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Sample records for lensfree tomographic microscope

  1. 3D+time acquisitions of 3D cell culture by means of lens-free tomographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdeu, Anthony; Laperrousaz, Bastien; Bordy, Thomas; Morales, S.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) imaging platform based on lens-free microscopy to perform multi-angle acquisitions on 3D cell cultures embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM). We developed algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem to perform fully 3D reconstructions of biological samples and we adapted the lens-free microscope to incubator conditions. Here we demonstrate for the first time, 3D+time lens-free acquisitions of 3D cell culture over 8 days directly into the incubator. The 3D reconstructed volume is as large as 5 mm3 and provides a unique way to observe in the same 3D cell culture experiment multiple cell migration strategies. Namely, in a 3D cell culture of prostate epithelial cells embedded within a Matrigel® matrix, we are able to distinguish single cell 'leaders', migration of cell clusters, migration of large aggregates of cells, and also close-gap and large-scale branching. In addition, we observe long-scale 3D deformations of the ECM that modify the geometry of the 3D cell culture. Interestingly, we also observed the opposite, i.e. we found that large aggregates of cells may deform the ECM by generating traction forces over very long distances. In sum we put forward a novel 3D lens-free microscopy tomographic technique to study the single and collective cell migrations, the cell-to-cell interactions and the cell-to-matrix interactions.

  2. Mesooptical microscope as a tomographical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroko, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that there are at least four regions which are common for the mesooptical microscopes, on the one hand, and for the reconstructed tomography, on the other hand. The following characteristics of the mesooptical microscope show the tomographical properties: the structure of the output data concerning the orientation and the position in space of the straight-line objects going at small angles with the perpendicular to the given tomographic plane, the behaviour of the two-dimensional fourier-transform of the straight-line object in the course of the rotation of this object with respect to the specified axis in space, the scanning algorithm of the nuclear emulsion volume by the fence-like illuminated region in the mesooptical microscope for searching for particle tracks going parallel to the optical axis of the microscope, and, finally, the fact that the mesooptical images of the straight-line particle tracks with a common vertex in the nuclear emulsion lie on the sinogram. 12 refs.; 16 figs

  3. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing ~38 grams (cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia). PMID:20445943

  4. Line-scanning tomographic optical microscope with isotropic transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdátsy, Gábor; Dudás, László; Erdélyi, Miklós; Szabó, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    An imaging method and optical system, referred to as a line-scanning tomographic optical microscope (LSTOM) using a combination of line-scanning technique and CT reconstruction principle, is proposed and studied theoretically and experimentally. In our implementation a narrow focus line is scanned over the sample and the reflected light is measured in a confocal arrangement. One such scan is equivalent to a transverse projection in tomography. Repeating the scanning procedure in several directions, a number of transverse projections are recorded from which the image can be obtained using conventional CT reconstruction algorithms. The resolution of the image is independent of the spatial dimensions and structure of the applied detector; furthermore, the transfer function of the system is isotropic. The imaging performance of the implemented confocal LSTOM was compared with a point-scanning confocal microscope, based on recorded images. These images demonstrate that the resolution of the confocal LSTOM exceeds (by 15%) the resolution limit of a point-scanning confocal microscope

  5. Optical Computed-Tomographic Microscope for Three-Dimensional Quantitative Histology

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    Ravil Chamgoulov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optical computed‐tomographic microscope has been developed allowing quantitative three‐dimensional (3D imaging and analysis of fixed pathological material. Rather than a conventional two‐dimensional (2D image, the instrument produces a 3D representation of fixed absorption‐stained material, from which quantitative histopathological features can be measured more accurately. The accurate quantification of these features is critically important in disease diagnosis and the clinical classification of cancer. The system consists of two high NA objective lenses, a light source, a digital spatial light modulator (DMD, by Texas Instrument, an x–y stage, and a CCD detector. The DMD, positioned at the back pupil‐plane of the illumination objective, is employed to illuminate the specimen with parallel rays at any desired angle. The system uses a modification of the convolution backprojection algorithm for reconstruction. In contrast to fluorescent images acquired by a confocal microscope, this instrument produces 3D images of absorption stained material. Microscopic 3D volume reconstructions of absorption‐stained cells have been demonstrated. Reconstructed 3D images of individual cells and tissue can be cut virtually with the distance between the axial slices less than 0.5 μm.

  6. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096 2 x512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096 2 pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024 2 x256 voxels from 122 1024 2 pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. -- Highlights: → A distributed multi-GPU system has been developed for electron microscopic tomography (EMT). → This system allows for rapid constrained, iterative reconstruction of very large volumes. → This system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for large-scale iterative EMT realignment.

  7. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W. [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States); Agard, David A., E-mail: agard@msg.ucsf.edu [The Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the W.M. Keck Advanced Microscopy Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, 600, 16th Street, Room S412D, CA 94158-2517 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096{sup 2}x512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096{sup 2} pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024{sup 2}x256 voxels from 122 1024{sup 2} pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. -- Highlights: {yields} A distributed multi-GPU system has been developed for electron microscopic tomography (EMT). {yields} This system allows for rapid constrained, iterative reconstruction of very large volumes. {yields} This system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for large-scale iterative EMT realignment.

  8. Automated Micro-Object Detection for Mobile Diagnostics Using Lens-Free Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohendra Roy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lens-free imaging technology has been extensively used recently for microparticle and biological cell analysis because of its high throughput, low cost, and simple and compact arrangement. However, this technology still lacks a dedicated and automated detection system. In this paper, we describe a custom-developed automated micro-object detection method for a lens-free imaging system. In our previous work (Roy et al., we developed a lens-free imaging system using low-cost components. This system was used to generate and capture the diffraction patterns of micro-objects and a global threshold was used to locate the diffraction patterns. In this work we used the same setup to develop an improved automated detection and analysis algorithm based on adaptive threshold and clustering of signals. For this purpose images from the lens-free system were then used to understand the features and characteristics of the diffraction patterns of several types of samples. On the basis of this information, we custom-developed an automated algorithm for the lens-free imaging system. Next, all the lens-free images were processed using this custom-developed automated algorithm. The performance of this approach was evaluated by comparing the counting results with standard optical microscope results. We evaluated the counting results for polystyrene microbeads, red blood cells, and HepG2, HeLa, and MCF7 cells. The comparison shows good agreement between the systems, with a correlation coefficient of 0.91 and linearity slope of 0.877. We also evaluated the automated size profiles of the microparticle samples. This Wi-Fi-enabled lens-free imaging system, along with the dedicated software, possesses great potential for telemedicine applications in resource-limited settings.

  9. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shawn Q; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2011-07-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096(2) × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096(2) pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024(2) × 256 voxels from 122 1024(2) pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color image sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan O Isikman

    Full Text Available We report Giga-pixel lensfree holographic microscopy and tomography using color sensor-arrays such as CMOS imagers that exhibit Bayer color filter patterns. Without physically removing these color filters coated on the sensor chip, we synthesize pixel super-resolved lensfree holograms, which are then reconstructed to achieve ~350 nm lateral resolution, corresponding to a numerical aperture of ~0.8, across a field-of-view of ~20.5 mm(2. This constitutes a digital image with ~0.7 Billion effective pixels in both amplitude and phase channels (i.e., ~1.4 Giga-pixels total. Furthermore, by changing the illumination angle (e.g., ± 50° and scanning a partially-coherent light source across two orthogonal axes, super-resolved images of the same specimen from different viewing angles are created, which are then digitally combined to synthesize tomographic images of the object. Using this dual-axis lensfree tomographic imager running on a color sensor-chip, we achieve a 3D spatial resolution of ~0.35 µm × 0.35 µm × ~2 µm, in x, y and z, respectively, creating an effective voxel size of ~0.03 µm(3 across a sample volume of ~5 mm(3, which is equivalent to >150 Billion voxels. We demonstrate the proof-of-concept of this lensfree optical tomographic microscopy platform on a color CMOS image sensor by creating tomograms of micro-particles as well as a wild-type C. elegans nematode.

  11. Whole slide imaging of unstained tissue using lensfree microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Sophie Nhu An; Hervé, Lionel; Bordy, Thomas; Cioni, Olivier; Delon, Antoine; Fromentin, Catherine; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Allier, Cédric

    2016-04-01

    Pathologist examination of tissue slides provides insightful information about a patient's disease. Traditional analysis of tissue slides is performed under a binocular microscope, which requires staining of the sample and delays the examination. We present a simple cost-effective lensfree imaging method to record 2-4μm resolution wide-field (10 mm2 to 6 cm2) images of unstained tissue slides. The sample processing time is reduced as there is no need for staining. A wide field of view (10 mm2) lensfree hologram is recorded in a single shot and the image is reconstructed in 2s providing a very fast acquisition chain. The acquisition is multispectral, i.e. multiple holograms are recorded simultaneously at three different wavelengths, and a dedicated holographic reconstruction algorithm is used to retrieve both amplitude and phase. Whole tissue slides imaging is obtained by recording 130 holograms with X-Y translation stages and by computing the mosaic of a 25 x 25 mm2 reconstructed image. The reconstructed phase provides a phase-contrast-like image of the unstained specimen, revealing structures of healthy and diseased tissue. Slides from various organs can be reconstructed, e.g. lung, colon, ganglion, etc. To our knowledge, our method is the first technique that enables fast wide-field lensfree imaging of such unlabeled dense samples. This technique is much cheaper and compact than a conventional phase contrast microscope and could be made portable. In sum, we present a new methodology that could quickly provide useful information when a rapid diagnosis is needed, such as tumor margin identification on frozen section biopsies during surgery.

  12. Lens-free microscopy of cerebrospinal fluid for the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacroix, Robin; Morel, Sophie Nhu An; Hervé, Lionel; Bordy, Thomas; Blandin, Pierre; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Drancourt, Michel; Allier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    The cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid is traditionally performed by an operator (physician, biologist) by means of a conventional light microscope. The operator visually counts the leukocytes (white blood cells) present in a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (10 μl). It is a tedious job and the result is operator-dependent. Here in order to circumvent the limitations of manual counting, we approach the question of numeration of erythrocytes and leukocytes for the cytological diagnosis of meningitis by means of lens-free microscopy. In a first step, a prospective counts of leukocytes was performed by five different operators using conventional optical microscopy. The visual counting yielded an overall 16.7% misclassification of 72 cerebrospinal fluid specimens in meningitis/non-meningitis categories using a 10 leukocyte/μL cut-off. In a second step, the lens-free microscopy algorithm was adapted step-by-step for counting cerebrospinal fluid cells and discriminating leukocytes from erythrocytes. The optimization of the automatic lens-free counting was based on the prospective analysis of 215 cerebrospinal fluid specimens. The optimized algorithm yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 86% specificity compared to confirmed diagnostics. In a third step, a blind lens-free microscopic analysis of 116 cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including six cases of microbiology confirmed infectious meningitis, yielded a 100% sensitivity and a 79% specificity. Adapted lens-free microscopy is thus emerging as an operator-independent technique for the rapid numeration of leukocytes and erythrocytes in cerebrospinal fluid. In particular, this technique is well suited to the rapid diagnosis of meningitis at point-of-care laboratories.

  13. Experimental and theoretical analysis for improved microscope design of optical projection tomographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Ryan L; Seibel, Eric J

    2013-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results of axial displacement of objects relative to a fixed condenser focal plane (FP) in optical projection tomographic microscopy (OPTM). OPTM produces three-dimensional, reconstructed images of single cells from two-dimensional projections. The cell rotates in a microcapillary to acquire projections from different perspectives where the objective FP is scanned through the cell while the condenser FP remains fixed at the center of the microcapillary. This work uses a combination of experimental and theoretical methods to improve the OPTM instrument design.

  14. Development of full-field x-ray phase-tomographic microscope based on laboratory x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, H.; Wu, Y.; Momose, A.

    2017-09-01

    An X-ray phase tomographic microscope that can quantitatively measure the refractive index of a sample in three dimensions with a high spatial resolution was developed by installing a Lau interferometer consisting of an absorption grating and a π/2 phase grating into the optics of an X-ray microscope. The optics comprises a Cu rotating anode X-ray source, capillary condenser optics, and a Fresnel zone plate for the objective. The microscope has two optical modes: a large-field-of-view mode (field of view: 65 μm x 65 μm) and a high-resolution mode (spatial resolution: 50 nm). Optimizing the parameters of the interferometer yields a self-image of the phase grating with 60% visibility. Through the normal fringe-scanning measurement, a twin phase image, which has an overlap of two phase image of opposite contrast with a shear distance much larger than system resolution, is generated. Although artifacts remain to some extent currently when a phase image is calculated from the twin phase image, this system can obtain high-spatial-resolution images resolving 50-nm structures. Phase tomography with this system has also been demonstrated using a phase object.

  15. High throughput on-chip analysis of high-energy charged particle tracks using lensfree imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Wei; Shabbir, Faizan; Gong, Chao; Gulec, Cagatay; Pigeon, Jeremy; Shaw, Jessica; Greenbaum, Alon; Tochitsky, Sergei; Joshi, Chandrashekhar [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ozcan, Aydogan, E-mail: ozcan@ucla.edu [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bioengineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate a high-throughput charged particle analysis platform, which is based on lensfree on-chip microscopy for rapid ion track analysis using allyl diglycol carbonate, i.e., CR-39 plastic polymer as the sensing medium. By adopting a wide-area opto-electronic image sensor together with a source-shifting based pixel super-resolution technique, a large CR-39 sample volume (i.e., 4 cm × 4 cm × 0.1 cm) can be imaged in less than 1 min using a compact lensfree on-chip microscope, which detects partially coherent in-line holograms of the ion tracks recorded within the CR-39 detector. After the image capture, using highly parallelized reconstruction and ion track analysis algorithms running on graphics processing units, we reconstruct and analyze the entire volume of a CR-39 detector within ∼1.5 min. This significant reduction in the entire imaging and ion track analysis time not only increases our throughput but also allows us to perform time-resolved analysis of the etching process to monitor and optimize the growth of ion tracks during etching. This computational lensfree imaging platform can provide a much higher throughput and more cost-effective alternative to traditional lens-based scanning optical microscopes for ion track analysis using CR-39 and other passive high energy particle detectors.

  16. Optimized computational imaging methods for small-target sensing in lens-free holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhen; Engle, Isaiah; Garan, Jacob; Melzer, Jeffrey E.; McLeod, Euan

    2018-02-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy is a promising diagnostic approach because it is cost-effective, compact, and suitable for point-of-care applications, while providing high resolution together with an ultra-large field-of-view. It has been applied to biomedical sensing, where larger targets like eukaryotic cells, bacteria, or viruses can be directly imaged without labels, and smaller targets like proteins or DNA strands can be detected via scattering labels like micro- or nano-spheres. Automated image processing routines can count objects and infer target concentrations. In these sensing applications, sensitivity and specificity are critically affected by image resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Pixel super-resolution approaches have been shown to boost resolution and SNR by synthesizing a high-resolution image from multiple, partially redundant, low-resolution images. However, there are several computational methods that can be used to synthesize the high-resolution image, and previously, it has been unclear which methods work best for the particular case of small-particle sensing. Here, we quantify the SNR achieved in small-particle sensing using regularized gradient-descent optimization method, where the regularization is based on cardinal-neighbor differences, Bayer-pattern noise reduction, or sparsity in the image. In particular, we find that gradient-descent with sparsity-based regularization works best for small-particle sensing. These computational approaches were evaluated on images acquired using a lens-free microscope that we assembled from an off-the-shelf LED array and color image sensor. Compared to other lens-free imaging systems, our hardware integration, calibration, and sample preparation are particularly simple. We believe our results will help to enable the best performance in lens-free holographic sensing.

  17. In vivo detection of basal cell carcinoma: comparison of a reflectance confocal microscope and a multiphoton tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Martina; Klemp, Marisa; Darvin, Maxim E.; König, Karsten; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C.

    2013-06-01

    The standard diagnostic procedure for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is invasive tissue biopsy with time-consuming histological examination. To reduce the number of biopsies, noninvasive optical methods have been developed providing high-resolution skin examination. We present direct comparison of a reflectance confocal microscope (RLSM) and a multiphoton tomograph (MPT) for BCC diagnosis. Both systems are applied to nine patients prior to surgery, and the results are analyzed, including histological results. Both systems prove suitable for detecting typical characteristics of BCC in various stages. The RLSM allows large horizontal overview images to be obtained, enabling the investigator to find the regions of interest quickly, e.g., BCC nests. Elongated cells and palisading structures are easily recognized using both methods. Due to the higher resolution, changes in nucleus diameter or cytoplasm could be visualized with the MPT. Therefore, the nucleus diameter, nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, and cell density are estimated for normal and BCC cells using the MPT. The nucleus of elongated BCC cells is significantly longer than other measured normal skin cells, whereas the cell density and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of BCC cannot be significantly distinguished from granular cells.

  18. Fusion of lens-free microscopy and mobile-phone microscopy images for high-color-accuracy and high-resolution pathology imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Wu, Yichen; Zhang, Yun; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Digital pathology and telepathology require imaging tools with high-throughput, high-resolution and accurate color reproduction. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital in-line holography is a promising technique towards these needs, as it offers a wide field of view (FOV >20 mm2) and high resolution with a compact, low-cost and portable setup. Color imaging has been previously demonstrated by combining reconstructed images at three discrete wavelengths in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum, i.e., the RGB combination method. However, this RGB combination method is subject to color distortions. To improve the color performance of lens-free microscopy for pathology imaging, here we present a wavelet-based color fusion imaging framework, termed "digital color fusion microscopy" (DCFM), which digitally fuses together a grayscale lens-free microscope image taken at a single wavelength and a low-resolution and low-magnification color-calibrated image taken by a lens-based microscope, which can simply be a mobile phone based cost-effective microscope. We show that the imaging results of an H&E stained breast cancer tissue slide with the DCFM technique come very close to a color-calibrated microscope using a 40x objective lens with 0.75 NA. Quantitative comparison showed 2-fold reduction in the mean color distance using the DCFM method compared to the RGB combination method, while also preserving the high-resolution features of the lens-free microscope. Due to the cost-effective and field-portable nature of both lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy techniques, their combination through the DCFM framework could be useful for digital pathology and telepathology applications, in low-resource and point-of-care settings.

  19. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

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    Berdeu, Anthony; Momey, Fabien; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Allier, Cédric

    2017-02-01

    New microscopes are needed to help reaching the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies by gathering large quantitative and systematic data over extended periods of time while preserving the integrity of the living sample. In order to reconstruct large volumes while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose new imaging platforms based on lens-free microscopy, a technic which is addressing these needs in the context of 2D cell culture, providing label-free and non-phototoxic acquisition of large datasets. We built lens-free diffractive tomography setups performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid cultures embedded in Matrigel and developed dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithms based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. Nonetheless, holographic setups do not record the phase of the incident wave front and the biological samples in Petri dish strongly limit the angular coverage. These limitations introduce numerous artefacts in the sample reconstruction. We developed several methods to overcome them, such as multi-wavelength imaging or iterative phase retrieval. The most promising technic currently developed is based on a regularised inverse problem approach directly applied on the 3D volume to reconstruct. 3D reconstructions were performed on several complex samples such as 3D networks or spheroids embedded in capsules with large reconstructed volumes up to 25 mm3 while still being able to identify single cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an inverse problem approach is implemented in the context of lens-free diffractive tomography enabling to reconstruct large fully 3D volumes of unstained biological samples.

  20. Wide-field imaging of birefringent synovial fluid crystals using lens-free polarized microscopy for gout diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Gout is a form of crystal arthropathy where monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit and elicit inflammation in a joint. Diagnosis of gout relies on identification of MSU crystals under a compensated polarized light microscope (CPLM) in synovial fluid aspirated from the patient’s joint. The detection of MSU crystals by optical microscopy is enhanced by their birefringent properties. However, CPLM partially suffers from the high-cost and bulkiness of conventional lens-based microscopy, and its relatively small field-of-view (FOV) limits the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis. Here we present a lens-free polarized microscope which adopts a novel differential and angle-mismatched polarizing optical design achieving wide-field and high-resolution holographic imaging of birefringent objects with a color contrast similar to that of a standard CPLM. The performance of this computational polarization microscope is validated by imaging MSU crystals made from a gout patient’s tophus and steroid crystals used as negative control. This lens-free polarized microscope, with its wide FOV (>20 mm2), cost-effectiveness and field-portability, can significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis, reduce costs, and can be deployed even at the point-of-care and in resource-limited clinical settings.

  1. Wide-field synovial fluid imaging using polarized lens-free on-chip microscopy for point-of-care diagnostics of gout (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Gout and pseudogout are forms of crystal arthropathy caused by monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint, respectively, that can result in painful joints. Detecting the unique-shaped, birefringent MSU/CPPD crystals in a synovial fluid sample using a compensated polarizing microscope has been the gold-standard for diagnosis since the 1960's. However, this can be time-consuming and inaccurate, especially if there are only few crystals in the fluid. The high-cost and bulkiness of conventional microscopes can also be limiting for point-of-care diagnosis. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital holography routinely achieves high-throughput and high-resolution imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable design. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, polarized lens-free on-chip imaging of MSU and CPPD crystals over a wide field-of-view (FOV ~ 20.5 mm2, i.e., gout and pseudogout. Circularly polarizer partially-coherent light is used to illuminate the synovial fluid sample on a glass slide, after which a quarter-wave-plate and an angle-mismatched linear polarizer are used to analyze the transmitted light. Two lens-free holograms of the MSU/CPPD sample are taken, with the sample rotated by 90°, to rule out any non-birefringent objects within the specimen. A phase-recovery algorithm is also used to improve the reconstruction quality, and digital pseudo-coloring is utilized to match the color and contrast of the lens-free image to that of a gold-standard microscope image to ease the examination by a rheumatologist or a laboratory technician, and to facilitate computerized analysis.

  2. Lens-free imaging of magnetic particles in DNA assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Frederik; Vercruysse, Dries; Peeters, Sara; Liu, Chengxun; Stakenborg, Tim; Lagae, Liesbet; Del-Favero, Jurgen

    2013-11-07

    We present a novel opto-magnetic system for the fast and sensitive detection of nucleic acids. The system is based on a lens-free imaging approach resulting in a compact and cheap optical readout of surface hybridized DNA fragments. In our system magnetic particles are attracted towards the detection surface thereby completing the labeling step in less than 1 min. An optimized surface functionalization combined with magnetic manipulation was used to remove all nonspecifically bound magnetic particles from the detection surface. A lens-free image of the specifically bound magnetic particles on the detection surface was recorded by a CMOS imager. This recorded interference pattern was reconstructed in software, to represent the particle image at the focal distance, using little computational power. As a result we were able to detect DNA concentrations down to 10 pM with single particle sensitivity. The possibility of integrated sample preparation by manipulation of magnetic particles, combined with the cheap and highly compact lens-free detection makes our system an ideal candidate for point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  3. Integrated immunoassay using tuneable surface acoustic waves and lensfree detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Zhang, Yi; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-08-21

    The diagnosis of infectious diseases in the Developing World is technologically challenging requiring complex biological assays with a high analytical performance, at minimal cost. By using an opto-acoustic immunoassay technology, integrating components commonly used in mobile phone technologies, including surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers to provide pressure driven flow and a CMOS camera to enable lensfree detection technique, we demonstrate the potential to produce such an assay. To achieve this, antibody functionalised microparticles were manipulated on a low-cost disposable cartridge using the surface acoustic waves and were then detected optically. Our results show that the biomarker, interferon-γ, used for the diagnosis of diseases such as latent tuberculosis, can be detected at pM concentrations, within a few minutes (giving high sensitivity at a minimal cost). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  4. Yeast viability and concentration analysis using lens-free computational microscopy and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Alborz; Zhang, Yibo; Greenbaum, Alon; Guziak, Alex; Luong, Michelle; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Berg, Brandon; Ozkan, Haydar; Luo, Wei; Wu, Michael; Wu, Yichen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Research laboratories and the industry rely on yeast viability and concentration measurements to adjust fermentation parameters such as pH, temperature, and pressure. Beer-brewing processes as well as biofuel production can especially utilize a cost-effective and portable way of obtaining data on cell viability and concentration. However, current methods of analysis are relatively costly and tedious. Here, we demonstrate a rapid, portable, and cost-effective platform for imaging and measuring viability and concentration of yeast cells. Our platform features a lens-free microscope that weighs 70 g and has dimensions of 12 × 4 × 4 cm. A partially-coherent illumination source (a light-emitting-diode), a band-pass optical filter, and a multimode optical fiber are used to illuminate the sample. The yeast sample is directly placed on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor chip, which captures an in-line hologram of the sample over a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. The hologram is transferred to a touch-screen interface, where a trained Support Vector Machine model classifies yeast cells stained with methylene blue as live or dead and measures cell viability as well as concentration. We tested the accuracy of our platform against manual counting of live and dead cells using fluorescent exclusion staining and a bench-top fluorescence microscope. Our regression analysis showed no significant difference between the two methods within a concentration range of 1.4 × 105 to 1.4 × 106 cells/mL. This compact and cost-effective yeast analysis platform will enable automatic quantification of yeast viability and concentration in field settings and resource-limited environments.

  5. Clamshell tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, Th. F.

    1984-01-01

    In brief, the invention is a tomograph modified to be in a clamshell configuration so that the ring or rings may be moved to multiple sampling positions. The tomograph includes an array of detectors arranged in successive adjacent relative locations along a closed curve in a first position in a selected plane, and means for securing the detectors in the relative locations in a first sampling position. The securing means is movable in the plane in two sections and pivotable at one point and only one point to enable movement of at least one of the sections to a second sampling position out of the closed curve so that the ends of the section which are opposite the point are moved apart a predetermined space

  6. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  7. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  8. Computer tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzwiedzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    Physical foundations and the developments in the transmission and emission computer tomography are presented. On the basis of the available literature and private communications a comparison is made of the various transmission tomographs. A new technique of computer emission tomography ECT, unknown in Poland, is described. The evaluation of two methods of ECT, namely those of positron and single photon emission tomography is made. (author)

  9. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  10. Rapid, portable and cost-effective yeast cell viability and concentration analysis using lensfree on-chip microscopy and machine learning

    KAUST Repository

    Feizi, Alborz

    2016-09-24

    Monitoring yeast cell viability and concentration is important in brewing, baking and biofuel production. However, existing methods of measuring viability and concentration are relatively bulky, tedious and expensive. Here we demonstrate a compact and cost-effective automatic yeast analysis platform (AYAP), which can rapidly measure cell concentration and viability. AYAP is based on digital in-line holography and on-chip microscopy and rapidly images a large field-of-view of 22.5 mm2. This lens-free microscope weighs 70 g and utilizes a partially-coherent illumination source and an opto-electronic image sensor chip. A touch-screen user interface based on a tablet-PC is developed to reconstruct the holographic shadows captured by the image sensor chip and use a support vector machine (SVM) model to automatically classify live and dead cells in a yeast sample stained with methylene blue. In order to quantify its accuracy, we varied the viability and concentration of the cells and compared AYAP\\'s performance with a fluorescence exclusion staining based gold-standard using regression analysis. The results agree very well with this gold-standard method and no significant difference was observed between the two methods within a concentration range of 1.4 × 105 to 1.4 × 106 cells per mL, providing a dynamic range suitable for various applications. This lensfree computational imaging technology that is coupled with machine learning algorithms would be useful for cost-effective and rapid quantification of cell viability and density even in field and resource-poor settings.

  11. Rapid, portable and cost-effective yeast cell viability and concentration analysis using lensfree on-chip microscopy and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Alborz; Zhang, Yibo; Greenbaum, Alon; Guziak, Alex; Luong, Michelle; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Berg, Brandon; Ozkan, Haydar; Luo, Wei; Wu, Michael; Wu, Yichen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring yeast cell viability and concentration is important in brewing, baking and biofuel production. However, existing methods of measuring viability and concentration are relatively bulky, tedious and expensive. Here we demonstrate a compact and cost-effective automatic yeast analysis platform (AYAP), which can rapidly measure cell concentration and viability. AYAP is based on digital in-line holography and on-chip microscopy and rapidly images a large field-of-view of 22.5 mm 2 . This lens-free microscope weighs 70 g and utilizes a partially-coherent illumination source and an opto-electronic image sensor chip. A touch-screen user interface based on a tablet-PC is developed to reconstruct the holographic shadows captured by the image sensor chip and use a support vector machine (SVM) model to automatically classify live and dead cells in a yeast sample stained with methylene blue. In order to quantify its accuracy, we varied the viability and concentration of the cells and compared AYAP's performance with a fluorescence exclusion staining based gold-standard using regression analysis. The results agree very well with this gold-standard method and no significant difference was observed between the two methods within a concentration range of 1.4 × 10 5 to 1.4 × 10 6 cells per mL, providing a dynamic range suitable for various applications. This lensfree computational imaging technology that is coupled with machine learning algorithms would be useful for cost-effective and rapid quantification of cell viability and density even in field and resource-poor settings.

  12. Dynamic quantitative analysis of adherent cell cultures by means of lens-free video microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allier, C.; Vincent, R.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Ghenim, L.; Gidrol, X.; Bordy, T.; Hervé, L.; Cioni, O.; Bardin, S.; Bornens, M.; Usson, Y.; Morales, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present our implementation of lens-free video microscopy setup for the monitoring of adherent cell cultures. We use a multi-wavelength LED illumination together with a dedicated holographic reconstruction algorithm that allows for an efficient removal of twin images from the reconstructed phase image for densities up to those of confluent cell cultures (>500 cells/mm2). We thereby demonstrate that lens-free video microscopy, with a large field of view ( 30 mm2) can enable us to capture the images of thousands of cells simultaneously and directly inside the incubator. It is then possible to trace and quantify single cells along several cell cycles. We thus prove that lens-free microscopy is a quantitative phase imaging technique enabling estimation of several metrics at the single cell level as a function of time, for example the area, dry mass, maximum thickness, major axis length and aspect ratio of each cell. Combined with cell tracking, it is then possible to extract important parameters such as the initial cell dry mass (just after cell division), the final cell dry mass (just before cell division), the average cell growth rate, and the cell cycle duration. As an example, we discuss the monitoring of a HeLa cell cultures which provided us with a data-set featuring more than 10 000 cell cycle tracks and more than 2x106 cell morphological measurements in a single time-lapse.

  13. Field-portable pixel super-resolution colour microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Greenbaum

    Full Text Available Based on partially-coherent digital in-line holography, we report a field-portable microscope that can render lensfree colour images over a wide field-of-view of e.g., >20 mm(2. This computational holographic microscope weighs less than 145 grams with dimensions smaller than 17×6×5 cm, making it especially suitable for field settings and point-of-care use. In this lensfree imaging design, we merged a colorization algorithm with a source shifting based multi-height pixel super-resolution technique to mitigate 'rainbow' like colour artefacts that are typical in holographic imaging. This image processing scheme is based on transforming the colour components of an RGB image into YUV colour space, which separates colour information from brightness component of an image. The resolution of our super-resolution colour microscope was characterized using a USAF test chart to confirm sub-micron spatial resolution, even for reconstructions that employ multi-height phase recovery to handle dense and connected objects. To further demonstrate the performance of this colour microscope Papanicolaou (Pap smears were also successfully imaged. This field-portable and wide-field computational colour microscope could be useful for tele-medicine applications in resource poor settings.

  14. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in

  15. Sparsity-Based Pixel Super Resolution for Lens-Free Digital In-line Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Leon Swisher, Christine; Im, Hyungsoon; Jeong, Sangmoo; Pathania, Divya; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Pivovarov, Misha; Weissleder, Ralph; Lee, Hakho

    2016-04-21

    Lens-free digital in-line holography (LDIH) is a promising technology for portable, wide field-of-view imaging. Its resolution, however, is limited by the inherent pixel size of an imaging device. Here we present a new computational approach to achieve sub-pixel resolution for LDIH. The developed method is a sparsity-based reconstruction with the capability to handle the non-linear nature of LDIH. We systematically characterized the algorithm through simulation and LDIH imaging studies. The method achieved the spatial resolution down to one-third of the pixel size, while requiring only single-frame imaging without any hardware modifications. This new approach can be used as a general framework to enhance the resolution in nonlinear holographic systems.

  16. Dynamics of cell and tissue growth acquired by means of extended field of view lensfree microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momey, F; Coutard, J-G; Bordy, T; Navarro, F; Menneteau, M; Dinten, J-M; Allier, C

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss a new methodology based on lensfree imaging to perform wound healing assay with unprecedented statistics. Our video lensfree microscopy setup is a simple device featuring only a CMOS sensor and a semi coherent illumination system. Yet it is a powerful mean for the real-time monitoring of cultivated cells. It presents several key advantages, e.g. integration into standard incubator, compatibility with standard cell culture protocol, simplicity and ease of use. It can perform the follow-up in a large field of view (25 mm(2)) of several crucial parameters during the culture of cells i.e. their motility, their proliferation rate or their death. Consequently the setup can gather large statistics both in space and time. Here we uses this facility in the context of wound healing assay to perform label-free measurements of the velocities of the fronts of proliferation of the cell layer as a function of time by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) processing. However, for such tissue growth experiments, the field of view of 25 mm(2) remains not sufficient and results can be biased depending on the position of the device with respect to the recipient of the cell culture. Hence, to conduct exhaustive wound healing assays, we propose to enlarge the field of view up to 10 cm(2) through a raster scan, by moving the source/sensor with respect to the Petri dish. We have performed acquisitions of wound healing assay (keratinocytes HaCaT) both in real-time (25 mm(2)) and in final point (10 cm(2)) to assess the combination of velocimetry measurements and final point wide field imaging. In the future, we aim at combining directly our extended field of view acquisitions (>10 cm(2)) with real time ability inside the incubator.

  17. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to a multiplexer slip ring means for receiving output from the detectors and enabling interfeed to the image reconstruction station. (U.K.)

  18. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are presented of a tomographic scanning apparatus, its rotational assembly, and the control and circuit elements, with particular reference to the amplifier and multiplexing circuits enabling detector signal calibration. (U.K.)

  19. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal, and particularly to the design of the gas-pressurized ionization detection system. (U.K.)

  20. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification describes a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to the adjustable fan beam and its collimator system, together with the facility for taking a conventional x-radiograph without moving the patient. (U.K.)

  1. Combined reflection and transmission microscope for telemedicine applications in field settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Gabriel; Greenbaum, Alon; Isikman, Serhan O; Lee, Kelvin; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-08-21

    We demonstrate a field-portable upright and inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes. This compact and cost-effective dual-mode microscope weighs only ∼135 grams (image of the specimen onto an opto-electronic sensor-array that is positioned above the beam-splitter cube. In addition to this, the illumination beam is also partially transmitted through the same specimen, which then casts lensfree in-line holograms of the same objects onto a second opto-electronic sensor-array that is positioned underneath the beam-splitter cube. By rapid digital reconstruction of the acquired lensfree holograms, transmission images (both phase and amplitude) of the same specimen are also created. We tested the performance of this field-portable microscope by imaging various micro-particles, blood smears as well as a histopathology slide corresponding to skin tissue. Being compact, light-weight and cost-effective, this combined reflection and transmission microscope might especially be useful for telemedicine applications in resource limited settings. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  2. Mobile 3D tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illerhaus, Bernhard; Goebbels, Juergen; Onel, Yener; Sauerwein, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Mobile tomographs often have the problem that high spatial resolution is impossible owing to the position or setup of the tomograph. While the tree tomograph developed by Messrs. Isotopenforschung Dr. Sauerwein GmbH worked well in practice, it is no longer used as the spatial resolution and measuring time are insufficient for many modern applications. The paper shows that the mechanical base of the method is sufficient for 3D CT measurements with modern detectors and X-ray tubes. CT measurements with very good statistics take less than 10 min. This means that mobile systems can be used, e.g. in examinations of non-transportable cultural objects or monuments. Enhancement of the spatial resolution of mobile tomographs capable of measuring in any position is made difficult by the fact that the tomograph has moving parts and will therefore have weight shifts. With the aid of tomographies whose spatial resolution is far higher than the mechanical accuracy, a correction method is presented for direct integration of the Feldkamp algorithm [de

  3. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Details are given of a tomographic scanning apparatus, with particular reference to the means of adjusting the apparent gain of the signal processing means for receiving output signals from the detectors, to compensate for drift in the gain characteristics, including means for passing a reference signal. (U.K.)

  4. Axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An axial tomographic system is described comprising axial tomographic means for collecting sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption of a number of beams of penetrating radiation through a planar slice of an object. It includes means to locate an object to be analyzed, a source and detector for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector, and means to rotate (and optionally translate) the source as well as means to process the collected sets of data. Data collection, data processing, and data display can each be conducted independently of each other. An additional advantage of the system described is that the raw data (i.e., the originally collected data) are not destroyed by the data processing but instead are retained intact for further reference or use, if needed

  5. Tomographic method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    A tomographic x-ray machine has a camera and film-plane section which move about a primary axis for imaging a selected cross-section of an anatomical member onto the film. A ''scout image'' of the member is taken at right angles to the plane of the desired cross-section to indicate the cross-section's angle with respect to the primary axis. The film plane is then located at the same angle with respect to a film cassette axis as the selected cross-section makes with the primary axis. The film plane and the cross-section are then maintained in parallel planes throughout motion of the camera and film plane during tomographic radiography. (author)

  6. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-01-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  7. Tomographic scanning apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abele, M.

    1983-01-01

    A computerized tomographic scanning apparatus suitable for diagnosis and for improving target identification in stereotactic neurosurgery is described. It consists of a base, a source of penetrating energy, a detector which produces scanning signals and detector positioning means. A frame with top and bottom arms secures the detector and source to the top and bottom arms respectively. A drive mechanism rotates the frame about an axis along which the frame may also be moved. Finally, the detector may be moved relative to the bottom arm in a direction contrary to the rotation of the frame. (U.K.)

  8. Computerized tomographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbarsen, R.; Barrett, D.M.; Garrott, P.M.; Foley, L.E.; Redington, R.W.; Lambert, T.W.; Edelheit, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized tomographic system for examining human breasts is described in detail. Conventional X-ray scanning apparatus has difficulty in achieving the levels of image definition and examination speeds required for mass screening. A novel method of scanning successive layers of the breast with a rotating X-ray beam is discussed and details of the control circuitry and sequence steps are given. The method involves immersing the breast in an inner fluid (e.g. water) filled container which is stationary during an examination and is surrounded by a large outer container which is also filled with the fluid; the inner and outer containers are always maintained at a constant height and the X-ray absorption across the fan-shaped beam is as close as possible to constant. (U.K.)

  9. Emission computed tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Y.; Kanno, I.; Koga, K.; Miura, S.; Uemura, K.

    1981-01-01

    Emission computed tomograph wherein a pluralty of detectors surround an object to be examined so as to detect x- or gamma radiation emitted by said object. In front of each of said detectors there is provided a collimator which comprises a pair of main plates and a subsidiary plate interposed therebetween. The plates are made of a material capable of blocking penetration of the radiation therethrough and so supported as to be swingable over an angle sufficient to cover the whole of said object. The plates of all the collimators are simultaneously swung to the same side and at the same angular speed thereby to change the direction of incidence of said radiation on each of said detectors

  10. Tomographic examination table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redington, R.W.; Henkes, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Equipment is described for positioning and supporting patients during tomographic mammography using X-rays. The equipment consists of a table and fabric slings which permit the examination of a downward, pendant breast of a prone patient by allowing the breast to pass through a aperture in the table into a fluid filled container. The fluid has an X-ray absorption coefficient similar to that of soft human tissue allowing high density resolution radiography and permitting accurate detection of breast tumours. The shape of the equipment and the positioning of the patient allow the detector and X-ray source to rotate 360 0 about a vertical axis through the breast. This permits the use of relatively simple image reconstruction algorithms and a divergent X-ray geometry. (UK)

  11. A Field-Portable Cell Analyzer without a Microscope and Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dongmin; Oh, Sangwoo; Lee, Moonjin; Hwang, Yongha; Seo, Sungkyu

    2017-12-29

    This paper demonstrates a commercial-level field-portable lens-free cell analyzer called the NaviCell (No-stain and Automated Versatile Innovative cell analyzer) capable of automatically analyzing cell count and viability without employing an optical microscope and reagents. Based on the lens-free shadow imaging technique, the NaviCell (162 × 135 × 138 mm³ and 1.02 kg) has the advantage of providing analysis results with improved standard deviation between measurement results, owing to its large field of view. Importantly, the cell counting and viability testing can be analyzed without the use of any reagent, thereby simplifying the measurement procedure and reducing potential errors during sample preparation. In this study, the performance of the NaviCell for cell counting and viability testing was demonstrated using 13 and six cell lines, respectively. Based on the results of the hemocytometer ( de facto standard), the error rate (ER) and coefficient of variation (CV) of the NaviCell are approximately 3.27 and 2.16 times better than the commercial cell counter, respectively. The cell viability testing of the NaviCell also showed an ER and CV performance improvement of 5.09 and 1.8 times, respectively, demonstrating sufficient potential in the field of cell analysis.

  12. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  13. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sætre, C.; Johansen, G.A.; Tjugum, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: ► Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. ► High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow pattern and gas fraction. ► Dual modality

  14. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saetre, C., E-mail: camilla@ift.uib.no [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Johansen, G.A. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen (Norway); Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Tjugum, S.A. [Michelsen Centre for Industrial Measurement Science and Technology (Norway); Roxar Flow Measurement, Bergen (Norway)

    2012-07-15

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiphase flow gas-fraction and flow regime measurements by multi gamma ray beams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-speed gamma ray tomograph as reference for the flow

  15. Tomographic imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Horiba, I.; Kohno, H.; Nakaya, C.; Sekihara, K.; Shiono, H.; Tomura, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yanaka, S.

