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Sample records for lens nucleus proteins

  1. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  2. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  3. A Class I UV-Blocking (senofilcon A) Soft Contact Lens Prevents UVA-induced Yellow Fluorescence and NADH loss in the Rabbit Lens Nucleus in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Frank J.; Lin, Li-Ren; Simpanya, Mukoma F.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Fick, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    -crystallin after the in vivo UVA exposure. It is concluded that UVA-induced loss of free NADH (which fluoresces blue) may have allowed the natural yellow fluorescence of λ-crystallin and other proteins in the lens nucleus to become visible. Increased fluorescence exhibited by UVA-exposed λ-crystallin may have been the result of a UVA-induced change in the conformation of the protein occurring during the initial UVA-exposure in vivo. The results demonstrate the greater susceptibility of the lens nucleus to UVA-induced stress, and may relate to the formation of human nuclear cataract. The senofilcon A contact lens was shown to be beneficial in protecting the rabbit lens against effects of UVA light, including changes in fluorescence, increased yellowing and loss of pyridine nucleotides. PMID:22766154

  4. Properties of Fiber Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from the Cortex and Nucleus of the Porcine Eye Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    The organization and physical properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the eyes lenses of two-year-old pigs were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, and the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) were assessed from the EPR spectra of precisely positioned spin labels. Intact cortical and nuclear membranes, which include membrane proteins, were found to contain three distinct lipid environments. These lipid environments were termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain (lipids in protein aggregates). The amount of boundary and trapped lipids was greater in intact nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The properties of intact membranes were compared with the organization and properties of lens lipid membranes made of the total lipid extracts from the lens cortex or nucleus. In cortical lens lipid membranes, only one homogenous environment was detected, which was designated as a bulk lipid domain (phospholipid bilayer saturated with cholesterol). Lens lipid membranes prepared from the lens nucleus possessed two domains, assigned as a bulk lipid domain and a cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). In intact nuclear membranes, it was difficult to discriminate the CBD, which was clearly detected in nuclear lens lipid membranes because the OTP measured in the CBD is the same as in the domain formed by trapped lipids. The two domains unique to intact membranes—namely, the domain formed by boundary lipids and the domain formed by trapped lipids—were most likely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins. It is concluded that formation of rigid and practically impermeable domains is enhanced in the lens nucleus, indicating changes in membrane composition that may help to maintain low oxygen concentration in this lens region. PMID:22326289

  5. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about......In their natural environment, cells are regularly exposed to various stress conditions that may lead to protein misfolding, but also in the absence of stress, misfolded proteins occur as the result of mutations or failures during protein synthesis. Since such partially denatured proteins are prone...... to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...

  6. A Class I UV-blocking (senofilcon A) soft contact lens prevents UVA-induced yellow fluorescence and NADH loss in the rabbit lens nucleus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Frank J; Lin, Li-Ren; Simpanya, Mukoma F; Leverenz, Victor R; Fick, Catherine E

    2012-09-01

    -crystallin after the in vivo UVA exposure. It is concluded that UVA-induced loss of free NADH (which fluoresces blue) may have allowed the natural yellow fluorescence of λ-crystallin and other proteins in the lens nucleus to become visible. Increased fluorescence exhibited by UVA-exposed λ-crystallin may have been the result of a UVA-induced change in the conformation of the protein occurring during the initial UVA-exposure in vivo. The results demonstrate the greater susceptibility of the lens nucleus to UVA-induced stress, and may relate to the formation of human nuclear cataract. The senofilcon A contact lens was shown to be beneficial in protecting the rabbit lens against effects of UVA light, including changes in fluorescence, increased yellowing and loss of pyridine nucleotides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pars plana vitrectomy with posterior iris claw implantation for posteriorly dislocated nucleus and intraocular lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor B Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the safety and efficacy of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV with primary posterior iris claw intraocular lens (IOL implantation in cases of posterior dislocation of nucleus and IOL without capsular support. This was a retrospective interventional case series. Fifteen eyes underwent PPV with primary posterior iris claw IOL implantation performed by a single vitreoretinal surgeon. The main outcome measures were changes in best corrected visual acuity and anterior and posterior segment complications. A total of 15 eyes were included in this study. Eight had nucleus drop, three had IOL drop during cataract surgery and four had traumatic posterior dislocation of lens. The final postoperative best corrected visual acuity was 20/60 or better in 11 patients. This procedure is a viable option in achieving good functional visual acuity in eyes without capsular support.

  8. Immunochemical analyses of soluble lens proteins in some marine fishes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens proteins of 10 fishes, belonging to the families Clupeidae, Hemirhamphidae, Lactaridae, Scombridae, Stromatidae, Psettodidae, Bothidae and Soleidae were studied by immunoelectrophoresis using the lens antiserum of Sardinella...

  9. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The incorporation of 2-[14C]glycine into porcine lens protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.B.; Kauffman, R.G.; DeVenecia, G.

    1977-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to estimate the apparent turnover rate of lens soluble protein, the incorporation rate of 2-[ 14 C]glycine into various soluble protein components and the effect of nutritional stress on the disappearance of radioactivity with time. Evidence is presented that there are two fractions of soluble lens protein with different turnover rates: one is a fast turnover fraction with a half-life of 20.8 hr and the other is a metabolically inert fraction with an infinitely long half-life. It is postulated that the fast turnover fraction is present in the newly-formed younger fibers in the periphery, whereas the inert fraction is in the old lens fibers of the cortex and nucleus. Sephadex G-200 column chromatography was used to separate the soluble lens protein into four components: A, B, C and D in the order of elution. The changes in specific activities of the four components with the time course after injection were followed. Prolonged starvation did not affect the disappearance of carbon incorporated into lens protein with the time course after injection, suggesting normal synthesis and degradation of lens protein without regard to dietary stress. (author)

  11. Double-magnetic-lens beta spectrometer for measurements of nucleus excited state lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikov, B.A.; Lizurej, G.I.; Muminov, T.M.; Ormandzhiev, S.I.; Salikhbaev, U.S.; Usmanov, R.R.; Kholbaev, I.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a design of an installation made on the basis of a double magnetic-lens beta spectrometer intended for measurement of lifetimes of nucleus excited states by the method of e-e-delayed coincidences. A system of the Hubert conic diaphragms is used in the spectrometer, and plastic scintillation detectors and photomultipliers are used as a registering system. The experimental arrangement is considered, and the main parameters of a stabilized current rectifier, developed for the supply of the spectrometer windings are given. Also presented is the lay-out of the time spectrometer of e-e-delayed coincidences which uses units of fast spectra metric electronics and the system of amplification stabilization. Besides, analytically studied were focusing characteristics of the magnetic-lens spectrometer for the case when the magnetic field shape may be considered triangular. Using the above installation obtained was the time spectrum of delayed coincidences between conversion electrons of K241 and K104 keV in a 136 E/ r nucleus, and determined was the half-life of 104 keV state (Tsub(1/2)=0.53+-0.02 ns) which is in a good agreement with the known value of Tsub(1/2)=0.52+-0.02 ns

  12. Isofocusing and immunological investigations on cephalopod lens proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; Lancieri, M.

    1979-01-01

    Soluble lens proteins from Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis, and Loligo vulgaris were analyzed by thin-layer isoelectric focusing and compared by various immunochemical methods using antibodies directed against total soluble lens protein antigens from the said three species. The results show

  13. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Lynnerup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area, there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon dating is made possible by comparing the (14C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even on a yearly basis this allows very accurate dating. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results allow us to conclude that the crystalline formation in the lens nucleus almost entirely takes place around the time of birth, with a very small, and decreasing, continuous formation throughout life. The close relationship may be further expressed as a mathematical model, which takes into account the timing of the crystalline formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Such a life-long permanence of human tissue has hitherto only been described for dental enamel. In confront to dental enamel it must be held in mind that the eye lens is a soft structure, subjected to almost continuous deformation, due to lens accommodation, yet its most important constituent, the lens crystalline, is never subject to turnover or remodelling once formed. The determination of the (14C content of various tissues may be used to assess turnover rates and degree of substitution (for example for brain cell DNA. Potential targets may be nervous tissues in terms of senile or pre

  14. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2015), s. 1627-1640 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-28443S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cell nucleus * chromatin * genome function Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  15. Determination of dideoxyosone precursors of AGEs in human lens proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Kaid Johar, S R; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2011-10-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl)benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by Western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 vs. 31.7±19.5AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lentil (Lens culinaris) Lipid Transfer Protein Len c 3: A Novel Legume Allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, J.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Santos Magadán, S.; Knulst, A.; Fernandez-Rivas, M.; Asero, R.; van Ree, R.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lentils are increasingly consumed in many parts of the world. Two allergens, Len c 1 and 2, have been reported previously. Recently, peanut and green bean lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been identified as the first two members of an important group of allergens that might be

  17. The contact lens environment: tear proteins in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, L G; Hill, R M

    1985-03-01

    Tear protein deposition on contact lenses can lead to interruption or even cessation of lens wear. Yet, there are positive roles that tear proteins play in the maintenance of ocular integrity, with and without contact lenses present. One of these roles, that of tear buffering, is explored here.

  18. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in in...

  19. The preferentially magnified active nucleus in IRAS F10214+4724 - I. Lens model and spatially resolved radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, R. P.; Rawlings, S.; Marshall, P. J.; Heywood, I.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Grainge, K.; Mauch, T.; Serjeant, S.

    2013-03-01

    This is the first paper in a series that presents a multiwavelength analysis of the archetype ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS F10214+4724, a gravitationally lensed, starburst/active galactic nucleus at z = 2.3. Here we present a new lens model and spatially resolved radio data, as well as a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) F160W map. The lens modelling employs a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm with extended source, forward ray tracing. Using these high-resolution HST, Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and Very Large Array (VLA) maps, the algorithm allows us to constrain the level of distortion to the continuum spectral energy distribution resulting from emission components with differing magnification factors, due to their size and proximity to the caustic. Our lens model finds that the narrow-line region, and by proxy the active nucleus, is preferentially magnified. This supports previous claims that preferential magnification could mask the expected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon spectral features in the Spitzer mid-infrared spectrum which roughly trace the star-forming regions. Furthermore, we show that the arc-to-counter-image flux ratio is not a good estimate of the magnification in this system, despite its common use in the IRAS F10214+4724 literature. Our lens modelling suggests magnifications of μ ˜ 15-20 ± 2 for the HST F814W, MERLIN 1.7 GHz and VLA 8 GHz maps, significantly lower than the canonical values of μ = 50-100 often used for this system. Systematic errors such as the dark matter density slope and colocation of stellar and dark matter centroids dominate the uncertainties in the lens model at the 40 per cent level.

  20. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of TCA/acetone protein extraction in the cataract lens protein extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Dong Chu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the effectiveness of different protein extraction method in the cataract lens protein extract, and look for the best protein extraction method suitable for cataract proteomics research. METHODS: Cataract lens samples were dissolved in lysis buffer and sonication; the samples were extracted by TCA/acetone and protein extraction kit after centrifugation. Lens proteins of the samples were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis(2-DE, gel electrophoresis and staining, image acquisition and image analysis. RESULTS: According to the results obtained from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel image, the molecular weight of protein points were localized at 14-97.4kDa, PI5-9. The molecular weight of high abundance crystallins were localized at 20-31kDa, the molecular weight of lower abundance crystallins were localized at 35-45kDa. The 2-DE image background of cataract lens sample with hyaluronic acid extracted by TCA /acetone was clear, no obvious vertical bands, point of proteins were more clear, and 35 to 40 protein points were detected. CONCLUSION: TCA/acetone extraction method has better purification compared to other methods in human cataract lens proteomics, and provides the reliable two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel Image for human cataract lens proteomics mass spectrometry analysis.

  2. Differences in α-Crystallin isomerization reveal the activity of protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) in the nucleus and cortex of human lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Yana A; Sabbah, Georgette M; Julian, Ryan R

    2018-03-20

    Although it is well-known that protein turnover essentially stops in mature lens fiber cells, mapping out the ensuing protein degradation and its effects on lens function over time remains challenging. In particular, isomerization is a common, spontaneous post-translational modification that occurs over long timescales and generates products invisible to most analytical methods. Nevertheless, isomerization can significantly impact protein structure, function, and solubility, which are all necessary to maintain clarity and proper refractive index within the lens. Herein, we examine the degree of isomerization occurring in crystallin proteins in the human eye lens as a function of both age and location within the lens. A novel mass spectrometric technique leveraging radical chemistry enables detailed characterization of proteins extracted from the cortex and nucleus of the lens. It is observed that the degree of isomerization increases significantly between the cortex and nucleus and between water-soluble and water-insoluble fractions. Interestingly, the abundance of L-isoAsp is low in the water-soluble cortex despite being the dominant product generated by isomerization of Asp in vitro, suggesting that Protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) is active in the cortex and suppresses the accumulation of L-isoAsp. The abundance of L-isoAsp increases dramatically in the nucleus, revealing that PIMT activity decreases over time in the center of the lens. In addition, the growth of L-isoAsp in the nuclear fraction suggests protein isomerization continues within the nucleus, despite the fact that most of the protein within the nucleus has become insoluble. Additionally, it is demonstrated that sequential Asp residues lead to isomerization hotspots in human crystallin proteins and that the isomerization profiles for αA and αB crystallin are notably different. Although αA is more prone to isomerization, αB loses solubility more rapidly upon modification. These

  3. A nucleus-based quality control mechanism for cytosolic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rupali; Kawaguchi, Shinichi; Ng, Davis T W

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular quality control systems monitor protein conformational states. Irreversibly misfolded proteins are cleared through specialized degradation pathways. Their importance is underscored by numerous pathologies caused by aberrant proteins. In the cytosol, where most proteins are synthesized, quality control remains poorly understood. Stress-inducible chaperones and the 26S proteasome are known mediators but how their activities are linked is unclear. To better understand these mechanisms, a panel of model misfolded substrates was analyzed in detail. Surprisingly, their degradation occurs not in the cytosol but in the nucleus. Degradation is dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase San1p, known previously to direct the turnover of damaged nuclear proteins. A second E3 enzyme, Ubr1p, augments this activity but is insufficient by itself. San1p and Ubr1p are not required for nuclear import of substrates. Instead, the Hsp70 chaperone system is needed for efficient import and degradation. These data reveal a new function of the nucleus as a compartment central to the quality control of cytosolic proteins.

  4. Relief memory consolidation requires protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Johann E A; Breitfeld, Tino; Kahl, Evelyn; Bergado-Acosta, Jorge R; Fendt, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Relief learning refers to the association of a stimulus with the relief from an aversive event. The thus-learned relief stimulus then can induce, e.g., an attenuation of the startle response or approach behavior, indicating positive valence. Previous studies revealed that the nucleus accumbens is essential for the acquisition and retrieval of relief memory. Here, we ask whether the nucleus accumbens is also the brain site for consolidation of relief memory into a long-term form. In rats, we blocked local protein synthesis within the nucleus accumbens by local infusions of anisomycin at different time points during a relief conditioning experiment. Accumbal anisomycin injections immediately after the relief conditioning session, but not 4 h later, prevented the consolidation into long-term relief memory. The retention of already consolidated relief memory was not affected by anisomycin injections. This identifies a time window and site for relief memory consolidation. These findings should complement our understanding of the full range of effects of adverse experiences, including cases of their distortion in humans such as post-traumatic stress disorder and/or phobias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nucleus-to-nucleus gene transfer and protein retargeting into a remnant cytoplasm of cryptophytes and diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Sven B; Sommer, Maik S; Kroth, Peter G; Gile, Gillian H; Keeling, Patrick J; Maier, Uwe-G

    2006-12-01

    The complex plastid of the cryptophyte Guillardia theta and of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum can both be traced back to an engulfed eukaryotic red alga. The eukaryotic origin of these plastids is most obvious in cryptophytes, where the organelle still possesses a remnant nucleus, the nucleomorph. The nucleomorph itself is embedded in the periplastid compartment (PPC), the remnant of the former red algal cytosol. In the cryptophyte and diatom, the complex plastid is surrounded by 4 membranes, the outer one being continuous with the host rough endoplasmatic reticulum. In a recent report, we have shown that a nuclear encoded PPC protein of G. theta expressed in P. tricornutum leads to a localization, recently described as being a "bloblike structure," which can be obtained by mutation of plastid protein-targeting sequences of the diatom itself. Here we present further nucleus-encoded PPC proteins from G. theta, such as the eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1alpha, evidence for their nucleus-to-nucleus gene transfer, and retargeting of the proteins. We also investigated the first nuclear encoded PPC-targeted protein of P. tricornutum (Hsp70) and analyzed it for in vivo localization together with the identified G. theta PPC proteins. This revealed that all localize to the bloblike structures, which we suggest is the highly reduced PPC of P. tricornutum. Furthermore, the described cryptophyte PPC proteins possibly allow the elucidation of the processes by which proteins are involved in different levels of host control over its eukaryotic organelle.

