for patient education regarding leprosy symptoms and the reduction of stigma to encourage patients to present. The high rate of misdiagnosis reported suggests a need to increase clinician suspicion of leprosy. Further education regarding disease symptoms in medical

  1. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Truman, Richard W; Goulart, Isabela Maria B; Vissa, Varalakshmi; Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suffys, Philip; Fontes, Amanda B; Rosa, Patricia S; Scollard, David M; Williams, Diana L

    2017-06-01

    Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM) analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens. The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR), rifampin (rpoB DRDR) and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR) was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB) and 55 paucibacillary (PB) cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA) were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7%) and PB (35/55; 63.3%) patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues or archival Fite's stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172), formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues (n = 36) or archival Fite's stained slides (n = 3) were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST analysis. The HRM-based assay was also able to

  2. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Araujo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens.The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR, rifampin (rpoB DRDR and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB and 55 paucibacillary (PB cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7% and PB (35/55; 63.3% patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues or archival Fite's stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues (n = 36 or archival Fite's stained slides (n = 3 were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST analysis. The HRM-based assay was also able

  3. Clinical variables associated with leprosy reactions and persistence of physical impairment

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    Daniela Teles de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Leprosy is a chronic disease that affects skin and peripheral nerves. Disease complications include reactional episodes and physical impairment. One World Health Organization (WHO goal of leprosy programs is to decrease the number of grade 2 impairment diagnoses by 2015. This study aims to evaluate clinical factors associated with the occurrence of leprosy reactions and physical impairment in leprosy patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of data from medical records of patients followed in two important centers for the treatment of leprosy in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil, from 2005 to 2011. We used the chi-square test to analyze associations between the following categorical variables: gender, age, operational classification, clinical forms, leprosy reactions, corticosteroid treatment, and physical impairment at the diagnosis and after cure. Clinical variables associated with multibacillary leprosy and/or reactional episodes and the presence of any grade of physical impairment after cure were evaluated using the logistic regression model. Results We found that men were more affected by multibacillary forms, reactional episodes, and grade 2 physical impairment at diagnosis. Leprosy reactions were detected in a total of 40% of patients and all were treated with corticosteroids. However, physical impairment was observed in 29.8% of the patients analyzed at the end of the treatment and our multivariate analysis associated a low dose and short period of corticosteroid treatment with persistence of physical impairments. Conclusions Physical impairment should receive an increased attention before and after treatment, and adequate treatment should be emphasized.

  4. Estimation of serum level of interleukin-17 and interleukin-4 in leprosy, towards more understanding of leprosy immunopathogenesis

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    Marwa Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combating Mycobacterium leprae is known to be via T-helper1 response. However, other T-helper effector cells; T-helper17 and T-helper2; play a role, particularly in the context of disease type. Aims: We aimed to evaluate serum levels of interleukin (IL-17 (T-helper17 cytokine and IL-4 (T-helper2 cytokine in untreated patients with different types of leprosy, compared to controls. Methods: Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, serum IL-17 and IL-4 levels were estimated in 43 leprotic patients and 43 controls. Patients were divided into six groups; tuberculoid, borderline cases, lepromatous, erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL, type 1 reactional leprosy, and pure neural leprosy. Patients were also categorized according to bacillary load and the presence or absence of reactions. Results: Serum IL-17 was significantly lower in cases (4-61.5 pg/mL; median 19, compared to controls (26-55 pg/mL; median 36 (P < 0.001, and was significantly lower in each type of leprosy compared to controls, with the lowest level in lepromatous leprosy (4-61.5 pg/mL; median 12.5. Significantly elevated serum IL-4 was found in patients (1.31-122.4 pg/mL; median 2.31 compared to controls (1.45-5.72 pg/mL; median 2.02 (P = 0.008, with the highest level among lepromatous leprosy patients (2-87.2 pg/mL; median 28.9, and the lowest in type 1 reactional leprosy (1.4-2.5 pg/mL; median 1.87 (P = 0.006. Conclusion: Defective secretion of IL-17 is related to disease acquisition as well as progression toward lepromatous pole in leprosy patients. The overproduction of IL-4 in patients with lepromatous leprosy may infer their liability to develop ENL. Nevertheless, the small number of the studied population is a limitation.

  5. Leprosy in Puerto Rico: insight into the new millennia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín, Diana C; Candelario, Nicole; Carrasquillo, Osward Y; Figueroa, Luz; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined the elimination of the disease as a global prevalence of less than one case per 10,000 population. However, disease transmission is an ongoing worldwide public health concern, as evidenced by the more than 220,000 new cases diagnosed each year. This study is an update of the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico for the period of 2000-2014. A retrospective analysis of data was obtained from the Tropical Disease Clinic (TDC) of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Sixty-three new cases of leprosy are detailed in this study. Disease incidence and prevalence were 1.65 and 5.26 per 100,000 inhabitants (of the island of Puerto Rico), respectively, and an average of 4.2 new cases per year. Most of the male patients in the study suffered from lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.026). In all, 47 (74.6%) patients had been born in Puerto Rico, and 29 (46%) had an affected family member or were in close contact with someone with leprosy. Compared to those of previous studies, these results demonstrate a decrease in both the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico over the past 15 years. The relatively high prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico means that it remains endemic on the island. Concerted efforts must be undertaken to achieve the goal of the elimination of this old and stigmatized disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography in Pure Neuritic Leprosy: First Experience Report and Review of the Literature

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    Michele R. Colonna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five years after both right ulnar and median nerve decompression for paraesthesias and palsy, a patient, coming from Nigeria but living in Italy, came to our unit claiming to have persistent pain and combined median and ulnar palsy. Under suspicion of leprosy, skin and left sural nerve biopsy were performed. Skin tests were negative, but Schwann cells resulted as positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB, leading to the diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy (PNL. The patient was given PB multidrug therapy and recovered from pain in two months. After nine months both High Resolution Ultrasonography (HRUS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI were performed, revealing thickening of the nerves. Since demyelination is common in PNL, the Authors started to use Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography (DTIT to get better morphological and functional data about myelination than does the traditional imaging. DTIT proved successful in showing myelin discontinuity, reorganization, and myelination, and the Authors suggest that it can give more information about the evolution of the disease, as well as further indications for surgery (nerve decompression, nerve transfers, and babysitting for distal effector protection, and should be added to traditional imaging tools in leprosy.

  7. A historical overview of leprosy epidemiology and control activities in Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Carolina; Pedrosa, Valderiza Lourenço; Dias, Luiz Carlos; Braga, Andréa; Chrusciak-Talhari, Anette; Santos, Mônica; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Talhari, Sinésio; Talhari, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is an ancient infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. According to comparative genomics studies, this disease originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. The Europeans and North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. In Brazil, this disease arrived with the colonizers who disembarked at the first colonies, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador and Recife, at the end of the sixteenth century, after which it was spread to the other states. In 1854, the first leprosy cases were identified in State of Amazonas in the north of Brazil. The increasing number of leprosy cases and the need for treatment and disease control led to the creation of places to isolate patients, known as leprosaria. One of them, Colonia Antônio Aleixo was built in Amazonas in 1956 according to the most advanced recommendations for isolation at that time and was deactivated in 1979. The history of the Alfredo da Matta Center (AMC), which was the first leprosy dispensary created in 1955, parallels the history of leprosy in the state. Over the years, the AMC has become one of the best training centers for leprosy, general dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases in Brazil. In addition to being responsible for leprosy control programs in the state, the AMC has carried out training programs on leprosy diagnosis and treatment for health professionals in Manaus and other municipalities of the state, aiming to increase the coverage of leprosy control activities. This paper provides a historical overview of leprosy in State of Amazonas, which is an endemic state in Brazil.

  8. Leprosy. An update: definition, pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelmann, K; González González, S E; Salas-Alanis, J C; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves and is still endemic in various regions of the world. Clinical presentation depends on the patient's immune status at the time of infection and during the course of the disease. Leprosy is associated with disability and marginalization. Diagnosis is clinical and is made when the patient has at least 1 of the following cardinal signs specified by the World Health Organization: hypopigmented or erythematous macules with sensory loss; thickened peripheral nerves; or positive acid-fast skin smear or skin biopsy with loss of adnexa at affected sites. Leprosy is treated with a multidrug combination of rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone. Two main regimens are used depending on whether the patient has paucibacillary or multibacillary disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Leprosy, a Pleitropic infectious disease: a challenging diagnosis

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    Manal El Meniawy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of 22-year-old man who was suffering from epididymo-orchitis for more than 2 years. Several months after the onset of the condition, the patient developed bilateral upper-limb and lower-limb numbness and tingling sensation with hypothesia, which was further complicated by nonhealing foot ulcer, arthralgia, and generalized maculopapular skin rash. The patient was initially managed as rheumatoid arthritis associated with vasculitis, which was later diagnosed as lepromatous leprosy. Musculoskeletal complaints are not exclusive to only autoimmune diseases; it can also be observed in several disorders, such as infectious diseases. It is challenging for any physician to properly diagnose patients with leprosy as differentiating leprosy from other systemic rheumatic disease is pivotal.

  10. Patient satisfaction and suggestions for improvement of remote ICD monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Larsen, Mie Christa Jensen; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study aim was to evaluate patient acceptance and content with remote follow-up (FU) of their implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and to estimate patients' wish for changes in remote follow-up routines. METHODS: Four hundred seventy-four ICD patients at the device follow-up c...

  11. A migration-driven model for the historical spread of leprosy in medieval Eastern and Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Helen D; Michael Taylor, G; Marcsik, Antónia; Molnár, Erika; Pálfi, Gyorgy; Pap, Ildikó; Teschler-Nicola, Maria; Pinhasi, Ron; Erdal, Yilmaz S; Velemínsky, Petr; Likovsky, Jakub; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Mariotti, Valentina; Riga, Alessandro; Rubini, Mauro; Zaio, Paola; Besra, Gurdyal S; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Bull, Ian D; O'Grady, Justin; Spigelman, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Leprosy was rare in Europe during the Roman period, yet its prevalence increased dramatically in medieval times. We examined human remains, with paleopathological lesions indicative of leprosy, dated to the 6th-11th century AD, from Central and Eastern Europe and Byzantine Anatolia. Analysis of ancient DNA and bacterial cell wall lipid biomarkers revealed Mycobacterium leprae in skeletal remains from 6th-8th century Northern Italy, 7th-11th century Hungary, 8th-9th century Austria, the Slavic Greater Moravian Empire of the 9th-10th century and 8th-10th century Byzantine samples from Northern Anatolia. These data were analyzed alongside findings published by others. M. leprae is an obligate human pathogen that has undergone an evolutionary bottleneck followed by clonal expansion. Therefore M. leprae genotypes and sub-genotypes give information about the human populations they have infected and their migration. Although data are limited, genotyping demonstrates that historical M. leprae from Byzantine Anatolia, Eastern and Central Europe resembles modern strains in Asia Minor rather than the recently characterized historical strains from North West Europe. The westward migration of peoples from Central Asia in the first millennium may have introduced different M. leprae strains into medieval Europe and certainly would have facilitated the spread of any existing leprosy. The subsequent decline of M. leprae in Europe may be due to increased host resistance. However, molecular evidence of historical leprosy and tuberculosis co-infections suggests that death from tuberculosis in leprosy patients was also a factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Active search for leprosy and other skin diseases in school children from Agua de Dios, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gerzaín; González, Rosalba; Gonzalez, Deysy; Granados, Carolina; Pinto, Rafael; Herrera, Hilda; Gutiérrez, Luisa F; Hernández, Elkin; López, Fernando; Gómez, Yenny

    2007-01-01

    Actively searching for leprosy, other skin diseases and BCG vaccination scars amongst school children from Agua de Dios, the municipality having the highest prevalence of leprosy in Colombia. A clinical examination of the children was carried out by nurses, interns, general practitioners and experts on leprosy. Skin smear tests and skin biopsies were performed when the clinical findings suggested leprosy. Anti-phenolic glycolipid antibodies in blood were determined in special cases. 86 % of the 2 844 school children were examined; 833 had skin diseases and 16 % of these required evaluation by specialists. Four new cases of paucibacillary leprosy, two indeterminate and two primary polyneuritic cases were found. Pediculosis capitis, pityriasis alba, tinea versicolor, hypopigmented nevus, insect bites and miliaria were frequently detected. BCG vaccination scars were absent in 387 children; following several logistical problems, they were vaccinated. Four children had signs of childhood abuse. An 11-year-old girl presented hypopigmented mycosis fungoides. All diseases and conditions found were treated. The community received information regarding the results, emphasising the importance of an early diagnosis of leprosy. The incidence of leprosy found (16/10,000) was 123 times higher than the rest of the country's incidence. It is advisable to continue clinical examinations in Agua de Dios and research into risk factors for acquiring leprosy.

  13. Inheritance and heritability of resistance to citrus leprosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianel, Marinês; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Cristofani, Mariângela; Filho, Oliveiro Guerreiro; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana; Rodrigues, Vandeclei; Astúa-Monge, Gustavo; Machado, Marcos Antônio

    2006-10-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic inheritance of resistance to leprosis, the most important viral disease of citrus in Brazil, was characterized through the phenotypic assessment of 143 hybrids resulting from crosses between tangor 'Murcott' (Citrus sinensis x C. reticulata) and sweet orange 'Pêra' (C. sinensis), considered to be resistant and susceptible to the disease, respectively. All plants were grafted onto Rangpur lime (C. limonia) and inoculated with Citrus leprosis virus, cytoplasmic type through the infestation with viruliferous mites, Brevipalpus phoenicis. The experiments were arranged in a completely randomized block design with 10 replicates. Incidence and severity of the disease in leaves and stems as well as plant growth parameters (plant height and stem diameter) were recorded for 3 years after the infestation with the viruliferous mites. The average values of all variables were analyzed using principal component analysis, discriminant factorial analysis, estimation of the clonal repeatability coefficients, and frequency of the distributions of the average values for each measured variable. The principal component analysis resulted in the identification of at least two groups with resistance and susceptibility to leprosis, respectively. About 99% of all hybrids were correctly classified according to the discriminant factorial analysis. The broad-sense heritability coefficients for characteristics associated with incidence and severity of leprosis ranged from 0.88 to 0.96. The data suggest that the inheritance of resistance to leprosis may be controlled by only a few genes.

  14. Factors contributing to delay in diagnosis and start of treatment of leprosy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholls, P.G.; Chhina, N; Aaen, Karen Bro

    2005-01-01

    The objective of our research was to identify factors contributing to delay in diagnosis and start of treatment in leprosy, focussing on patients' narratives of help-seeking behaviour. Our research took place in Purulia, West Bengal, India and in Nilphamari, northern Bangladesh. Between January...... and August 2000, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 104 patients that explored each individual's narrative of help-seeking behaviour and the context of beliefs and attitudes towards leprosy. Subsequently we surveyed 356 patients currently receiving treatment for leprosy and recorded specific...

  15. Malassezia pachydermatis fungemia in an adult with multibacillary leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Roman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Malassezia pachydermatis is a relatively rare agent of bloodstream infections. We describe an unusual case of Malassezia fungemia in an adult patient hospitalized for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was also found to have multibacillary leprosy. Treatment of the patient required extensive medical management but resulted in a good outcome.

  16. Malassezia pachydermatis fungemia in an adult with multibacillary leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Roman; Prabhava Bagla; Ping Ren; Lucas S. Blanton; Megan A. Berman

    2016-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a relatively rare agent of bloodstream infections. We describe an unusual case of Malassezia fungemia in an adult patient hospitalized for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was also found to have multibacillary leprosy. Treatment of the patient required extensive medical management but resulted in a good outcome.

  17. Leprosy in Denmark 1980-2010: a review of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Huma; Nielsen, Susanne D; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2016-01-05

    Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic and progressive granulomatous disease affecting mainly the skin and the peripheral nervous system. If left unrecognized, the infection can lead to permanent nerve damage and disability. The clinical presentation depends on the immune response of the patient and can result in a wide spectrum of symptoms. Leprosy is a rare encounter in Scandinavia but remains endemic in some parts of the world, with some areas reporting an increasing incidence. We performed a retrospective record review of leprosy cases in Denmark from 1980 to 2010 with the purpose of presenting the most common geographical, demographic and clinical findings and to discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of patients with leprosy. In total 15 cases were reviewed. The majority (87%) of leprosy patients in Denmark were born in South- and Southeast Asia, and were presumed to have contracted the infection in their countries of origin. Patients were predominately young males (mean age: 28.6 years). Anaesthetic skin lesion with or without nerve enlargement were the most common clinical presentations (73%). Immunological leprosy reactions were seen in 40% of the cases. Diagnoses were based on clinical findings and skin biopsies. Treatment length varied but all patients received multidrug regimens. Leprosy should be kept in mind when encountering patients with suspicious skin lesions originating from leprosy endemic areas or with history of travel or work in the tropics. Due to the long incubation period with symptoms presenting long after immigration or return, clinicians often do not have the diagnosis in mind. The wide spectrum of symptoms and immunological reactions further complicates the diagnostic process. Treatment of leprosy and the complicated immunological reactions, which frequently accompanies the infection, should be performed in collaboration with a specialist.

  18. Histoid leprosy: a rare exuberant case*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Pedro Jose Secchin; Messias, Sulamita dos Santos Nascimento Dutra; Ferreira, Paola Cristina Brandão Oliveira; Sales, Anna Maria; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Nery, José Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a neglected disease. We point up the need of recognizing the unusual clinical presentations of the disease in order to make early diagnosis and proper treatment possible, and break the transmission chain. The authors report a rare type of multibacillary leprosy: histoid leprosy and present images of numerous well-circumscribed indurated papules and nodules distributed throughout the entire body. PMID:26560226

  19. Histoid leprosy: a rare exuberant case*

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Pedro Jose Secchin; Messias, Sulamita dos Santos Nascimento Dutra; Ferreira, Paola Cristina Brand?o Oliveira; Sales, Anna Maria; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Nery, Jos? Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    AbstractLeprosy is a neglected disease. We point up the need of recognizing the unusual clinical presentations of the disease in order to make early diagnosis and proper treatment possible, and break the transmission chain. The authors report a rare type of multibacillary leprosy: histoid leprosy and present images of numerous well-circumscribed indurated papules and nodules distributed throughout the entire body.

  20. [Emergency care of vertigo patients: suggestions for efficient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Takei, Yasuhiko; Matsuda, Takeaki; Karaho, Takehiro; Morita, Masahiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    Some diseases in which persons show vertigo or dizziness may be life-threatening, regardless of symptom severity, and require careful attention. These include diseases of the inner ear, central nervous system, and cardiovascular manifestation. In May 2006, a group in charge of primary emergency consultation began work enabling physicians to treat vertigo patients more efficiently and safely, as detailed in this report. Of the 173 persons with vertigo hospitalized from January 2004 to March 2008, six had cerebrovascular manifestations clarified only after hospitalization, underscoring the importance of careful examination, especially of those 75 years of age older, having continuous headache, having severe trunk ataxia despite apparently mild eye nystagmus, or reporting a history of high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or ischemic heart disease.

  1. Operational barriers to the implementation of multidrug therapy and leprosy elimination in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson S; Bamgboye, Elijah A; Oyediran, Alain B O O

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization targeted to eliminate leprosy from the world with multidrug therapy (MDT) by 2000. But, leprosy remains a problem in Essimbiland of Menchum Division of Cameroon, with a prevalence of 1.7/10,000 and high rate of case detection in children. To assess knowledge and practices on the cure of leprosy, treatment duration, drug availability and problems faced by leprosy patients acquiring drugs in order to enhance MDT implementation and leprosy elimination in Menchum and Boyo divisions. Observational study in which a structured questionnaire was administered to leprosy patients, their contacts and a control group. 480 respondents were interviewed and 405 (84.8%) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 81.6-87.2%) knew that leprosy can be cured. These respondents comprised 166 (92.2%) of 180 contacts, 129 (93.5%) of 138 patients and 110 (67.9%) of 162 controls. Two hundred and fourteen (44.6%) (95% CI: 40.1-48.9%) respondents knew that leprosy treatment is free, comprising of 110 (51.4%) patients, 99 (46.3%) contacts and five (2.3%) controls. A statistically significant difference in the knowledge on free treatment of leprosy was found to exist between leprosy patients, contacts and controls, with leprosy patients having a better knowledge (79.71%) (95% CI: 73-86.42%), followed by contacts (55.0%) (95% CI: 47.73-62.26%) and controls (3.1%) (95% CI: 0.43-5.77%) (P = 0.00). Pertinent problems faced by patients in getting MDT included distant health facilities and poor road network (91[19.0%]), lack of confidence in treatment (56 [11.7%]), MDT shortage (45 [9.4%]), few health facilities (52 [10.8%]), gratification demands (25 [5.2%]), disturbance from other illnesses (24 [5.0]), ignorance (21 [4.4%]) and poor relationship with nurses (24 [5.0%]). Patients still face problems in getting free MDT. Better MDT implementation and leprosy elimination strategies are proposed.

  2. Operational barriers to the implementation of multidrug therapy and leprosy elimination in Cameroon

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    Nsagha Dickson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World Health Organization targeted to eliminate leprosy from the world with multidrug therapy (MDT by 2000. But, leprosy remains a problem in Essimbiland of Menchum Division of Cameroon, with a prevalence of 1.7/10,000 and high rate of case detection in children. Aims: To assess knowledge and practices on the cure of leprosy, treatment duration, drug availability and problems faced by leprosy patients acquiring drugs in order to enhance MDT implementation and leprosy elimination in Menchum and Boyo divisions. Methods: Observational study in which a structured questionnaire was administered to leprosy patients, their contacts and a control group. Results: 480 respondents were interviewed and 405 (84.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 81.6-87.2% knew that leprosy can be cured. These respondents comprised 166 (92.2% of 180 contacts, 129 (93.5% of 138 patients and 110 (67.9% of 162 controls. Two hundred and fourteen (44.6% (95% CI: 40.1-48.9% respondents knew that leprosy treatment is free, comprising of 110 (51.4% patients, 99 (46.3% contacts and five (2.3% controls. A statistically significant difference in the knowledge on free treatment of leprosy was found to exist between leprosy patients, contacts and controls, with leprosy patients having a better knowledge (79.71% (95% CI: 73-86.42%, followed by contacts (55.0% (95% CI: 47.73-62.26% and controls (3.1% (95% CI: 0.43-5.77% (P = 0.00. Pertinent problems faced by patients in getting MDT included distant health facilities and poor road network (91[19.0%], lack of confidence in treatment (56 [11.7%], MDT shortage (45 [9.4%], few health facilities (52 [10.8%], gratification demands (25 [5.2%], disturbance from other illnesses (24 [5.0], ignorance (21 [4.4%] and poor relationship with nurses (24 [5.0%]. Conclusion: Patients still face problems in getting free MDT. Better MDT implementation and leprosy elimination strategies are proposed.

  3. Reação reversa atípica em paciente com hanseníase dimorfa co-infectado pelo HIV Atypical reversal reaction in a borderline leprosy patient co-infected with HIV

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    Rafaela de Lima Caruso

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo HIV não altera a história natural da hanseníase. Observa-se maior incidência de estados reacionais nos pacientes co-infectados, além de casos mais graves de neurite. Paciente soropositiva com hanseníase dimorfa tuberculóide manifestou reação reversa exuberante. Lesões cutâneas atípicas e raras surgiram após a introdução da terapia anti-retroviral que promoveu o início da recuperação imunológica com aumento de linfócitos T CD4+ e queda da carga viral. A restauração da imunidade celular nos pacientes soropositivos pode precipitar reações reversas, descritas recentemente como uma das manifestações da síndrome inflamatória de reconstituição imunológica associada à hanseníase.HIV infection does not modify the natural course of leprosy. However, HIV co-infection seems to be associated with an increased rate of reactional states and more severe cases of neuritis. The authors describe a case of borderline tuberculoid leprosy in a HIV-positive patient who developed a marked reversal reaction. Atypical and rare skin manifestations, such as verrucous lesions and ulcers, appeared after highly active antiretroviral therapy, which resulted in increased CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and drop in viral load. The restoration of the cellular immunity in HIV-seropositive patients can trigger reversal reactions that are one of the manifestations of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Only recently the syndrome has been associated with leprosy.

  4. Review of leprosy control activities in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Qubati, Y; al-Dobai, A B

    1999-06-01

    Leprosy control activities in Yemen are reviewed historically and up to the present time. Since 1983 the World Health Organization's multidrug therapy has been used in the National Leprosy Control Programme. Current activities are carried out in 63 leprosy clinics distributed all over the country and staffed by trained primary health care workers and medical assistants. In Yemen leprosy prevalence has declined from 1400 per 10,000 population in 1990 to 647 in 1997. Over the same period, new case detection rates per 10,000 population increased from 185 to 517. A backlog of leprosy cases continues to transmit the disease in Yemen.

  5. Vitiligo occurring after thyroidectomy at sites of leprosy lesions

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    George Anuja

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old female patient developed vitiligo at the previous sites of treated leprosy immediately after thyroidectomy. A neurological factor in association with thyroid dysfunction is considered as the possible aetiology of vitiligo in this case.

  6. Leprosy reactions: coinfections as a possible risk factor

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    Ana Carolina F. Motta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the frequency of coinfections in leprosy patients and whether there is a relationship between the presence of coinfections and the development of leprosy reactional episodes. METHOD: A cross-sectional study based on an analysis of the medical records of the patients who were treated at the Leprosy Clinics of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, was conducted from 2000 to 2010. Information was recorded regarding the age, sex, clinical status, WHO classification, treatment, presence of reactions and coinfections. Focal and systemic infections were diagnosed based on the history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between the leprosy reactions and the patients' gender, age, WHO classification and coinfections. RESULTS: Two hundred twenty-five patients were studied. Most of these patients were males (155/225 = 68.8% of an average age of 49.31±15.92 years, and the most prevalent clinical manifestation was the multibacillary (MB form (n = 146, followed by the paucibacillary (PB form (n = 79. Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL was more prevalent (78/122 = 63.9% than the reversal reaction (RR (44/122 = 36.1%, especially in the MB patients (OR 5.07; CI 2.86-8.99; p<0.0001 who exhibited coinfections (OR 2.26; CI 1.56-3.27; p,<0.0001. Eighty-eight (88/225 = 39.1% patients exhibited coinfections. Oral coinfections were the most prevalent (40/88 = 45.5%, followed by urinary tract infections (17/88 = 19.3%, sinusopathy (6/88 = 6.8%, hepatitis C (6/88 = 6.8%, and hepatitis B (6/88 = 6.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Coinfections may be involved in the development and maintenance of leprosy reactions.

  7. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  8. Accentuation of ichthyosis vulgaris due to associated leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. P.; Shah, S. S.; Doshi, H. V.

    1973-01-01

    A case of ichthyosis vulgaris associated with tuberculoid leprosy is reported. Ichthyotic scales were markedly accentuated within the anaesthetic patches of leprosy. The probable mechanism of the accentuation of ichthyosis by leprosy is discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4760727

  9. Avaliação e controle de contatos faltosos de doentes com hanseníase Evaluación y control de contactos faltantes de enfermos con lepra Evaluation and control of missing contacts of leprosy patients

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    Carmen Silvia de Campos Almeida Vieira

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Estudo descritivo, com variáveis qualitativas, realizado no Ambulatório Regional de Especialidades de Taubaté, com objetivo de resgatar e avaliar contatos faltosos de doentes de hanseníase. Analisou-se 36 prontuários de casos novos, no período de janeiro de 2003 a julho de 2004. Identificou-se 92 contatos, sendo 64,1% faltosos, tendo 25% entre 20 a 29 anos e 58,5% do sexo feminino. Destes, 61% foram submetidos à consulta de enfermagem no domicilio. Relataram não adesão ao controle por esquecimento (66,6%, e falta de tempo (11,1%; 4 contatos tinham sintomas de hanseníase, e 1 foi confirmado (forma transmissível - Dimorfa. Sem atingir 100% da cobertura de busca ativa, sugerimos, para assegurar a meta de eliminação da doença, parcerias e descentralização das ações de controle.Estudio descriptivo, con cualitativas variable, realizado en el Ambulatorio de Especialidades Regional de Taubaté, a fin de canjear y evaluar las deficiencias de enfermos de lepra. Se analizaron los registros de 36 nuevos casos, entre enero de 2003 y julio de 2004. Se identificaron 92 contactos, sendo 64,1% deficiencias, tendo 25% de 20 a 29 años y 58,5% mujeres. De estos, 61% fueron sometidos a consulta en la casa de los enfermos . Informó de la no pertenencia al control en el olvido (66,6%, y la falta de tiempo (11,1%, 4 contactos había síntomas de la lepra, y se confirmó 1 (formulario transmisibles - Dimorfa. Sin lograr una cobertura del 100% del activo de búsqueda, le sugerimos que, para garantizar el objetivo de eliminar la enfermedad, las asociaciones y la descentralización de las actividades de control.Descriptive study, with qualitative variables, carried on in the Ambulatory of Specialties Region of Taubaté, in order to evaluate the missing contacts of leprosy patients. Thirty-six records of new cases were analyzed, from January 2003 to July 2004. Ninety-two contacts were identified, being 64.1% missing ones, having 25% from 20 to 29 years

  10. Oral coinfection can stress peripheral lymphocyte to inflammatory activity in leprosy

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    Ana Carolina Fragoso Motta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated the intracellular profile of interleukin-2 (IL-2, interleukin-4 (IL-4, interleukin-10 (IL-10 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from leprosy patients based on oral infections presence to determine whether these coinfections could be associated with pro-inflammatory activity in leprosy. METHODS: Leprosy patients regardless of clinical form and specific leprosy treatment (n=38 were divided into two groups: Group I - leprosy patients with oral infections (n=19, and Group II - leprosy patients without oral infections (n=19. Non-leprosy patients presenting oral infections were assigned to the control Group (n=10. Intracellular IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ production was evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS before and 7 days after controlling the oral infection in the Group I, before and 7 days after dental prophylaxis in the Group II, and during oral infection process in control Group. RESULTS: Low percentages of CD3+ lymphocytes bearing IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ were observed in the Group I and Group II at baseline and 7 days after therapy or prophylaxis compared to controls. Group I showed reduced percentages of IL-4 at baseline and 7 days after therapy compared to controls, or at baseline of Group II, and the Group II showed reduced percentages of CD3+ cells bearing IL-4 compared to control. An increase of the percentages of CD3+cells bearing IL-4 was observed in the Group I after the oral infections treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of oral infections favors the intracellular cytokines expression and, probably, the inflammatory reaction operating as a stimulatory signal triggering the leprosy reactions.

  11. BCG and Adverse Events in the Context of Leprosy

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    Renate Richardus

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNotwithstanding its beneficial immunoprophylactic outcomes regarding leprosy and childhood TB, BCG vaccination may cause adverse events, particularly of the skin. However, this local hyper-immune reactivity cannot be predicted before vaccination, nor is its association with protection against leprosy known. In this study we investigated the occurrence of adverse events after BCG (revaccination in contacts of leprosy patients and analyzed whether the concomitant systemic anti-mycobacterial immunity was associated with these skin manifestations.MethodsWithin a randomized controlled BCG vaccination trial in Bangladesh, 14,828 contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients received BCG vaccination between 2012 and 2017 and were examined for adverse events 8 to 12 weeks post-vaccination. From a selection of vaccinated contacts, venous blood was obtained at follow-up examination and stimulated with Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae antigens in overnight whole-blood assays (WBA. M. leprae phenolic glycolipid-I-specific antibodies and 32 cytokines were determined in WBAs of 13 individuals with and 13 individuals without adverse events after vaccination.ResultsOut of the 14,828 contacts who received BCG vaccination, 50 (0.34% presented with adverse events, mainly (80% consisting of skin ulcers. Based on the presence of BCG scars, 30 of these contacts (60% had received BCG in this study as a booster vaccination. Similar to the pathological T-cell immunity observed for tuberculoid leprosy patients, contacts with adverse events at the site of BCG vaccination showed elevated IFN-γ levels in response to M. leprae-specific proteins in WBA. However, decreased levels of sCD40L in serum and GRO (CXCL1 in response to M. leprae simultaneously indicated less T-cell regulation in these individuals, potentially causing uncontrolled T-cell immunity damaging the skin.ConclusionSkin complications after BCG vaccination present surrogate markers for protective

  12. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, José Antonio Armani; Paschoal, Vania Del'Arco; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ismael, Manuela Gallo y Sanches; Sichieri, Eduvaldo Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1%) of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3%) were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease. PMID:24288467

  13. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

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    José Antonio Armani Paschoal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1% of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3% were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease.

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Leprosy Coinfection: Challenges in Resource-Limited Setups

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    Charles M. Kwobah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria leprae(leprosy and HIV coinfection are rare in Kenya. This is likely related to the low prevalence (1 per 10,000 of population of leprosy. Because leprosy is no longer a public health challenge there is generally a low index of suspicion amongst clinicians for its diagnosis. Management of a HIV-1-leprosy-coinfected individual in a resource-constrained setting is challenging. Some of these challenges include difficulties in establishing a diagnosis of leprosy; the high pill burden of cotreatment with both antileprosy and antiretroviral drugs (ARVs; medications’ side effects; drug interactions; scarcity of drug choices for both diseases. This challenge is more profound when managing a patient who requires second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART. We present an adult male patient coinfected with HIV and leprosy, who failed first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART and required second-line treatment. Due to limited choices in antileprosy drugs available, the patient received monthly rifampicin and daily lopinavir-/ritonavir-based antileprosy and ART regimens, respectively. Six months into his cotreatment, he seemed to have adequate virological control. This case report highlights the challenges of managing such a patient.

  15. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease.

  16. A geospatial risk assessment model for leprosy in Ethiopia based on environmental thermal-hydrological regime analysis

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    Azeb Tadesse Argaw

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Geospatial methods were used to study the associations of the environmental thermal-hydrological regime with leprosy prevalence in the Oromia and Amhara regions of Ethiopia. Prediction models were developed that indicated leprosy prevalence was related to: (i long-term normal climate grid data on temperature and moisture balance (rain/potential evapo-transpiration; (ii satellite surveillance data on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and daytime earth surface temperature (Tmax from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR; and (iii a Genetic Algorithm Rule-Set Prediction (GARP model based on NDVI and Tmax data in relation to leprosy prevalence data. Our results suggest that vertical transmission is not the only means of acquiring leprosy and support earlier reports that a major factor that governs transmission of leprosy is the viability of Mycobacterium leprae outside the human body which is related to the thermal-hydrologic regime of the environment.

  17. Lepromatous Leprosy of Prepuce- A Case Report

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    Kalpana R. Sulhyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is commonly seen over cooler parts of the body and very rarely found over external genitalia because of their warm temperature.We report a case of lepromatous leprosy of prepuce in a 79 years old male who presented with phimosis. Local examination revealed anodule over prepuce and the clinical diagnosis was carcinoma of penis. This case highlights that leprosy should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of penile lesions.

  18. Educating for early diagnosis of leprosy in the municipality of Mato Grosso Rondonópolis

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    Débora Aparecida da Silva Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rondonópolis-MT has shown high rates of leprosy cases, leading to the need for preventive educational activities. The extension project "Leprosy: Early diagnosis is the solution" is carried out in partnership with the Health Department for 4 years with the Nursing Course UFMT / ICEN / CUR. This article aimed to describe the realization of educational activities on prevention of leprosy in the areas of health facilities, in-service education, lectures in schools and participation in joint efforts between March 2014 and March 2015. The audience were 1764 residents, in addition to students and professionals schools and health teams. They were referred 22 suspected cases and confirmed 11 new, professional training and schools. This citizenship action, the project significantly contributed to the early diagnosis of leprosy and the public health of the city. It is suggested that new projects are undertaken to promote the quality of primary care, encouraging the participation of academia through the university extension.

  19. Leprosy and its socio-cultural perception in Indian religions and ancient texts.

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    Sinha, A K; Banerjee, B G; Singh, S

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is one of the oldest ailments known to the mankind. Many of the ancient texts and scriptures reveal that leprosy was not categorised as a specified disease but was grouped along with other skin diseases. However, in certain texts categorical mention of this disease does exist. The prime objective of this article is to highlight the age old traditional line of perception about this disease. A literature review was done to up-date the socio-cultural perception of leprosy in Indian religions and ancient texts. References were obtained through examining relevant bibliographies and the views/suggestions of eminent scholars engaged in this field were also included. An analysis of the secondary sources of data, particularly the ancient texts reveals that in good old days, leprosy had been considered to be an infliction of wrong-doings and sins. This viewpoint has been significantly reflected in these texts.

  20. Diagnostic challenges of single plaque-like lesion paucibacillary leprosy

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    Raquel Rodrigues Barbieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of single-lesion paucibacillary leprosy remains a challenge. Reviews by expert dermatopathologists and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR results obtained from 66 single-plaque biopsy samples were compared. Histological findings were graded as high (HP, medium (MP or low (LP probability of leprosy or other dermatopathy (OD. Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes were detected using qPCR. The biopsies of 47 out of 57 clinically diagnosed patients who received multidrug therapy were classified as HP/MP, eight of which were qPCR negative. In the LP/OD (n = 19, two out of eight untreated patients showed positive qPCR results. In the absence of typical histopathological features, qPCR may be utilised to aid in final patient diagnosis, thus reducing overtreatment and delay in diagnosis.

  1. The oral mucosa in leprosy: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice; Neto Pimentel, Dalva Regina; Hirata, Cleonice Hitomi Watashi; de Avelar Alchorne, Maurício Mota

    2006-01-01

    Multibacillary leprosy may involve the oral mucosa, with or without apparent lesions. There are few studies that deal with this issue in the era of multidrug therapy. To assess the frequency of oral mucosa involvement in multibacillary leprosy patients. A transversal study with twenty non-treated multibacillary leprosy patients. The patients were treated in Dracena, São Paulo, between 2000 and 2002. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa was carried out. All patients were submitted to jugal mucosa, soft palate and tongue biopsies, in altered or in pre-established sites. The cross-sections were stained by techniques of hematoxilin-eosin and Ziehl-Neelsen. Granuloma and alcohol-acid-resistant bacilli findings determined the specific histopathological involvement. The study involved 19 patients with an average of 2.5 years of disease progression. Specific histopathological involvement occurred in the tongue and soft palate of one lepromatous patient with an apparently normal oral mucosa. (1) Clinical alterations in the oral mucosa does not imply disease involvement, it is necessary to have histopathological confirmation. (2) Apparent specific clinical alterations are rare. (3) The clinically normal oral mucosa can show specific histopathological involvement.