    1980-01-01

    A tomographic imaging system comprising: irradiating means for irradating a cross-section of an object under consideration with radiation rays from plural directions; detector means for detecting the radiation rays transmitted through the cross-section of said object to produce an output signal; first memory means for storing the output signal of said detector means; and an image jreconstructing section for performing a convolution integral operation on the contents of said first memory means by means of a first weighting function to reconstruct a three-dimensional image of the cross-section of said object, said image reconstructing section including (I) second memory means for storing a second weighting function, said second weighting function being provided with a predetermined positive and negative (N-1)th order when the output signal of said detector means produced by the irradiation of the cross-section of said object from one of said plural directions is sampled by N points, the value of the (N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the (N-1)th order to positive infinity and the value of -(N-1)th order of said second weighting function being an integration of said first weighting function from the -(N-1)th order to negative infinity, (II) control means for successively reading out the contents of said first and second memory means, and (III) operational means for performing multiplying and summing operations on the read-out contents of said first and second memory means, said operational means producing the product of the values fo the (N-1)th and -(N-1)th orders of said second weighting function and a component of the output signal of said detector means relating to the radiation rays free from the absorption thereof by said object

  16. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body, specifically the feet, lower legs and, in bed-ridden patients, the buttocks. The skin findings of cutaneous ... that are in contact with the lungs’ microscopic air sacs – the condition may quickly pose a threat ...

  17. Computer tomographic diagnosis of echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, M.; Fretz, C.; Fuchs, W.A.

    1980-08-01

    The computer tomographic appearances and differential diagnosis in 22 patients with echinococcosis are described; of these, twelve were of the cystic and ten of the alveolar type. The computer tomographic appearances are characterised by the presence of daughter cysts (66%) within the sharply demarkated parasitic cyst of water density. In the absence of daughter cysts, a definite aetiological diagnosis cannot be made, although there is a tendency to clasification of the occassionally multiple echinococcus cysts. The computer tomographic appearances of advanced alveolar echinococcosis are characterised by partial collequative necrosis, with clacification around the necrotic areas (90%). The absence of CT evidence of partial necrosis and calsification of the pseudotumour makes it difficult to establish a specific diagnosis. The conclusive and non-invasive character of the procedure and its reproducibility makes computer tomography the method of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of echinococcosis.

  18. Tomographic methods in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the various approaches to tomographic imaging that have been pursued in nuclear medicine. The evolution of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is discussed in detail, and the major classes of instrumentation are represented. A section on positron emission tomography is also included, but is rather brief and may serve only as a general introduction

  19. Original circuitry for TOHR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuzon, J.C.; Pinot, L.

    1999-01-01

    Having industrialization in mind, a specific electronics for a high resolution tomograph is designed out of the usual standards of nuclear physics. All the information are converted in the time domain and a fast processor, in front of the data acquisition, carries out the time and energy coincidences. (authors)

  20. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  1. Rapid immuno-analytical system physically integrated with lens-free CMOS image sensor for food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Mook; Lee, Won-Ho; Lee, Do-Young; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2014-02-15

    To realize an inexpensive, pocket-sized immunosensor system, a rapid test devise based on cross-flow immuno-chromatography was physically combined with a lens-free CMOS image sensor (CIS), which was then applied to the detection of the food-borne pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium). Two CISs, each retaining 1.3 mega pixel array, were mounted on a printed circuit board to fabricate a disposable sensing module, being connectable with a signal detection system. For the bacterial analysis, a cellulose membrane-based immunosensing platform, ELISA-on-a-chip (EOC), was employed, being integrated with the CIS module, and the antigen-antibody reaction sites were aligned with the respective sensor. In such sensor construction, the chemiluminescent signals produced from the EOC are transferred directly into the sensors and are converted to electric signals on the detector. The EOC-CIS integrated sensor was capable of detecting a traceable amount of the bacterium (4.22 × 10(3)CFU/mL), nearly comparable to that adopting a sophisticated detector such as cooled-charge-coupled device, while having greatly reduced dimensions and cost. Upon coupling with immuno-magnetic separation, the sensor showed an additional 67-fold enhancement in the detection limit. Furthermore, a real sample test was carried out for fish muscles inoculated with a sample of 3.3CFU S. typhimurium per 10 g, which was able to be detected earlier than 6h after the onset of pre-enrichment by culture. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomographic appearances of cherubism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, S D; Boccardi, A; Mela, F; Romagnoli, R

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) aspects of six cases of cherubism are described. Through its optimal representation of the lesions, CT enabled certain characteristics of this disease to be substantiated, namely, limitation of the process to the bones of the jaw and primarily superficial development of the mandibular lesions, coupled with an unusual mandibular condylar impairment. Moreover, the composition of this series permitted investigation of the condition in its several stages of progression.

  3. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarano, F

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127–54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures. (topical review)

  4. Segmentation-DrivenTomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas

    such that the segmentation subsequently can be carried out by use of a simple segmentation method, for instance just a thresholding method. We tested the advantages of going from a two-stage reconstruction method to a one stage segmentation-driven reconstruction method for the phase contrast tomography reconstruction......The tomographic reconstruction problem is concerned with creating a model of the interior of an object from some measured data, typically projections of the object. After reconstructing an object it is often desired to segment it, either automatically or manually. For computed tomography (CT...

  5. Computer tomographic examinations in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villiers, J.F.K.

    1984-01-01

    Epileptic patients that was examined at the Universitas Hospital (Bloemfontein) by means of computerized tomography for the period July 1978 - December 1980, are divided into two groups: a) Patients with general epilepsy of convulsions - 507; b) Patients with vocal or partial epilepsy - 111. The method of examination and the results for both general and vocal epilepsy are discussed. A degenerative state was found in 35% of the positive computer tomographic examinations in general epilepsy and 22% of the positive examinations for vocal epilepsy. The purpose of the article was to explain the circumstances that can be expected when a epileptic patient is examined by means of computerized tomography

  6. Ovarian metastases: Computed tomographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megibow, A.J.; Hulnick, D.H.; Bosniak, M.A.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomographic scans of 34 patients with ovarian metastases were reviewed to assess the radiographic appearances and to correlate these with the primary neoplasms. Primary neoplasms were located in the colon (20 patients), breast (six), stomach (five), small bowel (one), bladder (one), and Wilms tumor of the kidney (one). The radiographic appearance of the metastatic lesions could be described as predominantly cystic (14 lesions), mixed (12 lesions), or solid (seven lesions). The cystic and mixed lesions tended to be larger in overall diameter than the solid. The metastases from gastric carcinoma appeared solid in four of five cases. The metastases from the other neoplasms had variable appearances simulating primary ovarian carcinoma

  7. Precision of quantum tomographic detection of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ariano, G.M. (Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Alessandro Volta' ' , Via A. Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy)); Macchiavello, Chiara (Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Alessandro Volta' ' , Via A. Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy)); Paris, M.G.A. (Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' Alessandro Volta' ' , Via A. Bassi 6, I-27100, Pavia (Italy))

    1994-11-21

    Homodyne tomography provides an experimental technique for reconstructing the density matrix of the radiation field. Here we analyze the tomographic precision in recovering observables like the photon number, the quadrature, and the phase. We show that tomographic reconstruction, despite providing a complete characterization of the state of the field, is generally much less efficient than conventional detection techniques. ((orig.))

  8. Precision of quantum tomographic detection of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ariano, G.M.; Macchiavello, Chiara; Paris, M.G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Homodyne tomography provides an experimental technique for reconstructing the density matrix of the radiation field. Here we analyze the tomographic precision in recovering observables like the photon number, the quadrature, and the phase. We show that tomographic reconstruction, despite providing a complete characterization of the state of the field, is generally much less efficient than conventional detection techniques. ((orig.))

  9. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 180 0 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  10. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi, N.; Mannweiler, E.; Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  11. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  14. Tomographical properties of uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    Recent work in coded aperture imaging has shown that the uniformly redundant array (URA) can image distant planar radioactive sources with no artifacts. The performance of two URA apertures when used in a close-up tomographic imaging system is investigated. It is shown that a URA based on m sequences is superior to one based on quadratic residues. The m sequence array not only produces less obnoxious artifacts in tomographic imaging, but is also more resilient to some described detrimental effects of close-up imaging. It is shown that in spite of these close-up effects, tomographic depth resolution increases as the source is moved closer to the detector

  15. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  16. Compact Positron Tomograph for Prostate Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huber, Jennifer S

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to construct a functioning compact positron tomograph, whose geometry is optimized for detecting prostate tumors with molecular tracers such as 11Ccholine (carbon-11 choline...

  17. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial gliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisberg, L.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in eight patients with pathological evidence of cerebral gliosis are analyzed. CT findings do not permit differentiation of gliosis from other neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions. (orig.)

  18. Precision tomographic analysis of reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Jong Soo; Jeong, Jwong Hwan; Nam, Ki Yong

    2001-03-01

    For the tomographical assay, search of current status, analysis of neutron beam characteristics, MCNP code simulation, sim-fuel fabrication, neutron experiment for sim-fuel, multiaxes operation system design were done. In sensitivity simulation, the reconstruction results showed the good agreement. Also, the scoping test at ANL was very helpful for actual assay. Therefore, the results are applied for HANARO tomographical system setup and consecutive next research.

  19. Precision tomographic analysis of reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Jong Soo; Jeong, Jwong Hwan; Nam, Ki Yong

    2001-03-01

    For the tomographical assay, search of current status, analysis of neutron beam characteristics, MCNP code simulation, sim-fuel fabrication, neutron experiment for sim-fuel, multiaxes operation system design were done. In sensitivity simulation, the reconstruction results showed the good agreement. Also, the scoping test at ANL was very helpful for actual assay. Therefore, the results are applied for HANARO tomographical system setup and consecutive next research

  20. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Besnerais, Guy Le; Plyer, Aurélien; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels. (paper)

  1. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Geir Anton

    2013-01-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  2. Introduction to curved rotary tomographic apparatus 'TOMOREX'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kazuo; Shinojima, Masayasu; Kohirasawa, Hideo; Tokui, Mitsuru

    1980-01-01

    In recent years, panorama X-ray photographic method is widely used for the X-ray diagnosis of teeth, jawbones and faces. One type based on the principle of tomography is curved surface rotary tomographic method utilizing fine-gap X-ray beam. With the synchronous rotation of an X-ray tube and a photographic film around a face, describing a U-shaped tomographic plane along a dental arch, an upper or lower jawbone is photographed. In the ''TOMOREX'' belonging to this type, is different tomographic planes are available, so that by selecting any position in advance, the part can be photographed. Furthermore, patients can be subjected to examination as laid on a stretcher. The mechanism and equipment, and the photographic method for eye sockets, cheekbones, upper jaw cavities and stereoscopic images are described. (J.P.N.)

  3. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial pyogenic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. J.; Suh, J. H.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The early diagnosis and effective treatment of brain abscess pose a difficult clinical problem. With the advent of computed tomography, however, it appears that mortality due to intracranial abscess has significantly diminished. 54 cases of intracranial pyogenic abscess are presented. Etiologic factors and computed tomographic findings are analyzed and following result are obtained. 1. The common etiologic factors are otitis media, post operation, and head trauma, in order of frequency. 2. The most common initial computed tomographic findings of brain abscess is ring contrast enhancement with surrounding brain edema. 3. The most characteristic computed tomographic finding of ring contrast enhancement is smooth thin walled ring contrast enhancement. 4. Most of thick irregular ring contrast enhancement are abscess associated with cyanotic heart disease or poor operation. 5. The most common findings of epidural and subdural empyema is crescentic radiolucent area with thin wall contrast enhancement without surrounding brain edema in convexity of brain

  4. First experience with a mobile computed tomograph in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoj, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    Utilization experience of mobile computerized tomograph mounted in the bus is presented. Problems concerning staff, selection of medical base institutes etc are considered. Efficiency of mobile computerized tomographes in revealing different diseases is pointed out

  5. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  6. Arbitrary layer tomographic method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Ishida, M.

    1984-01-01

    Many two-dimensional X-ray projection distribution images obtained by exposing an object to X-rays in various directions are once stored in positions different from one another in a stimulable phosphor sheet or respectively in many stimulable phosphor sheets. The stimulable phosphor sheet or sheets are then scanned with stimulating rays, and the light emitted thereby from the stimulable phosphor sheet or sheets is photoelectrically read out to obtain electric signals representing the X-ray projection distribution images. The electric signals are processed to obtain a tomographic image of an arbitrary tomographic layer of the object

  7. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  8. Computed tomographic appearances of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigira, Masaki; Shimizu, Toru (Gunma Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery)

    1989-08-01

    Computed tomographical analysis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis was performed in 27 patients. In the earliest stage hyperostosis occurred around the cartilaginous portion of the first ribs. The sternoclavicular joint space was preserved even in the late stage III of the disorder. It is also suggested that perichondritis and periostitis play important roles in the etiology of this disorder. (orig./GDG).

  9. Computed tomographic appearances of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigira, Masaki; Shimizu, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomographical analysis of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis was performed in 27 patients. In the earliest stage hyperostosis occurred around the cartilaginous portion of the first ribs. The sternoclavicular joint space was preserved even in the late stage III of the disorder. It is also suggested that perichondritis and periostitis play important roles in the etiology of this disorder. (orig./GDG)

  10. Tomographic image reconstruction using training images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2017-01-01

    We describe and examine an algorithm for tomographic image reconstruction where prior knowledge about the solution is available in the form of training images. We first construct a non-negative dictionary based on prototype elements from the training images; this problem is formulated within...

  11. Photon emission tomographic apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    Tomographic imaging system employs large area, collimated scintillation detector rotated around radiation emitting subject. Detector support rotates with an inner ring inside a stationary outer ring. Counterbalanced detector support arm is forced by spring action to cause collimator face to follow body contour as detector rotates around the body, thereby reducing collimator to subject distance to improve system resolution. Includes adjustable subject support system

  12. Case Report: Unusual computed tomographic features of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report of a 57-year old woman who presented with signs and symptoms of intracranial mass. Computed tomographic (CT) and clinical features were unusual and suggestive of a parasaggital Meningioma. However an accurate diagnosis of a tuberculoma was made at surgery and histopathological examination.

  13. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  14. The bar coil for NMR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorodzki, P.; Piatkowski, A.; Wasielewski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The bar coil (bi-planar) for the NMR tomograph, designed for medical diagnostics, has been described. The tests of coil shown that it generates good homogenous magnetic field in a big volume what results in improving of the signal-to-noise ratio

  15. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  16. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  17. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  18. Present state and development of positron tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.; Gariod, R.; Laval, M.; Tournier, F.

    1979-01-01

    This document presents the main characteristics of positron tomographs and analyses the relative importance of the parameters to be taken into consideration in the design of a tomograph: on the one hand, the physical parameters linked to the measurement of the annihilation photons by time coincidence and, on the other, the geometrical and technological parameters of prime importance in minimizing the many spurious effects. The last part endeavours to show this sort of instrumentation has evolved. Using the results obtained in our laboratory by mathematical simulation, the expected advantages are presented on the picture quality of the time of flight measurement of annihilation photons. Where the physical aspects of this method are concerned, the advantage of using cesium fluoride as scintillator is demonstrated [fr

  19. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  20. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  1. The computed tomographic appearances of cherubism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, S.D.; Boccardi, A.; Mela, F.; Romagnoli, R.

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) aspects of six cases of cherubism are described. Through its optimal representation of the lesions, CT enabled certain characteristics of this disease to be substantiated, namely, limitation of the process to the bones of the jaw and primarily superficial development of the mandibular lesions, coupled with an unusual mandibular condylar impairment. Moreover, the composition of this series permitted investigation of the condition in its several stages of progression. (orig.)

  2. Tomographic scanning apparatus with ionization detector means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification describes a tomographic scanning apparatus using a fan beam and digital output signal. Particular reference is made to the gas-pressurized ionization detector chamber, consisting of an array of side-by-side elongate ionization detection cells, the principal axis of each of the said cells being oriented along a radius extending towards the radiation source, and connection means for applying potentials across the cells for taking their output signals. (U.K.)

  3. Tomographic extreme-ultraviolet spectrographs: TESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, D M; Stephan, A; Cook, T; Vickers, J; Taylor, V; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-08-01

    We describe the system of Tomographic Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) SpectrographS (TESS) that are the primary instruments for the Tomographic Experiment using Radiative Recombinative Ionospheric EUV and Radio Sources (TERRIERS) satellite. The spectrographs were designed to make high-sensitivity {80 counts/s)/Rayleigh [one Rayleigh is equivalent to 10(6) photons/(4pi str cm(2)s)}, line-of-sight measurements of the oi 135.6- and 91.1-nm emissions suitable for tomographic inversion. The system consists of five spectrographs, four identical nightglow instruments (for redundancy and added sensitivity), and one instrument with a smaller aperture to reduce sensitivity and increase spectral resolution for daytime operation. Each instrument has a bandpass of 80-140 nm with approximately 2- and 1-nm resolution for the night and day instruments, respectively. They utilize microchannel-plate-based two-dimensional imaging detectors with wedge-and-strip anode readouts. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and calibrated at Boston University, and the TERRIERS satellite was launched on 18 May 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  4. The Homemade Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Roger C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Directions for the building of a pocket microscope that will make visible the details of insect structure and living bacteria are described. Background information on the history of microscopes and lenses is provided. The procedures for producing various types of lenses are included. (KR)

  5. Mailing microscope slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  6. Tomographic visualization of stress corrosion cracks in tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.; Kruger, R.P.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1979-06-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine the possibility of detecting and sizing cracks in reactor cooling water tubes using tomographic techniques. Due to time and financial constraints, only one tomographic reconstruction using the best technique available was made. The results indicate that tomographic reconstructions can, in fact, detect cracks in the tubing and might possibly be capable of measuring the depth of the cracks. Limits of detectability and sensitivity have not been determined but should be investigated in any future work

  7. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  8. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu

    1985-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor

  9. Computerized tomographic diagnosis of basal skull fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Shimoyama, Ichiro; Endoh, Mitsutoshi; Ninchoji, Toshiaki; Uemura, Kenichi.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of basal skull fractures used to be difficult, particularly on the basis of routine skull roentgenography alone. We have now examined the diagnostic value of conventional computerized tomography in basal skull fractures. We studied 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures. We examined them based on at least one of the following computerized tomographic criteria for basal skull fractures: 1) fracture line(s), 2) intracranial air, 3) fluid in the paranasal sinuses, and 4) fluid in the middle ear, including the mastoid air cells. The signs of the fracture line and of the intracranial air are definite indications of basal skull fracture, but the signs of fluid in the paranasal sinuses and/or in the middle ear are not definite. When combined, however, with such other clinical signs as black eye, Battle's sign, CSF leakage, CSF findings, and profuse nasal or ear bleeding, the diagnosis is more reliable. Seventy cases (85.4%) in this series had basal skull fractures according to our computerized tomographic criteria. Among them , 26 cases (31.7%) were diagnosed with fracture lines, 17 cases (20.7%) with intracranial air, 16 cases (19.5%) with fluid in the paranasal sinuses, 10 cases (12.2%) with fluid in the middle ear, and one case (1.2%) with fluid in both. Twelve cases (14.6%) of the 82 cases clinically diagnosed as basal skull fractures could not have been diagnosed on our computerized tomographic criteria alone. We diagnosed them because of CSF leakage, CSF findings, surgical findings, etc. (author)

  10. Computer tomographic investigation of ancient Egyptian mummies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, K.H.; Pahl, W.M.; Tuebingen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Radiological and computer tomographic examinations of Egyptian mummies have been carried out at the Institute of Anthropology and Human Genetics from 1975 to 1978. These have demonstrated the value of CT in medical archaeology. It enables one to study the soft tissues, the skin (if bandaged), the muscles and any organs retained in situ for magical or religious reason. Measurements of attenuation values indicate the materials which were used for mummifying the skin and organs. Characteristic examples are described and the early results of these examinations are discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Computer tomographic investigation of ancient Egyptian mummies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, K H; Pahl, W M

    1981-08-01

    Radiological and computer tomographic examinations of Egyptian mummies have been carried out at the Institute of Anthropology and Human Genetics from 1975 to 1978. These have demonstrated the value of CT in medical archaeology. It enables one to study the soft tissues, the skin (if bandaged), the muscles and any organs retained in situ for magical or religious reason. Measurements of attenuation values indicate the materials which were used for mummifying the skin and organs. Characteristic examples are described and the early results of these examinations are discussed.

  12. An intragastric trichobezoar: computerised tomographic appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris B

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old lady presented with a history of abdominal pain and distension since two months. The ultrasound examination showed an epigastric mass, which was delineated as a filling defect in the stomach on barium studies. The computerised tomographic scan showed a gastric mass with pockets of air in it, without post-contrast enhancement. This case highlights the characteristic appearance on computerised tomography of a bezoar within the stomach, a feature that is not commonly described in medical literature.

  13. Computed tomographic study in children with microcephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masatoshi; Okuno, Takehiko; Mikawa, Haruki

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) brain scanning was performed on fifty-eight infants and children with microcephaly. CT scans were useful for detecting unsuspected brain lesions and for diagnosing underlying diseases. The head size did not correlate with the CT findings, the degree of mental retardation, or the existence of motor disturbance or epilepsy. On the other hand, the CT findings were correlated with the degree of mental retardation, and the existence of motor disturbance or epilepsy. CT scans were useful for determining the prognosis of the microcephaly. (author)

  14. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  15. Microscopic approach to polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    contrary to experimental experience. In order to remove this absurdity the semiclassical approach must be abandoned and the electromagnetic field quantized. A simple microscopic polariton model is then derived. From this the wave function for the interacting exciton-photon complex is obtained...... of light of the crystal. The introduction of damping smears out the excitonic spectra. The wave function of the polariton, however, turns out to be very independent of damping up to large damping values. Finally, this simplified microscopic polariton model is compared with the exact solutions obtained...... for the macroscopic polariton model by Hopfield. It is seen that standing photon and exciton waves must be included in an exact microscopic polariton model. However, it is concluded that for practical purposes, only the propagating waves are of importance and the simple microscopic polariton wave function derived...

  16. Microscopic Theory of Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the microscopic method has been applied to the notoriously difficult problem of nuclear fission with unprecedented success. In this paper, we discuss some of the achievements and promise of the microscopic method, as embodied in the Hartree-Fock method using the Gogny finite-range effective interaction, and beyond-mean-field extensions to the theory. The nascent program to describe induced fission observables using this approach at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented

  17. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  18. Experience of computed tomographic myelography and discography in cervical problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Uratsuji, Masaaki; Suzuki, Kunio; Matsui, Eigo [Hyogo Prefectural Awaji Hospital, Sumoto, Hyogo (Japan); Kurihara, Akira

    1983-06-01

    CTM (computed tomographic myelography) was performed on 15 cases of cervical lesions, and on 5 of them, CTD (computed tomographic discography) was also made. CTM revealed the intervertebral state, and in combination with CTD, providing more accurate information. The combined method of CTM and CTD was useful for soft disc herniation.

  19. Terahertz wave tomographic imaging with a Fresnel lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Wang; X.-C. Zhang

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional tomographic imaging using a Fresnel lens with broadband terahertz pulses. Objects at various locations along the beam propagation path are uniquely imaged on the same imaging plane using a Fresnel lens with different frequencies of the imaging beam. This procedure allows the reconstruction of an object's tomographic contrast image by assembling the frequency-dependent images.

  20. Tomographs based on non-conventional radiation sources and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuzza, R.; Fresno, M. del; Venere, Marcelo J.; Clausse, Alejandro; Moreno, C.

    2000-01-01

    Computer techniques for tomographic reconstruction of objects X-rayed with a compact plasma focus (PF) are presented. The implemented reconstruction algorithms are based on stochastic searching of solutions of Radon equation, using Genetic Algorithms and Monte Carlo methods. Numerical experiments using actual projections were performed concluding the feasibility of the application of both methods in tomographic reconstruction problem. (author)

  1. X-ray Tomographic Microscopy at TOMCAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marone, F; Hintermueller, C; McDonald, S; Abela, R; Mikuljan, G; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M, E-mail: federica.marone@psi.c [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy is a powerful technique for fast non-destructive, high resolution quantitative volumetric investigations on diverse samples. At the TOMCAT (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) beamline at the Swiss Light Source, synchrotron light is delivered by a 2.9 T superbend. The main optical component, a Double Crystal Multilayer Monochromator, covers an energy range between 8 and 45 keV. The standard TOMCAT detector offers field of views ranging from 0.75x0.75 mm{sup 2} up to 12.1x12.1 mm{sup 2} with a pixel size of 0.37 {mu}m and 5.92 {mu}m, respectively. In addition to routine measurements, which exploit the absorption contrast, the high coherence of the source also enables phase contrast tomography, implemented with two complementary techniques (Modified Transport of Intensity approach and Grating Interferometry). Typical acquisition times for a tomogram are in the order of few minutes, ensuring high throughput and allowing for semi-dynamical investigations. Raw data are automatically post-processed online and full reconstructed volumes are available shortly after a scan with minimal user intervention.

  2. Computerized tomographic in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    The process of computerized tomography has been developed for medical imaging purposes using tomographs with X-ray, and little attention has been given to others possibles applications of technique, because of its cost. As an alternative for the problem, we constructed a Tomographic System (STAC-1), using gamma-rays, for nonmedical applications. In this work we summarize the basic theory of reconstructing images using computerized tomography and we describe the considerations leading to the development of the experimental system. The method of reconstruction image implanted in the system is the filtered backprojection or convolution, with a digital filters system to carried on a pre-filtering in the projections. The experimental system is described, with details of control and the data processing. An alternative and a complementary system, using film as a detector is shown in preliminary form . This thesis discuss and shows the theorical and practical aspects, considered in the construction of the STAC-1, and also its limitations and apllications [pt

  3. Bone densitometry with the computer tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, T.

    1978-01-01

    This work tests the usefulness of the EMI head scanner MARK I for a quantitative detection of ossary mineral content. Twenty-three concentration levels of a aqueous K 2 HPO 4 -solution were positioned by means of a special clamping device at the EMI-scanner and examined at tubevoltages of 100, 120 and 140 kV. This produces an almost linear dependence between CT-unit and sample concentration, whereby it shows that the measured special element densities of samples with the same densities vary in dependence with the voltage. The examination of an anotomical fore-arm preperate served as a statement for the reproductability of computer tomographic densitometry at non-moving biological objects. The test of reproductability of bone densitometry measurements under clinical conditions was made on the occation of the six time examinations of the right hand fore-arm bone of a young dummy. Furthermore densitometric examination were made at the fore-arm shelton of 40 long-time dialysis patients in the age levels between 17 and 67 years. The reproductability of the technique presented here is at least not better with the EMI-head-scanner MARK I used here. A change is possible by using the new whole body tomographs. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within ±1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  5. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations

  6. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  7. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 2. Organ doses from computed tomographic examinations in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Panzer, W.; Drexler, G.

    1993-11-01

    This report provides a catalogue of organ dose conversion factors resulting from computed tomographic (CT) examinations of children. Two radiation qualities and two exposure geometries were simulated as well as the use of asymmetrical beams. The use of further beam shaping devices was not considered. The organ dose conversion factors are applicable to babies at the age of ca. 2 months and to children between 5 and 7 years but can be used for other ages as well with the appropriate adjustments. For the calculations, the patients were represented by the GSF tomographic anthropomorphic models BABY and CHILD. The radiation transport in the body was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The doses are presented as conversion factors of mean organ doses per air kerma free in air on the axis of rotation. Mean organ dose conversion factors are given per organ and per scanned body section of 1 cm height. The mean dose to an organ resulting from a particular CT examination can be estimated by summing up the contributions to the organ dose from all relevant sections. To facilitate the selection of the appropriate sections, a table is given which relates the tomographic models' coordinates to certain anatomical landmarks in the human body. (orig.)

  8. Collimated trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The objects of this invention are first to reduce the time required to obtain statistically significant data in trans-axial tomographic radioisotope scanning using a scintillation camera. Secondly, to provide a scintillation camera system to increase the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable from a known radiation source without sacrificing spatial resolution. Thirdly to reduce the scanning time without loss of image clarity. The system described comprises a scintillation camera detector, means for moving this in orbit about a cranial-caudal axis relative to a patient and a collimator having septa defining apertures such that gamma rays perpendicular to the axis are admitted with high spatial resolution, parallel to the axis with low resolution. The septa may be made of strips of lead. Detailed descriptions are given. (U.K.)

  9. Collimated trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The principal problem in trans-axial tomographic radioisotope scanning is the length of time required to obtain meaningful data. Patient movement and radioisotope migration during the scanning period can cause distortion of the image. The object of this invention is to reduce the scanning time without degrading the images obtained. A system is described in which a scintillation camera detector is moved to an orbit about the cranial-caudal axis relative to the patient. A collimator is used in which lead septa are arranged so as to admit gamma rays travelling perpendicular to this axis with high spatial resolution and those travelling in the direction of the axis with low spatial resolution, thus increasing the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable without sacrificing spatial resolution. (author)

  10. Computer tomographic and sonographic diagnosis of echinococcus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Huebener, K.H.; Klott, K.; Jenss, H.; Baehr, R. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1980-05-01

    In 33 patients (18 cystic echinococci, 15 alveolar) both methods produced the following findings which could be correlated with the pathological results: single or multi-centric lesions, sharp or indefinite demarkation and abnormalities in the shape and size of the liver. The sonographic findings were analysed with respect to the echo characteristics, whereas the computer tomographically demonstrated lesions were examined densitometrically in order to show calcification. Both methods demonstrate the pathological changes satisfactorily. Computer tomography is more effective in alveolar echinococcus lesions by showing the different types of calcification, whereas sonography provides a more accurate picture of the internal structure of the cysts in cystic echinococcus. Comparison of the methods in 19 patients examined by both showed a high accuracy in each method, but sonography was relatively poor in demonstrating lesions in the spleen.

  11. Computerized tomographic scanner with shaped radiation filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.; Walters, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention comprises a shaped filter and a filter correction circuitry for computerized tomographic scanners. The shaped filter is a generally u-shaped block of filter material which is adapted to be mounted between the source of radiation and the scan circle. The u-shaped block has a parabolic recess. The filter material may be beryllium, aluminum, sulphur, calcium, titanium, erbium, copper, and compounds including oxides and alloys thereof. The filter correction circuit comprises a first filter correction profile adding circuit for adding a first scaler valve to each intensity valve in a data line. The data line is operated on by a beam hardness correction polynomial. After the beam hardness polynomial correction operation, a second filter correction circuit adds a second filter correction profile consisting of a table of scalor values, one corresponding to each intensity reading in the data line

  12. Occult fractures of the knee: tomographic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Allen, N.B.; Caldwell, D.S.; Rice, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adults with painful effusions of the knee were examined for occult fractures using pluridirectional tomograph in the coronal and lateral planes. Six patients (ages 50 to 82 years) were osteopenic and gave histories ranging from none to mild trauma; one 26-year-old man was not osteopenic and had severe trauma. In all cases, routine radiographs were interpreted as negative, but tomography demonstrated a fracture. Five fractures were subchondral. Bone scans in 2 patients were positive. The authors conclude that osteopenic patients with a painful effusion of the knee should be considered to have an occult fracture. While bone scans may be helpful, tomography is recommended as the procedure of choice to define the location and extent of the fracture

  13. Axial tomographic system for radiation diagnoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The axial tomographic scanner consists of a source of hard radiation passing a fan shaped beam through a plane layer of the body under examination, a detector, and driving systems for the sequential displacement and rotation of the radiation source and the detector. The diagnosis is made by means of a data processing system offering extensive time overlap capability of the individual system functions. The data sets from transmission or absorption are processed in three independent subsystems, i.e., the scanning system, the processing system and the display system. The systems are made up of well-known modules, e.g., Nova 1200 or Eclipse 5200. Hence, as a result of the independent design of the data system, raw data will not be lost in case of faults in some subsystem. (DG) [de

  14. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  15. E-learn Computed Tomographic Angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Christensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jens K

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is widely available in emergency rooms to assess acute stroke patients. To standardize readings and educate new readers, we developed a 3-step e-learning tool based on the test-teach-retest methodology in 2 acute stroke scenarios: vascular...... occlusion and "spot sign" in acute intracerebral hemorrhage. We hypothesized that an e-learning program enhances reading skills in physicians of varying experience. METHODS: We developed an HTML-based program with a teaching segment and 2 matching test segments. Tests were taken before and after...... sign correctly 69% before versus 92% after teaching (P = .009) and reported a median self-perceived diagnostic certainty of 50% versus 75% (P = .030). Self-perceived diagnostic certainty revealed no significant increase for vascular occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: The e-learning program is a useful educational...

  16. Advanced Ultrasonic Tomograph of Children's Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre; Guillermin, Régine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Petit, Philippe

    This study deals with the development of an experimental device for performing ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) on bone in pediatric degrees. The children's bone tomographs obtained in this study, were based on the use of a multiplexed 2-D ring antenna (1 MHz and 3 MHz) designed for performing electronic and mechanical scanning. Although this approach is known to be a potentially valuable means of imaging objects with similar acoustical impedances, problems arise when quantitative images of more highly contrasted media such as bones are required. Various strategies and various mathematical procedures for modeling the wave propagation based on Born approximations have been developed at our laboratory, which are suitable for use with pediatric cases. Inversions of the experimental data obtained are presented.

  17. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Ko, Young Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1987-01-01

    The computed tomographic findings of cerebral arterial ectasia in 8 patients, of which 5 cases were angiographically documented, are reported. The ecstatic arteries, located predominantly in the suprasellar and interpeduncular cisterns, appeared as serpignous, tubular structures on the unenhanced scan. The enhanced CT scan demonstrated dense, sharply defined, homogeneous intraluminal enhancement. Until recently, the diagnosis of cerebral arterial ectasia was usually established by angiography. With introduction of CT it has become possible to noninvasively identify and characterize this vascular disorder and its associated intracranial complications. The vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia may be diagnosed by CT as an extra-axial lesion in the cerebellopontine angle. It enhances in a tubular fashion after intravenous injection of contrast.

  18. Computed tomographic investigations on intraventricular hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laber-Szillat, S.

    1982-01-01

    This work investigated in 106 patients with intraventricular hematomas all the known factors which can have an influence on prognosis: age, sex, anamnesis of the patients, size, extent and localization of the intracranial bleeding, underlying angiopathy and differences between arterial and venous and spontaneous and traumatic bleedings. It was shown that the state of mind was the deciding prognostic factor, whereby viligance was the cumulative expression of all other investigated influences. A computed tomography (CT) examination is deciding in the question of operative hydrocephalus care. In 13 patients it was further shown, how clearly CT results and brain dissection allowed themselves to be compared. The computed tomographic examination method is best suited to achieve even physiological and more extensive prognostic possibilities. (orig.) [de

  19. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  20. The scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A newly conceived microscope, based on a pure quantum phenomenon, is an ideal tool to study atom by atom the topography and properties of surfaces. Applications are presented: surface ''reconstruction'' of silicon, lamellar compound study, etc... Spectroscopy by tunnel effect will bring important information on electronic properties; it is presented with an application on silicon [fr

  1. Scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The principle underlying the design of the scanning electron microscope (SEM), the design and functioning of SEM are described. Its applications in the areas of microcircuitry and materials science are outlined. The development of SEM in India is reviewed. (M.G.B.)

  2. Lateral resolution testing of a novel developed confocal microscopic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Yunhai; Chang, Jian; Huang, Wei; Xue, Xiaojun; Xiao, Yun

    2015-10-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscope has been widely used in biology, medicine and material science owing to its advantages of high resolution and tomographic imaging. Based on a set of confirmatory experiments and system design, a novel confocal microscopic imaging system is developed. The system is composed of a conventional fluorescence microscope and a confocal scanning unit. In the scanning unit a laser beam coupling module provides four different wavelengths 405nm 488nm 561nm and 638nm which can excite a variety of dyes. The system works in spot-to-spot scanning mode with a two-dimensional galvanometer. A 50 microns pinhole is used to guarantee that stray light is blocked and only the fluorescence signal from the focal point can be received . The three-channel spectral splitter is used to perform fluorescence imaging at three different working wavelengths simultaneously. The rat kidney tissue slice is imaged using the developed confocal microscopic imaging system. Nucleues labeled by DAPI and kidney spherule curved pipe labeled by Alexa Fluor 488 can be imaged clearly and respectively, realizing the distinction between the different components of mouse kidney tissue. The three-dimensional tomographic imaging of mouse kidney tissue is reconstructed by several two-dimensional images obtained in different depths. At last the resolution of the confocal microscopic imaging system is tested quantitatively. The experimental result shows that the system can achieve lateral resolution priority to 230nm.

  3. Development of x-ray computed tomographic scanner for iron and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Isamu; Nakamura, Shigeo.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is extensively used in medicine, but has rarely been applied to non-medical purposes. Steel specimens pose particularly difficult problems-very poor transmission of X-rays and the need for high resolving capability. There has thus been no effective tomographic method of examining steel specimens. Due to the growing need for non-destructive, non-contact methods for observing and analyzing the internal conditions of steel microscopically, however, we have developed an X-ray Computed Tomographic Scanner for Steel (CTS) system, specifically for examination of steel specimens. Its major specifications and functions are as follows. Type: the second-generation CT, 8-channels, Scanning method: 6 0 revolution, 30-times traversing, Slice width: 0.5 mm, Resolving capability: 0.25 x 0.25 mm, X-ray source: 420 kV, 3 mA, X-ray detector: BGO scintillator, Standard specimen shape: 50 mm dia., 100 mm high, Measuring time: 10.5 min. Porosity of a stainless steel (SUS 304) bloom was examined three-dimensionally by the CTS system. Corrosion procedure of a steel slab was also examined. (author)

  4. Tomographic Approach in Three-Orthogonal-Basis Quantum Key Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Wen-Ye; Yin Zhen-Qiang; Chen Hua; Li Hong-Wei; Chen Wei; Han Zheng-Fu; Wen Hao

    2015-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing awareness of some three-orthogonal-basis quantum key distribution protocols, such as, the reference-frame-independent (RFI) protocol and the six-state protocol. For secure key rate estimations of these protocols, there are two methods: one is the conventional approach, and another is the tomographic approach. However, a comparison between these two methods has not been given yet. In this work, with the general model of rotation channel, we estimate the key rate using conventional and tomographic methods respectively. Results show that conventional estimation approach in RFI protocol is equivalent to tomographic approach only in the case of that one of three orthogonal bases is always aligned. In other cases, tomographic approach performs much better than the respective conventional approaches of the RFI protocol and the six-state protocol. Furthermore, based on the experimental data, we illustrate the deep connections between tomography and conventional RFI approach representations. (paper)

  5. Radiographic test phantom for computed tomographic lung nodule analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerhouni, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a method for evaluating a computed tomograph scan of a nodule in a lung of a human or non-human animal. The method comprises generating a computer tomograph of a transverse section of the animal containing lung and nodule tissue, and generating a second computer tomograph of a test phantom comprising a device which simulates the transverse section of the animal. The tissue simulating portions of the device are constructed of materials having radiographic densities substantially identical to those of the corresponding tissue in the simulated transverse section of the animal and have voids therein which simulate, in size and shape, the lung cavities in the transverse section and which contain a test reference nodule constructed of a material of predetermined radiographic density which simulates in size, shape and position within a lung cavity void of the test phantom the nodule in the transverse section of the animal and comparing the respective tomographs

  6. Computed tomographic determination of tracheal dimensions in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griscom, N.T.

    1982-01-01

    A computed tomographic system for determining the internal diameters, cross-sectional area, and length of the trachea in children and adolescents was developed. Intraluminal volumes were calculated from these measurements.The results of 18 analyses are reported

  7. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning–imaging X-ray microscope optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional X-ray microtomographic micro-imaging system which enables simultaneous measurement of differential phase contrast and absorption contrast has been developed. The optical system consists of a scanning microscope with one-dimensional focusing device and an imaging microscope with one-dimensional objective. A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning–imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown

  8. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, M.A.; Silva, A.M. Marques da

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  9. Tomographic imaging of subducted lithosphere below northwest Pacific island arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Hilst, R.; Engdahl, R.; Spakman, W.; Nolet, G.

    1991-01-01

    The seismic tomography problem does not have a unique solution, and published tomographic images have been equivocal with regard to the deep structure of subducting slabs. An improved tomographic method, using a more realistic background Earth model and surf ace-reflected as well as direct seismic phases, shows that slabs beneath the Japan and Izu Bonin island arcs are deflected at the boundary between upper and lower mantle, whereas those beneath the northern Kuril and Mariana arcs sink into the lower mantle.

  10. Variable temperature superconducting microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Yeh, W. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed and tested a promising type of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, which can be used to detect vortex motion and can operate in magnetic fields over a large temperature range. The system utilizes a single-loop coupling transformer, consisting of a patterned high Tc superconducting thin film. At one end of the transformer, a 20 μm diam detecting loop is placed close to the sample. At the other end, a large loop is coupled to a NbTi coil, which is connected to a low Tc SQUID sensor. Transformers in a variety of sizes have been tested and calibrated. The results show that the system is capable of detecting the motion of a single vortex. We have used the microscope to study the behavior of moving vortices at various positions in a YBa2Cu3O7 thin film bridge.