  6. Evolution of a protein superfamily: relationships between vertebrate lens crystallins and microorganism dormancy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistow, G

    1990-02-01

    A search of sequence databases shows that spherulin 3a, an encystment-specific protein of Physarum polycephalum, is probably structurally related to the beta- and gamma-crystallins, vertebrate ocular lens proteins, and to Protein S, a sporulation-specific protein of Myxococcus xanthus. The beta- and gamma-crystallins have two similar domains thought to have arisen by two successive gene duplication and fusion events. Molecular modeling confirms that spherulin 3a has all the characteristics required to adopt the tertiary structure of a single gamma-crystallin domain. The structure of spherulin 3a thus illustrates an earlier stage in the evolution of this protein superfamily. The relationship of beta- and gamma-crystallins to spherulin 3a and Protein S suggests that the lens proteins were derived from an ancestor with a role in stress-response, perhaps a response to osmotic stress.

  7. ELAV proteins along evolution: back to the nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombrita, Claudia; Silani, Vincenzo; Ratti, Antonia

    2013-09-01

    The complex interplay of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBP) at different steps of RNA metabolism is pivotal for the development of the nervous system and the maintenance of adult brain activities. In this review, we will focus on the highly conserved ELAV gene family encoding for neuronal-specific RBPs which are necessary for proper neuronal differentiation and important for synaptic plasticity process. In the evolution from Drosophila to man, ELAV proteins seem to have changed their biological functions in relation to their different subcellular localization. While in Drosophila, they are localized in the nuclear compartment of neuronal cells and regulate splicing and polyadenylation, in mammals, the neuronal ELAV proteins are mainly present in the cytoplasm where they participate in regulating mRNA target stability, translation and transport into neurites. However, recent data indicate that the mammalian ELAV RBPs also have nuclear activities, similarly to their fly counterpart, being them able to continuously shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Here, we will review and comment on all the biological functions associated with neuronal ELAV proteins along evolution and will show that the post-transcriptional regulatory network mediated by these RBPs in the brain is highly complex and only at an initial stage of being fully understood. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'RNA and splicing regulation in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Polymorphisms in sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter genes and plasma, aqueous humor and lens nucleus ascorbate concentrations in an ascorbate depleted setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumari, Srinivasan; Talwar, Badri; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu; Ravindran, Ravilla D; Jayanthi, Ramamurthy; Sundaresan, Periasamy; Saravanan, Charu; Young, Ian S; Dangour, Alan D; Fletcher, Astrid E

    2014-07-01

    We have previously reported low concentrations of plasma ascorbate and low dietary vitamin C intake in the older Indian population and a strong inverse association of these with cataract. Little is known about ascorbate levels in aqueous humor and lens in populations habitually depleted of ascorbate and no studies in any setting have investigated whether genetic polymorphisms influence ascorbate levels in ocular tissues. Our objectives were to investigate relationships between ascorbate concentrations in plasma, aqueous humor and lens and whether these relationships are influenced by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter genes (SLC23A1 and SLC23A2). We enrolled sixty patients (equal numbers of men and women, mean age 63 years) undergoing small incision cataract surgery in southern India. We measured ascorbate concentrations in plasma, aqueous humor and lens nucleus using high performance liquid chromatography. SLC23A1 SNPs (rs4257763, rs6596473) and SLC23A2 SNPs (rs1279683 and rs12479919) were genotyped using a TaqMan assay. Patients were interviewed for lifestyle factors which might influence ascorbate. Plasma vitamin C was normalized by a log10 transformation. Statistical analysis used linear regression with the slope of the within-subject associations estimated using beta (β) coefficients. The ascorbate concentrations (μmol/L) were: plasma ascorbate, median and inter-quartile range (IQR), 15.2 (7.8, 34.5), mean (SD) of aqueous humor ascorbate, 1074 (545) and lens nucleus ascorbate, 0.42 (0.16) (μmol/g lens nucleus wet weight). Minimum allele frequencies were: rs1279683 (0.28), rs12479919 (0.30), rs659647 (0.48). Decreasing concentrations of ocular ascorbate from the common to the rare genotype were observed for rs6596473 and rs12479919. The per allele difference in aqueous humor ascorbate for rs6596473 was -217 μmol/L, p humor ascorbate were higher for the GG genotype of rs6596473: GG, β = 1460 compared to

  9. Presbyopia and heat: changes associated with aging of the human lens suggest a functional role for the small heat shock protein, alpha-crystallin, in maintaining lens flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, Karl R; Friedrich, Michael G; Truscott, Roger J W

    2007-12-01

    Presbyopia, the inability to focus up close, affects everyone by age 50 and is the most common eye condition. It is thought to result from changes to the lens over time making it less flexible. We present evidence that presbyopia may be the result of age-related changes to the proteins of the lens fibre cells. Specifically, we show that there is a progressive decrease in the concentration of the chaperone, alpha-crystallin, in human lens nuclei with age, as it becomes incorporated into high molecular weight aggregates and insoluble protein. This is accompanied by a large increase in lens stiffness. Stiffness increases even more dramatically after middle age following the disappearance of free soluble alpha-crystallin from the centre of the lens. These alterations in alpha-crystallin and aggregated protein in human lenses can be reproduced simply by exposing intact pig lenses to elevated temperatures, for example, 50 degrees C. In this model system, the same protein changes are also associated with a progressive increase in lens stiffness. These data suggest a functional role for alpha-crystallin in the human lens acting as a small heat shock protein and helping to maintain lens flexibility. Presbyopia may be the result of a loss of alpha-crystallin coupled with progressive heat-induced denaturation of structural proteins in the lens during the first five decades of life.

  10. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Integral Membrane Proteins from Ocular Lens and Retinal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Angus C.; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A tissue preparation protocol for MALDI (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization) imaging mass spectrometry of an integral membrane protein was developed using ocular lens and retina tissues as model samples. Frozen bovine and human lenses were cryosectioned equatorially or axially at −20 °C into 20 μm-thick tissue sections. Lens sections were mounted onto gold-coated MALDI targets by methanol soft-landing to maintain tissue integrity. Tissue sections underwent extensive water washing to deplete the samples of highly abundant water-soluble proteins. Automated matrix deposition was achieved using an acoustic reagent multispotter, with sinapinic acid as matrix and high percentage acetonitrile as solvent, with a center-to-center spot spacing of 200–300 μm. Molecular images of full-length Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and its most abundant truncation products were obtained from mass spectral data acquired across whole bovine and human lens sections. In equatorial and axial sections of bovine lenses, full-length AQP0 was detected throughout the lens. A truncation product corresponding to AQP0 (1–260) was detected in the bovine lens core at low abundance. In axial lens sections, no antero-posterior variation was detected. In 11 year-old human lens sections, full-length AQP0 was most abundant in the lens periphery, but was detected throughout the lens. The major truncation product, consisting of AQP0 residues 1–246, was absent from the lens periphery and increased in abundance in the lens core. This tissue preparation protocol was then applied to image the distribution of the G-protein coupled receptor, opsin, in the rabbit retina. This protocol has expanded the variety of target analytes which can be detected by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to include integral membrane proteins. PMID:19326924

  11. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  12. Inter-specific and intraspecific eye lens protein differences in some sciaenid fishes from Goa coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of sciaenid fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Four distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  13. Soluble lens protein polymorphism in flying fishes from the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of flying-fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Three distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  14. An electrophoretic study of the soluble lens proteins from the Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuv)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta were studied by cellogel electrophoresis, to see whether there are any intra species variations. A distinct pattern characterised by the number of bands, mobility...

  15. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  16. Vitreous Humor Changes Expression of Iron-Handling Proteins in Lens Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goralska, Malgorzata; Fleisher, Lloyd N.; McGahan, M. Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In humans, vitrectomy is associated with development of nuclear cataracts. Iron catalyzes free radical formation causing oxidative damage, which is implicated in cataract formation. This study was designed to determine if vitreous humor, which can initiate differentiation of lens epithelial cells, would have an effect on iron-handling proteins. Methods Cultured canine lens epithelial cells were treated with collected canine vitreous humor. Lysates of treated and control cells were separated by SDS-PAGE. Ferritin H- and L-chains, transferrin receptor 1, and aquaporin 0 were immunodetected and quantitated with specific antibodies. Morphologic changes in treated cells were assessed. Results Treatment of lens epithelial cells with a 33% (vol/vol) solution of vitreous humor changed the morphology of lens cells and induced expression of aquaporin 0, a marker of fiber cell differentiation that was undetectable in control cells. Treatment did not modify the size of iron-handling proteins but significantly increased content of ferritin from 2.9- to 8.8-fold over control and decreased levels of transferrin receptor by 37% to 59%. Conclusions Vitreous humor may significantly limit iron uptake by transferrin/transferrin receptor pathway, and by increasing ferritin levels could profoundly increase the iron-storage capacity of ferritin in lens cells. Vitreous humor may play a significant protective role against iron-catalyzed oxidative damage of lens epithelial cells and therefore in the formation of cataracts. PMID:28245299

  17. Bradycardic effects mediated by activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor in rat nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Oprea, Tudor I; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2013-03-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has been identified in several brain regions, including cholinergic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus, which are critical for parasympathetic cardiac regulation. Using calcium imaging and electrophysiological techniques, microinjection into the nucleus ambiguus and blood pressure measurement, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of GPER activation in nucleus ambiguus neurons. A GPER selective agonist, G-1, produced a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in a concentration-dependent manner in retrogradely labelled cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus. The increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) produced by G-1 was abolished by pretreatment with G36, a GPER antagonist. G-1 depolarized cultured cardiac vagal neurons of the nucleus ambiguus. The excitatory effect of G-1 was also identified by whole-cell visual patch-clamp recordings in nucleus ambiguus neurons, in medullary slices. To validate the physiological relevance of our in vitro studies, we carried out in vivo experiments. Microinjection of G-1 into the nucleus ambiguus elicited a decrease in heart rate; the effect was blocked by prior microinjection of G36. Systemic injection of G-1, in addition to a previously reported decrease in blood pressure, also reduced the heart rate. The G-1-induced bradycardia was prevented by systemic injection of atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, or by bilateral microinjection of G36 into the nucleus ambiguus. Our results indicate that GPER-mediated bradycardia occurs via activation of cardiac parasympathetic neurons of the nucleus ambiguus and support the involvement of the GPER in the modulation of cardiac vagal tone.

  18. Effect of gamma irradiation on in vitro bovine lens proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, D.M.L.; Mastro, N.L. del.

    1988-07-01

    The radiosensitivity of the ocular lens manifested by cataract formation has been of considerable interest in the study on the biological efects of radiations. Cataract can ben produced by different causes and also for the normal process of ageing. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro system similar to in vivo cataract formation. It was used an aqueous solution of bovine lenses. The lenses after surgical removal mechanical and ultrasonic disrupted. The suspension was centrifuged and the supernatant was dialyzed and irradiated with different doses of 60 Co radiation. The opacification extent was measured in an spectrophotometer. (author) [pt

  19. Communication Between the Cell Membrane and the Nucleus: Role of Protein Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelievre, Sophie A; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-10-21

    Understanding how the information is conveyed from outside to inside the cell is a critical challenge for all biologists involved in signal transduction. The flow of information initiated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is mediated by the formation of adhesion complexes involving multiple proteins. Inside adhesion complexes, connective membrane skeleton (CMS) proteins are signal transducers that bind to adhesion molecules, organize the cytoskeleton, and initiate biochemical cascades. Adhesion complex-mediated signal transduction ultimately directs the formation of supramolecular structures in the cell nucleus, as illustrated by the establishment of multi complexes of DNA-bound transcription factors, and the redistribution of nuclear structural proteins to form nuclear subdomains. Recently, several CMS proteins have been observed to travel to the cell nucleus, suggesting a distinctive role for these proteins in signal transduction. This review focuses on the nuclear translocation of structural signal transducers of the membrane skeleton and also extends our analysis to possible translocation of resident nuclear proteins to the membrane skeleton. This leads us to envision the communication between spatially distant cellular compartments (i.e., membrane skeleton and cell nucleus) as a bidirectional flow of information (a dynamic reciprocity) based on subtle multilevel structural and biochemical equilibria. At one level, it is mediated by the interaction between structural signal transducers and their binding partners, at another level it may be mediated by the balance and integration of signal transducers in different cellular compartments.

  20. Concurrent decrease of vasopressin and protein kinase C-alpha immunoreactivity during the light phase in the vole suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, K; Van der Zee, EA; Gerkema, MP

    1998-01-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) is a major neuropeptide in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the mammalian hypothalamic circadian pacemaker. Protein kinase C alpha is a putatively coupled intracellular messenger. Mean numbers of AVP- and protein kinase C alpha- immunoreactive neurons were determined in the

  1. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein localizes efficiently to the nucleus and nucleolus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Kyung Lee; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun Soo; You, Ji Chang

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is an essential viral protein containing two highly conserved retroviral-type zinc finger (ZF) motifs, which functions in multiple stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. Although a number of functions for NC either in its mature form or as a domain of Gag have been revealed, little is known about the intracellular localization of NC and, moreover, its role in Gag protein trafficking. Here, we have investigated various forms of HIV-1 NC protein for its cellular localization and found that the NC has a strong nuclear and nucleolar localization activity. The linker region, composed of a stretch of basic amino acids between the two ZF motifs, was necessary and sufficient for the activity. - Highlights: • HIV-1 NC possess a NLS and leads to nuclear and nucleolus localization. • Mutations in basic residues between two ZFs in NC decrease the nucleus localization. • ZFs of NC affect cytoplasmic organelles localization rather than nucleus localization.

  2. Decreased Fos protein expression in rat caudal vestibular nucleus is associated with motion sickness habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi-Ling; Wang, Jun-Qin; Chen, Xin-Min; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Min; Guo, Jun-Sheng

    2010-08-09

    We investigated the temporal change of Fos protein expression in the caudal vestibular nucleus of rats exposed to daily 2-h Ferris-wheel like (FWL) rotation. Repeated rotation (2h daily for 14 consecutive days) caused an initial increase in defecation, followed by a gradual decline back to the baseline level after 8 rotation sessions. Unlike defecation, the Kaolin consumption of rats showed a bitonic function during the daily rotation sessions (2h daily for 33 consecutive days) and finally recovered to the baseline after about 31 sessions. Immunohistochemistry study revealed increased Fos immunolabeled (Fos-LI) neurons in the medial vestibular nucleus and spinal vestibular nucleus during the initial 7 rotation sessions, and it decreased to the baseline level after 10 rotation sessions. There was a strong linear relationship between the amount of Fos-LI neurons and rat defecation level throughout the whole rotation sessions. These results suggest that the change of neuronal plasticity in the caudal vestibular nucleus might contribute to attenuation of gastrointestinal symptoms during motion sickness habituation process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. LenVarDB: database of length-variant protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutt, Eshita; Mathew, Oommen K; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2014-01-01

    Protein domains are functionally and structurally independent modules, which add to the functional variety of proteins. This array of functional diversity has been enabled by evolutionary changes, such as amino acid substitutions or insertions or deletions, occurring in these protein domains. Length variations (indels) can introduce changes at structural, functional and interaction levels. LenVarDB (freely available at http://caps.ncbs.res.in/lenvardb/) traces these length variations, starting from structure-based sequence alignments in our Protein Alignments organized as Structural Superfamilies (PASS2) database, across 731 structural classification of proteins (SCOP)-based protein domain superfamilies connected to 2 730 625 sequence homologues. Alignment of sequence homologues corresponding to a structural domain is available, starting from a structure-based sequence alignment of the superfamily. Orientation of the length-variant (indel) regions in protein domains can be visualized by mapping them on the structure and on the alignment. Knowledge about location of length variations within protein domains and their visual representation will be useful in predicting changes within structurally or functionally relevant sites, which may ultimately regulate protein function. Non-technical summary: Evolutionary changes bring about natural changes to proteins that may be found in many organisms. Such changes could be reflected as amino acid substitutions or insertions-deletions (indels) in protein sequences. LenVarDB is a database that provides an early overview of observed length variations that were set among 731 protein families and after examining >2 million sequences. Indels are followed up to observe if they are close to the active site such that they can affect the activity of proteins. Inclusion of such information can aid the design of bioengineering experiments.