  2. Early detection of leprosy by examination of household contacts, determination of serum anti-PGL-1 antibodies and consanguinity

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    Renata Bazan-Furini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional clinical trial in which the serum anti-phenolic glycolipid (anti-PGL-1 antibodies were analysed in household contacts (HHC of patients with leprosy as an adjunct early leprosy diagnostic marker was conducted. The families of 83 patients underwent clinical examination and serum anti-PGL1 measurement using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of 320 HHC, 98 were contacts of lepromatous leprosy (LL, 80 were contacts of borderline lepromatous (BL, 28 were contacts of borderline (BB leprosy, 54 were contacts of borderline tuberculoid (BT, 40 were contacts of tuberculoid (TT and 20 were contacts of indeterminate (I leprosy. Consanguinity with the patients was determined for 232 (72.5% HHC. Of those 232 contacts, 183 had linear consanguinity. Forty-nine HHC had collateral consanguinity. Fifty-eight contacts (18.1% tested positive for anti-PGL1 antibodies. The number of seropositive contacts based on the clinical forms of the index case was 17 (29.3% for LL, 15 (25.9% for BL, one (1.7% for BB, 14 (24.1% for BT, three (5.2% for TT and eight (13.7% for I. At the one year follow-up, two (3.4% of these seropositive contacts had developed BT leprosy. The results of the present study indicate that the serum anti-PGL-1 IgM antibody may be useful for evaluating antigen exposure and as a tool for an early leprosy diagnosis in HHC.

  3. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management

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    Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho Fabri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I, ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1, and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID. From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management.

  4. Understanding the stigma of leprosy | Luka | South Sudan Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leprosy is the oldest disease known to man. The earliest written records describing true leprosy came from India around the period 600 BC. Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae; the Norwegian, Dr Amauer Hansen, isolated the bacterium in 1873. Leprosy is also called Hansen's disease after him. Although it is the ...

  5. Dermatologic Diseases in School Going Children of Parents Having Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available All the 138 school children whose parent (s had leprosy were examined for leprosy or other dermatological disease. BT leprosy was detected in one child, while in 2 other cases, the diagnosis of leprosy was doubtful. Among the other dermatological diseases. the prevalence of pityriasis versicolor and pediculosis capitis was high.

  6. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  7. miRNome Expression Analysis Reveals New Players on Leprosy Immune Physiopathology

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    Claudio Guedes Salgado

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy remains as a public health problem and its physiopathology is still not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNA are small RNA non-coding that can interfere with mRNA to regulate gene expression. A few studies using DNA chip microarrays have explored the expression of miRNA in leprosy patients using a predetermined set of genes as targets, providing interesting findings regarding the regulation of immune genes. However, using a predetermined set of genes restricted the possibility of finding new miRNAs that might be involved in different mechanisms of disease. Thus, we examined the miRNome of tuberculoid (TT and lepromatous (LL patients using both blood and lesional biopsies from classical leprosy patients (LP who visited the Dr. Marcello Candia Reference Unit in Sanitary Dermatology in the State of Pará and compared them with healthy subjects. Using a set of tools to correlate significantly differentially expressed miRNAs with their gene targets, we identified possible interactions and networks of miRNAs that might be involved in leprosy immunophysiopathology. Using this approach, we showed that the leprosy miRNA profile in blood is distinct from that in lesional skin as well as that four main groups of genes are the targets of leprosy miRNA: (1 recognition and phagocytosis, with activation of immune effector cells, where the immunosuppressant profile of LL and immunoresponsive profile of TT are clearly affected by miRNA expression; (2 apoptosis, with supportive data for an antiapoptotic leprosy profile based on BCL2, MCL1, and CASP8 expression; (3 Schwann cells (SCs, demyelination and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT, supporting a role for different developmental or differentiation gene families, such as Sox, Zeb, and Hox; and (4 loss of sensation and neuropathic pain, revealing that RHOA, ROCK1, SIGMAR1, and aquaporin-1 (AQP1 may be involved in the loss of sensation or leprosy pain, indicating possible new therapeutic targets

  8. Household expenditure on leprosy outpatient services in the Indian health system: A comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Tiwari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a major public health problem in many low and middle income countries, especially in India, and contributes considerably to the global burden of the disease. Leprosy and poverty are closely associated, and therefore the economic burden of leprosy is a concern. However, evidence on patient's expenditure is scarce. In this study, we estimate the expenditure in primary care (outpatient by leprosy households in two different public health settings.We performed a cross-sectional study, comparing the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli with the Umbergaon block of Valsad, Gujrat, India. A household (HH survey was conducted between May and October, 2016. We calculated direct and indirect expenditure by zero inflated negative binomial and negative binomial regression. The sampled households were comparable on socioeconomic indicators. The mean direct expenditure was USD 6.5 (95% CI: 2.4-17.9 in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 5.4 (95% CI: 3.8-7.9 per visit in Umbergaon. The mean indirect expenditure was USD 8.7 (95% CI: 7.2-10.6 in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 12.4 (95% CI: 7.0-21.9 in Umbergaon. The age of the leprosy patients and type of health facilities were the major predictors of total expenditure on leprosy primary care. The higher the age, the higher the expenditure at both sites. The private facilities are more expensive than the government facilities at both sites. If the public health system is enhanced, government facilities are the first preference for patients.An enhanced public health system reduces the patient's expenditure and improves the health seeking behaviour. We recommend investing in health system strengthening to reduce the economic burden of leprosy.

  9. Household expenditure on leprosy outpatient services in the Indian health system: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Anuj; Suryawanshi, Pramilesh; Raikwar, Akash; Arif, Mohammad; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Leprosy is a major public health problem in many low and middle income countries, especially in India, and contributes considerably to the global burden of the disease. Leprosy and poverty are closely associated, and therefore the economic burden of leprosy is a concern. However, evidence on patient's expenditure is scarce. In this study, we estimate the expenditure in primary care (outpatient) by leprosy households in two different public health settings. We performed a cross-sectional study, comparing the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli with the Umbergaon block of Valsad, Gujrat, India. A household (HH) survey was conducted between May and October, 2016. We calculated direct and indirect expenditure by zero inflated negative binomial and negative binomial regression. The sampled households were comparable on socioeconomic indicators. The mean direct expenditure was USD 6.5 (95% CI: 2.4-17.9) in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 5.4 (95% CI: 3.8-7.9) per visit in Umbergaon. The mean indirect expenditure was USD 8.7 (95% CI: 7.2-10.6) in Dadra and Nagar Haveli and USD 12.4 (95% CI: 7.0-21.9) in Umbergaon. The age of the leprosy patients and type of health facilities were the major predictors of total expenditure on leprosy primary care. The higher the age, the higher the expenditure at both sites. The private facilities are more expensive than the government facilities at both sites. If the public health system is enhanced, government facilities are the first preference for patients. An enhanced public health system reduces the patient's expenditure and improves the health seeking behaviour. We recommend investing in health system strengthening to reduce the economic burden of leprosy.

  10. Leprosy Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (LPEP) programme: Study protocol for evaluating the feasibility and impact on case detection rates of contact tracing and single dose rifampicin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth-Jaeggi, T. (Tanja); Steinmann, P. (Peter); Mieras, L. (Liesbeth); W.H. van Brakel (Wim); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); Tiwari, A. (Anuj); Bratschi, M. (Martin); Cavaliero, A. (Arielle); Vander Plaetse, B. (Bart); Mirza, F. (Fareed); Aerts, A. (Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The reported number of new leprosy patients has barely changed in recent years. Thus, additional approaches or modifications to the current standard of passive case detection are needed to interrupt leprosy transmission. Large-scale clinical trials with single dose

  11. Household costs of leprosy reactions (ENL in rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Chandler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL is a common immune-mediated complication of lepromatous (LL and borderline lepromatous (BL leprosy. Most patients experience chronic or multiple acute ENL over many years during an economically active period of their lives. Understanding the economic burden of ENL is essential to provide effective patient support, yet this area has not been investigated.Ninety-one patients with LL or BL leprosy attending a leprosy hospital in Purulia district of West Bengal, India, were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Cases (n = 53 were identified as those who had one or more episodes of ENL within the last 3 years. Controls (n = 38 had LL or BL leprosy but no history of ENL. Data were collected on household income, direct and indirect costs, and coping strategies.The total household cost was Rs 1543 per month or 27.9% (IQR 13.2-52.6 of monthly household income for cases, and Rs 237 per month or 4.9% (IQR 1.7-13.4 of monthly household income for controls. Indirect costs accounted for 65% of total household costs for cases. Direct costs accounted for the remaining 35% of household costs, and resulted almost entirely from treatment-seeking in the private sector. Total household costs exceeded 40% of household income for 37.7% of cases (n = 20 and 2.6% of controls (n = 1 [1 USD = 59 INR].Households affected by ENL face significant economic burden and are at risk of being pushed further into poverty. Health policy should acknowledge the importance of private sector provision and the significant contribution to total household costs of lost productivity (indirect cost. Further work is needed to explore this area and identify solutions.

  12. Amiloidose e insuficiência renal crônica terminal associada à hanseníase Amyloidosis and end-stage renal disease associated with leprosy

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    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Júnior

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available O envolvimento renal na hanseníase é diverso, incluindo glomerulonefrites, amiloidose e nefrite túbulo-intersticial. Um homem de 58 anos foi admitido com edema de membros inferiores e dispnéia. Na admissão, havia retenção de escórias nitrogenadas, anemia, hipercalemia e acidose metabólica, com necessidade de hemodiálise. Referia história de hanseníase virchoviana. Foi realizada biopsia renal, compatível com amiloidose. O paciente evoluiu estável, sem recuperação da função renal, permanecendo em tratamento hemodialítico. A hanseníase deve ser investigada em todo paciente com perda de função renal, sobretudo naqueles que apresentam lesões cutâneas ou outras manifestações sugestivas de hanseníase.Renal involvement in leprosy includes glomerulonephritis, amyloidosis and tubulointerstitial nephritis. A 58-year-old man was admitted with complaints of lower limb edema and dyspnea. At admission, nitrogen retention, anemia, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis were observed, requiring hemodialysis. The patient had a history of lepromatous leprosy. A renal biopsy was performed that was compatible with amyloidosis. The patient had a stable outcome, but without renal function recovery and remained on regular hemodialysis. Leprosy should be investigated in every patient with renal function loss, particularly in those with cutaneous lesions or other manifestations suggestive of leprosy.

  13. PCR-based techniques for leprosy diagnosis: from the laboratory to the clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Nóbrega Martinez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In leprosy, classic diagnostic tools based on bacillary counts and histopathology have been facing hurdles, especially in distinguishing latent infection from active disease and diagnosing paucibacillary clinical forms. Serological tests and IFN-gamma releasing assays (IGRA that employ humoral and cellular immune parameters, respectively, are also being used, but recent results indicate that quantitative PCR (qPCR is a key technique due to its higher sensitivity and specificity. In fact, advances concerning the structure and function of the Mycobacterium leprae genome led to the development of specific PCR-based gene amplification assays for leprosy diagnosis and monitoring of household contacts. Also, based on the validation of point-of-care technologies for M. tuberculosis DNA detection, it is clear that the same advantages of rapid DNA detection could be observed in respect to leprosy. So far, PCR has proven useful in the determination of transmission routes, M. leprae viability, and drug resistance in leprosy. However, PCR has been ascertained to be especially valuable in diagnosing difficult cases like pure neural leprosy (PNL, paucibacillary (PB, and patients with atypical clinical presentation and histopathological features compatible with leprosy. Also, the detection of M. leprae DNA in different samples of the household contacts of leprosy patients is very promising. Although a positive PCR result is not sufficient to establish a causal relationship with disease outcome, quantitation provided by qPCR is clearly capable of indicating increased risk of developing the disease and could alert clinicians to follow these contacts more closely or even define rules for chemoprophylaxis.

  14. Leprosy in Buriticupu, state of Maranhão: active search in the general population

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    Antonio Rafael da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study was developed to evaluate the situation of leprosy in the general population of the municipality of Buriticupu, State of Maranhão, Brazil. METHODS: We used the method of active search to identify new cases from 2008 to 2010. Bacilloscopy of intradermal scrapings was performed in all patients with skin lesions compatible with leprosy, and histopathological examination in those who had doubts on the definition of the clinical form. RESULTS: The study included 19,104 individuals, with 42 patients diagnosed with leprosy after clinical examination, representing a detection rate of 219.84 per 100,000 inhabitants. The predominant clinical presentation was tuberculoid with 24 (57.1% cases, followed by borderline with 11, indeterminate with four, and lepromatous with three cases. The study also allowed the identification of 81 patients with a history of leprosy and other skin diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, dermatophytosis, scabies, vitiligo, and skin carcinoma. The binomial test showed that the proportion of cases in the headquarters was significantly higher than that in the villages (p = 0.04, and the generalized exact test showed that there was no association between age and clinical form (p = 0.438 and between age and gender (p = 0.083. CONCLUSIONS: The elevated detection rate defines the city as hyperendemic for leprosy; the active search for cases, as well as the organization of health services, is an important method for disease control.

  15. [Leprosy, a pillar of human genetics of infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschignard, J; Scurr, E; Alcaïs, A

    2013-06-01

    Despite a natural reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae limited to humans and free availability of an effective antibiotic treatment, more than 200,000 people develop leprosy each year. This disease remains a major cause of disability and social stigma worldwide. The cause of this constant incidence is currently unknown and indicates that important aspects of the complex relationship between the pathogen and its human host remain to be discovered. An important contribution of host genetics to susceptibility to leprosy has long been suggested to account for the considerable variability between individuals sustainably exposed to M. leprae. Given the inability to cultivate M. leprae in vitro and in the absence of relevant animal model, genetic epidemiology is the main strategy used to identify the genes and, consequently, the immunological pathways involved in protective immunity to M. leprae. Recent genome-wide studies have identified new pathophysiological pathways which importance is only beginning to be understood. In addition, the prism of human genetics placed leprosy at the crossroads of other common diseases such as Crohn's disease, asthma or myocardial infarction. Therefore, novel lights on the pathogenesis of many common diseases could eventually emerge from the detailed understanding of a disease of the shadows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Opening a Can of Worms: Leprosy Reactions and Complicit Soil-Transmitted Helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagge, Deanna A; Parajuli, Pawan; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Rana, Divya R S J B; Thapa, Ruby; Neupane, Kapil D; Nicholls, Peter; Adams, Linda B; Geluk, Annemieke; Shah, Mahesh; Napit, Indra B

    2017-09-01

    >94% of new annual leprosy cases are diagnosed in populations co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminths (STH). STH can profoundly dysregulate host immune responses towards Th2 bias, which can be restored over time after deworming. We hypothesize that STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction (denoted as simply "reaction" herein) occurrence within a co-endemic population. A cohort study was performed on a cohort of Nepalese leprosy patients across treatment and diagnostic classifications who were screened by routine fecal smear microscopy and multiplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) for Ascaris lumbricoides (Al), Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss), Ancyclostoma duodenale (Ad) and Necator americanus (Na). Among 145 patients, 55% were positive for ≥1 STH (STH+): 34% Al+, 18% Ss+, 17% Ad+and 5% Na+. Significant inverse STH and reaction relationships were evidenced by the bulk of cases: 63% reaction-negative were STH+ of total cases (p=0.030) while 65% reaction-positive were STH- in new cases (96; p=0.023). Strikingly, the majority of STH+ were reaction-negative, even when considering each species: 59% Al+, 60% Ss+, 62% Ad+and 67% Na+of new leprosy cases. Absence of STH co-infection is associated with leprosy reaction at diagnosis within a co-endemic population. This is likely due to immune reconstitution effects after deworming or interruption of chronic STH-mediated immune dysregulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Estudo comparativo preliminar entre os alongamentos proprioceptivo e estático passivo em pacientes com seqüelas de hanseníase Preliminary comparative study between proprioceptive and passive static stretching in patients with leprosy sequelae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Floricel Diaz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste estudo foi comparar a aplicação de alongamento estático passivo e alongamento proprioceptivo no tratamento de seqüelas de hanseníase. Doze pacientes com essas seqüelas participaram da pesquisa, separados aleatoriamente em dois grupos: o grupo FNP, tratado com facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva, e o grupo AEP, com alongamento estático passivo. Ambos realizaram dez sessões de alongamentos, sendo submetidos à avaliação inicial e final nas quais foram aplicados o questionário SF-36, mensuradas a amplitude de movimento (ADM do punho e tornozelo, testados os reflexos e a sensibilidade. No grupo FNP foi observada melhora na ADM do tornozelo e em três domínios do SF-36; no grupo AEP, em cinco domínios do SF-36. Quando comparados os grupos, o FNP obteve melhora significativa na extensão do punho, dorsiflexão e plantiflexão em relação ao AEP. A facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva parece ser um método mais eficaz para ganhar alongamento muscular e ADM de tornozelo e punho em pacientes com seqüelas de hanseníase. Não foi observada relação entre acréscimo na ADM e melhora na qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde nos pacientes dos dois grupos.The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two kinds of stretching - passive, static stretching, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF - in patients with leprosy sequel. Twelve patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the PNF group and the SS group, that was submitted to static stretching. Both groups attended ten stretching sessions, being submitted to initial and final evaluations in which were assessed: health-related quality of life, by means of he SF-36 questionnaire; ankle and wrist range of motion (ROM; and sensitivity and reflex testing. Improvements in ankle movement and in three SF-36 domains were observed in PNF group; and in five SF-36 domains in SS group. PNF group showed better improvement in wrist extension and

  18. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Natasja; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, Cairns; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1...

  19. Avaliação da dor em portadores de hanseníase submetidos à mobilização neural Pain in leprosy patients undergoing neural mobilisation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Sales Téles Véras

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo avaliar o efeito da técnica de mobilização neural sobre a percepção da dor em portadores de hanseníase. A amostra de 56 indivíduos portadores de hanseníase foi randomizada em: grupo experimental (GMN composto por 29 indivíduos submetidos ao tratamento com mobilização neural e grupo controle (GC composto por 27 indivíduos que foram submetidos ao tratamento convencional. A percepção da dor foi avaliada através da Escala Visual Analógica, indicando-se em uma extremidade a marcação de ausência de dor e na outra, pior dor imaginável. O GMN foi submetido ao tratamento utilizando a técnica de mobilização neural, que consistiu de dezoito atendimentos (seis semanas, três vezes por semana. O GC foi submetido ao tratamento convencional com exercícios de flexibilidade, fortalecimento, com uso de exercitadores de tornozelo ou de recursos eletroterápicos. O GMN apresentou redução significativa (p=0,000 na percepção da dor ao comparar o pré e o pós-teste e na comparação com o GC no pós-teste. O GC não apresentou diferença significativa (p=0,520. Conclui-se que a utilização da técnica de mobilização neural promoveu redução nos níveis de dor em portadores de hanseníase.This Study aimed to evaluate the effect of the neural mobilisation technique on pain in patients with leprosy. A sample of 56 individuals with leprosy was randomised into an experimental group (GMN, composed of 29 individuals undergoing treatment with neural mobilisation, and the control group (CG of 27 individuals who underwent conventional treatment. We evaluated the perception of pain by Visual Analogue Scale - EVA. The GMN underwent treatment using the neural mobilisation technique, which consisted of eighteen treatments (six weeks, at three times per week. The CG was subjected to conventional treatment. The GMN showed a significant reduction (p = 0.000 in pain perception when comparing the pre and post-test for the

  20. Oral health conditions in leprosy cases in hyperendemic area of the Brazilian Amazon

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    Zilanda Martins de Almeida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Leprosy is a hyperendemic chronic condition in the Rondônia State . Despite the significant impact of oral health on the quality of life and clinical evolution of leprosy patients, systematic evaluation of oral health status has been neglected. To analyze the dental-clinical profile, self-perceived oral health and dental health service access of leprosy cases in the municipality of Cacoal in Rondônia State , North Brazil, from 2001 to 2012. A descriptive, cross-sectional study design was performed based on dental evaluation and standardized structured instruments. We investigated clinically assessed and self-perceived oral health status, as well as dental health service access. A total of 303 leprosy cases were included; 41.6% rated their oral health as good, and 42.6% reported being satisfied with their oral health. Self-reported loss of upper teeth was 45.5%. The clinical evaluation revealed that 54.5% had active caries. Most (97.7% cases reported having been to the dentist at least once in their life and 23.1% used public health services. The poor standard of oral health in this population may increase the risk for leprosy reactions, consequently reducing quality of life. Low access to public health dental services and poor self-perceived oral health reinforce the need to achieve comprehensive health care in this population.

  1. Is Leprosy Control In Urban Slums Possible ? - A Study In Bombay

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    Ganapati R

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of community-based leprosy control operations spanning almost a decade in two locations, a small self settled leprosy colony (I of about 800 subjects as well as a large slum (II with a population of about 20,000 in the metropolitan city of Bombay are compared. New case detection through survey in location I and voluntary reporting in location II during the period 1982-86 is taken as an index of the impact of the intervention, which consisted of field based administration of multi-drug therapy. Though the leprosy colony concentrates an abnormal reservoir of infectious cases in a small population, it was relatively easier to achieve success in reducing the transmission rate through field-based chemotherapy programme. The same degree of success however, could not be achieved in a normal slum. Health care delivery system in relation to leprosy eradication at the grass-root levels has to be planned giving maximum importance to cost-effective methods of identification of multi-bacillary leprosy patients and monitoring their movements carefully during the treatment phase.

  2. Epidemiological aspects of leprosy in Juazeiro-BA, from 2002 to 2012*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Eduarda Gomes da Cruz; de Souza, Carlos Dornels Freire; Silva, Susanne Pinheiro Costa e; da Costa, Flávia Monteiro; do Carmo, Rodrigo Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, able to infect large numbers of people. This work is relevant to Juazeiro-BA, a hyper-endemic area for leprosy, since unravel the behavior of the disease in the area, may suggest the decision making for sectors of surveillance, establishing strategies, organizing and evaluating programs and services. OBJECTIVES To analyze the epidemiology of leprosy in Juazeiro-BA, from 2002 to 2012. METHODS A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted based in data of the Diseases Notification System, assigned by the service of Epidemiology from Juazeiro-BA, between 2002 and 2012. RESULTS 1,916 new cases of leprosy were detected between 2002 and 2012, of which 921 (48.07%) represented male sex, 995 (51.93%) female, and there was a reduction in the incidence rate of leprosy per 100,000 inhabitants. Most carriers were brown individuals, with low levels of education, living in the urban area, being more prevalent in the economically active age group. Through statistical analysis we found that there are more chances of developing sequelae among men, and multibacillary individuals older than 45 years. CONCLUSIONS The work serves to direct efforts to control this disease, and highlights the importance of active search for new cases to achieve an early diagnosis, reducing the number of sequels and allowing breaking the chain of disease transmission. PMID:26734859

  3. National sample survey to assess the new case disease burden of leprosy in India

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    Kiran Katoch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A national sample survey of leprosy was undertaken in partnership with Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR institutions, National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP, Panchayati Raj members, and treated leprosy patients to detect new cases of leprosy in India. The objectives of the survey were to estimate the new leprosy case load; record both Grade 1 and Grade 2 disabilities in the new cases; and to assess the magnitude of stigma and discrimination prevalent in the society. A cluster based, cross-sectional survey involving all States was used for the door-to-door survey using inverse sampling methodology. Rural and urban clusters were sampled separately. The population screened for detecting 28 new cases in rural and 30 in urban clusters was enumerated, recorded and analyzed. Data capture and analysis in different schedules were the main tools used. For quality control three tiers of experts were utilized for the confirmation of cases and disabilities. Self-stigma was assessed in more than half of the total new patients detected with disabilities by the approved questionnaire. A different questionnaire was used to assess the stigma in the community. A population of 14,725,525 (10,302,443 rural; 4,423,082 urban was screened and 2161 new cases - 1300 paucibacillary (PB and 861 multibacillary (MB were detected. New case estimates for leprosy was 330,346 (95% Confidence limits, 287,445-380,851. Disabilities observed in these cases were 2.05/100,000 population and 13.9 per cent (302/2161 in new cases. Self-stigma in patients with disabilities was reduced, and the patients were well accepted by the spouse, neighbour, at workplace and in social functions.

  4. Improving working memory performance in brain-injured patients using hypnotic suggestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeløv, Jonas K.; Overgaard, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    be effectively restored by suggesting to hypnotized patients that they have regained their pre-injury level of working memory functioning. Following four 1-h sessions, 27 patients had a medium-sized improvement relative to 22 active controls (Bayes factors of 342 and 37.5 on the two aggregate outcome measures...

  5. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy

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    Rogerio Del Arco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5% had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5% of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12 for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6% responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4% there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12 and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020. Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture.

  6. national jalma institute for leprosy & other mycobacterial diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. NATIONAL JALMA INSTITUTE FOR LEPROSY & OTHER MYCOBACTERIAL DISEASES : MAJOR THRUST AREAS. LEPROSY : Understanding the disease better using electrophysiological, immunological, molecular and electron-microscopic tools. Developing better ...

  7. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy. A Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage in leprosy. We assessed the effectiveness of corticosteroids for treating nerve damage due to leprosy. METHODS: A systematic search was undertaken to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing

  8. Impact of PGL-I seropositivity on the protective effect of BCG vaccination among leprosy contacts: a cohort study.

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    Nádia C Düppre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contacts of leprosy patients are at increased risk of developing leprosy and need to be targeted for early diagnosis. Seropositivity to the phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has been used to identify contacts who have an increased risk of developing leprosy. In the present study, we studied the effect of seropositivity in patient contacts, on the risk of developing leprosy, stratified by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG vaccination after index case diagnosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Leprosy contacts were examined as part of the surveillance programme of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute Leprosy Outpatient Clinic in Rio de Janeiro. Demographic, social, epidemiological and clinical data were collected. The presence of IgM antibodies to PGL-I in sera and BCG vaccination status at the time of index case diagnosis were evaluated in 2,135 contacts. During follow-up, 60 (2.8%; 60/2,135 leprosy cases were diagnosed: 41 among the 1,793 PGL-I-negative contacts and 19 among the 342 PGL-I-positive contacts. Among PGL-I-positive contacts, BCG vaccination after index case diagnosis increased the adjusted rate of developing clinical manifestations of leprosy (Adjusted Rate Ratio (aRR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.8-8.2 compared with the PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts (aRR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.2-8.1. The incidence density was highest during the first year of follow-up for the PGL-I-positive vaccinated contacts. However, all of those contacts developed PB leprosy, whereas most MB cases (4/6 occurred in PGL-I-positive unvaccinated contacts. CONCLUSION: Contact examination combined with PGL-I testing and BCG vaccination remain important strategies for leprosy control. The finding that rates of leprosy cases were highest among seropositive contacts justifies targeting this specific group for close monitoring. Furthermore, it is recommended that PGL-I-positive contacts and contacts with a high familial bacteriological index

  9. Differential Expression of MicroRNAs in Leprosy Skin Lesions

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    Cleverson T. Soares

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy, a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a major public health problem in poor and developing countries of the Americas, Africa, and Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, which are small non-coding RNAs (18–24 nucleotides, play an important role in regulating cell and tissue homeostasis through translational downregulation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Deregulation of miRNA expression is important for the pathogenesis of various neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases and has been the focus of many publications; however, studies on the expression of miRNAs in leprosy are rare. Herein, an extensive evaluation of differentially expressed miRNAs was performed on leprosy skin lesions using microarrays. Leprosy patients, classified according to Ridley and Jopling’s classification or reactional states (R1 and R2, and healthy controls (HCs were included. Punch biopsies were collected from the borders of leprosy lesions (10 tuberculoid, 10 borderline tuberculoid, 10 borderline borderline, 10 borderline lepromatous, 4 lepromatous, 14 R1, and 9 R2 and from 9 HCs. miRNA expression profiles were obtained using the Agilent Microarray platform with miRBase, which consists of 1,368 Homo sapiens (hsa-miRNA candidates. TaqMan quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs. Sixty-four differentially expressed miRNAs, including 50 upregulated and 14 downregulated (fold change ≥2.0, p-value ≤ 0.05 were identified after comparing samples from patients to those of controls. Twenty differentially expressed miRNAs were identified exclusively in the reactional samples (14 type 1 and 6 type 2. Eight miRNAs were validated by RT-PCR, including seven upregulated (hsa-miR-142-3p, hsa-miR-142-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-342-3p, hsa-miR-361-3p, hsa-miR-3653, and hsa-miR-484 and one downregulated (hsa-miR-1290. These miRNAs were differentially expressed in leprosy and

  10. Specific antigen serologic tests in leprosy: implications for epidemiological surveillance of leprosy cases and household contacts

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    Ana Paula Mendes Carvalho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND There is a lack of straightforward tests for field application and known biomarkers for predicting leprosy progression in infected individuals. OBJECTIVE The aim was to analyse the response to infection by Mycobacterium leprae based on the reactivity of specific antigens: natural disaccharide linked to human serum albumin via an octyl (NDOHSA, a semisynthetic phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I; Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (LID-1 and natural disaccharide octyl - Leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute Diagnostic-1 (NDOLID. METHODS The study population consisted of 130 leprosy cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 and 277 household contacts. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to analyse the reactivity of antibodies against NDOHSA, LID-1 and NDOLID. The samples and controls were tested in duplicate, and the antibody titer was expressed as an ELISA index. Data collection was made by home visits with application of questionnaire and dermatological evaluation of all household contacts to identify signs and symptoms of leprosy. FINDINGS Significant differences in the median ELISA results were observed among leprosy cases in treatment, leprosy cases that had completed treatment and household contacts. Higher proportions of seropositivity were observed in leprosy cases in treatment. Seropositivity was also higher in multibacillary in relation to paucibacillary, with the difference reaching statistical significance. Lower titers were observed among cases with a longer treatment time or discharge. For household contacts, the differences according to the clinical characteristics of the leprosy index case were less pronounced than expected. Other factors, such as the endemicity of leprosy, exposure outside the residence and genetic characteristics, appeared to have a greater influence on the seropositivity. MAIN CONCLUSIONS Serologic tests could be used as auxiliary tools for determining the

  11. Primary neural leprosy: systematic review

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    Jose Antonio Garbino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors proposed a systematic review on the current concepts of primary neural leprosy by consulting the following online databases: MEDLINE, Lilacs/SciELO, and Embase. Selected studies were classified based on the degree of recommendation and levels of scientific evidence according to the “Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine”. The following aspects were reviewed: cutaneous clinical and laboratorial investigations, i.e. skin clinical exam, smears, and biopsy, and Mitsuda's reaction; neurological investigation (anamnesis, electromyography and nerve biopsy; serological investigation and molecular testing, i.e. serological testing for the detection of the phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-I and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR; and treatment (classification criteria for the definition of specific treatment, steroid treatment, and cure criteria.

  12. Leprosy diagnosis: a device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, H.; Stumpe, B.

    1989-01-01

    A handy device for testing the thermal sensibility of skin lesions has been developed and field tested in various centres in Africa and India. The instrument performed satisfactorily and its use made testing for thermal sensibility in the field practicable and straightforward. Analysis of the results of testing 260 persons, most of whom exhibited a few lesions that were characteristic of early leprosy, showed that the rate of diagnosis of sensory impairment of such skin lesions, and hence the diagnosis of leprosy, would be about 15-25% more if thermal sensibility testing using this device were added to the other tests of sensibility routinely carried out in the field. Regular use of the device in the field would help to bring more leprosy patients under treatment than at present. Images Fig. 5 PMID:2699276

  13. Leprosy Sufferers' Perception Of Social Stigma As A Determinant Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at relating leprosy sufferers perception of social stigma to their lifestyles. Eighty leprosy affected persons comprising males and females drawn from Delta State Government Tuberculosis and Leprosy Referral Center participated in this study. A focus group discussion schedule containing information about ...

  14. The Impact of Leprosy Control: Epidemiological and modelling studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Meima

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis addresses the impact of leprosy control on the occurrence of leprosy and its associated impairments. Chapter 1 introduces leprosy, an infectious disease. Its manifestations vary widely: from mild self-healing forms to chronic and destructive disease. Knowledge regarding

  15. Leprosy and the eye a review of epidemiology, pathogenesis, ocular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: 1. To update knowledge on the current trends in the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of leprosy 2. To highlight the ocular complications associated with leprosy. Methodology:Current literature on various aspects of leprosy research obtained from the Internet and supplemented by available journals ...

  16. Evaluation of Acute Phase Reactants As Indicators of Activity in Leprosy

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    A P Jain

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute phase reactants i. e. ESR, C-reactive proteins, alpha 1 antitrypsin, complement (C3 and circulation immune complexes were evaluated in relation with the activity of the disease in leprosy. Levels of all the acute phase reactants were significantly raised during the active plase (LL and ENL, while these were normal during the arrested phase of the disease. Appearance of, circulating immune complexes also followed the same pattern. It is concluded that raised levels of ESR (C-reactive proteins, alpha-1 antitrypsin, complement (C3 and circulating immune complexes suggest active phase (LL ENL of the disease in leprosy.

  17. Skin imprinting in silica plates: a potential diagnostic methodology for leprosy using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Estela de Oliveira; de Macedo, Cristiana Santos; Esteves, Cibele Zanardi; de Oliveira, Diogo Noin; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos

    2015-04-07

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which primarily infects macrophages and Schwann cells, affecting skin and peripheral nerves. Clinically, the most common form of identification is through the observation of anesthetic lesions on skin; however, up to 30% of infected patients may not present this clinical manifestation. Currently, the gold standard diagnostic test for leprosy is based on skin lesion biopsy, which is invasive and presents low sensibility for suspect cases. Therefore, the development of a fast, sensible and noninvasive method that identifies infected patients would be helpful for assertive diagnosis. The aim of this work was to identify lipid markers in leprosy patients directly from skin imprints, using a mass spectrometric analytical strategy. For skin imprint samples, a 1 cm(2) silica plate was gently pressed against the skin of patients or healthy volunteers. Imprinted silica lipids were extracted and submitted to direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS). All samples were differentiated using a lipidomics-based data workup employing multivariate data analysis, which helped electing different lipid markers, for example, mycobacterial mycolic acids, inflammatory and apoptotic molecules were identified as leprosy patients' markers. Otherwise, phospholipids and gangliosides were pointed as healthy volunteers' skin lipid markers, according to normal skin composition. Results indicate that silica plate skin imprinting associated with ESI-HRMS is a promising fast and sensible leprosy diagnostic method. With a prompt leprosy diagnosis, an early and effective treatment could be feasible and thus the chain of leprosy transmission could be abbreviated.

  18. Leprosy on Reunion Island, 2005-2013: Situation and Perspectives.

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    Guillaume Camuset

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reunion Island is a French overseas territory located in the south-western of Indian Ocean, 700 km east of Madagascar. Leprosy first arrived on Reunion Island in the early 1700s with the African slaves and immigration from Madagascar. The disease was endemic until 1980 but improvement of health care and life conditions of inhabitants in the island have allowed a strong decrease in new cases of leprosy. However, the reintroduction of the disease by migrants from endemic neighbouring countries like Comoros and Madagascar is a real and continuing risk. This observational study was then conducted to measure the number of new cases detected annually on Reunion Island between 2005 and 2013, and to describe the clinical features of these patients.Data were collected over two distinct periods. Incident cases between 2005 and 2010 come from a retrospective study conducted in 2010 by the regional Office of French Institute for Public Health Surveillance (CIRE of Indian Ocean, when no surveillance system exist. Cases between 2011 and 2013 come from a prospective collection of all new cases, following the implementation of systematic notification of all new cases. All patient data were anonymized. Among the 25 new cases, 12 are Reunion Island residents who never lived outside Reunion Island, and hence are considered to be confirmed autochthonous patients. Registered prevalence in 2014 was 0.05 /10 000 habitants, less than the WHO's eradication goal (1/10 000.Leprosy is no longer a major public health problem on Reunion Island, as its low prevalence rate indicates. However, the risk of recrudescence of the disease and of renewed autochthonous transmission remains real. In this context, active case detection must be pursued through the active declaration and rapid treatment of all new cases.

  19. Obesity and symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis in patients with type 2 diabetes and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Mona; Kislov, Julia; Dickman, Ram; Wainstein, Julio

    2011-01-01

    Associated with neuropathy, symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and include nausea, vomiting, bloating and early satiety. Gastric motor abnormalities have been reported in obese patients, and obesity is associated with T2DM. An association between obesity and gastroparesis symptoms in diabetic patients with neuropathy has not been investigated. In this nested case-control study, 161 patients with neuropathy were identified from within a cross-sectional survey of 380 T2DM patients. Of these, 134 (83.2%, "cases") had at least one cardinal symptom suggestive of gastroparesis. The remaining symptom-free subjects served as controls. Logistic and general linear modeling was used to assess associations between obesity and the presence and number of symptoms. Subjects were 66.6±10 years of age. Cases were significantly more likely than controls to be obese (89% vs. 77%, P=.04), female (55.6% vs. 33.3%) and hypertensive (90.2% vs. 63%, P=.001) and to report adherence to diet (87.4% vs. 66.7%, P=.007). In a logistic regression model including sex, hypertension, antiaggregant therapy, adherence to diet therapy and an obesity-by-sex interaction term, obesity emerged as a significant independent predictor of any cardinal symptom suggestive of gastroparesis (odds ratio 9.86, 95% confidence interval 1.4-69.2, P=.02). Obesity was also identified as a significant independent predictor of number of cardinal symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis in the general linear model. Obese subjects reported significantly more early satiety (61.5% vs. 35.2%, P=.001), fullness (63.7% vs. 40.8%, P=.004), bloating (70.3% vs. 49.3%, P=.006) and abdominal distention (71.4 vs. 50.7%, P=.007) than nonobese subjects. Further, obese subjects reported more cardinal symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis symptoms (4.2±2.4 vs. 3.1±2.5, P=.01). Obesity emerged as a significant independent predictor of cardinal symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis

  20. Stigma in leprosy: concepts, causes and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermrittirong, Silatham; Van Brakel, Wim H

    2014-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that has stigmatised people affected since ancient times until now. This has resulted in difficulties in the lives of those affected. This literature review was conducted to understand the concept, causes, and determinants of stigma in leprosy. Electronic searches were undertaken using PubMed (Medline), CINAHL and PsycInfo databases. The internet was searched through Google Scholar for papers not found in these databases. The main inclusion criteria were papers related to stigma or leprosy written in Thai or English. After searching the databases, 84 papers were identified, 3 were removed because of duplication and parallel publication, and 20 were removed on abstract screening. After reading 61 full papers, 7 were excluded. Finally, 54 were included in this review. It was found that the concept of stigma involves not only characteristics considered undesirable, but also the social context of the individual or group. Reported causes and determinants of stigma related to leprosy are the external manifestations of the disease, cultural and religious beliefs, fear of transmission, association with people considered inferior and public health-related interventions. Stigma is a complex phenomenon that has multiple causes, often linked to the cultural context in which it occurs. Despite this, many similarities were found in leprosy-related stigma across countries and cultures, which would facilitate the development of interventions.