  11. Neuromorphic Data Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegle, John H.; Suppona, Roger A.; Aimone, James Bradley; James, Conrad D.; Follett, David R.; Townsend, Duncan C.M.; Follett, Pamela L.; Karpman, Gabe D.

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, Lewis Rhodes Labs, (LRL), shipped the first commercially viable Neuromorphic Processing Unit, (NPU), branded as a Neuromorphic Data Microscope (NDM). This product leverages architectural mechanisms derived from the sensory cortex of the human brain to efficiently implement pattern matching. LRL and Sandia National Labs have optimized this product for streaming analytics, and demonstrated a 1,000x power per operation reduction in an FPGA format. When reduced to an ASIC, the efficiency will improve to 1,000,000x. Additionally, the neuromorphic nature of the device gives it powerful computational attributes that are counterintuitive to those schooled in traditional von Neumann architectures. The Neuromorphic Data Microscope is the first of a broad class of brain-inspired, time domain processors that will profoundly alter the functionality and economics of data processing.

  12. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  13. From tomographic images to fault heterogeneities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Local Earthquake Tomography (LET is a useful tool for imaging lateral heterogeneities in the upper crust. The pattern of P- and S-wave velocity anomalies, in relation to the seismicity distribution along active fault zones. can shed light on the existence of discrete seismogenic patches. Recent tomographic studies in well monitored seismic areas have shown that the regions with large seismic moment release generally correspond to high velocity zones (HVZ's. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the seismogenic behavior of faults and the velocity structure of fault zones as inferred from seismic tomography. First, we review some recent tomographic studies in active strike-slip faults. We show examples from different segments of the San Andreas fault system (Parkfield, Loma Prieta, where detailed studies have been carried out in recent years. We also show two applications of LET to thrust faults (Coalinga, Friuli. Then, we focus on the Irpinia normal fault zone (South-Central Italy, where a Ms = 6.9 earthquake occurred in 1980 and many thousands of attershock travel time data are available. We find that earthquake hypocenters concentrate in HVZ's, whereas low velocity zones (LVZ’ s appear to be relatively aseismic. The main HVZ's along which the mainshock rupture bas propagated may correspond to velocity weakening fault regions, whereas the LVZ's are probably related to weak materials undergoing stable slip (velocity strengthening. A correlation exists between this HVZ and the area with larger coseismic slip along the fault, according to both surface evidence (a fault scarp as high as 1 m and strong ground motion waveform modeling. Smaller wave-length, low-velocity anomalies detected along the fault may be the expression of velocity strengthening sections, where aseismic slip occurs. According to our results, the rupture at the nucleation depth (~ 10-12 km is continuous for the whole fault lenoth (~ 30 km, whereas at shallow depth

  14. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  15. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  16. GPU acceleration towards real-time image reconstruction in 3D tomographic diffractive microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, J.; Simon, B.; Debailleul, M.; Liu, H.; Haeberlé, O.

    2012-06-01

    Phase microscopy techniques regained interest in allowing for the observation of unprepared specimens with excellent temporal resolution. Tomographic diffractive microscopy is an extension of holographic microscopy which permits 3D observations with a finer resolution than incoherent light microscopes. Specimens are imaged by a series of 2D holograms: their accumulation progressively fills the range of frequencies of the specimen in Fourier space. A 3D inverse FFT eventually provides a spatial image of the specimen. Consequently, acquisition then reconstruction are mandatory to produce an image that could prelude real-time control of the observed specimen. The MIPS Laboratory has built a tomographic diffractive microscope with an unsurpassed 130nm resolution but a low imaging speed - no less than one minute. Afterwards, a high-end PC reconstructs the 3D image in 20 seconds. We now expect an interactive system providing preview images during the acquisition for monitoring purposes. We first present a prototype implementing this solution on CPU: acquisition and reconstruction are tied in a producer-consumer scheme, sharing common data into CPU memory. Then we present a prototype dispatching some reconstruction tasks to GPU in order to take advantage of SIMDparallelization for FFT and higher bandwidth for filtering operations. The CPU scheme takes 6 seconds for a 3D image update while the GPU scheme can go down to 2 or > 1 seconds depending on the GPU class. This opens opportunities for 4D imaging of living organisms or crystallization processes. We also consider the relevance of GPU for 3D image interaction in our specific conditions.

  17. Radiographic and tomographic study of the elbow joint in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sendyk-Grunkraut, Alessandra; Martin, Claudia M.; Souza, Alexandre N.A.; Patricio, Geni Cristina F.; Lorigados, Carla A.B.; Matera, Julia M.; Fonseca-Pinto, Ana C.B.C.

    2017-01-01

    Elbow dysplasia disease includes an united anconeal process, fragmented medial coronoid process, osteochondrosis of humeral trochlea, articular incongruity and degenerative joint disease. The aim of this study was to present detailed morphologic and morphometric aspects of the elbow joint in dog in clinical and correlate with radiographic and tomographic (CT) exam. Inter-observer variation for articular incongruity measurements by CT, comparative analysis in the radiographic exam, angle in ulnar notch and its comparative analysis between radiographic and tomographic agreement examination in 44 elbow of dogs with different ages were evaluated. The statistics analyses included the kappa coefficient and interclass correlation and Fischer's test and McNemar's test. It was evidenced that individual performance of each radiographic incidence had poor agreement with the tomographic exam, suggesting that the accomplishment of more than two radiograph views are needed. There was no agreement between the three evaluators in the ulnar notch angle at radiographic and tomographic exams. However, there was good/moderate agreement for articular incongruity measurement in the sagittal plane between evaluators. It was possible to conclude that none of the five radiographic incidences was better than the others for radiographic analysis because each incidence had a better identification of a particular elbow compartment; measurements at the tomographic exam to evaluate radioulnar incongruity had no reproductiveness in the frontal plane, but in sagittal plan had a good/moderate agreement between observers and the angle in ulnar notch presented no repeatability at radiographic exam and no reproductiveness at tomographic exam. (author)

  18. Gamma Ray Tomographic Scan Method for Large Scale Industrial Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Ho; Jung, Sung Hee; Kim, Jong Bum; Park, Jang Geun

    2011-01-01

    The gamma ray tomography systems have been used to investigate a chemical process for last decade. There have been many cases of gamma ray tomography for laboratory scale work but not many cases for industrial scale work. Non-tomographic equipment with gamma-ray sources is often used in process diagnosis. Gamma radiography, gamma column scanning and the radioisotope tracer technique are examples of gamma ray application in industries. In spite of many outdoor non-gamma ray tomographic equipment, the most of gamma ray tomographic systems still remained as indoor equipment. But, as the gamma tomography has developed, the demand on gamma tomography for real scale plants also increased. To develop the industrial scale system, we introduced the gamma-ray tomographic system with fixed detectors and rotating source. The general system configuration is similar to 4 th generation geometry. But the main effort has been made to actualize the instant installation of the system for real scale industrial plant. This work would be a first attempt to apply the 4th generation industrial gamma tomographic scanning by experimental method. The individual 0.5-inch NaI detector was used for gamma ray detection by configuring circular shape around industrial plant. This tomographic scan method can reduce mechanical complexity and require a much smaller space than a conventional CT. Those properties make it easy to get measurement data for a real scale plant

  19. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  20. Thimble microscope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Rubinstein, Jaden; Watkins, Rachel; Cen, Zijian; Kong, Gary; Lee, W. M.

    2016-12-01

    Wearable computing devices, e.g. Google Glass, Smart watch, embodies the new human design frontier, where technology interfaces seamlessly with human gestures. During examination of any subject in the field (clinic, surgery, agriculture, field survey, water collection), our sensory peripherals (touch and vision) often go hand-in-hand. The sensitivity and maneuverability of the human fingers are guided with tight distribution of biological nerve cells, which perform fine motor manipulation over a range of complex surfaces that is often out of sight. Our sight (or naked vision), on the other hand, is generally restricted to line of sight that is ill-suited to view around corner. Hence, conventional imaging methods are often resort to complex light guide designs (periscope, endoscopes etc) to navigate over obstructed surfaces. Using modular design strategies, we constructed a prototype miniature microscope system that is incorporated onto a wearable fixture (thimble). This unique platform allows users to maneuver around a sample and take high resolution microscopic images. In this paper, we provide an exposition of methods to achieve a thimble microscopy; microscope lens fabrication, thimble design, integration of miniature camera and liquid crystal display.

  1. A tomographic approach to intravenous coronary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritman, E.L.; Bove, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Coronary artery anatomy can be visualized using high speed, volume scanning X-ray CT. A single scan during a bolus injection of contrast medium provides image data for display of all angles of view of the opacified coronary arterial tree. Due to the tomographic nature of volume image data the superposition of contrast filled cardiac chambers, such as would occur in the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent, can be eliminated. Data are presented which support these statements. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan a life-like radiologic phantom of an adult human thorax in which the left atrial and ventricular chambers and the major epicardial coronary arteries were opacified so as to simulate the levophase of an intravenous injection of contrast agent. A catheter filled with diluted contrast agent and with regions of luminal narrowing (i.e. 'stenoses') was advanced along a tract equivalent to a right ventricular catheterization. Ease of visualization of the catheter 'stenoses' and the accuracy with which they can be measured are presented. (Auth.)

  2. Comparison among tomographic reconstruction with limited data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eric F.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Vasconcelos, Daniel A.A.; Cadiz, Luis F.; Melo, Silvio B.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there is a continuing interest in applying computed tomography (CT) techniques in non-destructive testing and inspection of many industrial products. These applications of CT usually require a differentiated analysis when there are strong limitations in acquiring a sufficiently large amount of projection data. The use of a low number of tomographic data normally degrades the quality of the reconstructed image, highlighting the formation of artifacts and noise. This work investigates the reconstruction methods most commonly used (FBP, ART, SIRT, MART, SMART) and shows the performance of each one in this limited scenario. For this purpose, all methods were implemented and tested with a phantom of uniform density with well-known distribution, with measures of transmission of gamma radiation in a first generation CT scanner. The phantom is a concentric stainless steel tube coupled with a half - cylinder of aluminum. The measurements were made with an highest root mean square error, with the formation of visible artifacts. The artifacts are diminished but still visible in the ART and SIRT techniques, and the best performance was observed with the techniques MART and SMART. The technical superiority of these multiplicative methods is clearly seen in the reconstructed image quality, endorsing their application to situations of limited input data. (author)

  3. Computed tomographic findings of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, In Su; Jong, Woo Yung; Lee, Jong Yul; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Ki

    1987-01-01

    With Development of Computed Tomography, detection of the Hepatocellular Carcinoma are easily performed and frequently used in the world. During 15 months, from December 1985 to February 1987, 59 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were evaluated with computed tomography in department of radiology at Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital. The results were as follow: 1. The most prevalent age group was 5th to 7th decades, male to female ratio was 4.9:1. 2. Classification with incidence of computed tomographic appearance of the hepatocellular carcinoma were solitary type 28 cases (48%), multinodular type 24 cases (40%), and diffuse type 7 cases (12%), Association with liver cirrhosis was noted in 22 cases (38%). 3. Inhomogenous internal consistency of hepatocellular carcinoma due to central necrosis were 35 cases (60%). Portal vein invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma was noted in 15 cases (25%), and particularly most common in diffuse type 4 cases (55%). 4. On precontrast scan, all hepatocellular carcinoma were seen as area of low density except for 3 cases(0.5%) of near isodensity which turned out to be remarkable low density on postcontrast scan. 5. In solitary type, posterior segment of right lobe was most common site of involvement 12 cases (43%). In diffuse type, bilobar involvement was most common, 6 cases (85%)

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugie, Yoko

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered. (author)

  6. Computed tomographic findings of intracerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Ho Kyun; Ahn, Chi Yul [School of Medicine, Kyung-Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease in which man serves as the intermediate host of Taenia Solium, the pork tapeworm. The computed tomographic findings of 25 cases of intracerebral cysticercosis proven by pathologic and/or clinical findings during past 2 years were analysed. The results were as follows; 1. The sex was 19 males and 6 females, and 56 percent of the patients were seen in fourth and fifth decades. The most common symptom was epilepsy (72%). 2. The C. T. findings in precontrast study were varied; such as ill defined low density (48%), cystic low density (20%), dilated ventricles (20%), ill defined low density with isodense nodule (18%), cystic low density with isodense mural nodule (12%) and calcification (8%). 3. The areas of involvement were 20 cases (80%) of parenchymal form, 3 cases (12%) of ventricular form and 2 cases (8%) of mixed form. 4. The contrast-enhanced 13 cases were 5 nodular, 5 ring or rim-like and 3 mixed type enhancements, while 12 cases were not enhanced. 5. C.T. scan demonstrated more precise location and extents of cerebral cysticercosis, especially in parenchymal form. It was considered to be important in determination of surgical feasibility and its approach.

  7. Distance weighting for improved tomographic reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, R.A.; Holden, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved method for the reconstruction of emission computed axial tomography images has been developed. The method is a modification of filtered back-projection, where the back projected values are weighted to reflect the loss of formation, with distance from the camera, which is inherent in gamma camera imaging. This information loss is a result of: loss of spatial resolution with distance, attenuation, and scatter. The weighting scheme can best be described by considering the contributions of any two opposing views to the reconstruction image pixels. The weight applied to the projections of one view is set to equal the relative amount of the original activity that was initially received in that projection, assuming a uniform attenuating medium. This yields a weighting value which is a function of distance into the image with a value of one for pixels ''near the camera'', a value of .5 at the image center, and a value of zero on the opposite side. Tomographic reconstructions produced with this method show improved spatial resolution when compared to conventional 360 0 reconstructions. The improvement is in the tangential direction, where simulations have indicated a FWHM improvement of 1 to 1.5 millimeters. The resolution in the radial direction is essentially the same for both methods. Visual inspection of the reconstructed images show improved resolution and contrast

  8. Formation of tomographic images with neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, A.; Tenreiro, C; Valencia, J; Steinman, G.; Henriquez, C

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of having a non-destructive method of analysis for archaeological and paleontological samples is of interest. A special group of fossil samples has come to our attention, which because of their value should be preserved and, therefore, the availability of an indirect, non-destructive, non contaminating analytical technique is important. The strong absorption of usual kinds of radiation by a fossilized sample restricts the application of conventional methods of analysis. A type of radiation that is not completely attenuated by thick samples, in sizes that are typical in paleontology, is necessary. Neutrons may be considered as an ideal non-invasive probe with the possibility of developing a technique for the formation and analysis of images. A technique has been developed for the spatial reconstruction of the contents of a fossilized sample (tomography) with neutrons, without touching or altering the sample in any way. The neutron beam was extracted from the RECH-1 reactor belonging to the CCHEN, La Reina. The tomographic images of the contents of a fossilized egg are presented for the first time and represent views or cuts of the content as well as a set that permits the three dimensional reconstruction of the inside of the object and its subsequent animation in graphic format. This project developed a technique for taking neutron radiographs of this kind of sample including the numerical algorithms and the treatment and formation of the images (CW)

  9. Method and apparatus for producing tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, M.

    1989-01-01

    A device useful in producing a tomographic image of a selected slice of an object to be examined is described comprising: a source of penetrating radiation, sweep means for forming energy from the source into a pencil beam and repeatedly sweeping the pencil beam over a line in space to define a sweep plane, first means for supporting an object to be examined so that the pencil beam intersections the object along a path passing through the object and the selected slice, line collimating means for filtering radiation scattered by the object, the line collimating means having a field of view which intersects and sweep plane in a bounded line so that the line collimating means passes only radiation scattered by elementary volumes of the object lying along the bounded line, and line collimating means including a plurality of channels such substantially planar in form to collectively define the field of view, the channels oriented so that pencil beam sweeps along the bounded line as a function of time, and radiation detector means responsive to radiation passed by the line collimating means

  10. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Nak Kwan; Nam, Kyung Jin; Park, Churl Min; Eun, Chung Kie; Lee, Sun Wha

    1983-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is widely distributed in Far East and Southeast Asia, particularly in Korea. The central nervous system is the most frequent location for paragonimiasis outside the lungs. We analyzed the computed tomographic findings of 17 cases which were diagnosed pathologically and clinically as cerebral paragonimiasis. The results were as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female was 10 : 7 and about 88% of cases were under the age of 40 years. 2. The common locations of cerebral paragonimiasis were the occipital (12 cases) and temporal (11 cases) lobes. 3. Precontrast CT findings of cerebral paragonimiasis were low density with calcifications in 6 cases, low and isodensities in 4 cases, mixed densities in 3 cases, only low density in 2 cases and only calcification in 2 cases. Hydrocephalus (7 cases), mass effect (6 cases), atrophic change (6 cases) and cyst formation (3 cases) were associated. 4. The shape of calcifications in CT scan were soap-bubble or ring in 6 cases, nodular or oval in 6 cases, stipple in 4 cases and amorphous conglomerated in 2 cases. 5. The contrast -enhanced 8 cases were 5 ring or rim like, 2 nodular and 1 irregular enhancements, while 9 cases were not enhanced

  11. Collimator trans-axial tomographic scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved collimator is provided for a scintillation camera system that employs a detector head for transaxial tomographic scanning. One object of this invention is to significantly reduce the time required to obtain statistically significant data in radioisotope scanning using a scintillation camera. Another is to increase the rate of acceptance of radioactive events to contribute to the positional information obtainable from a radiation source of known strength without sacrificing spatial resolution. A further object is to reduce the necessary scanning time without degrading the images obtained. The collimator described has apertures defined by septa of different radiation transparency. The septa are aligned to provide greater radiation shielding from gamma radiation travelling within planes perpendicular to the cranial-caudal axis and less radiation shielding from gamma radiation travelling within other planes. Septa may also define apertures such that the collimator provides high spatial resolution of gamma rays traveling within planes perpendicular to the cranial-caudal axis and directed at the detector and high radiation sensitivity to gamma radiation travelling other planes and indicated at the detector. (LL)

  12. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  13. Solid state optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  14. Computed tomographic findings of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Chung Kie [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-09-15

    It is well known that CT is very useful in the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma. The computed tomographic findings of 56 patients diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma were reviewed and analyzed. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio was 3 : 1 and the age ranged from 31 to 73 years with average age of 54 years. 2. Alpha-fetoprotein was positive in 19 out of 38 cases (50%). HBsAg was positive in 8 out of 33 cases (24%). 3. All lesions were seen as areas of low density except 1 case (0%) of isodensity, and 40 cases (72%) appeared to be solitary while 15 (26%) were multifocal. The low density was homogenous in 13 cases (24%) and inhomogenous in 42 cases (76%), and 18 cases out of 42 cases inhomogenous low density showed peripheal and/or central nodular enhancement. The additional findings were contour changes in 37 cases (66%), metastasis in 35 cases (63%), splenomegaly in 23 cases (42%) and ascities in 22 cases (39%). 4. In postcontrast scans, 41 cases (80%) out of 51 cases showed the change of density after contrast infusion. The presence and extent of tumors were better seen after contrast infusion in 30 cases (59%), better seen before contrast infusion in 11 cases (21%) and no significant difference before and after contrast infusion in 10 cases (20%). 5. The sites of involved lobe were right lobe in 38 cases (68%), left lobe in 5 cases (9%) and both lobes in 13 cases (23%). 6. 35 cases (63%) showed evidence of metastasis to regional lymph nodes, organ or tissues.

  15. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Weon Tae; Jung, Min Ki; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyon De

    1988-01-01

    Authors analyzed the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 19 cases pathologically and clinically proven cerebral paragonimiasis that were performed at Chonnam University Hospital from April 1983 through March 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 15:4 and the most prevalent age group was 3rd decade (7 cases). The common symptoms were epileptic seizure (16 cases) and headache (12 cases). 2. The multiplicity of cerebral paragonimiasis was 7 of 19 cases and the distributions of lesion were occipital (11 cases), temporal (6 cases), frontal (5 cases) and parietal (5 cases) lobe. 3. The calcification on CT scan were single (7 cases) or multiple (7 cases) and the shape of calcification were nodular (10 cases), soap babble of ring (8 cases), and stippled (6 cases). The pattern of contrast enhancement were ring (5 cases) or nodular (1 case), and along the basal cistern (1 case with arachnoiditis). 4. 12 out of 13 cases, had long clinical symptoms over 3 years with calcifications, could be analyzed according to Valentine's vascular territory; 6 cases in PCA territory, 3 in MCA and 3 in ACA. 5. CT findings were noted according to the duration of symptoms; 5 cases, had symptoms less than 1 year, showed abscess (5 cases) and arachnoiditis (1 case) with brain edema, mass effect, hydrocephalus and contrast enhancement but no calcification in all. One case, had symptom of 1 year and 2 months, showed partially calcified granulomatous lesion with perifocal edema and contrast enhancement, 13 cases, had symptoms over 3 years, showed multiple calcification with brain atrophy (10 cases), but no contrast enhancement in all cases.

  16. Tomographic analysis of CBF in cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Hiromu; Kimura, Kazumoto; Ueda, Yuichi; Nagai, Masakatsu; Yoshimasu, Norio.

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion was examined in various types of occlusive disease by computed tomographic CBF method. The method utilized has several advantages over conventional studies using isotope, providing high resolution images in a direct relation to CT anatomy. Ten representative cases were presented from 25 consective cases of occlusive disease studied by this method. The method included inhalation of 40 to 60% xenon with serial CT scanning for 25 min. K (build-up rate), lambda (partition coefficient) and CBF values were calculated from ΔHU for each pixel and ΔXe in expired air, based on Fick's principle, and displayed on CRT as K-, lambda- and CBF-map separately. CBF for gray matter of normal control was 82 +- 11 ml/100 gm/min and that for white matter was 24 +- 5 ml/100 gm/min. The ischemic threshold for gray matter appeared to be approximately 20 ml/100 gm/min, as blood flow in focus of complete infarction was below this level. Blood flow between 20 - 30 ml/ 100 gm/min caused some change on CT, such as localized atrophy, cortical thinning, loss of distinction between gray and white matter and decreased or increased density, which were considered to be compatible with pathological changes of laminar necrosis or gliosis with neuronal loss. In a case with occlusion of middle cerebral artery with subsequent recanalization, causing hemorrhagic infarct, hyperemia was observed in the infarcted cortex that was enhanced by iodine. Periventricular lucency observed in two cases, where blood flow was decreased below threshold, could be classified as ''watershed infarction'' mainly involving white matter. In moyamoya disease, blood flow in the anterior circulation was decreased near ischemic level, whereas that in basal ganglia and territory of posterior cerebral artery was fairly preserved, which was compatible with general angiographic finding of this disease. (author)

  17. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  18. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  19. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  20. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  1. Microscopic Theory of Transconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jauho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of momentum transfer between two closely spaced mesoscopic electronic systems, which couple via Coulomb interaction but where tunneling is inhibited, have proven to be a fruitful method of extracting information about interactions in mesoscopic systems. We report a fully microscopic theory for transconductivity σ12, or, equivalently, momentum transfer rate between the system constituents. Our main formal result expresses the transconductivity in terms of two fluctuation diagrams, which are topologically related, but not equivalent to, the Azlamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson diagrams known for superconductivity. In the present paper the magnetic field dependence of σ12 is discussed, and we find that σ12(B is strongly enhanced over its zero field value, and it displays strong features, which can be understood in terms of a competition between density-of-states and screening effects.

  2. Microscopic entropy and nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, E.; Ordonets, G.; Petroskij, T.; Prigozhin, I.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained a microscopic expression for entropy in terms of H function based on nonunitary Λ transformation which leads from the time evolution as a unitary group to a Markovian dynamics and unifies the reversible and irreversible aspects of quantum mechanics. This requires a new representation outside the Hilbert space. In terms of H, we show the entropy production and the entropy flow during the emission and absorption of radiation by an atom. Analyzing the time inversion experiment, we emphasize the importance of pre- and postcollisional correlations, which break the symmetry between incoming and outgoing waves. We consider the angle dependence of the H function in a three-dimensional situation. A model including virtual transitions is discussed in a subsequent paper

  3. Computed Tomographic Perfusion Improves Diagnostic Power of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penagaluri, Ashritha; Higgins, Angela Y.; Vavere, Andrea L

    2016-01-01

    laboratories. Prevalence of flow-limiting CAD defined by invasive coronary angiography equal to 50% or greater with an associated single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging defect was 45% (114/252) and 23% (30/129) in males and females, respectively. Patient-based diagnostic......Background-Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) is a validated approach for detection and exclusion of flow-limiting coronary artery disease (CAD), but little data are available on gender-specific performance of these modalities. In this study, we...... aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of combined coronary CTA and CTP in detecting flow-limiting CAD in women compared with men.  Methods and Results-Three hundred and eighty-one patients who underwent both CTA-CTP and single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging...

  4. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  5. A tomograph VMEbus parallel processing data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, N.A.; Rogers, J.G.; Atkins, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a VME based data acquisition system suitable for the development of Positron Volume Imaging tomographs which use 3-D data for improved image resolution over slice-oriented tomographs. the data acquisition must be flexible enough to accommodate several 3-D reconstruction algorithms; hence, a software-based system is most suitable. Furthermore, because of the increased dimensions and resolution of volume imaging tomographs, the raw data event rate is greater than that of slice-oriented machines. These dual requirements are met by our data acquisition system. Flexibility is achieved through an array of processors connected over a VMEbus, operating asynchronously and in parallel. High raw data throughput is achieved using a dedicated high speed data transfer device available for the VMEbus. The device can attain a raw data rate of 2.5 million coincidence events per second for raw events which are 64 bits wide

  6. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-01-01

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect

  7. Generalized Row-Action Methods for Tomographic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Skovgaard; Hansen, Per Christian

    2014-01-01

    Row-action methods play an important role in tomographic image reconstruction. Many such methods can be viewed as incremental gradient methods for minimizing a sum of a large number of convex functions, and despite their relatively poor global rate of convergence, these methods often exhibit fast...... initial convergence which is desirable in applications where a low-accuracy solution is acceptable. In this paper, we propose relaxed variants of a class of incremental proximal gradient methods, and these variants generalize many existing row-action methods for tomographic imaging. Moreover, they allow...

  8. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  10. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  11. The new Isidore microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabouille, O.; Viard, J.; Menard, M.; Allegre, S.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the refurbishment of LECI hot laboratory in Saclay, it was decided to renew one of the two metallography lines of the building. This line is located at one end of the Isidore line of lead-shielded hot cells. The work started by the cleaning of 5 aout of 9 cells in Isidore line. Two were 2 m x 1.5 m cells, whereas the 3 others were smaller. Decontamination was difficult in both larger cells, because a lot of metallographic preparation had been performed there and because the cleaning of the lower parts of the cell, below the working area, was uneasy by remote manipulators. The refurbishment of the cells included: - Changing the windows, because old windows were made of glass panels sperated by oil, which is now prohibited by safety requirements. - Putting of a new pair of manipulators on one large cell, and adding bootings on manipulators on one large cell, and adding bootings on manipulators on both large cells. - Changing all the ventilation systems in these cells (new types of filters, new air-ducts), - Modifying and changing metallic pieces constituting the working are inside the cell - Increasing the hight of the small cells in order to add a manipulator for charging the sample on microscope or on hardness machine. - Simplifying the electrical wiring in order to decrease the fire risk in the hot cell line. - Add a better fire protection between the working area and the transfer area, i. e. between the front and the rear part of the cells. The scientific equipments fot these cells are: An Olympus microscope, modified by Optique Peter (company based in Lyons), equipped with a motorised sample holder (100 x 200 mm), maximum size of sample: O. D.=100 mm, 6 magnifications: x 12.5, x50, x100, x200, x500 and x1000, two microhardness positions: Vickers and Knoop. Polaroid image and digital camera with SIS image analysis system. A new periscope manufactured by Optique Peter. magnification x2 and x9, digital image and SIS system, and old periscope

  12. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  13. Tomographic spectral imaging: microanalysis in 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotula, P.G.; Keenan, M.R.; Michael, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Spectral imaging, where a series of complete x-ray spectra are typically collected from a 2D area, holds great promise for comprehensive near-surface microanalysis. There are however numerous microanalysis problems where 3D chemical information is needed as well. In the SEM, some sort of sectioning (either mechanical or with a focused ion beam (FIB) tool) followed by x-ray mapping has, in the past, been utilized in an attempt to perform 3D microanalysis. Reliance on simple mapping has the potential to miss important chemical features as well as misidentify others. In this paper we will describe the acquisition of serial-section tomographic spectral images (TSI) with a dual-beam FIB/SEM equipped with an EDS system. We will also describe the application of a modified version of our multivariate statistical analysis algorithms to TSIs. Serial sectioning was performed with a FEI DB-235 FIB/SEM. Firstly, the specimen normal was tilted to the optic axis of the FIB column and a trench was milled into the surface of the specimen. A second trench was then milled perpendicular to the first to provide visibility of the entire analysis surface to the x-ray detector. In addition, several fiducial markers were milled into the surface to allow for alignment from slice to slice. The electron column is at an angle of 52 deg to the ion column so the electron beam can 'see' the analysis surface milled by the FIB with no additional specimen tilting or rotation. Likewise the x-ray detector is at a radial angle of 45 deg to the plane of the electron and ion columns (about the electron column) and a take-off-angle of 35 deg with respect to an untilted specimen so it can 'see' the analysis surface as well with no additional sample tilting or rotation. Spectral images were acquired from regions 40 μm wide and 20μm deep for each slice. Approximately 1μm/slice was milled and 10-12 total slices were cut. Spectral images were acquired with a Thermo NORAN Vantage (Digital imaging

  14. Design and applications of Computed Industrial Tomographic Imaging System (CITIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishna, G S; Kumar, Umesh; Datta, S S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Isotope Div.

    1994-12-31

    This paper highlights the design and development of a prototype Computed Tomographic (CT) imaging system and its software for image reconstruction, simulation and display. It also describes results obtained with several test specimens including Dhruva reactor uranium fuel assembly and possibility of using neutrons as well as high energy x-rays in computed tomography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Computer tomographic detection of an intraspinal arachnoidal cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckein, D; Walter, K; Paal, G

    1981-03-01

    A 46 year old female patient who after 3-4 weeks of influenza suffered from strong headaches, vomiting and rotatory vertigo was subjected to a myelograph and then to a computerized tomographic investigation due to suspect cerebrospinal fluid. The computerized tomography is better than the myelography in diagnosing intraspinal arachnoidal cysts, however this should be preceded by most accurate possible segment location.

  16. Comparison of the practical diagnostic value of different tomographic movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laehde, S.; Vuoria, P.

    1977-01-01

    The practical results of linear and circular tomography with angles of 6, 20, 30 and 45 degrees and spiral tomography were compared. The spiral proved to be suitable as a tomographic movement for different purposes. In zonography, circular movement with 6 degrees of deviation proved suitable. The linear movement presented no advantages when compared with the multidirectional movements. ( orig.) [de

  17. Computed tomographic findings in manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Verbeeten, B.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical and computed tomographic (CT) findings in 3 manifesting carriers of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reported. CT proved to be an important adjunct to the clinical examination: in all our 3 cases a decrease in density was found in various non-paretic muscles

  18. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.; Alarfaj, Meshal K.; Li, Erqiang; Hernandez Sanchez, Jose Federico; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets

  19. Computerized tomographic findings in children with head trauma in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the computerized tomographic findings in children with head trauma who presented at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Methods: It is a retrospective review of patients aged 0 – 15 years with suspected intracranial injury (ICI) following head trauma, who presented for CT ...

  20. Pressure spectra from single-snapshot tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Avallone, F.; Pröbsting, S.; Ragni, D.; Scarano, F.

    2018-01-01

    The power spectral density and coherence of temporal pressure fluctuations are obtained from low-repetition-rate tomographic PIV measurements. This is achieved by extension of recent single-snapshot pressure evaluation techniques based upon the Taylor’s hypothesis (TH) of frozen turbulence and

  1. Expediting model-based optoacoustic reconstructions with tomographic symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutzweiler, Christian; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Image quantification in optoacoustic tomography implies the use of accurate forward models of excitation, propagation, and detection of optoacoustic signals while inversions with high spatial resolution usually involve very large matrices, leading to unreasonably long computation times. The development of fast and memory efficient model-based approaches represents then an important challenge to advance on the quantitative and dynamic imaging capabilities of tomographic optoacoustic imaging. Methods: Herein, a method for simplification and acceleration of model-based inversions, relying on inherent symmetries present in common tomographic acquisition geometries, has been introduced. The method is showcased for the case of cylindrical symmetries by using polar image discretization of the time-domain optoacoustic forward model combined with efficient storage and inversion strategies. Results: The suggested methodology is shown to render fast and accurate model-based inversions in both numerical simulations andpost mortem small animal experiments. In case of a full-view detection scheme, the memory requirements are reduced by one order of magnitude while high-resolution reconstructions are achieved at video rate. Conclusions: By considering the rotational symmetry present in many tomographic optoacoustic imaging systems, the proposed methodology allows exploiting the advantages of model-based algorithms with feasible computational requirements and fast reconstruction times, so that its convenience and general applicability in optoacoustic imaging systems with tomographic symmetries is anticipated

  2. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...

  3. Estimation of spatial uncertainties of tomographic velocity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, M.; Du, Z.; Querendez, E. [SINTEF Petroleum Research, Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    This research project aims to evaluate the possibility of assessing the spatial uncertainties in tomographic velocity model building in a quantitative way. The project is intended to serve as a test of whether accurate and specific uncertainty estimates (e.g., in meters) can be obtained. The project is based on Monte Carlo-type perturbations of the velocity model as obtained from the tomographic inversion guided by diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the resolution and the covariance matrices. The implementation and testing of this method was based on the SINTEF in-house stereotomography code, using small synthetic 2D data sets. To test the method the calculation and output of the covariance and resolution matrices was implemented, and software to perform the error estimation was created. The work included the creation of 2D synthetic data sets, the implementation and testing of the software to conduct the tests (output of the covariance and resolution matrices which are not implicitly provided by stereotomography), application to synthetic data sets, analysis of the test results, and creating the final report. The results show that this method can be used to estimate the spatial errors in tomographic images quantitatively. The results agree with' the known errors for our synthetic models. However, the method can only be applied to structures in the model, where the change of seismic velocity is larger than the predicted error of the velocity parameter amplitudes. In addition, the analysis is dependent on the tomographic method, e.g., regularization and parameterization. The conducted tests were very successful and we believe that this method could be developed further to be applied to third party tomographic images.

  4. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope... Devices § 884.6190 Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are...

  5. Full-field optical coherence tomography using immersion Mirau interference microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng-Hua; Chang, Chia-Jung; Kao, Ching-Fen

    2013-06-20

    In this study, an immersion Mirau interference microscope was developed for full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT). Both the reference and measuring arms of the Mirau interferometer were filled with water to prevent the problems associated with imaging a sample in air with conventional FFOCT systems. The almost-common path interferometer makes the tomographic system less sensitive to environmental disturbances. En face OCT images at various depths were obtained with phase-shifting interferometry and Hariharan algorithm. This immersion interferometric method improves depth and quality in three-dimensional OCT imaging of scattering tissue.

  6. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a specific biological object of interest. Here an AFM is presented which has an incorporated inverted optical microscope. The optical image from the optical microscope is not obscured by the cantilever...

  8. Mobile microscope complex GIB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, A.V.; Gorbachev, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    To study microstructure in operating pipelines of power units a mobile microscope system is developed and successfully used. The system includes a portable microscope, a monitor, power supply and a portable computer. The monitor is used for surveying images from a video camera mounted on the microscope. The magnification on visual examination constitutes x 100 and x 500. Diameters of pipelines examined should not be less than 130 mm. Surface preparation for microstructural studies includes routine mechanical rough grinding and polishing with subsequent etching [ru

  9. The deuteron microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Congshan; Zhang Jingshang; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The two particle Green's function is introduced. When the direct interaction between two nucleons is neglected, the first and second order mass operators of two particles are the sum of those for each particle. The nucleon microscopic optical potential is calculated by applying nuclear matter approximation and effective Skyrme interaction. Then the deuteron microscopic optical potential (DMOP) is calculated by using fold formula. For improvement of the theory, the two particle polarization diagram contribution to the imaginary part of the deuteron microscopic optical potential is studied

  10. Tomographic findings of acute pulmonary toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Giassi, Karina; Costa, Andre Nathan; Apanavicius, Andre; Teixeira, Fernando Bin; Fernandes, Caio Julio Cesar; Helito, Alfredo Salim; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2014-11-25

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common human zoonosis, and is generally benign in most of the individuals. Pulmonary involvement is common in immunocompromised subjects, but very rare in immunocompetents and there are scarce reports of tomographic findings in the literature. The aim of the study is to describe three immunocompetent patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary toxoplasmosis and their respective thoracic tomographic findings. Acute toxoplasmosis was diagnosed according to the results of serological tests suggestive of recent primary infection and the absence of an alternative etiology. From 2009 to 2013, three patients were diagnosed with acute respiratory failure secondary to acute toxoplasmosis. The patients were two female and one male, and were 38, 56 and 36 years old. Similarly they presented a two-week febrile illness and progressive dyspnea before admission. Laboratory tests demonstrated lymphocytosis, slight changes in liver enzymes and high inflammatory markers. Tomographic findings were bilateral smooth septal and peribronchovascular thickening (100%), ground-glass opacities (100%), atelectasis (33%), random nodules (33%), lymph node enlargement (33%) and pleural effusion (66%). All the patients improved their symptoms after treatment, and complete resolution of tomographic findings were found in the followup. These cases provide a unique description of the presentation and evolution of pulmonary tomographic manifestations of toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patients. Toxoplasma pneumonia manifests with fever, dyspnea and a non-productive cough that may result in respiratory failure. In animal models, changes were described as interstitial pneumonitis with focal infiltrates of neutrophils that can finally evolve into a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage with focal necrosis. The tomographic findings are characterized as ground glass opacities, smooth septal and marked peribronchovascular thickening; and may mimic pulmonary congestion

  11. Microscopic Procedures for Plant Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braselton, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes laboratory techniques designed to familiarize students with meiosis and how microscopic preparations of meiosis are made. These techniques require the use of fresh or fixed flowers. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  12. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  13. Microscopic modelling of doped manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, Alexander; Fehske, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Colossal magneto-resistance manganites are characterized by a complex interplay of charge, spin, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom. Formulating microscopic models for these compounds aims at meeting two conflicting objectives: sufficient simplification without excessive restrictions on the phase space. We give a detailed introduction to the electronic structure of manganites and derive a microscopic model for their low-energy physics. Focusing on short-range electron-lattice and spin-orbital correlations we supplement the modelling with numerical simulations

  14. Microscopic approach to nuclear anharmonicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    1985-01-01

    Present status of microscopic study of nuclear anharmonicity phenomena is reviewed from the viewpoint of the time-dependent Hartree-Bogoliubov approach. Both classical- and quantum-mechanical aspects of this approach are discussed. The Bohr-Mottelson-type collective Hamiltonian for anharmonic gamma vibrations is microscopically derived by means of the self-consistent-collective-coordinate method, and applied to the problem of two-phonon states of 168 Er. (orig.)

  15. Deuteron microscopic optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hairui; Han Yinlu; Shen Qingbiao; Xu Yongli

    2010-01-01

    A deuteron microscopic optical model potential is obtained by the Green function method through nuclear-matter approximation and local-density approximation based on the effective Skyrme interaction. The microscopic optical model potential is used to calculate the deuteron reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions for some target nuclei in the mass range 6≤A≤208 with incident deuteron energies up to 200 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data.

  16. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2011-01-01

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa

  17. STM-SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Tadayuki; Tachiki, Minoru; Itozaki, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a STM-SQUID probe microscope. A high T C SQUID probe microscope was combined with a scanning tunneling microscope for investigation of samples at room temperature in air. A high permeability probe needle was used as a magnetic flux guide to improve the spatial resolution. The probe with tip radius of less than 100 nm was prepared by microelectropolishing. The probe was also used as a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Topography of the sample surface could be measured by the scanning tunneling microscope with high spatial resolution prior to observation by SQUID microscopy. The SQUID probe microscope image could be observed while keeping the distance from the sample surface to the probe tip constant. We observed a topographic image and a magnetic image of Ni fine pattern and also a magnetically recorded hard disk. Furthermore we have investigated a sample vibration method of the static magnetic field emanating from a sample with the aim of achieving a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  18. Computed-tomographic determination of mineral content of bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delov, I.; Tabakov, S.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of precise computed-tomographic densitometry of the mineral content of bones is pointed out. A method is proposed including the use of standard density and observance of definite radiation, scanning and image estimation parameters. A good correlation of the results obtained for the mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae with literature data are reported. A method is also described for determining the mineral content of tubular bones based on densiprofile check-up of the computed-tomographic density. The procedure takes 10-15 minutes and includes 1 or 2 scans. It might therefore gain wide acceptance for the diagnosis and tracing of osteoporosis and other osteopathies associated with distrorted calcium metabolism

  19. Design and applications of Computed Industrial Tomographic Imaging System (CITIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, G.S.; Umesh Kumar; Datta, S.S.; Rao, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Computed tomographic imaging is an advanced technique for nondestructive testing (NDT) and examination. For the first time in India a computed aided tomography system has been indigenously developed in BARC for testing industrial components and was successfully demonstrated. The system in addition to Computed Tomography (CT) can also perform Digital Radiography (DR) to serve as a powerful tool for NDT applications. It has wider applications in the fields of nuclear, space and allied fields. The authors have developed a computed industrial tomographic imaging system with Cesium 137 gamma radiation source for nondestructive examination of engineering and industrial specimens. This presentation highlights the design and development of a prototype system and its software for image reconstruction, simulation and display. The paper also describes results obtained with several tests specimens, current development and possibility of using neutrons as well as high energy x-rays in computed tomography. (author)

  20. Time-resolved tomographic images of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, H.A.; Jacoby, B.A.; Nelson, M.