  4. Calcium-binding proteins in the laterodorsal thalamic nucleus during development of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakowski, Witold; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Wasilewska, Barbara; Hermanowicz, Beata; Robak, Anna

    2014-11-01

    The laterodorsal thalamic nucleus (LD) is often treated as a part of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) because of its location and similar connectivity. Our previous studies have shown that distribution of three calcium-binding proteins, i.e. calbindin D28k (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), changes within the ATN during development of the guinea pig. The aim of this study is to examine the immunoreactivity pattern of these proteins in the LD in the guinea pig ontogeny. Brains from animals ranging from 40th embryonic day to 80th postnatal day were used in the study. Two methods were applied: a single-labelling immunoenzymatic method and double-labelling immunofluorescence. No changes of the distribution pattern of the substances were observed throughout the examined developmental stages. CB and CR were the most abundantly expressed proteins in perikarya of the LD. Numerous CB- and CR-immunoreactive cell bodies were found throughout the whole extent of the nucleus. In most of these cell bodies both proteins colocalized vastly. The highest immunoreactivity of the perikarya containing CB and CR was observed in the mediodorsal part of the LD and in its rostral portion. In regard to PV, single cell bodies were observed mostly in the dorsal part of the nucleus. PV did not colocalize with the other proteins. In summary, all the studied calcium-binding proteins were already present in the LD at prenatal developmental stages and the pattern of distribution remained virtually constant until adulthood. Thus, the LD differs considerably from the ATN in an aspect of neurochemical cell differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-01-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH 2 -terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH 2 -terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4 1 (or P4 3 ), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å

  6. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M., E-mail: dinakar@nii.res.in [National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2008-08-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH{sub 2}-terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å.

  7. Photoreactivity of biologically active compounds. VIII. Photosensitized polymerization of lens proteins by antimalarial drugs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, S; Wang, R H; Tønnesen, H H; Dillon, J; Roberts, J E

    1995-02-01

    The drugs commonly used in the treatment of malaria are photochemically unstable. Several of these compounds cause dermal and ocular toxic reactions that may be light induced. The in vitro photopolymerization of calf lens proteins in the presence of antimalarial drugs was studied as part of a screening of the photochemical properties and phototoxic capabilities of these compounds. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the reaction was calculated, and related to the amount of light absorbed by the compounds in order to determine the relative photosensitizing effect of each drug. The reaction mechanisms were evaluated by adding a variety of quenchers to the reaction medium during irradiation. Based on the results obtained in this study and previous knowledge about the pharmacokinetic behavior of these compounds, several of the drugs investigated have to be considered as potential photosensitizers in the human lens, the retina and the skin.

  8. Adsorption of proteins from artificial tear solutions to contact lens materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnert, J.L.; Horbett, T.A.; Ratner, B.D.; Royce, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of polymers and copolymers of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) were synthesized in order to find surfaces that would adsorb minimal amounts of protein. The adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and immunoglobulin G from a three-way mixture of these proteins in isotonic buffered saline to the polymers was measured using 125 I-labeled proteins. Apparently high protein uptake on copolymers rich in HEMA was found to be due to sorption of unbound 125 I by the polymers. 125 I sorption by the polymers was minimized by dialysis of the protein solution to remove unbound 125 I iodide and inclusion of 0.01 M sodium iodide to block uptake of residual 125 I iodide. Using these improved protocols, minimal total protein uptake was observed on copolymers containing 50% or more HEMA. The majority of adsorbed protein on all p(MMA-HEMA) polymers was albumin. Total protein uptake was greatest on pMMA. Commercial contact lenses composed of copolymers of HEMA and N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) or acrylamide (AAm) adsorbed small amounts of all proteins whereas copolymers of methacrylic acid (MAAc) and HEMA adsorbed much larger quantities of lysozyme. These results indicate that protein uptake by contact lens materials varies greatly with polymer composition. Artifactually high adsorption can occur if precautions are not taken to prevent uptake of unbound 125 I

  9. Silencing of Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (NuMA) accelerates the apoptotic disintegration of the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivinen, Katri; Taimen, Pekka; Kallajoki, Markku

    2010-08-01

    One main feature of apoptosis is the sequential degradation of the nuclear structure, including the fragmentation of chromatin and caspase-mediated cleavage of various nuclear proteins. Among these proteins is the Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus protein (NuMA) which plays a specific role in the organization of the mitotic spindle. The exact function of NuMA in the interphase nucleus is unknown, but a number of reports have suggested that it may play a role in chromatin organization and/or gene expression. Here we show that upon cleavage in apoptotic cells, the N-terminal cleavage fragment of NuMA is solubilized while the C-terminal fragment remains associated with the condensed chromatin. Using pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and caspase-3 deficient MCF-7 cells, we further show that the solubilization is dependent on caspase-mediated cleavage of NuMA. Finally, the silencing of NuMA by RNAi accelerated nuclear breakdown in apoptotic MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that NuMA may provide structural support in the interphase nucleus by contributing to the organization of chromatin.

  10. Extent of Detached Retina and Lens Status Influence Intravitreal Protein Expression in Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollreisz, Andreas; Sacu, Stefan; Eibenberger, Katharina; Funk, Marion; Kivaranovic, Danijel; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Georgopoulos, Michael; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare intravitreal cytokines and chemokines to clinical parameters in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). In this prospective study vitreous samples were taken undiluted from 60 patients with RRD and 20 age-matched controls with idiopathic epiretinal membranes at the beginning of primary vitrectomy. The following clinical parameters were assessed from RRD patients prior to surgery: number of quadrants detached, RD height, lens status, symptom duration, and refractive power. Concentrations of 40 different proteins in the vitreous of RRD eyes were measured by multiplex protein array, compared with controls and correlated to clinical parameters. Ten cytokines and chemokines were significantly upregulated in the vitreous of RRD eyes compared with controls (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases [TIMP]-1 and -2, macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-1α, monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1, IL-6, and -8, inducible protein (IP)-10, brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], TGFβ-3, and platelet-derived growth factor [PDGF]-AB/BB). Linear regression analysis revealed that IL-8 and TGFβ-3 increased with the number of retinal quadrants detached, while TIMP-1 rose in eyes with greater RD heights. Concentrations of IP-10 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) peaked in eyes with two or more quadrants detached, while TIMP-2 was highest expressed in the vitreous of eyes with great RD height. In pseudophakic eyes with higher detachment height levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 were significantly increased, while neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was decreased in pseudophakic patients with shallow RD height. Extent of RRD and lens status significantly influence intravitreal proinflammatory, profibrotic, and proapoptotic protein expression. These data contribute to the fundamental understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in RRD and may serve as a basis for development of adjunct therapeutics to facilitate

  11. Plasma graft of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) on RGP lens surface for reducing protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shiheng; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted on fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permissible contact lens surface by means of argon plasma induced polymerization to improve surface hydrophilicity and reduce protein adsorption. The surface properties were characterized by contact angle measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy respectively. The surface protein adsorption was evaluated by lysozyme solution immersion and XPS analysis. The results indicated that a thin layer of PEGMA was successfully grafted. The surface hydrophilicity was bettered and surface free energy increased. The lysozyme adsorption on the lens surface was reduced greatly. The study was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51273072).

  12. A critical role for protein degradation in the nucleus accumbens core in cocaine reward memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Meng-Meng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Xue, Li-Fen; Zhai, Suo-Di; Lu, Lin

    2013-04-01

    The intense associative memories that develop between cocaine-paired contexts and rewarding stimuli contribute to cocaine seeking and relapse. Previous studies have shown impairment in cocaine reward memories by manipulating a labile state induced by memory retrieval, but the mechanisms that underlie the destabilization of cocaine reward memory are unknown. In this study, using a Pavlovian cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure in rats, we tested the contribution of ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent protein degradation in destabilization of cocaine reward memory. First, we found that polyubiquitinated protein expression levels and polyubiquitinated N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion (NSF) markedly increased 15 min after retrieval while NSF protein levels decreased 1 h after retrieval in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. We then found that infusion of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin into the NAc core prevented the impairment of memory reconsolidation induced by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin and reversed the effects of anisomycin on NSF and glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) protein levels in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the NAc core. We also found that lactacystin infusion into the NAc core but not into the shell immediately after extinction training sessions inhibited CPP extinction and reversed the extinction training-induced decrease in NSF and GluR2 in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the NAc core. Finally, infusions of lactacystin by itself into the NAc core immediately after each training session or before the CPP retrieval test had no effect on the consolidation and retrieval of cocaine reward memory. These findings suggest that ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent protein degradation is critical for retrieval-induced memory destabilization.

  13. Gamma and x radiation and thermal neutrons effects in lens solutions and the relation with proteins concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez A, M.; Alarcon C, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation effects have been studied irradiating porcine lens solutions with doses which range between 52 Gy to 1042 Gy in the case of x-rays (30 kVp), 631 Gy to 4001 Gy in the case of 60 Co gamma rays and 314 Gy to 7596 Gy for thermal neutrons. The optics density time variation of solutions was determined using a Spectronic-501 spectrophotometer, and with this data an equation which describes the behavior in the mentioned cases was found. A phenomenological model is postulated which connects the optical time variation density increment macroscopic effect with proteins concentration in the crystalline lens obtaining relative biological effectiveness using the supra-molecular aggregate formation due to the denaturalization and destruction of lens proteins by radiation criteria. (authors). 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-1α downregulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition early marker proteins without undermining cell survival in hypoxic lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Patrick R; Neelam, Sudha; Brooks, Morgan M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify potential therapeutic strategies to slow down or prevent the expression of early-onset epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins (fibronectin and alpha smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) without sacrificing the synthesis and accumulation of the prosurvival protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured virally transformed human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. HLE-B3 cells, maintained in a continuous hypoxic environment (1% oxygen), were treated with SB216763, a specific inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) catalytic activity. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of β-catenin, as well as the total lysate content of fibronectin and α-SMA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure the levels of VEGF in cell culture medium. A hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) translation inhibitor and an HIF-2α translation inhibitor were independently employed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia inducible factor inhibition on EMT marker protein and VEGF expression. XAV932 was used to assess the suppression of nuclear β-catenin and its downstream effect on EMT marker proteins and VEGF expression. SB216763-treated HLE-B3 cells caused marked inhibition of GSK-3β activity prompting a significant increase in the translocation of cytoplasmic β-catenin to the nucleus. The enhancement of nuclear β-catenin looked as if it positively correlated with a significant increase in the basal expression of VEGF as well as increased expression of fibronectin and α-SMA. In conjunction with SB216763, coadministration of an HIF-1α translation inhibitor, but not an HIF-2α translation inhibitor, markedly suppressed the expression of fibronectin and α-SMA without affecting VEGF levels. Treatment with XAV932 significantly reduced the level of nuclear β-catenin, but the levels of neither the EMT marker proteins nor VEGF were changed. Recently, we reported

  15. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å 3 ). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours

  16. CPEB4 is a cell survival protein retained in the nucleus upon ischemia or endoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A; Bassell, Gary J; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D

    2010-12-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments.

  17. CPEB4 Is a Cell Survival Protein Retained in the Nucleus upon Ischemia or Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Depletion ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D.

    2010-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments. PMID:20937770

  18. Structure and dynamics of the fish eye lens protein, γM7-crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Bryon; Chen, Yingwei; Ford, Jason; Thiel, Caleb; Wistow, Graeme; Wu, Zhengrong

    2013-05-21

    The vertebrate eye lens contains high concentrations of crystallins. The dense lenses of fish are particularly abundant in a class called γM-crystallin whose members are characterized by an unusually high methionine content and partial loss of the four tryptophan residues conserved in all γ-crystallins from mammals which are proposed to contribute to protection from UV-damage. Here, we present the structure and dynamics of γM7-crystallin from zebrafish (Danio rerio). The solution structure shares the typical two-domain, four-Greek-key motif arrangement of other γ-crystallins, with the major difference noted in the final loop of the N-terminal domain, spanning residues 65-72. This is likely due to the absence of the conserved tryptophans. Many of the methionine residues are exposed on the surface but are mostly well-ordered and frequently have contacts with aromatic side chains. This may contribute to the specialized surface properties of these proteins that exist under high molecular crowding in the fish lens. NMR relaxation data show increased backbone conformational motions in the loop regions of γM7 compared to those of mouse γS-crystallin and show that fast internal motion of the interdomain linker in γ-crystallins correlates with linker length. Unfolding studies monitored by tryptophan fluorescence confirm results from mutant mouse γS-crystallin and show that unfolding of a βγ-crystallin domain likely starts from unfolding of the variable loop containing the more fluorescently quenched tryptophan residue, resulting in a native-like unfolding intermediate.

  19. The Major Chromophore Arising from Glucose Degradation and Oxidative Stress Occurrence during Lens Proteins Glycation Induced by Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Ávila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose autoxidation has been proposed as a key reaction associated with deleterious effects induced by hyperglycemia in the eye lens. Little is known about chromophores generated during glucose autoxidation. In this study, we analyzed the effect of oxidative and dicarbonyl stress in the generation of a major chromophore arising from glucose degradation (GDC and its association with oxidative damage in lens proteins. Glucose (5 mM was incubated with H2O2 (0.5–5 mM, Cu2+ (5–50 μM, glyoxal (0.5–5 mM or methylglyoxal (0.5–5 mM at pH 7.4, 5% O2, 37 °C, from 0 to 30 days. GDC concentration increased with incubation time, as well as when incubated in the presence of H2O2 and/or Cu2+, which were effective even at the lowest concentrations. Dicarbonylic compounds did not increase the levels of GDC during incubations. 1H, 13C and FT-IR spectra from the purified fraction containing the chromophore (detected by UV/vis spectroscopy showed oxidation products of glucose, including gluconic acid. Lens proteins solutions (10 mg/mL incubated with glucose (30 mM presented increased levels of carboxymethyl-lysine and hydrogen peroxide that were associated with GDC increase. Our results suggest a possible use of GDC as a marker of autoxidative reactions occurring during lens proteins glycation induced by glucose.

  20. Identification of a nuclear export signal in the KSHV latent protein LANA2 mediating its export from the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Fontela, C.; Collado, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia, M.A.; Alvarez-Barrientos, A.; Arroyo, J.; Nombela, C.; Rivas, C.

    2005-01-01

    LANA2 is a latent protein detected in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected B cells that inhibits p53-dependent transcriptional transactivation and apoptosis and PKR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. It has been reported that LANA2 localizes into the nucleus of both KSHV-infected B cells and transiently transfected HeLa cells. In this study, we show that LANA2 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that requires a Rev-type nuclear export signal located in the C-terminus to direct the protein to the cytoplasm, through an association with the export receptor CRM1. In addition, a functional protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt phosphorylation motif partially overlapping with the nuclear export signal was identified. Nuclear exclusion of LANA2 was negatively regulated by the phosphorylation of threonine 564 by Akt. The ability of LANA2 to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm has implications for the function of this viral protein

  1. The Verticillium-specific protein VdSCP7 localizes to the plant nucleus and modulates immunity to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Ni, Hao; Du, Xuan; Wang, Sheng; Ma, Xiao-Wei; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Guo, Hui-Shan; Hua, Chenlei

    2017-07-01

    Fungal pathogens secrete effector proteins to suppress plant basal defense for successful colonization. Resistant plants, however, can recognize effectors by cognate R proteins to induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI). By analyzing secretomes of the vascular fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, we identified a novel secreted protein VdSCP7 that targets the plant nucleus. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged VdSCP7 gene with either a mutated nuclear localization signal motif or with additional nuclear export signal was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, and investigated for induction of plant immunity. The role of VdSCP7 in V. dahliae pathogenicity was characterized by gene knockout and complementation, and GFP labeling. Expression of the VdSCP7 gene in N. benthamiana activated both salicylic acid and jasmonate signaling, and altered the plant's susceptibility to the pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora capsici. The immune response activated by VdSCP7 was highly dependent on its initial extracellular secretion and subsequent nuclear localization in plants. Knockout of the VdSCP7 gene significantly enhanced V. dahliae aggressiveness on cotton. GFP-labeled VdSCP7 is secreted by V. dahliae and accumulates in the plant nucleus. We conclude that VdSCP7 is a novel effector protein that targets the host nucleus to modulate plant immunity, and suggest that plants can recognize VdSCP7 to activate ETI during fungal infection. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) protein is contributed by the donor cell nucleus in cloned porcine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Schatten, Heide; Hao, Yanhong; Lai, Liangxue; Wax, David; Samuel, Melissa; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Prather, Randall S

    2006-05-01

    The Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus (NuMA) protein is a multifunctional protein that is localized to the nucleus in interphase and to the poles of the mitotic apparatus during mitosis. In unfertilized porcine oocytes, NuMA is localized to the meiotic spindle. NuMA is removed along with the meiotic spindle during the enucleation process before reconstructing the egg by introducing the donor cell nucleus to produce cloned embryos. Questions have been raised regarding the source for NuMA in cloned embryos, as the enucleated oocyte does not contain detectable NuMA in the cytoplasm. To determine the source of NuMA in porcine nuclear transfer (NT) embryos, we conducted an immunofluorescence microscopy study with antibodies against NuMA to investigate the appearance and distribution of NuMA before and after reconstructing NT embryos with porcine skin fibroblasts. We used donor cells from a confluent culture with all cells in interphase. For comparative studies, we also determined the immunofluorescence pattern of NuMA, gamma-tubulin, and alpha-tubulin in porcine fibroblasts, parthenogenetic embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos. Results show that NuMA was localized in nuclei of 33.5% (163/456) of the serum-deprived fibroblasts used as donor cells. No NuMA staining was detected in enucleated pig oocytes. Immediately after nuclear transfer, NuMA staining was absent in all donor cell fibroblast nuclei (0 h) but staining was detected by 6 h within the reconstructed eggs, at which time the transferred somatic cell nucleus swelled in most cells (19/27) and became a pronucleus-like structure. NuMA was localized exclusively within the pronucleus-like structures (15/27). At 25 h, NuMA was detected inside the nucleus (16/25) either in one-cell or in 2-cell stage embryos. Interestingly, in parthenogenetic embryos, NuMA staining was not detected in all 42 eggs examined at 1 h, and evident NuMA staining was only detected inside a few (4/51 at 6 h; 6/48 at 25 h) of the nuclei. In IVF

  3. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cross-linking of lens crystallin proteins induced by tryptophan metabolites and metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweeddale, Helen J; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Janmie, Joane F

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength solar UV radiation is implicated in photodamage to the human eye. The human lens contains multiple tryptophan-derived compounds that have significant absorbance bands in the UVA region (λ 315-400 nm) that act as efficient physical filters for these wavelengths. The concentrations ...