  1. Effect of nigella sativa on IL-10 in MB leprosy that received MDT-WHO therapy

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    Febrina Primasanti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy, a chronic infectious disease presents a broad clinical spectrum that is correlated with the immunological response of the patient, mainly related to Th1/Th2 cells. IL-10 is a major cytokine produced by Th2 cells inhibits imunostimulatory cytokine produced by Th1 cells. Suppressive effects of IL-10 in monocytes and cytokine synthesis by Th1 cells presumably because IL-10 has a general suppressive effect on immune function. Nigella sativa has a potent potentiating effect on cellular immunity through suppression of Th2 cells and IL-10, resulting in potentiation of Th1 cells. Method: The study design is a randomized pretest and posttest controlled design involving 40 subjects of MB leprosy patients. Serum levels of IL-10 were measured by ELISA. Result: The mean decrease in serum levels of IL-10 (IL-10 delta in the treatment group (average fell 3.12 pg/ml is greater than the control group (average rose 0.21 pg/ml, where the difference is statistically significant (p = 0.029. Nigella sativa giving significant correlation with a decrease in IL-10 compared to the control group (p=0.044, OR: 10.23. Conclusion: supplementation of Nigella sativa 3 x 1000 mg for 2 months in patients with MB leprosy can reduce levels of IL-10, thus increasing the cellular immune response in patients with MB leprosy.

  2. Case of Diffuse Lepromatous Leprosy Associated with “Mycobacterium lepromatosis” ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy G.; Gomez-Flores, Minerva; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2011-01-01

    An 86-year-old female patient from northeast Mexico presented with diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL). Sequence analysis of four genes (rrs, rpoB, sigA, and hsp65) from the skin biopsy specimen identified “Mycobacterium lepromatosis.” This is the first independent confirmation of a case of DLL due to M. lepromatosis.

  3. Assessment of the sensory and physical limitations imposed by leprosy in a Brazilian Amazon Population

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    Cintia Yolette Urbano Pauxis Aben-Athar

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION Leprosy often results in sensory and physical limitations. This study aimed to evaluate these limitations using a quantitative approach in leprosy patients in Belém (Pará, Brazil. METHODS This epidemiological, cross-sectional study measured the sensory impairment of smell and taste through the use of a questionnaire and evaluated activity limitations of daily life imposed by leprosy through the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA Scale. Data were collected from 84 patients and associations between the degree of disability and clinical and epidemiological characteristics were assessed. RESULTS The majority of patients were men (64.3%, married (52.4%, age 31-40 years old (26.2%, had primary education (50%, and were independent laborers (36.9%. The multibacillary operational classification (81%, borderline clinical form (57.1%, and 0 degrees of physical disability (41.7% were predominant. SALSA scores ranged from 17 to 59 points, and being without limitations was predominant (53.6%. The risk awareness score ranged from 0 to 8, with a score of 0 (no awareness of risk being the most common (56%. Evaluation of smell and taste sensory sensitivities revealed that 70.2% did not experience these sensory changes. Patients with leprosy reactions were 7 times more likely to develop activity limitations, and those who had physical disabilities were approximately four times more likely to develop a clinical picture of activity limitations. CONCLUSIONS Most patients showed no sensory changes, but patients with leprosy reactions were significantly more likely to develop activity limitations. Finally, further studies should be performed, assessing a higher number of patients to confirm the present results.

  4. From genome-based in silico predictions to ex vivo verification of leprosy diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, Annemieke; Spencer, John S.; Bobosha, Kidist; Pessolani, Maria C. V.; Pereira, Geraldo M. B.; Banu, Sayera; Honoré, Nadine; Reece, Stephen T.; MacDonald, Murdo; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Ranjit, Chaman; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Zewdie, Martha; Aseffa, Abraham; Hussain, Rabia; Stefani, Mariane M.; Cho, Sang-Nae; Oskam, Linda; Brennan, Patrick J.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of hundreds of thousands of new cases of leprosy every year suggests that transmission of Mycobacterium leprae infection still continues. Unfortunately, tools for identification of asymptomatic disease and/or early-stage M. leprae infection (likely sources of transmission) are lacking.

  5. Abnormalities in Serum Lipids and Liver Fuction in Nigeria Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To estimate the serum lipids and liver function of Nigerian leprosy patients and the effect of dietary habits on their serum lipid levels. A questionnaire was administered to all leprosy patients seen in leprosy clinics in Anambra State to ascertain disease type, activity and duration as well as dietary preferences. Each patient ...

  6. Schleswig: medieval leprosy on the boundary between Germany and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldsen, Jesper L; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund; Riis, Thomas; Dittmar, Manuela; Weise, Svenja

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy was a well-recognized and dreaded disease in medieval Europe. The disease is reported to have reached Germany with the Roman invasion and it was present in Scandinavia in the first centuries AD. This paper estimates and analyzes the frequency of leprosy among adult people buried in one of five medieval cemeteries in the city of Schleswig. Seven different dichotomous osteological lesions indicative of leprosy were analyzed, and it was possible to score at least one of these conditions on 350 adult skeletons (aged 15 or older). The scores were transformed to a statistic indicating the likelihood that the person to whom the skeleton belonged suffered from leprosy. It was found that the frequency of leprosy in the five cemeteries varied between 9 and 44%. Four of the five cemeteries showed frequencies ranging from 35 and 44% and with no statistically significant differences among them. The fifth cemetery showed a significantly lower frequency of leprosy (9%). The distribution of female age at death does not appear to be affected by leprosy status. This means that females experienced a considerably elevated risk of dying once they had contracted leprosy as the disease usually has a mid-adulthood age of onset. In four of the five cemeteries males with leprosy died in higher ages than men without leprosy--in two of the cemeteries the difference was statistically significant. This indicates that leprosy usually added less to the risk of dying among men than among women in medieval Schleswig.

  7. qPCR detection of Mycobacterium leprae in biopsies and slit skin smear of different leprosy clinical forms

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    Michelle de Campos Soriani Azevedo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy, whose etiological agent is Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic infectious disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of leprosy is based on clinical evaluation, whereas histopathological analysis and bacilloscopy are complementary diagnostic tools. Quantitative PCR (qPCR, a current useful tool for diagnosis of infectious diseases, has been used to detect several pathogens including Mycobacterium leprae. The validation of this technique in a robust set of samples comprising the different clinical forms of leprosy is still necessary. Thus, in this study samples from 126 skin biopsies (collected from patients on all clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy and 25 slit skin smear of leprosy patients were comparatively analyzed by qPCR (performed with primers for the RLEP region of M. leprae DNA and routine bacilloscopy performed in histological sections or in slit skin smear. Considering clinical diagnostic as the gold standard, 84.9% of the leprosy patients were qPCR positive in skin biopsies, resulting in 84.92% sensitivity, with 84.92 and 61.22% positive (PPV and negative (NPV predictive values, respectively. Concerning bacilloscopy of histological sections (BI/H, the sensitivity was 80.15% and the PPV and NPV were 80.15 and 44.44%, respectively. The concordance between qPCR and BI/H was 87.30%. Regarding the slit skin smear, 84% of the samples tested positive in the qPCR. Additionally, qPCR showed 100% specificity, since all samples from different mycobacteria, from healthy individuals, and from other granulomatous diseases presented negative results. In conclusion, the qPCR technique for detection of M. leprae using RLEP primers proved to be specific and sensitive, and qPCR can be used as a complementary test to diagnose leprosy irrespective of the clinical form of disease.

  8. qPCR detection of Mycobacterium leprae in biopsies and slit skin smear of different leprosy clinical forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Michelle de Campos Soriani; Ramuno, Natália Mortari; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vincenzi; Tassa, Mônica; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Belone, Andrea de Faria Fernandes; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro

    Leprosy, whose etiological agent is Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic infectious disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of leprosy is based on clinical evaluation, whereas histopathological analysis and bacilloscopy are complementary diagnostic tools. Quantitative PCR (qPCR), a current useful tool for diagnosis of infectious diseases, has been used to detect several pathogens including Mycobacterium leprae. The validation of this technique in a robust set of samples comprising the different clinical forms of leprosy is still necessary. Thus, in this study samples from 126 skin biopsies (collected from patients on all clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy) and 25 slit skin smear of leprosy patients were comparatively analyzed by qPCR (performed with primers for the RLEP region of M. leprae DNA) and routine bacilloscopy performed in histological sections or in slit skin smear. Considering clinical diagnostic as the gold standard, 84.9% of the leprosy patients were qPCR positive in skin biopsies, resulting in 84.92% sensitivity, with 84.92 and 61.22% positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values, respectively. Concerning bacilloscopy of histological sections (BI/H), the sensitivity was 80.15% and the PPV and NPV were 80.15 and 44.44%, respectively. The concordance between qPCR and BI/H was 87.30%. Regarding the slit skin smear, 84% of the samples tested positive in the qPCR. Additionally, qPCR showed 100% specificity, since all samples from different mycobacteria, from healthy individuals, and from other granulomatous diseases presented negative results. In conclusion, the qPCR technique for detection of M. leprae using RLEP primers proved to be specific and sensitive, and qPCR can be used as a complementary test to diagnose leprosy irrespective of the clinical form of disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Leprosy - evolution of the path to eradication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Dogra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is among the world′s oldest and most dreaded diseases and it has been synonymous with stigma and discrimination due to the hideous deformities it produced, mystery around its aetiology and transmission and lack of any effective remedy till recently. Leprosy control started with the use of chaulmoogra oil and for the last three decades, multi drug therapy (MDT has been our main tool against leprosy. In the last two decades, the reported global prevalence of active leprosy infection has dropped by almost 90 per cent by the combined efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO, local governments, health professionals, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs, however, a parallel drop in the incidence or new case detection rate (NCDR has not occurred. From 1994 through 2011, more than 100,000 new cases are being detected annually, of whom maximum case load is from India. There is need for research on tools for early diagnosis, short and effective treatment, and prevention of deformities and disabilities. Evaluating the role of immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis will also lead us to better understanding of their mode of action. Further molecular analysis of Mycobacterium leprae genome may provide the requisite basis for all this. The current reality is that there is a need to sustain and provide quality leprosy services to all persons through general health services, including good referral system. All these provisions in the integrated health care approach will go a long way in further reducing the stigma. Efforts need to be made to reduce deformity through early detection, self care, physiotherapy and reconstructive surgery and developing sound surveillance systems. With all the remarkable achievements in the fight against leprosy, the stage is now set for the final assault. It is hoped that with the efforts of all the stake holders and strong political will, the disease will be eradicated in the near future.

  10. Lepra en la infancia: Desafío diagnóstico Leprosy in childhood: Diagnostic challenge

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    AE Táquez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La lepra en la infancia cursa con una diversidad de manifestaciones clínicas e histopatológicas, que hacen necesario un minucioso examen cutáneo en todo niño, que presente lesiones dermatológicas sugestivas y una fuente infecciosa sospechosa. Para un oportuno diagnóstico es indispensable que el médico tenga siempre presente la enfermedad, así como destreza al realizar el examen clínico, ya que muchas lesiones cutáneas suelen ser asintomáticas y con frecuencia simulan otros cuadros dermatológicos. Presentamos tres casos de pacientes erróneamente diagnosticados, tratados por otras dermatosis y quienes finalmente estaban afectados de lepra.Leprosy in childhood course with a diversity of clinical and histopathological signs that make necessary a detailed cutaneous inspection in every child that presents suggestive dermatological lesions, have had a suspected infectious contact. For an appropriate diagnosis, is very important to keep in mind the disease, as well as medical clinical skill because many skin and nerve lesions can be asymptomatic and frequently look like other dermatological pathology. The authors report three cases of children misdiagnosed and treated for other dermatosis and whom finally were found leprosy´s patients.

  11. Molecular phenotypes in triple negative breast cancer from African American patients suggest targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Robert; Sullivan, Catherine; Offor, Onyinye; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Halligan, Kyle; Fischbach, Neal; Shah, Mansi; Bossuyt, Veerle; Schulz, Vincent; Tuck, David P; Harris, Lyndsay N

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by high proliferation, poor differentiation and a poor prognosis due to high rates of recurrence. Despite lower overall incidence African American (AA) patients suffer from higher breast cancer mortality in part due to the higher proportion of TNBC cases among AA patients compared to European Americans (EA). It was recently shown that the clinical heterogeneity of TNBC is reflected by distinct transcriptional programs with distinct drug response profiles in preclinical models. In this study, gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry were used to elucidate potential differences between TNBC tumors of EA and AA patients on a molecular level. In a retrospective cohort of 136 TNBC patients, a major transcriptional signature of proliferation was found to be significantly upregulated in samples of AA ethnicity. Furthermore, transcriptional profiles of AA tumors showed differential activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and a signature of BRCA1 deficiency in this cohort. Using signatures derived from the meta-analysis of TNBC gene expression carried out by Lehmann et al., tumors from AA patients were more likely of basal-like subtypes whereas transcriptional features of many EA samples corresponded to mesenchymal-like or luminal androgen receptor driven subtypes. These results were validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas mRNA and protein expression data, again showing enrichment of a basal-like phenotype in AA tumors and mesenchymal subtypes in EA tumors. In addition, increased expression of VEGF-activated genes together with elevated microvessel area determined by the AQUA method suggest that AA patients exhibit higher tumor vascularization. This study confirms the existence of distinct transcriptional programs in triple negative breast cancer in two separate cohorts and that these programs differ by racial group. Differences in TNBC subtypes and levels of tumor angiogenesis in AA versus EA patients

  12. Molecular phenotypes in triple negative breast cancer from African American patients suggest targets for therapy.

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    Robert Lindner

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is characterized by high proliferation, poor differentiation and a poor prognosis due to high rates of recurrence. Despite lower overall incidence African American (AA patients suffer from higher breast cancer mortality in part due to the higher proportion of TNBC cases among AA patients compared to European Americans (EA. It was recently shown that the clinical heterogeneity of TNBC is reflected by distinct transcriptional programs with distinct drug response profiles in preclinical models. In this study, gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry were used to elucidate potential differences between TNBC tumors of EA and AA patients on a molecular level. In a retrospective cohort of 136 TNBC patients, a major transcriptional signature of proliferation was found to be significantly upregulated in samples of AA ethnicity. Furthermore, transcriptional profiles of AA tumors showed differential activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 and a signature of BRCA1 deficiency in this cohort. Using signatures derived from the meta-analysis of TNBC gene expression carried out by Lehmann et al., tumors from AA patients were more likely of basal-like subtypes whereas transcriptional features of many EA samples corresponded to mesenchymal-like or luminal androgen receptor driven subtypes. These results were validated in The Cancer Genome Atlas mRNA and protein expression data, again showing enrichment of a basal-like phenotype in AA tumors and mesenchymal subtypes in EA tumors. In addition, increased expression of VEGF-activated genes together with elevated microvessel area determined by the AQUA method suggest that AA patients exhibit higher tumor vascularization. This study confirms the existence of distinct transcriptional programs in triple negative breast cancer in two separate cohorts and that these programs differ by racial group. Differences in TNBC subtypes and levels of tumor angiogenesis in AA

  13. Mast cell subsets and neuropeptides in leprosy reactions

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    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunohistochemical identification of neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, substance P, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone quantification of mast cells and their subsets (tryptase/chymase-immunoreactive mast cells = TCMC and tryptase-immunoreactive mast cells = TMC were determined in biopsies of six patients with leprosy reactions (three patients with type I reaction and three with type II. Biopsies were compared with those taken from the same body site in the remission stage of the same patient. We found a relative increase of TMC in the inflammatory infiltrate of the reactional biopsies compared to the post-reactional biopsy. Also, the total number of mast cells and the TMC/TCMC ratio in the inflammatory infiltrate was significantly higher than in the intervening dermis of the biopsies of both periods. No significant difference was found regarding neuroptide expression in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies. The relative increase of TMC in the reactional infiltrates could implicate this mast cell subset in the reported increase of the immune response in leprosy reactions.

  14. [Role of hypnosis and hypno-suggestions methods in the complex therapy of tumor patients].

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    Jakubovits, Edit

    2010-06-01

    Besides more conventional tumor risks, depression and negative life events are significant risk factors in cancer here in Hungary, therefore oncopsychology is increasingly important. We discuss traumatizing effects of the diagnosis and invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures from the viewpoint of altered state of consciousness. During stress and hypnosis brain functioning is altered in a similar way, which can be seen both in the patient's symptoms and his/her physiological and neuroimaging findings. In trance state patients part from reality, they no longer communicate conventionally or maturely. Hypnosis is characterized not only by physical and mental changes, but important unique social interactions as well. These interactions affect the endocrine and immune system and the mental state of the patient, they strengthen and synchronize resources and help posttraumatic growth. Since in the stress induced spontaneous altered state of consciousness the susceptibility to suggestions is increased, suggestive communication can be used effectively and it can even result in formal hypnosis induction. Under the strong time and mental pressure characterizing the work of the oncologic departments, it might help the staff to improve the cooperation with the patient if staff members, physicians and nurses as well, are aware of the nature and the neurophysiologic background of the spontaneous trance state induced by the life-threatening diagnosis of cancer.

  15. Muscle involvement in leprosy: study of the anterior tibial muscle in 40 patients Alterações musculares na lepra: estudo do músculo tibial anterior em 40 pacientes

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    LINEU CESAR WERNECK

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of skeletal striated muscle in leprosy is considered secondary due to peripheral neuropathy, but some studies point it to a primary muscle lesion. In order to investigate the muscle involvement in leprosy, we studied 40 patients (lepromatous 23, tuberculoid 13, borderline 2 and indeterminate 2. The motor nerve conduction of the peroneal nerves had a reduction of the velocity, decreased compound muscle action potential and sometimes absence of potentials. The electromyographic study of the anterior tibial muscle showed signs of recent and chronic denervation in 77.5% of the cases and no myopathic potentials. The anterior tibial muscle biopsy revealed denervation in 45% of the cases, interstitial inflammatory myopathy in 30% and mixed (myopathic and neuropathic pattern in 12.5%. Acid fast bacillus was detected in 25% of the cases, always in the interstitial tissue. Inflammatory reaction was present in the interstitial space and in patients with the lepromatous type. The histological findings clearly defined the presence of the so-called "Leprous Interstitial Myositis" on the top of denervation signs.O envolvimento do músculo estriado na lepra é considerado secundário à lesão dos nervos periféricos, mas alguns estudos relataram acometimento muscular primário. A fim de verificar esta controvérsia estudamos 40 pacientes com lepra, sendo 23 da forma lepromatosa, 13 da tuberculoide, 2 borderline e 2 indeterminada. Realizamos a neurocondução do nervo peroneiro, junto com eletromiografia e biópsia do músculo tibial anterior. Encontramos redução de velocidade de condução, da amplitude e algumas vezes ausência de potenciais no nervo peroneiro. A eletromiografia do tibial anterior mostrou sinais de desinervação recente e crônica em 77,5% dos casos e não foi encontrada evidência de padrão "miopático". A biópsia do músculo tibial anterior revelou desinervação em 45% dos casos, miopatia inflamatória intersticial em

  16. Interventions for skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy.

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    Reinar, Liv Merete; Forsetlund, Louise; Bjørndal, Arild; Lockwood, Diana

    2008-07-16

    More than three million persons are disabled by leprosy worldwide. The main complication of sensory nerve damage is neuropathic ulceration, particularly of the feet. In this review we explored interventions that can prevent and treat secondary damage to skin and limbs. To assess the effects of self-care, dressings and footwear in preventing and healing secondary damage to the skin in persons affected by leprosy. We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (April 2008), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008), MEDLINE (from 2003 to April 2008), EMBASE (from 2005 to April 2008), CINAHL (1982-2006) and LILACS (1982- April 2008 ) as well as online registers of ongoing trials (April 2008). Randomised controlled trials involving anyone with leprosy and damage to peripheral nerves treated with any measures designed to prevent damage with the aim of healing existing ulcers and preventing development of new ulcers. Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. Eight trials with a total of 557 participants were included. The quality of the trials was generally poor. The interventions and outcome measures were diverse. Although three studies that compared zinc tape to more traditional dressings found some benefit, none of these showed a statistically significant effect. One trial indicated that topical ketanserin had a better effect on wound healing than clioquinol cream or zinc paste, RR was 6.00 (95% CI 1.45 to 24.75). We did not combine the results of the two studies that compared topical phenytoin to saline dressing, but both studies found statistically significant effects in favour of phenytoin for healing of ulcer (SMD -2.34; 95% CI -3.30 to -1.39; and SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.20 to 0.39). Canvas shoes were not much better than PVC-boots, and double rocker shoes did not promote healing much more than below-knee plasters. One study suggested that topical ketanserin is more effective than clioquinol cream

  17. Tentativas de transmissão da lepra ao homem, por meio de Triatomídeos infectados em doentes lepromatosos: (nota prévia Attempts to transmit Leprosy to man by means of Triatomidae infected in lepromatous cases

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    H. C. de Souza-Araújo

    1944-12-01

    Full Text Available The A.A. started a new series of experiments upon the transmission of Leprosy to man by means of one of the more widespread hematophagi of the hinterland of Brazil, the Triatomidae. Two species of these insects were found naturally infected with Hansen's bacillus in huts of lepers in the interior of the State of Minas Gerais and one of the writers (S.A. upon feeding the same insects on lepromatous cases could obtain two strains of acid-fast bacilli cultures smearing Lowenstein medium with the intestinal contains of the same. The first phase of the experiments lasted five months and the results, partially positive, are here describe. More than one hundred Triatomidae (Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus bred in the Institute Oswaldo Cruz and fed in normal pigeons until convenient growth were put on lepromatous lesions, which they sucked many times, and them after one or more days they were put to be fed on selected regions of the skin of four negativated cases of leprosy. The arguments in favour and against the possibility of obtaining new lesions of leprosy in such burnet out patients were discussed. The A.A. are not authorized to draw any definite conclusions, but the few facts registered are worth of divulgation, in orther that other workers send their suggestions. Three out of the four volunteers showed moderate local reactions between 1 to 4 days after being sucked by the infected insectes. After five months experiments subcutanous lymph were obtained from the points where the insects have bitten. A very few acid-fast bacilli were found in such material. The patients, being kept in separation from infectious cases, will be followed up during months or a year in order to be detected any suspicious experimental lesions of leprosy.

  18. Cholestasis in patients with Cockayne syndrome and suggested modified criteria for clinical diagnosis

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    Elsobky Ezzat S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by low-to-normal birth weight; growth failure; brain dysmyelination with calcium deposits, cutaneous photosensitivity; pigmentary retinopathy, cataract, and sensorineural hearing loss. To the best of our knowledge, cholestatic liver disease was not previously reported in these patients. Aim To highlight the presence of cholestasis and liver dysfunction in this group of patients and to suggest modified criteria for clinical diagnosis. Methods The study included nine patients with Cockayne from four different families (five males and four females in which Cockayne was suspected clinically. In all patients chromosomal breakage studies revealed mild (45% to moderate (60% increase in frequency of chromatid and chromosome gaps and breaks versus 25% in normal controls. Diagnosis was confirmed by DNA repair assay. Results During routine follow up of these patients, seven of them had evident liver affection ranging from mild elevation in liver enzymes to cholestatic liver disease and liver cell failure. The attacks were recurrent in two patients and were sometimes preceded by infection. The attack may lead to deterioration of neurological and/or liver condition. It may end in liver cell failure that either recovers completely or may lead to death. Conclusions liver disease could be considered common in Egyptian patients with Cockayne with the cholestatic form being the most evident. The syndrome should be included in the list of causes of cholestatic liver disease. Chromosomal breakage study and positive family history should be included as major criteria for clinical diagnosis of Cockayne especially in a population like ours where consanguineous marriage is very high and molecular testing and UV sensitivity tests are considered unaffordable.

  19. Assistência de enfermagem ao portador de Hanseníase: abordagem transcultural Asistencia de enfermería al portador de Lepra: abordaje transcultural Nursing assistance to a Leprosy-infected patient: transcultural approach

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    Fernando José Guedes da Silva Júnior

    2008-11-01

    com la lepra de forma culturalmente satisfactória.This is a case study, developed in a health center in Teresina-PI, which dealt with the issue of nursing assistance given to a patient with Multibacillary Leprosy, focusing on the Transcultural Nursing care, Diagnosis and Nursing Interventions according to NANDA Taxonomy II. A semi-structured interview and participant observation were carried out, which enabled data collection handled according to normative patterns, values and daily practices, ways of popular care and cares required in the professional system. In this study, we realized that nursing assistance planning aimed, especially, to contribute on the disease treatment support, reducing potential risks and using preservation, negotiation and re-standardization of the professional system. We also observed the support to the treatment and the development of self care turned to leprosy in a culturally satisfactory way.

  20. Begotten of Corruption? Bioarchaeology and "othering" of leprosy in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins Schug, Gwen

    2016-12-01

    Leprosy is strongly stigmatized in South Asia, being regarded as a manifestation of extreme levels of spiritual pollution going back through one or more incarnations of the self. Stigma has significant social consequences, including surveillance, exclusion, discipline, control, and punishment; biologically speaking, internalized stigma also compounds the disfigurement and disability resulting from this disease. Stigma results from an othering process whereby difference is recognized, meaning is constituted, and eventually, sufferers may be negatively signified and marked for exclusion. This paper traces the history of leprosy's stigmatization in South Asia, using archaeology and an exegesis of Vedic texts to examine the meaning of this disease from its apparent zero-point-when it first appears but before it was differentiated and signified-in the mature Indus Age. Results suggest that early in the second millennium BCE, leprosy was perceived as treatable and efforts were apparently made to mitigate its impact on the journey to the afterworld. Ignominy to the point of exclusion does not emerge until the first millennium BCE. This paper uses archaeology to create an effective history of stigma for leprosy, destabilizing what is true about this disease and its sufferers in South Asia today. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Leprosy and the adaptation of human toll-like receptor 1.

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    Sunny H Wong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7 x 10(-8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20-0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9 x 10(-14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35-0.54. The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases.

  2. Social stigma as an epidemiological determinant for leprosy elimination in Cameroon.

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    Nsagha, Dickson S; Bissek, Anne-Cécile Z K; Nsagha, Sarah M; Njunda, Anna L; Assob, Jules C N; Tabah, Earnest N; Bamgboye, Elijah A; Oyediran, Alain Bankole O O; Nde, Peter F; Njamnshi, Alfred K

    2011-03-01

    Leprosy has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries of the world according to the WHO, but the social stigma to the disease is still very high. The present study was performed to investigate the role of social stigma as a determinant for leprosy elimination in a leprosy endemic region of Cameroon. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to investigate leprosy social stigma among lepers, their contacts and a control group consisting of patients attending a health facility for reasons other than leprosy. Informed consent was sought and gained prior to starting the study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews identified three types of stigma: lack of self-esteem, tribal stigma and complete rejection by society. From the 480 structured questionnaires administered, there were overall positive attitudes to lepers among the study population and within the divisions (P=0.0). The proportion of participants that felt sympathetic with deformed lepers was 78.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 74.4-81.8%] from a total of 480. Three hundred and ninety nine (83.1%) respondents indicated that they could share a meal or drink at the same table with a deformed leper (95% CI: 79.7-86.5%). Four hundred and three (83.9%) participants indicated that they could have a handshake and embrace a deformed leper (95% CI: 80.7-87.3%). A total of 85.2% (95.0% CI: 81.9-88.4%) participants affirmed that they could move with a deformed leper to the market or church. A high proportion of 71.5% (95.0% CI: 67.5%-75.5%) participants stated that they could offer a job to a deformed leper. The results indicate that Menchum division had the lowest mean score of 3.3 on positive attitudes to leprosy compared with Mezam (4.1) and Boyo (4.8) divisions. The high proportion of positive attitudes among the participants and in different divisions is a positive indicator that the elimination of leprosy social stigma is progressing in the

  3. Social stigma as an epidemiological determinant for leprosy elimination in Cameroon

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    Dickson S. Nsagha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries of the world according to the WHO, but the social stigma to the disease is still very high. The present study was performed to investigate the role of social stigma as a determinant for leprosy elimination in a leprosy endemic region of Cameroon. Focus group discussions, in-depth interviews and structured questionnaires were used to investigate leprosy social stigma among lepers, their contacts and a control group consisting of patients attending a health facility for reasons other than leprosy. Informed consent was sought and gained prior to starting the study. Focus group discussions and in-depth interviews identified three types of stigma: lack of self-esteem, tribal stigma and complete rejection by society. From the 480 structured questionnaires administered, there were overall positive attitudes to lepers among the study population and within the divisions (P=0.0. The proportion of participants that felt sympathetic with deformed lepers was 78.1% [95% confidence interval (CI: 74.4-81.8%] from a total of 480. Three hundred and ninety nine (83.1% respondents indicated that they could share a meal or drink at the same table with a deformed leper (95% CI: 79.7-86.5%. Four hundred and three (83.9% participants indicated that they could have a handshake and embrace a deformed leper (95% CI: 80.7-87.3%. A total of 85.2% (95.0% CI: 81.9-88.4% participants affirmed that they could move with a deformed leper to the market or church. A high proportion of 71.5% (95.0% CI: 67.5%-75.5% participants stated that they could offer a job to a deformed leper. The results indicate that Menchum division had the lowest mean score of 3.3 on positive attitudes to leprosy compared with Mezam (4.1 and Boyo (4.8 divisions. The high proportion of positive attitudes among the participants and in different divisions is a positive indicator that the elimination of leprosy social stigma is progressing

  4. Association of Taq I, Fok I and Apa I polymorphisms in Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) gene with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Suryadevara, Naveen Chandra; Shinde, Vidya Gouri; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Jain, Suman; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Anandaraj, M P J S

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is a transacting transcription factor which mediates immunomodulatory function and plays a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses through its ligand and polymorphisms in VDR gene may affect its regulatory function. To investigate the association of three VDR gene polymorphisms (TaqI rs731236, FokI rs2228570 and ApaI rs7975232) with leprosy. The study group includes 404 participants of which 222 were leprosy patients (paucibacillary=87, multibacillary=135) and 182 healthy controls. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP technique. Statistical analysis was performed using SNP Stats and PLINK software. The VDR FokI (rs2228570) ff genotype, ApaI (rs7975232) AA, Aa genotype and haplotype T-f-a, T-F-A were positively associated with leprosy when compared to healthy controls. The two variants at Fok and Apa positions in VDR gene are significantly associated with leprosy. Genotypes at FokI (ff), ApaI (aa) and haplotype (T-F-a, T-f-a) may contribute to the risk of developing leprosy by altering VDR phenotype/levels subsequently modulation of immune response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative study of short term results in two multidrug regimens in multibacillary leprosy.

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    Singh, R P; Tiwari, V D; Chattopadhyay, S P

    1993-01-01

    Thirty lepromatous and Borderline lepromatous leprosy patients were treated with multidrug therapy in an open trial. Fifteen of them received the standard WHO multidrug regimen ie., rifampicin 600 mg and clofazimine 300 mg monthly, supervised, and dapsone 100 mg daily and clofazimine 100 mg on alternate days as self administered; the other 15 received a modified multidrug therapy regimen comprising of rifampicin 600 mg, clofazimine 100 mg and dapsone 100 mg daily for 21 days as suggested by the Indian Association of Leprologists, followed by the standard WHO regimen. The observation period was six months. Clinical, bacteriological, histological and immunological parameters were studied. The fall in morphological index was much faster in patients receiving modified multidrug therapy regimen compared to those receiving the standard WHO regimen. Otherwise, there was no difference between the two groups of patients. Five patients developed type I (upgrading) reaction with one developing ulnar nerve paralysis. No untoward effects of drugs were noted in the study subjects except for darkening of skin colour of all the patients.

  6. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

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    Arthur da Silva Neumann

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  7. Epidemiologic and clinicopathologic aspects of Leprosy in Dakar; evaluation of 73 new cases

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    Suzanne Oumou Niang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of new leprosy cases are still diagnosed in Dakar despite all the efforts in the struggle by the national program for elimination of leprosy by the Institute of Applied Leprosy in Dakar. The aim of our study was to evaluate the epidemiological, clinicopathological and outcome of new cases of leprosy. A prospective study was conducted over a period of one year listing all new cases of leprosy based on clinical diagnosis, bacteriology and histology. 73 new cases were recorded. The sex ratio was 1.5 and the mean age of 39.5 years. Children aged from 0 to 15 years old represented 12%. The clinical forms were rated in order of decreasing frequency Borderline 47.94%, 30.13% lepromatous lepromatous, indeterminate 8.21, borderline lepromatous 6.84, TT: 5.47%, 1.36 and neurological bb%. Neurological signs were enlarged nerve in 50 cases, a neurological deficit in 16 cases and a sensitive deficit in 16 cases. The complications were burns and ulcerations in 10 cases, a claw in 7 cases, a reversal reaction in 7 cases, erythema nodosum in 4 cases and neuritis in 8 cases. The number of new cases mutilated was 24.65%. The smear was positive in 42% and histology contribution in 91.37% of cases. Our study highlights the significant number of patients with multibacillary contagious, affected children, the high proportion of disability grade 2/OMS reflecting the delay in diagnosis. This delay is due to ignorance, to traditional treatments and low socio-economic status and lack of trained diagnostic teams in different areas apart from referral centres.

  8. Retraso en el diagnóstico de lepra como factor pronóstico de discapacidad en una cohorte de pacientes en Colombia, 2000 - 2010 Delay in leprosy diagnosis as a predictor of disability in a cohort of patients in Colombia, 2000 - 2010

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    Martha Inírida Guerrero

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar los factores pronósticos de la presencia de discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico de lepra en una cohorte de pacientes colombianos de 2000 a 2010. MÉTODOS: Estudio analítico y observacional descriptivo de una cohorte retrospectiva de pacientes ingresados con diagnóstico de lepra en el Centro Dermatológico Federico Lleras Acosta, de Bogotá, Colombia, entre 2000 y 2010. Se realizó el análisis descriptivo de las variables y se identificaron factores pronósticos de la presencia de discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico mediante análisis simple y multifactorial (modelo de riesgos proporcionales de Cox; se calcularon las razones de riesgo (hazard ratio para cada uno de los factores incluidos en el modelo. RESULTADOS: El tiempo entre los primeros síntomas y el diagnóstico en los 333 pacientes de la cohorte fue en promedio 2,9 años; 32,3% de ellos tenían algún grado de discapacidad, especialmente en los pies. Hubo una mayor proporción de retraso en el diagnóstico y discapacidad en hombres que en mujeres y en pacientes con lepra multibacilar que con paucibacilar. La discapacidad se asoció significativamente con demoras ≥ 1 año en el diagnóstico, edad ≥ 30 años, índice baciloscópico inicial ≥ 2, lepra multibacilar y proceder de Cundinamarca o Santander. Los factores protectores fueron ser del sexo femenino, tener algún grado de escolaridad y residir en Boyacá. CONCLUSIONES: El tiempo entre los primeros síntomas y el diagnóstico constituye el factor pronóstico clave de la discapacidad al momento del diagnóstico de lepra. Se recomienda reforzar la búsqueda activa de personas infectadas y promover el diagnóstico precoz.OBJECTIVE: Evaluate predictive factors of disability at time of leprosy diagnosis in a cohort of Colombian patients, from 2000 to 2010. METHODS: Descriptive and analytical observational study of a retrospective cohort of patients admitted with a leprosy diagnosis to the Centro

  9. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

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    Cruz-Jaramillo, José Luis; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Rojas-Morales, Lourdes; López-Buenfil, José Abel; Morales-Galván, Oscar; Chavarín-Palacio, Claudio; Ramírez-Pool, José Abrahán; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV) and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants. PMID:25004279

  10. Characterization of a Proposed Dichorhavirus Associated with the Citrus Leprosis Disease and Analysis of the Host Response

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    José Luis Cruz-Jaramillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal agents of Citrus leprosis are viruses; however, extant diagnostic methods to identify them have failed to detect known viruses in orange, mandarin, lime and bitter orange trees with severe leprosis symptoms in Mexico, an important citrus producer. Using high throughput sequencing, a virus associated with citrus leprosis was identified, belonging to the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. The virus was termed Citrus Necrotic Spot Virus (CNSV and contains two negative-strand RNA components; virions accumulate in the cytoplasm and are associated with plasmodesmata—channels interconnecting neighboring cells—suggesting a mode of spread within the plant. The present study provides insights into the nature of this pathogen and the corresponding plant response, which is likely similar to other pathogens that do not spread systemically in plants.

  11. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  12. Interruption of persistent exposure to leprosy combined or not with recent BCG vaccination enhances the response to Mycobacterium leprae specific antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Marques; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista

    2017-05-01

    Household contacts of multibacillary leprosy patients (HCMB) constitute the group of individuals at the highest risk of developing leprosy. Early diagnosis and treatment of their index cases combined with Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunization remain important strategies adopted in Brazil to prevent HCMB from evolving into active disease. In the present study, we assessed the impact of these measures on the immune response to Mycobacterium leprae in HCMB. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HCMB (n = 16) were obtained at the beginning of leprosy index case treatment (T0). At this time point, contacts were vaccinated (n = 13) or not (n = 3) in accordance with their infancy history of BCG vaccination and PBMCs were recollected at least 6 months later (T1). As expected, a significant increase in memory CD4 and CD8 T cell frequencies responsive to M. leprae whole-cell sonicate was observed in most contacts. Of note, higher frequencies of CD4+ T cells that recognize M. leprae specific epitopes were also detected. Moreover, increased production of the inflammatory mediators IL1-β, IL-6, IL-17, TNF, IFN-γ, MIP1-β, and MCP-1 was found at T1. Interestingly, the increment in these parameters was observed even in those contacts that were not BCG vaccinated at T0. This result reinforces the hypothesis that the continuous exposure of HCMB to live M. leprae down regulates the specific cellular immune response against the pathogen. Moreover, our data suggest that BCG vaccination of HCMB induces activation of T cell clones, likely through "trained immunity", that recognize M. leprae specific antigens not shared with BCG as an additional protective mechanism besides the expected boost in cell-mediated immunity by BCG homologues of M. leprae antigens.

  13. Clinical, bacteriological, and histopathological characteristics of newly detected children with leprosy: A population based study in a defined rural and urban area of Maharashtra, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja P Shetty

    2013-01-01

    transmission, and highlight implications on individual patients and the community. Key Message: Most of the cases were paucibacillary (62%. A large proportion of children (49% had SSL and (55% had it on the face followed by arms and leg (27% and trunk (17%. The mean duration of symptoms exceeded one year which can be attributed to poor knowledge of leprosy or barriers in access to health care or its utilization.

  14. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A; Österroos, A; Hassan, S; Gullbo, J; Rickardson, L; Jarvius, M; Nygren, P; Fryknäs, M; Höglund, M; Larsson, R

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC 1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  15. Elimination of Leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To identify potential publications, we included papers on leprosy elimination monitoring, special action projects for the elimination of leprosy, modified leprosy elimination campaigns, and the Global Alliance to eliminate leprosy from the following principal data bases: Cochrane data base of systematic reviews, PubMed, ...

  16. Functional Activity Limitation and Quality of Life of Leprosy Cases in an Endemic Area in Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Victor S.; Oliveira, Laudice S.; Castro, Fabrícia D. N.; Gois-Santos, Vanessa T.; Lemos, Ligia M. D.; Ribeiro, Maria do C. O.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Gurgel, Ricardo Q.