    1984-07-01

    We obtained a sequential series of time-resolved tomographic two-dimensional images of a 4.5-MeV, 6-kA, 30-ns electron beam. Three linear fiber-optic arrays of 30 or 60 fibers each were positioned around the beam axis at 0 0 , 61 0 , and 117 0 . The beam interacting with nitrogen at 20 Torr emitted light that was focused onto the fiber arrays and transmitted to a streak camera where the data were recorded on film. The film was digitized, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using the maximum-entropy tomographic technique. These images were then combined to produce an ultra-high-speed movie of the electron-beam pulse

  1. The CDD system in computed tomographic diagnosis of diverticular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelnik, Daniel; Elsholtz, Fabian Henry Juergen; Hamm, Bernd; Niehues, Stefan Markus; Bojarski, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose cation in computed tomographic diagnosis and briefly recapitulates its targeted advantages over preliminary systems. Primarily, application of the CDD in computed tomography diagnostics is described. Differences with respect to the categories of the older systems are pointed out on the level of each CDD type using imaging examples. The presented images are derived from our institute according to the S2k criteria. Literature was researched on PubMed. Results The CDD constitutes an improvement compared to older systems for categorizing the stages of diverticular disease. It provides more discriminatory power on the descriptive-morphological level and defines as well as differentiates more courses of the disease. Furthermore, the categories translate more directly into state-of-the-art decision-making concerning hospitalization and therapy. The CDD should be applied routinely in the computed tomographic diagnosis of diverticular disease. Typical imaging patterns are presented.

  2. Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Xiaoxia; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Terahertz Imaging for Biomedical Applications: Pattern Recognition and Tomographic Reconstruction presents the necessary algorithms needed to assist screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and these algorithms will play a critical role in the accurate detection of abnormalities present in biomedical imaging. Terahertz biomedical imaging has become an area of interest due to its ability to simultaneously acquire both image and spectral information. Terahertz imaging systems are being commercialized with an increasing number of trials performed in a biomedical setting. Terahertz tomographic imaging and detection technology contributes to the ability to identify opaque objects with clear boundaries,and would be useful to both in vivo and ex vivo environments. This book also: Introduces terahertz radiation techniques and provides a number of topical examples of signal and image processing, as well as machine learning Presents the most recent developments in an emerging field, terahertz radiation Utilizes new methods...

  3. Heidelberg Retina Tomograph for the Detection of Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Cvenkel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT is a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope which acquires and analyzes 3-dimensional images of the optic nerve head. The latest instrument HRT3 includes software with larger ethinic-specific normative database. This review summarizes relevant published literature on HRT in diagnosing glaucoma, detecting glaucoma progression, the diagnostic accuracy of HRT among other imaging devices and its role in clinical practice.

  4. Computed tomographic diagnosis of abdominal abscess in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, J.P.; Berger, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-eight children suspected clinically of having an abdominal abscess were examined by CT. Eighteen had gallium 67 citrate scans and 22 had ultrasound studies. Computed tomography was found to be the most accurate test for diagnosis and evaluation of an abscess and the computed tomographic appearance of abscess is illustrated. However, because of cost factors, radiation dose, and clinical considerations, computed tomography is not always the first modality of choice in evaluating a suspected abdominal abscess [fr

  5. A general purpose tomographic program with combined inversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenbin; Dong Jiafu; Li Fanzhu

    1996-01-01

    A general tomographic program has been developed by combining the Bessel expansion with the Zernicke expansion. It is useful for studying of the magnetic island structure of the tearing mode and in reconstructing the density profiles of impurities in tokamak plasmas. This combined method have the advantages of both expansions, i.e. there will be no spurious images in the edge and it will be of high inverse precision in the center of plasma

  6. Computer tomographic detection of an intraspinal arachnoidal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckein, D.; Walter, K.; Paal, G.; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Harlaching, Muenchen

    1981-01-01

    A 46 year old female patient who after 3-4 weeks of influenza suffered from strong headaches, vomiting and rotatory vertigo was subjected to a myelograph and then to a computerized tomographic investigation due to suspect cerebrospinal fluid. The computerized tomography is better than the myelography in diagnosing intraspinal arachnoidal cysts, however this should be preceded by most accurate possible segment location. (MG) [de

  7. Initial results from the Donner 600-crystal positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.B.; Uber, D.C.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    These results show the 3-mm BGO crystals can improve the resolution in positron tomography by a substantial factor. This measured crystal-pair resolution of 2.4 mm FWHM and the reconstructed image resolution of 2.9 mm FWHM at the center of the tomograph are in good agreement with expected values. The most serious limitation of the detector design is that only a single section can be imaged. 4 refs., 4 figs

  8. Computer tomographic evaluation of digestive tract non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupescu, Ioana G; Grasu, Mugur; Goldis, Gheorghe; Popa, Gelu; Gheorghe, Cristian; Vasilescu, Catalin; Moicean, Andreea; Herlea, Vlad; Georgescu, Serban A

    2007-09-01

    Computer Tomographic (CT) study is crucial for defining distribution, characteristics and staging of primary gastrointestinal lymphomas. The presence of multifocal sites, the wall thickening with diffuse infiltration of the affected gastrointestinal (GI) segment in association with regional adenopathies, permit the orientation of the CT diagnosis for primary GI lymphomas. The gold standard for diagnosis remains, in all cases of digestive tract non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), the histological examination, which allows a tissue diagnosis, performed preferably by transmural biopsy.

  9. An introduction to the tomographic picture of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Ventriglia, F

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the famous Pauli problem on the possibility of associating quantum states with probabilities, the formulation of quantum mechanics in which quantum states are described by fair probability distributions (tomograms, i.e. tomographic probabilities) is reviewed in a pedagogical style. The relation between the quantum state description and the classical state description is elucidated. The difference between those sets of tomograms is described by inequalities equivalent to a complete set of uncertainty relations for the quantum domain and to non-negativity of probability density on phase space in the classical domain. The intersection of such sets is studied. The mathematical mechanism that allows us to construct different kinds of tomographic probabilities like symplectic tomograms, spin tomograms, photon number tomograms, etc is clarified and a connection with abstract Hilbert space properties is established. The superposition rule and uncertainty relations in terms of probabilities as well as quantum basic equations like quantum evolution and energy spectra equations are given in an explicit form. A method to check experimentally the uncertainty relations is suggested using optical tomograms. Entanglement phenomena and the connection with semigroups acting on simplexes are studied in detail for spin states in the case of two-qubits. The star-product formalism is associated with the tomographic probability formulation of quantum mechanics.

  10. A tomograph VMEbus parallel processing data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, M.S.; Wilkinson, N.A.; Rogers, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes a VME based data acquisition system suitable for the development of Positron Volume Imaging tomographs which use 3-D data for improved image resolution over slice-oriented tomographs. The data acquisition must be flexible enough to accommodate several 3-D reconstruction algorithms; hence, a software-based system is most suitable. Furthermore, because of the increased dimensions and resolution of volume imaging tomographs, the raw data event rate is greater than that of slice-oriented machines. These dual requirements are met by our data acquisition systems. Flexibility is achieved through an array of processors connected over a VMEbus, operating asynchronously and in parallel. High raw data throughput is achieved using a dedicated high speed data transfer device available for the VMEbus. The device can attain a raw data rate of 2.5 million coincidence events per second for raw events per second for raw events which are 64 bits wide. Real-time data acquisition and pre-processing requirements can be met by about forty 20 MHz Motorola 68020/68881 processors

  11. Three dimensional reconstruction of tomographic images of the retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glittenberg, C.; Zeiler, F.; Falkner, C.; Binder, S.; Povazay, B.; Hermann, B.; Drexler, W.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new display system for the three-dimensional visualization of tomographic images in ophthalmology. Specifically, a system that can use stacks of B-mode scans from an ultrahigh resolution optical tomography examination to vividly display retinal specimens as three-dimensional objects. Several subroutines were programmed in the rendering and raytracing program Cinema 4D XL 9.102 Studio Bundle (Maxon Computer Inc., Friedrichsburg, Germany), which could process stacks of tomographic scans into three-dimensional objects. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography examinations were performed on patients with various retinal pathologies and post processed with the subroutines that had been designed. All ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomographies were performed with a titanium: sapphire based ultra broad bandwidth (160 nm) femtosecond laser system (INTEGRAL, Femtolasers Productions GmbH. Vienna Austria) with an axial resolution of 3 μm. A new three dimensional display system for tomographic images in ophthalmology was developed, which allows a highly vivid display of physiological and pathological structures of the retina. The system also distinguishes itself through its high interactivity and adaptability. This new display system allows the visualization of physiological and pathological structures of the retina in a new way, which will give us new insight into their morphology and development. (author) [de

  12. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Alarfaj, Meshal K.

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry Using Colored Shadow Imaging by Meshal K Alarfaj, Master of Science King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, 2015 Tomographic Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a recent PIV method capable of reconstructing the full 3D velocity field of complex flows, within a 3-D volume. For nearly the last decade, it has become the most powerful tool for study of turbulent velocity fields and promises great advancements in the study of fluid mechanics. Among the early published studies, a good number of researches have suggested enhancements and optimizations of different aspects of this technique to improve the effectiveness. One major aspect, which is the core of the present work, is related to reducing the cost of the Tomographic PIV setup. In this thesis, we attempt to reduce this cost by using an experimental setup exploiting 4 commercial digital still cameras in combination with low-cost Light emitting diodes (LEDs). We use two different colors to distinguish the two light pulses. By using colored shadows with red and green LEDs, we can identify the particle locations within the measurement volume, at the two different times, thereby allowing calculation of the velocities. The present work tests this technique on the flows patterns of a jet ejected from a tube in a water tank. Results from the images processing are presented and challenges discussed.

  13. Field experience with a mobile tomographic nondestructive assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Betts, S.E.; Taggart, D.P.; Estep, R.J.; Nicholas, N.J.; Lucas, M.C.; Harlan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A mobile tomographic gamma-ray scanner (TGS) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory was recently demonstrated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and is currently in use at Los Alamos waste storage areas. The scanner was developed to assay radionuclides in low-level, transuranic, and mixed waste in containers ranging in size from 2 ft 3 boxes to 83-gallon overpacks. The tomographic imaging capability provides a complete correction for source distribution and matrix attenuation effects, enabling accurate assays of Pu-239 and other gamma-ray emitting isotopes. In addition, the system can reliably detect self-absorbing material such as plutonium metal shot, and can correct for bias caused by self-absorption. The system can be quickly configured to execute far-field scans, segmented gamma-ray scans, and a host of intermediate scanning protocols, enabling higher throughput (up to 20 drums per 8-hour shift). In this paper, we will report on the results of field trials of the mobile system at Rocky Flats and Los Alamos. Assay accuracy is confirmed for cases in which TGS assays can be compared with assays (e.g. with calorimetry) of individual packages within the drums. The mobile tomographic technology is expected to considerably reduce characterization costs at DOE production and environmental technology sites

  14. Tomographic findings of lobar consolidation in primary pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Bruno Alberto Falcao; Macedo, Solange Goncalves David de; Penna, Claudia Renata Rezende

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe tomographic findings of lobar consolidation as early manifestation of primary pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and methods: The present study was developed at Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2002 and 2006, retrospectively evaluating tomographic findings in four children aged from 3 to 14 months with lobar consolidation as an early manifestation of primary pulmonary tuberculosis. Results: The most frequently found radiological pattern was lobar consolidation with calcifications, cavitation and intermingle necrotic areas, associated with bulging fissure. Signs of bronchogenic dissemination and lymph node enlargement were observed in all of the four children. Consolidation with a pseudotumor aspect and masslike effect was observed in one case. Conclusion: The cases included in the present study have demonstrated that primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifested as lobar consolidation presents typical tomographic images such as cavitation, hypodense areas and calcifications intermingled with consolidation. The association with lymph node enlargement with central necrosis and signs of bronchogenic dissemination reinforce the diagnosis of tuberculosis. (author)

  15. Three-dimensional DNA image cytometry by optical projection tomographic microscopy for early cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Biancardi, Alberto M; Patten, Florence W; Reeves, Anthony P; Seibel, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy is typically assessed by flow cytometry (FCM) and image cytometry (ICM). We used optical projection tomographic microscopy (OPTM) for assessing cellular DNA content using absorption and fluorescence stains. OPTM combines some of the attributes of both FCM and ICM and generates isometric high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) images of single cells. Although the depth of field of the microscope objective was in the submicron range, it was extended by scanning the objective's focal plane. The extended depth of field image is similar to a projection in a conventional x-ray computed tomography. These projections were later reconstructed using computed tomography methods to form a 3-D image. We also present an automated method for 3-D nuclear segmentation. Nuclei of chicken, trout, and triploid trout erythrocyte were used to calibrate OPTM. Ratios of integrated optical densities extracted from 50 images of each standard were compared to ratios of DNA indices from FCM. A comparison of mean square errors with thionin, hematoxylin, Feulgen, and SYTOX green was done. Feulgen technique was preferred as it showed highest stoichiometry, least variance, and preserved nuclear morphology in 3-D. The addition of this quantitative biomarker could further strengthen existing classifiers and improve early diagnosis of cancer using 3-D microscopy.

  16. Industrial dynamic tomographic reconstruction; Reconstrucao tomografica dinamica industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eric Ferreira de

    2016-07-01

    The state of the art methods applied to industrial processes is currently based on the principles of classical tomographic reconstructions developed for tomographic patterns of static distributions, or is limited to cases of low variability of the density distribution function of the tomographed object. Noise and motion artifacts are the main problems caused by a mismatch in the data from views acquired in different instants. All of these add to the known fact that using a limited amount of data can result in the presence of noise, artifacts and some inconsistencies with the distribution under study. One of the objectives of the present work is to discuss the difficulties that arise from implementing reconstruction algorithms in dynamic tomography that were originally developed for static distributions. Another objective is to propose solutions that aim at reducing a temporal type of information loss caused by employing regular acquisition systems to dynamic processes. With respect to dynamic image reconstruction it was conducted a comparison between different static reconstruction methods, like MART and FBP, when used for dynamic scenarios. This comparison was based on a MCNPx simulation as well as an analytical setup of an aluminum cylinder that moves along the section of a riser during the process of acquisition, and also based on cross section images from CFD techniques. As for the adaptation of current tomographic acquisition systems for dynamic processes, this work established a sequence of tomographic views in a just-in-time fashion for visualization purposes, a form of visually disposing density information as soon as it becomes amenable to image reconstruction. A third contribution was to take advantage of the triple color channel necessary to display colored images in most displays, so that, by appropriately scaling the acquired values of each view in the linear system of the reconstruction, it was possible to imprint a temporal trace into the regularly

  17. A study of the decoding of multiple pinhole coded aperture RI tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    1980-01-01

    The authors constructed a Multiple Pinhole Coded Aperture (MPCA) and developed related decoding software. When simple coordinate transformation was performed, omission of points and shifting of counts occurred. By selecting various tomographic planes and collecting count for each tomographic depth from the shadowgram, a solution to these problems was found. The counts from the central portion of the tomographic image from the MPCA were incorrectly high, this was rectified by a correction function to improve the uniformity correction program of the γ-camera. Depth resolution of the tomographic image improved in proportion to the area encompassed by the pinhole configuration. An MPCA with a uniform arrangement of pinholes (e, g, pinholes in an arrangement parallel to the X-axis or the Y-axis) yielded decoded tomographic images of inferior quality. Optimum results were obtained with a ring-shaped arrangement yielding clinically applicable tomographic images even for large objects. (author)

  18. Axiomatic electrodynamics and microscopic mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1981-04-01

    A new approach to theoretical physics, along with the basic formulation of a new MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS for the motion of small charged particles is described in this set of lecture notes. Starting with the classical (Newtonian) mechanics and classical fields, the important but well known properties of Classical Electromagnetic field are discussed up to section 4. The next nection describes the usual radiation damping theory and its difficulties. It is argued that the usual treatment of radiation damping is not valid for small space and time intervals and the true description of motion requires a new type of mechanics - the MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS: Section 6 and 7 are devoted to showing that not only the new microscopic mechanics goes over to Newtonian mechanics in the proper limit, but also it is closely connected with Quantum Mechanics. All the known results of the Schroedinger theory can be reproduced by microscopic mechanics which also gives a clear physical picture. It removes Einstein's famous objections against Quantum Theory and provides a clear distinction between classical and Quantum behavior. Seven Axioms (three on Classical Mechanics, two for Maxwell's theory, one for Relativity and a new Axiom on Radiation damping) are shown to combine Classical Mechanics, Maxwellian Electrodynamics, Relativity and Schroedinger's Quantum Theory within a single theoretical framework under Microscopic Mechanics which awaits further development at the present time. (orig.)

  19. Implementation of 3D tomographic visualisation through planar ICT data from experimental gamma-ray tomographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umesh Kumar; Singh, Gursharan; Ravindran, V.R.

    2001-01-01

    Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) is one of the latest methods of non-destructive testing and examination. Different prototypes of Computed Industrial Tomographic Imaging System (CITIS) have been developed and experimental data have been generated in Isotope Applications Division. The experimental gamma-rays based tomographic imaging system comprises of beam generator containing approx. 220 GBq (6 Curies) of 137 Cs, a single NaI(Tl) -PMT integral assembly in a thick shielding and associated electronics, stepper motor controlled mechanical manipulator, collimators and required software. CITIS data is normally acquired in one orientation of the sample. It may be sometimes required to view a tomographic plane in a different orientation. Also, 3D visualization may be required with the available 2D data set. All these can be achieved by processing the available data. We have customized some of the routines for this purpose provided IDL (Integrated Data Language) package to suit our requirements. The present paper discusses methodology adopted for this purpose with an illustrative example. (author)

  20. Microscopic collective models of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, Rezsoe

    1985-01-01

    Microscopic Rosensteel-Rowe theory of the nuclear collective motion is described. The theoretical insufficiency of the usual microscopic establishment of the collective model is pointed. The new model treating exactly the degrees of freedom separates the coordinates describing the collective motion and the internal coordinates by a consistent way. Group theoretical methods analyzing the symmetry properties of the total Hamiltonian are used defining the collective subspaces transforming as irreducible representations of the group formed by the collective operators. Recent calculations show that although the results of the usual collective model are approximately correct and similar to those of the new microscopic collective model, the underlying philosophy of the old model is essentially erroneous. (D.Gy.)

  1. Microscope and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  2. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  3. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  4. Microscopic description of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatov, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The genealogical series method has been extended to the continuous spectrum of the many-body systems. New nonlinear integral equations have been formulated to perform the microscopical description of the nuclear reactions with arbitrary number of particles. The way to solve them numerically is demonstrated

  5. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF 91 (France); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, PO Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  6. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.; Goriely, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations.While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  7. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  8. DG TOMO: A new method for tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, D. de; Feschet, F.; Cachin, F.; Geissler, B.; Bapt, A.; Karidioula, I.; Martin, C.; Kelly, A.; Mestas, D.; Gerard, Y.; Reveilles, J.P.; Maublant, J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: FBP and OSEM are the most popular tomographic reconstruction methods in scintigraphy. FBP is a simple method but artifacts of reconstruction are generated which corrections induce degradation of the spatial resolution. OSEM takes account of statistical fluctuations but noise strongly increases after a certain number of iterations. We compare a new method of tomographic reconstruction based on discrete geometry (DG TOMO) to FBP and OSEM. Materials and methods: Acquisitions were performed on a three-head gamma-camera (Philips) with a NEMA Phantom containing six spheres of sizes from 10 to 37 mm inner diameter, filled with around 325 MBq/l of technetium-99 m. The spheres were positioned in water containing 3 MBq/l of technetium-99 m. Acquisitions were realized during a 180 o -rotation around the phantom by 25-s steps. DG TOMO has been developed in our laboratory in order to minimize the number of projections at acquisition. Two tomographic reconstructions utilizing 32 and 16 projections with FBP, OSEM and DG TOMO were performed and transverse slices were compared. Results: FBP with 32 projections detects only the activity in the three largest spheres (diameter ≥22 mm). With 16 projections, the star effect is predominant and the contrast of the third sphere is very low. OSEM with 32 projections provides a better image but the three smallest spheres (diameter ≤17 mm) are difficult to distinguish. With 16 projections, the three smaller spheres are not detectable. The results of DG TOMO are similar to OSEM. Conclusion: Since the parameters of DG TOMO can be further optimized, this method appears as a promising alternative for tomoscintigraphy reconstruction

  9. Imaging MOSS tomographic system for H-1NF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, F.; Howard, J.

    1999-01-01

    A tomographic diagnostic utilising the Modulated Optical Solid-State spectrometer (MOSS) is planned for the H-1NF stellarator at the ANU. It is designed to create two-dimensional temperature or velocity maps of a poloidal cross-section of the high temperature plasma of H-1NF. The introduction of the MOSS spectrometers has enabled the development of several diagnostics to be used on the H-1NF stellerator. The MOSS spectrometer allows calculations of the plasma temperature and bulk velocity based on a line-integrated measurement of light emitted from electronic transitions within the plasma. A tomographic system utilising a rotatable multi-view ring apparatus and spatial multiplexing through a MOSS spectrometer is currently being developed. The ring apparatus is placed inside the H-1NF vessel and encircles the plasma. Multiple line-of-sight views collect light through a poloidal cross-section of the plasma and the emitted light is coupled into large core optical fibres. The transmitted light, via the optical fibre bundle, is then imaged through a large aperture MOSS spectrometer and onto another optical fibre array. Each fibre is then fed into a photomultiplier tube for signal detection. Characterisation of the properties of the lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) crystal used for modulation in the MOSS spectrometer is being undertaken to account for ray divergence in the imaging system. Tomographic techniques enable the construction of a temperature or velocity map of the poloidal cross-section. Rotating the ring apparatus to a new viewing position for the next pulse of plasma should allow an accurate picture to be built up based on the reproducibility of the plasma pulses. It is expected that initial testing of the system will begin in May when H-1NF begins operations at 0.5 Telsa field strength

  10. Dense velocity reconstruction from tomographic PTV with material derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct the instantaneous velocity field from time-resolved volumetric particle tracking velocimetry (PTV, e.g., 3D-PTV, tomographic PTV and Shake-the-Box), employing both the instantaneous velocity and the velocity material derivative of the sparse tracer particles. The constraint to the measured temporal derivative of the PTV particle tracks improves the consistency of the reconstructed velocity field. The method is christened as pouring time into space, as it leverages temporal information to increase the spatial resolution of volumetric PTV measurements. This approach becomes relevant in cases where the spatial resolution is limited by the seeding concentration. The method solves an optimization problem to find the vorticity and velocity fields that minimize a cost function, which includes next to instantaneous velocity, also the velocity material derivative. The velocity and its material derivative are related through the vorticity transport equation, and the cost function is minimized using the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm. The procedure is assessed numerically with a simulated PTV experiment in a turbulent boundary layer from a direct numerical simulation (DNS). The experimental validation considers a tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment in a similar turbulent boundary layer and the additional case of a jet flow. The proposed technique (`vortex-in-cell plus', VIC+) is compared to tomographic PIV analysis (3D iterative cross-correlation), PTV interpolation methods (linear and adaptive Gaussian windowing) and to vortex-in-cell (VIC) interpolation without the material derivative. A visible increase in resolved details in the turbulent structures is obtained with the VIC+ approach, both in numerical simulations and experiments. This results in a more accurate determination of the turbulent stresses distribution in turbulent boundary layer investigations. Data from a jet

  11. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  12. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  13. Gas microstrip detectors for X-ray tomographic flow imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Key, M J; Luggar, R D; Kundu, A

    2003-01-01

    A investigation into the suitability of gas microstrip detector technology for a high-speed industrial X-ray tomography system is reported. X-ray energies in the region 20-30 keV are well suited to the application, which involves imaging two-dimensional slices through gas/liquid multiphase pipeline flows for quantitative component fraction measurement. Stable operation over a period representing several hundred individual tomographic scans at gas gains of 500 is demonstrated using a Penning gas mixture of krypton/propylene.

  14. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  15. Design of a volume-imaging positron emission tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, R.; Rogers, J.G.; Coombes, G.H.; Wilkinson, N.A.; Pate, B.D.; Morrison, K.S.; Stazyk, M.; Dykstra, C.J.; Barney, J.S.; Atkins, M.S.; Doherty, P.W.; Saylor, D.P.

    1988-11-01

    Progress is reported in several areas of design of a positron volume imaging tomograph. As a means of increasing the volume imaged and the detector packing fraction, a lens system of detector light coupling is considered. A prototype layered scintillator detector demonstrates improved spatial resolution due to a unique Compton rejection capability. The conceptual design of a new mechanism for measuring scattered radiation during emission scans has been tested by Monte Carlo simulation. The problem of how to use effectively the resulting sampled scattered radiation projections is presented and discussed

  16. Computed tomographic spectrum of intracranial mycosis: correlation with histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, M.A.; Stern, J.; deNapoli, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Four cases of intracerebral fungal infection are reviewed. The clinical course is outlined, and the computed tomographic (CT) characteristics are analyzed in light of known pathological data. The CT appearance of intracranial mycosis is dependent on the type of fungus as well as the dominant infecting form, i.e., yeast or hyphae. The hyphal form leads predominantly to a CT pattern consistent with vascular occlusion and secondary abscess formation; the yeast form generally results in noncaseating granulomas, which appear on CT scan as nodular enhancing lesions. If the patient survives the acute infective process, these fungal lesions undergo a prolonged subacute phase, and may eventually calcify

  17. Direct computation of harmonic moments for tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Ito, Nobutaka; Takamatsu, Tomonori; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    A novel algorithm to compute harmonic moments of a density function from its projections is presented for tomographic reconstruction. For projection p(r, θ), we define harmonic moments of projection by ∫ π 0 ∫ ∞ -∞ p(r,θ)(re iθ ) n drd θ and show that it coincides with the harmonic moments of the density function except a constant. Furthermore, we show that the harmonic moment of projection of order n can be exactly computed by using n+ 1 projection directions, which leads to an efficient algorithm to reconstruct the vertices of a polygon from projections.

  18. 4-D tomographic monitoring of enhanced oil recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzostowski, M.A.; McMechan, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    One application of tomography that has recently received considerable attention is reservoir monitoring for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Tomographic monitoring of a moving steam front uses the significant decrease in compressional wave velocity that occurs as hydrocarbon temperature increases. The purposes of this paper are to present a working algorithm for 3-D tomography, to demonstrate the feasibility of 3-D imaging of a simulated reservoir in which the position of a steam front changes with time, and to illustrate the relations between survey geometry and the resolution of the target

  19. Non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: clinical tomographic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, P.; Herrera, G.; Valneica, F.

    1991-01-01

    Presentation of clinical-tomographic correlation in 111 cases of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes seen between 1984-1988 in the Hospital Cayetano Heredia (Lima, Peru). Emphasis is given fundamentally to: the importance of establishing the organicity of partial and late epilepsy; the high incidence rate of inflammatory infectious processes with CNS compromise in under developing countries; the necessity of making public the importance of two parasitic diseases in the differential diagnosis of non tumoral intracranial expansive processes: free living amebiasis, and toxoplasmosis (especially in association with AIDS). (author)

  20. Pressure spectra from single-snapshot tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Avallone, Francesco; Pröbsting, Stefan; Ragni, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2018-03-01

    The power spectral density and coherence of temporal pressure fluctuations are obtained from low-repetition-rate tomographic PIV measurements. This is achieved by extension of recent single-snapshot pressure evaluation techniques based upon the Taylor's hypothesis (TH) of frozen turbulence and vortex-in-cell (VIC) simulation. Finite time marching of the measured instantaneous velocity fields is performed using TH and VIC. Pressure is calculated from the resulting velocity time series. Because of the theoretical limitations, the finite time marching can be performed until the measured flow structures are convected out of the measurement volume. This provides a lower limit of resolvable frequency range. An upper limit is given by the spatial resolution of the measurements. Finite time-marching approaches are applied to low-repetition-rate tomographic PIV data of the flow past a straight trailing edge at 10 m/s. Reference results of the power spectral density and coherence are obtained from surface pressure transducers. In addition, the results are compared to state-of-the-art experimental data obtained from time-resolved tomographic PIV performed at 10 kHz. The time-resolved approach suffers from low spatial resolution and limited maximum acquisition frequency because of hardware limitations. Additionally, these approaches strongly depend upon the time kernel length chosen for pressure evaluation. On the other hand, the finite time-marching approaches make use of low-repetition-rate tomographic PIV measurements that offer higher spatial resolution. Consequently, increased accuracy of the power spectral density and coherence of pressure fluctuations are obtained in the high-frequency range, in comparison to the time-resolved measurements. The approaches based on TH and VIC are found to perform similarly in the high-frequency range. At lower frequencies, TH is found to underestimate coherence and intensity of the pressure fluctuations in comparison to time-resolved PIV

  1. 3D Tomographic Image Reconstruction using CUDA C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, J. S.; Assis, J. T.; Oliveira, L. F. de

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the study and implementation of a software for three dimensional reconstruction of images obtained with a tomographic system using the capabilities of Graphic Processing Units(GPU). The reconstruction by filtered back-projection method was developed using the CUDA C, for maximum utilization of the processing capabilities of GPUs to solve computational problems with large computational cost and highly parallelizable. It was discussed the potential of GPUs and shown its advantages to solving this kind of problems. The results in terms of runtime will be compared with non-parallelized implementations and must show a great reduction of processing time. (Author)

  2. Tomographic Reconstruction from a Few Views: A Multi-Marginal Optimal Transport Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, I., E-mail: isabelle.abraham@cea.fr [CEA Ile de France (France); Abraham, R., E-mail: romain.abraham@univ-orleans.fr; Bergounioux, M., E-mail: maitine.bergounioux@univ-orleans.fr [Université d’Orléans, UFR Sciences, MAPMO, UMR 7349 (France); Carlier, G., E-mail: carlier@ceremade.dauphine.fr [CEREMADE, UMR CNRS 7534, Université Paris IX Dauphine, Pl. de Lattre de Tassigny (France)

    2017-02-15

    In this article, we focus on tomographic reconstruction. The problem is to determine the shape of the interior interface using a tomographic approach while very few X-ray radiographs are performed. We use a multi-marginal optimal transport approach. Preliminary numerical results are presented.

  3. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Computed Tomographic Characteristics and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimara de la Caridad Vergara Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: strokes are the third leading cause of death among adults and 10-15 % of them are due to spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Objective: to characterize spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage through computed tomography scan and its outcome. Methods: a case series study was conducted comprising patients diagnosed with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to the Arnaldo Milián Castro Provincial University Hospital in Villa Clara from January 2009 to January 2010. Tomographic variables of interest were derived from evaluation of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas. Results: fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage were studied, 23 were located in lobar regions, 4 had severe midline shift, and 2 showed volume greater than 80 ml. Eight out of eleven with extension into the ventricular system had an unfavorable outcome. Among those with thalamic hemorrhage, patients with diameter larger than 4cm and extension into the ventricular system died. Patients with putaminal hemorrhage larger than 4 cm and posterior fossa hematoma with hydrocephalus had a poor outcome, as well as most individuals (55 with other mass effects. Most lobar hematomas (14 out of 23 had a satisfactory outcome, unlike cerebellar and brainstem hematomas. Conclusions: tomographic variables that had a negative impact on the outcome were: volume greater than 80 ml, severe midline shift, diameter larger than 4 cm, extension into the ventricular system, hydrocephalus, other signs of mass effect and brainstem location.

  4. Clinical findings in 16 patients with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Maria do Carmo de Souza [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio Moraes]. E-mail: rodriguesmcs@yahoo.com.br; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Llerena Junior, Juan Clinton [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Fernandes Figueira. Centro de Genetica Medica; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro [Universidade Gama Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to establish a correlation between clinical features in a group of children with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly and clefts extent and localization. Materials and methods: retrospective study of dossiers from the archives of Neurology and Medical Genetics Services at Instituto Fernandes Figueira/FIOCRUZ and Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2000 and 2003. The study included 16 patients, nine female and seven male, with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly investigated for clinical findings, psychomotor development, motor/cognitive deficits and epilepsy. Results: predominance of bilateral clefts in 10:16 patients, open-lip schizencephaly type in 23:27 patients, and small lips in 11:27 patients. As regards anomalies associated with schizencephaly, pellucid septum absence was the most frequent one (10:16 patients). As regards clinical findings, 15 patients presented with developmental delay and motor deficit, six patients with cognitive deficit and ten with epilepsy. In three patients, we observed discordant clinical findings and cleft sizes, although the clefts were small, the clinical features severity was high because of other cerebral anomalies. Conclusion: the clinical features of schizencephaly are related to the size of the clefts, regardless laterality, presenting higher severity when associated with other cerebral anomalies. (author)

  5. Tomographic reconstruction of OH* chemiluminescence in two interacting turbulent flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worth, Nicholas A; Dawson, James R

    2013-01-01

    The tomographic reconstruction of OH* chemiluminescence was performed on two interacting turbulent premixed bluff-body stabilized flames under steady flow conditions and acoustic excitation. These measurements elucidate the complex three-dimensional (3D) vortex–flame interactions which have previously not been accessible. The experiment was performed using a single camera and intensifier, with multiple views acquired by repositioning the camera, permitting calculation of the mean and phase-averaged volumetric OH* distributions. The reconstructed flame structure and phase-averaged dynamics are compared with OH planar laser-induced fluorescence and flame surface density measurements for the first time. The volumetric data revealed that the large-scale vortex–flame structures formed along the shear layers of each flame collide when the two flames meet, resulting in complex 3D flame structures in between the two flames. With a fairly simple experimental setup, it is shown that the tomographic reconstruction of OH* chemiluminescence in forced flames is a powerful tool that can yield important physical insights into large-scale 3D flame dynamics that are important in combustion instability. (paper)

  6. Usefulness of tomographic phase image in ventricular conduction abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    In order to evaluate three-dimensional phase changes in ventricular conduction abnormalities, tomographic phase images were constructed in 7 normal subjects, 12 patients with ventricular pacing, 21 patients with bundle branch block and 12 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Eight to 12 slices of the short-axis ventricular tomographic phase image (TPI) were derived using a 7-pinhole collimator, and compared with planar phase images (PPIs) in left anterior oblique (LAO) and right anterior oblique (RAO) projections. TPIs were excellent for observing biventricular phase changes in the long-axis direction. In 6 cases of complete right bundle branch block with left axis deviation (beyond -30 0 ), the phase delay in the left ventricular anterior wall was recognized in 5 cases by TPI, although it was difficult to be detected by PPIs. The site of the pacing electrode was identified by TPI in 11 out of 12 cases, compared to 8 cases by PPIs in LAO and RAO projections. The site of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was detected in the basal slice of TPIs in 10 out of 12 cases, compared to 8 cases by PPI in the LAO projection. Therefore, it is obvious that TPIs offer more valid information than PPIs. In conclusion, TPI is useful for investigation of ventricular conduction abnormalities. (author)

  7. Clinical findings in 16 patients with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Maria do Carmo de Souza; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; Llerena Junior, Juan Clinton; Fernandes, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to establish a correlation between clinical features in a group of children with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly and clefts extent and localization. Materials and methods: retrospective study of dossiers from the archives of Neurology and Medical Genetics Services at Instituto Fernandes Figueira/FIOCRUZ and Hospital Municipal Jesus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil, in the period between 2000 and 2003. The study included 16 patients, nine female and seven male, with tomographic diagnosis of schizencephaly investigated for clinical findings, psychomotor development, motor/cognitive deficits and epilepsy. Results: predominance of bilateral clefts in 10:16 patients, open-lip schizencephaly type in 23:27 patients, and small lips in 11:27 patients. As regards anomalies associated with schizencephaly, pellucid septum absence was the most frequent one (10:16 patients). As regards clinical findings, 15 patients presented with developmental delay and motor deficit, six patients with cognitive deficit and ten with epilepsy. In three patients, we observed discordant clinical findings and cleft sizes, although the clefts were small, the clinical features severity was high because of other cerebral anomalies. Conclusion: the clinical features of schizencephaly are related to the size of the clefts, regardless laterality, presenting higher severity when associated with other cerebral anomalies. (author)

  8. A fast multi-resolution approach to tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2012-03-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) is a recently developed three-component, three-dimensional anemometric non-intrusive measurement technique, based on an optical tomographic reconstruction applied to simultaneously recorded images of the distribution of light intensity scattered by seeding particles immersed into the flow. Nowadays, the reconstruction process is carried out mainly by iterative algebraic reconstruction techniques, well suited to handle the problem of limited number of views, but computationally intensive and memory demanding. The adoption of the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) has become more and more accepted. In the present work, a novel multi-resolution approach is proposed, relying on the adoption of a coarser grid in the first step of the reconstruction to obtain a fast estimation of a reliable and accurate first guess. A performance assessment, carried out on three-dimensional computer-generated distributions of particles, shows a substantial acceleration of the reconstruction process for all the tested seeding densities with respect to the standard method based on 5 MART iterations; a relevant reduction in the memory storage is also achieved. Furthermore, a slight accuracy improvement is noticed. A modified version, improved by a multiplicative line of sight estimation of the first guess on the compressed configuration, is also tested, exhibiting a further remarkable decrease in both memory storage and computational effort, mostly at the lowest tested seeding densities, while retaining the same performances in terms of accuracy.

  9. Initial results from the Donner 600 crystal positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.; Uber, D.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-10-01

    We describe a positron tomograph using a single ring of 600 close-packed 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to 14 mm phototubes. The phototube preamplifier circuit derives a timing pulse from the first photoelectron, and sends it to address and coincidence circuits only if the integrated pulse height is within a pre-set window. The timing delays and pulse height windows for all 600 detectors and the coincidence timing windows are computer adjustable. An orbiting positron source is used for transmission measurements and a look-up table is used to reject scattered and random coincidences that do not pass through the source. Data can be acquired using a stationary mode for 1.57 mm lateral sampling or the two-position clam sampling mode for 0.79 mm lateral sampling. High maximum data rates are provided by 45 parallel coincidence circuits and 4 parallel histogram memory units. With two-position sampling and 1.57 mm bins, the reconstructed point spread function (PSF) of a 0.35 mm diam 22 Na wire source at the center of the tomograph is circular with 2.9 mm full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) and the PSF at a distance of 8 cm from the center is elliptical with a radial fwhm of 4.0 mm and tangential fwhm of 3.0 mm. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Performance of analytical methods for tomographic gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Mercer, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The use of gamma-ray computerized tomography for nondestructive assay of radioactive materials has led to the development of specialized analytical methods. Over the past few years, Los Alamos has developed and implemented a computer code, called ARC-TGS, for the analysis of data obtained by tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). ARC-TGS reduces TGS transmission and emission tomographic data, providing the user with images of the sample contents, the activity or mass of selected radionuclides, and an estimate of the uncertainty in the measured quantities. The results provided by ARC-TGS can be corrected for self-attenuation when the isotope of interest emits more than one gamma-ray. In addition, ARC-TGS provides information needed to estimate TGS quantification limits and to estimate the scan time needed to screen for small amounts of radioactivity. In this report, an overview of the analytical methods used by ARC-TGS is presented along with an assessment of the performance of these methods for TGS

  11. Tomographic Constraints on High-Energy Neutrinos of Hadronuclear Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Tamborra, Irene; Zandanel, Fabio

    2015-11-27

    Mounting evidence suggests that the TeV-PeV neutrino flux detected by the IceCube telescope has mainly an extragalactic origin. If such neutrinos are primarily produced by a single class of astrophysical sources via hadronuclear (pp) interactions, a similar flux of gamma-ray photons is expected. For the first time, we employ tomographic constraints to pinpoint the origin of the IceCube neutrino events by analyzing recent measurements of the cross correlation between the distribution of GeV gamma rays, detected by the Fermi satellite, and several galaxy catalogs in different redshift ranges. We find that the corresponding bounds on the neutrino luminosity density are up to 1 order of magnitude tighter than those obtained by using only the spectrum of the gamma-ray background, especially for sources with mild redshift evolution. In particular, our method excludes any hadronuclear source with a spectrum softer than E^{-2.1} as a main component of the neutrino background, if its evolution is slower than (1+z)^{3}. Starburst galaxies, if able to accelerate and confine cosmic rays efficiently, satisfy both spectral and tomographic constraints.

  12. Tomographic Environmental Sections for Environmental Mitigation Devices in Historical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cocci Grifoni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban heat waves and the overall growing trend in the annual global temperature underline the importance of urban/architectural resilience and the need to reduce energy consumption. By designing urban voids, it is possible to create thermodynamic buffers, i.e., bubbles of controlled atmosphere that act as mediators between the natural and built environments, between the human body and the surrounding air, between meteorology and physiology (meteorological architecture. Multiple small actions in the urban fabric’s open spaces, such as replacing dark pavements or inserting vegetation and green spaces, are intended to improve outdoor comfort conditions and therefore the resilience of the city itself. This not only benefits the place’s quality, which is intrinsic to the new project, but also the insulating capacity of buildings, which are relieved of an external heat load. The design emphasis therefore changes from solid structures to the climate and weather conditions, which are invisible but perceivable. To design and control these constructed atmopheres, tomographic sections processed with computational fluid dynamics software (tomographic environmental section, TENS becomes necessary. It allows the effects of an extreme event on an outdoor environment to be evaluated in order to establish the appropriate (adaptive climate mitigation devices, especially in historical centers where energy retrofits are often discouraged. By fixing boundary conditions after a local intervention, the virtual environment can be simulated and then "sliced" to analyze initial values and verify the design improvements.