  5. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heegaard, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    dating is made possible by comparing the (14)C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14)C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even...

  6. Expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins regulated by the algal cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Suzuki, Kenji; Okazaki, Kumiko; Kabeya, Yukihiro

    2012-10-01

    Chloroplasts have evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont and their continuity has been maintained by chloroplast division, which is performed by the constriction of a ring-like division complex at the division site. It is believed that the synchronization of the endosymbiotic and host cell division events was a critical step in establishing a permanent endosymbiotic relationship, such as is commonly seen in existing algae. In the majority of algal species, chloroplasts divide once per specific period of the host cell division cycle. In order to understand both the regulation of the timing of chloroplast division in algal cells and how the system evolved, we examined the expression of chloroplast division genes and proteins in the cell cycle of algae containing chloroplasts of cyanobacterial primary endosymbiotic origin (glaucophyte, red, green, and streptophyte algae). The results show that the nucleus-encoded chloroplast division genes and proteins of both cyanobacterial and eukaryotic host origin are expressed specifically during the S phase, except for FtsZ in one graucophyte alga. In this glaucophyte alga, FtsZ is persistently expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas the expression of the nucleus-encoded MinD and MinE as well as FtsZ ring formation are regulated by the phases of the cell cycle. In contrast to the nucleus-encoded division genes, it has been shown that the expression of chloroplast-encoded division genes is not regulated by the host cell cycle. The endosymbiotic gene transfer of minE and minD from the chloroplast to the nuclear genome occurred independently on multiple occasions in distinct lineages, whereas the expression of nucleus-encoded MIND and MINE is regulated by the cell cycle in all lineages examined in this study. These results suggest that the timing of chloroplast division in algal cell cycle is restricted by the cell cycle-regulated expression of some but not all of the chloroplast division genes. In addition, it is

  7. Cystatin D Locates in the Nucleus at Sites of Active Transcription and Modulates Gene and Protein Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J. Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer. PMID:26364852

  8. The DNA-repair Ku70 protein is located in the nucleus and tail of elongating spermatids in grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, Josefa; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence immunostaining for the phosphorylated H2AX histone (gammaH2AX) in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans has shown abundance of gammaH2AX in the nuclei of round and elongating spermatids, suggesting that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur regularly during spermiogenesis. Immunofluorescence patterns for Ku70, a DNA-repair protein participating in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, showed that this protein is present in round and elongating spermatids, implying that the NHEJ DNA-repair pathway operates during chromatin compaction in spermiogenesis. In addition, during the final stages of spermiogenesis, the Ku70 protein concentrates on the region forming the sperm tail. Since Ku70 was also abundant in spermatid tails, it is reasonable to assume that Ku70 might play a novel function in sperm-tail formation. The analysis of Ku70 immunofluorescence patterns in 13 other grasshopper species also showed the presence of this protein in the nucleus and tail of elongating spermatids, indicating that this is a general characteristic in grasshoppers.

  9. Proteostasis and the Regulation of Intra- and Extracellular Protein Aggregation by ATP-Independent Molecular Chaperones: Lens α-Crystallins and Milk Caseins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, John A; Ecroyd, Heath; Truscott, Roger J W; Thorn, David C; Holt, Carl

    2018-03-20

    Molecular chaperone proteins perform a diversity of roles inside and outside the cell. One of the most important is the stabilization of misfolding proteins to prevent their aggregation, a process that is potentially detrimental to cell viability. Diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and cataract are characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates. In vivo, many proteins are metastable and therefore under mild destabilizing conditions have an inherent tendency to misfold, aggregate, and hence lose functionality. As a result, protein levels are tightly regulated inside and outside the cell. Protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, describes the network of biological pathways that ensures the proteome remains folded and functional. Proteostasis is a major factor in maintaining cell, tissue, and organismal viability. We have extensively investigated the structure and function of intra- and extracellular molecular chaperones that operate in an ATP-independent manner to stabilize proteins and prevent their misfolding and subsequent aggregation into amorphous particles or highly ordered amyloid fibrils. These types of chaperones are therefore crucial in maintaining proteostasis under normal and stress (e.g., elevated temperature) conditions. Despite their lack of sequence similarity, they exhibit many common features, i.e., extensive structural disorder, dynamism, malleability, heterogeneity, oligomerization, and similar mechanisms of chaperone action. In this Account, we concentrate on the chaperone roles of α-crystallins and caseins, the predominant proteins in the eye lens and milk, respectively. Intracellularly, the principal ATP-independent chaperones are the small heat-shock proteins (sHsps). In vivo, sHsps are the first line of defense in preventing intracellular protein aggregation. The lens proteins αA- and αB-crystallin are sHsps. They play a crucial role in maintaining solubility of the crystallins (including themselves) with age and hence in

  10. Environmental enrichment alters protein expression as well as the proteomic response to cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl F. Lichti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior research demonstrated that environmental enrichment creates individual differences in behavior leading to a protective addiction phenotype in rats. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this phenotype will guide selection of targets for much-needed novel pharmacotherapeutics. The current study investigates differences in proteome expression in the nucleus accumbens of enriched and isolated rats and the proteomic response to cocaine self-administration using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS technique to quantify 1917 proteins. Results of complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analyses (IPA and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA, both performed using protein quantitative data, demonstrate that cocaine increases vesicular transporters for dopamine and glutamate as well as increasing proteins in the RhoA pathway. Further, cocaine regulates proteins related to ERK, CREB and AKT signaling. Environmental enrichment altered expression of a large number of proteins implicated in a diverse number of neuronal functions (e.g., energy production, mRNA splicing and ubiquitination, molecular cascades (e.g., protein kinases, psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington's and Alzheimer’s diseases. Upregulation of energy metabolism components in EC rats was verified using RNA sequencing. Most of the biological functions and pathways listed above were also identified in the Cocaine X Enrichment interaction analysis, providing clear evidence that enriched and isolated rats respond quite differently to cocaine exposure. The overall impression of the current results is that enriched saline-administering rats have a unique proteomic complement compared to enriched cocaine-administering rats as well as saline and cocaine-taking isolated rats. These results identify possible mechanisms of the protective phenotype and provide fertile soil for developing novel pharmacotherapeutics.

  11. Accumulation of transcription factors and cell signaling-related proteins in the nucleus during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, T Swaroopa; Durgeshwar, P; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-07-20

    The nucleus is the maestro of the cell and is involved in the modulation of cell signaling during stress. We performed a comprehensive nuclear proteome analysis of Citrus sinensis during interaction with host (Xanthomonas citri pv. citri-Xcc) and non-host (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-Xoo) pathogens. The nuclear proteome was obtained using a sequential method of organelle enrichment and determined by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 243 proteins accumulated differentially during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction, belonging to 11 functional groups, with signaling and transcription-related proteins dominating. MADS-box transcription factors, DEAD-box RNA helicase and leucine aminopeptidase, mainly involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, were in high abundance during non-host interaction (Xoo). Signaling-related proteins like serine/threonine kinase, histones (H3.2, H2A), phosphoglycerate kinase, dynamin, actin and aldolase showed increased accumulation early during Xoo interaction. Our results suggest that there is a possible involvement of JA-triggered defense responses during non-host resistance, with early recognition of the non-host pathogen. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  13. The C-Domain of Oleuropein β-Glucosidase Assists in Protein Folding and Sequesters the Enzyme in Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudounas, Konstantinos; Thomopoulou, Margarita; Michaelidis, Christos; Zevgiti, Efstathia; Papakostas, Georgios; Tserou, Paraskevi; Daras, Gerasimos; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2017-07-01

    Oleuropein, a terpene-derived glycosylated secoiridoid biosynthesized exclusively by members of the Oleaceae family, is involved in a two-component defense system comprising a β-glucosidase that activates oleuropein into a toxic glutaraldehyde-like structure. Oleuropein and its deglycosylated derivatives have high pharmaceutical interest. In this study we determined that the in planta heterologous expressed OeGLU, an oleuropein-specific β-glucosidase from olive ( Olea europaea ), had enzymatic kinetics similar to the olive native enzyme. The C terminus encompassing the nuclear localization signal sequesters the enzyme in the nucleus, and predetermines the protein-protein recognition and homodimerization. Biochemical analysis revealed that OeGLU is a homomultimer with high M r In silico prediction modeling of the complex structure and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses revealed that the C terminus of OeGLU is essential for the proper assembly of an octameric form, a key conformational feature that determines the activity of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that intrinsic characteristics of the OeGLU ensure separation from oleuropein and keep the dual-partner defensive system conditionally inactive. Upon cell destruction, the dual-partner defense system is activated and olive massively releases the arsenal of defense. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. "Cyt/Nuc," a Customizable and Documenting ImageJ Macro for Evaluation of Protein Distributions Between Cytosol and Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grune, Tilman; Kehm, Richard; Höhn, Annika; Jung, Tobias

    2018-01-10

    Large amounts of data from multi-channel, high resolution, fluorescence microscopic images require tools that provide easy, customizable, and reproducible high-throughput analysis. The freeware "ImageJ" has become one of the standard tools for scientific image analysis. Since ImageJ offers recording of "macros," even a complex multi-step process can be easily applied fully automated to large numbers of images, saving both time and reducing human subjective evaluation. In this work, we present "Cyt/Nuc," an ImageJ macro, able to recognize and to compare the nuclear and cytosolic areas of tissue samples, in order to investigate distributions of immunostained proteins between both compartments, while it documents in detail the whole process of evaluation and pattern recognition. As practical example, the redistribution of the 20S proteasome, the main intracellular protease in mammalian cells, is investigated in NZO-mouse liver after feeding the animals different diets. A significant shift in proteasomal distribution between cytosol and nucleus in response to metabolic stress was revealed using "Cyt/Nuc" via automatized quantification of thousands of nuclei within minutes. "Cyt/Nuc" is easy to use and highly customizable, matches the precision of careful manual evaluation and bears the potential for quick detection of any shift in intracellular protein distribution. © 2018 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Ultrastructural localization of actin and actin-binding proteins in the nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dingová, Hana; Fukalová, Jana; Maninová, Miloslava; Philimonenko, Vlada; Hozák, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 3 (2009), s. 425-434 ISSN 0948-6143 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : nuclear actin * ultrastructure * actin–binding proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.021, year: 2009

  16. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-08-08

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution.

  17. Ku80 Counters Oxidative Stress-Induced DNA Damage and Cataract Formation in the Human Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew John Oliver; Ball, Simon Sidney Robert; Manzar, Kamal; Bowater, Richard Peter; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the human lens leads to a wide range of damage including DNA strand breaks, which are likely to contribute to cataract formation. The protein Ku80 is a fundamental component of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double strand breaks. This study investigates the putative impact of Ku80 in cataract prevention in the human lens. The present study used the human lens epithelial cell line FHL124 and whole human lens organ culture. Targeted siRNA was used to deplete Ku80, with Western blot and immunocytochemistry employed to assess Ku80 expression levels. Oxidative stress was induced with hydrogen peroxide and DNA strand breaks measured by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci counts. Visual quality of whole human lenses was measured with image analysis software. Expression of Ku80 was predominately found in the cell nucleus of both FHL124 cells and native human lens epithelium. Treatment of FHL124 cells and whole lens cultures with siRNA targeted against Ku80 resulted in a significant knockdown at the protein level. Application of oxidative stress (30 μM H2O2) created more DNA strand breaks when added to Ku80 knockdown cells than in scrambled siRNA control cells as determined by the alkaline comet assay and the number of γH2AX foci. In whole lens cultures, exposure to 1 mM H2O2 resulted in more lens opacity in Ku80 knockdown lenses than match-paired controls. Depletion of Ku80 in the lens through acute change or a consequence of aging is likely to increase levels of DNA strand breaks, which could negatively influence physiological function and promote lens opacity. It is therefore feasible that Ku80 plays a role in retarding cataract formation.

  18. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J A; Sloboda, R D

    1992-11-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769-780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD protein phosphorylation occurs in a pattern similar to the accumulation of the mitotic cyclin proteins, experiments were performed to determine the relationship between cyclin and the 62-kD protein. Continuous labeling of marine embryos with [35S]methionine, as well as immunoblots of marine embryo proteins using specific antibodies, were used to identify both cyclin and the 62-kD protein. These results clearly demonstrate that the 62-kD protein is distinct from cyclin and, unlike cyclin, is a constant member of the cellular protein pool during the first two cell cycles in sea urchin and surf clam embryos. Similar results were obtained using immunofluorescence microscopy of intact eggs and embryos. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy reveals that the 62-kD protein associates with the microtubules of the mitotic apparatus in dividing cells. Interestingly, the protein changes its subcellular distribution with respect to microtubules during the cell cycle. Specifically, during mitosis the 62-kD protein associates with the mitotic apparatus; before nuclear envelope breakdown, however, the 62-kD protein is confined to the nucleus. After anaphase, the 62-kD protein returns to the nucleus, where it resides until nuclear envelope disassembly of the next cell cycle.

  19. Replacing dietary glucose with fructose increases ChREBP activity and SREBP-1 protein in rat liver nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Hyun-Young; Miyashita, Michio; Simon Cho, B.H.; Nakamura, Manabu T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in fructose cause hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in part due to simultaneous induction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes in liver. We investigated the mechanism underlying the unique pattern of gene induction by dietary fructose. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were meal-fed (4 h/d) either 63% (w/w) glucose or 63% fructose diet. After two weeks, animals were killed at the end of the last meal. Nuclear SREBP-1 was 2.2 times higher in fructose-fed rats than glucose-fed rats. Nuclear FoxO1 was elevated 1.7 times in fructose group, but did not reach significance (P = 0.08). Unexpectedly, no difference was observed in nuclear ChREBP between two groups. However, ChREBP DNA binding was 3.9x higher in fructose-fed animals without an increase in xylulose-5-phospate, a proposed ChREBP activator. In conclusion, the gene induction by dietary fructose is likely to be mediated in part by simultaneously increased ChREBP activity, SREBP-1 and possibly FoxO1 protein in nucleus.

  20. Replacing dietary glucose with fructose increases ChREBP activity and SREBP-1 protein in rat liver nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Hyun-Young [Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Miyashita, Michio [Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi, Tokyo (Japan); Simon Cho, B.H. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Harlan E. Moore Heart Research Foundation, 503 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820 (United States); Nakamura, Manabu T., E-mail: mtnakamu@illinois.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    Diets high in fructose cause hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance in part due to simultaneous induction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes in liver. We investigated the mechanism underlying the unique pattern of gene induction by dietary fructose. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were meal-fed (4 h/d) either 63% (w/w) glucose or 63% fructose diet. After two weeks, animals were killed at the end of the last meal. Nuclear SREBP-1 was 2.2 times higher in fructose-fed rats than glucose-fed rats. Nuclear FoxO1 was elevated 1.7 times in fructose group, but did not reach significance (P = 0.08). Unexpectedly, no difference was observed in nuclear ChREBP between two groups. However, ChREBP DNA binding was 3.9x higher in fructose-fed animals without an increase in xylulose-5-phospate, a proposed ChREBP activator. In conclusion, the gene induction by dietary fructose is likely to be mediated in part by simultaneously increased ChREBP activity, SREBP-1 and possibly FoxO1 protein in nucleus.