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated the association between quality of life (QoL) and functional activity limitations (FAL) of leprosy patients as determined by the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness scale (SALSA). Aim To identify the association between FALs and the QoL of patients during and post leprosy treatment. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional survey of 104 patients with leprosy followed in specialist reference centres in Sergipe, Brazil, between June and October 2014. QoL was evaluated using the World Health Organization-QoL-BREF (WHOQoL-BREF) questionnaire. The SALSA scale was used to measure FALs. Results Low SALSA scores were present in 76% of patients. QoL scores were lower for the physical and environmental domains, with median (interquartile range (IQR)) scores of 53.6 (32.1–67.9) and 53.1 (46.9–64.8), respectively. There was a statistical association between increasing SALSA scores and lower QoL as measured by the WHOQoL-BREF. Conclusion Functional limitations are associated with lower QoL in leprosy patients, especially in the physical and environmental WHOQoL-BREF domains. PMID:26132166

  17. Leprosy Reactions Show Increased Th17 Cell Activity and Reduced FOXP3+ Tregs with Concomitant Decrease in TGF-β and Increase in IL-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Saini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available 50% of leprosy patients suffer from episodes of Type 1/ reversal reactions (RR and Type 2/ Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL reactions which lead to morbidity and nerve damage. CD4+ subsets of Th17 cells and CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs have been shown to play a major role in disease associated immunopathology and in stable leprosy as reported by us and others. The aim of our study was to analyze their role in leprosy reactions.Quantitative reverse transcribed PCR (qPCR, flowcytometry and ELISA were used to respectively investigate gene expression, cell phenotypes and supernatant levels of cytokines in antigen stimulated PBMC cultures in patients with stable disease and those undergoing leprosy reactions. Both types of reactions are associated with significant increase of Th17 cells and associated cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-23 and chemokines CCL20, CCL22 as compared to matching stable forms of leprosy. Concurrently patients in reactions show reduction in FOXP3+ Treg cells as well as reduction in TGF-β and increase in IL-6. Moreover, expression of many T cell markers, cytokines, chemokines and signaling factors were observed to be increased in RR as compared to ENL reaction patients.Patients with leprosy reactions show an imbalance in Th17 and Treg populations. The reduction in Treg suppressor activity is associated withhigherTh17cell activity. The combined effect of reduced TGF-β and enhanced IL-6, IL-21 cytokines influence the balance between Th17 or Treg cells in leprosy reactions as reported in the murine models and autoimmune diseases. The increase in Th17 cell associated cytokines may contribute to lesional inflammation.

  18. Study Suggests Smaller Melanoma Excision Margins May Be Option for Some Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A randomized controlled trial of patients with stage IIA–C cutaneous melanoma thicker than 2-mm found that a 2-cm surgical resection margin is sufficient and is as safe for patients as a 4-cm margin.

  19. Increased plantar foot pressure in persons affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Frederik J.; van Schie, Carine H.; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R.; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Although foot pressure has been reported to be increased in people affected by leprosy, studies on foot pressure and its determinants are limited. Therefore, the aim was to assess barefoot plantar foot pressure and to identify clinical determinants of increased plantar foot pressure in leprosy

  20. First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) wer edete...

  1. Lepromatous leprosy treated with recombinant interferon gamma: cutaneous histologic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottasso, O; Besuschio, S; Merlin, V; Morini, J C; Bernabo, J; Falcoff, R; Falcoff, E

    1992-11-01

    We report on the histologic changes occurring in single cutaneous lesions, from six active lepromatous patients, 1 week following the administration of three daily intradermal injections, 35 micrograms each, of recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma). Except for a strong induration at the injection site, rIFN-gamma produced no adverse systemic reactions and was able to promote a remarkable influx of T-lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes with large nuclei, nonvacuolated cytoplasm, and reduced lysozyme reactivity. Furthermore, despite no clear-cut reduction of mycobacterial dermal burden, bacilli showed a clear increase in the granular appearance. Present findings provide a basis for further elucidation of rIFN-gamma as an additional tool for leprosy treatment.

  2. CD4+ Th17 cells discriminate clinical types and constitute a third subset of non Th1, Non Th2 T cells in human leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaman Saini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with localized tuberculoid and generalized lepromatous leprosy show respectively Th1 and Th2 cytokine profile. Additionally, other patients in both types of leprosy also show a non discriminating Th0 cytokine profile with both interferon-γ and IL-4. The present study investigated the role of Th17 cells which appear to be a distinct subtype of Th subtypes in 19 tuberculoid and 18 lepromatous leprosy patients. Five healthy subjects with long term exposure to infection and 4 skin biopsies from healthy subjects undergoing cosmetic surgery were used as controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: An array of Th17 related primers for cytokines, chemokines and transcription factors was used in real time reverse transcribed PCR to evaluate gene expression, ELISA for cytokine secretion in the supernatants of antigen stimulated PBMC cultures and flow cytometry for establishing the phenotype of the IL-17, IL-21 producing cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IL-17 isoforms showed significantly higher expression and release in supernatants of antigen stimulated PBMC cultures and dermal lesions of healthy contacts and tuberculoid leprosy as compared to lepromatous leprosy (p<0.003. This was further confirmed by Th17 associated transcription factor RORC, cytokines IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23, chemokines MMP13, CCL20, CCL22. Of interest was the association of IL-23R and not IL-6R with IL-17(+ cells. The Th17 cells were CD4(+ CCR6(+ confirming their effector cell lineage. Polarized Th1 cytokines were seen in 3/7 tuberculoid and Th2 cytokines in 5/10 lepromatous leprosy patients. Of importance was the higher association of Th17 pathway factors with the non-polarized Th0 types as compared to the polarized Th1 and Th2 (p<0.01. Our study draws attention to a third type of effector Th cell that may play a role in leprosy.

  3. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Michal; Bahouth, Hany; Leiser, Yoav; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient's survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient's airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients.

  4. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Hany; Leiser, Yoav; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient's survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient's airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients. PMID:26161411

  5. Suggestion of optimal patient characteristics for sentinel lymph node mapping in colorectal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A Quadros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In a previously published study, the variables lower rectal tumor site, preoperative chemoradiotherapy and large tumors were considered as independent risk factors for the inability of sentinel lymph node identification in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. OBJECTIVES: To determine if these variables could interfere in the precision and upstaging benefit of sentinel lymph node mapping in colorectal cancer. METHODS: A database composed of 52 patients submitted to lymphatic mapping using technetium-99m-phytate and patent blue was reviewed. Only patients with tumors smaller than 5.0 cm, not submitted to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and without lower rectal cancer were included. RESULTS: With these parameters, 11 patients remained to be studied. The sentinel lymph node identification rate was 100%, with a sensitivity of 100%, negative predictive value of 100%, no false negatives and accuracy of 100%. Sentinel lymph nodes were the only metastatic nodes in 36.4% of the patients, micrometastases (<0.2 cm or only identified by immunohistochemistry provided an upstaging rate of 27.1% and metastases an upstaging rate of 9.1%. CONCLUSION: The parameters proposed in this study for selection of colorectal adenocarcinoma patients to be submitted to sentinel lymph node mapping identified optimal accuracy and good upstaging results. As the number of included patients was low, these results could serve as guidance for proper patient selection in further prospective lymph node mapping studies in colorectal cancer patients.

  6. [Anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage for hospitalized risk patients: Assessment and suggestions for improvements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, C; Le Garlantezec, P; Lamand, V; Rasamijao, V; Rapp, C

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can cause invasive infections. Incidence and severity are linked to patients' risk factors. Due to the resistance to leading antibiotics, the anti-pneumococcal vaccination has become a major public health issue. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the anti-pneumococcal vaccine coverage in a population of adults with risk factors. This was a prospective study that included patients with at least one recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination as indicated by the Weekly Epidemiological Bulletin (BEH), to which three further US recommendations were added (diabetes, obesity and age>65years). One hundred and thirty-four patients with an average age of 70 years were included. The physician could only confirm 68 % of the patients' vaccination status. Vaccination coverage as recommended by the BEH board was 30 % (n=54). All HIV patients were vaccinated (n=2) and the vaccination coverage was 75 % (n=8) for patients treated for autoimmune diseases and only 10 % (n=20) for patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with no vaccination didn't know the existence of the vaccine or didn't know that vaccination was recommended to them. This study has highlighted a deficit in pneumococcal vaccination coverage and a high level of ignorance of the existence of recommended vaccination. In addition to awareness campaign for patients and caregiver training, the expansion of the vaccine e-book utilization could improve the vaccination status. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Airway Management of the Patient with Maxillofacial Trauma: Review of the Literature and Suggested Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Barak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Advanced Trauma Life Support recommendations for managing patients with life-threatening injuries, securing the airway is the first task of a primary caregiver. Airway management of patients with maxillofacial trauma is complex and crucial because it can dictate a patient’s survival. Securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma is often extremely difficult because the trauma involves the patient’s airway and their breathing is compromised. In these patients, mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation are anticipated to be difficult. Additionally, some of these patients may not yet have been cleared of a cervical spine injury, and all are regarded as having a full stomach and having an increased risk of regurgitation and pulmonary aspiration. The requirements of the intended maxillofacial operation may often preclude the use of an oral intubation tube, and alternative methods for securing the airway should be considered before the start of the surgery. In order to improve the clinical outcome of patients with maxillofacial trauma, cooperation between maxillofacial surgeons, anesthesiologists, and trauma specialists is needed. In this review, we discuss the complexity and difficulties of securing the airway of patients with maxillofacial trauma and present our approach for airway management of such patients.

  8. Decentralisation of leprosy control activities in the municipality of Betim, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzikawa, Priscila Leiko; De Acúrcio, Francisco Assis; Velema, Johan P; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2010-09-01

    The present study aims at evaluating the decentralisation of the leprosy control activities in the municipality of Betim, Minas Gerais, Brazil. A quantitative study was undertaken using data from SINAN (Sistema Nacional de Agravos de Notificação) and patient records. The study included 435 new cases registered and living in Betim. The pre (1995-2000) and post (2001-2005) decentralisation periods were compared using the chi-square test. Besides this, units which already had leprosy control activities were compared to those which implemented them from 2001 on. There was a decrease in the percentage of cases diagnosed with deformities after decentralisation, as well as an increase in the number of cases detected through self-reporting. More patients were notified closer to home after decentralisation. The selected indicators did not show any difference between the quality of assistance regarding prevention of disabilities when comparing health units which already had leprosy activities to those which implemented them from 2001 onwards. Decentralisation, in Betim, did not lead to an increase in the number of cases, but led to earlier diagnosis and patients being treated closer to their homes. The study did not show evidence of decrease in the quality of care after decentralisation.

  9. A Case of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Leprosy Discovered after 9 Years of Misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onivola Raharolahy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of misdiagnosed leprosy in a 21-year-old Malagasy male, who, improperly treated, developed secondary mycobacterial resistance to fluoroquinolone. The patient contracted the infection 9 years prior to the current consultation, displaying on the right thigh a single papulonodular lesion, which progressively spread to the lower leg, back, and face. Initial administration of ciprofloxacin and prednisolone led to temporary and fluctuating improvement. Subsequent long-term self-medication with ciprofloxacin and corticosteroid did not heal the foul and nonhealing ulcers on the legs and under the right sole. Histopathological findings were compatible with lepromatous leprosy. Skin biopsy was positive for acid-fast bacilli and PCR assay confirmed the presence of a fluoroquinolone-resistant strain of Mycobacterium leprae (gyrA A91V. After 6 months of standard regimen with rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone, clinical outcome significantly improved. Clinical characteristics and possible epidemiological implications are discussed.

  10. Electrophysiological study of nerves in type-II reaction in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection primarily affecting the peripheral nervous system, skin and reticuloendothelial system. Cutaneous nerves are severely affected in lepra reaction and this leads to morbidity. Objective: To study electrophysiological pattern of different nerves involved in Type-II reactions in leprosy. Method: The present study was undertaken in 21 leprosy patients with Type-II reactions attending in and out-patient department of Dermatology & Venereology, B.R.D. Medical College, Gorakhpur from July 2005 to October 2006. This was a prospective case control study in which 20 healthy, age and sex matched people with no evidence of any disease (particularly nerve involvement were included. Limitation: Lesser number of cases were studied. Result: The proximal motor conduction latency was significantly prolonged in both ulnar and common peroneal nerve and proximal motor conduction velocity was also significantly reduced. On examining the values beyond 2S.D. of the control value, distal latency was not affected and only proximal conduction was affected in ulnar nerve. Conclusion: In Type II lepra reaction the motor conduction abnormalities are not prominent. Abnormalities are relatively more marked in the proximal segment.

  11. Suggestion of the manual exposure condition guideline for reducing patient dose in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Eun Ae [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The conditions after exposure to digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis were analyzed. The examinations for the ACR phantom were done using manual exposure, not auto exposure, to examine image discrimination and patient dose. As a result, the following results were derived: In the CC exposure , the kVp was 2kVp higher while mAs decreased to 58.6% for the 3D tomography. Such result showed an approximate decrease of 60mAs. At that time, the patients Average Glandular Dose (AGD) was 1.65mGy in 2D and 1.87mGy in 3D; thus, AGD of 3D was shown to have about 1.13 times higher. The result of the manual exposure revealed a reduced mAs of up to 80%; there was no effect in the assessment standard in terms of image discrimination, resulting in more than 10 points. When mAs was reduced to 80% in the manual exposure for ACR phantom, AGD was decreased to 0.66mGy. The diagnostic values of images were maintained and patients dose was reduced in the manual exposure in the AEC condition for 3D. Since the use of 3D has recently increased, using the manual exposure has been recommended in this study to improve the diagnostic value, while, simultaneously reducing patients dose.

  12. The leprosy asylum in India: 1886-1947.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jo

    2009-10-01

    Writing against a historical practice that situates the leprosy asylum exclusively within prison-like institutions, this article seeks to show the variation in leprosy asylums, the contingencies of their evolution, and the complexity of their designs, by devoting attention to the characteristics of the leprosy asylum in India from 1886 to 1947, in particular to the model agricultural colony. Drawing upon the travel narratives of Wellesley Bailey, the founder of the Mission to Lepers in India, for three separate periods in 1886, 1890-91, and 1895-96, it argues that leprosy asylums were formed in response to a complex conjunction of impulses: missionary, medical, and political. At the center of these endeavors was the provision of shelter for persons with leprosy that accorded with principles of good stewardship and took the form of judicious use of donations provided by benefactors. As the Mission to Lepers began to bring about improvements and restructuring to asylums, pleasant surroundings, shady trees, sound accommodation, and good ventilation became desirable conditions that would confer physical and psychological benefits on those living there. At the same time, the architecture of the asylum responded to economic imperatives, in addition to religious and medical aspirations, and asylums moved towards the regeneration of a labor force. Leprosy-affected people were increasingly employed in occupations that contributed to their sustenance and self-sufficiency, symbolically reincorporating the body damaged by leprosy into the economic world of productive relations.

  13. Correlation between occurrence of leprosy and fossil fuels: role of fossil fuel bacteria in the origin and global epidemiology of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, A N; Dastidar, S G

    1989-06-01

    On the basis of correlative data on the global distribution of leprosy, its bacteria metabolizing fossil fuels (FF), and the FF themselves, the origin of leprosy in the world as a whole, and in the leprosy-free countries, in particular, as indigenous cases, appeared to be primarily due to a soil-to-man, and secondarily due to a man-to-man infection. These findings helped to elucidate similar problems of animal leprosies and nocardial diseases.

  14. Positividade sorológica antiPGL-I em contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares de hanseníase em área urbana Seropositivity with anti-PGL-I of household and neighbours contacts of leprosy patients in an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lucena Sampaio Calado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Pesquisas atuais buscam avaliar a prevalência de pessoas infectadas pelo M. leprae, bem como o valor preditivo dos testes utilizados, em meio aos quais está a sorologia, que detecta anticorpos contra um antígeno específico da parede do Mycobacterium leprae, o glicolipídio fenólico (PGL-I. OBJETIVOS: Conhecer a taxa de infecção em contatos intra e peridomiciliares, e a relação de soropositividade com sexo, idade e grupo multibacilar/paucibacilar. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Inquérito soroepidemiológico em contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares dos casos notificados como hanseníase entre 1998 e 2002, no segundo distrito do Município de Duque de Caxias, RJ, utilizando o teste sorológico rápido de fluxo lateral ou ML Flow. RESULTADOS: Em 390 domicílios de casos de hanseníase foram identificados 2.130 contatos, e submetidos à sorologia 1.866 (12,4% de perda. A soropositividade foi de 15,7% (292/1.866, sendo 15,8% no domicílio e 15,6% no peridomicílio. Também não houve diferença na relação entre soropositividade e sexo e em maiores e menores de 15 anos. Observou-se diferença significativa na soropositividade de contatos de casos de hanseníase MB (67,5%, duas vezes maior do que a dos casos de PB (32,5%. DISCUSSÃO / CONCLUSÃO: Nas condições de moradia da periferia urbana de área endêmica devem ser submetidos igualmente à vigilância epidemiológica os contatos domiciliares e peridomiciliares.BACKGROUND: Actually many studies have been made to evaluate the predictive value of tests that identify patients infected by Mycobacterium leprae. Among then, the serology that determinates the presence o M. leprae specific antibody. OBJECTIVES: To know the infections tax among households and direct neighbours contacts, establish soropositivity relationship according to sex, household/ neighbour, age and classification of leprosy of the index case (paucibacillary x multibacillary. PATIENTS AND METHODS: seroepidemiological

  15. Leprosy in Denmark 1980-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, Huma; Nielsen, Susanne D.; Bygbjerg, Ib C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic and progressive granulomatous disease affecting mainly the skin and the peripheral nervous system. If left unrecognized, the infection can lead to permanent nerve damage and disability. The clinical presentation depends on the immune...... or with history of travel or work in the tropics. Due to the long incubation period with symptoms presenting long after immigration or return, clinicians often do not have the diagnosis in mind. The wide spectrum of symptoms and immunological reactions further complicates the diagnostic process. Treatment...

  16. Although Limited Evidence Suggests Patient Perceptions and Expectations for Dental Implants Are Realistic, Many Misconceptions Remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsai, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: A multicenter study. Yao J, Li M, Tang H, Want P-L, Zhao Y-X, McGrath C, Mattheos N. Clin Oral Implants Res 28(3):261-71. Information not available TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Cross-sectional study (survey). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding the stigma of leprosy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angel_D

    life. The patients pass through the concealability course, disruptive, aesthetic, origin and peril dimensions8. ▫ Stage 2 - the affective stage in which the social devaluation of the .... self-esteem and status in the community, and assists patients ... through mass media campaigns, schools and involvement of community leaders.

  18. Genotype-Property Patient-Phenotype Relations Suggest that Proteome Exhaustion Can Cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    aggregation mechanism. This paper reports analysis of compiled patient data and experimental and computed protein properties for variants of human SOD1, a major risk factor of ALS. Both stability and reduced net charge correlate significantly with disease, with larger significance than previously observed....... Using two independent methods and two data sets, a probability protein copy...... to expensive protein turnover of misfolded protein copies is consistent with the data but can further explain e. g. the expression-dependence of SOD1 pathogenicity, the lack of identification of a molecular toxic mode, elevated SOD1 mRNA levels in sporadic ALS, bioenergetic effects and increased resting energy...

  19. BH4 treatment in BH4-responsive PKU patients : Preliminary data on blood prolactin concentrations suggest increased cerebral dopamine concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Danique; Anjema, Karen; Jahja, Rianne; de Groot, Martijn J; Liemburg, Geertje B; Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca; van der Zee, Eddy A; Derks, Terry G J; Kema, Ido P; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    In phenylketonuria (PKU), cerebral neurotransmitter deficiencies have been suggested to contribute to brain dysfunction. Present treatment aims to reduce blood phenylalanine concentrations by a phenylalanine-restricted diet, while in some patients blood phenylalanine concentrations also respond to

  20. Epidemiological and histopathological study of leprosy cases in the state of Sergipe, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V S; Mendonça-Neto, P T; Fakhouri, R; Raposo, O F F; Reiss, F P; Feitosa, V L C

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease with different ratings due to the diversity of clinical manifestations. The most used classification by Reference Centers is the histopathological, which has been considered to have better specificity and sensitivity. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the histopathological types of profile of Leprosy patients from different parts of Sergipe, Brazil, from 1985 to 2005. For this purpose, it was used histopathological diagnosis reports filed at Prof. Dr. Nestor Piva Memorial from 1985 to 2005. There were 2,102 reports with Leprosy diagnosis, from which 1,165 (55.4%) cases were women, 1,224 (58.2%) cases were of mixed race and 1,835 (87.3%) were from the metropolitan area of Aracaju/SE. The mean age was 36.62 year. The smear microscopy classified 1,669 (79.4%) lesions as paucibacillary and there was a predominance of tuberculoid and indeterminate forms. Men were more likely to be multibacillary, as well as being the lepromatous pole. The determination of histopathological forms and the knowledge about the association and the epidemiological profile are important tools to contribute to public health policies.

  1. Routine endoscopy for esophageal cancer is suggestive for patients with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Han Hung

    Full Text Available This study attempted to reveal the incidence and risk of synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancer in subjects with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer based on a population-wide database in Taiwan.We retrieved data for this cross-sectional study from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. The study group included 2,965 subjects who had received their first-time diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer in 2002∼2009. We assigned the date of their first diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer as the index date. We also randomly retrieved 29,650 comparison subjects matched with the study subjects in terms of gender and age group. We assigned their first medical utilization that occurred in the index year as the index date for the comparison group. We further performed a conditional logistic regression to investigate the association between esophageal cancer and oral cancer.Results showed that prevalences of esophageal cancer within 3 months before and after the index date were respectively 2.19% and 0.04% for the study and comparison groups. A conditional logistic regression revealed that the odds ratio (OR of esophageal cancer for subjects with oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 55.33 (95% confidence interval (CI: 29.86∼102.52 compared to comparison subjects. Furthermore, compared to comparison subjects, ORs for esophageal cancer were respectively 18.41 (95% CI: 8.50-39.85, 40.49 (95% CI: 15.11∼108.64, and 240.96 (95% CI: 125.49-462.69 for study subjects with a malignancy of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx.We concluded that there were relatively high chances for synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancers being detected through panendoscopy in patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers. The routine use of panendoscopy in such patients should be encouraged with a higher priority.

  2. National Health and Hospital Reform Commission final report and patient-centred suggestions for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Yen, Laurann; Wells, Robert; Leeder, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The final report of the National Health and Hospital Reform Commission (NHHRC) called for a strengthened consumer voice and empowerment. This has salience for the development of health policy concerning chronic illnesses. This paper compares the recommendations for chronic illness care made in the NHHRC final report with suggestions made by people with chronic illness and family carers of people with chronic illness in a recent Australian study. Sixty-six participants were interviewed in a qualitative research project of the Serious and Continuing Illness Policy and Practice Study (SCIPPS). Participants were people with type II diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic heart failure. Family carers were also interviewed. Content analysis was undertaken and participants' recommendations for improving care were compared with those proposed in the NHHRC final report. Many suggestions from the participants of the SCIPPS qualitative research project appeared in the NHHRC final report, including the need to improve care coordination, health literacy and the experience of Indigenous Australians. The research project also identified important issues of family carers, immigrants and people with multiple illnesses, which were not addressed in the NHHRC final report. More specific attention is needed in health reform to improve the experience of family carers, Indigenous peoples, immigrants to Australia and people with multiple illnesses. To align more closely with their needs, health reform must be explicitly informed by the voices of people with chronic illness and their family carers. The NHHRC recommendations must be supplemented with proposals that address the needs of these people for support and the problems associated with poor care coordination.

  3. LEPROSY NEPHROPATHY: A REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, highly incapacitating, and with systemic involvement in some cases. Renal involvement has been reported in all forms of the disease, and it is more frequent in multibacillary forms. The clinical presentation is variable and is determined by the host immunologic system reaction to the bacilli. During the course of the disease there are the so called reactional states, in which the immune system reacts against the bacilli, exacerbating the clinical manifestations. Different renal lesions have been described in leprosy, including acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, secondary amyloidosis and pyelonephritis. The exact mechanism that leads to glomerulonephritis in leprosy is not completely understood. Leprosy treatment includes rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Prednisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to control acute immunological episodes.

  4. analysis, diagnosis and prognosis of leprosy utilizing fuzzy classifier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TRIPPLEJO2K2

    leprae to humans: chimpanzees, mangabey monkeys, and nine-banded armadillos. The early signs and symptoms of leprosy are very subtle and occur slowly (usually over years), which includes; numbness (loss of temperature sensation), skin ...

  5. Near nerve potencial of sural nerve in leprosy Estudo da condução do nervo sural com a técnica de eletrodos justa-nervo em pacientes com moléstia de Hansen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula M. Arruda

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy neuropathy is characterized by initial involvement of the small nerve fibers, later followed by involvement of the large fibers, when routine nerve conduction studies become abnormal. To increase the diagnostic yield and precocity of these studies, we applied the near nerve technique to the sural nerve of 8 leprosy patients. Contrary to our expectations, the main component of the sural nerve sensory action potential was abnormal in all patients, but the minimum conduction velocity originating from small 3-6 mm fibers was normal or only mildly involved in three patients. Also, although Schwann cells are the first to be involved in leprosy, the results are suggestive of axonal degeneration instead of demyelination. To better understand the neurophysiology and physiology of leprosy and to increase the accuracy and precocity of the diagnosis, it will be necessary to investigate patients in the very early stages of the disease and to correlate these findings with the corresponding nerve pathology.Na hanseníase, as fibras de pequeno calibre são acometidas antes que as fibras mais grossas, ocasião em que o estudo da condução torna-se anormal. Neste estudo, utilizou-se a técnica de registro com eletrodos justa-nervo com a finalidade de aumentar a precocidade e a acurácia diagnóstica, devido à sua capacidade de detectar potenciais oriundos de fibras com cerca de 3-6 mm. Contrário às nossas expectativas, o componente principal do potencial sensitivo do nervo sural foi anormal em todos os pacientes, enquanto a velocidade de condução mínima foi normal ou discretamente alterada em 3 pacientes. Além disso, os resultados são sugestivos de degeneração axonal e não mielinopatia, como seria esperado em uma doença que compromete inicialmente a bainha de mielina. Para um melhor entendimento da fisiologia e fisiopatologia, e para aumentar a precocidade diagnóstica, é fundamental estudar casos bem precoces e correlacionar os dados

  6. Recent advances in leprosy and Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Douglas S; Portaels, Françoise; Meyers, Wayne M

    2010-10-01

    After tuberculosis, leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and Buruli ulcer (M. ulcerans infection) are the second and third most common mycobacterial infections in humankind, respectively. Recent advances in both diseases are summarized. Leprosy remains a public health problem in some countries, and new case detections indicate active transmission. Newly identified M. lepromatosis, closely related to M. leprae, may cause disseminated leprosy in some regions. In genome-wide screening in China, leprosy susceptibility associates with polymorphisms in seven genes, many involved with innate immunity. World Health Organization multiple drug therapy administered for 1 or 2 years effectively arrests disseminated leprosy but disability remains a public health concern. Relapse is infrequent, often associated with higher pretreatment M. leprae burdens. M. ulcerans, a re-emerging environmental organism, arose from M. marinum and acquired a virulence plasmid coding for mycolactone, a necrotizing, immunosuppressive toxin. Geographically, there are multiple strains of M. ulcerans, with variable pathogenicity and immunogenicity. Molecular epidemiology is describing M. ulcerans evolution and genotypic variants. First-line therapy for Buruli ulcer is rifampin + streptomycin, sometimes with surgery, but improved regimens are needed. Leprosy and Buruli ulcer are important infections with significant public health implications. Modern research is providing new insights into molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis, boding well for improved control strategies.

  7. Leprosy and the testis La lepra y el testículo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando López

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Damage of testicles is frequent in lepromatous leprosy worsen by the presence of erythema nodosum leprosum.
    Objective. One patient is presented who developed lepromatous leprosy and erythema nodosum leprosum with important testicular compromise.
    Material and methods. A 28 year old man patient who had lepromatous leprosy since his 22 was studied. During a polychemotherapy treatment for the lepromatous leprosy, he presented chronic erythema nodosum leprosum that affected both testicles and did not respond to the conventional treatment. A left orchidectomy was practiced to treat the persistent pain.
    Results. The extracted testis evidenced the following findings: tubular atrophy, remarkable fibrosis, cumulus of foamy macrophages without rods, focal Leydig cell hyperplasia, linfocitary and granulomatous arteritis and endarteritis of small and medium size vessels. These changes were also observed in the epididymis. Two years after the polychemoterapy and the orchidectomy, the patient revealed azoospermy, normal total testosterone, discretely diminished free testosterone and elevated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. No loss of libido or sexual activity. We reviewed general concepts about erythema nodosum leprosum and the pathologic changes produced by leprosy in the testis.
    Conclusion. Lepromatous leprosy may lead to hypogonadism. This should be considered by the leprosy programs in order to avoid and treat the consequences of the possible hypogonadism.
    Introducción. La afección testicular es frecuente en la lepra lepromatosa, daño que se incrementa cuando cursa con eritema nodoso leproso.
    Objetivo. Presentar un paciente con lepra lepromatosa y eritema nodoso leproso con severo compromiso testicular.
    Materiales y métodos. Estudiamos un hombre de 28 años con lepra lepromatosa desde los 22, que durante el tratamiento con poliquimioterapia para la lepra presentó eritema nodoso

  8. Limited activity and social participation after hospital discharge from leprosy treatment in a hyperendemic area in north Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Dias Monteiro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neural damages are among the main factors that contribute to physical disability in leprosy. Systematic monitoring using a broad physical, psychological and social approach is necessary. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to characterize the limitation of activity and social participation and its correlation with disabilities and/or impairment in individuals after being discharged from a multidrug leprosy therapy. METHOD: A cross-sectional study conducted in Araguaína, state of Tocantins, which is a leprosy hyperendemic municipality. We included cases of patients who were discharged from treatment considered as cured from January 2004 to December 2009. We performed dermatological examination and applied the Screening Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA and social participation scales. RESULTS: We included 282 individuals (mean age: 45.8 years old. The paucibacillary operational classification was more common (170; 60.3%. The eye-hand-foot score ranged from 0 to 12 (mean: 0.7. A total of 84 (29.8% individuals presented limited activity. A slight restriction in social participation occurred in 18 (6.3% cases. There was a statistically significant correlation between activity limitation, age (r = 0.40; p < 0.0001 and degree of functional limitation (r = 0.54; p < 0.0001, as well as of restricted social participation, activity limitation (r = 0.56, p < 0.0001 and functional limitations (r = 0.54, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Functional limitation due to leprosy had an impact on the conduct of activities and social participation after the discharge from a leprosy treatment. The association between Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness and participation scales will assist in designing evidence-based assistance measures.

  9. A Website to Improve Asthma Care by Suggesting Patient Questions for Physicians: Qualitative Analysis of User Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Blanch, Danielle C; Mui, Sarah; Lawless, Heather; Manocchia, Michael; Rosen, Rochelle K; Pietropaoli, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in the United Sates, yet despite the existence of national guidelines, nearly three fourths of patients with asthma do not have adequate control and clinical adherence to guidelines is low. While there are many reasons for this, physician inertia with respect to treatment change is partly to blame. Research suggests that patients who ask for specific tests and treatments are more likely to receive them. Objectives This study investigated the impact and experience of using an interactive patient website designed to give patients individual feedback about their condition and to suggest tailored questions for patients to ask their physician. The website was designed to be used prior to a physician visit, to increase the likelihood that patients would receive recommended tests and treatments. Methods A total of 37 adult patients with asthma participated in semi-structured telephone interviews aimed at eliciting information about their experiences with the website. Transcripts were coded using qualitative data analysis techniques and software. Themes were developed from subsets of codes generated through the analysis. In addition, 26 physicians were surveyed regarding their impressions of the website. Results Opportunities exist for improving website feedback, although the majority of both patient and physician respondents held favorable opinions about the site. Two major themes emerged regarding patients’ experiences with the website. First, many patients who used the website had a positive shift in their attitudes regarding interactions with their physicians. Second, use of the website prompted patients to become more actively involved in their asthma care. No patient reported any negative experiences as a result of using the website. Physicians rated the website positively. Conclusions Patients perceived that the interactive website intervention improved communication and interaction with their

  10. A profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1986-2007 Perfil de los enfermos tratados en un servicio nacional de remisión de pacientes ambulatorios con lepra en Río de Janeiro, Brasil, 1986-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Hacker

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze a profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in metropolitan Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over a period of more than two decades, and the subgroup of nationally registered leprosy cases from the same residential area, as well as all registered cases statewide. METHODS: An observational, descriptive analysis was carried out for patients treated from 1986 to 2007 at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic (Ambulatório Souza Araújo, ASA, a national referral center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz that serves clients from the city of Rio de Janeiro and other municipalities in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro State. Demographic and clinical data for the subgroup of leprosy cases registered with Brazil's National Disease Notification System (Sistema Nacional de Informação de Agravos de Notificação, SINAN between 2001 and 2007 and residing in the same municipalities as the ASA patients, and for all registered cases statewide, were also analyzed. RESULTS: Among the ASA patients, there was a decrease in average family income (from 3.9 to 2.7 times the minimum salary between the periods 1998-2002 and 2003-2007; the proportion of multibacillary (MB patients (from 52.7% to 46.9%; and the proportion of patients younger than 15 years old (from 12.8% to 8.7%. Among the MB patients, the average initial and final bacilloscopic indices were significantly higher in 2003-2007. Compared with the SINAN cases, more ASA cases involved disability and were younger than 15 years old. CONCLUSIONS: Patients living with leprosy in the metropolitan area of the state of Rio de Janeiro belong to the most deprived social strata and have not benefited from the overall improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Brazil.OBJETIVO: Analizar el perfil de los enfermos tratados en un servicio nacional de remisión de pacientes ambulatorios con lepra ubicado en la zona

  11. Learning from a leprosy project in Indonesia: making mindsets explicit for stigma reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.M.H.; Lusli, M.M.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Miranda Galarza, H.B.; van Brakel, W.H.; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2015-01-01

    International attention for disability recognises that it plays an important role in persistent poverty. Leprosy can cause preventable disability. Stigma associated with leprosy often has greater implications for people affected than physical impairments. The Stigma Assessment and Reduction of

  12. Leprosy Elimination: Progress and Challenges in Nigeria; Kaduna State TB and Leprosy Control Programme as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Gidado; Olusegu, Obasanya Joshua; Mustapha, Sani; Clement, Adesigbin; Dahiru, Tahir; Gagere, J; Olusola, Adejumo Adeleji

    2012-01-01

    The study aims at describing the achievements and challenges of Leprosy control in Kaduna State using appropriate indicators. The study was a five year (2004-2008) retrospective review of the Leprosy records and annual reports of all the twenty three LGAs in Kaduna State. Various Leprosy indicators were calculated and presented in different graphic presentations. Focus group discussions were organised with the aim of identifying current challenges of Leprosy control in the State. There was a decline in the new Leprosy cases detected annually from 226 cases in 2004 to 140 cases in 2008. The prevalence rate ranged between 0.3-0.4 per 10,000 population within the five year period. The proportion of children among new cases dropped from 12% in 2004 to 5% in 2007 and increased to 9% in 2008. Grade 2 disability among new cases was very high (between 21%-27%) within the same period. Leprosy elimination target has been achieved in Kaduna State, but new cases with high proportion of children and WHO grade 2 disability were still been reported.

  13. Measurement of Change in the Knowledge and Attitude about Leprosy in Physiotherapy Students Undergoing Intensive One Week Training in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakashkumar, M D; Ebenezer, M; Richard, J

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease that causes not only physical problems, but also mental and social problems. In the post integration era, every health care professional needs to understand about leprosy, to be able to diagnose and treat them. Physiotherapy students, in their usual syllabus, have minimal exposure to leprosy, in spite of the fact that they have a major role in preventing impairments and disabilities caused by leprosy, as well as treating such impairments. In order to educate physiotherapy students on leprosy, a one-week intensive training course was organised. This study was done to assess if the intensive training to physiotherapy students resulted in increase in their knowledge on leprosy and change their attitude positively. A batch consisting of 42 physiotherapy students went through the one-week training programme. The improvement in knowledge and attitude were assessed through a pre-test and a post-test design. Results showed that there was significant improvement in knowledge (53.05%) and brought positive change in attitude (75.0%). Such training programmes are recommended for all physiotherapy students.

  14. A case of secondary syphilis with HIV, resembling borderline lepromatous leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Mohan Zachariah; Kanish, Bimal; Kwatra, Kanwardeep; Chaudhary, Paulina R.; Bhatia, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of secondary syphilis, in a homosexual male patient, which resembled borderline lepromatous leprosy, and in whom the diagnosis was considered on clinical grounds. The patient also had concomitant HIV infection, with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. His rapid plasma reagin test was reactive in 1:128 dilution. He improved with three standard, weekly injections of benzathine penicillin, along with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone daily for 15 days. This case is being reported to highlight the need for a high index of suspicion in diagnosing unusual cases of secondary syphilis, especially in those with concomitant HIV infection. PMID:26692613

  15. BH4 treatment in BH4-responsive PKU patients: preliminary data on blood prolactin concentrations suggest increased cerebral dopamine concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Danique; Anjema, Karen; Jahja, Rianne; de Groot, Martijn J; Liemburg, Geertje B; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van der Zee, Eddy A; Derks, Terry G J; Kema, Ido P; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2015-01-01

    In phenylketonuria (PKU), cerebral neurotransmitter deficiencies have been suggested to contribute to brain dysfunction. Present treatment aims to reduce blood phenylalanine concentrations by a phenylalanine-restricted diet, while in some patients blood phenylalanine concentrations also respond to cofactor treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Recently, a repurposing approach of BH4 was suggested to increase cerebral neurotransmitter synthesis. To investigate whether BH4 may improve cerebral dopamine concentrations in PKU patients beyond its effect through lowering blood phenylalanine concentrations, we investigated blood prolactin concentrations-as a parameter of brain dopamine availability. We retrospectively compared blood prolactin in relation to blood phenylalanine concentrations of nine (male) BH4-responsive PKU patients, when being treated without and with BH4. Blood prolactin concentrations positively correlated to blood phenylalanine concentrations (p=0.002), being significantly lower with than without BH4 treatment (p=0.047). In addition, even in this small number of male patients, blood prolactin concentrations tended to be lower at increasing BH4 dose (p=0.054), while taking blood phenylalanine concentrations into account (p=0.002). In individual BH4-responsive patients, median blood prolactin concentrations were significantly lower while using BH4 than before using BH4 treatment (p=0.024), whereas median blood phenylalanine concentrations tended to be lower, but this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.107). Therefore, these data show that high blood phenylalanine in BH4-responsive PKU male patients seems to be associated with increased blood prolactin concentrations, suggesting reduced cerebral dopamine availability. Moreover, these data suggest that BH4 treatment in itself could decrease blood prolactin concentrations in a dose-responsive way, independent of blood phenylalanine concentrations. We conclude that these preliminary data

  16. Polyneuritic leprosy presenting with bone changes prior to the onset of florid skin manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuravi Anandam

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of polyneuritic leprosy is reported. There were minimal changes on skin, but changes in the bones were predominant. It is emphasized that polyneuritic leprosy is an entity. It is also stressed that neuritic leprosy can produce changes in deeper structures like bones, with minimal changes on skin.