  13. An original acquisition chain for the TOHR High Resolution Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinot, Laurent

    1999-01-01

    The framework of this work is part of a new approach of emission tomography adapted to small animals. The principle of our tomographic system TOHR (French acronym for High Resolution Tomograph) is based on the use of large solid angle and high resolution focusing collimators each mounted in front of a detection module of high efficiency. With a first-generation acquisition chain we were able to characterize TOHR, however, to take fully advantage of the TOHR possibilities, a completely new acquisition scheme had to be designed. This system, being the main topic of this work, makes use of temporal information. The detection of a particle that entered the detector is translated into temporal logical signals. These signals pass into a time coding circuitry and the coded results are transferred in a digital processor. According to the initial terms of delivery, the developed acquisition chain steers the detection of events dependent on the deposited energy and time of arrival. The latter is done by coincidence measurements. All elements are mounted on a special board included into a PC unit and a dedicated program controls the whole system. First experiments showed up the interest of the new acquisition unit for other application in physics or medical imaging

  14. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  16. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  17. Paraquat-poisoning in the rabbit lungs: high resolution computed tomographic findings and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Eui Han; Lee, Byoung Ho; Kim, Kun Sang

    1992-01-01

    The authors evaluated high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings of the isolated rabbit lungs with paraquat poisoning, and the findings were correlated with pathologic specimens. The purposes of this study are 1) to obtain the HRCT findings of the normal rabbit lung. 2) to find out if pulmonary pathology can be induced in rabbits by paraquat, and 3) to correlate the HRCT findings to those of pathology. Thirty rabbits were divided into three groups: group I included four control rabbits; group II included 16 rabbits given paraquat intraperitoneally (IP group); and group III included 10 rabbits given paraquat intravenously (IV group). The rabbits were sacrificed seven, 10, and 14 days after injection of various amount of paraquat, and then the lungs were isolated for HRCT and pathologic studies. Gross and microscopic findings of the three groups of control and paraquat-injected rabbit lungs were correlated with HRCT findings. Pulmonary congestion, mild thickening of alveolar walls and septae, and multifocal micro-atelectasis were the man pathologic findings of the lungs in both groups of the rabbits. Pulmonary hemorrhage was noted in five (31%) of 16 rabbits of IP group and three (30%) of 10 IV group. Pulmonary edema was seen in one rabbits (6%) of IP and four (40%) of IV group. Typical pulmonary fibrosis was seen in one rabbit of IP (6%) and IV (10%) group, respectively. There was no correlation between the amount of paraquat and frequency of the pulmonary pathology. Pulmonary fibrosis was seen at least one week after the paraquat injection. On HRCT, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema appeared as diffuse air-space consolidation and pulmonary fibrosis as linear or band-like opacities. However, minimal changes such as mild congestion

  18. Computational diffraction tomographic microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zuo, Chao

    2017-10-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of +/-37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ˜ 0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  19. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  20. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  1. Microscopic nuclear dissipation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannouleas, C.; Dworzecka, M.; Griffin, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have formulated a microscopic, nonperturbative, time reversible model which exhibits a dissipative decay of collective motion for times short compared to the system's Poincare time. The model assumes an RPA approximate description of the initial collective state within a restricted subspace, then traces its time evolution when an additional subspace is coupled to the restricted subspace by certain simplified matrix elements. It invokes no statistical assumptions. The damping of the collective motion occurs via real transitions from the collective state to other more complicated nuclear states of the same energy. It corresponds therefore to the so called 'one-body' long mean free path limit of nuclear dissipation when the collective state describes a surface vibration. When the simplest RPA approximation is used, this process associates the dissipation with the escape width for direct particle emission to the continuum. When the more detailed second RPA is used, it associates the dissipation with the spreading width for transitions to the 2p-2h components of the nuclear compound states as well. The energy loss rate for sharp n-phonon initial states is proportional to the total collective energy, unlike the dissipation of a classical damped oscillator, where it is proportional to the kinetic energy only. However, for coherent, multi-phonon wave packets, which explicitly describe the time-dependent oscillations of the mean field, dissipation proportional only to the kinetic energy is obtained. Canonical coordinates for the collective degree of freedom are explicitly introduced and a nonlinear frictional hamiltonian to describe such systems is specified by the requirement that it yield the same time dependence for the collective motion as the microscopic model. Thus, for the first time a descriptive nonlinear hamiltonian is derived explicitly from the underlying microscopic model of a nuclear system. (orig.)

  2. Microscopically Based Nuclear Energy Functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogner, S. K.

    2009-01-01

    A major goal of the SciDAC project 'Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional' is to develop next-generation nuclear energy density functionals that give controlled extrapolations away from stability with improved performance across the mass table. One strategy is to identify missing physics in phenomenological Skyrme functionals based on our understanding of the underlying internucleon interactions and microscopic many-body theory. In this contribution, I describe ongoing efforts to use the density matrix expansion of Negele and Vautherin to incorporate missing finite-range effects from the underlying two- and three-nucleon interactions into phenomenological Skyrme functionals.

  3. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2002-12-17

    We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso

  5. Clinical significance of computed tomographic arteriography for minute hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, H; Matsui, O; Suzuki, M; Ida, M; Kitagawa, K [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) can clearly demonstrate minute hepatocellular carcinoma (H.C.C.) more than 2 cm in diameter as an enhanced mass lesion. In this case the precise localization of H.C.C. becomes so obvious that CTA plays an important role to evaluate its resectability. However, H.C.C. of the size from 2 cm to 1 cm indiameter, which is visualized with celiac and infusion hepatic angiography, becomes more difficult in detection, and particularly H.C.C. of less than 1 cm in diameter can hardly be recognized, nor be diagnosed as a malignant nodule by CTA, therefore it appears that in these sizes of H.C.C. the detectability of CTA is not superior to the hepatic angiography.

  6. Computer tomographic and angiographic studies of histologically confirmed intrahepatic masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janson, R.; Lackner, K.; Paquet, K.J.; Thelen, M.; Thurn, P.

    1980-01-01

    The computer tomographic and angiographic findings in 53 patients with intrahepatic masses were compared. The histological findings show that 17 were due to echinococcus, 12 were due to hepatic carcinoma, ten were metastases, five patients had focal nodular hyperplasia, three an alveolar echinococcus and there were three cases with an haemangioma of the liver and a further three liver abscesses. Computer tomography proved superior in peripherally situated lesions, and in those in the left lobe of the liver. Arteriography was better at demonstrating lesions below 2 cm in size, particularly vascular tumours. As a pre-operative measure, angiography is to be preferred since it is able to demonstrate anatomic anomalies and variations in the blood supply, as well as invasion of the portal vein or of the inferior vena cava. (orig.) [de

  7. Computer tomographic and angiographic studies of histologically confirmed intrahepatic masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, R.; Lackner, K.; Paquet, K.J.; Thelen, M.; Thurn, P.

    1980-06-01

    The computer tomographic and angiographic findings in 53 patients with intrahepatic masses were compared. The histological findings show that 17 were due to echinococcus, 12 were due to hepatic carcinoma, ten were metastases, five patients had focal nodular hyperplasia, three an alveolar echinococcus and there were three cases with an haemangioma of the liver and a further three liver abscesses. Computer tomography proved superior in peripherally situated lesions, and in those in the left lobe of the liver. Arteriography was better at demonstrating lesions below 2 cm in size, particularly vascular tumours. As a pre-operative measure, angiography is to be preferred since it is able to demonstrate anatomic anomalies and variations in the blood supply, as well as invasion of the portal vein or of the inferior vena cava.

  8. Computed tomographic study of hormone-secreting microadenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemminghytt, S.; Kalkhoff, R.K.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Grogan, J.P.; Haughton, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review was made of the computed tomographic (CT) studies of 33 patients with hormone-secreting microadenomas that had been verified by transsphenoidal surgery and endocrinologic evaluation. In previous studies in small series of patients, the CT appearance of pituitary microadenomas has been reported as hypodense, isodense, and hyperdense. In this study, CT showed a region of diminished enhancement and ususally an enlarged pituitary gland in cases of prolactin-secreting adenomas. HGH- or ACTH-secreting adenomas were less consistently hypodense. It is concluded that hypodensity and enlargement in the pituitary gland are the most useful criteria for identification of microadenomas. Some technical factors that may affect the CT appearance of microadenomas and lead to conflicting reports are discussed

  9. Central nervous system leukemia and lymphoma: computed tomographic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, J.J.; Libshitz, H.I.; Wallace, S.; Hayman, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were identified in 31 of 405 patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Abnormalities included neoplastic masses (15), hemorrhage (nine), abscess (two), other brain tumors (four), and methotrexate leukoencephalopathy (one). CT was normal in 374 patients including 148 with meningeal disease diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid cytologic examination. Prior to treatment, malignant masses were isodense or of greater density with varying amounts of edema. Increase in size or number of the masses indicated worsening. Response to radiation and chemotherapy was manifested by development of a central low density region with an enhancing rim. CT findings correlated with clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings. The differential diagnosis of the various abnormalities is considered

  10. Electronics for the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahoon, J.L.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Geyer, A.B.; Uber, D.C.; Turko, B.T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-10-01

    The data acquisition system, designed for the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph, is described. Coincidence timing resolution of less than five nanoseconds full width at half maximum and data rates in excess of one million events per second are achieved by using high-speed emitter coupled logic circuits, first-in first-out memory to derandomize data flow, and parallel architecture to increase throughput. These data rates allow the acquisition of adequate transmission data in a reasonable amount of time. Good timing resolution minimizes accidental coincidences and permits data rates greater than 100,000 image-forming events per second for high-speed dynamic emission tomography. Additional scatter and accidental rejection are accomplished for transmission data by using an orbiting source and a look-up table for valid events. Calibration of this complex electronic system is performed automatically under computer control. 4 refs., 5 figs

  11. Combination tomographic and cardiographic ultrasonic imaging method and system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, T.; Fukukita, H.; Fukumoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Irioka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic echo signals are successively sampled and converted to digital echo data which are written into a first digital memory column by column and then read out row by row into a first buffer memory. The digital echo data which are derived in response to beams successively transmitted in a predetermined direction are written into columns of a second digital memory and read out of the memory in rows into a second buffer memory. The data stored in the first and second buffer memories are read out for digital-to-analog conversion and selectively applied within a television ''frame'' interval to control electron beam intensity of a single cathode ray tube so as to present tomographic and cardiographic images in different display areas of the tube

  12. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  13. Design of a femtosecond laser assisted tomographic atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, B.; Vurpillot, F.; Vella, A.; Gilbert, M.; Menand, A.; Blavette, D.; Deconihout, B.

    2006-01-01

    A tomographic atom probe (TAP) in which the atoms are field evaporated by means of femtosecond laser pulses has been designed. It is shown that the field evaporation is assisted by the laser field enhanced by the subwavelength dimensions of the specimen without any significant heating of the specimen. In addition, as compared with the conventional TAP, due to the very short duration of laser pulses, no spread in the energy of emitted ions is observed, leading to a very high mass resolution in a straight TAP in a wide angle configuration. At last, laser pulses can be used to bring the intense electric field required for the field evaporation on poor conductive materials such as intrinsic Si at low temperature. In this article, the performance of the laser TAP is described and illustrated through the investigation of metals, oxides, and silicon materials

  14. The electronics for the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahoon, J.L.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Geyer, A.B.; Uber, D.C.; Turko, B.T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    The data acquisition system, designed for the Donner 600-Crystal Positron Tomograph, is described. Coincidence timing resolution of less than five nanoseconds full width at half maximum and data rates in excess of one million events per second are achieved by using high-speed emitter coupled logic circuits, first-in first-out memory to derandomize data flow, and parallel architecture to increase throughput. These data rates allow the acquisition of adequate transmission data in a reasonable amount of time. Good timing resolution minimizes accidental coincidences and permits data rates greater than 100,000 image-forming events per second for high-speed dynamic emission tomography. Additional scatter and accidental rejection are accomplished for transmission data by using an orbiting source and a look-up table for valid events. Calibration of this complex electronic system is performed automatically under computer control

  15. The accuracy of the ATLAS muon X-ray tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramidou, R.; Berbiers, J.; Boudineau, C.; Dechelette, C.; Drakoulakos, D.; Fabjan, C.; Grau, S.; Gschwendtner, E.; Maugain, J.-M.; Rieder, H.; Rangod, S.; Rohrbach, F.; Sbrissa, E.; Sedykh, E.; Sedykh, I.; Smirnov, Y.; Vertogradov, L.; Vichou, I.

    2003-01-01

    A gigantic detector, the ATLAS project, is under construction at CERN for particle physics research at the Large Hadron Collider which is to be ready by 2006. An X-ray tomograph has been developed, designed and constructed at CERN in order to control the mechanical quality of the ATLAS muon chambers. We reached a measurement accuracy of 2 μm systematic and 2 μm statistical uncertainties in the horizontal and vertical directions in the working area 220 cm (horizontal)×60 cm (vertical). Here we describe in detail the fundamental approach of the basic principle chosen to achieve such good accuracy. In order to crosscheck our precision, key results of measurements are presented.

  16. The accuracy of the ATLAS muon X-ray tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramidou, R.; Berbiers, J.; Boudineau, C.; Dechelette, C.; Drakoulakos, D.; Fabjan, C.; Grau, S.; Gschwendtner, E.; Maugain, J.-M.; Rieder, H.; Rangod, S.; Rohrbach, F.; Sbrissa, E.; Sedykh, E.; Sedykh, I.; Smirnov, Y.; Vertogradov, L.; Vichou, I.

    2003-01-01

    A gigantic detector, the ATLAS project, is under construction at CERN for particle physics research at the Large Hadron Collider which is to be ready by 2006. An X-ray tomograph has been developed, designed and constructed at CERN in order to control the mechanical quality of the ATLAS muon chambers. We reached a measurement accuracy of 2 μm systematic and 2 μm statistical uncertainties in the horizontal and vertical directions in the working area 220 cm (horizontal)x60 cm (vertical). Here we describe in detail the fundamental approach of the basic principle chosen to achieve such good accuracy. In order to crosscheck our precision, key results of measurements are presented

  17. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver - computed tomographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, E.; Usadel, S.; Vogel, J.; Kern, P.; Friedrich, J.M.; Brambs, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    In order to ascertain the typical computed tomographic findings of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, 24 computed tomograms of 19 patients were evaluated. The liver was involved in all cases whereas the diaphragma was infiltrated in 32%, and the retroperioteneal area in 42%. The right liver lobe was affected in 65%. Both before and after intravenous bolus contrast medium administration, the lesions were mainly inhomogeneous and of low density; a masking of the lesions due to the contrast medium administration was not observed; the enhancement pattern was irregular. Calcifications were detected in 96% of the cases, cystic structures in 50%, and cholestasis in 54%. On the basis of the crucial finding of calcifications in combination with the other typical observations, CT seems to be very suitable for the evaluation of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Low-dose computed tomographic imaging in orbital trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, A.; Whitehouse, R.W. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1993-08-01

    The authors review findings in 75 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 66 patients with orbital trauma who were imaged using a low-radiation-dose CT technique. Imaging was performed using a dynamic scan mode and exposure factors of 120 kVp and 80 mAs resulting in a skin dose of 11 mGy with an effective dose-equivalent of 0.22 mSv. Image quality was diagnostic in all cases and excellent in 73 examinations. Soft-tissue abnormalities within the orbit including muscle adhesions were well demonstrated both on primary axial and reconstructed multiplanar images. The benefits of multiplanar reconstructions are stressed and the contribution of soft-tissue injuries to symptomatic diplopia examined. (author).

  19. Computed tomographic findings in children with spastic diplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokochi, Kenji; Horie, Masayo; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Kito, Hideyuki; Shimabukuro, Satoshi; Kodama, Kazuo.

    1989-01-01

    Computed tomographic findings of 46 children with spastic diplegia examined at nine months to three years of age corrected for preterm births were analyzed. Both the size of the lateral ventricles measured by the width of the anterior horns, and the volume of the extracerebral low-density areas were enlarged in some patiens. Both enlargements did not, however, correlate to the severity of the motor abnormality in the patients. The low-density areas of the periventricular white matter, especially adjacent to the trigone, were reduced in many children, probably due to the atrophy of the cerebral white matter having periventricular leukomalacia. The anterior expansion of the white matter reduction from the trigone corresponded to the severer motor abnormality in the children with spastic diplegia. (author)

  20. Tomographic study of temporomandibular joints before orthodontic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Jeong [Kyung Hee Univ. College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To determine whether there is a relationship between abnormal temporomandibular joint radiographic findings and age or gender in a sample of preorthodontic patients. Individualized corrected sagittal tomographs of 188 temporomandibular joints in 94 preorthodontic patients, aged 11 to 29 years, were taken and viewed by an observer blinded to clinical records. The study population was divided into 2 aged groups (11-15 years and 16-29 years) for comparative purpose. Temporomandibular joint radiographic findings were classified as normal or abnormal. There was no difference in ratio of abnormal to normal findings between the both aged groups. The frequency of osseous abnormalities was similar with that of abnormalities of condylar position. Abnormalities in CP and JS were most frequent in all aged groups. There is no significant difference between ages or genders for temporomandibular joint radiographic abnormalities.

  1. Detectability in the presence of computed tomographic reconstruction noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1977-01-01

    The multitude of commercial computed tomographic (CT) scanners which have recently been introduced for use in diagnostic radiology has given rise to a need to compare these different machines in terms of image quality and dose to the patient. It is therefore desirable to arrive at a figure of merit for a CT image which gives a measure of the diagnostic efficacy of that image. This figure of merit may well be dependent upon the specific visual task being performed. It is clearly important that the capabilities and deficiencies of the human observer as well as the interface between man and machine, namely the viewing system, be taken into account in formulating the figure of merit. Since the CT reconstruction is the result of computer processing, it is possible to use this processing to alter the characteristics of the displayed images. This image processing may improve or degrade the figure of merit

  2. Longitudinal and transverse digital image reconstruction with a tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, D.R.; Price, R.R.; Erickson, J.J.; Patton, J.A.; Partain, C.L.; Rollo, F.D.

    1981-01-01

    A Siemens Gammasonics PHO/CON-192 Multiplane Imager is interfaced to a digital computer for the purpose of performing tomographic reconstructions from the data collected during a single scan. Data from the two moving gamma cameras as well as camera position information are sent to the computer by an interface designed in the authors' laboratory. Backprojection reconstruction is implemented by the computer. Longitudinal images in whole-body format as well as smaller formats are reconstructed for up to six planes simultaneously from the list mode data. Transverse reconstructions are demonstrated for 201 T1 myocardial scans. Post-reconstruction deconvolution processing to remove the blur artifact (characteristic of focal plane tomography) is applied to a multiplane phantom. Digital data acquisition of data and reconstruction of images are practical, and can extend the usefulness of the machine when compared with the film output (author)

  3. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  4. Matching tomographic IMRT fields with static photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, A.; Leybovich, L.; Dogan, N.; Emami, B.

    2001-01-01

    The matching of abutting radiation fields presents a challenging problem in radiation therapy. Due to sharp penumbra of linear accelerator beams, small (1-2 mm) errors in field positioning can lead to large (>30%) hot or cold spots in the abutment region. With head and neck immobilization devices (thermoplastic mask/aquaplast) an average setup error of 3 mm has been reported. Therefore hot or cold spots approaching 50% of the prescription dose may occur along the matchline. Although abutting radiation fields have been investigated for static fields, there is no reported study regarding matching of tomographic IMRT and static fields. Compared to static fields, the matching of tomographic IMRT fields with static fields is more complicated. Since IMRT and static fields are planned on separate treatment planning computers, the dose in the abutment region is not specified. In addition, commonly used techniques for matching fields, such as feathering of junctions, are not practical. We have developed a method that substantially reduces dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region. In this method, a 'buffer zone' around the matchline was created and was included as part of the target for both IMRT and static field plans. In both fields, a small dose gradient (≤3%/mm) in the buffer zone was created. In the IMRT plan, the buffer zone was divided into three sections with dose varying from 83% to 25% of prescription dose. The static field dose profile was modified using either a specially designed physical (hard) or a dynamic (soft) wedge. When these modified fields were matched, the combined dose in the abutment region varied by ≤10% in the presence of setup errors spanning 4 mm (±2 mm) when the hard wedge was used and 10 mm (±5 mm) with the soft wedge

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of multi-slice computed tomographic angiography in the detection of cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighatkhah, H. R.; Sabouri, S.; Borzouyeh, F.; Bagherzadeh, M. H.; Bakhshandeh, H.; Jalali, A. H.

    2008-01-01

    Multislice computed tomographic angiography is a rapid and minimally invasive method for the detection of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to compare Multislice computed tomographic angiography with digital subtraction angiography In the diagnosis of cerebral aneurysms. Patients and Methods: In this cross sectional study we evaluated 111 consecutive patients [42(37.8%) male and 69(62.2%) female], who were admitted under clinical symptoms and signs. suggestive of harboring an intracranial aneurysm by using a four detector Multislice computed tomographic angiography. Then we compared results of Multislice computed tomographic angiography with digital subtraction angiography results as a gold standard method. Digital subtraction angiography was performed by bilateral selective common carotid artery injections and either unilateral or bilateral vertebral artery injections, as necessary. Multislice computed tomographic angiography images were interpreted by one radiologist and digital subtraction angiography was performed by another radiologist who was blinded to the interpretation of the Multislice computed tomographic angiograms. Results: The mean ±S D age of the patients was 49.1±13.6 years (range: 12-84 years). We performed Multislice computed tomographic in 111 and digital subtraction angiography in 85 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive and negative likelihood ratio of Multislice computed tomographic angiography, when compared with digital subtraction angiography as the gold standard, were 100%, 90%, 87.5%, 100%, 10 and 0, respectively. Conclusion: Multislice computed tomographic angiography seems to be an accurate and noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms

  6. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-06-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1 to 4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  7. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-01-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1-4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  8. Microscopical advances in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, B

    2004-01-01

    In a series of papers carried out by this laboratory it was demonstrated that the quality of sterile males sperm, assessed submicroscopically and mathematically, is closely correlated with the success of the various procedures of assisted reproduction. If we attempt to select hypothetically optimal spermatozoa destined to the ICSI by light inverted microscopy, a considerable amount of ultrastructural information is lost and our selection is merely based on the motility. In this study we apply polarization microscopy to the ICSI technique, introducing polarizing and analyzing lenses in an inverted microscope model, operating in a transparent container. The retardation of the birefringence in the various organelles is evaluated by compensators, and the images are transmitted to a video system, and stored in a computer. Spermatozoa are maintained alive and perfectly motile in this polarizing inverted microscope, and the character of the birefringence is the same as in fixed and sectioned biological material examined by polarization microscopy. The birefringence of the sperm structures allows a sperm analysis closer to TEM than to phase contrast light microscopy analysis.

  9. Visualizing 3-D microscopic specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Per-Ola; Majlof, Lars L.

    1992-06-01

    The confocal microscope can be used in a vast number of fields and applications to gather more information than is possible with a regular light microscope, in particular about depth. Compared to other three-dimensional imaging devices such as CAT, NMR, and PET, the variations of the objects studied are larger and not known from macroscopic dissections. It is therefore important to have several complementary ways of displaying the gathered information. We present a system where the user can choose display techniques such as extended focus, depth coding, solid surface modeling, maximum intensity and other techniques, some of which may be combined. A graphical user interface provides easy and direct control of all input parameters. Motion and stereo are available options. Many three- dimensional imaging devices give recordings where one dimension has different resolution and sampling than the other two which requires interpolation to obtain correct geometry. We have evaluated algorithms with interpolation in object space and in projection space. There are many ways to simplify the geometrical transformations to gain performance. We present results of some ways to simplify the calculations.

  10. Robotic autopositioning of the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Merkl, Brandon; Hattendorf, Guido M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Use of the operating microscope has become pervasive since its introduction to the neurosurgical world. Neuronavigation fused with the operating microscope has allowed accurate correlation of the focal point of the microscope and its location on the downloaded imaging study. However, the robotic ability of the Pentero microscope has not been utilized to orient the angle of the microscope or to change its focal length to hone in on a predefined target. To report a novel technology that allows automatic positioning of the operating microscope onto a set target and utilization of a planned trajectory, either determined with the StealthStation S7 by using preoperative imaging or intraoperatively with the microscope. By utilizing the current motorized capabilities of the Zeiss OPMI Pentero microscope, a robotic autopositioning feature was developed in collaboration with Surgical Technologies, Medtronic, Inc. (StealthStation S7). The system is currently being tested at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Three options were developed for automatically positioning the microscope: AutoLock Current Point, Align Parallel to Plan, and Point to Plan Target. These options allow the microscope to pivot around the lesion, hover in a set plane parallel to the determined trajectory, or rotate and point to a set target point, respectively. Integration of automatic microscope positioning into the operative workflow has potential to increase operative efficacy and safety. This technology is best suited for precise trajectories and entry points into deep-seated lesions.

  11. Construction of a positron emission tomograph with 2.4 mm detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, J.A.; Sprosst, R.L.; Wang, K.

    1986-01-01

    One-quarter of one ring of a positron tomograph has been constructed. The positron annihilation gamma rays are detected by polished plastic scintillators which direct scintillation light by internal reflection to optical fibers for transmission to the photo-multiplier tubes. By viewing each scintillator with four sets of optical fibers, the number of photomultipliers required for an eight ring tomograph with 1024 detectors per ring (2.4 mm wide detectors) can be reduced from 8192 to 288, and the cost of the tomograph reduced accordingly

  12. Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kollár, Alicia J.; Taylor, Stephen F.; Turner, Richard W.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic imaging of local magnetic fields provides a window into the organizing principles of complex and technologically relevant condensed-matter materials. However, a wide variety of intriguing strongly correlated and topologically nontrivial materials exhibit poorly understood phenomena outside the detection capability of state-of-the-art high-sensitivity high-resolution scanning probe magnetometers. We introduce a quantum-noise-limited scanning probe magnetometer that can operate from room-to-cryogenic temperatures with unprecedented dc-field sensitivity and micron-scale resolution. The Scanning Quantum Cryogenic Atom Microscope (SQCRAMscope) employs a magnetically levitated atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), thereby providing immunity to conductive and blackbody radiative heating. The SQCRAMscope has a field sensitivity of 1.4 nT per resolution-limited point (approximately 2 μ m ) or 6 nT /√{Hz } per point at its duty cycle. Compared to point-by-point sensors, the long length of the BEC provides a naturally parallel measurement, allowing one to measure nearly 100 points with an effective field sensitivity of 600 pT /√{Hz } for each point during the same time as a point-by-point scanner measures these points sequentially. Moreover, it has a noise floor of 300 pT and provides nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in magnetic flux sensitivity (down to 10-6 Φ0/√{Hz } ) over previous atomic probe magnetometers capable of scanning near samples. These capabilities are carefully benchmarked by imaging magnetic fields arising from microfabricated wire patterns in a system where samples may be scanned, cryogenically cooled, and easily exchanged. We anticipate the SQCRAMscope will provide charge-transport images at temperatures from room temperature to 4 K in unconventional superconductors and topologically nontrivial materials.

  13. Preparation and tomographic reconstruction of an arbitrary single-photon path qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, So-Young; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    We report methods for preparation and tomographic reconstruction of an arbitrary single-photon path qubit. The arbitrary single-photon path qubit is prepared losslessly by passing the heralded single-photon state from spontaneous parametric down-conversion through variable beam splitter. Quantum state tomography of the single-photon path qubit is implemented by introducing path-projection measurements based on the first-order single-photon quantum interference. Using the state preparation and path-projection measurements methods for the single-photon path qubit, we demonstrate preparation and complete tomographic reconstruction of the single-photon path qubit with arbitrary purity. -- Highlights: → We report methods for preparation and tomographic reconstruction of an arbitrary single-photon path qubit. → We implement path-projection measurements based on the first-order single-photon quantum interference. → We demonstrate preparation and complete tomographic reconstruction of the single-photon path qubit with arbitrary purity.

  14. Project, building and utilization of a tomograph of micro metric resolution to application in soil science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Alvaro; Torre Neto, Andre; Cruvinel, Paulo Estevao; Crestana, Silvio

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the project , building and utilization of a tomograph of micro metric resolution in soil science. It describes the problems involved in soil's science study and it describes the system and methodology

  15. Tomographic apparatus for reconstructing planar slices from non-absorbed and non-scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus which can be used in computerized tomographic systems for producing a fan shaped beam, detectors to be used in conjunction with the source and equipment for rotating the source supports are described. (U.K.)

  16. IceBridge Radar L3 Tomographic Ice Thickness V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Level-3 tomographic ice thickness measurements derived from data captured by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Multichannel...

  17. Blunt oesophageal perforation: treatment with surgical exclusion and percutaneous drainage under computed tomographic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauthey, J.N.; Lerut, J.; Laube, M.; Gertsch, P.

    1992-01-01

    We report a patient with a left thoracic contusion and rupture of the distal oesophagus. Persistent sepsis developed after oesophageal exclusion without closure. Two collection were drained percutaneously under computed tomographic guidance and the sepsis resolved. (11 refs., 1 fig.)

  18. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part II: tomographic imaging modalities--techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Najmaei, Nima; Khoshnam, Mahta; Patel, Rajni

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative application of tomographic imaging techniques provides a means of visual servoing for objects beneath the surface of organs. The focus of this survey is on therapeutic and diagnostic medical applications where tomographic imaging is used in visual servoing. To this end, a comprehensive search of the electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013. Existing techniques and products are categorized and studied, based on the imaging modality and their medical applications. This part complements Part I of the survey, which covers visual servoing techniques using endoscopic imaging and direct vision. The main challenges in using visual servoing based on tomographic images have been identified. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field and ultrasound is the most commonly used tomographic modality for visual servoing. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Evaluation and optimization of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoess, C.

    2004-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an imaging technique used in medicine to determine qualitative and quantitative metabolic parameters in vivo. The High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a new high resolution tomograph that was designed for brain studies (312 mm transaxial field-of-view (FOV), 252 mm axial FOV). The detector blocks are arranged in a quadrant sharing design and consist of two crystal layers with dimensions of 2.1 mm x 2.1 mm x 7.5 mm. The main detector material is the newly developed scintillator lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO). Events from the different crystal layers are distinguished by Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) to gain Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. This will improve the spatial resolution, especially at the edges of the FOV. A prototype of the tomograph was installed at the Max-Planck Institute for Neurological Research in Cologne, Germany in 1999 and was evaluated with respect to spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and count rate behavior. These performance measurements showed that this prototype provided a spatial resolution of around 2.5 mm in a volume big enough to contain the human brain. A comparison with a single layer HRRT prototype showed a 10% worsening of the resolution, despite the fact that DOI was used. Without DOI, the resolution decreased considerably. The sensitivity, as measured with a 22 Na point source, was 46.5 cps/kBq for an energy window of 350-650 keV and 37.9 cps/kBq for an energy window of 400-650 keV, while the scatter fractions were 56% for 350-650 keV and 51% for 400-650 keV, respectively. A daily quality check was developed and implemented that uses the uniform, natural radioactive background of the scintillator material LSO. In 2001, the manufacturer decided to build a series of additional HRRT scanners to try to improve the design (detector electronics, transmission source design, and shielding against out-of-FOV activity) and to eliminate problems (difficult detector

  20. Development of a computerized tomographic system based on the FAN-BEAM technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junqueira, M.M.; Santos, C.A.C.; Borges, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, at COPPE/UFRJ, concentrates its researches in the development of computerized tomographic systems, looking for applications in industrial and medical non destructive analysing techniques. In this work we have projected and constructed a tomographic prototype, based on the FAN-BEAM technique for irradiating the object under analysis. An algorithm previously developed to analyse parallel beams, was modified and adapted to the FAN-BEAM geometry. (Author) [pt

  1. Remote diagnosis via a telecommunication satellite--ultrasonic tomographic image transmission experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, I; Inokuchi, S; Tajima, T; Takahashi, T

    1985-04-01

    An experiment to transmit ultrasonic tomographic section images required for remote medical diagnosis and care was conducted using the mobile telecommunication satellite OSCAR-10. The images received showed the intestinal condition of a patient incapable of verbal communication, however the image screen had a fairly coarse particle structure. On the basis of these experiments, were considered as the transmission of ultrasonic tomographic images extremely effective in remote diagnosis.

  2. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  3. Motion tracking-enhanced MART for tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novara, Matteo; Scarano, Fulvio; Batenburg, Kees Joost

    2010-01-01

    A novel technique to increase the accuracy of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) reconstruction from tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) recordings at higher seeding density than currently possible is presented. The motion tracking enhancement (MTE) method is based on the combined utilization of images from two or more exposures to enhance the reconstruction of individual intensity fields. The working principle is first introduced qualitatively, and the mathematical background is given that explains how the MART reconstruction can be improved on the basis of an improved first guess object obtained from the combination of non-simultaneous views reduced to the same time instant deforming the 3D objects by an estimate of the particle motion field. The performances of MTE are quantitatively evaluated by numerical simulation of the imaging, reconstruction and image correlation processes. The cases of two or more exposures obtained from time-resolved experiments are considered. The iterative application of MTE appears to significantly improve the reconstruction quality, first by decreasing the intensity of the ghost images and second, by increasing the intensity and the reconstruction precision for the actual particles. Based on computer simulations, the maximum imaged seeding density that can be dealt with is tripled with respect to the MART analysis applied to a single exposure. The analysis also illustrates that the maximum effect of the MTE method is comparable to that of doubling the number of cameras in the tomographic system. Experiments performed on a transitional jet at Re = 5000 apply the MTE method to double-frame recordings. The velocity measurement precision is increased for a system with fewer views (two or three cameras compared with four cameras). The ghost particles' intensity is also visibly reduced although to a lesser extent with respect to the computer simulations. The velocity and vorticity field obtained from a three

  4. Positioning of Nuclear Fuel Assemblies by Means of Image Analysis on Tomographic Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troeng, Mats

    2005-06-01

    A tomographic measurement technique for nuclear fuel assemblies has been developed at the Department of Radiation Sciences at Uppsala University. The technique requires highly accurate information about the position of the measured nuclear fuel assembly relative to the measurement equipment. In experimental campaigns performed earlier, separate positioning measurements have therefore been performed in connection to the tomographic measurements. In this work, another positioning approach has been investigated, which requires only the collection of tomographic data. Here, a simplified tomographic reconstruction is performed, whereby an image is obtained. By performing image analysis on this image, the lateral and angular position of the fuel assembly can be determined. The position information can then be used to perform a more accurate tomographic reconstruction involving detailed physical modeling. Two image analysis techniques have been developed in this work. The stability of the two techniques with respect to some central parameters has been studied. The agreement between these image analysis techniques and the previously used positioning technique was found to meet the desired requirements. Furthermore, it has been shown that the image analysis techniques offer more detailed information than the previous technique. In addition, its off-line analysis properties reduce the need for valuable measurement time. When utilizing the positions obtained from the image analysis techniques in tomographic reconstructions of the rod-by-rod power distribution, the repeatability of the reconstructed values was improved. Furthermore, the reconstructions resulted in better agreement to theoretical data

  5. A positron emission tomograph designed for 3/4 mm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInytre, J.A.; Allen, R.D.; Aguiar, J.; Paulson, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    Two factors of the design for a positron tomograph affect the magnitude of the tomograph spatial resolution: the gamma ray detector width and the analogue measurement of the scintillator location. In the tomograph design reported here the analogue measurement is eliminated and the detector transaxial width factor is reduced to 3/4 mm. The analogue measurement is eliminated by transmitting the scintillation light from each individual scintillator through optical fibers to four photo-multipliers (PMT's); the identities of the PMT's then provide a digital address for the scintillation location. Plastic scintillators are used to provide enough scintillation light for transmission through the optical fibers. Bonuses from the use of plastic scintillators are first, the reduction of the scintillator dead time to about 10 nsec, second, a large reduction of cross-talk between neighboring scintillators, third, the reduction of resolution loss from off-axis gamma rays and, fourth, the ability to sample the axial image at one-eighth the axial resolution distance of 2.5 mm. The designed tomograph incorporates 20 rings. Two of the 32 tomograph 20-ring modules have been constructed to measure the resolution and other characteristics of the tomographs

  6. Foldscope: origami-based paper microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Cybulski

    Full Text Available Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education.

  7. Microscopic description of magnetized plasma: quasiparticle concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.; Decyk, V.K.

    1993-01-01

    A quasiparticle concept is developed systematically, from first principles, within the context of microscopic description of magnetized plasma. It is argued that the zeroth velocity-gyroangle harmonic of the microscopic particle distribution function under the gyrokinetic change of variables can be taken as a microscopic quasi-particle density in a reduced phase space. The nature of quasiparticles is discussed and equations of their motion are derived within both exact and reduced microscopic descriptions. The reduced one employs explicitly the separation of interesting time scales. (orig.)

  8. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  9. Exceptionally preserved Cambrian trilobite digestive system revealed in 3D by synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats E Eriksson

    Full Text Available The Cambrian 'Orsten' fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish 'Orsten' fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the 'Orsten' fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome.

  10. Investigation of liquid water in gas diffusion layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells using X-ray tomographic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueckiger, Reto [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Marone, Federica [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Stampanoni, Marco [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Wokaun, Alexander [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Buechi, Felix N., E-mail: felix.buechi@psi.c [Electrochemistry Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), condensation of water within the pore network of the gas diffusion layers (GDL) can influence the gas transport properties and thus reduce the electrochemical conversion rates. The use of X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM), which allows for a resolution in the order of one micrometer is investigated for studying ex situ the local saturation in GDL's. The strength of XTM is the high spatial resolution with simultaneous contrast for water and carbon, allowing for non-destructive 3D-imaging of the solid and the contained water. The application of this method for imaging the ex situ water intrusion into the porous network of GDLs is explored using absorption and phase contrast methods. It is shown that the inhomogeneous filling behavior of GDL materials can indeed be visualized with sufficient resolution. For Toray paper TGP-H-060 the local saturation was measured as function of the water pressure. The results, evaluated in 1D, 2D and 3D show a liquid water retention effect at the denser layers near the surface. A comparison with established capillary pressure functions is presented. Altogether, the results show the potential of the XTM-method as a tool for studying the liquid water behavior in PEFC on a microscopic scale.

  11. Investigation of liquid water in gas diffusion layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells using X-ray tomographic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueckiger, Reto; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco; Wokaun, Alexander; Buechi, Felix N.

    2011-01-01

    In polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), condensation of water within the pore network of the gas diffusion layers (GDL) can influence the gas transport properties and thus reduce the electrochemical conversion rates. The use of X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM), which allows for a resolution in the order of one micrometer is investigated for studying ex situ the local saturation in GDL's. The strength of XTM is the high spatial resolution with simultaneous contrast for water and carbon, allowing for non-destructive 3D-imaging of the solid and the contained water. The application of this method for imaging the ex situ water intrusion into the porous network of GDLs is explored using absorption and phase contrast methods. It is shown that the inhomogeneous filling behavior of GDL materials can indeed be visualized with sufficient resolution. For Toray paper TGP-H-060 the local saturation was measured as function of the water pressure. The results, evaluated in 1D, 2D and 3D show a liquid water retention effect at the denser layers near the surface. A comparison with established capillary pressure functions is presented. Altogether, the results show the potential of the XTM-method as a tool for studying the liquid water behavior in PEFC on a microscopic scale.

  12. A microscope for Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on a novel quantum gas microscope to investigate many-body systems of fermionic atoms in optical lattices. Single-site resolved imaging of ultracold lattice gases has enabled powerful studies of bosonic quantum many-body systems. The extension of this capability to Fermi gases offers new prospects to studying complex phenomena of strongly correlated systems, for which numerical simulations are often out of reach. Using standard techniques of laser cooling, optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li are prepared and loaded into a large-scale 2D optical lattice of flexible geometry. The atomic distribution is frozen using a second, short-scaled lattice, where we perform Raman sideband cooling to induce fluorescence on each atom while maintaining its position. Together with high-resolution imaging, the fluorescence signals allow for reconstructing the initial atom distribution with single-site sensitivity and high fidelity. Magnetically driven evaporative cooling in the plane allows for producing degenerate Fermi gases with almost unity filling in the initial lattice, allowing for the first microscopic studies of ultracold gases with clear signatures of Fermi statistics. By preparing an ensemble of spin-polarised Fermi gases, we detect a flattening of the density profile towards the centre of the cloud, which is a characteristic of a band-insulating state. In one set of experiments, we demonstrate that losses of atom pairs on a single lattice site due to light-assisted collisions are circumvented. The oversampling of the second lattice allows for deterministic separation of the atom pairs into different sites. Compressing a high-density sample in a trap before loading into the lattice leads to many double occupancies of atoms populating different bands, which we can image with no evidence for pairwise losses. We therefore gain direct access to the true number statistics on each lattice site. Using this feature, we can

  13. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J.