  1. Variations in gene and protein expression in canine chondrodystrophic nucleus pulposus cells following long-term three-dimensional culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munetaka Iwata

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration greatly affects quality of life. The nucleus pulposus (NP of chondrodystrophic dog breeds (CDBs is similar to the human NP, because the cells disappear with age and are replaced by fibrochondrocyte-like cells. However, because IVD develops as early as within the first year of life, we used canines as a model to investigate in vitro the mechanisms underlying IVD degeneration. Specifically, we evaluated the potential of a three-dimensional (3D culture of healthy NP as an in vitro model system to investigate the mechanisms of IVD degeneration. Agarose hydrogels were populated with healthy NP cells from beagles after performing magnetic resonance imaging, and mRNA expression profiles and pericellular extracellular matrix (ECM protein distribution were determined. After 25 days of 3D culture, there was a tendency for redifferentiation into the native NP phenotype, and mRNA levels of Col2A1, COMP, and CK18 were not significantly different from those of freshly isolated cells. Our findings suggest that long-term 3D culture promoted chondrodystrophic NP redifferentiation through reconstruction of the pericellular microenvironment. Further, lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced expression of TNF-α, MMP3, MMP13, VEGF, and PGES mRNA in the 3D cultures, creating a molecular milieu that mimics that of degenerated NP. These results suggest that this in vitro model represents a reliable and cost-effective tool for evaluating new therapies for disc degeneration.

  2. Induction of Zenk protein expression within the nucleus taeniae of the amygdala of pigeons following tone and shock stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Brito

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the expression of the Zenk protein within the nucleus taeniae of the pigeon’s amygdala (TnA after training in a classical aversive conditioning, in order to improve our understanding of its functional role in birds. Thirty-two 18-month-old adult male pigeons (Columba livia, weighing on average 350 g, were trained under different conditions: with tone-shock associations (experimental group; EG; with shock-alone presentations (shock group; SG; with tone-alone presentations (tone group; TG; with exposure to the training chamber without stimulation (context group; CG, and with daily handling (naive group; NG. The number of immunoreactive nuclei was counted in the whole TnA region and is reported as density of Zenk-positive nuclei. This density of Zenk-positive cells in the TnA was significantly greater for the EG, SG and TG than for the CG and NG (P < 0.05. The data indicate an expression of Zenk in the TnA that was driven by experience, supporting the role of this brain area as a critical element for neural processing of aversive stimuli as well as meaningful novel stimuli.

  3. The generation of superoxide anion by the UVA irradiation of human lens proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linetsky, M.; James, H.-L.; Ortwerth, B.J. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States)

    1996-07-01

    In this study we report the generation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide by a water-insoluble protein fraction from aged human lenses in response to UVA light. Irradiation with 1.5 kJ cm{sup -2} of UVA light (> 338 nm) over a 1 hr period caused the formation of 20 {+-} 0.1 {mu}M superoxide radical and 37 {+-} 0.5 {mu}M hydrogen peroxide. A linear photolysis of SH-groups (21 nmol ml{sup -1}, 26%), His (117 nmol ml{sup -1}, 26%) and Trp (72 nmol ml{sup -1}, 27%) residues was seen following 60 min of irradiation. The addition of SOD, however, had no effect on the photolytic destruction of any of these amino acid residues. Incubation of the human WISS proteins and bovine {alpha}-crystallin in the presence of 43-49 {mu}m of O{sub 2}{sup -} generated in a xanthine oxidase/hypoanthine system over a 1 hr period, caused no loss of histidine, little or no loss of tryptophan and loss of 7-9 nmol ml{sup -1} of syfhydryl groups with both proteins. This argues that O{sub 2}{sup -} can only account for the destruction of at most 4-8 nmol SH-groups in human water-insoluble proteins following 1 hr of UVA irradiation. (author).

  4. Hypoxic regulation of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 expression in nucleus pulposus cells of the rat intervertebral disc: role of hypoxia-inducible factor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Shilpa S; Nasser, Rena; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) proteins regulate expression of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-1), a key enzyme in glycosaminoglycan synthesis in nucleus pulposus cells. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to measure GlcAT-1 expression. Transfections were performed to determine the effect of HIF-1α and HIF-2α on GlcAT-1 promoter activity. Under hypoxic conditions there was an increase in GlcAT-1 expression; a significant increase in promoter activity was seen both in nucleus pulposus cells and in N1511 chondrocytes. We investigated whether HIF controlled GlcAT-1 expression. Suppression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced GlcAT-1 promoter activity and expression only in nucleus pulposus cells. Transfection with CA-HIF-1α as well as with CA-HIF-2α suppressed GlcAT-1 promoter activity only in nucleus pulposus cells, suggesting a cell type-specific regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis and deletion constructs were used to further confirm the suppressive effect of HIFs on GlcAT-1 promoter function in nucleus pulposus cells. Although it was evident that interaction of HIF with hypoxia-responsive elements resulted in suppression of basal promoter activity, it was not necessary for transcriptional suppression. This result suggested both a direct and an indirect mode of regulation, possibly through recruitment of a HIF-dependent repressor. Finally, we showed that hypoxic expression of GlcAT-1 was also partially dependent on MAPK signaling. These studies demonstrate that hypoxia regulates GlcAT-1 expression through a signaling network comprising both activator and suppressor molecules, and that this regulation is unique to nucleus pulposus cells. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Objective lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens and a method for using same. The objective lens has a first end, a second end, and a plurality of optical elements. The optical elements are positioned between the first end and the second end and are at least substantially symmetric about a plane centered between the first end and the second end.

  6. Endogenous RGS14 is a cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling protein that localizes to juxtanuclear membranes and chromatin-rich regions of the nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 14 (RGS14) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that integrates G protein and H-Ras/MAPkinase signaling pathways to regulate synaptic plasticity important for hippocampal learning and memory. However, to date, little is known about the subcellular distribution and roles of endogenous RGS14 in a neuronal cell line. Most of what is known about RGS14 cellular behavior is based on studies of tagged, recombinant RGS14 ectopically overexpressed in unnatural host cells. Here, we report for the first time a comprehensive assessment of the subcellular distribution and dynamic localization of endogenous RGS14 in rat B35 neuroblastoma cells. Using confocal imaging and 3D-structured illumination microscopy, we find that endogenous RGS14 localizes to subcellular compartments not previously recognized in studies of recombinant RGS14. RGS14 localization was observed most notably at juxtanuclear membranes encircling the nucleus, at nuclear pore complexes (NPC) on both sides of the nuclear envelope and within intranuclear membrane channels, and within both chromatin-poor and chromatin-rich regions of the nucleus in a cell cycle-dependent manner. In addition, a subset of nuclear RGS14 localized adjacent to active RNA polymerase II. Endogenous RGS14 was absent from the plasma membrane in resting cells; however, the protein could be trafficked to the plasma membrane from juxtanuclear membranes in endosomes derived from ER/Golgi, following constitutive activation of endogenous RGS14 G protein binding partners using AlF4¯. Finally, our findings show that endogenous RGS14 behaves as a cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling protein confirming what has been shown previously for recombinant RGS14. Taken together, the findings highlight possible cellular roles for RGS14 not previously recognized that are distinct from the regulation of conventional GPCR-G protein signaling, in particular undefined roles for RGS14 in the nucleus. PMID:28934222

  7. Spatial distributions of AQP5 and AQP0 in embryonic and postnatal mouse lens development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Rosica S.; Schey, Kevin L.; Donaldson, Paul J.; Grey, Angus C.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the water channel protein aquaporin (AQP)-5 in adult rodent and human lenses was recently reported using immunohistochemistry, molecular biology, and mass spectrometry techniques, confirming a second transmembrane water channel that is present in lens fibre cells in addition to the abundant AQP0 protein. Interestingly, the sub-cellular distribution and level of post-translational modification of both proteins changes with fibre cell differentiation and location in the adult rodent lens. This study compares the sub-cellular distribution of AQP0 and AQP5 during embryonic and postnatal fibre cell development in the mouse lens to understand how the immunolabelling patterns for both AQPs observed in adult lens are first established. Immunohistochemistry was used to map the cellular and sub-cellular distribution of AQP5 and AQP0 throughout the lens in cryosections from adult (6 weeks to 8 months) and postnatal (0-2 weeks) mouse lenses and in sections from paraffin embedded mouse embryos (E10-E19). All sections were imaged by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Using antibodies directed against the C-terminus of each AQP, AQP5 was abundantly expressed early in development, being found in the cytoplasm of cells of the lens vesicle and surrounding tissues (E10), while AQP0 was detected later (E11), and only in the membranes of elongating primary fibre cells. During the course of subsequent embryonic and postnatal development the pattern of cytoplasmic AQP5 and membranous AQP0 labelling was maintained until postnatal day 6 (P6). From P6 AQP5 labelling became progressively more membranous initially in the lens nucleus and then later in all regions of the lens, while AQP0 labelling was abruptly lost in the lens nucleus due to C-terminal truncation. Our results show that the spatial distribution patterns of AQP0 and AQP5 observed in the adult lens are established during a narrow window of post natal development (P6-P15) that precedes eye opening and coincides

  8. Model for screened, charge-regulated electrostatics of an eye lens protein: Bovine gammaB-crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Christopher W.; Martini, K. Michael; Hollenbeck, Dawn M.; Langner, Andreas; Ross, David S.; Hamilton, John F.; Thurston, George M.

    2017-09-01

    We model screened, site-specific charge regulation of the eye lens protein bovine gammaB-crystallin (γ B ) and study the probability distributions of its proton occupancy patterns. Using a simplified dielectric model, we solve the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation to calculate a 54 ×54 work-of-charging matrix, each entry being the modeled voltage at a given titratable site, due to an elementary charge at another site. The matrix quantifies interactions within patches of sites, including γ B charge pairs. We model intrinsic p K values that would occur hypothetically in the absence of other charges, with use of experimental data on the dependence of p K values on aqueous solution conditions, the dielectric model, and literature values. We use Monte Carlo simulations to calculate a model grand-canonical partition function that incorporates both the work-of-charging and the intrinsic p K values for isolated γ B molecules and we calculate the probabilities of leading proton occupancy configurations, for 4 screening lengths from 6 to 20 Å. We select the interior dielectric value to model γ B titration data. At p H 7.1 and Debye length 6.0 Å, on a given γ B molecule the predicted top occupancy pattern is present nearly 20% of the time, and 90% of the time one or another of the first 100 patterns will be present. Many of these occupancy patterns differ in net charge sign as well as in surface voltage profile. We illustrate how charge pattern probabilities deviate from the multinomial distribution that would result from use of effective p K values alone and estimate the extents to which γ B charge pattern distributions broaden at lower p H and narrow as ionic strength is lowered. These results suggest that for accurate modeling of orientation-dependent γ B -γ B interactions, consideration of numerous pairs of proton occupancy patterns will be needed.

  9. Model for screened, charge-regulated electrostatics of an eye lens protein: Bovine gammaB-crystallin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Christopher W.; Martini, K. Michael; Hollenbeck, Dawn M.; Langner, Andreas; Ross, David S.; Hamilton, John F.; Thurston, George M.

    2018-01-01

    We model screened, site-specific charge regulation of the eye lens protein bovine gammaB-crystallin (γ B) and study the probability distributions of its proton occupancy patterns. Using a simplified dielectric model, we solve the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation to calculate a 54 × 54 work-of-charging matrix, each entry being the modeled voltage at a given titratable site, due to an elementary charge at another site. The matrix quantifies interactions within patches of sites, including γB charge pairs. We model intrinsic pK values that would occur hypothetically in the absence of other charges, with use of experimental data on the dependence of pK values on aqueous solution conditions, the dielectric model, and literature values. We use Monte Carlo simulations to calculate a model grand-canonical partition function that incorporates both the work-of-charging and the intrinsic pK values for isolated γB molecules and we calculate the probabilities of leading proton occupancy configurations, for 4 charge sign as well as in surface voltage profile. We illustrate how charge pattern probabilities deviate from the multinomial distribution that would result from use of effective pK values alone and estimate the extents to which γB charge pattern distributions broaden at lower pH and narrow as ionic strength is lowered. These results suggest that for accurate modeling of orientation-dependent γB-γB interactions, consideration of numerous pairs of proton occupancy patterns will be needed. PMID:29346981

  10. Advances in hard nucleus cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Security and perfect vision and fewer complications are our goals in cataract surgery, and hard-nucleus cataract surgery is always a difficulty one. Many new studies indicate that micro-incision phacoemulsification in treating hard nucleus cataract is obviously effective. This article reviews the evolution process of hard nuclear cataract surgery, the new progress in the research of artificial intraocular lens for microincision, and analyse advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods.

  11. Early Reporting of Apoptosis by Real-time Imaging of Cancer Cells Labeled with Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescent Protein in the Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    We previously developed PC-3 human prostate cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B expressed in the nucleus. We demonstrate in the present report the use of these dual-color cells for early detection of apoptosis in the presence of cancer chemotherapy agents. Induction of apoptosis was observed by real-time imaging of cytoplasmic and nuclear size and shape changes and nuclear fragmentation using fluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis was also detected by measuring DNA fragmentation. The cancer chemotherapy agents paclitaxel and vinblastine were used for induction of apoptosis. When the PC-3 dual-color cells were treated with paclitaxel or vinblastine, cytoplasmic and nuclear size and shape changes and nuclear fragmentation were observed by 24 hours. The paclitaxel-treated PC-3 dual-color cells exhibited ring-like structures formed by the fragmented nuclei, which could be brightly visualized by H2B-GFP fluorescence. Apoptosis was also detected by the dual-color PC-3 cells by 24 hours when treated with vinblastine. However, no nuclear ring-like structures were formed in the PC-3 cells by vinblastine treatment. In contrast, DNA fragmentation could not be observed in PC-3 cells until 48 hours after exposure to paclitaxel. Dual-color PC-3 cells can serve as a simple real-time early reporter of apoptosis and as a screen for novel cancer therapeutics or genotoxic agents. The dual-color cell real-time imaging assay is a more sensitive and earlier reporter for apoptosis than the DNA fragmentation assay. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Early quantitative profiling of differential retinal protein expression in lens-induced myopia in guinea pig using fluorescence difference two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Lam, Carly Siu-Yin; Tse, Dennis Yan-Yin; To, Chi Ho; Liu, Quan; McFadden, Sally A; Chun, Rachel Ka-Man; Li, King Kit; Bian, Jianfang; Lam, Chuen

    2018-04-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the differential protein expression in guinea pig retinas in response to lens-induced myopia (LIM) before fully compensated eye growth. Four days old guinea pigs (n=5) were subjected to ‑4D LIM for 8 days. Refractive errors were measured before and at the end of the lens wear period. Ocular dimensions were also recorded using high‑frequency A‑scan ultrasonography. After the LIM treatment, retinas of both eyes were harvested and soluble proteins were extracted. Paired retinal protein expressions in each animal were profiled and compared using a sensitive fluorescence difference two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis. The quantitative retinal proteomes of myopic and control eye were analysed using computerised DeCyder software. Those proteins that were consistently changed with at least 1.2‑fold difference (P<0.05) in the same direction in all five animals were extracted, trypsin digested and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Significant myopia was induced in guinea pigs after 8 days of lens wear. The vitreous chamber depth in lens‑treated eyes was found to be significantly elongated. Typically, more than 1,000 protein spots could be detected from each retina. Thirty‑two of them showed differential expression between myopic and untreated retina. Among these proteins, 21 spots were upregulated and 11 were downregulated. Eight protein spots could be successfully identified which included β‑actin, enolase 1, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, Ras‑related protein Rab‑11B, protein‑L‑isoaspartate (D‑aspartate) O‑methyltransferase, PKM2 protein, X‑linked eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A and ACP1 protein. The present study serves as the first report to uncover the retinal 2D proteome expressions in mammalian guinea pig myopia model using a top‑down fluorescent dyes labelling gel approach. The results showed a downregulation in glycolytic enzymes that may suggest a significant alteration of

  13. Analysis of trafficking of Rev and transdominant Rev proteins in living cells using green fluorescent protein fusions: transdominant Rev blocks the export of Rev from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, R; Gaitanaris, G A; Pavlakis, G N

    1995-11-10

    Expression of gag/pol and env genes of human immunodeficiency virus requires the viral Rev protein. Mutant Rev proteins, displaying a transdominant phenotype (TDRev), were shown to inhibit Rev function. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this inhibition, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of Aequorea victoria was fused to Rev and TDRev, which allowed the study of their trafficking and interactions in living human cells. Both Rev-GFP and TDRev-GFP were shown to retain appropriate nucleolar localization and function. Upon actinomycin D treatment, Rev-GFP was transported to the cytoplasm within 1.5 hr, while TDRev, although partially dissociated from the nucleolus, was retained in the nucleus. Coexpression of Rev-GFP and TDRev in the same cell demonstrated that TDRev inhibited the transport of Rev-GFP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This inhibition was specific for Rev, since the export of the functionally analogous Rex protein of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I was not inhibited by TDRev. These results indicate that Rev and TDRev form heteromultimers in the nucleolus and that this interaction prevents Rev's export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In addition to providing a model for the function of TDRev, these results also demonstrate the successful application of protein fusions to GFP to study localization and trafficking of proteins in living mammalian cells.