  17. Polyneuritic leprosy presenting with bone changes prior to the onset of florid skin manifestation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuravi Anandam; Girish K; Ghatti Suvarna; Stephen T; Kumar V

    2001-01-01

    A case of polyneuritic leprosy is reported. There were minimal changes on skin, but changes in the bones were predominant. It is emphasized that polyneuritic leprosy is an entity. It is also stressed that neuritic leprosy can produce changes in deeper structures like bones, with minimal changes on skin.

  18. Household expenditure on leprosy outpatient services in the Indian health system: A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A. (Anuj); Suryawanshi, P. (Pramilesh); Raikwar, A. (Akash); Arif, M. (Mohammad); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy is a major public health problem in many low and middle income countries, especially in India, and contributes considerably to the global burden of the disease. Leprosy and poverty are closely associated, and therefore the economic burden of leprosy is a concern.

  19. The Meaning of Leprosy and Everyday Experiences: An Exploration in Cirebon, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.M.H.; Lusli, M.M.; Miranda Galarza, H.B.; van Brakel, W.H.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Damayanti, R.; Seda, F.S.S.E.; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative to consider the meaning of leprosy and everyday experiences of people affected by leprosy and key persons in the community if one aims to make leprosy services more effective, which appears necessary in Indonesia given the large numbers of new cases detected annually. However,

  20. Disappearance of leprosy from Norway: an exploration of critical factors using an epidemiological modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Meima; L.M. Irgens; G.J. van Oortmarssen (Gerrit); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: By the middle of the 19th century, leprosy was a serious public health problem in Norway. By 1920, new cases only rarely occurred. This study aims to explain the disappearance of leprosy from Norway. METHODS: Data from the National Leprosy Registry of

  1. Retrospective analysis of 194 leprosy cases in the Republic of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhlafi, G A; al-Qubati, Y

    1996-01-01

    A review of the case files of 194 leprosy patients registered at a representative skin and venereal diseases out-patient clinic was done to assess the epidemiological and clinical patterns of the disease in Yemen. Almost all patients came from the poorer social groups and there was clustering of patients around some families. About 55% of the patients were aged 20 to 39 years and about 35% were aged over 40 years at the time of detection. Males were affected about three times as females; in males MB cases occurred about twice as often as PB cases and 12% of the cases presented as pure neuritic leprosy. Reactions were noticed in 39 cases (20%), six having type 1 and 27 having type 2 reaction. Bacterial index (BI) among 123 positive cases ranged from 0.1 to 6, about 70% of these cases showing mean BI of more than 2.0. Patients' response to treatment (MDT) was very good and BI decreased by about 1.55 (+/-0.05) logs per year. About 50% of the patients had some disability (14% grade 1), and the disability rate among PB cases was about 70%. Our findings indicate the need for earlier diagnosis and better disability preventive measures.

  2. Fatores associados à soropositividade do teste ML Flow em pacientes e contatos de pacientes com hanseníase menores de 18 anos Factors associated with ML Flow test seropositivity in leprosy patients and household contacts under the age of 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Alves Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal em menores de 18 anos, sendo 115 casos novos de hanseníase e 1.011 contatos intradomiciliares. Determinaram-se as proporções da soropositividade do ML Flow e fatores associados ao teste positivo. Observou-se soropositividade em 21,7% dos pacientes e 19,7% dos contatos. Nos pacientes, a regressão logística indicou associação com baciloscopia positiva e número de lesões cutâneas maior que cinco. A análise por árvore de decisão mostrou associação com baciloscopia, classificação de Madri, número de nervos acometidos e idade. Nos contatos, as duas análises indicaram as mesmas associações: classificação do caso-índice, idade e tipo de serviço de saúde. As variáveis que explicaram melhor a soropositividade, em menores de 18 anos, são aquelas associadas à maior carga bacilar. Assim, o teste ML Flow poderia ser utilizado também na infância para ajudar na correta classificação dos pacientes para tratamento e na identificação dos contatos com maior risco de desenvolver hanseníase.This article presents the results of a cross-sectional study involving 115 newly-diagnosed leprosy patients and 1,011 household contacts, all under the age of 18. Seropositivity ratios and factors associated with a positive ML Flow were determined. The test was positive in 21.7% of patients and in 19.7% of contacts. Among patients, logistic regression indicated the association of seropositivity with positive slit skin smear and having more than five skin lesions. The tree method analysis indicated associations with skin smear, Madrid classification, number of nerves affected and age. In the contact group, index case classification, age and type of health service were associated with seropositivity in both analyses. The variables that best explained seropositivity are those associated with higher bacterial load. Therefore, the ML Flow test could be used in children to aid correct classification of patients for treatment and to

  3. Shared clonality in distinctive lesions of lymphomatoid papulosis and mycosis fungoides occurring in the same patients suggests a common origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza Bravo, Maria M; Patel, Keyur P; Loghavi, Sanam; Curry, Jonathan L; Torres Cabala, Carlos A; Cason, Ronald C; Gangar, Pamela; Prieto, Victor G; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Duvic, Madeleine; Tetzlaff, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) lies within the spectrum of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders. Approximately 10% to 15% of patients with LyP develop other lymphomas, most commonly mycosis fungoides (MF), suggesting a biological relationship between these distinctive diseases. Here, we describe the clinical and histopathologic features of 11 patients who had both LyP and MF, including a total of 30 biopsy specimens (14 LyP and 16 MF). Clinically, LyP lesions were characterized by clustered papules undergoing spontaneous regression and were classified as type A (n = 11), type C (n = 2), or type D (n = 1). All cases of MF were characterized clinically by patch/plaque disease, were stage I or II at the time of diagnosis, and consisted of a CD4-predominant epidermotropic T-cell infiltrate. We used polymerase chain reaction-based methods to assess the TCR-β chain (TCRB) and TCR-γ chain (TCRG) in both LyP and MF lesions of all patients. Monoclonal TCR gene rearrangements were detected in 13 LyP lesions from 10 of 11 patients and in 14 MF lesions from 10 of 11 patients. All 10 patients in whom their skin lesions carried monoclonal TCR gene rearrangements exhibited overlapping clones in both their LyP and MF lesions; additional non-overlapping clones were identified in 3 LyP lesions from 2 patients and 1 MF lesion from another patient. The demonstration of shared monoclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in LyP and MF lesions in almost all patients suggests a common origin between these distinctive clinicopathological diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nursing students' perspectives and suggestions on patient safety--implications for developing the nursing education curriculum in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Bondas, Terese; Jasper, Melanie; Turunen, Hannele

    2014-02-01

    Nursing students' close involvement in knowledge development about patient safety will enhance the integrity of the current content of nursing education and pave the way towards developing a nursing curriculum that facilitates achieving a safer health-care system. This study explores nursing students' perspectives and suggestions on developing patient safety aspects of the nursing curriculum in the context of Iranian culture. A qualitative methodology involving three focus groups with a purposive sample of 18 nursing students from a large Iranian nursing school, utilising directed semi-structured interviews generated data, which was analysed using the content analysis process. Two main themes emerged from content analysis: (1) "involving students fully in patient care" with subthemes 'building a trusting relationship between education and practice', and 'promoting inter-dependence between health-care providers', and (2) "structuring patient safety education" with subthemes 'transforming nursing routines to evidence-based care', and 'connecting care to patient safety issues'. The extent of students' involvement in clinical practice and clinical nurses' roles in student education in practice requires clarification. The curriculum needs to incorporate patient safety aspects throughout, and include interdisciplinary education to ensure compliance with patient safety policies. Moreover, successful implementation of such a curriculum necessitates cooperation from nursing practice and instructors to meet nursing students' expectations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Utility of a genomic-based, personalized medicine test in patients presenting with symptoms suggesting coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Lee; Froelich, James; Kanelos, Dino; St Amant, Robert; Yau, May; Rhees, Brian; Monane, Mark; McPherson, John

    2014-01-01

    Better methods are needed to assess patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that the use of a gene expression score (GES) would lead to a change in the diagnostic evaluation. The Primary Care Providers Use of a Gene Expression Test in Coronary Artery Disease Diagnosis (IMPACT-PCP) trial (clinical trial identifier NCT01594411, clinicaltrials.gov) was a prospective study of stable, nonacute, nondiabetic patients presenting with chest pain and related symptoms at 4 primary care practices. All patients underwent GES testing, with clinicians documenting their planned diagnostic strategy both before and after GES. The GES was derived from a peripheral blood draw measuring expression of 23 genes and has been shown to have a 96% negative predictive value for excluding the diagnosis of obstructive CAD. Of the 251 study patients, 140 were women (56%); the participants had a mean age of 56 years (standard deviation, 13.0) and a mean body mass index of 30 mg/kg(2) (standard deviation, 6.7). The mean GES was 16 (range, 1-38), and 127 patients (51%) had a low GES ([ltqeu]15). A change in the diagnostic testing pattern before and after GES testing was noted in 145 of 251 patients (58% observed vs. 10% predefined expected change; P clinical utility above and beyond conventional clinical factors by optimizing the patient's diagnostic evaluation.

  6. Whole genome sequencing distinguishes between relapse and reinfection in recurrent leprosy cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane M A Stefani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since leprosy is both treated and controlled by multidrug therapy (MDT it is important to monitor recurrent cases for drug resistance and to distinguish between relapse and reinfection as a means of assessing therapeutic efficacy. All three objectives can be reached with single nucleotide resolution using next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of Mycobacterium leprae DNA present in human skin.DNA was isolated by means of optimized extraction and enrichment methods from samples from three recurrent cases in leprosy patients participating in an open-label, randomized, controlled clinical trial of uniform MDT in Brazil (U-MDT/CT-BR. Genome-wide sequencing of M. leprae was performed and the resultant sequence assemblies analyzed in silico.In all three cases, no mutations responsible for resistance to rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin were found, thus eliminating drug resistance as a possible cause of disease recurrence. However, sequence differences were detected between the strains from the first and second disease episodes in all three patients. In one case, clear evidence was obtained for reinfection with an unrelated strain whereas in the other two cases, relapse appeared more probable.This is the first report of using M. leprae whole genome sequencing to reveal that treated and cured leprosy patients who remain in endemic areas can be reinfected by another strain. Next generation sequencing can be applied reliably to M. leprae DNA extracted from biopsies to discriminate between cases of relapse and reinfection, thereby providing a powerful tool for evaluating different outcomes of therapeutic regimens and for following disease transmission.

  7. Double-blind trial of the efficacy of pentoxifylline vs thalidomide for the treatment of type II reaction in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Sales

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Type II reaction in leprosy, or erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL, is often characterized by severe clinical symptoms together with nerve function impairment leading to permanent disabilities. Thalidomide has been shown to be a highly effective drug for the treatment of ENL. It is, however, contraindicated for women of childbearing age due to its teratogenicity. On the other hand, pentoxifylline, used to treat hypercoagulable states, is not teratogenic and, like thalidomide, can inhibit the synthesis of tumor necrosis factor-a and other cytokines. In the present randomized double-blind clinical study we compared the effectiveness of orally administered pentoxifylline vs thalidomide in treating type II reaction in 44 patients. Daily doses of 300 mg thalidomide or 1.2 g pentoxifylline were administered for 30 days to multibacillary leprosy patients undergoing type II reaction. Randomly chosen patients were included in the study before, during, and after specific multidrug therapy. Clinical evaluations were performed on the 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 30th days of treatment and laboratory tests were carried out on the 1st and 30th days. As expected, overall, thalidomide proved to be more effective in the treatment of type II leprosy reaction. Nevertheless, continuous treatment with pentoxifylline was effective in relieving the clinical signs of ENL, especially limb edema and systemic symptoms, in 62.5% of the patients.

  8. A New Suggestion for the Radiation Target Volume After a Subtotal Gastrectomy in Patients With Stomach Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Heerim; Lim, Do Hoon; Kim, Sung; Kang, Won Ki; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Chul Keun; Ahn, Yong Chan; Huh, Seung Jae

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment results between the use of two different radiation fields including and excluding remnant stomach and suggest new target volumes excluding remnant stomach after subtotal gastrectomy (STG) in patients with stomach cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 291 patients treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after STG and D2 dissection at the Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. Eighty-three patients registered from 1995 to 1997 underwent irradiation according to the INT 0116 protocol that recommended the inclusion of remnant stomach within the target volume (Group A). After this period, we excluded remnant stomach from the target volume for 208 patients (Group B). Median follow-up was 67 months. Results: Treatment failure developed in 93 patients (32.0%). Local and regional recurrence rates for Group A vs. Group B were 10.8% vs. 5.3% (p = not significant) and 9.6% vs. 6.3% (p = not significant), and recurrence rates for remnant stomach were 7.2% vs. 1.4% (p = 0.018), respectively. Overall and disease-free survival rates were not different between the two groups. Grade 3 or 4 vomiting and diarrhea developed more frequently in Group A than Group B (4.8% vs. 1.4% and 6.0% vs. 1.9%, respectively; p = 0.012; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Exclusion of remnant stomach from the radiation field had no effect on failure rates or survival, and a low complication rate occurred in patients treated excluding remnant stomach. We suggest that remnant stomach be excluded from the radiation target volume for patients with stomach cancer who undergo STG and D2 dissection

  9. Phylogenomics and antimicrobial resistance of the leprosy bacillus Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjak, Andrej; Avanzi, Charlotte; Singh, Pushpendra; Loiseau, Chloé; Girma, Selfu; Busso, Philippe; Fontes, Amanda N Brum; Miyamoto, Yuji; Namisato, Masako; Bobosha, Kidist; Salgado, Claudio G; da Silva, Moisés B; Bouth, Raquel C; Frade, Marco A C; Filho, Fred Bernardes; Barreto, Josafá G; Nery, José A C; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Lupien, Andréanne; Al-Samie, Abdul R; Al-Qubati, Yasin; Alkubati, Abdul S; Bretzel, Gisela; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Sakho, Fatoumata; Johnson, Christian R; Kodio, Mamoudou; Fomba, Abdoulaye; Sow, Samba O; Gado, Moussa; Konaté, Ousmane; Stefani, Mariane M A; Penna, Gerson O; Suffys, Philip N; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Moraes, Milton O; Rosa, Patricia S; Baptista, Ida M F Dias; Spencer, John S; Aseffa, Abraham; Matsuoka, Masanori; Kai, Masanori; Cole, Stewart T

    2018-01-24

    Leprosy is a chronic human disease caused by the yet-uncultured pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Although readily curable with multidrug therapy (MDT), over 200,000 new cases are still reported annually. Here, we obtain M. leprae genome sequences from DNA extracted directly from patients' skin biopsies using a customized protocol. Comparative and phylogenetic analysis of 154 genomes from 25 countries provides insight into evolution and antimicrobial resistance, uncovering lineages and phylogeographic trends, with the most ancestral strains linked to the Far East. In addition to known MDT-resistance mutations, we detect other mutations associated with antibiotic resistance, and retrace a potential stepwise emergence of extensive drug resistance in the pre-MDT era. Some of the previously undescribed mutations occur in genes that are apparently subject to positive selection, and two of these (ribD, fadD9) are restricted to drug-resistant strains. Finally, nonsense mutations in the nth excision repair gene are associated with greater sequence diversity and drug resistance.

  10. Spatial distribution of leprosy in Brazil: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláuffer Luiz Machado Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Leprosy remains a public health problem in developing countries. Among communicable diseases, it is one of the leading causes of permanent disability. Brazil had not reached the goal of reducing cases to less than 1 per 10,000 population. This study aimed to analyze the spatial distribution of leprosy cases in Brazil, using a literature review. The search strategy included the LILACS and MEDLINE databases with no language or period restriction. Ecological studies with spatial data analysis were considered as a criterion for the inclusion. We found 38 studies for review after the selection criteria. Among the epidemiological indicators of the disease, the most common was the new case detection rate. Several articles have explored the association between spatial distribution of leprosy and socioeconomic, demographic, and environmental factors. The most common unit of analysis was the municipality. The spatial distribution methods mostly used were: empirical Bayesian method, autocorrelation (Moran’s I index and Kernel estimates. The distribution of leprosy was very heterogeneous, independent of the unit of analysis. There was a decrease in the rate of detection and among under-15-year-olds, but some regions maintained high endemicity during the study period. The distribution and risk of illness were directly related to living conditions of the population. Improved access to health services was associated with increased detection rate in some regions. Spatial analysis seems to be a very useful tool to study leprosy and to guide interventions and surveillance.

  11. Spatial distribution of leprosy in Brazil: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cláuffer Luiz Machado; Fonseca, Sandra Costa; Kawa, Helia; Palmer, Dayanna de Oliveira Quintanilha

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy remains a public health problem in developing countries. Among communicable diseases, it is one of the leading causes of permanent disability. Brazil had not reached the goal of reducing cases to less than 1 per 10,000 population. This study aimed to analyze the spatial distribution of leprosy cases in Brazil, using a literature review. The search strategy included the LILACS and MEDLINE databases with no language or period restriction. Ecological studies with spatial data analysis were considered as a criterion for the inclusion. We found 38 studies for review after the selection criteria. Among the epidemiological indicators of the disease, the most common was the new case detection rate. Several articles have explored the association between spatial distribution of leprosy and socioeconomic, demographic, and environmental factors. The most common unit of analysis was the municipality. The spatial distribution methods mostly used were: empirical Bayesian method, autocorrelation (Moran's I index) and Kernel estimates. The distribution of leprosy was very heterogeneous, independent of the unit of analysis. There was a decrease in the rate of detection and among under-15-year-olds, but some regions maintained high endemicity during the study period. The distribution and risk of illness were directly related to living conditions of the population. Improved access to health services was associated with increased detection rate in some regions. Spatial analysis seems to be a very useful tool to study leprosy and to guide interventions and surveillance.

  12. Some aspects of the pathogenesis and pathomorphology of leprosy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results of bacteriological and histological examinations of the organs of mice infected in the footpad with human leprosy bacilli by the Shepard method are summarized. The periods of observation ranged from a few days to 2 years. The disease developed in mice as a chronic infection with a lengthy “incubation” period of 3-4 months or more without symptoms. Usually about 2 years after inoculation, or in some cases after a shorter interval, the disease became generalized. Different types of tissue reaction occurred: simple inflammatory infiltration, tuberculoid granuloma, and leproma-like granuloma, similar to the clinical types of leprosy in man. When the infection became general, cells resembling lepra cells formed in the internal organs and at the site of infection. These cells contained massive intracellular aggregations of mycobacteria and compact globi with lipids and a vacuolized protoplasm, similar in origin and morphology to the lepra cells in human lesions. Changes were found in the neuroreceptor apparatus of the skin of the mice, with groups of leprosy bacilli in the endoneurium, the Schwann cells, and the perineural spaces. The length of the experiments and the histological examination of material from the sacrificed mice at different stages of the infective process revealed biological parallels with human leprosy and threw light on a number of aspects of the pathogenesis of leprosy. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 1 A-DFig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4538195

  13. Neuro-lepra: valor de la electromiografia Neuro-leprosy: electromyographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Herskovits

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available Dada la frecuencia con que la lepra afecta al sistema nervioso, consideramos de interés realizar un estudio electromiográfico en zonas corporales clínicamente sanas. Hemos elegido para tal fin 14 enfermos que no tenían lesión sensitivo-motora clínicamente perceptible en el nervio cubital izquierdo. Hemos estudiado tambén un grupo de control de 5 enfermos con lesión evidente del mismo nervio. Se ha comprobado que de los 14 enfermos que aparentemente no tenían lesión del nervio cubital izquierdo, en 12 de ellos surgieron alteraciones electromiográficas que señalan la lesión del nervio, aunque en um grado menor que en el grupo de control. Este hecho nos hace pensar que la agresión que sufre el sistema nervioso periférico es de una extensión mayor que lo hace suponer la clínica, o que las lesiones anatómicas no retrogradan como nos lo sugiere el examen de los pacientes.Considering the frequency of the peripheral nervous system envolvement in leprosy 14 patients without clinical signs indicating impairment of the left ulnar nerve were submitted to electromyographic studies. All were chronic cases in which the disease had an evolution of three years for the most recent one, the longest during thirty one years. All patients were under leprosy treatment: nine had lepromatous leprosy, four had tuberculoid form, one had a dimorfous form. At the same time, as a control group, were studied 5 patients presenting clinical signis of injury of the left ulnar nerve. An electromiograph DISA with 3 channels, a Multistin estimulator and concentric electrodes were employed. In all the 19 cases the espontaneous activity, the type of recruiting reaction and the conduction velocity were analysed. Results were synthetized in Tables 1 and 2. The finding of electromyographic abnormalities in clinically healthy territores of 12/14 patients examined lead to the conclusion that in leprosy the agression to the peripheral nervous system is more extensive than

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of PGL-1, LAM, 30 kD and 65 kD antigens in leprosy infected paraffin preserved skin and nerve sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, I. C.; Khanolkar-Young, S.; Das, P. K.; Lockwood, D. N.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of lipid, carbohydrate and protein antibodies were optimized for use in detecting M. leprae antigens in paraffin embedded material. Skin and nerve biopsies from 13 patients across the leprosy spectrum were studied. All antibodies detected antigen in tissues with a BI > 1. Phenolic-glycolipid

  15. An international observational study suggests that artificial intelligence for clinical decision support optimizes anemia management in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Carlo; Molina, Manuel; Ponce, Pedro; Tothova, Monika; Cattinelli, Isabella; Ion Titapiccolo, Jasmine; Mari, Flavio; Amato, Claudia; Leipold, Frank; Wehmeyer, Wolfgang; Stuard, Stefano; Stopper, Andrea; Canaud, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    Managing anemia in hemodialysis patients can be challenging because of competing therapeutic targets and individual variability. Because therapy recommendations provided by a decision support system can benefit both patients and doctors, we evaluated the impact of an artificial intelligence decision support system, the Anemia Control Model (ACM), on anemia outcomes. Based on patient profiles, the ACM was built to recommend suitable erythropoietic-stimulating agent doses. Our retrospective study consisted of a 12-month control phase (standard anemia care), followed by a 12-month observation phase (ACM-guided care) encompassing 752 patients undergoing hemodialysis therapy in 3 NephroCare clinics located in separate countries. The percentage of hemoglobin values on target, the median darbepoetin dose, and individual hemoglobin fluctuation (estimated from the intrapatient hemoglobin standard deviation) were deemed primary outcomes. In the observation phase, median darbepoetin consumption significantly decreased from 0.63 to 0.46 μg/kg/month, whereas on-target hemoglobin values significantly increased from 70.6% to 76.6%, reaching 83.2% when the ACM suggestions were implemented. Moreover, ACM introduction led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin fluctuation (intrapatient standard deviation decreased from 0.95 g/dl to 0.83 g/dl). Thus, ACM support helped improve anemia outcomes of hemodialysis patients, minimizing erythropoietic-stimulating agent use with the potential to reduce the cost of treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnóstico da hanseníase fora do município de residência: uma abordagem espacial, 2001 a 2009 Leprosy diagnosis in municipalities other than the patients' place of residence: spatial analysis, 2001-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Morais de Alencar

    2012-09-01

    located more than 1,000km from the endemic area. The flow indicates gaps in the decentralization of comprehensive care for persons with leprosy and calls attention to the difficulties associated with patient monitoring during and after multidrug therapy.

  17. Test-to-test variability in motor activity during the suggested immobilization test in restless legs patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba-Rubio, José; Sforza, Emilia

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the test-to-test variability of the suggested immobilization test (SIT) in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Twenty patients with primary RLS (12 men and eight women; age: 53.3+/-11.3 years) were selected for the study. We compared the results of two SITs performed on two consecutive evenings prior to polysomnographic recordings. Overall, the periodic leg movement index during the SIT (SIT PLM) and the SIT PLM index associated with sensory manifestations (SIT PLM+) were not significantly different between tests. The number of PLM sequences per SIT, the mean PLM duration and the PLM interval did not significantly change between the two consecutive tests. The pattern of temporal evolution of motor activity across the SIT was very reproducible, SIT PLM showing a clear tendency to a progressive increase across the test, with the SIT PLM+ index decreasing in the second half of the test. Despite good reproducibility, there were marked intra-individual differences. Considering the proposed cut-off value of 12 for the SIT PLM index to confirm RLS, 11 patients were positive at the first test and four additional patients became positive at the second test. SIT PLM index changes did not correlate with age, severity of disease and polysomnographic measures. Quantitative analysis of motor activity during two consecutive SITs in RLS patients showed a significant inter-test intra-individual variability unrelated to demographic, clinical or polysomnographic parameters. SIT PLM index variability suggests that a single test would not be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes in unclear cases and that new criteria need to be applied to increase its specificity and sensitivity.

  18. Leprosy--evolution of the path to eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Narang, Tarun; Kumar, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is among the world's oldest and most dreaded diseases and it has been synonymous with stigma and discrimination due to the hideous deformities it produced, mystery around its aetiology and transmission and lack of any effective remedy till recently. Leprosy control started with the use of chaulmoogra oil and for the last three decades, multi drug therapy (MDT) has been our main tool against leprosy. In the last two decades, the reported global prevalence of active leprosy infection has dropped by almost 90 per cent by the combined efforts of the World Health Organization (WHO), local governments, health professionals, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), however, a parallel drop in the incidence or new case detection rate (NCDR) has not occurred. From 1994 through 2011, more than 100,000 new cases are being detected annually, of whom maximum case load is from India. There is need for research on tools for early diagnosis, short and effective treatment, and prevention of deformities and disabilities. Evaluating the role of immunotherapy and immunoprophylaxis will also lead us to better understanding of their mode of action. Further molecular analysis of Mycobacterium leprae genome may provide the requisite basis for all this. The current reality is that there is a need to sustain and provide quality leprosy services to all persons through general health services, including good referral system. All these provisions in the integrated health care approach will go a long way in further reducing the stigma. Efforts need to be made to reduce deformity through early detection, self care, physiotherapy and reconstructive surgery and developing sound surveillance systems. With all the remarkable achievements in the fight against leprosy, the stage is now set for the final assault. It is hoped that with the efforts of all the stake holders and strong political will, the disease will be eradicated in the near future.

  19. New sonographic measures of peripheral nerves: a tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve involvement in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Andrey Cipriani Frade

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate ultrasonographic (US cross-sectional areas (CSAs of peripheral nerves, indexes of the differences between CSAs at the same point (∆CSAs and between tunnel (T and pre-tunnel (PT ulnar CSAs (∆TPTs in leprosy patients (LPs and healthy volunteers (HVs. Seventy-seven LPs and 49 HVs underwent bilateral US at PT and T ulnar points, as well as along the median (M and common fibular (CF nerves, to calculate the CSAs, ∆CSAs and ∆TPTs. The CSA values in HVs were lower than those in LPs (p 80% and ∆TPT had the highest specificity (> 90%. New sonographic peripheral nerve measurements (∆CSAs and ∆TPT provide an important methodological improvement in the detection of leprosy neuropathy.

  20. Misericordia and leprosy in the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Korecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, which in particular affects poor people of developing countries, was also a challenge for social and charitable activities. This was possible due to the engagement of "great community workers," people who devoted their professional and family life, passions, and their own material goods to conduct socio-medical activities among leprosy affected persons. This contribution discusses the work of the lepro-activists of international fame, Albert Schweitzer and Mother Teresa of Calcutta, as well as those who are less well known, Wanda Maria Błeńska and Marian Żelazek. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Elimination of leprosy as a public health problem by 2000 AD: an epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson Shey; Bamgboye, Elijah Afolabi; Assob, Jules Clement Nguedia; Njunda, Anna Longdoh; Kamga, Henri Lucien Foumou; Zoung-Kanyi Bissek, Anne-Cécile; Tabah, Earnest Nji; Oyediran, Alain Bankole O O; Njamnshi, Alfred Kongnyu

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and manifests as damage to the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease is dreaded because it causes deformities, blindness and disfigurement. Worldwide, 2 million people are estimated to be disabled by leprosy. Multidrug therapy is highly effective in curing leprosy, but treating the nerve damage is much more difficult. The World Health Assembly targeted to eliminate leprosy as a public health problem from the world by 2000. The objective of the review was to assess the successes of the leprosy elimination strategy, elimination hurdles and the way forward for leprosy eradication. A structured search was used to identify publications on the elimination strategy. The keywords used were leprosy, elimination and 2000. To identify potential publications, we included papers on leprosy elimination monitoring, special action projects for the elimination of leprosy, modified leprosy elimination campaigns, and the Global Alliance to eliminate leprosy from the following principal data bases: Cochrane data base of systematic reviews, PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, and the Leprosy data base. We also scanned reference lists for important citations. Key leprosy journals including WHO publications were also reviewed. The search identified 63 journal publications on leprosy-related terms that included a form of elimination of which 19 comprehensively tackled the keywords including a book on leprosy elimination. In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly called for the elimination of leprosy as a public health problem in the world by 2000. Elimination was defined as less than one case of leprosy per 10000-population. Elimination has been made possible by a confluence of several orders of opportunities: the scientific (the natural history of leprosy at the present state of knowledge), technological (multi-drug therapy and the blister pack); political (commitment of governments) and financial (support from NGOs for example the Nippon Foundation that

  2. High-resolution mutational profiling suggests the genetic validity of glioblastoma patient-derived pre-clinical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn E Yost

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the ability to efficiently characterize tumor genomes is enabling targeted drug development, which requires rigorous biomarker-based patient selection to increase effectiveness. Consequently, representative DNA biomarkers become equally important in pre-clinical studies. However, it is still unclear how well these markers are maintained between the primary tumor and the patient-derived tumor models. Here, we report the comprehensive identification of somatic coding mutations and copy number aberrations in four glioblastoma (GBM primary tumors and their matched pre-clinical models: serum-free neurospheres, adherent cell cultures, and mouse xenografts. We developed innovative methods to improve the data quality and allow a strict comparison of matched tumor samples. Our analysis identifies known GBM mutations altering PTEN and TP53 genes, and new actionable mutations such as the loss of PIK3R1, and reveals clear patient-to-patient differences. In contrast, for each patient, we do not observe any significant remodeling of the mutational profile between primary to model tumors and the few discrepancies can be attributed to stochastic errors or differences in sample purity. Similarly, we observe ∼96% primary-to-model concordance in copy number calls in the high-cellularity samples. In contrast to previous reports based on gene expression profiles, we do not observe significant differences at the DNA level between in vitro compared to in vivo models. This study suggests, at a remarkable resolution, the genome-wide conservation of a patient's tumor genetics in various pre-clinical models, and therefore supports their use for the development and testing of personalized targeted therapies.

  3. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-08-08

    to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. identificar as dificuldades em diagnosticar e tratar a dor neuropática causada pela hanseníase, bem como determinar as características principais dessa situação. examinaram-se 85 pacientes tratados no ambulatório de referência para hanseníase e referiam dor. Aplicou-se questionário, o teste Douleur Neuropathic 4, e criterioso exame neurológico pelo qual exclu

  4. Clinical epidemiological profile of leprosy in children under 15 years in the city of Juazeiro-BA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igara Cavalcanti Feitosa Luna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the clinical and epidemiological profile of new cases of leprosy in people aged under 15 years, reported to the Municipal Department of Health (Secretaria Municipal de Saúde - SMS of Juazeiro-BA, in the period from 2001 to 2010. Methods: This is a quantitative study, of exploratory and descriptive nature, performed through the analysis of data contained in the Information System for Notifiable Diseases (Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação - SINAN, in municipal level. Results: The results showed that 145 (7.94% new cases of leprosy affected people under 15 years. High detection rates were verified for this age group, with predominance in females (n=81; 55.86% and greater occurrence in the age group from 10 to 14 years (n=85; 58.62%. The paucibacillary forms (n=107; 74.48% have predominated over the multibacillary forms of the disease (n=37; 25.52%, being the tuberculoid clinical form (n=80; 55.17% the most prevalent one. The disabilities reached 18 (12.41% of the surveyed patients at the diagnosis time and 15 (10.34% at the hospital discharge time. Many of the cases (n=58; 40.07% were not assessed or were ignored. Conclusion: The clinical and epidemiological profile of the occurrence of new cases of leprosy in Juazeiro-BA showed that both the overall detection coefficients of leprosy as those for people aged under 15 years remained at hyperendemic levels during the surveyed period. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p208

  5. Childhood Leprosy In Essimbiland of Cameroon: Results of Chart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The WHO targeted to eliminate leprosy from the world as a public health problem by reducing the prevalence to less than 1 case per 10000 population based on the use of multi-drug therapy (MDT). Despite the success of MDT, endemic pools still exist in some countries that have attained the national ...

  6. Psychiatric Morbidity among Subjects with Leprosy and Albinism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Skin, which is the largest organ in the body, carries immense psychological significance. Disfiguring skin disorders may impact negatively on the mental health of individuals. Aim: This study compared the psychiatric morbidity of subjects with leprosy and albinism. Subjects and Methods: One hundred subjects ...

  7. Analysis, Diagnosis and Prognosis of Leprosy Utilizing Fuzzy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leprosy (Hensen's Disease) is an infectious disease that progressively deteriorates over time and is associated with mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae). Although human-to-human transmission is the primary source of infection, three other species can carry and (rarely) transfer M.leprae to humans: chimpanzees, mangabey ...

  8. Trigeminal somatosensorial evoked potentials suggest increased excitability during interictal period in patients with long disease duration in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanoz, Yesim; Abanoz, Yasin; Gündüz, Aysegül; Savrun, Feray Karaali

    2016-01-26

    Migraine pathogenesis is suggested to involve many structures in cerebral cortex, brainstem and trigeminovascular system. Electrophysiological studies revealed loss of habituation, decreased cortical preactivation, segmental hypersensitivity and reduction in control of inhibitory descending pathways. Given these information, we aimed to evaluate the excitability changes of the trigeminal pathway in the cortex and brainstem in migraine using trigeminal nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (TSEP). Fifty-one women with migraine without aura and 32 age-matched healthy women were included. TSEPs were recorded in migraine patients during interictal period and in healthy subjects. Sensory thresholds, stimulation intensities, latencies of N1, P1, N2 and P2 waves as well as N1/P1 and N2/P1 amplitudes were measured. Comparisons of ipsilateral latencies with N1-P1 and N2-P1 amplitudes between migraine and control groups showed no difference. Sensory thresholds were also similar. Stimulation thresholds decreased as the attack frequency increased and ipsilateral N1/P1 amplitude increased with prolonged disease duration (p=0.043). Our study did not show significant difference between migraine patients and healthy subjects during interictal period. However, migraine with long duration affects the excitability of the cortical and brainstem trigeminal pathways even during interictal periods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A subset of fibromyalgia patients have findings suggestive of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and appear to respond to IVIg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, X J; Winter, E F; Dumas, A J

    2008-02-01

    The aetiopathogenesis of the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) remains unknown. Recent reports, however, suggest that a subgroup of FMS subjects has an immune-mediated disease. Therefore, our primary objective was to study FMS subjects for evidence of an immune-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy. Our secondary objective was to determine the effects of treating these FMS subjects with the immune modulator, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Fifty-eight FMS subjects, 26 rheumatic non-FMS subjects and 52 non-rheumatic non-FMS subjects were studied. Subjective measures of paraesthesias, weakness, stocking hypaesthesia, pain, fatigue and stiffness were made. Objective measures of tenderness, proximal muscle strength and electrodiagnostic (EDX) evidence of polyneuropathy and demyelination were also made. Eleven other FMS subjects underwent sural nerve biopsy. Paraesthesias, subjective weakness and stocking hypaesthesia were more common in FMS than in rheumatic non-FMS (P < or = 0.0001). Proximal muscle strength was less in FMS than in rheumatic non-FMS (P < or = 0.0001). EDX demonstrated a distal demyelinating polyneuropathy, suggestive of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), in 33% of FMS subjects. No rheumatic non-FMS subject had polyneuropathy (P = 0.005), or demyelination (P = 0.05). Fifteen FMS/CIDP subjects were subsequently treated with IVIg (400 mg/kg each day for 5 days). Pain (P = 0.01), tenderness (P = 0.001) and strength (P = 0.04) improved significantly. Fatigue and stiffness trended towards improvement. A significant subset of FMS subjects have clinical and EDX findings suggestive of CIDP. IVIg treatment shows promise in treating this subset. These observations have implications for better understanding and treating some FMS patients.

  10. A 29-Year-Old Male with Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Khondker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease that primarily affects the peripheral nerves, skin, upper respiratory tract mucosa, eyes and certain other tissues. It is diagnosable and curable if recognized early and treated adequately. A twenty nine-year-old male from Jessore, Bangladesh reported in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh with the complaints of multiple erythematous, large, raised and circumscribed lesions with loss of sensations on different parts of the body, especially distal portions of all four limbs for last eight months. Subsequently he developed ulcers on the anesthetic fingers due to smoking and few ulcerative lesions on both feet. Skin examination revealed multiple erythematous, large nodular lesions on both sides of the cheek and forehead, multiple erythematous, indurated, large plaques with raised margin and central clearing on the trunk, waist and all four limbs, few satellite lesions around the large plaques on the trunk, few hypopigmented patches and plaques on buttock and lower limbs, multiple painless ulcers on dorsal surface of fingers of both hands, both lateral malleoluses and right sole. On examination of peripheral nerves, left great auricular nerve, both ulnar nerves and both common peroneal nerves were moderately enlarged and tender. Slit skin smear for AFB (modified Z-N stain was done and revealed that there were large number of acid and alcohol-fast bacilli arranged in straight and curved parallel bundles with globular masses (cigar-bundle appearance, morphologically resembling Mycobacterium leprae. Skin biopsy for histopathological examination revealed extensive infiltration of macrophages in the dermis, separated from epidermis by narrow grenz zone, with destruction of skin adnexa. Few foci of poorly defined granuloma in dermis were also noted. The patient was managed with rifampicin, clofazimine, dapsone, prednisolone and omeprazole.

  11. Clinical studies on using lyophilised radiation sterilised amnion membranes as dressing for leprosy wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarusarraya, P.; Basril, A.; Hilmy, N.