    1990-01-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine and excretion of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of [ 18 F]-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of [ 18 F]fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function

  14. Method of making tomographic images of X-rayed objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eickel, R.

    1979-01-01

    A tomographic image of a selected layer of a stationary object is made by moving the source of X-rays along a first path at one side of the selected layer and by moving an ionography imaging chamber which contains a dielectric receptor sheet along a second path at the other side of the selected layer. The movement of the sheet is synchronized with movement of the source of X-rays and includes a translatory movement in a direction counter to the direction of movement of the source, a pivotal movement to maintain the sheet in a plane which is normal to the central beam of the bundle of X-rays, and a sidewise movement to vary the distance between the selected layer and the sheet so that the length of the projection of selected layer upon the sheet remains unchanged. If the sheet is rectangular, the pivotal movement is performed about an axis which is located in the plane of the selected layer and is parallel to the shorter sides of the sheet

  15. Non-rigid registration of tomographic images with Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Ar; Isoardi, Ra; Mato, G

    2007-01-01

    Spatial image registration of deformable body parts such as thorax and abdomen has important medical applications, but at the same time, it represents an important computational challenge. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm to perform non-rigid registration of tomographic images using a non-rigid model based on Fourier transforms. As a measure of similarity, we use the correlation coefficient, finding that the optimal order of the transformation is n = 3 (36 parameters). We apply this method to a digital phantom and to 7 pairs of patient images corresponding to clinical CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a fairly good agreement according to medical experts, with an average registration error of 2 mm for the case of clinical images. For 2D images (dimensions 512x512), the average running time for the algorithm is 15 seconds using a standard personal computer. Summarizing, we find that intra-modality registration of the abdomen can be achieved with acceptable accuracy for slight deformations and can be extended to 3D with a reasonable execution time

  16. Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry using Smartphones and Colored Shadows

    KAUST Repository

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.

    2017-06-12

    We demonstrate the viability of using four low-cost smartphone cameras to perform Tomographic PIV. We use colored shadows to imprint two or three different time-steps on the same image. The back-lighting is accomplished with three sets of differently-colored pulsed LEDs. Each set of Red, Green & Blue LEDs is shone on a diffuser screen facing each of the cameras. We thereby record the RGB-colored shadows of opaque suspended particles, rather than the conventionally used scattered light. We subsequently separate the RGB color channels, to represent the separate times, with preprocessing to minimize noise and cross-talk. We use commercially available Tomo-PIV software for the calibration, 3-D particle reconstruction and particle-field correlations, to obtain all three velocity components in a volume. Acceleration estimations can be done thanks to the triple pulse illumination. Our test flow is a vortex ring produced by forcing flow through a circular orifice, using a flexible membrane, which is driven by a pressurized air pulse. Our system is compared to a commercial stereoscopic PIV system for error estimations. We believe this proof of concept experiment will make this technique available for education, industry and scientists for a fraction of the hardware cost needed for traditional Tomo-PIV.

  17. Tuberculosis of the Parotid Gland: Computed Tomographic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y.; Xiao, J.; Pui, M.H.; Gong, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) of the parotid gland is rare, even in endemic regions. Approximately 100 cases have been reported in the English literature. The computed tomographic (CT) features, however, have seldom been studied. Purpose: To determine the diagnostic CT features of tuberculosis of the parotid gland. Material and Methods: CT studies of four histologically proven cases of tuberculosis of the parotid gland were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 15 enlarged lymph nodes were found in the superficial lobes of the parotid glands. The nodes were arranged linearly within the gland. Enhancement patterns included homogeneous enhancement (9/15, 60%), homogeneous enhancement with eccentric microcysts (3/15, 20%), and thick-walled rim enhancement with central lucency (3/15, 20%). Thickened adjacent fascial plane and platysma were seen in two patients. Ipsilateral cervical lymphadenopathy was seen in all patients. Conclusion: In patients presenting with unilateral parotid nodules, TB should be considered when linearly arranged enhancing nodules are demonstrated in the superficial lobes of the glands on CT scan

  18. The research of clinical application of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Pan Zhenyu; Zhai Xiaoli; Gu Hua; Wang Yajie; Ding Yi; Wang Li; Liang Ying; Zhai Renyou

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the values, methods and findings of computed tomographic virtual gastroscopy (CTVG). Methods: Sixty-nine patients underwent the examination of spiral CT after charged air into stomachs in different cubage. The CT scan conditions were collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 2.5, scanning speed 0.8 s/360 degree, the raw data of CT volume scan was reconstructed in overlapping rate 33% - 67%. Then the images of CTVG were built using navigator software (GE AG, USA). Results: The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of CTVG were 92.8%, 96.4%, and 78.6%, respectively. CTVG corresponded well with fibrous gastroscopy and specimens in demonstrating the gastric lesions. CTVG was provided with the ability of revealing the tiny lesions of chronic atrophic gastritis, chronic erosive gastritis, chronic proliferative gastritis, and acute hemorrhagic gastritis in some degree. The high quality imaging of CTVG could be obtained in condition of collimating width 3 mm, pitch 1.2 - 1.5, overlapping 50% - 67%, well hold-breath, gastric cubage in full and feasible scan positions. Conclusion: CTVG is a rising means of gastric examination and has great value in clinic applications

  19. Linear analysis of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesmann, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method to analyze the linear imaging characteristics of rotationally invariant, radially variant tomographic imaging systems using singular value decomposition (SVD). When the projection measurements from such a system are assumed to be samples from independent and identically distributed multi-normal random variables, the best estimate of the emission intensity is given by the unweighted least squares estimator. The noise amplification of this estimator is inversely proportional to the singular values of the normal matrix used to model projection and backprojection. After choosing an acceptable noise amplification, the new method can determine the number of parameters and hence the number of pixels that should be estimated from data acquired from an existing system with a fixed number of angles and projection bins. Conversely, for the design of a new system, the number of angles and projection bins necessary for a given number of pixels and noise amplification can be determined. In general, computing the SVD of the projection normal matrix has cubic computational complexity. However, the projection normal matrix for this class of rotationally invariant, radially variant systems has a block circulant form. A fast parallel algorithm to compute the SVD of this block circulant matrix makes the singular value analysis practical by asymptotically reducing the computation complexity of the method by a multiplicative factor equal to the number of angles squared

  20. Ectomography - a tomographic method for gamma camera imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, S.; Edholm, P.E.; Hellstroem, L.G.; Larsson, S.

    1985-01-01

    In computerised gamma camera imaging the projections are readily obtained in digital form, and the number of picture elements may be relatively few. This condition makes emission techniques suitable for ectomography - a tomographic technique for directly visualising arbitrary sections of the human body. The camera rotates around the patient to acquire different projections in a way similar to SPECT. This method differs from SPECT, however, in that the camera is placed at an angle to the rotational axis, and receives two-dimensional, rather than one-dimensional, projections. Images of body sections are reconstructed by digital filtration and combination of the acquired projections. The main advantages of ectomography - a high and uniform resolution, a low and uniform attenuation and a high signal-to-noise ratio - are obtained when imaging sections close and parallel to a body surface. The filtration eliminates signals representing details outside the section and gives the section a certain thickness. Ectomographic transverse images of a line source and of a human brain have been reconstructed. Details within the sections are correctly visualised and details outside are effectively eliminated. For comparison, the same sections have been imaged with SPECT. (author)

  1. The tuning algorithms used by the Donner 600 crystal tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Geyer, A.B.; Huesman, R.H.; Uber, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe the computer algorithms used to adjust the energy thresholds and timing delays in the Donner 600 Crystal Tomograph. These thresholds and delays are adjusted using 1890 computer controlled digital to analog converters (DAC's) and a orbiting positron source. The energy threshold for each crystal is adjusted by measuring the counting rate of each crystal-crystal coincidence as a function of the DAC settings that control a pulse height window for the crystal in question. The DAC settings that correspond to the 511 keV photopeak are noted, thus determining the conversion from DAC setting to energy, and allowing the DAC's to be set to any desired energy window. The DAC settings controlling the timing delay for each channel are systematically adjusted to maximize the overall event rate. As these 1890 adjustments are coupled, the authors discuss the convergence of the tuning algorithms, and also report on the photomultiplier tube gain and timing variations over a period of 18 months

  2. The tuning algorithms used by the Donner 600 Crystal Tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Geyer, A.B.; Huesman, R.H.; Uber, D.C.

    1988-11-01

    We describe the computer algorithms used to adjust the energy thresholds and timing delays in the Donner 600 Crystal Tomograph. These thresholds and delays are adjusted using 1890 computer controlled digital to analog converters (DAC's) and a orbiting positron source. The energy threshold for each crystal is adjusted by measuring the counting rate of each crystal-crystal coincidence as a function of the DAC settings that control a pulse height window for the crystal in question. The DAC settings that correspond to the 511 keV photopeak are noted, thus determining the conversion from DAC setting to energy, and allowing the DAC's to be set to any desired energy window. The DAC settings controlling the timing delay for each channel are systematically adjusted to maximize the overall event rate. As these 1890 adjustments are coupled, we discuss the convergence of the tuning algorithms, and also report on the photomultiplier tube gain and timing variations over a period of 18 months. 7 refs., 6 figs

  3. An attenuation measurement technique for rotating planar detector positron tomographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, P.A.; Julyan, P.J.; Parker, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a new attenuation measurement technique suitable for rotating planar detector positron tomographs. Transmission measurements are made using two unshielded positron-emitting line sources, one attached to the front face of each detector. Many of the scattered and accidental coincidences are rejected by including only those coincidences that form a vector passing within a predetermined distance of either line source. Some scattered and accidental coincidences are still included, which reduces the measured linear attenuation; in principle their contribution can be accurately estimated and subtracted, but in practice, when limited statistics are available (as is the case with the multi-wire Birmingham positron camera), this background subtraction unacceptably increases the noise. Instead an attenuation image having the correct features can be reconstructed from the measured projections. For objects containing only a few discrete linear attenuation coefficients, segmentation of this attenuation image reduces noise and allows the correct linear attenuation coefficients to be restored by renormalization. Reprojection through the segmented image may then provide quantitatively correct attenuation correction factors of sufficient statistical quality to correct for attenuation in PET emission images. (author)

  4. Reproducibility of tomographic evaluation of posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Italo Risso Neto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate interobserver agreement of Glassman classification for posterolateral lumbar spine arthrodesis.METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four CT scans from patients who underwent posterolateral arthrodesis of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine were evaluated by four observers, namely two orthopedic surgeons experienced in spine surgery and two in training in this area. Using the reconstructed tomographic images at oblique coronal plane, 299 operated levels were systematically analyzed looking for arthrodesis signals. The appearance of bone healing in each operated level was classified in five categories as proposed by Glassman to the posterolateral arthrodesis: 1 bilateral solid arthrodesis; 2 unilateral solid arthrodesis; 3 bilateral partial arthrodesis; 4 unilateral partial arthrodesis; 5 absence of arthrodesis. In a second step, the evaluation of each operated level was divided into two categories: fusion (including type 1, 2, 3, and 4 and non fusion (type 5. Statistical analysis was performed by calculating the Kappa coefficient considering the paired analysis between the two experienced observers and between the two observers in training.RESULTS: The interobserver reproducibility by the kappa coefficient for arthrodesis consolidation analysis for the classification proposed, divided into 5 types, was 0.729 for both experienced surgeons and training surgeons. Considering only two categories kappa coefficient was 0.745 between experienced surgeons and 0.795 between training surgeons. In all analyzes, we obtained high concordance power.CONCLUSION: Interobserver reproducibility was observed with high concordance in the classification proposed by Glassman for posterolateral arthrodesis of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine.

  5. TOMOGRAPHIC SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING CPT, ERT, AND GPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rexford M. Morey; Susanne M. Conklin; Stephen P. Farrington, P.E.; James D. Shinn II, P.E.

    1999-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system for site characterization. Applied Research Associates, Inc. is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); and (2) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the CPT. The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used for both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site cleanup and waste management operations.

  6. Conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostateimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, J.S.; Derenzo, S.E.; Qi, J.; Moses, W.W.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.

    2000-11-04

    We present a conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging using a pair of external curved detector banks, one placed above and one below the patient. The lower detector bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank adjusts vertically for maximum sensitivity and patient access. Each bank is composed of 40conventional block detectors, forming two arcs (44 cm minor, 60 cm major axis) that are tilted to minimize attenuation and positioned as close as possible to the patient to improve sensitivity. The individual detectors are angled to point towards the prostate to minimize resolution degradation in that region. Inter-plane septa extend 5 cm beyond the scintillator crystals to reduce random and scatter backgrounds. A patient is not fully encircled by detector rings in order to minimize cost,causing incomplete sampling due to the side gaps. Monte Carlo simulation (including random and scatter) demonstrates the feasibility of detecting a spherical tumor of 2.5 cm diameter with a tumor to background ratio of2:1, utilizing the number of events that should be achievable with a6-minute scan after a 10 mCi injection (e.g., carbon-11 choline or fluorine-18 fluorocholine).

  7. Strategies for source space limitation in tomographic inverse procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewis, P.S.; Schlitt, H.A.; Kaplan, L.; Gorodnitsky, I.; Wood, C.C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of magnetic recordings for localization of neural activity requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse problem: i.e. the determination of the spatial configuration, orientation, and timecourse of the currents that give rise to a particular observed field distribution. In its general form, this inverse problem has no unique solution; due to superposition and the existence of silent source configurations, a particular magnetic field distribution at the head surface could be produced by any number of possible source configurations. However, by making assumptions concerning the number and properties of neural sources, it is possible to use numerical minimization techniques to determine the source model parameters that best account for the experimental observations while satisfying numerical or physical criteria. In this paper the authors describe progress on the development and validation of inverse procedures that produce distributed estimates of neuronal currents. The goal is to produce a temporal sequence of 3-D tomographic reconstructions of the spatial patterns of neural activation. Such approaches have a number of advantages, in principle. Because they do not require estimates of model order and parameter values (beyond specification of the source space), they minimize the influence of investigator decisions and are suitable for automated analyses. These techniques also allow localization of sources that are not point-like; experimental studies of cognitive processes and of spontaneous brain activity are likely to require distributed source models

  8. Voxel-based model construction from colored tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Eduardo Cesar de Miranda

    2002-07-01

    This work presents a new approach in the construction of voxel-based phantoms that was implemented to simplify the segmentation process of organs and tissues reducing the time used in this procedure. The segmentation process is performed by painting tomographic images and attributing a different color for each organ or tissue. A voxel-based head and neck phantom was built using this new approach. The way as the data are stored allows an increasing in the performance of the radiation transport code. The program that calculates the radiation transport also works with image files. This capability allows image reconstruction showing isodose areas, under several points of view, increasing the information to the user. Virtual X-ray photographs can also be obtained allowing that studies could be accomplished looking for the radiographic techniques optimization assessing, at the same time, the doses in organs and tissues. The accuracy of the program here presented, called MCvoxEL, that implements this new approach, was tested by comparison to results from two modern and well-supported Monte Carlo codes. Dose conversion factors for parallel X-ray exposure were also calculated. (author)

  9. Brain computed tomographic findings in post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuguharu; Yoshinaga, Kazumasa; Horibe, Takashi; Kokubu, Kiyokazu; Kokura, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Konosuke; Inamoto, Kazuo.

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively assessed the brain computed tomographic (CT) findings in 22 post-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) patients excluding neonatal cases. On the basis of the CT findings, the patients were divided into two groups. Eight patients (36.4 %) had bilateral abnormal lowdensity areas in the basal ganglia (Group I). The remaining 14 patients (63.6 %) had no abnormalities in that area (Group II). In Group I, the incidence of primary cardiac arrest and duration of advanced life support (ALS) was significantly different (p < 0.05) from Group II. Sex, age, duration of basic life support (BLS), time elapsed from initiation of BLS to initial CT and from initiation of ALS to initial CT was not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome was very poor in both groups and no significant difference was noted between them. We conclude that primary cardiac arrest and long duration of ALS were predictors of abnormal bilateral low-density areas in the basal ganglia in post-CPR patients. However, their appearance was not related to outcome. (author)

  10. Cardiac imaging systems and methods employing computerized tomographic scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richey, J.B.; Wake, R.H.; Walters, R.G.; Hunt, W.F.; Cool, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to cardiac imaging systems and methods employing computerised tomographic scanning. Apparatus is described which allows an image of the radiation attenuation of the heart at a desired phase of the cardiac cycle. The patients ECG signal can be used in a transverse-and-rotate type CT scanner as a time base, so that the beam reaches the heart at a desired phase of the cardiac cycle, or, in a purely rotational-type CT scanner continuously generated scan data is only stored for corresponding phases of successive cardiac cycles. Alternatively, gating of the beams themselves by shuttering or switching the power supply can be controlled by the ECG signal. A pacemaker is used to stabilize the cardiac period. Also used is a system for recognising unacceptable variations in the cardiac period and discarding corresponding scan data. In a transverse-and-rotate type fan-beam CT scanner, the effective beam width is narrowed to reduce the duration of the traverse of the heart. (U.K.)

  11. Random signal tomographical analysis of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, P.; Wesser, U.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on radiation tomography which is a useful tool for studying the internal structures of two-phase flow. However, general tomography analysis gives only time-averaged results, hence much information is lost. As a result, it is sometimes difficult to identify the flow regime; for example, the time-averaged picture does not significantly change as an annual flow develops from a slug flow. A two-phase flow diagnostic technique based on random signal tomographical analysis is developed. It extracts more information by studying the statistical variation of the measured signal with time. Local statistical parameters, including mean value, variance, skewness and flatness etc., are reconstructed from the information obtained by a general tomography technique. More important information are provided by the results. Not only the void fraction can be easily calculated, but also the flow pattern can be identified more objectively and more accurately. The experimental setup is introduced. It consisted of a two-phase flow loop, an X-ray system, a fan-like five-beam detector system and a signal acquisition and processing system. In the experiment, for both horizontal and vertical test sections (aluminum and steel tube with Di/Do = 40/45 mm), different flow situations are realized by independently adjusting air and water mass flow. Through a glass tube connected with the test section, some typical flow patterns are visualized and used for comparing with the reconstruction results

  12. Double Colorectal Cancer Only Diagnosed by Computed Tomographic Colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Nagata

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old woman presented to her physician with rectal bleeding and intermittent diarrhea. Optical colonoscopy revealed a bulky tumor which was diagnosed as rectal cancer. She was referred to our institution for further evaluation and treatment. Slim optical colonoscopy showed an obstructive cancer in the rectosigmoid junction and no information of the proximal side of the obstruction. The patient then underwent computed tomographic (CT colonography for further evaluation of the proximal side. Three-dimensional endoluminal ‘fly-through’ images revealed another protruded lesion in the proximal side of the obstruction. Diagnosis of synchronous double cancer was made by CT colonography. This CT data was not only used to create three-dimensional images but also to decide on a preoperative clinical staging. Laparoscopy-assisted high anterior resection was performed and T3 rectal cancer and T1 sigmoid colon cancer were confirmed in the resected specimen. Follow-up optical colonoscopy revealed no other tumors. CT colonography has recently become a popular preoperative examination tool with significant improvement in quality of image due to a rapid progress in computer technology. CT colonography correctly showed synchronous double cancer in our case and provided crucial information for planning surgery. We recommend that CT colonography should be used for evaluating the proximal side of obstructive colorectal cancer.

  13. Computed tomographic findings of liver injury in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Deok Gi; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Won Jae; Oh, Yeon Hee; Lee, Sung Hee; Yun, Jee Yeong; Lee, Tae Woo; Lee, Sung Woo; Park, Soo Soung

    1994-01-01

    We studied to compare computed tomographic(CT) findings of liver injury with management method in adults and, moreover, to present the CT basis for the management. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of 43 adults diagnosed as liver injury during a 66 month period. Thirty-eight patients were hemodynamically stable. Thirty-two of them were managed conservatively, whereas six managed operatively. Five unstable patients underwent emergency operation. We classified CT findings according to the severity of liver injuries(ie, hematoma, laceration, and periportal tracking) and hemoperitoneum, ranging from grade 1 to 5 and from 0 to 3 +. respectively. Thus, we compared the CT classifications with their management(ie, operation rate), especially hemodynamically stable patients. Operation rates of all patients and hemodynamically stable patients were 26% and 16%, respectively. Operation rate at each grade of liver injury was low, especially in hemodynamically stable, despite relatively high operation rate in grade 4. Operation rate of 3+ homoperitoneum was 100%, including hemodynamically stable patients, in contrast to otherwise low operation rate of others. Most liver injury in adults, including grade 4, were managed conservatively, especially hemodynamically stable. Though large amount of hemoperitoneum(ie, 3+) required operation, most hemooperitoeum were managed conservatively. Thus, CT findings of liver injury is helpful in the decision for the management method

  14. Quantitative analysis of normal thallium-201 tomographic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisner, R.L.; Gober, A.; Cerqueira, M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the normal (nl) distribution of Tl-201 uptake post exercise (EX) and at redistribution (RD) and nl washout, Tl-201 rotational tomographic (tomo) studies were performed in 40 subjects: 16 angiographic (angio) nls and 24 nl volunteers (12 from Emory and 12 from Yale). Oblique angle short axis slices were subjected to maximal count circumferential profile analysis. Data were displayed as a ''bullseye'' functional map with the apex at the center and base at the periphery. The bullseye was not uniform in all regions because of the variable effects of attenuation and resolution at different view angles. In all studies, the septum: lateral wall ratio was 1.0 in males and approximately equal to 1.0 in females. This occurred predominantly because of anterior defects due to breast soft tissue attenuation. EX and RD bullseyes were similar. Using a bi-exponential model for Tl kinetics, 4 hour normalized washout ranged 49-54% in each group and showed minimal variation between walls throughout the bullseye. Thus, there are well defined variations in Tl-201 uptake in the nl myocardium which must be taken into consideration when analyzing pt data. Because of these defects and the lack of adequate methods for attenuation correction, quantitative analysis of Tl-201 studies must include direct comparison with gender-matched nl data sets

  15. On the computed tomographic diagnosis of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Yuuichirou

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to examine 53 pulmonary nodules which were considered not definitely calcified on plain radiographs or conventional tomograms. An average CT number was calculate for each lesion. For the primary lung cancers, the average CT number was 36 HU with a standard deviation of 6.6 HU, while the benign lesions had the mean CT number of 69 HU, with a standard deviation of 42.8 HU. The mean CT number separating lung malignancies from benign lesions was 78.8 HU. To evaluate the attenuation values within each nodule, iso-CT value map was obtained by using Siemens therapy planning system, MEVAPLAN. Nodules were classified into five categories, Type I to V. All of three nodules classified as Type IV were benign. Iso-CT value map was effective in establishing the benignancy of nodules. The quantitative computed tomographic analysis of pulmonary nodules was evaluated by dual-energy CT. Dual-energy CT has the potential to eliminate the effect of spectral hardening by use of monoenergic images derived from dual-kV data and to separate high CT numbers due to calcium from those due to high density organic material. (author)

  16. Computed tomographic mammography using a conventional body scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C H; Nesbit, D E; Fisher, D R; Fritz, S L; Dwyer, S J; Templeton, A W; Lin, F; Jewell, W R

    1982-03-01

    The technique for computed tomographic (CT) examination of the breasts using a conventional body scanner is described, and experience with 67 patients is reported. In the diagnosis of both malignant and benign breast lesions, the results with a body scanner were equal to those of a dedicated CT/M mammographic unit. Although the CT study of the breast cannot replace conventional mammography in screening or in routine diagnostic workup, the unique capability of demonstrating both anatomic changes and increased iodide concentration in a cancer provides many advantages over conventional mammography. CT mammography appears to have the capability to detect breast cancers that are occult to other methods. Indications for a CT study of the breasts are: (1) clinically suspected breast cancer, especially with a mammographically occult lesion; (2) questionable mammographic findings, including microcalcifications, tumor shape, architectural distortion, and uncertain lesion location; and (3) evaluation of postbiopsy or postlumpectomy breast cancers when a primary irradiation therapy is contemplated. Breast CT also appears to be a valuable diagnostic tool in searching for a second primary breast cancer, follow-up study of postirradiation of breast cancer, followup study for postmastectomy patients, and screening procedure for genetically high-risk patients, especially those with dense breasts.

  17. Initial results from the Donner 600 crystal positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Geyer, A.; Uber, D.; Vuletich, T.; Budinger, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a positron tomography using a single ring of 600 close-packed 3 mm wide bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to 14 mm phototubes. The phototube preamplifier circuit derives a timing pulse from the first photoelectron, and sends it to address and coincidence circuits only if the integrated pulse height is within a pre-set window. The timing delays and pulse height windows for all 600 detectors and the coincidence timing windows are computer adjustable. An orbiting positron source is used for transmission measurements and look-up table is used to reject scattered and random coincidences that do not pass through the source. Data can be acquired using a stationary mode for 1.57 mm lateral sampling or the two-position clam sampling mode for 0.79 mm lateral sampling. High maximum data rates are provided by 45 parallel coincidence circuits and 4 parallel histogram memory units. With two-position sampling and 1.57 mm bins, the reconstructed point spread function (PSF) of a 0.35 mm diam /sup 22/Na wire source at the center of the tomograph is circular with 2.9 mm full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) and the PSF at a distance of 8 cm from the center is elliptical with a radial fwhm of 4.0 mm and tangential fwhm of 3.0 mm

  18. Quantification of tomographic PIV uncertainty using controlled experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Yue; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-20

    The goal of this work was to experimentally quantify the uncertainty of three-dimensional (3D) and three-component (3C) velocity measurements using tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV). Controlled measurements were designed using tracer particles embedded in a solid sample, and tomo-PIV measurements were performed on the sample while it was moved both translationally and rotationally to simulate various known displacement fields, so the 3D3C displacements measured by tomo-PIV can be directly compared to the known displacements created by the sample. The results illustrated that (1) the tomo-PIV technique was able to reconstruct the 3D3C velocity with an averaged error of 0.8-1.4 voxels in terms of magnitude and 1.7°-1.9° in terms of orientation for the velocity fields tested; (2) view registration (VR) plays a significant role in tomo-PIV, and by reducing VR error from 0.6° to 0.1°, the 3D3C measurement accuracy can be improved by at least 2.5 times in terms of both magnitude and orientation; and (3) the use of additional cameras in tomo-PIV can extend the 3D3C velocity measurement to a larger volume, while maintaining acceptable accuracy. These results obtained from controlled tests are expected to aid the error analysis and the design of tomo-PIV measurements.

  19. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  20. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  1. Mice embryology: a microscopic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maria Letícia Baptista; Lessa, Thais Borges; Russo, Fabiele Baldino; Fernandes, Renata Avancini; Kfoury, José Roberto; Braga, Patricia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we studied the embryology of mice of 12, 14, and 18 days of gestation by gross observation, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Grossly, the embryos of 12 days were observed in C-shaped region of the brain, eye pigmentation of the retina, first, second, and third pharyngeal arches gill pit nasal region on the fourth ventricle brain, cervical curvature, heart, liver, limb bud thoracic, spinal cord, tail, umbilical cord, and place of the mesonephric ridge. Microscopically, the liver, cardiovascular system and spinal cord were observed. In the embryo of 14 days, we observed structures that make up the liver and heart. At 18 days of gestation fetuses, it was noted the presence of eyes, mouth, and nose in the cephalic region, chest and pelvic region with the presence of well-developed limbs, umbilical cord, and placenta. Scanning electron microscopy in 18 days of gestation fetuses evidenced head, eyes closed eyelids, nose, vibrissae, forelimb, heart, lung, kidney, liver, small bowel, diaphragm, and part of the spine. The results obtained in this work describe the internal and external morphology of mice, provided by an integration of techniques and review of the morphological knowledge of the embryonic development of this species, as this animal is of great importance to scientific studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  3. A transmission positron microscope and a scanning positron microscope being built at KEK, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Yagishita, A.; Shidara, T.; Nakahara, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the plans of positron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan improving used electron microscopes. The kinetic energies of positron produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays have not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam will be guided near electron microscopes, a transmission electron microscope (JEM100S) and a scanning electron microscope (JSM25S). Positrons are slowed down by a tungsten foil, accelerated and focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam will be injected into an electron microscope. The focusing of positrons and electrons is achieved by magnetic system of the electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (orig.)

  4. A microscopic model of triangular arbitrage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yukihiro; Hatano, Naomichi

    2006-11-01

    We introduce a microscopic model which describes the dynamics of each dealer in multiple foreign exchange markets, taking account of the triangular arbitrage transaction. The model reproduces the interaction among the markets well. We explore the relation between the parameters of the present microscopic model and the spring constant of a macroscopic model that we proposed previously.

  5. Quantum theory and microscopic mechanics. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1984-08-01

    The need for theoretical descriptions and experimental observations on 'small' individual systems is emphasized. It is shown that the mathematical basis for microscopic mechanics is very simple in one dimension. The square well problem is discussed to clarify general points about stationary states and the continuity of (p'/p) across potential boundaries in the applications of microscopic mechanics. (author)

  6. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  7. The Current Status of Microscopical Hair Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter F. Rowe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the microscopical comparison of human hairs has been accepted in courts of law for over a century, recent advances in DNA technology have called this type of forensic examination into question. In a number of cases, post-conviction DNA testing has exonerated defendants who were convicted in part on the results of microscopical hair comparisons. A federal judge has held a Daubert hearing on the microscopical comparison of human hairs and has concluded that this type of examination does not meet the criteria for admission of scientific evidence in federal courts. A review of the available scientific literature on microscopical hair comparisons (including studies conducted by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation leads to three conclusions: (1 microscopical comparisons of human hairs can yield scientifically defensible conclusions that can contribute to criminal investigations and criminal prosecutions, (2 the reliability of microscopical hair comparisons is strongly affected by the training of the forensic hair examiner, (3 forensic hair examiners cannot offer estimates of the probability of a match of a questioned hair with a hair from a randomly selected person. In order for microscopical hair examinations to survive challenges under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Daubert decision, hair microscopists must be better trained and undergo frequent proficiency testing. More research on the error rates of microscopical hair comparisons should be undertaken, and guidelines for the permissible interpretations of such comparisons should be established. Until these issues have been addressed and satisfactorily resolved, microscopical hair comparisons should be regarded by law enforcement agencies and courts of law as merely presumptive in nature, and all microscopical hair comparisons should be confirmed by nuclear DNA profiling or mitochondrial DNA sequencing.

  8. Software development for modeling positrons emission tomograph scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner

    2013-01-01

    The Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) is an international platform recognized and used to develop Computational Model Exposure (CME) in the context of Nuclear Medicine, although currently there are dedicated modules for applications in Radiotherapy and Computed Tomography (CT). GATE uses Monte Carlo (MC) methods, and has a scripting language of its own. The writing of scripts for simulation of a PET scanner in GATE involves a number of interrelated steps, and the accuracy of the simulation is dependent on the correct setup of the geometries involved, since the physical processes depend on them, as well as the modeling of electronic detectors in module Digitizer, for example. The manual implementation of this setup can be a source of errors, especially for users without experience in the field of simulations or without any previous knowledge of a programming language, and also due to the the fact that the modeling process in GATE still remains bounded to LINUX / UNIX based systems, an environment only familiar to a few. This becomes an obstacle for beginners and prevents the use of GATE by a larger number of users interested in optimizing their experiments and/or clinical protocols through a more accessible, fast and friendly application. The objective of this work is therefore to develop a user-friendly software for the modeling of Positron Emission Tomography called GUIGATE (Graphical User Interface for GATE), with specific modules dedicated to quality control in PET scanners. The results exhibit the features available in this first version of GUIGATE, present in a set of windows that allow users to create their input files, perform and display in real time the model and analyze its output file in a single environment, allowing so intuitively access the entire architecture of the GATE simulation and to CERN's data analyzer, the ROOT. (author)

  9. New method to analyze internal disruptions with tomographic reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, C.P. [EURATOM-FOM Association, FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, P.O. BOX 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (The Netherlands); de Blank, H.J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-IPP Association, 85740 Garching (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Sawtooth crashes have been investigated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) [N. J. Lopes Cardozo {ital et al.}, {ital Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research}, W{umlt u}rzburg, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1993), Vol. 1, p. 271]. Internal disruptions in tokamak plasmas often exhibit an m=1 poloidal mode structure prior to the collapse which can be clearly identified by means of multicamera soft x-ray diagnostics. In this paper tomographic reconstructions of such m=1 modes are analyzed with a new method, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) invariants computed from the two-dimensional emissivity profiles, which quantifies the amount of profile flattening not only after the crash but also during the precursor oscillations. The results are interpreted by comparing them with two models which simulate the measurements of the m=1 redistribution of soft x-ray emissivity prior to the sawtooth crash. One model is based on the magnetic reconnection model of Kadomtsev. The other involves ideal MHD motion only. In cases where differences in magnetic topology between the two models cannot be seen in the tomograms, the analysis of profile flattening has an advantage. The analysis shows that in RTP the clearly observed m=1 displacement of some sawteeth requires the presence of convective ideal MHD motion, whereas other precursors are consistent with magnetic reconnection of up to 75{percent} of the magnetic flux within the q=1 surface. The possibility of ideal interchange combined with enhanced cross-field transport is not excluded. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. New method to analyze internal disruptions with tomographic reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, C.P.; de Blank, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Sawtooth crashes have been investigated on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP) [N. J. Lopes Cardozo et al., Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Wuerzburg, 1992 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1993), Vol. 1, p. 271]. Internal disruptions in tokamak plasmas often exhibit an m=1 poloidal mode structure prior to the collapse which can be clearly identified by means of multicamera soft x-ray diagnostics. In this paper tomographic reconstructions of such m=1 modes are analyzed with a new method, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) invariants computed from the two-dimensional emissivity profiles, which quantifies the amount of profile flattening not only after the crash but also during the precursor oscillations. The results are interpreted by comparing them with two models which simulate the measurements of the m=1 redistribution of soft x-ray emissivity prior to the sawtooth crash. One model is based on the magnetic reconnection model of Kadomtsev. The other involves ideal MHD motion only. In cases where differences in magnetic topology between the two models cannot be seen in the tomograms, the analysis of profile flattening has an advantage. The analysis shows that in RTP the clearly observed m=1 displacement of some sawteeth requires the presence of convective ideal MHD motion, whereas other precursors are consistent with magnetic reconnection of up to 75% of the magnetic flux within the q=1 surface. The possibility of ideal interchange combined with enhanced cross-field transport is not excluded. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-12-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas.

  12. Regrowth patterns of supratentorial gliomas: estimation from computed tomographic scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboi, K.; Yoshii, Y.; Nakagawa, K.; Maki, Y.

    1986-01-01

    To clarify the regrowth patterns of benign and malignant gliomas, we chose 27 intervals (between two operations or between an operation and autopsy) from 21 patients with pathologically verified recurrent supratentorial gliomas. Serial computed tomographic (CT) scans of these cases were analyzed to determine the doubling time (Td) calculated from the change in volume of enhanced and low density areas, the enhancement effect graded from 0 to 4 according to the Hounsfield number, and the presence of dissemination and contralateral extension. We studied 5 benign gliomas (including 1 case of radiation necrosis), 8 malignant astrocytomas, and 8 glioblastomas. The Td's of enhanced areas on CT scans of benign gliomas, malignant astrocytomas, and glioblastomas were 937 +/- 66.5 days, 65.1 +/- 29.4 days, and 48.1 +/- 20.9 days, respectively. The Td's of low density areas were 895 +/- 130.6 days, 70.8 +/- 22.2 days, and 50.5 +/- 14.7 days. There was a significant correlation between the Td's of the enhanced and low density areas (0.97). The enhancement effect increased at recurrence in 55% of the cases, with an average increase of 1.1 grades. The increase in enhancement effect at recurrence showed a tendency to become smaller as the tumor's degree of anaplasia increased. Radiotherapy was effective in significantly retarding the growth rate of malignant gliomas, whose Td's were doubled. Although the Td's of both enhanced and low density areas of benign gliomas were significantly longer than those of malignant gliomas, there was no significant difference in the Td's of enhanced areas between malignant astrocytomas and glioblastomas

  13. Microdose computed tomographic cardiac angiography in normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kiira T; O'Brien, Mauria A; Hartman, Susan K; Mulherin, Allison C; McReynolds, Casie J; McMichael, Maureen; Rapoport, Gregg; O'Brien, Robert T

    2014-03-01

    To determine if microdose contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) allows characterization of cardiac chambers in lightly sedated normal cats. Seven healthy domestic cats. Lightly sedated normal cats were imaged pre-contrast and with microdose (0.22 ml/kg of non-ionic iodinated contrast medium, 300 mg I/ml) triple-phase MDCTA in a motion restriction device. On pre-contrast images, the aorta (median: 52.43 Hounsfield units [HU], range 27.35-76.74 HU) was outlined by significantly (p = 0.015) lower attenuating periaortic fat (-66.16 HU, -42.62 to -92.77 HU). On post-contrast images, median peak contrast enhancement in the right ventricle (111.77 HU, 36.09-141.60 HU) was achieved in 3.1 s (range 2.9-7.3 s), in the aorta (149.30 HU, 99.43-319.60 HU) and left atrium (180.83 HU, 88.53-266.84 HU) in 6.4 s (range 5.6-7.7 s) and in the left ventricle (147.89 HU, 57.23-245.77 HU) in 7.10 s (range 6.2-11.2 s). Significantly higher attenuation was measured between all chambers and walls, the right ventricular lumen and interventricular septum (median ratio 53.78 HU, range 0.21-83.20 HU), left ventricular lumen and left ventricular free wall (89.32 HU, 38.81-185.95 HU) and aorta and periaortic fat (190.43 HU, 143.22-425.44 HU) on post-contrast images. Sufficient biological contrast is available on survey CT to discriminate between the aorta and the left atrium, and microdose MDCTA provides sufficient contrast enhancement for adequate visualization of the heart chambers in normal cats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging properties of a positron tomograph with 280 BGO crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.; Cahoon, J.L.; Vuletich, T.

    1980-11-01

    The basic imaging properties of the Donner 280-BGO-Crystal positron tomograph were measured and compared with the same system when it was equipped with 280 NaI(T1) crystals. The NaI(T1) crystals were 8 mm x 30 mm x 50 mm deep, sealed in 10 mm wide stainless steel cans. The BGO crystals are 9.5 mm x 32 mm x 32 mm deep and as they are not hygroscopic do not require sealed cans. With a shielding gap of 3 cm (section thickness 1.7 cm FWHM) the sensitivity of the BGO system is 55,000 events per sec for 1 μCi per cm 3 in a 20 cm cylinder of water, which is 2.3 times higher than the NaI(T1) system. For a 200 μCi/cm line source on the ring axis in a 20 cm diameter water cylinder, the BGO system records 86% of the scatter fraction and 66% of the accidental fraction of the NaI(T1) system. The lower light yield and poorer time resolution of BGO requires a wider coincidence timing window than NaI(T1). However, the ability to use full-energy pulse height selection with a 2.3-fold improvement in sensitivity results in an overall reduction in the fraction of accidental events recorded. The in-plane resolution of the BGO system is 9 to 10 mm FWHM within the central 30 cm diameter field, and the radial elongation at the edge of the field in the NaI(T1) system has been nearly eliminated

  15. Noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric monitoring of multiphase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouki, J.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    A condensed review of recent advances accomplished in the development and the applications of noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric measurement techniques to multiphase flows and systems is presented. In recent years utilization of such noninvasive techniques has become widespread in many engineering disciplines that deal with systems involving two immiscible phases or more. Tomography provides concentration, holdup, or 2D or 3D density distribution of at least one component of the multiphase system, whereas velocimetry provides the dynamic features of the phase of interest such as the flow pattern, the velocity field, the 2D or 3D instantaneous movements, etc. The following review is divided into two parts. The first part summarizes progress and developments in flow imaging techniques using γ-ray and X-ray transmission tomography; X-ray radiography; neutron transmission tomography and radiography; positron emission tomography; X-ray diffraction tomography; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; electrical capacitance tomography; optical tomography; microwave tomography; and ultrasonic tomography. The second part of the review summarizes progress and developments in the following velocimetry techniques: positron emission particle tracking; radioactive particle tracking; cinematography; laser-Doppler anemometry; particle image velocimetry; and fluorescence particle image velocimetry. The basic principles of tomography and velocimetry techniques are outlined, along with advantages and limitations inherent to each technique. The hydrodynamic and structural information yielded by these techniques is illustrated through a literature survey on their successful applications to the study of multiphase systems in such fields as particulate solids processes, fluidization engineering, porous media, pipe flows, transport within packed beds and sparged reactors, etc

  16. Computed tomographic features of lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Evaluation in 138 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobino, Kazunori, E-mail: tobino@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Iizuka Hospital, 3-83 Yoshiomachi, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-0018 (Japan); Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine & Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Johkoh, Takeshi [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers, Kurumazuka 3-1, Itami, Hyogo 664-0872 (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine and Center for Diagnostic Imaging, Kurume University Hospital, 67 Asahi-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 830-0011 (Japan); Sakai, Fumikazu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Saitama International Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Arakawa, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Kurihara, Masatoshi [The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Pneumothorax Center, Nissan Tamagawa Hospital, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Kumasaka, Toshio [The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan); Department of Pathology, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, 4-1-22 Hiroo, Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo 150-0012 (Japan); Koike, Kengo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine & Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Seyama, Kuniaki [Division of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine & Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); The Study Group of Pneumothorax and Cystic Lung Diseases, 4-8-1 Seta, Setagaya-Ku, Tokyo 158-0095 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •In our series, the frequency of pulmonary nodules was higher than in the previous reports. •Our sporadic LAM patients had a lower frequency of renal AML than in that of previous reports. •LAM patients may have a high incidence of renal and hepatic cysts. •LAM cells may originate in the pelvis then spread via the axial lymphatic system. -- Abstract: Purpose: The aim was to characterize the computed tomographic (CT) findings from Japanese patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Materials and methods: CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis from 124 patients with sporadic LAM (S-LAM, mean age, 37.4 years) and 14 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-LAM (mean age, 35.6 years) were analyzed. Results: Pulmonary nodules (18.8%) and hepatic angiomyolipoma (AML, 24.3%) were more common in our patients than those in previous reports. Compared with TSC-LAM, S-LAM group had a higher frequency of pulmonary nodules (28.6% vs 32.3%, P < 0.01) and lower frequencies of air-space consolidation (21.4% vs 2.4%, P < 0.01), pneumothorax (28.6% vs 8.1%, P = 0.02), pulmonary hilar lymphadenopathy (14.3% vs 0.8%, P < 0.01), renal AML (85.7% vs 17.4%, P < 0.01), hepatic AML (71.4% vs 17.4%, P < 0.01), and retrocrural lymphadenopathy (14.3% vs 1.4%, P = 0.04). Axial lymphatic abnormalities (i.e., thoracic duct dilatation, lymphadenopathy, and lymphangioleiomyoma) were most common in the pelvis and tended to decrease in incidence with increased distance from the pelvis. Conclusion: The incidence of some CT findings in Japanese patients differed from those in previous reports. Axial lymphatic abnormalities noted here suggest that the origin of LAM cells may be the pelvis.