  14. The cellular prion protein: a new partner of the lectin CBP70 in the nucleus of NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybner, C; Finel-Szermanski, S; Felin, M; Sahraoui, T; Rousseau, C; Fournier, J G; Sève, A P; Botti, J

    2002-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormal isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) whose physiological role still remains elusive. To better understand the function of PrPc, it is important to identify the different subcellular localization(s) of the protein and the different partners with which it might be associated. In this context, the PrPc-lectins interactions are investigated because PrPc is a sialoglycoprotein which can react with lectins which are carbohydrate-binding proteins. We have previously characterized a nuclear lectin CBP70 able to recognize N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine residues in HL60 cells. Using confocal immunofluorescence, flow-cytofluorometry, and Western-blotting, we have found that PrPc is expressed in the nucleus of the NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. It was also found that the lectin CBP70 is localized in NB4 cell nuclei. Moreover, several approaches revealed that PrPc and CBP70 are colocalized in the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that these proteins are coprecipitated and interact via a sugar-dependent binding moiety. In conclusion, PrPc and CBP70 are colocalized in the nuclear compartment of NB4 cells and this interaction may be important to better understand the biological function and possibly the conversion process of PrPc into its pathological form (PrPsc). Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Neuronal degeneration induced by status epilepticus in the thalami reuniens nucleus of immature rats. Are calcium binding proteins neuroprotective?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Druga, Rastislav; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. S4 (2006), s. 302-302 ISSN 0013-9580. [Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society and Canadian League against Epilepsy. 01.12.2006-05.12.2006, San Diego, CA] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0464 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : pilocarpine * neurodegeneration * nucleus reuniens Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  16. Lens Crystallin Modifications and Cataract in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Acylpeptide Hydrolase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Xie, Leike; Raju, Murugesan; Reneker, Lixing; Sharma, K. Krishna

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of crystallin fragments in vivo and their subsequent interaction with crystallins are responsible, in part, for protein aggregation in cataracts. Transgenic mice overexpressing acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) specifically in the lens were prepared to test the role of protease in the generation and accumulation of peptides. Cataract development was seen at various postnatal days in the majority of mice expressing active APH (wt-APH). Cataract onset and severity of the cataracts correlated with the APH protein levels. Lens opacity occurred when APH protein levels were >2.6% of the total lens protein and the specific activity, assayed using Ac-Ala-p-nitroanilide substrate, was >1 unit. Transgenic mice carrying inactive APH (mt-APH) did not develop cataract. Cataract development also correlated with N-terminal cleavage of the APH to generate a 57-kDa protein, along with an increased accumulation of low molecular weight (LMW) peptides, similar to those found in aging human and cataract lenses. Nontransgenic mouse lens proteins incubated with purified wt-APH in vitro resulted in a >20% increase in LMW peptides. Crystallin modifications and cleavage were quite dramatic in transgenic mouse lenses with mature cataract. Affected lenses showed capsule rupture at the posterior pole, with expulsion of the lens nucleus and degenerating fiber cells. Our study suggests that the cleaved APH fragment might exert catalytic activity against crystallins, resulting in the accumulation of distinct LMW peptides that promote protein aggregation in lenses expressing wt-APH. The APH transgenic model we developed will enable in vivo testing of the roles of crystallin fragments in protein aggregation. PMID:24554718

  17. Expression of ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box protein 4 (Asb-4) in proopiomelanocortin neurons of the arcuate nucleus of mice produces a hyperphagic, lean phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Yao; Chai, Biao-Xin; Zhang, Weizhen; Wang, Hui; Mulholland, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signaling box-containing protein 4 (Asb-4) is specifically expressed in the energy homeostasis-related brain areas and colocalizes with proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the arcuate nucleus (ARC). Injection of insulin into the third ventricle of the rat brain increased Asb-4 mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus but not in the ARC of the hypothalamus, whereas injection of leptin (ip) increased Asb-4 expression in both mouse paraventricular nucleus and ARC. A transgenic mouse in which Myc-tagged Asb-4 is specifically expressed in POMC neurons of the ARC was made and used to study the effects of Asb-4 on ingestive behavior and metabolic rate. Animals with overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons demonstrated an increase in food intake. However, POMC-Asb-4 transgenic animals gained significantly less weight from 6-30 wk of age. The POMC-Asb-4 mice had reduced fat mass and increased lean mass and lower levels of blood leptin. The transgenic animals were resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity. Transgenic mice had significantly higher rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production than wild-type mice during both light and dark periods. The locomotive activity of transgenic mice was increased. The overexpression of Asb-4 in POMC neurons increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The transgenic animals had no observed effect on peripheral glucose metabolism and the activity of the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that Asb-4 is a key regulatory protein in the central nervous system, involved in the control of feeding behavior and metabolic rate.

  18. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory...

  19. Investigation of gammaE-crystallin target protein binding to bovine lens alpha-crystallin by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M J; Artero, J B; Moulin, M; Callow, P; Carver, J A; Griffiths, P C; Haertlein, M; Harding, J J; Meek, K M; Timmins, P; Regini, J W

    2010-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin, one of the main constituent proteins in the crystalline lens, is an important molecular chaperone both within and outside the lens. Presently, the structural relationship between alpha-crystallin and its target proteins during chaperone action is poorly understood. It has been hypothesised that target proteins bind within a central cavity. Small-angle neutron-scattering (SANS) experiments in conjunction with isotopic substitution were undertaken to investigate the interaction of a target lens protein (gammaE-crystallin) with alpha-crystallin (alpha(H)) and to measure the radius of gyration (Rg) of the proteins and their binary complexes in solution under thermal stress. The size of the alpha(H) in D(2)O incubated at 65 degrees C increased from 69+/-3 to 81+/-5 A over 40 min, in good agreement with previously published small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and SANS measurements. Deuterated gammaE-crystallin in H(2)O buffer (gammaE(D)/H(2)O) and hydrogenous gammaE-crystallin in D(2)O buffer (gammaE(H)/D(2)O) free in solution were of insufficient size and/or too dilute to provide any measurable scattering over the angular range used, which was selected primarily to investigate gammaE:alpha(H) complexes. The evolution of the aggregation size/shape as an indicator of alpha(H) chaperone action was monitored by recording the neutron scattering in different H:D solvent contrasts under thermally stressed conditions (65 degrees C) for binary mixtures of alpha(H), gammaE(H), and gammaE(D). It was found that Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(D)/D(2)O)>Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(H)/D(2)O)>Rg(alpha(H)/D(2)O) and that Rg(alpha(H):gammaE(H)/D(2)O) approximately Rg(alpha(H)/D(2)O). The relative sizes observed for the complexes weighted by the respective scattering powers of the various components imply that gammaE-crystallin binds in a central cavity of the alpha-crystallin oligomer, during chaperone action. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Notes on electropherograms of eye-lens, muscle proteins and zymograms of muscle esterases of fish collected during the first Brazilian expedition to the Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Ngan Phan

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out on electropherograms of eye-lens, muscle proteins and zymograms of muscle esterases of ten Notothenia larseni, six Notothenia nudifrons and one lanternfish, Electrona antarctica. The fish were collected by the R/V "Prof. W. Besnard" of the Institute of Oceanography, University of São Paulo, during the First Brazilian Expedition to Antarctica. Eye-lens proteins were analysed on cellulose acetate membrane, muscle proteins and esterases on gel of polyaorylamide. Eye-lens proteins showed three types of electropherograms for N. larseni, and two types for N. nudifrons. One of the electropherograms of N. larseni can be readily distinguished from those of N. nudifrons. Electropherograms of muscle proteins of N. larseni and N. nudifrons are very similar and, consist of sixteen to seventeen fractions. Electropherograms of muscle proteins of N. larseni are severely affected by the conservation of the extracts overnight under -20ºC. All N. nudifrons were of the same zymograms of esterases while those of N. larseni varied. Electropherograms of eye-lens and muscle proteins as well as zymograms of esterases of the lanternfish are different from those of nototheniids.Foi realizado um estudo preliminar sobre eletroferogramas de proteínas de cristalino e de músculo esquelético, e zimogramas de esterases de músculo esquelético de dez Notothenia larseni, seis Notothenia nudifrons e de um peixe-lanterna, Electrona antarctica. Os peixes foram coletados pelo N/Oc. "Prof. W. Besnard" do Instituto Oceanográfico da Universidade de São Paulo durante a I Expedição Brasileira à Antártica. As proteinas do cristalino foram analisadas em membranas de acetato de celulose, enquanto que as proteínas e esterases do músculo esquelético, em gel de poliacrilamida. As proteínas do cristalino apresentam três tipos distintos de eletroferogramas para N. larseni, e dois para N. nudifrons. Um dos eletroferogramas de N. larseni, pode ser

  1. A Role for Calcium-Activated Adenylate Cyclase and Protein Kinase A in the Lens Src Family Kinase and Na,K-ATPase Response to Hyposmotic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2017-09-01

    Na,K-ATPase activity in lens epithelium is subject to control by Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Previously we showed hyposmotic solution causes an SFK-dependent increase in Na,K-ATPase activity in the epithelium. Here we explored the role of cAMP in the signaling mechanism responsible for the SFK and Na,K-ATPase response. Intact porcine lenses were exposed to hyposmotic Krebs solution (200 mOsm) then the epithelium was assayed for cAMP, SFK phosphorylation (activation) or Na,K-ATPase activity. An increase of cAMP was observed in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution. In lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution SFK phosphorylation in the epithelium approximately doubled as did Na,K-ATPase activity and both responses were prevented by H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. The magnitude of the SFK response to hyposmotic solution was reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 added to prevent TRPV4-mediated calcium entry, and by a cytoplasmic Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. The Na,K-ATPase activity response in the epithelium of lenses exposed to hyposmotic solution was abolished by BAPTA-AM. As a direct test of cAMP-dependent SFK activation, intact lenses were exposed to 8-pCPT-cAMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog. 8-pCPT-cAMP caused robust SFK activation. Using Western blot, two calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases, ADCY3 and ADCY8, were detected in lens epithelium. Calcium-activated adenylyl cyclases are expressed in the lens epithelium and SFK activation is linked to a rise of cAMP that occurs upon hyposmotic challenge. The findings point to cAMP as a link between TRPV4 channel-mediated calcium entry, SFK activation, and a subsequent increase of Na,K-ATPase activity.

  2. Vascular plant one-zinc-finger protein 2 is localized both to the nucleus and stress granules under heat stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Misaki; Yamasaki, Kanako; Hirano, Tomoko; Sato, Masa H

    2017-03-04

    VASCULAR PLANT ONE-ZINC FINGER (VOZ)1/and VOZ2 have an ability to bind to the specific cis-element in the AVP1 promoter of Arabidopsis, which function on the PhyB-dependent flowering and possibly in various stress responses as potential transcription factors, although nuclear localization of VOZ proteins is still unclear. In this study, we found that VOZ2 is dispersed throughout the cytoplasm under normal growth conditions, whereas VOZ2 is transferred not only to the nucleus but also to the cytoplasmic foci under heat stress conditions. The VOZ2 foci predominantly co-localized with a marker of stress granules (SGs), which were cytoplasmic granular structures for mRNA storage and decay under abiotic stress conditions. We also demonstrated that GFP-VOZ2 with a nuclear localization signal was rapidly degraded via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway under the heat stress conditions. Also, stress-related expression of DREB2A in the voz1voz2 mutant was significantly upregulated by heat stress as compared with that in the wild-type Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that VOZ2 is localized to SGs and nucleus under heat stress conditions, and functions as a transcriptional repressor of DREB2A in Arabidopsis.

  3. Hyperelastic modelling of the crystalline lens: Accommodation and presbyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchares, Elena; Navarro, Rafael; Calvo, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The modification of the mechanical properties of the human crystalline lens with age can be a major cause of presbyopia. Since these properties cannot be measured in vivo, numerical simulation can be used to estimate them. We propose an inverse method to determine age-dependent change in the material properties of the tissues composing the human crystalline lens. Methods A finite element model of a 30-year-old lens in the accommodated state was developed. The force necessary to achieve full accommodation in a 30-year-old lens of known external geometry was computed using this model. Two additional numerical models of the lens corresponding to the ages of 40 and 50 years were then built. Assuming that the accommodative force applied to the lens remains constant with age, the material properties of nucleus and cortex were estimated by inverse analysis. Results The zonular force necessary to reshape the model of a 30-year-old lens from the accommodated to the unaccommodated geometry was 0.078 newton (N). Both nucleus and cortex became stiffer with age. The stiffness of the nucleus increased with age at a higher rate than the cortex. Conclusions In agreement with the classical theory of Helmholtz, on which we based our model, our results indicate that a major cause of presbyopia is that both nucleus and cortex become stiffer with age; therefore, a constant value of the zonular forces with aging does not achieve full accommodation, that is, the accommodation capability decreases.

  4. The intracellular Scots pine shoot symbiont Methylobacterium extorquens DSM13060 aggregates around the host nucleus and encodes eukaryote-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimäki, Janne J; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Ihantola, Emmi-Leena; Halonen, Outi; Frank, A Carolin

    2015-03-24

    Endophytes are microbes that inhabit plant tissues without any apparent signs of infection, often fundamentally altering plant phenotypes. While endophytes are typically studied in plant roots, where they colonize the apoplast or dead cells, Methylobacterium extorquens strain DSM13060 is a facultatively intracellular symbiont of the meristematic cells of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoot tips. The bacterium promotes host growth and development without the production of known plant growth-stimulating factors. Our objective was to examine intracellular colonization by M. extorquens DSM13060 of Scots pine and sequence its genome to identify novel molecular mechanisms potentially involved in intracellular colonization and plant growth promotion. Reporter construct analysis of known growth promotion genes demonstrated that these were only weakly active inside the plant or not expressed at all. We found that bacterial cells accumulate near the nucleus in intact, living pine cells, pointing to host nuclear processes as the target of the symbiont's activity. Genome analysis identified a set of eukaryote-like functions that are common as effectors in intracellular bacterial pathogens, supporting the notion of intracellular bacterial activity. These include ankyrin repeats, transcription factors, and host-defense silencing functions and may be secreted by a recently imported type IV secretion system. Potential factors involved in host growth include three copies of phospholipase A2, an enzyme that is rare in bacteria but implicated in a range of plant cellular processes, and proteins putatively involved in gibberellin biosynthesis. Our results describe a novel endophytic niche and create a foundation for postgenomic studies of a symbiosis with potential applications in forestry and agriculture. All multicellular eukaryotes host communities of essential microbes, but most of these interactions are still poorly understood. In plants, bacterial endophytes are found inside

  5. The retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP2 protein exhibits exonuclease activity and translocates to the nucleus in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Qiu Junzhuan; Cai Sheng; Chen Yuan; Cheetham, Michael E.; Shen Binghui; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. Mutations in the RP2 gene are linked to the second most frequent form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 is a plasma membrane-associated protein of unknown function. The N-terminal domain of RP2 shares amino acid sequence similarity to the tubulin-specific chaperone protein co-factor C. The C-terminus consists of a domain with similarity to nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs). Human NDK1, in addition to its role in providing nucleoside triphosphates, has recently been described as a 3' to 5' exonuclease. Here, we show that RP2 is a DNA-binding protein that exhibits exonuclease activity, with a preference for single-stranded or nicked DNA substrates that occur as intermediates of base excision repair pathways. Furthermore, we show that RP2 undergoes re-localization into the nucleus upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents inducing oxidative stress, most notably solar simulated light and UVA radiation. The data suggest that RP2 may have previously unrecognized roles as a DNA damage response factor and 3' to 5' exonuclease

  6. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  7. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. The conjugation-specific Die5 protein is required for development of the somatic nucleus in both Paramecium and Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shieh, Annie Wan-Yi; Chalker, Douglas L; Forney, James D

    2010-07-01

    Development in ciliated protozoa involves extensive genome reorganization within differentiating macronuclei, which shapes the somatic genome of the next vegetative generation. Major events of macronuclear differentiation include excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), chromosome fragmentation, and genome amplification. Proteins required for these events include those with homology throughout eukaryotes as well as proteins apparently unique to ciliates. In this study, we identified the ciliate-specific Defective in IES Excision 5 (DIE5) genes of Paramecium tetraurelia (PtDIE5) and Tetrahymena thermophila (TtDIE5) as orthologs that encode nuclear proteins expressed exclusively during development. Abrogation of PtDie5 protein (PtDie5p) function by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing or TtDie5p by gene disruption resulted in the failure of developing macronuclei to differentiate into new somatic nuclei. Tetrahymena DeltaDIE5 cells arrested late in development and failed to complete genome amplification, whereas RNAi-treated Paramecium cells highly amplified new macronuclear DNA before the failure in differentiation, findings that highlight clear differences in the biology of these distantly related species. Nevertheless, IES excision and chromosome fragmentation failed to occur in either ciliate, which strongly supports that Die5p is a critical player in these processes. In Tetrahymena, loss of zygotic expression during development was sufficient to block nuclear differentiation. This observation, together with the finding that knockdown of Die5p in Paramecium still allows genome amplification, indicates that this protein acts late in macronuclear development. Even though DNA rearrangements in these two ciliates look to be quite distinct, analysis of DIE5 establishes the action of a conserved mechanism within the genome reorganization pathway.