    1999-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by a bacillus Mycobacterium leprae and characterised by the formation of nodules or of macules that enlarge and spread accompanied by loss of sensation with eventual paralysis and production of deformities and mutilation. The wound of the disease can be treated by using conventional method such as Zinc Oxide (ZnO) Ointment with sterile gauze. Human amnion membranes have been used as a biological burn dressing with good results for several decades. A comparison study on using that conventional dressings and radiation sterilised lyophilised amnion membranes has been done at Sitanala Leprosarium to observe the effectiveness of using amnion membranes as leprosy wound dressing. Number of patients observed were 85, age from 12 to 60 years old. The locations of the wounds observed were at the leg and arm, with two types of wound i.e. reaction and simple ulcer. Parameter observed was the length of the healing time of the wounds. Results show that the average length of the healing time of the wound can be reduced from 64 days to 30 days when using amnion membranes compared to using the conventional wound dressing. The length of the healing time of the simple ulcer is longer that those of reaction wound using both of the dressings

  12. Can preoperative CEA and CA19-9 serum concentrations suggest metastatic disease in colorectal cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic Lalosevic, Milica; Stankovic, Sanja; Stojkovic, Mirjana; Markovic, Velimir; Dimitrijevic, Ivan; Lalosevic, Jovan; Petrovic, Jelena; Brankovic, Marija; Pavlovic Markovic, Aleksandra; Krivokapic, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficiency of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate cancer antigen (CA19-9) levels for diagnosing synchronous liver metastases and lymph node in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. A total of 300 patients with histologically diagnosed CRC were included in this study between May 2014 and March 2015. The data were obtained prospectively from patient's medical records: medical history, demographics, tumor location, differentiation (grade), depth of the tumor (T), lymph node metastases (N), distant metastases (M), lymphatics, venous and perineural invasion, and disease stage. Tumor markers were measured with an electrochemiluminescent assay and the reference value was 5ng/ml for CEA and for Ca19-9, 37u/ml. There was A high statistically significant difference in the levels of serum CEA and CA19-9 between different disease stages of CRC (PCEA (stage I 3.76±8.73; II 5.68±17.27, III 7.56±14.81, and IV 70.90±253.23) and CA 19-9 levels (stage I 9.65±11.03, II 9.83±11.09; III 19.58±36.91, and IV 228.9±985.38, respectively). The mean CEA and CA19-9 serum levels were significantly higher in patients with regional lymph nodes involvement (CEA 37.21±177.85 vs 4.79±9.90, CA19-9 119.51±687.71 VS 12.24±17.69, respectively, PCEA 86.56±277.65 vs. 5.98±12.98, and CA19-9 273.27±1073.46 vs. 4.98±3142, respectively, with PCEA and CA 19-9, 3.5 ng/mL and 7.5 U/mL, respectively. While, a cut-off value for the presence of synchronous liver metastases of these two markers was 3.5ng/mL AND 5.5 U/mL. Our study showed that tumor makers, CEA and CA19-9, can be used as diagnostic factors regarding the severity of CRC specifically to suggest metastatic disease in CRC.

  13. Citrus leprosis transmission by Brevipalpus yothersi mites through non citrus hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo León M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis virus (C i LV was detected in Colombia at the eastern plains in 2004; it is a threat the disease spreads to other regions of the country. The main vector is Brevipalpus yothersi Baker (formerly identified as Brevipalpus phoenicis. This research determined the viability of B. yothersi to transmit C i LV to citrus plants, after been hosted in non-citrus plants. To virus acquisition, mites spent three days on symptomatic orange (Citrus x sinensis leaves positives to C i LV-C2; then mites were placed on six non-citrus plants (Dieffenbachia sp., Hibiscus rosa-sinensis,Codiaeum variegatum, Swinglea glutinosa, Sida acutaand Stachytarpheta cayennensis. A randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replicates was carried out. After scheduled time in non-citrus plants, mites were three days relocated on C. x sinensis healthy plants. Leaves of receptor plants, were evaluated to the occurrence or absence of symptoms and collected for RT-PCR tests. B. yothersi mites were able to transmit the C i LV virus over 85 % of Valencia orange plants (Citrus x sinensis L., after feeding from 2-20 days on non-citrus host plants. The first leprosis symptoms on C. x sinensis leaves was confirmed from 14 to 51 days after transmission. The present research work further established that C i LV-C2 is a persistently transmitted virus. The implement quarantine diagnostic measures to prevent spread of CiLV to disease-free zones is suggested.

  14. Osteological, biomolecular and geochemical examination of an early anglo-saxon case of lepromatous leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskip, Sarah A; Taylor, G Michael; Zakrzewski, Sonia R; Mays, Simon A; Pike, Alistair W G; Llewellyn, Gareth; Williams, Christopher M; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Stewart, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined a 5th to 6th century inhumation from Great Chesterford, Essex, UK. The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death. The remains show osteological evidence of lepromatous leprosy (LL) and this was confirmed by lipid biomarker analysis and ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis, which provided evidence for both multi-copy and single copy loci from the Mycobacterium leprae genome. Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe. While a number of contemporaneous cases exist, at present, this case of leprosy is the earliest radiocarbon dated case in Britain confirmed by both aDNA and lipid biomarkers. Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain. This potentially sheds light on the origins of the strain in Britain and its subsequent spread to other parts of the world, including the Americas where the 3I lineage of M. leprae is still found in some southern states of America.

  15. Osteological, biomolecular and geochemical examination of an early anglo-saxon case of lepromatous leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Inskip

    Full Text Available We have examined a 5th to 6th century inhumation from Great Chesterford, Essex, UK. The incomplete remains are those of a young male, aged around 21-35 years at death. The remains show osteological evidence of lepromatous leprosy (LL and this was confirmed by lipid biomarker analysis and ancient DNA (aDNA analysis, which provided evidence for both multi-copy and single copy loci from the Mycobacterium leprae genome. Genotyping showed the strain belonged to the 3I lineage, but the Great Chesterford isolate appeared to be ancestral to 3I strains found in later medieval cases in southern Britain and also continental Europe. While a number of contemporaneous cases exist, at present, this case of leprosy is the earliest radiocarbon dated case in Britain confirmed by both aDNA and lipid biomarkers. Importantly, Strontium and Oxygen isotope analysis suggest that the individual is likely to have originated from outside Britain. This potentially sheds light on the origins of the strain in Britain and its subsequent spread to other parts of the world, including the Americas where the 3I lineage of M. leprae is still found in some southern states of America.

  16. Copy number analysis of 413 isolated talipes equinovarus patients suggests role for transcriptional regulators of early limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, David M; Buchan, Jillian G; Frick, Steven L; Herzenberg, John E; Dobbs, Matthew B; Gurnett, Christina A

    2013-04-01

    Talipes equinovarus is one of the most common congenital musculoskeletal anomalies and has a worldwide incidence of 1 in 1000 births. A genetic predisposition to talipes equinovarus is evidenced by the high concordance rate in twin studies and the increased risk to first-degree relatives. Despite the frequency of isolated talipes equinovarus and the strong evidence of a genetic basis for the disorder, few causative genes have been identified. To identify rare and/or recurrent copy number variants, we performed a genome-wide screen for deletions and duplications in 413 isolated talipes equinovarus patients using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. Segregation analysis within families and gene expression in mouse E12.5 limb buds were used to determine the significance of copy number variants. We identified 74 rare, gene-containing copy number variants that were present in talipes equinovarus probands and not present in 759 controls or in the Database of Genomic Variants. The overall frequency of copy number variants was similar between talipes equinovarus patients compared with controls. Twelve rare copy number variants segregate with talipes equinovarus in multiplex pedigrees, and contain the developmentally expressed transcription factors and transcriptional regulators PITX1, TBX4, HOXC13, UTX, CHD (chromodomain protein)1, and RIPPLY2. Although our results do not support a major role for recurrent copy number variations in the etiology of isolated talipes equinovarus, they do suggest a role for genes involved in early embryonic patterning in some families that can now be tested with large-scale sequencing methods.

  17. Late gadolinium uptake demonstrated with magnetic resonance in patients where automated PERFIT analysis of myocardial SPECT suggests irreversible perfusion defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosendahl, Lene; Blomstrand, Peter; Ohlsson, Jan L; Björklund, Per-Gunnar; Ahlander, Britt-Marie; Starck, Sven-Åke; Engvall, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (MPS) is frequently used as the reference method for the determination of myocardial infarct size. PERFIT ® is a software utilizing a three-dimensional gender specific, averaged heart model for the automatic evaluation of myocardial perfusion. The purpose of this study was to compare the perfusion defect size on MPS, assessed with PERFIT, with the hyperenhanced volume assessed by late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE) and to relate their effect on the wall motion score index (WMSI) assessed with cine magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) and echocardiography (echo). LGE was performed in 40 patients where clinical MPS showed an irreversible uptake reduction suggesting a myocardial scar. Infarct volume, extent and major coronary supply were compared between MPS and LGE as well as the relationship between infarct size from both methods and WMSI. MPS showed a slightly larger infarct volume than LGE (MPS 29.6 ± 23.2 ml, LGE 22.1 ± 16.9 ml, p = 0.01), while no significant difference was found in infarct extent (MPS 11.7 ± 9.4%, LGE 13.0 ± 9.6%). The correlation coefficients between methods in respect to infarct size and infarct extent were 0.71 and 0.63 respectively. WMSI determined with cine-MRI correlated moderately with infarct volume and infarct extent (cine-MRI vs MPS volume r = 0.71, extent r = 0.71, cine-MRI vs LGE volume r = 0.62, extent r = 0.60). Similar results were achieved when wall motion was determined with echo. Both MPS and LGE showed the same major coronary supply to the infarct area in a majority of patients, Kappa = 0.84. MPS and LGE agree moderately in the determination of infarct size in both absolute and relative terms, although infarct volume is slightly larger with MPS. The correlation between WMSI and infarct size is moderate

  18. Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I correlate with disease status in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Luciana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caused by Mycobacterium leprae (ML, leprosy presents a strong immune-inflammatory component, whose status dictates both the clinical form of the disease and the occurrence of reactional episodes. Evidence has shown that, during the immune-inflammatory response to infection, the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I plays a prominent regulatory role. However, in leprosy, little, if anything, is known about the interaction between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. Methods In the present retrospective study, we measured the serum levels of IGF-I and IGBP-3, its major binding protein. These measurements were taken at diagnosis in nonreactional borderline tuberculoid (NR BT, borderline lepromatous (NR BL, and lepromatous (NR LL leprosy patients in addition to healthy controls (HC. LL and BL patients who developed reaction during the course of the disease were also included in the study. The serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α were evaluated at diagnosis and during development of reversal (RR or erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL reaction by the solid phase, enzyme-labeled, chemiluminescent-immunometric method. Results The circulating IGF-I/IGFBP-3 levels showed significant differences according to disease status and occurrence of reactional episodes. At the time of leprosy diagnosis, significantly lower levels of circulating IGF-I/IGFBP-3 were found in NR BL and NR LL patients in contrast to NR BT patients and HCs. However, after treatment, serum IGF-I levels in BL/LL patients returned to normal. Notably, the levels of circulating IGF-I at diagnosis were low in 75% of patients who did not undergo ENL during treatment (NR LL patients in opposition to the normal levels observed in those who suffered ENL during treatment (R LL patients. Nonetheless, during ENL episodes, the levels observed in RLL sera tended to decrease, attaining similar levels to those found in NR LL patients

  19. Association analysis of the genetic polymorphisms with leprosy subtypes in Chinese Han population from Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Wang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Honglei; Pan, Qing; Fu, Xi'an; Liu, Tingting; Yu, Gongqi; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen

    2018-03-24

    Leprosy is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations that extend from paucibacillary (PB) to multibacillary (MB) depending upon the different immunologic response to the invading of M. leprae 3,4 . It has been widely accepted that genetic predisposition plays the crucial role in the different clinical manifestations. Host susceptibility to leprosy is modified by number of genes via two stages. In the first stage, a group of genes confers susceptibility to leprosy per se; A second group of genes are associated to the type of host immune response and leprosy subtype 5 . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Global and local contexts: the Northern Ogoja Leprosy Scheme, Nigeria, 1945-1960

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manton John

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Deriving funding from missionary sources in Ireland, Britain and the USA, and from international leprosy relief organizations such as the British Empire Leprosy Relief Association (BELRA and drawing on developing capacities in international public health under the auspices of WHO and UNICEF through the 1950s, the Roman Catholic Mission Ogoja Leprosy Scheme applied international expertise at a local level with ever-increasing success and coverage. This paper supplements the presentation of a successful leprosy control programme in missionary narratives with an appreciation of how international medical politics shaped the parameters of success and the development of therapeutic understanding in the late colonial period in Nigeria.

  1. In cirrhotic patients reduced muscle strength is unrelated to muscle capacity for ATP turnover suggesting a central limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gam, Christiane Marie Bourgin; Nielsen, H B; Secher, Niels H.

    2011-01-01

      We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria.......  We investigated whether in patients with liver cirrhosis reduced muscle strength is related to dysfunction of muscle mitochondria....

  2. Suggestions for the optimization of the initial tobramycin dose in adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Vinks, A A; Heijerman, H G; Hermans, J; Bakker, W

    Clinical pharmacokinetic data of intravenously administered tobramycin in 34 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were correlated with patient parameters. Patients began tobramycin therapy with 10 mg/kg/day in three divided doses. Peak and trough serum concentrations were measured. Tobramycin dose was

  3. La proteína asociada a SLAM (SAP regula la expresión de IFN-g en lepra The SLAM-associated protein (SAP regulates IFN-g expression in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Quiroga

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available La inmunidad protectora contra Mycobacterium leprae requiere IFN-g. Los pacientes con lepra tuberculoide producen localmente citoquinas Th1, mientras que los pacientes lepromatosos producen citoquinas Th2. La molécula linfocitaria activadora de señales (SLAM y la proteína asociada a SLAM (SAP participan en la diferenciación celular que conduce a producción de patrones específicos de citoquinas. A fin de investigar la vía SLAM/SAP en la infección por M. leprae, determinamos expresión de ARN mensajero (ARNm de SAP, IFN-g y SLAM en pacientes con lepra. Observamos que la expresión de SLAM correlacionó en forma directa con la expresión de IFN-g, mientras que la expresión de SAP correlacionó inversamente con la expresión de ambas proteínas. Así, nuestros resultados indican que SAP interferiría con las respuestas de citoquinas Th1 mientras que SLAM contribuiría con la respuesta Th1 en lepra, señalando a la vía SLAM/SAP como potencial blanco modulador de citoquinas en enfermedades con respuestas Th2 disfuncionales.Tuberculoid leprosy patients locally produce Th1 cytokines, while lepromatous patients produce Th2 cytokines. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM and the SLAM-associated protein (SAP participate in the differentiation process that leads to the production of specific patterns of cytokines by activated T cells. To investigate the SLAM/SAP pathway in M. leprae infection, we determined the expression of SAP, IFN-g and SLAM RNA messenger in leprosy patients. We found a direct correlation of SLAM expression with IFN-g expression, whereas the expression of SAP was inversely correlated with the expression of both SLAM and IFN-g. Therefore, our data indicate that SAP might interfere with Th1 cytokine responses while SLAM expression may contribute to Th1 responses in leprosy. This study further suggests that the SLAM/SAP pathway might be a focal point for therapeutic modulation of T cell cytokine responses in diseases

  4. Leprosy: International Public Health Policies and Public Health Eras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyi Awofeso

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Public health policies continue to play important roles in national and international health reforms. However, the influence and legacies of the public health eras during which such policies are formulated remain largely underappreciated. The limited appreciation of this relationship may hinder consistent adoption of public health policies by nation-states, and encumber disinvestment from ineffective or anachronistic policies. This article reviews seven public health eras and highlights how each era has influenced international policy formulation for leprosy control—“the fertile soil for policy learning”. The author reiterates the role of health leadership and health activism in facilitating consistency in international health policy formulation and implementation for leprosy control.

  5. Dapsone and body mass index in subjects with multibacillary leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Fernanda M L; Dias, Rosa M; Araujo, Eliete C; Brasil, Laélia M B F; Ferreira, Michelle V D; Vieira, Jose L F

    2014-04-01

    The physiological changes in obese subjects can modify the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs influencing the therapeutic efficacy. In this study, the authors compare plasma dapsone trough levels of multibacillary leprosy subjects stratified by body mass index (BMI) to evaluate if obesity plays a significant role on drug levels. The relationship between drug levels and BMI was also determined. Dapsone was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and BMI based on World Health Organization criteria. At steady state, the median plasma dapsone trough level was significantly lower in obesity class 2 group, when compared with other groups, but they were similar between normal weight and preobesity groups. A weak association between drug levels and BMI was observed. Obesity promotes a significant reduction in plasma dapsone trough levels of subjects with multibacillary leprosy with a weak association between drug levels and BMI.

  6. Leprosy in Southern Brazil: a twenty-year epidemiological profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Nazario

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated leprosy rates in Rio Grande do Sul, an area with a historically low prevalence. However, recent studies are lacking. METHODS: Data extracted from a National Database were analyzed for clinical features and compared to 1980s data. Tendency was assessed via stationarity analysis. RESULTS: Between 1990 and 2011, 4,770 cases were reported (0.21/10,000 inhabitants; 95% CI = 0.19-0.24. Detection was slightly higher among males, 1.9% cases were among children and most multibacillary (74.7% at diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Leprosy is controlled in RS, but most cases are multibacillary. Early identification is important to avoid disabilities due to late diagnosis.

  7. Hanseníase no Município de Buriticupu, Estado do Maranhão: busca ativa de casos na população adulta Leprosy in Buriticupu, State of Maranhão: active search for cases in the adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rafael da Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O estudo foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar a situação da hanseníase na população adulta do Município de Buriticupu, MA. MÉTODOS: Foi empregado o método de busca ativa na identificação de casos novos, no período de 2005 a 2007. Baciloscopia de raspado intradérmico foi feita em todos os pacientes com lesões de pele compatíveis com hanseníase, enquanto exame histopatológico foi feito naqueles em que havia dúvidas na definição da forma clínica. RESULTADOS: Participaram do estudo 15.409 indivíduos, tendo o exame clínico definido o diagnóstico de hanseníase em 62 pacientes, o que representa um coeficiente de detecção de 40,23/10.000. A baciloscopia foi positiva em seis pacientes, sendo predominante a forma clínica tuberculóide, em 31 casos, seguida da forma indeterminada em 20, dimorfa em 10 e virchowiana em um. O estudo permitiu, ainda, a identificação de outras doenças da pele, tais como pitiríase versicolor, dermatofitose, escabiose, vitiligo e carcinoma de pele. CONCLUSÕES: O elevado coeficiente de detecção define o município como hiperendêmico para a hanseníase. A busca ativa de casos é um método importante para o controle da doença.INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to analyze the leprosy situation, focusing on the adult population of the town of Buriticupu, State of Maranhão. METHODS: An active search was conducted to identify new cases from 2005 to 2007. All patients with injuries suggestive of leprosy were submitted to cutaneous bacilloscopy and biopsies were performed when defining the clinical presentation was difficulty. RESULTS: 15,409 individuals participated in the study and 62 were diagnosed with leprosy which represents a detection coefficient of 40.23/10,000. Bacilloscopy showed positive results in six patients. The predominant clinical form was tuberculoid, 31 cases, followed by the indeterminate form (20 cases, the dimorphous form (10 cases and the lepromatous form (1

  8. Esophageal involvement is frequent in lichen planus: study in 32 patients with suggestion of clinicopathologic diagnostic criteria and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes S; Technau-Hafsi, Kristin; Schwacha, Henning; Kuhlmann, Jan; Hirsch, Gunther; Brass, Volker; Deibert, Peter; Schmitt-Graeff, Anette; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a classic skin disease that can involve the skin, hair, and nails, as well as the oral and genital mucosa. Histopathology is characterized by a T-lymphocytic, lichenoid, and interface dermatitis. Multiple case reports and small case series have shown that LP can involve the esophagus. However, the diagnostic criteria, incidence, and best treatment options remain uncertain. This study aimed to refine the diagnostic criteria, estimate prevalence, and present an outlook on treatment options to prevent long-term sequelae. Thirty-two consecutive patients with LP of the skin, hair, nails, oral mucosa, and/or genital mucosa underwent a comprehensive clinicopathologic assessment. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, and biopsies were evaluated histologically, immunohistochemically, and by direct immunofluorescence. Patients diagnosed with esophageal lichen planus (ELP) were followed up prospectively where possible. In total, 20 of 32 patients had ELP. Ten of these 20 patients were classified as having proven ELP, with clear-cut endoscopically visible lesions; the other 10 were classified as having probable ELP. Eight of 10 patients with proven ELP were started on new or additional therapy because of esophageal findings. Treatment with a topical budesonide formulation or systemic corticosteroids was successful in most patients with proven ELP and reversed functional esophageal stenosis. ELP can be found in more than 50% of patients with proven mucocutaneous LP when clinical and pathologic findings are correlated carefully. Topical or systemic corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for ELP. Timely medical therapy seems to prevent scarring stenosis of the esophagus.

  9. Clinical and neurophysiological study of peroneal nerve mononeuropathy after substantial weight loss in patients suffering from major depressive and schizophrenic disorder: Suggestions on patients' management

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    Koulouris George C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroneal nerve is susceptible to injuries due to its anatomical course. Excessive weight loss, which reduces the fatty cushion protecting the nerve, is considered a common underlying cause of peroneal palsy. Other predisposing factors, such as prolonged postures, traumas of the region or concomitant pathologies (for example diabetes mellitus contribute to the nerve damage. This study aims to reveal the multiple predisposing factors of peroneal nerve mononeuropathy after substantial weight loss that coexist in psychiatric patients and to make suggestions on their management. Methods Nine psychiatric inpatients, major depressive or schizophrenic, with foot drop underwent a complete clinical neurological and neurophysiological examination. All had excessive weight loss, which was completed in a short period of time and had not resulted from a well-balanced low-calorie diet, but was due to their psychiatric illness. Data regarding predisposing factors to peroneal nerve mononeuropathy were gathered, such as habitual leg crossing, squatting or other prolonged postures. Results The clinical examination and the neurophysiological evaluation in all patients were indicative of a focal lesion of the peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Conclusion Patients with major depressive and schizophrenic disorders gather multiple predisposing factors to peroneal palsy, adequate to classify them at a high risk group. The better focus of the attendant medical and nursing staff on this condition, the early clinical and neurophysiologic evaluation and surgical interventions may enable an improved management and prognosis of these patients.

  10. The Meaning of Leprosy and Everyday Experiences: An Exploration in Cirebon, Indonesia

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    Ruth M. H. Peters

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to consider the meaning of leprosy and everyday experiences of people affected by leprosy and key persons in the community if one aims to make leprosy services more effective, which appears necessary in Indonesia given the large numbers of new cases detected annually. However, little is written in the international literature about the experiences of people currently being treated for leprosy, those cured, or other key informants. This paper analyses the narratives of the people by drawing upon in-depth interviews with 53 participants and 20 focus groups discussions. The participants were purposively selected. We provide insights into the experiences of people and the meaning they give to leprosy and highlight aspect of aetiology, spirituality, religion, darkening of the skin, and sorcery. We also examine experiences of seeking care and focused on the impact of the disease in particular on the elderly and children. In conclusion, the continued need for implementation of leprosy services in Indonesia is very evident. The diversities in people’s experiences with leprosy indicate a demand for responsive leprosy services to serve the diverse needs, including services for those formally declared to be “cured.”

  11. BCG revaccination does not protect against leprosy in the Brazilian Amazon: a cluster randomised trial.

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    Sérgio S Cunha

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Although BCG has been found to impart protection against leprosy in many populations, the utility of repeat or booster BCG vaccinations is still unclear. When a policy of giving a second BCG dose to school children in Brazil was introduced, a trial was conducted to assess its impact against tuberculosis, and a leprosy component was then undertaken in parallel.to estimate the protection against leprosy imparted by a second dose of BCG given to schoolchildren.This is a cluster randomised community trial, with 6 years and 8 months of follow-up.City of Manaus, Amazon region, a leprosy-endemic area in Brazil.99,770 school children with neonatal BCG (aged 7-14 years at baseline, of whom 42,662 were in the intervention arm (revaccination.BCG given by intradermal injection.Leprosy (all clinical forms.The incidence rate ratio of leprosy in the intervention over the control arm within the follow-up, in schoolchildren with neonatal BCG, controlled for potential confounders and adjusted for clustering, was 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.68 to 1.45.There was no evidence of protection conferred by the second dose of BCG vaccination in school children against leprosy during the trial follow-up. These results point to a need to consider the effectiveness of the current policy of BCG vaccination of contacts of leprosy cases in Brazilian Amazon region.

  12. Predicting neuropathy and reactions in leprosy at diagnosis and before incident events-results from the INFIR cohort study.

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    W Cairns S Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is a disease of skin and peripheral nerves. The process of nerve injury occurs gradually through the course of the disease as well as acutely in association with reactions. The INFIR (ILEP Nerve Function Impairment and Reactions Cohort was established to identify clinically relevant neurological and immunological predictors for nerve injury and reactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study, in two centres in India, recruited 188 new, previously untreated patients with multi-bacillary leprosy who had no recent nerve damage. These patients underwent a series of novel blood tests and nerve function testing including motor and sensory nerve conduction, warm and cold detection thresholds, vibrometry, dynamometry, monofilament sensory testing and voluntary muscle testing at diagnosis and at monthly follow up for the first year and every second month for the second year. During the 2 year follow up a total of 74 incident events were detected. Sub-clinical changes to nerve function at diagnosis and during follow-up predicted these new nerve events. Serological assays at baseline and immediately before an event were not predictive; however, change in TNF alpha before an event was a statistically significant predictor of that event. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings increase our understanding of the processes of nerve damage in leprosy showing that nerve function impairment is more widespread than previously appreciated. Any nerve involvement, including sub-clinical changes, is predictive of further nerve function impairment. These new factors could be used to identify patients at high risk of developing impairment and disability.

  13. A leprosy clinical severity scale for erythema nodosum leprosum: An international, multicentre validation study of the ENLIST ENL Severity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Stephen L; Sales, Anna M; Butlin, C Ruth; Shah, Mahesh; Maghanoy, Armi; Lambert, Saba M; Darlong, Joydeepa; Rozario, Benjamin Jewel; Pai, Vivek V; Balagon, Marivic; Doni, Shimelis N; Hagge, Deanna A; Nery, José A C; Neupane, Kapil D; Baral, Suwash; Sangma, Biliom A; Alembo, Digafe T; Yetaye, Abeba M; Hassan, Belaynesh A; Shelemo, Mohammed B; Nicholls, Peter G; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2017-07-01

    We wished to validate our recently devised 16-item ENLIST ENL Severity Scale, a clinical tool for measuring the severity of the serious leprosy associated complication of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). We also wished to assess the responsiveness of the ENLIST ENL Severity Scale in detecting clinical change in patients with ENL. Participants, recruited from seven centres in six leprosy endemic countries, were assessed using the ENLIST ENL Severity Scale by two researchers, one of whom categorised the severity of ENL. At a subsequent visit a further assessment using the scale was made and both participant and physician rated the change in ENL using the subjective categories of "Much better", "somewhat better", "somewhat worse" and "much worse" compared with "No change" or "about the same". 447 participants were assessed with the ENLIST ENL Severity Scale. The Cronbach alpha of the scale and each item was calculated to determine the internal consistency of the scale. The ENLIST ENL Severity Scale had good internal consistency and this improved following removal of six items to give a Cronbach's alpha of 0.77. The cut off between mild ENL and more severe disease was 9 determined using ROC curves. The minimal important difference of the scale was determined to be 5 using both participant and physician ratings of change. The 10-item ENLIST ENL Severity Scale is the first valid, reliable and responsive measure of ENL severity and improves our ability to assess and compare patients and their treatments in this severe and difficult to manage complication of leprosy. The ENLIST ENL Severity Scale will assist physicians in the monitoring and treatment of patients with ENL. The ENLIST ENL Severity Scale is easy to apply and will be useful as an outcome measure in treatment studies and enable the standardisation of other clinical and laboratory ENL research.

  14. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  15. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Mu'taman; Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-10-20

    Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme "1 Care for 1 Malaysia" in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia.

  16. Burden of leprosy in Malawi: community camp-based cross-sectional study

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    Msyamboza Kelias P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although leprosy was eliminated globally in 2000, the disease continues to be the significant cause of peripheral neuropathy, disability and disfigurement in some developing countries. However, recent population-based prevalence data are lacking to inform evidence-based renewed commitment for the final push for leprosy elimination at national and sub-national levels. Methods Community camp-based cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in four selected districts. World Health Organisation guidelines and tools for leprosy elimination monitoring were used to evaluate the Malawi National Leprosy Programme. Results A total of 6,338 people (60% females, 35% children aged less than 15 years were examined for leprosy and other skin diseases. Prevalence of skin diseases was 18%, the commonest being fungal (9%, eczema/dermatitis (3% and leprosy (1%. Of the fungal skin conditions, pityriasis versicolor and Tinea capatis were the commonest (22% and 21% respectively then Tinea corporis (9%, Tinea cruris (6% and Tinea pedis (2%. A total of 66 leprosy cases were detected out of 6,338 people screened giving a prevalence of 104.1 per 10,000 population (range by district 67.1 to 194.1. Of the leprosy cases, 37 were new, 6 were defaulters and 23 were on treatment, 30 were females and 9 were children aged less than 15 years old. Of the 37 new leprosy cases, 9 (24.3% were children, 25 (67.6% had 1–5 leprosy lesions and 8 (21.6% had grade 2 disability. The most frequent location of leprosy lesions was the head and neck (24.1%, arms (24.1%, chest (17.2%, legs (13.8%, back (13.8% and abdomen (7.0%. Between 2006 and 2011, trends of leprosy prevalence and detection increased, prevalence/detection ratios were over 1 and cure rates by cohort analysis of 2009 multibacillary and 2010 paucibacillary cases were 33% and 63% respectively far below the expected 80% although the national prevalence remained at less than 1 case per 10

  17. Assessment of the implementation of the Leprosy Control Program in Camaragibe, Pernambuco State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Monique Feitosa de; Vanderlei, Lygia Carmen de Moraes; Frias, Paulo Germano de

    2017-01-01

    to assess the implementation of the actions of the Leprosy Control Program in Camaragibe, Pernambuco State, Brazil. evaluative research with 'implementation analysis', based on criteria, indicators and parameters guided from the construction of the Logic Model; four components were assessed - management, health care, epidemiological surveillance, health education and communication -; direct observation/questionnaire was used, as well as data from the Information System for Notifiable Diseases. the implementation of the program was incipient (58.3%); the estimate for the components varied from 'not implemented' (health education and communication, 48.0%), 'incipient' (management, 53.3%; health care, 57.2%) to 'partially implemented' (epidemiological surveillance, 73.0%); in 2012, it was observed low proportion of examined contacts (28.4%), treatment dropout (34.1%), limited standardization of patient care flow, and poor resolution of problems by managers. the level of implementation found was related to the organization of services, with negative repercussions regarding the result indicators.

  18. Communities of the afflicted: constituting leprosy through place in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, James

    2014-01-01

    With the promotion of community-based rehabilitation (CBR) as a solution to health-related issues across the global South, leprosy colonies have long been out of vogue for nongovernmental organizations and State institutions alike. Such colonies, however, have endured. As is being increasingly recognized by those working in the leprosy field, such places have played a particular role not only in the provision of leprosy-related care but also in forging new and collective identities for people affected by leprosy that might otherwise not have been possible. In this article, I draw on ethnographic fieldwork in one such colony in coastal Andhra Pradesh, South India, and explore the values invested in it as a particular kind of place; its geographical location on the peripheries; and its architecture and layout (inspired in part by colonial sanatoriums), which have particular implications for how leprosy and its ramifications are constituted and managed.

  19. A comparative study of homoeopathic medicine - Sulphur with the Multidrug therapy in the treatment of paucibacillary leprosy

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    D Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Results: The study showed that MDT therapy (PB regimen and homoeopathic medicine were found equally effective as histopathology of skin showed no granulomatous lesion. The most significant clinical sign observed in all cases treated with Sulphur was reappearance of normal skin colour and regain of loss of sensation of the skin lesion. Conclusions: MD therapy (PB regimen and homoeopathic medicine were found equally effective. The patients of paucibacillary leprosy could get rid of the skin symptoms if treatment with Sulphur (is also given with MDT.

  20. Suggestions for a web based universal exchange and inference language for medicine. Continuity of patient care with PCAST disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Barry; Caruso, Thomas P; Balis, Ulysses G J

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the applications of our recently proposed Q-UEL language to continuity of patient care between physicians, specialists and institutions as mediated via the Internet, giving examples derived from HL7 CDA and VistA of particular interest to workflow. Particular attention is given to the Universal Exchange Language for healthcare as requested by the US President׳s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) released in December 2010, especially in regard to disaggregation of the patient record on the Internet. To illustrate many features and options, one of our most elaborate configurations combining them, for disaggregation and reaggregation, is described. The Q-UEL tags used do not physically join, but query each other from a random mix via the application. Despite the computationally demanding complexity of the configuration with two joining tags for each data tag and four independently evolving keys, plus a valuable but rate limiting isomorphism test, packets of essential clinical data for patient could be recovered and displayed every 2 s for a "club" of 30,000-50,000 patients in the mix. All computation here is on a standard laptop, but for practical use of the Internet to display downloaded data, the above is adequate, so focus is primarily on increasing club size. In practice, it is not necessary that a club comprise an entire nation. Assuming that one does not use purely random assignments of patients to arbitrary clubs, there could for example be a club comprising all schoolchildren in Scotland, or a club comprising all military veterans in Illinois. In such cases, one is typically dealing with clubs each of the order of a mere million patients. Using such club sizes efficiently, and in principle even a club the size of a whole country, appears to be possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Higher educational status, staying in joint family and early treatment initiation improves quality of life in leprosy: Experiences from and observational study at a tertiary centre in Eastern India

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    Arup Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease with various risks of permanent and progressive disabilities as well as deformities. This can lead to social stigma and discrimination. Methodology A cross sectional institution based study was conducted among the patient of a leprosy clinic in a tertiary care center. WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used after taking consent from each study individual. Results Majority (69.8% of the patients was male and 41.3% of the study population belonged to below poverty line. Majority (85.7% of the study population were suffering from multi-bacillary type of leprosy. Though Majority (96.8% of the patients was receiving MDT (multi drug therapy regularly but still 33.33% of them were leading a poor quality of life. It has been seen that literacy, family type and time gap between starting of symptoms and initiation of treatment were significantly associated with quality of life. Discussion Different previous studies showed QOL (quality of life was associated with factors like SES (socio economic status, literacy and male gender, the present study revealed higher literacy, staying in the joint family and early treatment initiation helped to improve the QOL. Conclusion Better QOL was associated with higher educational status, good family support and early initiation of treatment among the leprosy patients.

  2. Identificação de alguns problemas psicossociais em portadores de hanseníase utilizando para a análise os recursos da informática Identification of some psychosocial aspects in patients with leprosy using computerized analyses resources

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    Lúcia Maria Frazão Helene

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo identificar nos pacientes com hanseníase alguns problemas psicossociais, como preocupações e mudanças ocorridas em relação à família, aos amigos, ao emprego e a si próprio, após terem sido informados do diagnóstico da doença. Na metodologia foram utilizados alguns recursos da informática, como o programa KARDS , gerenciador da base de dados, e o software JARGÃO, que possibilitou a tarefa de analisar em linguagem natural os depoimentos dos pacientes, obtidos por meio de entrevista composta por duas perguntas abertas. Os resultados encontrados evidenciaram que após o diagnóstico da doença a maioria dos pacientes estudados apresentava preocupações e manifestava algum tipo de mudança em relação à família, aos amigos, ao emprego e a si próprios. As preocupações estavam relacionadas principalmente à possibilidade de transmitir a doença, especialmente para os familiares, e à incerteza da cura. As mudanças diziam respeito especialmente ao aparecimento de sintomas que, segundo os pacientes, poderiam provocar reações discriminatórias por parte de outras pessoas. Esses fatos levavam os pacientes a não contar aos amigos sobre sua doença.The purpose of this study was to identify leprosy patients' psychosocial problems experienced after they were informed about their diagnosis. We foccused attention upon concerns and behavioral changes related to their families, friends, jobs and to themselves. Data were obtained by a two opened questions interview and they were analysed with the aid of artificial intelligence techniques. These inteligence tools were used to discover the most frequent words, phrases and concepts existing in the interview reports. The results showed that after being informed about their diagnosis, the majority of the patients referred some concerns and behavioral changes related to their families, friends, jobs and to themselves. The main concerns of the population were

  3. Factors associated with the functional capacity of older adults with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Paula Sacha Frota; Marques, Marilia Braga; Coutinho, Janaina Fonseca Victor; Maia, Juliana Cunha; Silva, Maria Josefina da; Moura, Escolástica Rejane Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    to investigate the association between socio-demographic and clinical factors and the functional capacity of older adults with leprosy. cross-sectional analytical study conducted in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, with 77 older adult patients with leprosy in a referral service, through interview, medical records and application of the Katz Index and the Lawton and Brody Scale. the mean age was 68.23 years, with prevalence of men, in stable union/married, with mean monthly family income of 2.04 minimum wages, positive bacillary index, clinical dimorphic form and grade zero disability. In the Lawton and Brody scale, independence (58.5%) was predominant and associated to the variables "living arrangement" and "educational attainment". Total independence (87.0%) was predominant in the Katz Index and statistically associated to the variable monthly family income. most of the participants were classified as independent in the instruments used. Furthermore, the instruments pointed to a greater number of associations with socio-demographic and clinical factors not related to leprosy. investigar a associação de fatores sociodemográficos e clínicos à capacidade funcional de idosos com hanseníase. estudo transversal, analítico realizado em Fortaleza, Ceará, com 77 idosos com hanseníase acompanhados em serviço de referência, através de entrevista, consulta ao prontuário e aplicação do Índice de Katz e Escala de Lawton e Brody. a média de idade foi de 68,23 anos, com prevalência de sexo masculino, união estável/casado, renda familiar mensal média de 2,04 salários mínimos, índice baciloscópico positivo, forma clínica dimorfa e Grau de Incapacidade Física zero. Na escala de Lawton e Brody prevaleceu a independência (58,5%) com associação às variáveis "com quem reside" e "escolaridade". Destacou-se a independência total (87,0%) no índice de Katz, associando-se estatisticamente a variável renda familiar mensal. a maioria dos participantes mostrou

  4. Symptom Burden and Functional Dependencies Among Cancer Patients in Botswana Suggest a Need for Palliative Care Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenby, Mark; Sebego, Miriam; Swart, Norman Carl; Lopez, Lidia; Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care and cancer nursing in sub-Saharan Africa is hampered by inadequate clinical resources and evidence base but is central to symptom management amid the growing cancer burden. The aim of this study is to describe symptom burden and functional dependencies of cancer patients in Botswana using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale-Short Form (MSAS-SF) and Enforced Social Dependency Scale (ESDS). A cross-sectional multisite study was conducted in Gaborone, Botswana, from June to August 2013 using MSAS-SF, ESDS, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status at 1 time point. Descriptive statistics, tests of association, correlation, and scale validity were used. Among the 100 cancer patients, 65 were women, 21 were inpatients, 48 were human immunodeficiency virus-positive, 23 had gynecological malignancies, 34 had stage 4 disease, and 54 received chemotherapy only. Sixty-four reported pain; 54, neuropathies; 51, weight loss; and 51, hunger. Most distressing symptoms were weight loss, body image, skin changes, and pain. Recreational/social role was most affected by cancer. Cronbach's α for both the MSAS-SF and ESDS was .91. Variations in means for MSAS-SF and ESDS were associated with ECOG grade 2 (P cancer pain, weight loss, hunger, and dependency in recreational/social activities. The Setswana translations of the MSAS-SF and ESDS were found reliable to assess cancer patients' symptoms and function. Nurses trained in palliative care are needed to meet cancer patients' pain and symptom management care needs.