  17. Method for calibration of an axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The method of calibrating an axial tomographic scanner including frame means having an opening therein in which an object to be examined is to be placed, source and detector means mounted on the frame means for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector means, and means to rotate the scanner including the source and detector means about the object whereby a plurality of sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption by the object of a plurality of beams of penetrating radiation are collected; the calibration method comprising mounting calibration means supporting an adjustable centering member onto the frame means, positioning the adjustable centering member at approximately the center of rotation of the scanner, placing position-sensitive indicator means adjacent the approximately centered member, rotating the scanner and the calibration means mounted thereon at least one time and, if necessary, adjusting the positioning of the centering member until the centering member is coincident with the center of rotation of the scanner as determined by minimum deflection of the position-sensitive indicator means, rotating and translating the source and detector means and determining for each angular orientation of the frame means supporting the source and detector means the central position of each translational scan relative to the centered member and/or if a plurality of detectors are utilized with the detector means for each planar slice of the object being examined, the central position of each translational scan for each detector relative to the centered member

  18. Tomographic models and seismotectonics of the Reggio Emilia region, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, M. G.; Chiarabba, C.

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study is to define the Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the fault zone ruptured by the M L 5.1 earthquake of October 15, 1996 which occurred near Reggio Emilia (central-northern Italy). A 1-month-long seismic sequence followed the mainshock and occurred in a small region along the outer border of the northern Apenninic belt, at depth ranging between 10 and 17 km. P- and S-wave arrival times from 304 aftershocks recorded by two local dense seismic arrays installed in the epicentral region have been inverted to obtain one- and three-dimensional velocity models by using state of the art local earthquake tomographic techniques. Velocity models and aftershock relocation help us to infer the seismotectonic of the region. Earthquakes originated along a NW-dipping backthrust of a NE-trending main thrust, composing the western part of the broad Ferrara Arc. A main high Vp and high Vp/Vs region delineates a pop-up structure in the center of the area. The high Vp/Vs within the pop-up structure supports the presence of a zone with increased pore pressure. The hypocentral depth of both mainshock and aftershocks is greater than those usually found for the main seismogenic regions of the Apenninic belt. P-wave velocity values in the seismogenic area, obtained by tomography, are compatible with rocks of the Mesozoic cover and suggest that seismicity occurred within the Mesozoic units stack at present by compressional tectonics.

  19. Orthopedic applications of single photon emission computed Tomographic bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    When compared with planar bone scanning, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has technical advantages of potential diagnostic significance. Planar imaging often superimposes substantial underlying or overlying activity on the bony structure of medical interest. SPECT, however, can be used to remove such unwanted activity. For example, in the hip the acetabulum extends downwards behind the femoral head. Therefore when using planar bone scanning techniques, the photon-deficient defect typical of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral had may be obscured by activity originating in the underlying acetabulum. By using SPECT, underlying and overlying distributions of activity can be separated into sequential tomographic planes. For this reason SPECT facilitates the detection of AVN of the femoral head. When referring a patient without a history of malignancy for bone scanning, the orthopaedic surgeon usually has a specific clinical question involving a limited portion of the skeleton. Orthopaedic surgeons at their institution commonly use bone scanning to clarify the cause of back, hip or knee pain; to determine with a physiological test the significance of radiographic findings; and to establish the extent of disease at symptomatic skeletal sites such as the three compartments of the knee. In instances such as these, when clinical concern is limited to a specific anatomical region, a bone scan procedure that includes SPECT imaging of only a portion of the skeleton is appropriate. To date, SPECT of the skeletal system has most frequently been used to evaluate patients with pain the larger joints and bony structures such as the lumbar spine, hips, knees, or temporomandibular joints (TMJ)

  20. Tomographic flow cytometry assisted by intelligent wavefronts analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, F.; Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Mugnano, M.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell analysis is a challenging target for implementing advanced biomedical applications. An excellent candidate for this aim is label-free tomographic phase microscopy. However, in-line tomography is very difficult to be implemented in practice, as it requires complex setup for rotating the sample and/or illuminate the cell along numerous directions [1]. We exploit random rolling of cells while they are flowing along a microfluidic channel demonstrating that it is possible to obtain in-line phase-contrast tomography by adopting strategies for intelligent wavefronts analysis thus obtaining complete retrieval of both 3D-position and orientation of rotating cells [2]. Thus, by numerical wavefront analysis a-priori knowledge of such information is no longer needed. This approach makes continuos-flow cyto-tomography suitable for practical operation in real-world, single-cell analysis and with substantial simplification of the optical system avoiding any mechanical/optical scanning of light source. Demonstration is given for different classes of biosamples, red-blood-cells (RBCs), diatom algae and fibroblast cells [3]. Accurate characterization of each type of cells is reported despite their very different nature and materials content, thus showing the proposed method can be extended, by adopting two alternate strategies of wavefront-analysis, to many classes of cells. In particular, for RBCs we furnish important parameters as 3D morphology, Corpuscular Hemoglobin (CH), Volume (V), and refractive index (RI) for each single cell in the total population [3]. This could open a new route in blood disease diagnosis, for example for the isolation and characterization of "foreign" cells in the blood stream, the so called Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC), early manifestation of metastasis.

  1. A study of the decoding of multiple pinhole coded aperture RI tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takeo; Kobayashi, Akitoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Akagi, Kiyoshi; Uehata, Hiroshi

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain a radioisotope (RI) tomographic image, there are various, methods, including the RCT method, Time Modulate method, and Multiple Pinhole Coded Aperture (MPCA) method and others. The MPCA method has several advantages. Using the MPCA method, there is no need to move either the detector or the patient, Furthermore, the generally used γ-camera may be used without any alterations. Due to certain problems in reconstructing the tomographic image, the use of the MPCA method in clinical practice is limited to representation of small organs (e.g. heart) using the 7-Pinhole collimator. This research presents an experimental approach to overcome the problems in reconstruction of tomographic images of large organs (organs other than the heart, such as the brain, liver, lung etc.) by introducing a reconstruction algorithm and correction software into the MPCA method. There are 2 main problems in MPCA image reconstruction: (1) Due to the rounding-off procedure, there is both point omission and shifting of point coordinates. (2) The central portion is characterized by high-counts. Both of these problems were solved by incorporating a reconstruction algorithm and a correction function. The resultant corrected tomographic image was processed using a filter derived from subjecting a PSF to a Fourier transform. Thus, it has become possible to obtain a high-quality tomographic image of large organs for clinical use. (author)

  2. Reconstruction of tomographic image from x-ray projections of a few views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Shoichiro

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographs have progressed rapidly, and in the latest high performance types, the photographing time has been shortened to less than 5 sec, but the clear images of hearts have not yet been obtained. The X-ray tomographs used so far irradiate X-ray from many directions and measure the projected data, but by limiting projection direction to a small number, it was planned to shorter the X-ray photographing time and to reduce X-ray exposure as the objective of this study. In this paper, a method is proposed, by which tomographic images are reconstructed from projected data in a small number of direction by generalized inverse matrix penalty method. This method is the calculation method newly devised by the authors for this purpose. It is a kind of the nonlinear planning method added with the restrictive condition using a generalized inverse matrix, and it is characterized by the simple calculation procedure and rapid convergence. Moreover, the effect on reconstructed images when errors are included in projected data was examined. Also, the simple computer simulation to reconstruct tomographic images using the projected data in four directions was performed, and the usefulness of this method was confirmed. It contributes to the development of superhigh speed tomographs in future. (Kako, I.)

  3. Construction of Korean male tomographic model segmented from PET-CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Park, Sang Kyun; Lee, Jai Ki

    2004-01-01

    Tomographic human models provide currently the most realistic representation of human anatomy for radiation dosimetry calculation. Most of the models have been constructed by using computed tomographic (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from a single individual. Each scan has its inherent advantages and disadvantages. CT scan gives a considerable radiation dose to a subject, and MR scan takes too long time to get clear images of an immobile subject. An emerging source of medical images for the construction of tomographic models is PET-CT, which is performed when looking for cancer. In this study, a tomographic model of Korean adult male was developed by processing whole-body CT images of a PET-CT-scanned healthy volunteer. The 343 slices of the CT images were semi-automatically segmented layer by layer using a graphic software and screen digitizer. The 3rd Korean tomographic model, named KRMAN-2, consisting of 300x150x344 voxels of a size of 2x2x5mm 3 , was constructed. Examples of application to Monte Carlo radiation dosimetry calculation in idealized whole-body irradiations were given and discussed

  4. Construction of tomographic head model using sectioned photographic images of cadaver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Jai Ki; Park, Jin Seo; Chung, Min Suk

    2004-01-01

    Tomographic models are currently the most complete, developed and realistic models of the human anatomy. They have been used to estimate organ doses for diagnostic radiation examination and radiotherapy treatment planning, and radiation protection. The quality of original anatomic images is a key factor to build a quality tomographic model. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, from which most of current tomographic models are constructed, have their inherent shortcomings. In this study, a tomographic model of Korean adult male head was constructed by using serially sectioned photographs of cadaver. The cadaver was embedded, frozen, serially sectioned and photographed by high resolution digital camera at 0.2 mm interval. The contours of organs and tissues in photographs were segmented by several trained anatomists. The 120 segmented images of head at 2mm interval were converted into binary files and ported into Monte Carlo code to perform an example calculation of organ dose. Whole body tomographic model will be constructed by using the procedure developed in this study

  5. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  6. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga + -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga + density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Development and applications of the positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Progress on the positron microscope during the past year has been steady, and we currently project that initial microscope images can be collected during mid to late summer of 1992. Work during the year has mainly been divided among four areas of effort: hardware construction; power supply and control system development; radioactive source fabrication; and planning of initial experimental projects. Details of progress in these areas will be given below. An initial optical design of the microscope was completed during 1990, but during the past year, significant improvements have been made to this design, and several limiting cases of microscope performance have been evaluated. The results of these evaluations have been extremely encouraging, giving us strong indications that the optical performance of the microscope will be better than originally anticipated. In particular, we should be able to explore ultimate performance capabilities of positron microscopy using our currently planned optical system, with improvements only in the image detector system, and the positron-source/moderator configuration. We should be able to study imaging reemission microscopy with resolutions approaching 10 Angstrom and be able to produce beam spots for rastered microscope work with diameters below the 1000 Angstrom diffusion limit. Because of these exciting new possibilities, we have decided to upgrade several microscope subsystems to levels consistent with ultimate performance earlier in our construction schedule than we had previously intended. In particular, alignment facilities in the optical system, vibration isolation, and power supply and control system flexibility have all been upgraded in their design over the past year

  8. Towards vortex imaging with scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dan T.

    1994-02-01

    A low temperature, Besocke beetle type scanning tunneling microscope, with a scan range of 10 by 10 microns was built. The scanning tunneling microscope was calibrates for various temperatures and tested on several samples. Gold monolayers evaporated at 400 deg C were resolved and their dynamic behavior observed. Atomic resolution images of graphite were obtained. The scanning tunneling microscope was designed for future applications of vortex imaging in superconductors. The special design considerations for this application are discussed and the physics underlying it reviewed. (author)

  9. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  10. Tay-Sachs disease with conspicuous cranial computerized tomographic appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kishichiro; Mukawa, Akio; Muto, Kazuhiko; Nishikawa, Jiro; Takahashi, Shigeko.

    1985-01-01

    An autopsy case of a 3-year-old female infant with Tay-Sachs disease was presented. A cherry red spot in the fundus and a deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase A in the white blood cells were revealed soon after admission at the age of one year. Her parents and sister were found to be healthy carriers. The patient showed a typical clinical course with marked cranial swelling. In addition to the marked ballooning of neurons on light microscope, membranous cytoplasmic body (MCB) on electron microscope and abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex by thin layer chromatography were confirmed in the autopsy specimens. In the late stage of her clinical course, the cranial computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated symmetric and deep-wavy hyperdense cerebral cortical zones, diffuse hypodensity and diminished volume of cerebral white matter, mild to moderate ventricular dilatation, and a small cerebellum and brainstem. These conspicuous appearances of the cranial CT seem to be characteristic of Tay-Sachs disease in the late stage, and they are derived from abnormal accumulation of GM 2 ganglioside in the cerebral cortex, and diffuse intense demyelination (dysmyelinating demyelination) of the cerebral white matter. (author)

  11. Computed tomographic study of 50 patients with hypodense hepatic injuries in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Alvares, Beatriz Regina; Baracat, Jamal; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Pereira, Ricardo Minniti Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the different tomographic findings in hypodense hepatic lesions in children and its differential diagnosis. Materials and methods: computed tomographic studies were obtained from 50 patients (age range: 0-16 years) with low-density liver lesions previously diagnosed by ultrasound. Images were made before and after administration of intravenous contrast medium. Image findings were analyzed and afterwards correlated with anatomopathological diagnosis. Results: forty-seven of 50 cases were confirmed, 30 by anatomopathological diagnosis. Most of then were benign lesions, hemangioma in 20%. Such lesions presented a homogeneous contrast absorption, mainly at the delayed phase, differing from malignant lesions. Metastasis was the most frequently found malignant lesion (18%). Conclusion: computed tomographic study is of great value in complementing the diagnosis of hypodense hepatic lesions in children, and must follow ultrasound diagnosis as a routine procedure. (author)

  12. Directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays: A tomographic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecki, P.; Szymonski, M.; Tolkiehn, M.; Novikov, D. V.; Materlik, G.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays for tomographic imaging of crystal structure at the atomic level. The interference between a direct x-ray beam and the secondary waves coherently scattered inside a specimen modifies the total wave field at the position of the absorbing atoms. For a white x-ray beam, the wave field variations cancel out by energy integration for all directions, except for the near forward scattering components, coinciding with the incident beam. Therefore, two-dimensional patterns of the angular-dependent fine structure in absorption of white x rays can be interpreted as real-space projections of atomic structure. In this work, we present a theory describing the directional fine structure in white x-ray absorption and a tomographic approach for crystal structure retrieval developed on its basis. The tomographic algorithm is applied to the experimental x-ray absorption data recorded for GaP crystals

  13. Data and Analysis from a Time-Resolved Tomographic Optical Beam Diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frayer, Daniel K.; Johnson, Douglas; Ekdahl, Carl

    2010-01-01

    An optical tomographic diagnostic instrument developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images has been fielded at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed for the creation of time histories of electron-beam cross section through the collection of Cerenkov light. Four optical lines of sight optically collapse an image and relay projections via an optical fiber relay to recording instruments; a tomographic reconstruction algorithm creates the time history. Because the instrument may be operated in an adverse environment, it may be operated, adjusted, and calibrated remotely. The instrument was operated over the course of various activities during and after DARHT commissioning, and tomographic reconstructions reported verifiable beam characteristics. Results from the collected data and reconstructions and analysis of the data are discussed.

  14. Lamb-Wave-Based Tomographic Imaging Techniques for Hole-Edge Corrosion Monitoring in Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengjiang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel monitoring method for hole-edge corrosion damage in plate structures based on Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques. An experimental procedure with a cross-hole layout using 16 piezoelectric transducers (PZTs was designed. The A0 mode of the Lamb wave was selected, which is sensitive to thickness-loss damage. The iterative algebraic reconstruction technique (ART method was used to locate and quantify the corrosion damage at the edge of the hole. Hydrofluoric acid with a concentration of 20% was used to corrode the specimen artificially. To estimate the effectiveness of the proposed method, the real corrosion damage was compared with the predicted corrosion damage based on the tomographic method. The results show that the Lamb-wave-based tomographic method can be used to monitor the hole-edge corrosion damage accurately.

  15. Tomographic images of cerebral blood flow using a slant hole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wraight, E.P.; Barber, R.W.; Crossland, P.; Maltby, P.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using a rotating slant hole (RSH) collimator on simple tomographic equipment such as a standard gamma camera interfaced to a general purpose Nuclear Medicine computer is reported for producing images of cerebral blood flow following the administration of 123 I-iodoamphetamine to patients. Initial studies produced satisfactory images, thus opening the possibility of tomographic cerebral blood flow imaging to centres not possessing sophisticated tomographic equipment. Planar resolution is superior to that reported for a 25 0 RSH collimator. Axial resolution is not as good at small source distances but is comparable at distances beyond 10 cm. Sensitivity is comparable to other RSH collimators and is similar to Technicare's parallel hole general all purpose collimator. (UK)

  16. Tomographic ventricular reconstruction using multiple view first-pass radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, J.L.; Ball, M.E.; Verani, M.S.; Wiles, H.; Roberts, R.

    1985-01-01

    In first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRA) images of both left and right ventricles are uncontaminated by adjacent structures. Thus, the problem of tomographic reconstruction is vastly simplified compared to equilibrium blood pool imaging in which all structures are imaged simultaneously. Tomographic reconstruction from a limited number of views may thus be possible. A simple filtered interpolative back-projection reconstruction technique was employed. In this technique interpolation was used between sectional distributions at successive angles. Interpolations yielding 9 and 13 back projection angles of 22.5 0 and 15 0 were evaluated. Ventricular borders were obtained in each back-projected tomographic slice by location of the intensity level which provided correct total ventricular volume. Cast cross sections were quantitatively well represented by these borders. This ventricular border definition algorithm forms the basis for applications of the technique in animals and humans

  17. Comparative validation of the radiographic and tomographic measurement of patellar height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Schueda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and validate the radiographic measurement of patellar height with computerized tomography scans. METHODS: Measured the patellar height through the lateral radiographic image supported by one foot and sagittal tomographic view of the knee in extension, flexion of 20°, and quadriceps contraction of 40 patients (80 knees, asymptomatic and no history of knee injuries using Insall-Salvati index. There were 20 adult females and 20 adult males. RESULTS: The height patellar index was higher in women of all images taken, in proportion. There was no statistical difference of patellar height index between the radiographics and tomographics images. CONCLUSION: The Insall-Salvati index in females was higher in all cases evaluated. Furthermore, it is possible to measure the patellar height index during tomographic study without distorting the results obtained, using to define the presence of patella alta or patella baja.

  18. Registration of synthetic tomographic projection data sets using cross-correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitchard, E.E.; Aldridge, J.S.; Reckwerdt, P.J.; Mackie, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    Tomographic registration, a method that makes possible accurate patient registration directly from projection data, consists of three processing steps: (i) manual coarse positioning, (ii) tomographic projection set acquisition, and (iii) computer mediated refined positioning. In the coarse positioning stage, the degree of patient alignment is comparable with that achieved with the standard radiotherapy set-up. However, the accuracy requirements are somewhat more relaxed in that meticulous alignment of the patient using external laser indicators is not necessary. Instead, tomographic projection sets are compared with planning CTs in order to achieve improved patient set-up. The projection sets are cross-correlated to obtain the best-fit translation and rotation offsets. The algorithm has been tested on synthetic data with the incorporation of varying amounts of Gaussian pseudo-random noise. These tests demonstrate the algorithm's stability and also confirm that alignment can be achieved with an accuracy of less than one projection pixel. (author)

  19. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Gardner, R.P.; Verghese, K.

    1990-01-01

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  20. phytochemical and microscopical evaluation of desmodium velutinum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... and observed under the compound microscope for the presence of cell inclusions such as cellulose, starch, oil ... opportunity of providing useful medicinal compounds. (Gill, 1992). ..... Medical Properties of African. Plants of.

  1. Understanding and caring for an operating microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Cordero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An operating or surgical microscope is an optical instrument that provides the surgeon with a stereoscopic, high quality magnified and illuminated image of the small structures in the surgical area.

  2. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  3. A tomographic study of the condyle position in temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Youn; Ryu, Young Kyu

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether T.M.J. tomographic examination yielded significant difference in condyle positions among asymptomatic, myalgia, derangement, and arthrosis group of T.M.J. disorders. The author obtained sagittal linear tomograms of right and left T.M.Js. of 36 asymptomatic, 22 myalgia, 54 derangement, and 31 arthrosis patients taken at serial lateral, central, and medial sections in the intercuspal position after submentovertex radiographs analyzed. With the dual linear measurements of the posterior and anterior interarticular space, condyle positions were mathematically expressed as proportion. All data from these analysis was recorded and processed statistically. The results were obtained as follows: 1. In asymptomatic group, radiographically concentric condyle position was found in 50.0% to 65.4% of subjects, with a substance range of variability. No significant differences existed between men and women and also between right and left T.M.Js. for condyle position. 2. In women, significant difference for mean condyle position of left lateral section of each diagnostic category existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< .05). Also that of left central section existed between derangement and myalgia group, and that of left medial section existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< . 05). 3. In main-symptom side, condyle position in myalgia group was more concentric, and condyle position in derangement and group was more posterior. This showed significant differences between derangement and myalgia groups in lateral, central, and medial sections of main symptom side, and only between derangement and myalgia groups in central section of contra-lateral sides (P< .05). Condyle position in arthrosis group was broadly distributed among all positions. 4. In contra-lateral side, significant difference for mean condyle position of central section of each symptomatic group existed between derangement and myalgia group (P< .05

  4. A tomographic study of the condyle position in temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sung Youn; Ryu, Young Kyu [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether T.M.J. tomographic examination yielded significant difference in condyle positions among asymptomatic, myalgia, derangement, and arthrosis group of T.M.J. disorders. The author obtained sagittal linear tomograms of right and left T.M.Js. of 36 asymptomatic, 22 myalgia, 54 derangement, and 31 arthrosis patients taken at serial lateral, central, and medial sections in the intercuspal position after submentovertex radiographs analyzed. With the dual linear measurements of the posterior and anterior interarticular space, condyle positions were mathematically expressed as proportion. All data from these analysis was recorded and processed statistically. The results were obtained as follows: 1. In asymptomatic group, radiographically concentric condyle position was found in 50.0% to 65.4% of subjects, with a substance range of variability. No significant differences existed between men and women and also between right and left T.M.Js. for condyle position. 2. In women, significant difference for mean condyle position of left lateral section of each diagnostic category existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< .05). Also that of left central section existed between derangement and myalgia group, and that of left medial section existed between derangement and myalgia groups (P< . 05). 3. In main-symptom side, condyle position in myalgia group was more concentric, and condyle position in derangement and group was more posterior. This showed significant differences between derangement and myalgia groups in lateral, central, and medial sections of main symptom side, and only between derangement and myalgia groups in central section of contra-lateral sides (P< .05). Condyle position in arthrosis group was broadly distributed among all positions. 4. In contra-lateral side, significant difference for mean condyle position of central section of each symptomatic group existed between derangement and myalgia group (P< .05

  5. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Smith, Susan [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. M. [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  6. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwaprem Raj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of posterior circulation to autoregulate. The clinical spectrum and the underlying pathophysiology are still poorly defined. No conclusive evidence has been put forward regarding the relationship between clinical conditions and specific imaging findings of severity or location of oedema. PURPOSE To assess the role of computed tomography in evaluation of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 55 patients referred to the Department of Radio-Diagnosis, with a history of neurological abnormalities, including altered mental function, visual loss, stupor with a predisposing history favouring PRES and followed up for a period of 10 – 30 days. RESULTS 21 patients (38.2% were females. 32 patients (58.1% were in the age group between 21 to 30 years. Predisposing condition; 16 (29.1% presented with pre-eclampsia, 12 (21.8% with post-partum status in altered sensorium, 9 (16.4% with seizures, 7 (12.7% with hypertension, 6 (10.9% with visual disturbances, 4 (7.3% with eclampsia and 1 (1.8% with uraemia. 20 cases (36.4% showed findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome on initial computed tomography examination. 35 cases showed no initial radiological evidence suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Of the 20 cases which showed computed tomographic evidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, recovery was noted in 5 cases (9.1%. Persistence of findings detected on first CT was noted in 13 patients (23.6%. Regional predominance of the lesions was as follows. Frontal lobe (39%, Parietal lobe (32%, Temporal lobe (15% and occipital lobe (15%. CONCLUSION Varied clinical manifestations are associated with anatomical findings recognisable by neuro-imaging as PRES. Prompt imaging is necessary for the recognition of the condition and appropriate

  7. A Mobile Automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning System - 13231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; LeBlanc, P.J.; Nakazawa, D.; Petroka, D.L.; Kane Smith, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M. [Canberra Industries, Inc. 800 Research Parkway, Meriden CT 06450 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Canberra Industries have recently designed and built a new automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) system for mobile deployment. The TGS technique combines high-resolution gamma spectroscopy with low spatial resolution 3-dimensional image reconstruction to provide increased accuracy over traditional approaches for the assay of non-uniform source distributions in low-to medium-density, non-heterogeneous matrices. Originally pioneered by R. Estep at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the TGS method has been further developed and commercialized by Canberra Industries in recent years. The present system advances the state of the art on several fronts: it is designed to be housed in a standard cargo transport container for ease of transport, allowing waste characterization at multiple facilities under the purview of a single operator. Conveyor feed, drum rotator, and detector and collimator positioning mechanisms operated by programmable logic control (PLC) allow automated batch mode operation. The variable geometry settings can accommodate a wide range of waste packaging, including but not limited to standard 220 liter drums, 380 liter overpack drums, and smaller 20 liter cans. A 20 mCi Eu-152 transmission source provides attenuation corrections for drum matrices up to 1 g/cm{sup 3} in TGS mode; the system can be operated in Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) mode to measure higher density drums. To support TGS assays at higher densities, the source shield is sufficient to house an alternate Co-60 transmission source of higher activity, up to 250 mCi. An automated shutter and attenuator assembly is provided for operating the system with a dual intensity transmission source. The system's 1500 kg capacity rotator turntable can handle heavy containers such as concrete lined 380 liter overpack drums. Finally, data acquisition utilizes Canberra's Broad Energy Germanium (BEGE) detector and Lynx MCA, with 32 k channels, providing better than 0.1 ke

  8. Software for tomographic analysis: application in ceramic filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figuerola, W.B.; Assis, J.T.; Oliveira, L.F.; Lopes, R.T.

    2001-01-01

    and UNIX). Various digital image processing techniques were implemented to extract physical properties such as: distance, volume, area and perimeter; digital filters as: Median filter, Histogram equalization, threshold quantization, boundary detection (Laplace and Sobel); and for the volume rendering, the Ray Casting technique was used. The results obtained with this software permits its use in this area of ceramic filters applications and to analyses others types of tomographic images

  9. A comparison of newborn stylized and tomographic models for dose assessment in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, R J; Pazik, F D; Nipper, J C; Williams, J L; Bolch, W E

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of organ doses from diagnostic and interventional examinations is a key component to quantifying the radiation risks from medical exposures and for formulating corresponding dose-reduction strategies. Radiation transport models of human anatomy provide a convenient method for simulating radiological examinations. At present, two classes of models exist: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. In the present study, organ dose comparisons are made for projection radiographs of both a stylized and a tomographic model of the newborn patient. Sixteen separate radiographs were simulated for each model at x-ray technique factors typical of newborn examinations: chest, abdomen, thorax and head views in the AP, PA, left LAT and right LAT projection orientation. For AP and PA radiographs of the torso (chest, abdomen and thorax views), the effective dose assessed for the tomographic model exceeds that for the stylized model with per cent differences ranging from 19% (AP abdominal view) to 43% AP chest view. In contrast, the effective dose for the stylized model exceeds that for the tomographic model for all eight lateral views including those of the head, with per cent differences ranging from 9% (LLAT chest view) to 51% (RLAT thorax view). While organ positioning differences do exist between the models, a major factor contributing to differences in effective dose is the models' exterior trunk shape. In the tomographic model, a more elliptical shape is seen thus providing for less tissue shielding for internal organs in the AP and PA directions, with corresponding increased tissue shielding in the lateral directions. This observation is opposite of that seen in comparisons of stylized and tomographic models of the adult

  10. Multi-compartment microscopic diffusion imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kaden, Enrico; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Carson, Robert P.; Does, Mark D.; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a multi-compartment model for microscopic diffusion anisotropy imaging. The aim is to estimate microscopic features specific to the intra- and extra-neurite compartments in nervous tissue unconfounded by the effects of fibre crossings and orientation dispersion, which are ubiquitous in the brain. The proposed MRI method is based on the Spherical Mean Technique (SMT), which factors out the neurite orientation distribution and thus provides direct estimates of the microsco...

  11. Microscopic and macroscopic models for pedestrian crowds

    OpenAIRE

    Makmul, Juntima

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with microscopic and macroscopic models for pedes- trian crowds. In the first chapter, we consider pedestrians exit choices and model human behaviour in an evacuation process. Two microscopic models, discrete and continuous, are studied in this chapter. The former is a cellular automaton model and the latter is a social force model. Different numerical test cases are investigated and their results are compared. In chapter 2, a hierarchy of models for...

  12. Tomographic thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigrams after maximal coronary artery vasodilation with intravenous dipyridamole: comparison of qualitative and quantitative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, D.A.; Collins, S.M.; Go, R.T.; Ehrhardt, J.C.; Van Kirk, O.C.; Marcus, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six patients had thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) myocardial perfusion scintigrams after intense coronary artery dilation with i.v. dipyridamole. Tomographic and planar 201 Tl scintigrams were obtained in each patient. Tomographic scintigrams were interpreted using quantitative or visual criteria; planar scintigrams were assessed using visual criteria only. When visual criteria were used, interobserver variability was 40% for tomographic scintigrams and 44% for planar scintigrams. In the 24 patients with normal or nonsignificant CAD, quantitative analysis of the tomograms (range approach) indicated that one of 24 (4%) had a positive image (specificity 96%%); in contrast, when visual criteria were used to interpret the tomographic or planar 201 Tl scintigrams, eight of 24 (33%) had positive scintigrams (specificity 67%). In the 51 abnormal patients, the sensitivity of detecting CAD was 46 of 51 (90%) for tomographic scintigrams interpreted quantitatively, 39 of 51 (76%) for tomographic scintigrams interpreted visually and 41 of 51 (80%) for planar scintigrams assessed visually. The tomographic imaging procedure (quantitative interpretation) also demonstrated a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (100%) in 28 patients (10 normal and 18 CAD), with a clinical diagnosis of unstable angina pectoris. Overall, the predictive accuracy of an abnormal scintigram with quantitative tomographic imaging (98%) was significantly better (p<0.05) than either qualitative planar or pinhole imaging

  13. Design and construction of the gamma ray transmission tomographer g-TAC-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavon Hernandez, Noriel; Ravelo Sanchez, Alberto; Idel, Pedro; Macias Perez, Rafael; Garcia Trapaga, Cesar; Campos Montenegro, Augusto

    2000-01-01

    An equipment for gamma ray transmission tomographer was designed and constructed in the Higher Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology. It was the g-TAC-01, based on a nuclear instrumentation, a mechanic instrumentation, and the control of the system from a personal computer. This first version permitted to obtain the know how of the technology of construction of equipment for tomography. The present work describes the second version of the gamma ray transmission tomographer: the g-TAC-02, with very important upgrading in the control session. Now the control system is a microcontroller based, electronic control system, designed to work in multiples forms: manual, automatic and with the computer

  14. An original emission tomograph for in vivo brain imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, A.V.; Ploux, L.; Mastrippolito, R.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of a new tomograph TOHR dedicated for small volume analysis with very high resolution is presented in this paper. We use uncorrelated multi-photons (X or gamma rays) radioisotopes and a large solid angle focusing collimator to make tomographic imaging without reconstruction algorithm. With this original device, detection efficiency and resolution are independent and submillimetric resolution can be achieved. A feasibility study shows that, made achieve the predicted performances of TOHR. We discuss its potential in rat brain tomography by simulating a realistic neuropharmacological experiment using a 1.4 mm resolution prototype of TOHR under development

  15. Characterization of tomographically faithful states in terms of their Wigner function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ariano, G M; Sacchi, M F

    2005-01-01

    A bipartite quantum state is tomographically faithful when it can be used as an input of a quantum operation acting on one of the two quantum systems, such that the joint output state carries complete information about the operation itself. Tomographically faithful states are a necessary ingredient for the tomography of quantum operations and for complete quantum calibration of measuring apparatuses. In this paper we provide a complete classification of such states for continuous variables in terms of the Wigner function of the state. For two-mode Gaussian states faithfulness simply resorts to correlation between the modes

  16. IMIS: An intelligence microscope imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Michael; Hunter, Norwood; Taylor, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Until recently microscope users in space relied on traditional microscopy techniques that required manual operation of the microscope and recording of observations in the form of written notes, drawings, or photographs. This method was time consuming and required the return of film and drawings from space for analysis. No real-time data analysis was possible. Advances in digital and video technologies along with recent developments in article intelligence will allow future space microscopists to have a choice of three additional modes of microscopy: remote coaching, remote control, and automation. Remote coaching requires manual operations of the microscope with instructions given by two-way audio/video transmission during critical phases of the experiment. When using the remote mode of microscopy, the Principal Investigator controls the microscope from the ground. The automated mode employs artificial intelligence to control microscope functions and is the only mode that can be operated in the other three modes as well. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the four modes of of microscopy and how the IMIS, a proposed intelligent microscope imaging system, can be used as a model for developing and testing concepts, operating procedures, and equipment design of specifications required to provide a comprehensive microscopy/imaging capability onboard Space Station Freedom.

  17. Applications of Mapping and Tomographic Techniques in Gem Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gem Sciences are scientific studies of gemstones - their genesis, provenance, synthesis, enhancement, treatment and identification. As high quality forms of specific minerals, the gemstones exhibit unusual physical properties that are usually unseen in the regular counterparts. Most gemstones are colored by trace elements incorporated in the crystal lattice during various growth stages; forming coloration zones of various scales. Studying the spectral and chemical contrast across color zones helps elucidating the origins of colors. These are done by UV-visible spectrometers with microscope and LA-ICPMS in modern gemological laboratories. In the case of diamonds, their colored zones arise from various structural defects incorporated in different growth zones and are studied with FTIR spectrometers with IR microscope and laser photoluminescence spectrometers. Advancement in modern synthetic techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has created some problem for identification. Some exploratory experiments in carbon isotope mapping were done on diamonds using SIMS. The most important issue in pearls is to identify one particular pearl being a cultured one or a natural pearl. The price difference can be enormous. Classical way of such identification is done by x-ray radiographs, which clearly show the bead and the nacre. Modern cultured pearl advancement has eliminated the need for an artificial bead, but a small piece of tissue instead. Nowadays, computer x-ray tomography (CT) scanning devices are used to depict the clear image of the interior of a pearl. In the Chinese jade market, filling fissures with epoxy and/or wax are very commonly seen. We are currently exploring Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique to map the distribution of artificial resin within a polycrystalline aggregates.

  18. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friets, E.M.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Hatch, J.F.; Roberts, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given

  20. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  1. Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal K.; Burns, Laurie D.; Cocker, Eric D.; Nimmerjahn, Axel; Ziv, Yaniv; Gamal, Abbas El; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals towards relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular-level imaging across ∼0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens. PMID:21909102

  2. The optics of microscope image formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    Although geometric optics gives a good understanding of how the microscope works, it fails in one critical area, which is explaining the origin of microscope resolution. To accomplish this, one must consider the microscope from the viewpoint of physical optics. This chapter describes the theory of the microscope-relating resolution to the highest spatial frequency that a microscope can collect. The chapter illustrates how Huygens' principle or construction can be used to explain the propagation of a plane wave. It is shown that this limit increases with increasing numerical aperture (NA). As a corollary to this, resolution increases with decreasing wavelength because of how NA depends on wavelength. The resolution is higher for blue light than red light. Resolution is dependent on contrast, and the higher the contrast, the higher the resolution. This last point relates to issues of signal-to-noise and dynamic range. The use of video and new digital cameras has necessitated redefining classical limits such as those of Rayleigh's criterion. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friets, E M; Strohbehn, J W; Hatch, J F; Roberts, D W

    1989-06-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given.

  4. Connections model for tomographic images reconstruction; Modelo conexionista para reconstrucao de imagens tomograficas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Roque, S.F. A.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica (FFCLRP) USP. Av. Bandeirantes, 3900- 14040- 901- Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    This paper shows an artificial neural network with an adequately topology for tomographic image reconstruction. The associated error function is derived and the learning algorithm is make. The simulated results are presented and demonstrate the existence of a generalized solution for nets with linear activation function. (Author)

  5. The use of tomographic techniques in the mineral processing Industry. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witika, L.K.; Jere, E.H.

    2002-01-01

    Process tomographic techniques may be used to analyse the internal state of most of the multiphase process engineering systems such as material segregation in a reactor multiphase flow in pipes and the spatial resolution of mineral grains in multiphase particles. These techniques include radiation computed tomography (X-ray or ray), electrical methods(capacitance, impedance and inductive tomography) positron emission tomography,optical tomography, microwave tomography, acoustic tomographical methods and many more. Many potential applications exist for process tomographic instrumentation for quantitative analysis and fault-detection purposes. Amongst these, electrical methods are widely used for those mineral processes deserving particular attention such as dense-medium separation, hydro cyclones, flotation cells and columns, gas-liquid absorbers, solvent extraction and other liquid-liquid processes, filtration and other solid-liquid processes, grinding mills (both dry and wet, conveyors and hoppers). Development in on-line measurement instrumentation now allow direct observation of the behaviour of fluids inside mineral separation equipment. This offers the possibility to acquire process data to enable models to be devised, to verify theoretical computational fluid dynamics predictions and control of various unit processes. In this review, the most important tomographic sensing methods are reviewed. Examples of the implementation of some electrical methods are illustrated. (authors)

  6. Ratios between effective doses for tomographic and mathematician models due to internal exposure of photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Santos, A.M.; Loureiro, E.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new and sophisticated Monte Carlo codes and tomographic human phantoms or voxels motivated the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to revise the traditional models of exposure, which have been used to calculate effective dose coefficients for organs and tissues based on mathematician phantoms known as MIRD5. This paper shows the results of calculations using tomographic phantoms MAX (Male Adult voXel) and FAX (Female Adult voXel), recently developed by the authors as well as with the phantoms ADAM and EVA, of specific genres, type MIRD5, coupled to the EGS4 Monte Carlo and MCNP4C codes, for internal exposure with photons of energies between 10 keV and 4 MeV to several organs sources. Effective Doses for both models, tomographic and mathematician, will be compared separately as a function of the Monte Carlo code replacement, of compositions of human tissues and the anatomy reproduced through tomographs. The results indicate that for photon internal exposure, the use of models of exposure based in voxel, increases the values of effective doses up to 70% for some organs sources considered in this study, when compared with the corresponding results obtained with phantoms of MIRD-5 type

  7. Investigating Gravity Waves in Polar Mesospheric Clouds Using Tomographic Reconstructions of AIM Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, V. P.; Taylor, M. J.; Doyle, T. E.; Zhao, Y.; Pautet, P.-D.; Carruth, B. L.; Rusch, D. W.; Russell, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    This research presents the first application of tomographic techniques for investigating gravity wave structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) imaged by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size instrument on the NASA AIM satellite. Albedo data comprising consecutive PMC scenes were used to tomographically reconstruct a 3-D layer using the Partially Constrained Algebraic Reconstruction Technique algorithm and a previously developed "fanning" technique. For this pilot study, a large region (760 × 148 km) of the PMC layer (altitude 83 km) was sampled with a 2 km horizontal resolution, and an intensity weighted centroid technique was developed to create novel 2-D surface maps, characterizing the individual gravity waves as well as their altitude variability. Spectral analysis of seven selected wave events observed during the Northern Hemisphere 2007 PMC season exhibited dominant horizontal wavelengths of 60-90 km, consistent with previous studies. These tomographic analyses have enabled a broad range of new investigations. For example, a clear spatial anticorrelation was observed between the PMC albedo and wave-induced altitude changes, with higher-albedo structures aligning well with wave troughs, while low-intensity regions aligned with wave crests. This result appears to be consistent with current theories of PMC development in the mesopause region. This new tomographic imaging technique also provides valuable wave amplitude information enabling further mesospheric gravity wave investigations, including quantitative analysis of their hemispheric and interannual characteristics and variations.