  9. The Conjugation-Specific Die5 Protein Is Required for Development of the Somatic Nucleus in both Paramecium and Tetrahymena▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shieh, Annie Wan-Yi; Chalker, Douglas L.; Forney, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Development in ciliated protozoa involves extensive genome reorganization within differentiating macronuclei, which shapes the somatic genome of the next vegetative generation. Major events of macronuclear differentiation include excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), chromosome fragmentation, and genome amplification. Proteins required for these events include those with homology throughout eukaryotes as well as proteins apparently unique to ciliates. In this study, we identified the ciliate-specific Defective in IES Excision 5 (DIE5) genes of Paramecium tetraurelia (PtDIE5) and Tetrahymena thermophila (TtDIE5) as orthologs that encode nuclear proteins expressed exclusively during development. Abrogation of PtDie5 protein (PtDie5p) function by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing or TtDie5p by gene disruption resulted in the failure of developing macronuclei to differentiate into new somatic nuclei. Tetrahymena ΔDIE5 cells arrested late in development and failed to complete genome amplification, whereas RNAi-treated Paramecium cells highly amplified new macronuclear DNA before the failure in differentiation, findings that highlight clear differences in the biology of these distantly related species. Nevertheless, IES excision and chromosome fragmentation failed to occur in either ciliate, which strongly supports that Die5p is a critical player in these processes. In Tetrahymena, loss of zygotic expression during development was sufficient to block nuclear differentiation. This observation, together with the finding that knockdown of Die5p in Paramecium still allows genome amplification, indicates that this protein acts late in macronuclear development. Even though DNA rearrangements in these two ciliates look to be quite distinct, analysis of DIE5 establishes the action of a conserved mechanism within the genome reorganization pathway. PMID:20495055

  10. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin modulates the firing 1 properties of the reticular thalamic nucleus bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albéri, Lavinia; Lintas, Alessandra; Kretz, Robert; Schwaller, Beat; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2013-06-01

    The reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) of the mouse is characterized by an overwhelming majority of GABAergic neurons receiving afferences from both the thalamus and the cerebral cortex and sending projections mainly on thalamocortical neurons. The RTN neurons express high levels of the "slow Ca(2+) buffer" parvalbumin (PV) and are characterized by low-threshold Ca(2+) currents, I(T). We performed extracellular recordings in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice in the rostromedial portion of the RTN. In the RTN of wild-type and PV knockout (PVKO) mice we distinguished four types of neurons characterized on the basis of their firing pattern: irregular firing (type I), medium bursting (type II), long bursting (type III), and tonically firing (type IV). Compared with wild-type mice, we observed in the PVKOs the medium bursting (type II) more frequently than the long bursting type and longer interspike intervals within the burst without affecting the number of spikes. This suggests that PV may affect the firing properties of RTN neurons via a mechanism associated with the kinetics of burst discharges. Ca(v)3.2 channels, which mediate the I(T) currents, were more localized to the somatic plasma membrane of RTN neurons in PVKO mice, whereas Ca(v)3.3 expression was similar in both genotypes. The immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that Ca(v)3.2 channels were localized at active axosomatic synapses, thus suggesting that the differential localization of Ca(v)3.2 in the PVKOs may affect bursting dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded neurons from the same electrode tip showed that about one-third of the cell pairs tended to fire synchronously in both genotypes, independent of PV expression. In summary, PV deficiency does not affect the functional connectivity between RTN neurons but affects the distribution of Ca(v)3.2 channels and the dynamics of burst discharges of RTN cells, which in turn regulate the activity in the thalamocortical circuit.

  11. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3 complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE. Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion.

  12. A protein synthesis-dependent mechanism sustains calcium-permeable AMPA receptor transmission in nucleus accumbens synapses during withdrawal from cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyer, Andrew F; Wolf, Marina E; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2014-02-19

    Extended-access cocaine self-administration results in withdrawal-dependent incubation of cocaine craving. Rats evaluated after ∼1 month of withdrawal from such regimens ("incubated rats") exhibit changes in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that include accumulation of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) and a switch in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-mediated suppression of synaptic transmission from mGluR5-dependent to mGluR1-dependent. To determine the role of protein synthesis in mediating these adaptations, we conducted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in NAc core MSNs of "incubated rats" in the presence of translational inhibitors (anisomycin, cycloheximide, rapamycin) or the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D. The contribution of CP-AMPARs to synaptic transmission was determined by the rectification index and the sensitivity to the CP-AMPAR antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine. We found that CP-AMPAR-mediated transmission in the NAc of "incubated rats" was reduced to levels comparable to those found in saline control rats when brain slices were treated with translational inhibitors, whereas actinomycin-D had no effect. We also investigated the effect of protein translation inhibitors on the switch of mGluR function in MSNs of "incubated rats" using the group I mGluR agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in combination with either an mGluR1 (LY367385) or an mGluR5 (3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine) antagonist. Data revealed that inhibition of protein translation eliminated the mGluR1-mediated inhibition and restored the mGluR5 responsiveness to a state functionally similar to that of saline control rats. Together, these results suggest that aberrant regulation of local protein synthesis contributes to the maintenance of adaptations accrued at NAc MSN synapses during incubation of cocaine craving.

  13. The Use of Living Cancer Cells Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein in the Nucleus and Red Fluorescence Protein in the Cytoplasm for Real-time Confocal Imaging of Chromosome and Cytoplasmic Dynamics During Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Atsushi; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Yamamoto, Norio; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saji, Shigetoyo; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-01

    A library of dual-color fluorescent cancer cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP), linked to histone H2B, expressed in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressed in the cytoplasm was previously genetically engineered. The aim of the current study was to use the dual-color cancer cells to visualize chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Using an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope, a library of dual-color cells from the major cancer types was cultured on plastic. The cells were imaged by confocal microscopy to demonstrate chromosome and cytoplasmic dynamics during mitosis. Nuclear GFP expression enabled visualization of chromosomes behavior, whereas simultaneous cytoplasmic RFP expression enabled visualization of cytoplasmic behavior during mitosis. Thus, total cellular dynamics can be visualized at high resolution, including individual chromosomes in some cases, in living dual-color cells in real time. Dual-color cancer cells expressing H2B-GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm provide unique tools for visualizing subcellular nuclear and cytoplasm dynamics, including the behavior of individual chromosomes during mitosis. The dual-color cells can be used to evaluate chromosomal loss or gain in real time during treatment with a variety of agents or as the cells are selected for increased or decreased malignancy in culture or in vivo. The dual color cells will be a useful tool to discover and evaluate novel strategies for killing cancer cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Differential metabolism and leakage of protein in an inherited cataract and a normal lens cultured with ouabain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatigorsky, J.; Fukui, H.N.; Kinoshita, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ocular lenses in Nakano mice showed marked changes in synthesis, degradation and leakage of protein during cataractogenesis. The cataract-associated changes included the differential lowering of crystalline synthesis, the cleavage of crystallin polypeptides to lower molecular weight forms and the leakage of crystallins from cultured lenses. Ouabain treatment of normal lenses induced these alterations, suggesting that changes in the intracellular levels of Na + and K + affect the anabolism and catabolism of protein during cataract formation. 35 S-methionine was used during the course of the experiments as a method of protein identification. (author)

  15. Contact lens in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha M Rathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL, hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL.

  16. Contact lens in keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  17. Time-of-day- and light-dependent expression of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrod H Ling

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are driven by the biological clock that operates endogenously but can also be entrained to the light-dark cycle of the environment. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which is composed of individual cellular oscillators that are driven by a set of core clock genes interacting in transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Light signals can trigger molecular events in the SCN that ultimately impact on the phase of expression of core clock genes to reset the master pacemaker. While transcriptional regulation has received much attention in the field of circadian biology in the past, other mechanisms including targeted protein degradation likely contribute to the clock timing and entrainment process. In the present study, proteome-wide screens of the murine SCN led to the identification of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component of the N-end rule pathway, as a time-of-day-dependent and light-inducible protein. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of UBR4 in the SCN was subsequently characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. UBR4 is expressed across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the SCN in a time-of-day-dependent fashion. UBR4 is localized exclusively to arginine vasopressin (AVP-expressing neurons of the SCN shell. Upon photic stimulation in the early subjective night, the number of UBR4-expressing cells within the SCN increases. This study is the first to identify a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component, UBR4, in the murine SCN and to implicate the N-end rule degradation pathway as a potential player in regulating core clock mechanisms and photic entrainment.

  18. Prioritizing targets for structural biology through the lens of proteomics: the archaeal protein TGAM_1934 from Thermococcus gammatolerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Fernandez, Bernard; Lagorce, Arnaud; Aloin, Valérie; De Guillen, Karine Montet; Boyer, Jean-Baptiste; Dedieu, Alain; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Armengaud, Jean; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ORFans are hypothetical proteins lacking any significant sequence similarity with other proteins. Here, we highlighted by quantitative proteomics the TGAM_1934 ORFan from the hyperradioresistant Thermococcus gammatolerans archaeon as one of the most abundant hypothetical proteins. This protein has been selected as a priority target for structure determination on the basis of its abundance in three cellular conditions. Its solution structure has been determined using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. TGAM_1934 displays an original fold, although sharing some similarities with the 3D structure of the bacterial ortholog of frataxin, CyaY, a protein conserved in bacteria and eukaryotes and involved in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. These results highlight the potential of structural proteomics in prioritizing ORFan targets for structure determination based on quantitative proteomics data. The proteomic data and structure coordinates have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000402 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000402) and Protein Data Bank under the accession number 2mcf, respectively. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of processing on the in vitro and in vivo protein quality of red and green lentils (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Matthew G; Medina, Gerardo; Franczyk, Adam J; Neufeld, Jason; Appah, Paulyn; Utioh, Alphonsus; Frohlich, Peter; House, James D

    2018-02-01

    In order to determine the effect of extrusion, baking and cooking on the protein quality of red and green lentils, a rodent bioassay was conducted and compared to an in vitro method of protein quality determination. On average, the Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score of red lentils (55.0) was higher than that of green lentils (50.8). Extruded lentil flour had higher scores (63.01 red, 57.09 green) than either cooked (57.40 red, 52.92 green) or baked (53.84 red, 47.14 green) flours. The average Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score of red lentils (0.54) was higher than green lentils (0.49). The Protein Efficiency Ratio of the extruded lentil flours (1.30 red, 1.34 green) was higher than that of the baked flour (0.98 red, 1.09 green). A correlation was found between in vivo and in vitro methods of determining protein digestibility (R 2 =0.8934). This work could influence selection of processing method during product development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypothyroidism Induces Hypophagia Associated with Alterations in Protein Expression of Neuropeptide Y and Proopiomelanocortin in the Arcuate Nucleus, Independently of Hypothalamic Nuclei-Specific Changes in Leptin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvino, Camila; Império, Güínever Eustáquio; Wilieman, Marianna; Costa-E-Sousa, Ricardo Henrique; Souza, Luana Lopes; Trevenzoli, Isis Hara; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas

    2016-01-01

    ARC and VMN but not in PVN nucleus. ObRb protein changes were concomitant with decreased phosphorylated STAT3 in the ARC, and decreased total STAT3 in VMN and PVN. However, hypothyroidism did not affect mRNA levels of Lepr or Stat3 in the hypothalamic nuclei. Experimental hypothyroidism induced a negative energy balance accompanied by decreased NPY and increased POMC protein content in the ARC, resulting in predominance of anorexigenic pathways, despite central leptin resistance and impairment of the leptin signaling cascade in a nuclei-specific manner.

  1. Characterization of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Expression in Nucleus Accumbens and Hippocampus of Rats Subjected to Food Selection in the Cafeteria Diet Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarro-Ramírez, Andrea; Sánchez, Daniel; Tejeda-Padrón, Alma; Buenfil-Canto, Linda Vianey; Valladares-García, Jorge; Pacheco-Pantoja, Elda; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health problem that requires different experimental perspectives to understand the onset of this disease, including the neurobiological basis of food selection. From a molecular perspective, obesity has been related with activity of several endogenous molecules, including the mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAP-K). The aim of this study was to characterize MAP-K expression in hedonic and learning and memory brain-associated areas such as nucleus accumbens (AcbC) and hippocampus (HIPP) after food selection. We show that animals fed with cafeteria diet during 14 days displayed an increase in p38 MAP-K activity in AcbC if chose cheese. Conversely, a diminution was observed in animals that preferred chocolate in AcbC. Also, a decrease of p38 MAP-K phosphorylation was found in HIPP in rats that selected either cheese or chocolate. Our data demonstrate a putative role of MAP-K expression in food selection. These findings advance our understanding of neuromolecular basis engaged in obesity.

  2. Nucleus Accumbens-Associated Protein 1 Expression Has Potential as a Marker for Distinguishing Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joji Sekine

    Full Text Available Oral epithelial dysplasia (OED and carcinoma in situ (CIS are defined by dysplastic cells in the epithelium. Over a third of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC patients present with associated OED. However, accurate histopathological diagnosis of such lesions is difficult. Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1 is a member of the Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad complex family of proteins, and is overexpressed in OSCC. This study aimed to determine whether NAC1 has the potential to be used as a marker to distinguish OED and OSCC.The study included 114 patients (64 men, 50 women. There were 67, 10, and 37 patients with OED, CIS, and OSCC, respectively. NAC1 labeling indices (LIs and immunoreactivity intensities (IRI were evaluated. The patients' pathological classification was significantly associated with age, sex, NAC1 LIs, and NAC1 IRI (p = 0.025, p = 0.022, p 50% positivity the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV were 0.766, 0.910, 0.857, and 0.847, respectively. For NAC1 IRI with ≤ 124 positive pixels, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.787, 0.866, 0.804, and 0.853, respectively. Though there are several potential limitations to this study and the results were obtained from a retrospective analysis of a single site cohort, the data suggest that the NAC1 LIs/IRI is a strong predictor of CIS/OSCC.NAC1 has potential as a marker for distinguishing OED from CIS/OSCC.

  3. Nucleus Accumbens-Associated Protein 1 Expression Has Potential as a Marker for Distinguishing Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Joji; Nakatani, Eiji; Ohira, Koichiro; Hideshima, Katsumi; Kanno, Takahiro; Nariai, Yoshiki; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Urano, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and carcinoma in situ (CIS) are defined by dysplastic cells in the epithelium. Over a third of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients present with associated OED. However, accurate histopathological diagnosis of such lesions is difficult. Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a member of the Pox virus and Zinc finger/Bric-a-brac Tramtrack Broad complex family of proteins, and is overexpressed in OSCC. This study aimed to determine whether NAC1 has the potential to be used as a marker to distinguish OED and OSCC. The study included 114 patients (64 men, 50 women). There were 67, 10, and 37 patients with OED, CIS, and OSCC, respectively. NAC1 labeling indices (LIs) and immunoreactivity intensities (IRI) were evaluated. The patients' pathological classification was significantly associated with age, sex, NAC1 LIs, and NAC1 IRI (p = 0.025, p = 0.022, p 50% positivity the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 0.766, 0.910, 0.857, and 0.847, respectively. For NAC1 IRI with ≤ 124 positive pixels, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.787, 0.866, 0.804, and 0.853, respectively. Though there are several potential limitations to this study and the results were obtained from a retrospective analysis of a single site cohort, the data suggest that the NAC1 LIs/IRI is a strong predictor of CIS/OSCC. NAC1 has potential as a marker for distinguishing OED from CIS/OSCC.

  4. Gene expression profiling in the stress control brain region hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reveals a novel gene network including Amyloid beta Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deussing Jan M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pivotal role of stress in the precipitation of psychiatric diseases such as depression is generally accepted. This study aims at the identification of genes that are directly or indirectly responding to stress. Inbred mouse strains that had been evidenced to differ in their stress response as well as in their response to antidepressant treatment were chosen for RNA profiling after stress exposure. Gene expression and regulation was determined by microarray analyses and further evaluated by bioinformatics tools including pathway and cluster analyses. Results Forced swimming as acute stressor was applied to C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice and resulted in sets of regulated genes in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, 4 h or 8 h after stress. Although the expression changes between the mouse strains were quite different, they unfolded in phases over time in both strains. Our search for connections between the regulated genes resulted in potential novel signalling pathways in stress. In particular, Guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha inhibiting 2 (GNAi2 and Amyloid β (A4 precursor protein (APP were detected as stress-regulated genes, and together with other genes, seem to be integrated into stress-responsive pathways and gene networks in the PVN. Conclusions This search for stress-regulated genes in the PVN revealed its impact on interesting genes (GNAi2 and APP and a novel gene network. In particular the expression of APP in the PVN that is governing stress hormone balance, is of great interest. The reported neuroprotective role of this molecule in the CNS supports the idea that a short acute stress can elicit positive adaptational effects in the brain.