  5. Molecular analysis in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II suggests that DXS466 maps within the Hunter gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steglich, C.; Bunge, S.; Hulsebos, T.; Beck, M.; Brandt, N. J.; Schwinger, E.; Hopwood, J. J.; Gal, A.

    1993-01-01

    Hunter disease is an X-linked mucopolysaccharidosis caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Using the IDS cDNA and DNA probes corresponding to loci flanking the IDS locus, we performed molecular genetic studies in two patients with Hunter syndrome. An interstitial

  6. TP53 suppression promotes erythropoiesis in del(5q) MDS, suggesting a targeted therapeutic strategy in lenalidomide-resistant patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Gisela; McGraw, Kathy; Yip, Bon Ham; Pellagatti, Andrea; Johnson, Joseph; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Kenian; Zhang, Lan Min; Fulp, William J.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Al Ali, Najla H.; Basiorka, Ashley; Smith, Larry J.; Daugherty, F. Joseph; Littleton, Neil; Wells, Richard A.; Sokol, Lubomir; Wei, Sheng; Komrokji, Rami S.; Boultwood, Jacqueline; List, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Stabilization of p53 in erythroid precursors in response to nucleosomal stress underlies the hypoplastic anemia in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with chromosome 5q deletion [del(5q)]. We investigated whether cenersen, a clinically active 20-mer antisense oligonucleotide complementary to TP53 exon10, could suppress p53 expression and restore erythropoiesis in del(5q) MDS. Cenersen treatment of ribosomal protein S-14-deficient erythroblasts significantly reduced cellular p53 and p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis expression compared with controls, accompanied by a significant reduction in apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. In a two-stage erythroid differentiation assay, cenersen significantly suppressed nuclear p53 in bone marrow CD34+ cells isolated from patients with del(5q) MDS, whereas erythroid burst recovery increased proportionally to the magnitude of p53 suppression without evidence of del(5q) clonal suppression (r = −0.6; P = 0.005). To explore the effect of p53 suppression on erythropoiesis in vivo, dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent p53 antagonist, was added to lenalidomide treatment in eight lower-risk, transfusion-dependent, del(5q) MDS patients with acquired drug resistance. Transfusion independence was restored in five patients accompanied by expansion of erythroid precursors and decreased cellular p53 expression. We conclude that targeted suppression of p53 could support effective erythropoiesis in lenalidomide-resistant del(5q) MDS. PMID:24043769

  7. Hyperventilation and photic stimulation are useful additions to a placebo-based suggestive seizure induction protocol in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The early and definitive diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures is a common challenge in epileptology practice. Suggestive seizure induction is a valuable tool to aid the differentiation between epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, especially when long-term video-EEG monitoring is inconclusive or unavailable. In this retrospective analysis, we compared the diagnostic yield of a classical, placebo-based induction protocol with that of an extended protocol that includes hyperventilation and photic stimulation as means of suggestion while also implementing more open, standardized patient information. We investigated whether the diversification of suggestive seizure induction has an effect on diagnostic yield and whether it preempts the administration of placebo. Data from 52 patients with confirmed psychogenic nonepileptic seizures were analyzed. While suggestive seizure induction using only placebo-based suggestion provoked a typical event in 13 of 20 patients (65%), the extended protocol was positive in 27 of 34 cases (84%); this improvement was not significant (p=0.11). Noninvasive suggestion techniques accounted for 78% of inductions, avoiding placebo administration in a majority of patients. Still, placebo remains an important part of suggestive seizure induction, responsible for 22% (6 out of 27) of successful inductions using our extended protocol. Our study demonstrates that the diversification of suggestive seizure induction is feasible and beneficial for both patients and diagnosticians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transethnic meta-analysis suggests genetic variation in the HEME pathway influences potassium response in patients treated with hydrochlorothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Aguila, J L; Cooper-DeHoff, R M; Chapman, A B; Gums, J G; Beitelshees, A L; Bailey, K; Turner, S T; Johnson, J A; Boerwinkle, E

    2015-04-01

    Hypokalemia is a recognized adverse effect of thiazide diuretic treatment. This phenomenon, which may impair insulin secretion, has been suggested to be a reason for the adverse effects on glucose metabolism associated with thiazide diuretic treatment of hypertension. However, the mechanisms underlying thiazide diuretic-induced hypokalemia are not well understood. In an effort to identify genes or genomic regions associated with potassium response to hydrochlorothiazide, without a priori knowledge of biologic effects, we performed a genome-wide association study and a multiethnic meta-analysis in 718 European- and African-American hypertensive participants from two different pharmacogenetic studies. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs10845697 (Bayes factor=5.560) on chromosome 12, near to the HEME binding protein 1 gene, and rs11135740 (Bayes factor=5.258) on chromosome 8, near to the Mitoferrin-1 gene, reached genome-wide association study significance (Bayes factor >5). These results, if replicated, suggest a novel mechanism involving effects of genes in the HEME pathway influencing hydrochlorothiazide-induced renal potassium loss.

  9. Molecular analysis of a leprosy immunotherapeutic bacillus provides insights into Mycobacterium evolution.

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    Niyaz Ahmed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evolutionary dynamics plays a central role in facilitating the mechanisms of species divergence among pathogenic and saprophytic mycobacteria. The ability of mycobacteria to colonize hosts, to proliferate and to cause diseases has evolved due to its predisposition to various evolutionary forces acting over a period of time. Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP, a taxonomically unknown 'generalist' mycobacterium, acts as an immunotherapeutic against leprosy and is approved for use as a vaccine against it. The large-scale field trials of this MIP based leprosy vaccine coupled with its demonstrated immunomodulatory and adjuvant property has led to human clinical evaluations of MIP in interventions against HIV-AIDS, psoriasis and bladder cancer. MIP, commercially available as 'Immuvac', is currently the focus of advanced phase III clinical trials for its antituberculosis efficacy. Thus a comprehensive analysis of MIP vis-à-vis evolutionary path, underpinning its immanent immunomodulating properties is of the highest desiderata. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genome wide comparisons together with molecular phylogenetic analyses by fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC based genotyping and candidate orthologues sequencing revealed that MIP has been the predecessor of highly pathogenic Mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex (MAIC that did not resort to parasitic adaptation by reductional gene evolution and therefore, preferred a free living life-style. Further analysis suggested a shared aquatic phase of MAIC bacilli with the early pathogenic forms of Mycobacterium, well before the latter diverged as 'specialists'. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This evolutionary paradigm possibly affirms to marshall our understanding about the acquisition and optimization of virulence in mycobacteria and determinants of boundaries therein.

  10. Quality of reporting and of methodology of studies on interventions for trophic ulcers in leprosy: A systematic review

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    Forsetlund L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the process of conducting a systematic review on interventions for skin lesions due to neuritis in leprosy, we assessed several primary papers with respect to the quality of reporting and methods used in the studies. Awareness of what constitutes weak points in previously conducted studies may be used to improve the planning, conducting and reporting of future clinical trials. Aims: To assess the quality of reporting and of methodology in studies of interventions for skin lesions due to neuritis in leprosy. Methods: Items of importance for preventing selection bias, detection bias, attrition bias and performance bias were among items assessed. The items for assessing methodological quality were used as a basis for making the checklist to assess the quality of reporting. Results: Out of the 854 references that we inspected eight studies were included on the basis of the inclusion criteria. The interventions tested were dressings, topical agents and footwear and in all studies healing of ulcers was the main outcome measure. Reporting of both, methods and results suffered from underreporting and disorganization. The most under-reported items were concealment of allocation, blinding of patients and outcome assessors, intention to treat and validation of outcomes. Conclusion: There is an apparent need to improve the methodological quality as well as the quality of reporting of trials in leprosy ulcer treatment. The most important threat in existing studies is the threat of selection bias. For the reporting of future studies, journals could promote and encourage the use of the CONSORT statement checklist by expecting and requiring that authors adhere to it in their reporting.

  11. Tamsulosin 0.4 mg once daily: effect on sexual function in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höfner, K.; Claes, H.; de Reijke, T. M.; Folkestad, B.; Speakman, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of tamsulosin, 0.4 mg once daily, on sexual function in comparison with placebo and alfuzosin, 2.5 mg three times daily, in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). Data from 830 patients randomized into three European

  12. Psychosocial consequences of leprosy and the related deformity in Bangladesh

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    Qazi Azad-uz-zaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the psychosocial condition and consequences of the people affected by leprosy and the related deformity in some selected areas of Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July to December 2015 among 92 leprosy-affected people. A pretested semi-structure questionnaire was used for collecting data by face to face interview from both the low prevalent areas of Khulna and the high prevalent area of Rangpur Division in Bangladesh. Results: Nearly two-fifth of respondents were observed having deformity. Among them, around four-fifth was from Khulna region, about half were above 50 years of age and more than half had monthly family income lower than 5 000 BDT. The development of deformity is found having highly significant association with region (P < 0.001, residence (P < 0.004, and family income (P < 0.004. Differences in consequences between ‘with deformity’ and ‘without deformity’ were found very high. About 65% of the respondents with deformity ‘think less’ of himself, and nearly 60% felt ashamed or embarrassed, 53% had to change job, and 47% was used to think having less respect in the society where the percentage was much lower in all cases to ‘without deformity’ group. Conclusions: Early diagnosis and start multidrug therapy at the earliest stages have chanced to reduce the leprosy-resulted deformity, disfigurement and disability. For those who already have had some nerve damages, health education is highly important to prevent further injury and hence psychosocial consequences.

  13. Factors preventing early case detection for women affected by leprosy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Victoria Grace

    Although leprosy can affect both sexes equally, it is globally reported that men are affected, or simply report, more often than females at the average ratio of 2:1. If cases are simply not being reported, women may be suffering in silence more often than men, and, therefore, understanding the social reasons for this in a number of countries could support the prevention of long-term disabilities caused as a result of leprosy. The objective of this review is to recognise the current academic literature surrounding the potential factors for late diagnosis of women affected by leprosy, giving possible explanations for the 2:1 gender disparity observed in case detection globally. It is hoped that health practitioners will become more equipped to recognise these barriers and ensure they are doing whatever possible to encourage women to report the early symptoms of leprosy. The review used a systematic search process in order to identify gender-related publications using robust research, useful for gleaning a cross-cultural perception of issues women may confront on the prospect of a diagnosis of leprosy. Identifying 12 publications from just five countries, the review found there to be four overarching areas which may be considered barriers more often faced by women: societal stigma; women's dependence and low status; self-stigmatising attitudes; and the gender insensitivity of leprosy services. Stigma surrounding leprosy experienced from these four overarching areas can all be attributed to the later diagnosis of women affected by leprosy, in relation to their male counterparts. The need for future research surrounding the specific experience of women affected by leprosy is pressing.

  14. Genetic association of COL5A1 variants in keratoconus patients suggests a complex connection between corneal thinning and keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Canedo, Ana Laura Caiado; Haritunians, Talin; Siscovick, David; Aldave, Anthony J; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Iyengar, Sudha K; Rotter, Jerome I; Taylor, Kent D; Rabinowitz, Yaron S

    2013-04-12

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located near or within the COL5A1 gene, at 9q34.2-q34.3 chromosomal region have been reported in association with central corneal thickness (CCT). Using family linkage analysis, we identified a keratoconus susceptibility locus at 9q34. These findings led us to perform an association study between COL5A1 variation and keratoconus susceptibility. A Caucasian case-control cohort of 222 keratoconus patients and 3324 controls was selected as the discovery panel. An independent case-control panel of 304 cases and 518 controls and a family panel of 186 subjects were replicated for genotyping and association. Forty-four SNPs (21 for discovery and 23 for fine-mapping) spanning 300 kilobases in and around COL5A1 were genotyped and tested for genetic association. Logistic regression models implemented in PLINK were used to test for association in case controls. Generalized estimating equation models accounting for familial correlations implemented in genome-wide interaction analyses with family data were used for association testing in families. Two CCT associated SNPs (rs1536482 and rs7044529 near and within COL5A1) were identified in the keratoconus discovery cohort (P values of 6.5 × 10(-3) and 7.4 × 10(-3)). SNP rs1536482 was replicated in the second case-control sample (P = 0.02), and SNP rs7044529 was replicated in a keratoconus family panel (P = 0.03). Meta P values of rs1536482 and rs7044529 in the keratoconus cohorts were 1.5 × 10(-4) (odds ratio [OR] = 1.30) and 2.9 × 10(-3) (OR = 1.39). After Bonferroni correction, the association of SNP rs1536482 remained significant (P = 6.5 × 10(-3)). SNPs in the COL5A1 region, which regulate normal variation in CCT, may play a role in the thinning associated with keratoconus.

  15. Leprosy and international adoption: a case report and review of diagnostic and treatment dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Katherine; Browning, John C; Metry, Denise W; Prestigiacomo, John; Scollard, David; Schutze, Gordon E; Stryjewska, Barbara; Schwarzwald, Heidi

    2009-04-01

    Hansen disease, commonly known as leprosy, is uncommon in the United States and poses difficult diagnostic and treatment challenges. A 10-year-old girl was adopted from Ethiopia with a history of "multibacillary leprosy" and "multidrug treatment" for 12 months. Three months after her arrival in the United States and 4 months after treatment was completed, she presented with new papules and plaques on her left nose and ear. Herein, we present her case and review current treatment options in leprosy in children and the management of immunologic reactions.

  16. PREVENTION OF DISABILITY IN MULTI DRUG TREATED LEPROSY AFFECTED PERSONS THROUGH HOMOEOPATHY IN TWO DISTRICTS OF CHHATTISGARH, INDIA – A PILOT STUDY

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    D. Chakraborty

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A project was undertaken and total 2785 leprosy patients of two districts namely Janjgir-Champa and Raigarh of a state of Chhattisgarh in India, who completed MDT but suffering from loss of sensation in their hand and feet and/or chronic ulcer were registered. Homeopathic medicines were applied and the effects were analyzed by different parameters and documented. Complete regain of sensation was recorded in 63.2% patients and 28.73% showed partial regain whereas no regain of sensation recorded in patients 8.04% and healing of ulcer was recorded in 69% of patients. Key words:

  17. Stigma and social participation in Southern India: differences and commonalities among persons affected by leprosy and persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevelink, S A M; van Brakel, W H; Augustine, V

    2011-12-01

    Stigma is a common phenomenon worldwide and infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS and leprosy are often associated with high levels of stigma. Several studies have been conducted concerning the effects of stigma and the impact on social participation, but comparative studies are rare. The objective of this study was to identify differences and similarities between HIV/AIDS and leprosy-related stigma. From April till July 2009, 190 questionnaire-based interviews were conducted to assess the levels of internalized stigma (Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale), perceived stigma (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue stigma scale) and social participation (Participation scale) in a cross-sectional sample of people affected by leprosy (PL) and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Respondents were selected from several hospitals, charity projects and during home visits in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu. Our results showed that both PLHA (n = 95) and leprosy-affected respondents (n = 95) faced a substantial burden of internalized and perceived stigma, with the former reporting a significantly higher level of stigma. As a result, PLHA faced more frequent and also more severe participation restrictions than PL. Especially, restrictions in work-related areas were reported by the majority of the respondents. In conclusion, PLHA faced a significantly higher level of stigma and participation restriction than PL. However, the latter also reported a substantial burden of stigma and participation restrictions. The study suggests that it may be possible to develop joint interventions based on the commonalities found. More research is needed to define these more precisely and to test the effectiveness of such joint interventions in reducing stigma and improving social participation.

  18. [Leprosy in indigenous populations of Amazonas State, Brazil: an epidemiological study in the counties of Autazes, Eirunepé and São Gabriel da Cachoeira (2000 to 2005)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbiriba, Elsia Belo; Basta, Paulo Cesar; Pereira, Emilia dos Santos; Levino, Antônio; Garnelo, Luiza

    2009-05-01

    In 2005, Amazonas State, Brazil, showed hyperendemic leprosy detection coefficients and prevalence with medium endemicity. Although this State has the largest indigenous population in Brazil, there are no data on the leprosy profile in these groups. This study aimed to describe and analyze the epidemiological characteristics of leprosy case reporting in the municipalities (counties) of Autazes, Eirunepé, and São Gabriel da Cachoeira, comparing indigenous and non-indigenous findings according to target variables. A total of 386 cases reported to SINAN from 2000 to 2005 were analyzed. Mean detection rates were 3.55, 14.94, and 2.13/10,000 (among non-indigenous) and 10.95, 1.93, and 0.78/10,000 (among indigenous peoples) in Autazes, Eirunepé, and São Gabriel da Cachoeira, respectively. Paucibacillary cases predominated among both indigenous and non-indigenous populations; however, dimorphous cases represented one-third of notifications. Despite coverage limitations and underreporting, the findings suggest that leprosy is a major public health problem for indigenous populations in Amazonas State. Classification according to race/ethnicity has been a useful tool for solving health inequalities.

  19. Space-time variability of citrus leprosis as strategic planning for crop management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Daniel J; Lorençon, José R; Siqueira, Diego S; Novelli, Valdenice M; Bassanezi, Renato B

    2018-01-31

    Citrus leprosis is the most important viral disease of citrus. Knowledge of its spatiotemporal structure is fundamental to a representative sampling plan focused on the disease control approach. Such a well-crafted sampling design helps to reduce pesticide use in agriculture to control pests and diseases. Despite the use of acaricides to control citrus leprosis vector (Brevipalpus spp.) populations, the disease has spread rapidly through experimental areas. Citrus leprosis has an aggregate spatial distribution, with high dependence among symptomatic plants. Temporal variation in disease incidence increased among symptomatic plants by 4% per month. Use of acaricides alone to control the vector of leprosis is insufficient to avoid its incidence in healthy plants. Preliminary investigation into the time and space variation in the incidence of the disease is fundamental to select a sampling plan and determine effective strategies for disease management. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Comparison and Contrast of the Elimination Campaigns for Poliomyelitis and Leprosy: Which is More Feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiro, Luís; Pinto, Sofia Correia; Sarmento, Antonio; Santos, Lurdes

    2016-04-01

    As we approach the third decade since the WHO started addressing the eradication of poliomyelitis and leprosy, a reflection of the previous campaigns efficacy and an evaluation of further elimination feasibility is important to adapt and intensify the next steps. We performed a critical review of the poliomyelitis and leprosy eradication campaigns to evaluate their technical and operational feasibilities. Vaccination and active case search are highly effective tools against poliomyelitis. If political stability and good vaccination coverage is achieved, poliomyelitis will be an easy target for eradication. Leprosy, on the other hand, faces many barriers towards elimination. The lack of a high efficacy vaccine, the long asymptomatic but infective period, the lack of screening tests and a poorly established elimination target, prevents this disease from being eliminated. In a world where resources and funding are limited, it is apparent that poliomyelitis is a more feasible target for elimination than leprosy.

  1. Déjà vu: leprosy and immigration discourse in the twenty-first century United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cassandra

    2010-03-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, continues to be feared and poorly understood in the United States, where knowledge of the disease is limited and prevalence is low. The presence of leprosy among immigrants, however, provides fuel for those with an anti-immigration agenda. In recent years, there have been several examples of popular media distortions of statistics and of information on leprosy's properties and contagiousness. As in previous eras of U.S. history, public fears about leprosy seem to be related to anti-immigration or nativist sentiment, which often mask underlying concerns about the potential economic threat of immigrant populations. In this article, I analyse the role of the U.S. media and other stakeholders who may have an interest in generating public fear associated with leprosy, in presenting and at times manipulating data about the disease to create an association between leprosy and undocumented immigration.

  2. Primary Cutaneous Histoplasmosis Masquerading as Lepromatous Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Jenna Blah; Rani, Poonam; Aggarwal, Radhika; Kaushal, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a genus of dimorphic fungi having various varieties of which the commonest one causing infection is Histoplasma capsulatum known to cause histoplasmosis. It has a varied disease spectrum ranging from an acute infection to chronic disease especially in lungs, disseminated disease and cutaneous disorder. Histoplasma capsulatum usually causes subclinical infection and serious infections only manifest in immunocompromised patients. Frank cases of infection are seen in pulmonary histoplasmosis. The spores of these organisms are seen to be strongly associated with droppings of birds and bats. A combination of these droppings and some soil types provide for an excellent environment for the proliferation of spores. Pulmonary histoplasmosis and disseminated disease are very common in AIDS patients and are a great cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Primary cutaneous histoplasmosis is very rare and occurs due to penetrating injuries. Once diagnosis is made, the lesions respond very well to oral itraconazole, fluconazole or amphotericicn B. We report a rare case of Cutaneous Histoplasmosis (CHP) in a 70-year-old male with complaints of multiple nodules all over his body in a HIV seronegative and otherwise immunocompetent patient.

  3. Psychiatric Morbidity among Subjects with Leprosy and Albinism in South East Nigeria: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attama, CM; Uwakwe, R; Onyeama, GM; Igwe, MN

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skin, which is the largest organ in the body, carries immense psychological significance. Disfiguring skin disorders may impact negatively on the mental health of individuals. Aim: This study compared the psychiatric morbidity of subjects with leprosy and albinism. Subjects and Methods: One hundred subjects with leprosy and 100 with albinism were interviewed. Sociodemographic questionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) assessed the sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric morbidity, respectively. GHQ positive cases and 10% of noncases for each group were interviewed with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory for specific ICD-10 diagnoses. Results: Fifty-five percent (55/100) subjects with leprosy were GHQ positive cases while 41% (41/100) with albinism were GHQ positive cases. The risk of developing psychiatric morbidity was significantly higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism (OR = 1.76, CI = 1.00 – 3.08, P = 0.04). The prevalence of specific psychiatric disorders among subjects with leprosy were depression 49% (49/100), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) 18% (18/100), alcohol/drug abuse 16% (16/100), whereas in albinism depression was 51% (51/100), GAD 27% (27/100), and alcohol/drug abuse 7% (7/100). Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy had significantly higher psychiatric morbidity than the male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism, respectively. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity was higher in subjects with leprosy than in subjects with albinism. Male, married and uneducated subjects with leprosy significantly had higher morbidity than male, married and uneducated subjects with albinism respectively. PMID:26097762

  4. Coexistence of lupus vulgaris with pure neuritic leprosy with incomplete claw hand

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    Angoori Gnaneshwar Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coexistence of two chronic granulomatous diseases in an individual is rare. Here, we present coexistence of lupus vulgaris (LV and pure neuritic leprosy with incomplete claw hand deformity in an 11-year-old immunocompetent girl, who presented with deformity and ulcer involving right upper limb. Characteristic clinical features and histopathology of biopsy from the ulcer assisted in establishing the diagnosis of LV and leprosy.

  5. Disability in people affected by leprosy: the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    van Brakel, Wim H.; Sihombing, Benyamin; Djarir, Hernani; Beise, Kerstin; Kusumawardhani, Laksmi; Yulihane, Rita; Kurniasari, Indra; Kasim, Muhammad; Kesumaningsih, Kadek I.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    Background: Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. We assessed the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment. Methods: We conducted a survey on disability among persons affecte...

  6. The impact of a primary care e-communication intervention on the participation of chronic disease patients who had not reached guideline suggested treatment goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Richard, Claude; Glaser, Emma; Roberge, Denis

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of two web-based educational approaches on doctor-patient communication. The study focused on chronic disease (CD) patients in a lengthy relationship with their family physician (FP) who had not reached guideline suggested treatment goals (off-target) for their CDs. 322 hypertensive, diabetic, or dyslipidemic patients of 18 FPs were randomised into three groups: Usual Care (UC), e-Learning (e-L) and e-Learning+Workshop (e-L+W). Interventions were based on Cegala's PACE system: Prepare, Ask questions, Check understanding, Express concerns. Communication was evaluated using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS), MEDICODE and questionnaires. Encounter length was similar across groups. RIAS showed that e-L+W group engaged in more socio-emotional talk and PACE-like utterances. MEDICODE showed that interventions increased frequency, initiative and dialogue for selected CD medication themes. Quality of communication was perceived as satisfactory at baseline and did not change. Following interventions, CD patients were more activated even in well-established doctor-patient relationships. PACE web-based interventions are accessible and effective at increasing CD patients' participation. They increase legitimacy to express the patient experience. FPs should present this type of training to CD patients as an integral part of their routine practice and consider referring patients to complete it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Analysis of the geographical distribution of cases of leprosy. Rio de Janeiro, 2001-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracie, Renata; Peixoto, Julia Novaes de Barros; Soares, Fabiane Bertoni Dos Reis; Hacker, Mariana de Andrea Vilas-Boas

    2017-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the geographical distribution of leprosy is related to different socioeconomic factors. This article aims to study the geographical distribution of leprosy in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The cases of leprosy reported in the 2001-2012 period were mapped according to municipality. Epidemiological and socioeconomic indicators were calculated. The ArcMap program was used for the construction of maps and Earth View to calculate the Bayesian rate. It was observed that leprosy is presented in hyper-endemic levels especially in the metropolitan area. However, there is also a reduction of the detection rate in the most recent study period. In municipalities in the metropolitan region and the north western region detection in children under 15 is high, indicating an active transmission situation. In municipalities in the south-central region and especially in the coastal region, there was a high proportion of cases diagnosed with level II disability, reflecting late diagnosis. There was no linear correlation between socioeconomic indicators and leprosy rate. These results contribute to the analysis of the geographical distribution of leprosy, important for the identification of areas for resource allocation, aiming to control and eliminate the disease.

  8. Human migration, railways and the geographic distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte State – Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Mauricio Lisboa; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Nobre, Paulo José Lisboa; De Souza, Márcia Célia Freitas; Dűppre, Nádia Cristina; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Jerŏnimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Leprosy is a public health problem in Brazil where 31,044 new cases were detected in 2013. Rio Grande do Norte is a small Brazilian state with a rate of leprosy lower than other areas in the same region, for unknown reasons. Objectives We present here a review based on the analysis of a database of registered leprosy cases in Rio Grande do Norte state, comparing leprosy's geographic distribution among municipalities with local socio-economic and public health indicators and with historical documents about human migration in this Brazilian region. Results The current distribution of leprosy in Rio Grande do Norte did not show correlation with socio-economic or public health indicators at the municipal level, but it appears related to economically emerging municipalities 100 years ago, with spread facilitated by railroads and train stations. Drought-related migratory movements which occurred from this state to leprosy endemic areas within the same period may be involved in the introduction of leprosy and with its present distribution within Rio Grande do Norte. Conclusions Leprosy may disseminate slowly, over many decades in certain circumstances, such as in small cities with few cases. This is a very unusual situation currently and a unique opportunity for epidemiologic studies of leprosy as an emerging disease. PMID:26964429

  9. Re-evaluation of bone pain in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease suggests that bone crises occur in small bones as well as long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Weisz Hubshman, Monika; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kornreich, Liora; Shkalim Zemer, Vered; Cohen, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Bone crises in type 1 Gaucher disease are reported in long bones and occasionally in weight bearing bones and other bones, but rarely in small bones of the hands and feet. We retrospectively examined the incidence of bone pain in patients followed at the Rabin Medical Center, Israel, before and following the initiation of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and evaluated them for bone crises. Of 100 type I Gaucher disease patients, 30 (30%) experienced one or more bone crises. Small bone crises represented 31.5% of all bone crises and were always preceded by crises in other bones. While the incidence of long bone crises reduced after the initiation of ERT, small bone crises increased. Almost 60% of patients with bone crises were of the N370S/84GG genotype suggesting a greater susceptibility of N370S/84GG patients to severe bone complications. These patients also underwent the greatest number of splenectomies (70.6% of splenectomised patients). Splenectomised patients showed a trend towards increased long and small bone crises after surgery. Active investigation of acute pain in the hands and feet in patients in our cohort has revealed a high incidence of small bone crises. Physicians should consider imaging studies to investigate unexplained pain in these areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-Percentage Pathological Findings in Obese Patients Suggest that Esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy Should Be Made Mandatory Prior to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Mizelle; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Kantharia, Nimisha S; Lakdawala, Muffazal

    2018-04-21

    ᅟ: Obesity is a global epidemic and will soon become the number one priority in healthcare management. Bariatric surgery causes a significant improvement in obesity and its related complications. Pre-operative esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) is done by several bariatric surgical teams across the world but is still not mandatory. To study the percentage of symptomatic and asymptomatic pathological EGD findings in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery and to analyze whether these findings influence the eventual choice of bariatric surgery. All patients posted for bariatric surgery at our institute from January 2015 to March 2017 had a pre-operative EGD done by the same team of endoscopists. In this study, totally, 675 patients were assessed prior to routine bariatric surgery. 78.52% of all pre-operative patients had an abnormal EGD. The most common endoscopic abnormalities found were hiatus hernia (52.44%), gastritis (46.22%), presence of Helicobacter (H.) pylori (46.67%), reflux esophagitis (16.89%), Barrett's esophagus (1.78%), gastric erosions (13.19%), and polyps (7.41%). Fifty patients had upper gastrointestinal polyps: 41 in the stomach, 3 in the esophagus, and 6 in the duodenum, mostly benign hyperplastic or inflammatory polyps. Two patients had gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 6 leiomyoma, and 6 neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Of those with endoscopic evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 70 (60.03%) of patients were asymptomatic. The pre-operative EGD findings resulted in a change of the planned surgical procedure in 67 (9.93%) patients. Our study suggests that a large percentage of patients undergoing bariatric surgery have pathologically significant endoscopic findings of which a significant number are asymptomatic; this can lead to a change in the planned bariatric procedure in a section of patients; hence, we believe that EGD should be made mandatory as a pre-operative investigation in all bariatric surgery patients.

  11. HOMA, BMI, and Serum Leptin Levels Variations during Antiviral Treatment Suggest Virus-Related Insulin Resistance in Noncirrhotic, Nonobese, and Nondiabetic Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Alessandro; Malfatti, Federica; Andraghetti, Gabriella; Marenco, Simona; Mazzucchelli, Chiara; Labanca, Sara; Cordera, Renzo; Testa, Roberto; Picciotto, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and viral load decay in nondiabetic and noncirrhotic genotype 1 chronic HCV patients during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment and the possible influence of BMI and leptin as metabolic confounders. Methods. 75 consecutive noncirrhotic, nonobese, and nondiabetic patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C treated with peginterferon alpha 2a plus ribavirin were evaluated. HOMA-IR, serum leptin, and BMI were measured in all patients at baseline and at weeks 12 and 48, whereas viral load was measured at the same time points and then 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. HOMA-IR was significantly associated with both BMI and leptin at baseline. During peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment, there was a significant reduction of HOMA-IR at weeks 12 and 48 from baseline (P = 0.033 and 0.048, resp.) in patients who achieved an early viral load decay (EVR), a trend not observed in patients who not achieved EVR. No variations during treatment were observed regarding BMI and leptin irrespective of EVR. Conclusion. The early reduction of HOMA-IR but not of BMI and leptin during antiviral treatment in noncirrhotic, chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 patients who achieved EVR suggests a viral genesis of insulin resistance in patients with nonmetabolic phenotype.

  12. HOMA, BMI, and Serum Leptin Levels Variations during Antiviral Treatment Suggest Virus-Related Insulin Resistance in Noncirrhotic, Nonobese, and Nondiabetic Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype 1 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between insulin resistance and viral load decay in nondiabetic and noncirrhotic genotype 1 chronic HCV patients during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment and the possible influence of BMI and leptin as metabolic confounders. Methods. 75 consecutive noncirrhotic, nonobese, and nondiabetic patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C treated with peginterferon alpha 2a plus ribavirin were evaluated. HOMA-IR, serum leptin, and BMI were measured in all patients at baseline and at weeks 12 and 48, whereas viral load was measured at the same time points and then 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. HOMA-IR was significantly associated with both BMI and leptin at baseline. During peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment, there was a significant reduction of HOMA-IR at weeks 12 and 48 from baseline (P=0.033 and 0.048, resp. in patients who achieved an early viral load decay (EVR, a trend not observed in patients who not achieved EVR. No variations during treatment were observed regarding BMI and leptin irrespective of EVR. Conclusion. The early reduction of HOMA-IR but not of BMI and leptin during antiviral treatment in noncirrhotic, chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 patients who achieved EVR suggests a viral genesis of insulin resistance in patients with nonmetabolic phenotype.

  13. The role of ERBB2 gene polymorphisms in leprosy susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Leão Rêgo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium leprae infects skin and peripheral nerves causing deformities and disability. The M. leprae bacterium binds to ErbB2 on the Schwann cell surface causing demyelination and favoring spread of the bacilli and causing nerve injury. Polymorphisms at the ERBB2 gene were previously investigated as genetic risk factors for leprosy in two Brazilian populations but with inconsistent results. Herein we extend the analysis of ERBB2 variants to a third geographically distinct population in Brazil. Our results show that there is no association between the genotyped SNPs and the disease (p > 0.05 in this population. A gene set or pathway analysis under the genomic region of ERBB2 will be necessary to clarify its regulation under M. leprae stimulus.

  14. Prevention and management guidelines to oral health care for patients with head and neck cancer: HCT20, Carisolv and Chlorhexidine varnish are suggested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Guerra, Eliete Neves da; Melo, N.S. de

    2004-01-01

    Orofacial complications are unfortunately common with all modalities used in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. It is well known that hypo salivation develops if radiation therapy involves the salivary glands. A significant decrease in salivary volume can adversely affect oral comfort, mucous health, dentition, deglutition and mastication. Xerostomia may lead to consumption of diet high in carbohydrates and make good oral hygiene difficult. The purpose of this study is to report a new prevention and management guidelines to oral and dental health care for patients with head and neck cancer who will treat with radiotherapy. New materials as HCT20, Carisolv and chlorhexidine varnish are suggested. (author)

  15. Interruption and defaulting of multidrug therapy against leprosy: population-based study in Brazil's Savannah Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg Heukelbach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low adherence to multidrug therapy against leprosy (MDT is still an important obstacle of disease control, and may lead to remaining sources of infection, incomplete cure, irreversible complications, and multidrug resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We performed a population-based study in 78 municipalities in Tocantins State, central Brazil, and applied structured questionnaires on leprosy-affected individuals. We used two outcomes for assessment of risk factors: defaulting (not presenting to health care center for supervised treatment for >12 months; and interruption of MDT. In total, 28/936 (3.0% patients defaulted, and 147/806 (18.2% interrupted MDT. Defaulting was significantly associated with: low number of rooms per household (OR = 3.43; 0.98-9.69; p = 0.03; moving to another residence after diagnosis (OR = 2.90; 0.95-5.28; p = 0.04; and low family income (OR = 2.42; 1.02-5.63: p = 0.04. Interruption of treatment was associated with: low number of rooms per household (OR = 1.95; 0.98-3.70; p = 0.04; difficulty in swallowing MDT drugs (OR = 1.66; 1.03-2.63; p = 0.02; temporal non-availability of MDT at the health center (OR = 1.67; 1.11-2.46; p = 0.01; and moving to another residence (OR = 1.58; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-2.40; p = 0.03. Logistic regression identified temporal non-availability of MDT as an independent risk factor for treatment interruption (adjusted OR = 1.56; 1.05-2.33; p = 0.03, and residence size as a protective factor (adjusted OR = 0.89 per additional number of rooms; 0.80-0.99; p = 0.03. Residence size was also independently associated with defaulting (adjusted OR = 0.67; 0.52-0.88; p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: Defaulting and interruption of MDT are associated with some poverty-related variables such as family income, household size, and migration. Intermittent problems of drug supply need to be resolved, mainly on the municipality level. MDT producers should consider oral drug formulations that may

  16. Interferon-beta treatment associated with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. A case report of a patient treated for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Frystyk, Jan; Miller, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 34-year-old female treated with IFN-beta for 8 years with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. The patient presented with elevated serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insufficient suppression of growth hormone (GH) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT...... IGF-I. In conclusion, IFN-beta treatment mimicked acromegaly biochemically. The changes were partially reversible...

  17. Interferon-β treatment associated with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. A case report of a patient treated for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Frystyk, Jan; Miller, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 34-year-old female treated with IFN-β for 8 years with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. The patient presented with elevated serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insufficient suppression of growth hormone (GH) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT......-I. In conclusion, IFN-β treatment mimicked acromegaly biochemically. The changes were partially reversible....

  18. Interferon-β treatment associated with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. A case report of a patient treated for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Frystyk, Jan; Miller, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 34-year-old female treated with IFN-ß for 8 years with a biochemical profile suggestive of acromegaly. The patient presented with elevated serum insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insufficient suppression of growth hormone (GH) during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT......-I. In conclusion, IFN-ß treatment mimicked acromegaly biochemically. The changes were partially reversible....

  19. Introducing leprosy post-exposure prophylaxis into the health systems of India, Nepal and Indonesia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, A; Mieras, L; Dhakal, K; Arif, M; Dandel, S; Richardus, J H

    2017-09-29

    Leprosy has a wide range of clinical and socio-economic consequences. India, Indonesia and Nepal contribute significantly to the global leprosy burden. After integration, the health systems are pivotal in leprosy service delivery. The Leprosy Post Exposure Prophylaxis (LPEP) program is ongoing to investigate the feasibility of providing single dose rifampicin (SDR) as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to the contacts of leprosy cases in various health systems. We aim to compare national leprosy control programs, and adapted LPEP strategies in India, Nepal and Indonesia. The purpose is to establish a baseline of the health system's situation and document the subsequent adjustment of LPEP, which will provide the context for interpreting the LPEP results in future. The study followed the multiple-case study design with single units of analysis. The data collection methods were direct observation, in-depth interviews and desk review. The study was divided into two phases, i.e. review of national leprosy programs and description of the LPEP program. The comparative analysis was performed using the WHO health system frameworks (2007). In all countries leprosy services including contact tracing is integrated into the health systems. The LPEP program is fully integrated into the established national leprosy programs, with SDR and increased documentation, which need major additions to standard procedures. PEP administration was widely perceived as well manageable, but the additional LPEP data collection was reported to increase workload in the first year. The findings of our study led to the recommendation that field-based leprosy research programs should keep health systems in focus. The national leprosy programs are diverse in terms of organizational hierarchy, human resource quantity and capacity. We conclude that PEP can be integrated into different health systems without major structural and personal changes, but provisions are necessary for the additional monitoring

  20. Comparison of urodynamics between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients; can we suggest the category of urinary dysfunction in patients with cerebrovascular accident according to type of stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Sun-Ju; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Yoo, Koo Han

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the urodynamic parameters in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients with bladder dysfunction. We retrospectively reviewed medical records such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and urodynamic study and identified 84 cases among 150 stroke patients underwent urodynamic test due to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) from June 2003 to May 2008. Exclusion criteria are diabetes mellitus (DM) cystopathy, previous pelvic surgery, spinal cord injury, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), and other neurologic etiology. Among analyzed variables of urodynamic study, total bladder capacity, postvoid residual urine volume and bladder compliance have a significant value between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke group (P = 0.004, P = 0.017, P = 0.007). Ischemic group have detrusor overactivity (DO) (70.7%), detrusor underactivity (DU) (29.3%), and hemorrhagic group have DO (34.6%), DU (65.4%). (P = 0.003). Evaluation of the stroke type may be helpful in the determination of the type of urinary dysfunction and in deciding the appropriate bladder management. The urodynamic study, however, is essential to manage LUTS in stroke patients. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Therapeutic effect of Mercurius solubilis on immune status of a borderline leprosy case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruba Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Borderline Lepromatous (BL leprosy case was treated with Mercurius solubilis, a homoeopathic medicine for two years. The clinical, immunological and histological assessment of the patient before and after treatment was recorded. The patient showed appreciable improvement in clinical signs and symptoms. Lesions on the skin almost disappeared; no swelling of hand and feet was noted along with disappearance of infiltration on eye brows. Nodular lesions on both the ear lobes diminished remarkably. Regain of sensation to touch, pain and pressure were noted and their test responses were normal. Slit skin smears were negative from all sites with 0 Bacteriological Index [BI] which was positive for acid fast bacilli [AFB] with an average of 4+ BI before treatment. Histologic study revealed absence of granuloma in dermis except the presence of occasional clusters of lymphocytes. Lepromin reaction which was negative before treatment was positive with 14 mm after 2 years of treatment. Estimation of different cytokines after completion of treatment showed appreciable changes with remarkable reduction in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IFN and TNF.