  8. A Penalization Approach for Tomographic Reconstruction of Binary Axially Symmetric Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, R.; Bergounioux, M.; Trelat, E.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a variational method for tomographic reconstruction of blurred and noised binary images based on a penalization process of a minimization problem settled in the space of bounded variation functions. We prove existence and/or uniqueness results and derive a penalized optimality system. Numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the relevance of the approach

  9. ECAT: a new computerized tomographic imaging system for position-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Hoffman, E.J.; Huang, S.C.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems

  10. Results of work of neurological clinic in first year of computer tomograph application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volejnik, V; Nettl, S; Heger, L [Karlova Univ., Hradec Kralove (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta

    1980-11-01

    The results are analyzed of one year's use of a computer tomograph (CT) by a department of neurology. Detailed comparisons with corresponding PEG and CT findings showed the accuracy of CT examinations in the descriptions of the width of the subarachnoid spaces and of the ventricular system. The advantages of CT are assessed from the medical, economic, and ethical points of view.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of computed tomographic colonography screening for colorectal cancer in the medicare population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Knudsen (Amy); I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); C.M. Rutter (Carolyn); J.E. Savarino (James); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein); K.M. Kuntz (Karen); A. Zauber (Ann)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) considered whether to reimburse computed tomographic colonography (CTC) for colorectal cancer screening of Medicare enrollees. To help inform its decision, we evaluated the reimbursement rate at which CTC screening could be

  12. Constraining fault interpretation through tomographic velocity gradients: application to northern Cascadia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ramachandran

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial gradients of tomographic velocities are seldom used in interpretation of subsurface fault structures. This study shows that spatial velocity gradients can be used effectively in identifying subsurface discontinuities in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three-dimensional velocity models constructed through tomographic inversion of active source and/or earthquake traveltime data are generally built from an initial 1-D velocity model that varies only with depth. Regularized tomographic inversion algorithms impose constraints on the roughness of the model that help to stabilize the inversion process. Final velocity models obtained from regularized tomographic inversions have smooth three-dimensional structures that are required by the data. Final velocity models are usually analyzed and interpreted either as a perturbation velocity model or as an absolute velocity model. Compared to perturbation velocity model, absolute velocity models have an advantage of providing constraints on lithology. Both velocity models lack the ability to provide sharp constraints on subsurface faults. An interpretational approach utilizing spatial velocity gradients applied to northern Cascadia shows that subsurface faults that are not clearly interpretable from velocity model plots can be identified by sharp contrasts in velocity gradient plots. This interpretation resulted in inferring the locations of the Tacoma, Seattle, Southern Whidbey Island, and Darrington Devil's Mountain faults much more clearly. The Coast Range Boundary fault, previously hypothesized on the basis of sedimentological and tectonic observations, is inferred clearly from the gradient plots. Many of the fault locations imaged from gradient data correlate with earthquake hypocenters, indicating their seismogenic nature.

  13. A new algorithm for γ-ray tomographic imaging using a scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terajima, Hirokatsu; Nakajima, Masato; Itoh, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    The gamma ray tomographic imaging giving 3-dimensional distribution of RI in human bodies is being actively investigated for the reason that the conventional images are of 2-dimensional projection, but it is not yet employed practically, because there are some problems in the tomographic image quality obtained. One of the methods is a technique to determine the radioisotope distribution on each tomographic plane by placing a planar detector in parallel with the assumed tomographic planes and by processing the 2-dimensional radioisotope projection images thus obtained. It does not require the repetition of reconstructive algorithm. The authors have proposed the algorithm for this method, and have carried out the experiments to verify the propriety of the algorithm. Radioisotope phantom is composed of the overlapping acrylic cubic vessels of 30 mm sides containing radioisotopes arranged 2-dimensionally in each layer, and the multi-pinhole shutter array is used as the collimator. The projection image of radioisotope distribution on the scintillator face is converted into the digital imaging data sampled in 2-dimensional space of 64 x 64 with the mini-computer. Among the probable causes to affect the reconstructed image quality, statistical fluctuation, absorption of gamma ray and the shape of aperture for the collimator are discussed. These indicate that this method is more effective than the conventional methods, and can be the effective technique for medical diagnosis and therapy, because this is a technique to determine 3-dimensional distribution of RI by utilizing existing equipments. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Rapid tomographic reconstruction based on machine learning for time-resolved combustion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Cai, Weiwei; Liu, Yingzheng

    2018-04-01

    Optical tomography has attracted surged research efforts recently due to the progress in both the imaging concepts and the sensor and laser technologies. The high spatial and temporal resolutions achievable by these methods provide unprecedented opportunity for diagnosis of complicated turbulent combustion. However, due to the high data throughput and the inefficiency of the prevailing iterative methods, the tomographic reconstructions which are typically conducted off-line are computationally formidable. In this work, we propose an efficient inversion method based on a machine learning algorithm, which can extract useful information from the previous reconstructions and build efficient neural networks to serve as a surrogate model to rapidly predict the reconstructions. Extreme learning machine is cited here as an example for demonstrative purpose simply due to its ease of implementation, fast learning speed, and good generalization performance. Extensive numerical studies were performed, and the results show that the new method can dramatically reduce the computational time compared with the classical iterative methods. This technique is expected to be an alternative to existing methods when sufficient training data are available. Although this work is discussed under the context of tomographic absorption spectroscopy, we expect it to be useful also to other high speed tomographic modalities such as volumetric laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic laser-induced incandescence which have been demonstrated for combustion diagnostics.

  15. Processing of acquisition data for a time of flight positron tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, G.

    1987-10-01

    After a review of basic principles concerning the time of flight positron tomography, the LETI positron tomograph is briefly described. For performance optimization (acquisition, calibration, image reconstruction), various specialized operators have been designed: the realization of the acquisition system is presented [fr

  16. Computed tomographic diagnosis of calcified inferior vena cava thrombus in a child with Wilm's tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirks, D R; Ponzi, J W; Korobkin, M

    1980-01-01

    A calcified thrombus in the inferior vena cava of infants and children may be imaged by computed tomography. The precise location of the calcification within the inferior vena cava may be confirmed by computed tomographic scanning during injection of intravenous contrast material.

  17. Tomographic site characterization using CPT, ERT, and GPR. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    ARA developed a geophysical tomographic system that incorporates results from Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography measurements. Both methods are useful for imaging subsurface structures and processes, however, GPR is more effective in sandy material and ERT is more effective in clayey material. CPT or drilling is used to deploy the electrodes in the subsurface

  18. Correlation of computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings in cerebral infartion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsubara, Chizuko; Chuda, Moriyoshi; Taka, Toshihiko

    1989-01-01

    We evaluated neurological findings in 75 patients of cerebral infarction, and correlated computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MRI was found to have the advantage when the lesion were multiple, or in the posterior fossa. MRI demonstrates the anatomical details, and lacks the bony artifact, so it is an excellent method for identification of cerebral infarction. (author)

  19. Evaluation of quality of tomographs of Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travassos, P.C.B.; Belem, V.R.; Magalhaes, L.A.; Almeida, C.E.A. de

    2014-01-01

    Computerized tomographs used in 56 institutions in the state of Rio de Janeiro were evaluated. Criteria of image quality and dosimetry were submitted. The results showed that some not performed optimize their protocols examinations or perform wrongly, which results in an increase in the dose received by patients, and an image in compromised quality. (author)

  20. Quantum-tomographic cryptography with a semiconductor single-photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, D.; Yang, L.J.; Yong, L.S.; Willeboordse, F.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the security of so-called quantum-tomographic cryptography with the source producing entangled photons via an experimental scheme proposed by Fattal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 37903 (2004)]. We determine the range of the experimental parameters for which the protocol is secure against the most general incoherent attacks

  1. Pressure estimation from single-snapshot tomographic PIV in a turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneiders, J.F.G.; Pröbsting, S.; Dwight, R.P.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine the instantaneous pressure field from a single tomographic PIV velocity snapshot and is applied to a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. The main concept behind the single-snapshot pressure evaluation method is to approximate the flow acceleration using the

  2. 3D velocity measurements in a premixed flame by tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarev, M P; Sharaborin, D K; Lobasov, A S; Chikishev, L M; Dulin, V M; Markovich, D M

    2015-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) has become a standard tool for 3D velocity measurements in non-reacting flows. However, the majority of the measurements in flows with combustion are limited to small resolved depth compared to the size of the field of view (typically 1 : 10). The limitations are associated with inhomogeneity of the volume illumination and the non-uniform flow seeding, the optical distortions and errors in the 3D calibration, and the unwanted flame luminosity. In the present work, the above constraints were overcome for the tomographic PIV experiment in a laminar axisymmetric premixed flame. The measurements were conducted for a 1 : 1 depth-to-size ratio using a system of eight CCD cameras and a 200 mJ pulsed laser. The results show that camera calibration based on the triangulation of the tracer particles in the non-reacting conditions provided reliable accuracy for the 3D image reconstruction in the flame. The modification of the tomographic reconstruction allowed a posteriori removal of unwanted bright objects, which were located outside of the region of interest but affected the reconstruction quality. This study reports on a novel experience for the instantaneous 3D velocimetry in laboratory-scale flames by using tomographic PIV. (paper)

  3. An efficient and accurate approach to MTE-MART for time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, KP; Scarano, F.

    2015-01-01

    The motion-tracking-enhanced MART (MTE-MART; Novara et al. in Meas Sci Technol 21:035401, 2010) has demonstrated the potential to increase the accuracy of tomographic PIV by the combined use of a short sequence of non-simultaneous recordings. A clear bottleneck of the MTE-MART technique has been

  4. An efficient and accurate approach to MTE-MART for time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.; Scarano, F.

    2015-01-01

    The motion-tracking-enhanced MART (MTE-MART; Novara et al. in Meas Sci Technol 21:035401, 2010) has demonstrated the potential to increase the accuracy of tomographic PIV by the combined use of a short sequence of non-simultaneous recordings. A clear bottleneck of the MTE-MART technique has been its

  5. Spiral Computed Tomographic Imaging Related to Computerized Ultrasonographic Images of Carotid Plaque Morphology and Histology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønholdt, Marie-Louise M.; Wagner, Aase; Wiebe, Britt M.

    2001-01-01

    Echolucency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques, as evaluated by computerized B-mode ultrasonographic images, has been associated with an increased incidence of brain infarcts on cerebral computed tomographic scans. We tested the hypotheses that characterization of carotid plaques on spiral comput...

  6. Results of work of neurological clinic in first year of computer tomograph application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volejnik, V.; Nettl, S.; Heger, L.

    1980-01-01

    The results are analyzed of one year's use of a computer tomograph (CT) by a department of neurology. Detailed comparisons with corresponding PEG and CT findings showed the accuracy of CT examinations in the descriptions of the width of the subarachnoid spaces and of the ventricular system. The advantages of CT are assessed from the medical, economic, and ethical points of view. (author)

  7. Determination of the parameters of a microscopic object from a complex response of a differential microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, D V; Egorov, Alexander A; Zolotov, Evgenii M; Svidzinsky, K K

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the amplitude and phase of a complex response of a heterodyne differential microscope was used to demonstrate experimentally the feasibility of determination of the parameters of a composite microscopic object representing a combination of a step with a groove. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. On the microscopic foundation of scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, T.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to give a contribution to the microscopic foundation of scattering theory, i. e. to show, how the asymptotic formalism of scattering theory with objects like the S-matrix as well the initial and final asymptotics ψ in and ψ out can be derived from a microscopic description of the basic system. First the final statistics from a N-particle system through farly distant surfaces is derived. Thereafter we confine us to the 1-particle scattering and apply the final statistics in order to derive the scattering cross section from a microscopical description of the scattering situation. The basing dynamics are Bohm's mechanics, a theory on the motion of point particles, which reproduces all results of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics

  9. Microscopic hydrodynamics study with nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilun Guo; Yuhua Zhao; Yulan Wang; Hiuhong Hao; Brandt, R.; Vater, P.

    1988-01-01

    Microscopic hydrodynamics has been studied using different liquids and nuclear track membranes with pores perpendicularly piercing through them. The flow rate of water and alcohol has been studied with polycarbonate track membranes with pore diameters 1.48 micrometres and 1.08 micrometres. It has been shown that the flow rate both for water and alcohol on a microscopic scale can be determined by the Poiseuille law which characterizes macroscopic laminar flow. The Reynolds number used in macroscopic fluid flow has been calculated from the flow rate and parameters of the liquids and the geometry of the pores. It has been shown that this Reynolds number can also be used to characterize microscopic flow. Based on the above results, the filtration capacity (or limit) of polycarbonate track microfilters for water had been calculated. Some possible limits on the application of the calculation are pointed out and discussed. (author)

  10. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  11. Smartphone Magnification Attachment: Microscope or Magnifying Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergemöller, Timo; Laumann, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Today smartphones and tablets do not merely pervade our daily life, but also play a major role in STEM education in general, and in experimental investigations in particular. Enabling teachers and students to make use of these new techniques in physics lessons requires supplying capable and affordable applications. Our article presents the improvement of a low-cost technique turning smartphones into powerful magnifying glasses or microscopes. Adding only a 3D-printed clip attached to the smartphone's camera and inserting a small glass bead in this clip enables smartphones to take pictures with up to 780x magnification (see Fig. 1). In addition, the construction of the smartphone attachments helps to explain and examine the differences between magnifying glasses and microscopes, and shows that the widespread term "smartphone microscope" for this technique is inaccurate from a physics educational perspective.

  12. Handy Microscopic Close-Range Videogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, F.; Ebadi, H.

    2017-09-01

    The modeling of small-scale objects is used in different applications such as medicine, industry, and cultural heritage. The capability of modeling small-scale objects using imaging with the help of hand USB digital microscopes and use of videogrammetry techniques has been implemented and evaluated in this paper. Use of this equipment and convergent imaging of the environment for modeling, provides an appropriate set of images for generation of three-dimensional models. The results of the measurements made with the help of a microscope micrometer calibration ruler have demonstrated that self-calibration of a hand camera-microscope set can help obtain a three-dimensional detail extraction precision of about 0.1 millimeters on small-scale environments.

  13. Scanning laser microscope for imaging nanostructured superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takekazu; Arai, Kohei; Akita, Yukio; Miyanari, Mitsunori; Minami, Yusuke; Yotsuya, Tsutomu; Kato, Masaru; Satoh, Kazuo; Uno, Mayumi; Shimakage, Hisashi; Miki, Shigehito; Wang, Zhen

    2010-10-01

    The nanofabrication of superconductors yields various interesting features in superconducting properties. A variety of different imaging techniques have been developed for probing the local superconducting profiles. A scanning pulsed laser microscope has been developed by the combination of the XYZ piezo-driven stages and an optical fiber with an aspheric focusing lens. The scanning laser microscope is used to understand the position-dependent properties of a superconducting MgB 2 stripline of length 100 μm and width of 3 μm under constant bias current. Our results show that the superconducting stripline can clearly be seen in the contour image of the scanning laser microscope on the signal voltage. It is suggested from the observed image that the inhomogeneity is relevant in specifying the operating conditions such as detection efficiency of the sensor.

  14. Environmental TEM in an Aberration Corrected Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    ‐resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole‐piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 10‐20 nm), the gas in the environmental...... the microscope column. The effects of gas on the electron wave in the objective lens are not well understood and needs further attention. Imaging samples with a simple geometry, such as gold particles on a flat graphene substrate and analyzing the variations in contrast, provides a means for understanding...... results from imaging in various elemental as well as di‐molecular gases and their effect on imaging and spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope....

  15. Image processing for HTS SQUID probe microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Koetitz, R.; Itozaki, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawabe, U.

    2005-01-01

    An HTS SQUID probe microscope has been developed using a high-permeability needle to enable high spatial resolution measurement of samples in air even at room temperature. Image processing techniques have also been developed to improve the magnetic field images obtained from the microscope. Artifacts in the data occur due to electromagnetic interference from electric power lines, line drift and flux trapping. The electromagnetic interference could successfully be removed by eliminating the noise peaks from the power spectrum of fast Fourier transforms of line scans of the image. The drift between lines was removed by interpolating the mean field value of each scan line. Artifacts in line scans occurring due to flux trapping or unexpected noise were removed by the detection of a sharp drift and interpolation using the line data of neighboring lines. Highly detailed magnetic field images were obtained from the HTS SQUID probe microscope by the application of these image processing techniques

  16. Neutron relativistic phenomenological and microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qing-biao; Feng Da-chun; Zhuo Yi-zhong

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, both the phenomenological and microscopic neutron relativistic optical potentials are presented. The global neutron relativistic phenomenological optical potential (RPOP) based on the available experimental data for various nuclei ranging from C to U with incident energies E n =20--1000 MeV has been obtained through an automatic search of the best parameters by computer. Then the nucleon relativistic microscopic optical potential (RMOP) is studied by utilizing the effective Lagrangian based on the popular Walecka model. Through comparison between the theoretical results and experimental data we shed some insight into both the RMOP and RPOP. Further improvement concerning how to combine the phenomenological potential with the microscopic one in order to reduce the number of free parameters appearing in the RPOP is suggested

  17. Microscopic saw mark analysis: an empirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jennifer C; Derrick, Sharon M; Wiersema, Jason M; Peters, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic saw mark analysis is a well published and generally accepted qualitative analytical method. However, little research has focused on identifying and mitigating potential sources of error associated with the method. The presented study proposes the use of classification trees and random forest classifiers as an optimal, statistically sound approach to mitigate the potential for error of variability and outcome error in microscopic saw mark analysis. The statistical model was applied to 58 experimental saw marks created with four types of saws. The saw marks were made in fresh human femurs obtained through anatomical gift and were analyzed using a Keyence digital microscope. The statistical approach weighed the variables based on discriminatory value and produced decision trees with an associated outcome error rate of 8.62-17.82%. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Development of an ultrasound microscope combined with optical microscope for multiparametric characterization of a single cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Mototaka; Shikama, Joe; Yoshida, Koki; Nagaoka, Ryo; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-09-01

    Biomechanics of the cell has been gathering much attention because it affects the pathological status in atherosclerosis and cancer. In the present study, an ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope for characterization of a single cell with multiple ultrasound parameters was developed. The central frequency of the transducer was 375 MHz and the scan area was 80 × 80 μm with up to 200 × 200 sampling points. An inverted optical microscope was incorporated in the design of the system, allowing for simultaneous optical observations of cultured cells. Two-dimensional mapping of multiple ultrasound parameters, such as sound speed, attenuation, and acoustic impedance, as well as the thickness, density, and bulk modulus of specimen/cell under investigation, etc., was realized by the system. Sound speed and thickness of a 3T3-L1 fibroblast cell were successfully obtained by the system. The ultrasound microscope system combined with optical microscope further enhances our understanding of cellular biomechanics.

  19. Expectations for neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, M.

    1993-01-01

    Neutrons have been used as microscopic probes to study structural and dynamical properties of various materials. In this paper I shall give a comparative study of the neutron research in the condensed matter physics with other typical microscopic methods such as X-rays, laser optics, magnetic resonances, Moessbauer effect and μSR. It is emphasized that the neutron study will extensively be important in future beyond the condensed matter physics. Chemistry, biology, earth sciences, material engineerings and medical sciences will become new frontiers for neutron study. (author)

  20. An innovative approach in microscopic endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mittal, Shifali

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the dental operating microscope was a turning point in the history of dentistry. It triggered a rapid transition from the conventional world of macro-dentistry to the precise, detailed world of micro-dentistry. However, working at these higher-power magnifications brings the clinician into the realm where even slight hand movements are disruptive. Physiologic hand tremor is a problem resulting in difficulty in mouth mirror placement. Hence, in this paper, a new instrument was designed to overcome the drawback of hand tremors during microscopic endodontics. PMID:24944459

  1. Microscopic tunneling theory of long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Hattel, Søren A.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1992-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate that the detai......We present a numerical scheme for solving a nonlinear partial integro-differential equation with nonlocal time dependence. The equation describes the dynamics in a long Josephson junction modeled by use of the microscopic theory for tunneling between superconductors. We demonstrate...

  2. Scanning microscopic four-point conductivity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Bøggild, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A method for fabricating microscopic four-point probes is presented. The method uses silicon-based microfabrication technology involving only two patterning steps. The last step in the fabrication process is an unmasked deposition of the conducting probe material, and it is thus possible to select...... the conducting material either for a silicon wafer or a single probe unit. Using shadow masking photolithography an electrode spacing (pitch) down to 1.1 mum was obtained, with cantilever separation down to 200 run. Characterisation measurements have shown the microscopic probes to be mechanically very flexible...

  3. Small-size low-temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'tfeder, I.B.; Khajkin, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    A small-size scanning tunnel microscope, designed for operation in transport helium-filled Dewar flasks is described. The microscope design contains a device moving the pin to the tested sample surface and a piezoelectric fine positioning device. High vibration protection of the microscope is provided by its suspension using silk threads. The small-size scanning tunnel microscope provides for atomic resolution

  4. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  5. Microscopic nuclear structure with sub-nucleonic degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, P.U.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews microscopic theories of nuclear structure. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: microscopic nuclear structure with nucleons only; microscopic nuclear structure with nucleons, isobars and mesons; and microscopic nuclear structure with nucleons, mesons and dibaryons. (U.K.)

  6. Inverse Problem Approach for the Alignment of Electron Tomographic Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, V.D.; Moreaud, M.; Thiebaut, E.; Denis, L.; Becker, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the refining industry, morphological measurements of particles have become an essential part in the characterization catalyst supports. Through these parameters, one can infer the specific physico-chemical properties of the studied materials. One of the main acquisition techniques is electron tomography (or nano-tomography). 3D volumes are reconstructed from sets of projections from different angles made by a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). This technique provides a real three-dimensional information at the nano-metric scale. A major issue in this method is the misalignment of the projections that contributes to the reconstruction. The current alignment techniques usually employ fiducial markers such as gold particles for a correct alignment of the images. When the use of markers is not possible, the correlation between adjacent projections is used to align them. However, this method sometimes fails. In this paper, we propose a new method based on the inverse problem approach where a certain criterion is minimized using a variant of the Nelder and Mead simplex algorithm. The proposed approach is composed of two steps. The first step consists of an initial alignment process, which relies on the minimization of a cost function based on robust statistics measuring the similarity of a projection to its previous projections in the series. It reduces strong shifts resulting from the acquisition between successive projections. In the second step, the pre-registered projections are used to initialize an iterative alignment-refinement process which alternates between (i) volume reconstructions and (ii) registrations of measured projections onto simulated projections computed from the volume reconstructed in (i). At the end of this process, we have a correct reconstruction of the volume, the projections being correctly aligned. Our method is tested on simulated data and shown to estimate accurately the translation, rotation and scale of arbitrary transforms. We

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. Microscopic polyangeitis, report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malagon, Patricia; Suarez, Martha Lucia

    1998-01-01

    Polyarteritis or microscopic polyangeitis is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis associated with the lung-kidney syndrome. It presents with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with multisystem involvement. A case is presented of a 50 years old male with its clinical and imaging findings

  9. MACROSCOPICAL AND MICROSCOPICAL STUDIES ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caesalpinia crista leaves are bipinnate of about six pairs with alternate leaflets while the stem us fibrous, cylindrical hollow and prickly. Microscopical examination revealed the presence of strained cuticle, straight-walled epidermal cells, paracytic stomata, unicellular covering trichomes, fibres, prisms as well as cluster of ...

  10. Microscopic Cluster Theory for Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, M; Kuehl, T; Ursescu, D; Fritzsche, S

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the dynamics of complex exotic nuclei it is of crucial importance to develop a practical microscopic theory easy to be applied to a wide range of masses. In this paper we propose to calculate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei within a dynamic model based on the EoM theory

  11. Study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, A.J.; Pancarobo, M.; Denisenko, N.; Aguilar, M.; Rejon, V.; Pena, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics is made. The knowledge of its behaviour allows us to determine accurately the region where the unstable operation could effect the measurements, and also to set the optimal working parameters. Each feedback circuitry compound is discussed as well as their mutual interaction. Different working conditions analysis and results are presented. (Author) 12 refs

  12. Microscopic Description of Le Chatelier's Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    A simple approach that "demystifies" Le Chatelier's principle (LCP) and simulates students to think about fundamental physical background behind the well-known principles is presented. The approach uses microscopic descriptors of matter like energy levels and populations and does not require any assumption about the fixed amount of substance being…

  13. Remote Controlling and Monitoring of Microscopic Slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, G.; Qadri, M.T.; Daraz, U.

    2016-01-01

    Remotely controlled microscopic slide was designed using especial Graphical User Interface (GUI) which interfaces the user at remote location with the real microscope using site and the user can easily view and control the slide present on the microscope's stage. Precise motors have been used to allow the movement in all the three dimensions required by a pathologist. The pathologist can easily access these slides from any remote location and so the physical presence of the pathologist is now made easy. This invention would increase the health care efficiency by reducing the time and cost of diagnosis, making it very easy to get the expert's opinion and supporting the pathologist to relocate himself for his work. The microscope is controlled with computer with an attractive Graphical User Interface (GUI), through which a pathologist can easily monitor, control and record the image of the slide. The pathologist can now do his work regardless of his location, time, cost and physically presence of lab equipment. The technology will help the specialist in viewing the patients slide from any location in the world. He would be able to monitor and control the stage. This will also help the pathological laboratories in getting opinion from senior pathologist who are present at any far location in the world. This system also reduces the life risks of the patients. (author)

  14. The Titan Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Jinschek, Jörg R.

    2009-01-01

    University of Denmark (DTU) provides a unique combination of techniques for studying materials of interest to the catalytic as well as the electronics and other communities [5]. DTU’s ETEM is based on the FEI Titan platform providing ultrahigh microscope stability pushing the imaging resolution into the sub...

  15. Exploring the environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob B.; Cavalca, Filippo; Damsgaard, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    of the opportunities that the environmental TEM (ETEM) offers when combined with other in situ techniques will be explored, directly in the microscope, by combining electron-based and photon-based techniques and phenomena. In addition, application of adjacent setups using sophisticated transfer methods...

  16. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  17. Microscopic approaches to quantum nonequilibriumthermodynamics and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-09

    perspective on quantum thermalization for Science [8]. Wrote a joint experiment- theory paper on studying connections between quantum and classical chaos in...on the random matrix theory (eigenstate thermalization) and macroscopic phenomena (both equilibrium and non-equilibrium). Understanding thermodynamics...information. Specific questions to be addressed: connections of microscopic description of quantum chaotic systems based on the random matrix theory

  18. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, Jose; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges...

  19. Reasoning about Magnetism at the Microscopic Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Cheng, Yufang; Hung, Shuo-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Based on our experience of teaching physics in middle and senior secondary school, we have found that students have difficulty in reasoning at the microscopic level. Their reasoning is limited to the observational level so they have problems in developing scientific models of magnetism. Here, we suggest several practical activities and the use of…

  20. Seamless stitching of tile scan microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse, F B; Chernavskaia, O; Heuke, S; Bocklitz, T; Meyer, T; Popp, J; Heintzmann, R

    2015-06-01

    For diagnostic purposes, optical imaging techniques need to obtain high-resolution images of extended biological specimens in reasonable time. The field of view of an objective lens, however, is often smaller than the sample size. To image the whole sample, laser scanning microscopes acquire tile scans that are stitched into larger mosaics. The appearance of such image mosaics is affected by visible edge artefacts that arise from various optical aberrations which manifest in grey level jumps across tile boundaries. In this contribution, a technique for stitching tiles into a seamless mosaic is presented. The stitching algorithm operates by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at corners to a common value. The corrected image mosaics appear to be free from stitching artefacts and are, therefore, suited for further image analysis procedures. The contribution presents a novel method to seamlessly stitch tiles captured by a laser scanning microscope into a large mosaic. The motivation for the work is the failure of currently existing methods for stitching nonlinear, multimodal images captured by our microscopic setups. Our method eliminates the visible edge artefacts that appear between neighbouring tiles by taking into account the overall illumination differences among tiles in such mosaics. The algorithm first corrects the nonuniform brightness that exists within each of the tiles. It then compensates for grey level differences across tile boundaries by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at the corners to a common value. After these artefacts have been removed further image analysis procedures can be applied on the microscopic images. Even though the solution presented here is tailored for the aforementioned specific case, it could be easily adapted to other contexts where image tiles are assembled into mosaics such as in astronomical or satellite photos. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal

  1. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankur N; Miga, Michael I; Pheiffer, Thomas S; Chambless, Lola B; Thompson, Reid C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient's preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1 Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (∼1 h) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  2. Persistent and automatic intraoperative 3D digitization of surfaces under dynamic magnifications of an operating microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankur N.; Miga, Michael I.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Chambless, Lola B.; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges impeding advancement in image-guided surgical (IGS) systems is the soft-tissue deformation during surgical procedures. These deformations reduce the utility of the patient’s preoperative images and may produce inaccuracies in the application of preoperative surgical plans. Solutions to compensate for the tissue deformations include the acquisition of intraoperative tomographic images of the whole organ for direct displacement measurement and techniques that combines intraoperative organ surface measurements with computational biomechanical models to predict subsurface displacements. The later solution has the advantage of being less expensive and amenable to surgical workflow. Several modalities such as textured laser scanners, conoscopic holography, and stereo-pair cameras have been proposed for the intraoperative 3D estimation of organ surfaces to drive patient-specific biomechanical models for the intraoperative update of preoperative images. Though each modality has its respective advantages and disadvantages, stereo-pair camera approaches used within a standard operating microscope is the focus of this article. A new method that permits the automatic and near real-time estimation of 3D surfaces (at 1Hz) under varying magnifications of the operating microscope is proposed. This method has been evaluated on a CAD phantom object and on full-length neurosurgery video sequences (~1 hour) acquired intraoperatively by the proposed stereovision system. To the best of our knowledge, this type of validation study on full-length brain tumor surgery videos has not been done before. The method for estimating the unknown magnification factor of the operating microscope achieves accuracy within 0.02 of the theoretical value on a CAD phantom and within 0.06 on 4 clinical videos of the entire brain tumor surgery. When compared to a laser range scanner, the proposed method for reconstructing 3D surfaces intraoperatively achieves root mean square

  3. Tomographic apparatus and method for reconstructing planar slices from non-absorbed and non-scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is described which can be used in computerized tomographic systems for constructing a representation of an object and which uses a fan-shaped beam source, detectors and a convolution method of data reconstruction. (U.K.)

  4. Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Annual technical report for program renewal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O.C.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report details the theoretical development, numerical results, experimental design (mechanical), experimental design (electronic), and experimental results for the research program for the development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flow analyzer.

  5. Pipelining Computational Stages of the Tomographic Reconstructor for Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Multi-GPU System

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali; Ltaief, Hatem; Gratadour, Damien; Keyes, David E.; Sevin, Arnaud; Abdelfattah, Ahmad; Gendron, Eric; Morel, Carine; Vidal, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    called MOSAIC has been proposed to perform multi-object spectroscopy using the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) technique. The core implementation of the simulation lies in the intensive computation of a tomographic reconstruct or (TR), which is used

  6. Self-masking noise subtraction (SMNS) in digital X-ray tomosynthesis for the improvement of tomographic image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J.E.; Cho, H.S.; Choi, S.I.; Park, Y.O.; Lee, M.S.; Cho, H.M.; Yang, Y.J.; Je, U.K.; Woo, T.H.; Lee, H.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed a simple and effective reconstruction algorithm, the so-called self-masking noise subtraction (SMNS), in digital X-ray tomosynthesis to reduce the tomographic blur that is inherent in the conventional tomosynthesis based upon the shift-and-add (SAA) method. Using the SAA and the SMNS algorithms, we investigated the influence of tomographic parameters such as tomographic angle (θ) and angle step (Δθ) on the image quality, measuring the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Our simulation results show that the proposed algorithm seems to be efficient in reducing the tomographic blur and, thus, improving image sharpness. We expect the simulation results to be useful for the optimal design of a digital X-ray tomosynthesis system for our ongoing application of nondestructive testing (NDT).

  7. Soil physical and X-ray computed tomographic measurements to investigate small-scale structural differences under strip tillage compared to mulch till and no-till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlitz, Julia; Rücknagel, Jan; Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    . Mechanical precompression stress was significantly higher for STBS (141 kPa) than STWS (38 kPa). In addition, the CT image cross sections and the computed tomographic parameters confirmed the mechanically more stable soil structure observed under STBS with a higher initial average pore size but lower porosity and connectivity values compared to STWS. The reason for this is the lack of tillage. On the other hand, tillage at STWS created a loosened, porous and connective substrate. For all variants, the increasing load application led to progressive homogenization processes of the soil structure. At the same time, as stress application increased in all variants, the increase in dry bulk density led to a decrease in average pore size, porosity, and connectivity, while anisotropy increased. It was possible to confirm that strip tillage combines the advantages of no-till and a deeper conservation primary tillage, since on the one hand MT and STWS and on the other hand STBS and NT showed very similar soil structures. The computed tomographic parameters therefore provide valuable information about the impact of tillage on microscopic pore space attributes that improve our understanding about soil functional behavior at much larger scales.

  8. Designs for a quantum electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruit, P.; Hobbs, R.G.; Kim, C-S.; Yang, Y.; Manfrinato, V.R.; Hammer, J.; Thomas, S.; Weber, P.; Klopfer, B.; Kohstall, C.; Juffmann, T.; Kasevich, M.A.; Hommelhoff, P.; Berggren, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This ‘quantum weirdness’ could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or “quantum electron microscope”. A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. - Highlights: • Quantum electron microscopy has the potential of reducing radiation damage. • QEM requires a fraction of the electron wave to pass through the sample

  9. Designs for a quantum electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruit, P., E-mail: p.kruit@tudelft.nl [Department of Imaging Physics, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands); Hobbs, R.G.; Kim, C-S.; Yang, Y.; Manfrinato, V.R. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hammer, J.; Thomas, S.; Weber, P. [Department of Physics, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstrasse 1, d-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Klopfer, B.; Kohstall, C.; Juffmann, T.; Kasevich, M.A. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hommelhoff, P. [Department of Physics, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstrasse 1, d-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Berggren, K.K. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This ‘quantum weirdness’ could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or “quantum electron microscope”. A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. - Highlights: • Quantum electron microscopy has the potential of reducing radiation damage. • QEM requires a fraction of the electron wave to pass through the sample

  10. Single-Shot, Volumetrically Illuminated, Three-Dimensional, Tomographic Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Imaging in a Gaseous Free Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three- dimensional, tomographic laser-induced- fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet Benjamin R. Halls...acquisition; (110.6955) Tomographic imaging ; (110.6960) Tomography; (280.2490) Flow diagnostics; (300.2530) Fluorescence , laser-induced...84 (1983). 2. I. van Cruyningen, A. Lozano, and R. K. Hanson, “Quantitative imaging of concentration by planar laser-induced fluorescence ,” Exp

  11. Tomographic capabilities of the new GEM based SXR diagnostic of WEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, A.; Mazon, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Mlynar, J.; Loffelmann, V.; Imrisek, M.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Wojenski, A.; Bourdelle, C.; Malard, P.

    2016-07-01

    The tokamak WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady-State Tokamak) will start operating by the end of 2016 as a test bed for the ITER divertor components in long pulse operation. In this context, radiative cooling of heavy impurities like tungsten (W) in the Soft X-ray (SXR) range [0.1 keV; 20 keV] is a critical issue for the plasma core performances. Thus reliable tools are required to monitor the local impurity density and avoid W accumulation. The WEST SXR diagnostic will be equipped with two new GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based poloidal cameras allowing to perform 2D tomographic reconstructions in tunable energy bands. In this paper tomographic capabilities of the Minimum Fisher Information (MFI) algorithm developed for Tore Supra and upgraded for WEST are investigated, in particular through a set of emissivity phantoms and the standard WEST scenario including reconstruction errors, influence of noise as well as computational time.

  12. Tomographic reconstruction of transverse phase space from turn-by-turn profile data

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, S; Lindroos, M

    1999-01-01

    Tomographic methods have the potential for useful application in beam diagnostics. The tomographic reconstruction of transverse phase space density from turn-by-turn profile data has been studied with particular attention to the effects of dispersion and chromaticity. It is shown that the modified Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) that deals successfully with the problem of non-linear motion in the longitudinal plane cannot, in general, be extended to cover the transverse case. Instead, an approach is proposed in which the effect of dispersion is deconvoluted from the measured profiles before the phase space picture is reconstructed using either the modified ART algorithm or the inverse Radon Transform. This requires an accurate knowledge of the momentum distribution of the beam and the modified ART reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density yields just such information. The method has been tested extensively with simulated data.

  13. Tomographic Image Reconstruction Using Training Images with Matrix and Tensor Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    the image resolution compared to a classical reconstruction method such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP). Some priors for the tomographic reconstruction take the form of cross-section images of similar objects, providing a set of the so-called training images, that hold the key to the structural......Reducing X-ray exposure while maintaining the image quality is a major challenge in computed tomography (CT); since the imperfect data produced from the few view and/or low intensity projections results in low-quality images that are suffering from severe artifacts when using conventional...... information about the solution. The training images must be reliable and application-specific. This PhD project aims at providing a mathematical and computational framework for the use of training sets as non-parametric priors for the solution in tomographic image reconstruction. Through an unsupervised...

  14. Investigation of the noise effect on tomographic reconstructions for a tangentially viewing vacuum ultraviolet imaging diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Tingfeng; Ohdachi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction for a tangentially viewing two-dimensional (2D) imaging system is studied. A method to calculate the geometry matrix in 2D tomography is introduced. An algorithm based on a Phillips-Tikhonov (P-T) type regularization method is investigated, and numerical tests using the P-T method are conducted with both tokamak and Heliotron configurations. The numerical tests show that the P-T method is not sensitive to the added noise levels and the emission profiles with higher mode numbers can be reconstructed with adequate resolution. The results indicate that this method is suitable for 2D tomographic reconstruction for a tangentially viewing vacuum ultraviolet telescope system. (author)

  15. Application of THz probe radiation in low-coherent tomographs based on spatially separated counterpropagating beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuritsyn, I I; Shkurinov, A P; Nazarov, M M [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Mandrosov, V I [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-31

    A principle of designing a high-resolution low-coherent THz tomograph, which makes it possible to investigate media with a high spatial resolution (in the range λ{sub 0} – 2λ{sub 0}, where λ{sub 0} is the average probe wavelength) is considered. The operation principle of this tomograph implies probing a medium by radiation with a coherence length of 8λ{sub 0} and recording a hologram of a focused image of a fixed layer of this medium using spatially separated counterpropagating object and reference beams. Tomograms of the medium studied are calculated using a temporal approach based on application of the time correlation function of probe radiation. (terahertz radiation)

  16. Suprathermal electron studies in the TCV tokamak: Design of a tomographic hard-x-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnesin, S.; Coda, S.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating and electron cyclotron current drive, disruptive events, and sawtooth activity are all known to produce suprathermal electrons in fusion devices, motivating increasingly detailed studies of the generation and dynamics of this suprathermal population. Measurements have been performed in the past years in the tokamak a configuration variable (TCV) tokamak using a single pinhole hard-x-ray (HXR) camera and electron-cyclotron-emission radiometers, leading, in particular, to the identification of the crucial role of spatial transport in the physics of ECCD. The observation of a poloidal asymmetry in the emitted suprathermal bremsstrahlung radiation motivates the design of a proposed new tomographic HXR spectrometer reported in this paper. The design, which is based on a compact modified Soller collimator concept, is being aided by simulations of tomographic reconstruction. Quantitative criteria have been developed to optimize the design for the greatly variable shapes and positions of TCV plasmas.

  17. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chieh Cheng

    Full Text Available A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  18. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2014-01-01

    A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  19. Use of knowledge-sharing web-based portal in gross and microscopic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosaro, Olayemi; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-12-01

    Changes in worldwide healthcare delivery require review of current medical school curricula structure to develop learning outcomes that ensures mastery of knowledge and clinical competency. In the last 3 years, Mayo Medical School implemented outcomes-based curriculum to encompass new graduate outcomes. Standard courses were replaced by 6-week clinically-integrated didactic blocks separated by student-self selected academic enrichment activities. Gross and microscopic anatomy was integrated with radiology and genetics respectively. Laboratory components include virtual microscopy and anatomical dissection. Students assigned to teams utilise computer portals to share learning experiences. High-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scans of cadavers prior to dissection were made available for correlative learning between the cadaveric material and radiologic images. Students work in teams on assigned presentations that include histology, cell and molecular biology, genetics and genomic using the Nexus Portal, based on DrupalEd, to share their observations, reflections and dissection findings. New generation of medical students are clearly comfortable utilising web-based programmes that maximise their learning potential of conceptually difficult and labor intensive courses. Team-based learning approach emphasising the use of knowledge-sharing computer portals maximises opportunities for students to master their knowledge and improve cognitive skills to ensure clinical competency.

  20. Virtual reality microscope versus conventional microscope regarding time to diagnosis: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Rebecca; Ruddle, Roy A; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Thomas, Rhys G; Quirke, Phil; Treanor, Darren

    2013-01-01

      To create and evaluate a virtual reality (VR) microscope that is as efficient as the conventional microscope, seeking to support the introduction of digital slides into routine practice.   A VR microscope was designed and implemented by combining ultra-high-resolution displays with VR technology, techniques for fast interaction, and high usability. It was evaluated using a mixed factorial experimental design with technology and task as within-participant variables and grade of histopathologist as a between-participant variable. Time to diagnosis was similar for the conventional and VR microscopes. However, there was a significant difference in the mean magnification used between the two technologies, with participants working at a higher level of magnification on the VR microscope.   The results suggest that, with the right technology, efficient use of digital pathology for routine practice is a realistic possibility. Further work is required to explore what magnification is required on the VR microscope for histopathologists to identify diagnostic features, and the effect on this of the digital slide production process. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.