  2. The cultural validation of two scales to assess social stigma in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ruth M H; Dadun; Van Brakel, Wim H; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Damayanti, Rita; Bunders, Joske F G; Irwanto

    2014-01-01

    Stigma plays in an important role in the lives of persons affected by neglected tropical diseases, and assessment of stigma is important to document this. The aim of this study is to test the cross-cultural validity of the Community Stigma Scale (EMIC-CSS) and the Social Distance Scale (SDS) in the field of leprosy in Cirebon District, Indonesia. Cultural equivalence was tested by assessing the conceptual, item, semantic, operational and measurement equivalence of these instruments. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted to increase our understanding of the concept of stigma in Cirebon District. A process of translation, discussions, trainings and a pilot study followed. A sample of 259 community members was selected through convenience sampling and 67 repeated measures were obtained to assess the psychometric measurement properties. The aspects and items in the SDS and EMIC-CSS seem equally relevant and important in the target culture. The response scales were adapted to ensure that meaning is transferred accurately and no changes to the scale format (e.g. lay out, statements or questions) of both scales were made. A positive correlation was found between the EMIC-CSS and the SDS total scores (r=0.41). Cronbach's alphas of 0.83 and 0.87 were found for the EMIC-CSS and SDS. The exploratory factor analysis indicated for both scales an adequate fit as unidimensional scale. A standard error of measurement of 2.38 was found in the EMIC-CSS and of 1.78 in the SDS. The test-retest reliability coefficient was respectively, 0.84 and 0.75. No floor or ceiling effects were found. According to current international standards, our findings indicate that the EMIC-CSS and the SDS have adequate cultural validity to assess social stigma in leprosy in the Bahasa Indonesia-speaking population of Cirebon District. We believe the scales can be further improved, for instance, by adding, changing and rephrasing certain items. Finally, we provide suggestions for use with other

  3. The Cultural Validation of Two Scales to Assess Social Stigma in Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ruth M. H.; Dadun; Van Brakel, Wim H.; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B. M.; Damayanti, Rita; Bunders, Joske F. G.; Irwanto

    2014-01-01

    Background Stigma plays in an important role in the lives of persons affected by neglected tropical diseases, and assessment of stigma is important to document this. The aim of this study is to test the cross-cultural validity of the Community Stigma Scale (EMIC-CSS) and the Social Distance Scale (SDS) in the field of leprosy in Cirebon District, Indonesia. Methodology/principle findings Cultural equivalence was tested by assessing the conceptual, item, semantic, operational and measurement equivalence of these instruments. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted to increase our understanding of the concept of stigma in Cirebon District. A process of translation, discussions, trainings and a pilot study followed. A sample of 259 community members was selected through convenience sampling and 67 repeated measures were obtained to assess the psychometric measurement properties. The aspects and items in the SDS and EMIC-CSS seem equally relevant and important in the target culture. The response scales were adapted to ensure that meaning is transferred accurately and no changes to the scale format (e.g. lay out, statements or questions) of both scales were made. A positive correlation was found between the EMIC-CSS and the SDS total scores (r = 0.41). Cronbach's alphas of 0.83 and 0.87 were found for the EMIC-CSS and SDS. The exploratory factor analysis indicated for both scales an adequate fit as unidimensional scale. A standard error of measurement of 2.38 was found in the EMIC-CSS and of 1.78 in the SDS. The test-retest reliability coefficient was respectively, 0.84 and 0.75. No floor or ceiling effects were found. Conclusions/significance According to current international standards, our findings indicate that the EMIC-CSS and the SDS have adequate cultural validity to assess social stigma in leprosy in the Bahasa Indonesia-speaking population of Cirebon District. We believe the scales can be further improved, for instance, by adding, changing and

  4. The use of performance improvement methods to enhance emergency department patient satisfaction in the United States: a critical review of the literature and suggestions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; Cruz, Brian L; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2006-07-01

    The authors reviewed the evidence on performance improvement methods for increasing emergency department (ED) patient satisfaction to provide evidence-based suggestions for clinical practice. Data sources consisted of searches through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, Cochrane Library, and Emergency Medicine Abstracts and a manual search of references. Articles were included if they reported a performance improvement intervention targeting patient satisfaction in the ED setting. Articles on studies not conducted in the United States or that failed to provide enough details to allow critical evaluation of the study were excluded. Two authors used structured evaluation criteria to independently review each retained study. Nineteen articles met all selection criteria. Three studies found varying levels of support for multicomponent interventions, predominantly focused on implementation of clinical practice guidelines for specific presenting complaints and process redesign. Sixteen studies evaluated single-component interventions, with the following having at least one supportive study: using alternating patient assignment to provider teams rather than "zone"-based assignment, enhancing provider communication and customer service skills, incorporating information delivery interventions (e.g., pamphlets, video) that target patient expectations, using preformatted charts, and establishing ED-based observation units for specific conditions such as asthma and chest pain. There is modest evidence supporting a range of performance improvement interventions for improving ED patient satisfaction. Further work is needed before specific, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding which process changes are most effective. Recommendations are made for improving the quality of performance improvement efforts in the ED setting.

  5. Prognostic value of high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Harzheim, Michael; Schmidt, Stephan; Lutterbey, Goetz G.; Schild, Hans H.; Traeber, Frank; Bogdanow, Manuela

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of metabolic alterations in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of patients presenting with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) with special regard to the prediction of conversion to definite MS. Using a 3T whole-body MR system, a multisequence conventional MRI protocol and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (PRESS, repetition time 2000 ms, echo times 38 ms and 140 ms) of the parietal NAWM were performed in 25 patients presenting with CIS at baseline and in 20 controls. Absolute concentrations of N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA), myo-inositol (Ins), choline (Cho) and creatine (tCr) as well as metabolite ratios were determined. Follow-up including neurological assessment and conventional MRI was performed 3-4 and 6-7 months after the initial event. Nine patients converted to definite MS during the follow-up period. Compared to controls, those patients who converted to MS also showed significantly lower tNAA concentrations in the NAWM (-13.4%, P = 0.002) whereas nonconverters (-6.5%, P = 0.052) did not. The Ins concentration was 20.2% higher in the converter group and 1.9% higher in the nonconverter group, but these differences did not reach significance. No significant differences could be observed for tCr and Cho in either patient group. Axonal damage at baseline in patients presenting with CIS was more prominent in those who subsequently converted to definite MS in the short term follow-up, indicating that tNAA might be a sufficient prognostic marker for patients with a higher risk of conversion to early definite MS. (orig.)

  6. Integration of leprosy in general health system vis-à-vis leprosy endemicity, health situation and socioeconomic development: observations from Chhattisgarh & Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Aparna; Rathod, Harish

    2010-06-01

    This study looked at the integration of leprosy services in the GHS in context of health and socioeconomic situations using predefined indicators. It also looked at clients' perception of MDT services. The Indian states of Chhattisgarh and Kerala, which are at two extremes in leprosy endemicity, health situation and socioeconomic development, have been compared using predefined integration indicators related to the training of health workers, availability of MDT services, maintenance of MDT stock and involvement of Sub-centres in leprosy care. Data was collected by surveys of health facilities, sub-centres and communities in the two states, during 2006-2007. Information was collected by interviewing health personnel and clients, checking of records and on the spot observations using specifically designed formats. Results showed that integration is more inclusive in Chhattisgarh and has reached up to Sub-centre level. Both the community and health systems are sensitive and responsive to leprosy as it is perceived to be a major public health threat. But in Kerala, despite integration, it continues as a vertical programme with dependence on specialists and districts hospitals for diagnosis and treatment. MDT stock management is even poorer. Clients' perception towards MDT services are similar in both states.

  7. Factors Associated with Migration in Individuals Affected by Leprosy, Maranhão, Brazil: An Exploratory Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Murto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, leprosy is endemic and concentrated in high-risk clusters. Internal migration is common in the country and may influence leprosy transmission and hamper control efforts. We performed a cross-sectional study with two separate analyses evaluating factors associated with migration in Brazil’s Northeast: one among individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy and the other among a clinically unapparent population with no symptoms of leprosy for comparison. We included 394 individuals newly diagnosed with leprosy and 391 from the clinically unapparent population. Of those with leprosy, 258 (65.5% were birth migrants, 105 (26.6% were past five-year migrants, and 43 (10.9% were circular migrants. In multivariate logistic regression, three independent factors were found to be significantly associated with migration among those with leprosy: (1 alcohol consumption, (2 separation from family/friends, and (3 difficulty reaching the healthcare facility. Separation from family/friends was also associated with migration in the clinically unapparent population. The health sector may consider adapting services to meet the needs of migrating populations. Future research is needed to explore risks associated with leprosy susceptibility from life stressors, such as separation from family and friends, access to healthcare facilities, and alcohol consumption to establish causal relationships.

  8. Caregivers’ views on stigmatization and discrimination of people affected by leprosy in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dako–Gyeke, Mavis; Oduro, Razak

    2018-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a condition that has long been associated with stigma and discrimination, even when infected persons have been cured. This paper describes stigma and discrimination as viewed by caregivers who are associated with people affected by leprosy in Ghana. Methods A qualitative interview with semi-structured interviews were conducted for twenty caregivers. Results Findings indicated that caregivers were of the view that people affected by leprosy in Ghana are stigmatized and discriminated against by the larger society thus making their movements and interactions restricted to the Leprosarium. Besides, employments opportunities are unavailable to them thus making them exposed to financial challenges. The livelihood Empowerment Against poverty (LEAP) money given them is not sufficient for their daily upkeep. Conclusion People affected by leprosy in Ghana are stigmatized and therefore find it difficult to interact freely with the public. The associated physical deformities with the disease also tend to impede their ability to relate to the general public. The LEAP cash given to people affected by leprosy is helpful however, it could be enhanced to keep pace with prevailing economic conditions in the country. PMID:29377890

  9. Lessons from the evolution of a CBR programme for people affected by leprosy in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenso, Bassey; Idah, Michael; Anyor, Terver; Opakunmi, Femi

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the 13-year evolution of the social economic activities in Northern Nigeria from a welfare-oriented to a community-centred programme for people affected by leprosy. The review relied on the analysis of policy and strategy documents, programme guidelines and statistical and evaluation reports. Findings revealed that the transformation among other things, demanded formulation of new programme policies and guidelines; and staff training in CBR principles and practice. Findings also showed that adopting CBR principles and community development projects can stimulate improvements in living conditions, self-esteem and acceptance of people affected by leprosy into the community. Regardless of becoming a more inclusive and participatory programme wherein people affected by leprosy contribute to programme implementation and evaluation; groups affected by leprosy remain economically dependent on the programme and partnership mobilisation is weak. This explains why the priorities for sustaining the processes and impacts generated through CBR in northern Nigeria include: i) empowering groups to access mainline services; ii) working through partners to implement CBR and attract extra funding/ownership of interventions, and iii) promoting human rights of people affected by leprosy and working for a barrier free environment. In the absence of an agreeable understanding and method of assessing sustainability in CBR, we recommend the field-testing of a proposal for evaluating sustainability, to determine its utility in different contexts. Such field-tests have the potential of influencing policy and practice in the future.

  10. Leprosy in England and Wales 1953-2012: surveillance and challenges in low incidence countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Nicholas; Anderson, Laura F; Watson, John M; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2016-05-03

    To review all notified cases of leprosy in England and Wales between 1953 and 2012. National surveillance study of all reported cases. England and Wales. Number and characteristics of reported cases. During this period, a total of 1449 leprosy cases were notified. The incidence fell from 356 new cases notified between 1953 and 1962 to 139 new cases between 2003 and 2012. Where data were available, leprosy was more common in men, 15-45 year olds and those from the Indian subcontinent. There was considerable undernotification in 2001-2012. The high level of under-reporting indicates a need for improved surveillance in the UK. Public Health England, in collaboration with the UK Panel of Leprosy opinion, has revised the UK Memorandum on Leprosy in order to provide updated guidance on diagnostic procedures, treatment, case management, contact tracing and notification. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. History and Diversity of Citrus leprosis virus Recorded in Herbarium Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, John S; Roy, Avijit; Fu, Shimin; Shao, Jonathan; Schneider, William L; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-09-01

    Leprosis refers to two diseases of citrus that present similar necrotic local lesions, often surrounded by chlorotic haloes on citrus. Two distinct viruses are associated with this disease, one that produces particles primarily in the nucleus of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus nuclear type [CiLV-N]; Dichorhavirus) and another type that produces particles in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells (Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type [CiLV-C]; Cilevirus). Both forms are transmitted by Brevipalpid mites and have bipartite, single-stranded, RNA genomes. CiLV-C and CiLV-N are present in South and Central America and as far north as parts of Mexico. Although leprosis disease was originally described from Florida, it disappeared from there in the 1960s. The United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service maintains preserved citrus specimens identified at inspection stations 50 or more years ago with symptoms of citrus leprosis. We isolated RNA from these samples and performed degradome sequencing. We obtained nearly full-length genome sequences of both a typical CiLV-C isolate intercepted from Argentina in 1967 and a distinct CiLV-N isolate obtained in Florida in 1948. The latter is a novel form of CiLV-N, not known to exist anywhere in the world today. We have also documented the previously unreported presence of CiLV-N in Mexico in the mid-20th century.

  12. Combination of intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index is useful to predict bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahisa; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2016-11-01

    To examine which parameters obtained from transrectal ultrasonography are accurate predictors of urodynamically-confirmed bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The records of 350 patients with complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia were reviewed. Baseline parameters were international prostate symptom score, quality of life score, postvoid residual urine volume, prostate-specific antigen, and data obtained from uroflowmetry and transrectal ultrasonography. Urodynamic studies were carried out to determine bladder outlet obstruction. Receiver operator characteristic curves were generated to compare the accuracy of the different parameters, and the area under the curve of each parameter was calculated. Bladder outlet obstruction index positively correlated with intravesical prostatic protrusion, total prostate volume, transition zone volume, transition zone index, resistive index and prostate-specific antigen. Further, resistive index was only a significant independent variable with intravesical prostatic protrusion. Intravesical prostatic protrusion had the highest area under the curve of 0.790 among all variables, and its cut-off value was 10 mm. The positive predictive value of intravesical prostatic protrusion was 76.2%. In addition, the positive predictive value of the combined parameters intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index increased to 83.8%. Intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index are useful parameters for predicting bladder outlet obstruction in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In clinical practice, the combination of intravesical prostatic protrusion and resistive index on ultrasound can be diagnostic of bladder outlet obstruction. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. The Influence of Coping-oriented Hypnotic Suggestions on Chronic Pain in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lone; Kjøgx, Heidi; Kasch, Helge

    Background and aims: Coping-oriented hypnotic suggestions aimed at reducing pain catastrophizing have been shown to reduce pain in people with chronic tension-type headache and experimental pain in healthy volunteers during hypnosis (Kjøgx et al., 2016). However, the effect on pain post-hypnosis...... is unknown. The aim is to investigate the effect of coping-oriented hypnotic suggestions on chronic pain post-hypnosis. Methods: Seventy-five SCI-patients with chronic pain (>3, NRS 0-10) are randomized into one of three conditions; 1) coping-oriented hypnosis plus current treatment, 2) neutral hypnosis plus...... Strategies Questionnaire), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Patients’ global impression of change and side effects of the hypnosis are also assessed for 14 days post-intervention. Results: Preliminary results will be presented...

  14. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  15. A novel FKRP-related muscular dystrophy founder mutation in South African Afrikaner patients with a phenotype suggestive of a dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Mudau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP muscular dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the FKRP gene. The condition is often misdiagnosed as a dystrophinopathy. A previously unreported mutation, c.1100T>C in exon 4 of FKRP, had been identified in homozygous form in two white South African (SA Afrikaner patients clinically diagnosed with a dystrophinopathy. Objectives. To investigate whether the c.1100T>C mutation and the common European FKRP mutation c.826C>A are present in other patients of Afrikaner origin with suspected dystrophinopathy, and whether a founder haplotype exists. Methods. The c.1100T>C mutation was initially tested for using an amplification refractory mutation system technique in 45 white SA Afrikaner patients who had tested negative using multiplex ligation probe amplification screening for exonic deletions/duplications in the dystrophin gene. Sequencing analysis was used to confirm the c.1100T>C mutation and screen for the c.826C>A mutation. Two cohorts (each numbering 100 of Afrikaans and other white controls were screened for the c.1100T>C and c.826C>A mutations, respectively. Results. Of the 45 patients, 8 patients (17.8% were homozygous for c.1100T>C, 2 (4.4% were compound heterozygotes for c.1100T>C and c.826C>A, and 1 (2.2% was heterozygous for c.1100T>C with a second unidentified mutation. The c.1100T>C mutation was found in 1/100 controls, but no heterozygotes for the c.826C>A mutation were identified. Linked marker analysis for c.1100T>C showed a common haplotype, suggesting a probable founder mutation in the SA Afrikaner population. Conclusion. FKRP mutations may be relatively common in Afrikaners, and screening should be considered in patients who have a suggestive phenotype and test negative for a dystrophinopathy. This test will be useful for offering diagnostic, carrier and prenatal testing for affected individuals and their families. As FKRP muscular dystrophy is autosomal

  16. Effect of the Brazilian conditional cash transfer and primary health care programs on the new case detection rate of leprosy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilda Silva Nery

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Social determinants can affect the transmission of leprosy and its progression to disease. Not much is known about the effectiveness of welfare and primary health care policies on the reduction of leprosy occurrence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of the Brazilian cash transfer (Bolsa Família Program-BFP and primary health care (Family Health Program-FHP programs on new case detection rate of leprosy.We conducted the study with a mixed ecological design, a combination of an ecological multiple-group and time-trend design in the period 2004-2011 with the Brazilian municipalities as unit of analysis. The main independent variables were the BFP and FHP coverage at the municipal level and the outcome was new case detection rate of leprosy. Leprosy new cases, BFP and FHP coverage, population and other relevant socio-demographic covariates were obtained from national databases. We used fixed-effects negative binomial models for panel data adjusted for relevant socio-demographic covariates. A total of 1,358 municipalities were included in the analysis. In the studied period, while the municipal coverage of BFP and FHP increased, the new case detection rate of leprosy decreased. Leprosy new case detection rate was significantly reduced in municipalities with consolidated BFP coverage (Risk Ratio 0.79; 95% CI  =0.74-0.83 and significantly increased in municipalities with FHP coverage in the medium (72-95% (Risk Ratio 1.05; 95% CI  =1.02-1.09 and higher coverage tertiles (>95% (Risk Ratio 1.12; 95% CI  =1.08-1.17.At the same time the Family Health Program had been effective in increasing the new case detection rate of leprosy in Brazil, the Bolsa Família Program was associated with a reduction of the new case detection rate of leprosy that we propose reflects a reduction in leprosy incidence.

  17. Sorologia da hanseníase utilizando PGL-I: revisão sistemática Leprosy serology using PGL-I: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Scaliante de Moura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A sorologia utilizando o antígeno espécie-específico do Mycobacterium leprae, PGL-I, pode ser um marcador de carga bacteriana em pacientes com hanseníase. Estudos identificaram potencial de uso da sorologia na classificação de pacientes para fins de tratamento, monitoramento de terapia, risco de recidiva e na seleção dos contatos com maior risco de adoecer. Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática e 26 artigos foram incluídos na análise comparativa. Avaliamos os resultados do uso da sorologia PGL-I em diferentes situações, suas limitações e possíveis aplicações. Estudos mostraram eficácia da sorologia PGL-I na classificação de pacientes, monitoramento da terapia, e nas reações hansênicas como teste preditivo. Para diagnóstico precoce e seguimento de população de alto risco, as metodologias utilizadas ainda não demonstraram custo-benefício favorável, porém estudos indicam que a utilização do teste poderá influenciar positivamente nos programas de controle da hanseníase. Com técnicas simples e robustas, o uso da sorologia PGL-I é viável.Serology using a species-specific antigen for Mycobacterium leprae, PGL-I, could be a marker for the bacterial load of patients with leprosy. Various studies have identified the potential use of serology in the classification of patients for treatment purposes, case monitoring, identification of the risk of relapse and selection of household contacts with a higher risk of contracting the disease. A systematic review of the literature was conducted and 26 articles were included in this comparative analysis. The results of the use of PGL-I serology in different situations, its limitations and possible applications were evaluated. Studies show the efficacy of PGL-I serology in the classification of patients, treatment monitoring and as a predictive test for leprosy reactions. To improve early diagnosis and follow-up of the population at greatest risk of developing leprosy, the

  18. Gnawing Pains, Festering Ulcers, and Nightmare Suffering: Selling Leprosy as a Humanitarian Cause in the British Empire, c. 1890-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsathorn, Kathleen

    2012-12-01

    When British attention was drawn to the issue of leprosy in the Empire, humanitarian organisations rose to take on responsibility for the 'fight against leprosy'. In an effort to fundraise for a distant cause at a time when hundreds of charities competed for the financial support of British citizens, fundraisers developed propaganda to set leprosy apart from all other humanitarian causes. They drew on leprosy's relationship with Christianity, its debilitating symptoms, and the supposed vulnerability of leprosy sufferers in order to mobilise Britain's sense of humanitarian, Christian, and patriotic duty. This article traces the emergence of leprosy as a popular imperial humanitarian cause in modern Britain and analyses the narratives of religion, suffering, and disease that they created and employed in order to fuel their growth and sell leprosy as a British humanitarian cause.

  19. The Add-On Effect of Solifenacin for Patients with Remaining Overactive Bladder after Treatment with Tamsulosin for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Masumori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the add-on effect of solifenacin for Japanese men with remaining overactive bladder (OAB symptoms after tamsulosin monotherapy for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO in real-life clinical practice. Methods. Patients aged ≥ 50 having remaining OAB symptoms (≥ 3 of OAB symptom score (OABSS with ≥2 of urgency score after at least 4 weeks treatment by 0.2 mg of tamsulosin for BPO/LUTS received 2.5 or 5.0 mg of solifenacin for 12 weeks. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, QOL index and OABSS, maximum flow rate (Qmax and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR were determined. Results. A total of 48 patients (mean age 72.5 years completed the study. There were significant improvement in IPSS (15.1 to 11.2 and QOL index (4.2 to 3.0 by add-on of solifenacin. Although the IPSS storage symptom score was significantly improved, there were no changes observed in the IPSS voiding symptom score. The OABSS showed significant improvement (8.0 to 4.8. No changes were observed in Qmax and PVR. Conclusions. Under the supervision of an experienced urologist, the additional administration of solifenacin to patients with BPO/LUTS treated with tamsulosin, is effective in controlling remaining OAB symptoms.

  20. Courtesy stigma: A concealed consternation among caregivers of people affected by leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dako-Gyeke, Mavis

    2018-01-01

    This study explored experiences of courtesy stigma among caregivers of people affected by leprosy. Using a qualitative research approach, twenty participants were purposively selected and in-depth interviews conducted. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed to identify emerging themes that addressed objectives of the study. The findings indicated that caregivers of people affected by leprosy experienced courtesy stigma. Evidence showed that fear of contagion underpinned caregivers' experiences, especially in employment and romantic relationships. In addition, participants adopted different strategies (disregarding, concealment, education, faith-based trust) to handle courtesy stigma. The findings demonstrate that psychosocial support and financial assistance to caregivers are necessary considerations for attainment of effective care for people affected by leprosy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of interferon beta-1b as treatment for patients with clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, C

    2016-05-01

    The BENEFIT study has demonstrated the benefits of early treatment with interferon beta 1b (IFNβ-1b). The objective of this study was to estimate the efficiency of early vs delayed IFNβ-1b treatment in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Spain. A Markov model reflecting the social perspective was developed with time horizons ranging from 2 years to lifetime. A cohort of 1000 patients with CIS, whose health status had been measured on the Expanded Disability Symptom Scale (EDSS), included patients who received early IFNβ-1b treatment and those who did not. Data from the BENEFIT study were used to model EDSS progression and transitions to MS. Costs were estimated from published literature. Patient utilities were derived from EQ-5D data and published data. Mortality was estimated using life tables and EDSS data. Costs (€ at 2013 rates) and outcomes were discounted at 3% per annum. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. In the base case, both the incremental cost utility ratio (ICUR) and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of IFNβ-1b versus no treatment were dominant (more effective and less costly) from a social perspective. From the perspective of the Spanish Health System, the ICUR was € 40,702/QALY and the ICER was € 13/relapse avoided. Early treatment with IFNβ-1b after a CIS versus delayed treatment is efficient from a social perspective, but it may not be efficient from the perspective of the NHS which does not take non health-related costs into account. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Differences Between Colon Cancer Primaries and Metastases Using a Molecular Assay for Tumor Radiation Sensitivity Suggest Implications for Potential Oligometastatic SBRT Patient Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Kamran A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Fulp, William J.; Berglund, Anders E. [Department of Biostatistics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Hoffe, Sarah E.; Dilling, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Eschrich, Steven A. [Department of Bioinformatics, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Shridhar, Ravi [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Torres-Roca, Javier F., E-mail: javier.torresroca@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiation sensitivity index (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple independent cohorts (breast, rectal, esophageal, and head and neck patients). The purpose of this study was to assess differences between RSI scores in primary colon cancer and metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified from our institutional review board–approved prospective observational protocol. A total of 704 metastatic and 1362 primary lesions were obtained from a de-identified metadata pool. RSI was calculated using the previously published rank-based algorithm. An independent cohort of 29 lung or liver colon metastases treated with 60 Gy in 5 fractions stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used for validation. Results: The most common sites of metastases included liver (n=374; 53%), lung (n=116; 17%), and lymph nodes (n=40; 6%). Sixty percent of metastatic tumors, compared with 54% of primaries, were in the RSI radiation-resistant peak, suggesting metastatic tumors may be slightly more radiation resistant than primaries (P=.01). In contrast, when we analyzed metastases based on anatomical site, we uncovered large differences in RSI. The median RSIs for metastases in descending order of radiation resistance were ovary (0.48), abdomen (0.47), liver (0.43), brain (0.42), lung (0.32), and lymph nodes (0.31) (P<.0001). These findings were confirmed when the analysis was restricted to lesions from the same patient (n=139). In our independent cohort of treated lung and liver metastases, lung metastases had an improved local control rate compared to that in patients with liver metastases (2-year local control rate of 100% vs 73.0%, respectively; P=.026). Conclusions: Assessment of radiation sensitivity between primary and metastatic tissues of colon cancer histology revealed significant differences based on anatomical location of metastases. These initial results warrant validation in a larger

  3. Association of narcolepsy-cataplexy with HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 in Mexican patients: A relationship between HLA and gender is suggested

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haro Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Narcolepsy-cataplexy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with recurrent episodes of irresistible sleep, cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Its aetiology is unknown, but it is positively associated with the human leukocyte antigens (HLA in all studied populations. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association of HLA class II DRB1/DQB1 alleles with narcolepsy-cataplexy in Mexican Mestizo patients. Methods This is a case-control study of consecutive patients and ethnically matched controls. We included 32 patients diagnosed with typical narcolepsy-cataplexy, of the National Institute of Neurology, of the Institute of Psychiatry and at the Center of Narcolepsy at Stanford University. As healthy controls, 203 Mexican Mestizos were included. DRB1 alleles were identified using sequence based typing. A PCR-SSOP reverse dot blot was used for DQB1 typing. Allele frequency was calculated by direct counting and the significance of the differences was assessed using the Yates Chi square. Odds ratio and confidence intervals were evaluated. Results HLA-DRB1*1501 (OR = 8.2; pc DQB1*0602 (OR = 8.4; pc DQB1*0602+ patients from the analysis, DQB1*0301 was also found increased (OR = 2.7; p = 0.035; pc = NS. DQB1*0602/DQB1*0301 genotype was present in 15.6% of the cases (OR = 11.5; p = 0.00035, conferring a high risk. DRB1*0407 (OR = 0.2; p = 0.016 pc = NS and DQB1*0302(OR = 0.4; p = 0.017, pc = NS were found decreased in the patients. The gender stratification analysis showed a higher risk in females carrying DRB1*1501 (OR = 15.8, pc DQB1*0602 (OR = 19.8, pc DRB1 & p = 0.0012, pc = 0.017 for DQB1. The susceptibility alleles found in Mexicans with narcolepsy are also present in Japanese and Caucasians; DRB1*04 linked protection has also been shown in Koreans. A stronger HLA association is suggested in females, in accordance with the sexual dimorphism claimed previously. Conclusion This knowledge may

  4. A Comparative Study Of Psychiatric Morbidity In Dermatological Patients

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    Sharma Neelu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric morbidity in five chronic and disfiguring diseases, namely psoriasis, chronic urticaria, leprosy, vitiligo and lichen simplex chronicus (LSC was assessed and compared using the standardized Hindi (Vernacular languages version of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-H. Thirty new untreated patients of each of the above skin diseases between the age group of 18-60 years were included in the study. The overall prevalence of the psychiatric morbidity was found to be 39%, depression and anxiety were present in 13% and 10.66% of the patients and suicidal ideations and somatisation in 16% and 13% of the patients respectively. Prevalence of interpersonal conflict and suicidal attempt were 10% and 2.6% respectively. On comparative analysis of psychiatric morbidity, significant difference was observed between vitiligo and other disorders (p=0.0028, i.e., chronic urticaria (p=0.0242 and psoriasis and other disorders (p=0.0028, however no significant difference could be elicited between psoriasis and leprosy or leprosy and vitiligo. Comparative analysis of anxiety revealed statistically significant difference between the patients of LSC and vitiligo (p=0.02 or vitiligo and chronic urticaria (p=0.04 but no significant difference was observed for vitiligo and leprosy of psoriasis and leprosy. The prevalence of somatic complaints showed significant difference between the patients of LSC and Leprosy.

  5. Discovery of a potential lead compound for treating leprosy with dapsone resistance mutation in M. leprae folP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisha, J; Ramanathan, K; Nawaz Khan, F; Dhanasekaran, D; Shanthi, V

    2016-06-21

    Dapsone resistance is a serious impediment to the implementation of the present leprosy control strategies. In the recent past, many studies have been undertaken to address the antibiotic activity and binding pattern of dapsone against both native and mutant (Pro55Leu) folP1. Yet, there is no well-developed structural basis for understanding drug action and there is dire need for new antibacterial therapies. In the present study, molecular simulation techniques were employed alongside experimental strategies to address and overcome the mechanism of dapsone resistance. In essence, we report the identification of small molecule compounds to effectively and specifically inhibit the growth of M. leprae through targeting dihydropteroate synthase, encoded by folP1 which is involved in folic acid synthesis. Initially, ADME and toxicity studies were employed to screen the lead compounds, using dapsone as standard drug. Subsequently, molecular docking was employed to understand the binding efficiency of dapsone and its lead compounds against folP1. Further, the activity of the screened lead molecule was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Furthermore, we synthesized 4-(2-fluorophenylsulfonyl)benzenamine, using (2-fluorophenyl)boronic acid and 4-aminobenzenesulfonyl chloride, and the compound structure was confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Most importantly, the antibacterial activity of the compound was also examined and compared against dapsone. Overall, the result from our analysis suggested that CID21480113 (4-(2-fluorophenylsulfonyl)benzenamine) could be developed into a promising lead compound and could be effective in treating dapsone resistant leprosy cases.

  6. Feline leprosy due to Candidatus 'Mycobacterium lepraefelis': Further clinical and molecular characterisation of eight previously reported cases and an additional 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Carolyn R; Malik, Richard; Globan, Maria; Reppas, George; McCowan, Christina; Fyfe, Janet A

    2017-09-01

    This paper, the last in a series of three on 'feline leprosy', provides a detailed description of disease referable to the previously unnamed species, Candidatus 'Mycobacterium lepraefelis', a close relative of the human pathogens Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Cases were sourced retrospectively and prospectively for this observational study, describing clinical, geographical and molecular microbiological data for cats definitively diagnosed with Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' infection. A total of 145 cases of feline leprosy were scrutinised; 114 'new' cases were sourced from the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory (VIDRL) records, veterinary pathology laboratories or veterinarians, and 31 cases were derived from six published studies. Thirty-eight cats were definitively diagnosed with Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' infection. Typically, cats tended to be middle-aged or older when first infected, with a male predilection. Affected cats typically had widespread cutaneous lesions, in some cases after initially localised disease. Advanced cases were often systemically unwell. All cats had outdoor access. The histological picture was lepromatous in the majority of patients, although two cases had tuberculoid disease. In one case that underwent necropsy, lesions were evident in the liver, spleen and lungs. Treatment was varied, although most cats received a combination of oral clarithromycin and rifampicin. Prognosis for recovery was variable, but typically poor. Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' typically causes high bacterial index (lepromatous) feline leprosy that in some cases progresses to systemic mycobacteriosis. The disease has a variable clinical course and prognosis. Many cases either died or were euthanased due to the infection. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals a heterogeneous picture and further analysis of draft genome sequencing may give clues to the taxonomy and epidemiology of this organism. Prospective treatment trials and

  7. Suggestion of optimal radiation fields in rectal cancer patients after surgical resection for the development of the patterns of care study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Dae Yong [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2003-06-01

    To suggest the optimal radiation fields after a surgical resection based on a nationwide survey on the principles of radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the Korean Patterns of Care Study. A consensus committee, composed of radiation oncologists from 18 hospitals in Seoul Metropolitan area, developed a survey format to analyze radiation oncologist's treatment principles for rectal cancer after a surgical resection. The survey format included 19 questions on the principles of defining field margins, and was sent to the radiation oncologists in charge of gastrointestinal malignancies in all Korean hospitals (48 hospitals). Thirty three (69%) oncologists replied. On the basis of the replies and literature review, the committee developed guidelines for the optimal radiation fields for rectal cancer. The following guidelines were developed: superior border between the lower tip of the L5 vertebral body and upper sacroiliac joint; inferior border 2-3 cm distal to the anastomosis in patient whose sphincter was saved, and 2-3 cm distal to the perineal scar in patients whose anal sphincter was sacrificed; anterior margin at the posterior tip of the symphysis pubis or 2-3 cm anterior to the vertebral body, to include the internal iliac lymph node and posterior margin 1.5-2 cm posterior to the anterior surface of the sacrum, to include the presacral space with enough margin. Comparison with the guidelines, the replies on the superior margin coincided in 23 cases (70%), the inferior margin after sphincter saving surgery in 13 (39%), the inferior margin after abdominoperineal resection in 32 (97%), the lateral margin in 32 (97%), the posterior margins in 32 (97%) and the anterior margin in 16 (45%). These recommendations should be tailored to each patient according to the clinical characteristics such as tumor location, pathological and operative findings, for the optimal treatment. The adequacy of these guidelines should be proved by following the Korean Patterns of Care

  8. Open to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  9. Systematic review with meta-analysis: risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease suggest a shared altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile between lean and obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, S; Pirola, C J

    2017-07-01

    The pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is closely associated with the co-occurrence of multiple pathological conditions characterising the metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity in particular. However, NAFLD also develops in lean subjects, whose risk factors remain poorly defined. We performed a meta-analysis of 15 studies, along with the data pertaining to our own population (n=336 patients). Data from lean (n=1966) and obese (n=5938) patients with NAFLD were analysed; lean (n=9946) and obese (n=6027) subjects without NAFLD served as controls. Relative to the lean non-NAFLD controls, lean patients with NAFLD were older (3.79±0.72 years, P=1.36×10 -6 ) and exhibited the entire spectrum of the MetS risk factors. Specifically, they had a significant (P=10 -10 ) increase in plasma glucose levels (6.44±1.12 mg/dL) and HOMA-IR (0.52±0.094-unit increment), blood lipids (triglycerides: 48.37±3.6, P=10 -10 and total cholesterol: 7.04±3.8, mg/dL, P=4.2×10 -7 ), systolic (5.64±0.7) and diastolic (3.37±0.9) blood pressure (mm Hg), P=10 -10 , and waist circumference (5.88±0.4 cm, P=10 -10 ); values denote difference in means±SE. Nevertheless, the overall alterations in the obese group were much more severe when compared to lean subjects, regardless of the presence of NAFLD. Meta-regression suggested that NAFLD is a modifier of the level of blood lipids. Lean and obese patients with NAFLD share a common altered metabolic and cardiovascular profile. The former, while having normal body weight, showed excess of abdominal adipose tissue as well as other MetS features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of interventions to prevent disability in leprosy: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P. McNamee (McNamee); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prevention of disability (POD) is one of the key objectives of leprosy programmes. Recently, coverage and access have been identified as the priority issues in POD. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of POD interventions is highly relevant to understanding the barriers and

  11. Role of PGL-I antibody detection in the diagnosis of pure neural leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jardim, Marcia R.; Antunes, Sergio L. G.; Simons, Brian; Wildenbeest, Joanne G.; Nery, José Augusto C.; Illarramendi, Ximena; Moraes, Milton O.; Martinez, Alejandra N.; Oskam, Linda; Faber, William R.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Bührer-Sékula, Samira

    2005-01-01

    Pure neural leprosy (PNL) is difficult to diagnose because skin lesions and acid-fast bacilli (AFB) in slit smears are absent. At present, the gold standard for PNL diagnosis is the histopathological examination of a peripheral nerve biopsy. Even so, detection of bacteria is difficult and

  12. 13 Assessment of Social Welfare Services of Sufferers of Leprosy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    intended social welfare services and practicable social welfare practices. Keywords: focus group discussion, Social welfare, sufferers of. Leprosy. Introduction. Dyrough (1995:27) defined social welfare as;. The system of social services and institutions, designed to aid individuals and groups to attain satisfying standards of ...

  13. Dealing with Stigma: Experiences of Persons Affected by Disabilities and Leprosy