  5. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  6. The putative Agrobacterium transcriptional activator-like virulence protein VirD5 may target T-complex to prevent the degradation of coat proteins in the plant cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafei; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Xu; Huang, Fei; Shao, Lingyun; Luo, Meizhong

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium exports at least five virulence proteins (VirE2, VirE3, VirF, VirD2, VirD5) into host cells and hijacks some host plant factors to facilitate its transformation process. Random DNA binding selection assays (RDSAs), electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and yeast one-hybrid systems were used to identify protein-bound DNA elements. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation, glutathione S-transferase pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays were used to detect protein interactions. Protoplast transformation, coprecipitation, competitive binding and cell-free degradation assays were used to analyze the relationships among proteins. We found that Agrobacterium VirD5 exhibits transcriptional activation activity in yeast, is located in the plant cell nucleus, and forms homodimers. A specific VirD5-bound DNA element designated D5RE (VirD5 response element) was identified. VirD5 interacted directly with Arabidopsis VirE2 Interacting Protein 1 (AtVIP1). However, the ternary complex of VirD5-AtVIP1-VirE2 could be detected, whereas that of VirD5-AtVIP1-VBF (AtVIP1 Binding F-box protein) could not. We demonstrated that VirD5 competes with VBF for binding to AtVIP1 and stabilizes AtVIP1 and VirE2 in the cell-free degradation system. Our results indicated that VirD5 may act as both a transcriptional activator-like effector to regulate host gene expression and a protector preventing the coat proteins of the T-complex from being quickly degraded by the host's ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Perspective of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The paper concerns the lectures given at the International School of nuclear physics, Erice, 1985, which survey the expectations for the field of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The primary motivation for the field, the organization of the lectures, and a description of the NA 34 experiment, are all briefly given. (U.K.)

  8. Effects of 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field on DNA damage and expression of heat shock protein 70 in human lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lixia; Ke Yao; Wang Kaijun; Lu Deqiang; Hu Huajun; Gao Xiangwei; Wang Baohong; Zheng Wei; Lou Jianling; Wu Wei

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the DNA damage, expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and cell proliferation of human lens epithelial cells (hLEC) after exposure to the 1.8 GHz radiofrequency field (RF) of a global system for mobile communications (GSM). An Xc-1800 RF exposure system was used to employ a GSM signal at 1.8 GHz (217 Hz amplitude-modulated) with the output power in the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 1, 2 and 3 W/kg. After 2 h exposure to RF, the DNA damage of hLEC was accessed by comet assay at five different incubation times: 0, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min, respectively. Western blot and RT-PCR were used to determine the expression of Hsp70 in hLECs after RF exposure. The proliferation rate of cells was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation on days 0, 1 and 4 after exposure. The results show that the difference of DNA-breaks between the exposed and sham-exposed (control) groups induced by 1 and 2 W/kg irradiation were not significant at any incubation time point (P > 0.05). The DNA damage caused by 3 W/kg irradiation was significantly increased at the times of 0 and 30 min after exposure (P 0.05). Detectable mRNA as well as protein expression of Hsp70 was found in all groups. Exposure at SARs of 2 and 3 W/kg for 2 h exhibited significantly increased Hsp70 protein expression (P 0.05). No difference of the cell proliferation rate between the sham-exposed and exposed cells was found at any exposure dose tested (P > 0.05). The results indicate that exposure to non-thermal dosages of RF for wireless communications can induce no or repairable DNA damage and the increased Hsp70 protein expression in hLECs occurred without change in the cell proliferation rate. The non-thermal stress response of Hsp70 protein increase to RF exposure might be involved in protecting hLEC from DNA damage and maintaining the cellular capacity for proliferation

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lens because they can be purchased over-the-counter or on the Internet," says Thomas Steinemann, MD, ... Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes ...

  10. Onuf's nucleus X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1981-01-01

    in the length of the nucleus was observed. Based on the cytoarchitecture the nucleus could be divided in three parts, a cranial, a dorsomedial and a ventrolateral. All parts of the nucleus consisted of chromatin-rich medium-sized neurons, and apparent direct appositions between different cells bodies as well...

  11. [Effect of tanshinone IIA on the change of calcium current induced by beta-amyloid protein 25-35 in neurons of nucleus basalis of Meynert].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shujuan; Qian, Yihua; Shi, Lili; Yang, Weina; Feng, Xinzheng; Li, Cuiqin; Liu, Yong

    2010-08-01

    To explore the effect of tanshinone IIA (TanIIA) on calcium current induced by beta-amyloid protein 25-35 (Abeta25-35) in neurons of nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM). Cell acute dissociated technique and the whole-cell recording model of patch-clamp technique of single-cell were used. The voltage-dependent calcium current in neurons of nbM was recorded in SD rats first. Then the effect of TanIIA on the voltage-dependent calcium current in the neurons was assayed. The change of calcium current induced by Abeta25-35 as well as the effect of TanIIA on the change of calcium current induced by Abeta25-35 in neurons of nbM were analyzed. Extracellular fluid containing different concentrations of TanIIA was irrigated, respectively. The peak current did not change obviously. There was no difference in current density between the TanIIA group and the control group at 0 mV (P>0.05). Extracellular fluid containing 200 nmol/L Abeta25-35 was irrigated after the normal calcium current recorded under whole patch clamp, and the peak current changed obviously. There was distinct difference in the current density between the Abeta group and the control group at 0 mV (Pcalcium current was recorded under whole patch clamp, respectively, and the peak current did not change. There was no difference in current density between the TanIIA +Abeta group and the control group at 0 mV (P>0.05). In vitro, TanIIA could inhibit the calcium current amplification induced by Abeta25-35 in neurons of nbM. TanIIA may protect neurons against the toxicity of Abeta and decrease the inward flow of Ca(2+).

  12. Transport of glutathione into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine

    2014-10-01

    The tripeptide thiol glutathione (GSH) is present in the nucleus of plant and animal cells. However, the functions of GSH in the nucleus remain poorly characterised. GSH appears to become sequestered in the nucleus at the early stages of the cell cycle. As part of our search for proteins that may be involved in GSH transport into the nucleus, we studied the functions of the nucleoporin called Alacrima Achalasia aDrenal Insufficiency Neurologic disorder (ALADIN). ALADIN is encoded by the Achalasia-Addisonianism-Alacrimia (AAAS) gene in mammalian cells. Defects in ALADIN promote adrenal disorders and lead to the triple A syndrome in humans. The ALADIN protein localizes to the nuclear envelope in Arabidopsis thaliana and interacts with other components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We characterised the functions of the ALADIN protein in an Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion knockout mutant, which shows slow growth compared to the wild type. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative picture of high energy hadron-nucleus collision process, emerging from the analysis of experimental data, is presented. Appropriate description procedure giving a possibility of reproducing various characteristics of this process in terms of the data on elementary hadron-nucleon interaction is proposed. Formula reproducing hadron-nucleus collision cross sections is derived. Inelastic collision cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus reactions at wide energy interval are calculated for Pb, Ag, and Al targets. A-dependence of cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions at nearly 50 GeV/c momentum were calculated and compared with existing experimental data. Energy dependence of cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions is determined simply by energy dependence of corresponding cross sections for hadron-nucleon collisions; A-dependence is determined simply by nuclear sizes and nucleon density distributions in nuclei

  14. A combinatorial relative mass value evaluation of endogenous bioactive proteins in three-dimensional cultured nucleus pulposus cells of herniated intervertebral discs: identification of potential target proteins for gene therapeutic approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demissew S Mern

    Full Text Available Painful degenerative disc diseases have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches. Nucleus pulposus (NP cells play a central role in intervertebral disc (IVD maintenance by orchestrating catabolic, anabolic and inflammatory factors that affect the extracellular matrix. IVD degeneration is associated with imbalances of these factors, resulting in a catabolic inflammatory metabolism. Therefore, accurate knowledge about their quantity and quality with regard to matrix synthesis is vital for a rational gene therapeutic approach. NP cells were isolated from 63 patients operated due to lumbar disc herniation (mean age 56 / range 29 - 84 years. Then, three-dimensional culture with low-glucose was completed in a collagen type I scaffold for four weeks. Subsequently cell proliferation evaluation was performed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and intracellular concentration of 28 endogenously expressed anabolic, catabolic, inflammatory factors and relevant matrix proteins was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Specimen-related grades of degeneration were confirmed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Independent from gender, age and grade of degeneration proliferation rates remained similar in all groups of NP cells. Progressive grades of degeneration, however, showed a significant influence on accumulation of selective groups of factors such as disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix metalloproteinase 3, metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 and 2, interleukin-1β and interleukin-1 receptor. Along with these changes, the key NP matrix proteins aggrecan and collagen II decreased significantly. The concentration of anabolic factors bone morphogenetic proteins 2, 4, 6 and 7, insulin-like growth factor 1, transforming growth factor beta 1 and 3, however, remained below the minimal detectable quantities. These findings indicate that progressive degenerative

  15. K+-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The K + -nucleus system is reviewed and comparison with data is made. The principal conclusions are that the theoretical uncertainties in relating the K + -nucleus interaction to the K + -nucleon interaction are very small and hence the positive kaon makes an excellent probe of the nucleus. It is suggested that this particle may be more sensitive to non-nucleonic degrees of freedom (especially quarks) than classical probes

  16. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  17. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N. N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  18. Contact lens in keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the En...

  19. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein localized to the nucleus restores HBx-deficient virus replication in HepG2 cells and in vivo in hydrodynamically-injected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keasler, Victor V.; Hodgson, Amanda J.; Madden, Charles R.; Slagle, Betty L.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the requirements for the regulatory HBx protein in hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication is an important goal. A plasmid-based HBV replication assay was used to evaluate whether HBx subcellular localization influences its ability to promote virus replication, as measured by real time PCR quantitation of viral capsid-associated DNA. HBx targeted to the nucleus by a nuclear localization signal (NLS-HBx) was able to restore HBx-deficient HBV replication, while HBx containing a nuclear export signal (NES-HBx) was not. Both NLS-HBx and NES-HBx were expressed at similar levels (by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting), and proper localization of the signal sequence-tagged proteins was confirmed by deconvolution microscopy using HBx, NLS-HBx, and NES-HBx proteins fused to GFP. Importantly, these findings were confirmed in vivo by hydrodynamic injection into mice. Our results demonstrate that in these HBV replication assays, at least one function of HBx requires its localization to the nucleus.

  20. Influence of photoperiod duration and light–dark transitions on entrainment of Per1 and Per2 gene and protein expression in subdivisions of the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Hut, R.A.; Daan, S.; Sumová, Alena

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 9 (2009), s. 1802-1814 ISSN 0953-816X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0503 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-2004115-4-018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : clock gene * suprachiasmatic nucleus * photoperiod Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2009

  1. Nucleus-encoded mRNAs for chloroplast proteins GapA, PetA, and PsbO are trans-spliced in the flagellate Euglena gracilis irrespective of light and plastid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateášiková-Kováčová, Bianka; Vesteg, Matej; Drahovská, Hana; Záhonová, Kristína; Vacula, Rostislav; Krajčovič, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a fresh-water flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. In contrast with organisms possessing primary plastids, mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded genes for chloroplast proteins in E. gracilis depend on neither light nor plastid function. However, it remains unknown, if all these mRNAs are trans-spliced and possess spliced leader sequence at the 5'-end and if trans-splicing depends on light or functional plastids. This study revealed that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding the chloroplast proteins glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA), cytochrome f (PetA), and subunit O of photosystem II (PsbO) are trans-spliced irrespective of light or plastid function. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  2. Effect of infrared radiation on the lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Eman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infrared (IR radiation is becoming more popular in industrial manufacturing processes and in many instruments used for diagnostic and therapeutic application to the human eye. Aim : The present study was designed to investigate the effect of IR radiation on rabbit′s crystalline lens and lens membrane. Materials and Methods: Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were used in the present work. The rabbits were classified into three groups; one of them served as control. The other two groups were exposed to IR radiation for 5 or 10 minutes. Animals from these two irradiated groups were subdivided into two subgroups; one of them was decapitated directly after IR exposure, while the other subgroup was decapitated 1 hour post exposure. IR was delivered from a General Electric Lamp model 250R 50/10, placed 20 cm from the rabbit and aimed at each eye. The activity of Na + -K + ATPase was measured in the lens membrane. Soluble lens proteins were extracted and the following measurements were carried out: estimation of total soluble protein, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. For comparison between multiple groups, analysis of variance was used with significance level set at P < 0.001. Results: The results indicated a change in the molecular weight of different lens crystalline accompanied with changes in protein backbone structure. These changes increased for the groups exposed to IR for 10 minutes. Moreover, the activity of Na + -K + ATPase significantly decreased for all groups. Conclusions: The protein of eye lens is very sensitive to IR radiation which is hazardous and may lead to cataract.

  3. Electrophysiological effects of kainic acid on vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 neurones isolated from the supraoptic nucleus in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, J; Ohbuchi, T; Yoshimura, M; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Matsuura, T; Suzuki, H; Ueta, Y

    2014-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) contains two types of magnocellular neurosecretory cells: arginine vasopressin (AVP)-producing and oxytocin (OXT)-producing cells. We recently generated and characterised two transgenic rat lines: one expressing an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and the other expressing an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1). These transgenic rats enable the visualisation of AVP or OXT neurones in the SON. In the present study, we compared the electrophysiological responses of AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones to glutamic acid in SON primary cultures. Glutamate mediates fast synaptic transmission through three classes of ionotrophic receptors: the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. We investigated the contributions of the three classes of ionotrophic receptors in glutamate-induced currents. Three different antagonists were used, each predominantly selective for one of the classes of ionotrophic receptor. Next, we focused on the kainate receptors (KARs). We examined the electrophysiological effects of kainic acid (KA) on AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In current clamp mode, KA induced depolarisation and increased firing rates. These KA-induced responses were inhibited by the non-NMDA ionotrophic receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H4H)-dione in both AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In voltage clamp mode, the application of KA evoked inward currents in a dose-dependent manner. The KA-induced currents were significantly larger in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. This significant difference in KA-induced currents was abolished by the GluK1-containing KAR antagonist UBP302. At high concentrations (250-500 μm), the specific GluK1-containing KAR agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) induced significantly larger currents in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. Furthermore, the difference between the AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones in the ATPA currents

  4. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Jennifer A.; Sloboda, Roger D.

    1992-01-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769- 780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD prot...

  5. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... new application of artificial intelligence shows whether a patient’s eyes point to high blood pressure or risk ...

  6. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be purchased over-the-counter or on the Internet," says Thomas Steinemann, MD, professor of ophthalmology at ... ask for a prescription. There is no such thing as a "one size fits all" contact lens. ...

  7. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... had not been properly fitted by an eye care professional, the lenses stuck to my eye like ... lenses do not require the same level of care or consideration as a standard contact lens because ...

  8. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sell contacts without a prescription are breaking the law, and may be fined $11,000 per violation. " ... wear any kind of contact lens. In Butler's case, the lenses caused an infection and left her ...

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Costume Contact Lenses Can Ruin Vision Eye Makeup Safety In fact, it is illegal to sell colored ...

  10. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Colored Contact Lenses Julian: Teenager Blinded In One Eye By Non-Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision ... Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety ...

  11. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  12. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had "extreme pain in ... to wear any kind of contact lens. In Butler's case, the lenses caused an infection and left ...

  13. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... use of colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses ...

  14. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an impulsive buy from a souvenir shop, but 10 hours after she first put in a pair ... Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision Loss After Just 10 Hours Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops ...

  15. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  16. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes Four Ways Over- ... without a prescription are breaking the law, and may be fined $11,000 per violation. "Many of ...

  17. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not require the same level of care or consideration as a standard contact lens because they can ... sell contacts without a prescription are breaking the law, and may be fined $11,000 per violation. " ...

  18. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... an ophthalmologist — an eye medical doctor — who will measure each eye and talk to you about proper ...

  19. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription. Follow the contact lens care directions for cleaning, disinfecting, and wearing the lenses. Never share contact ... with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American ...

  20. Viscous froth lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. E.; Bramley, A.; Lue, L.; Grassia, P.

    2006-11-01

    Microscale models of foam structure traditionally incorporate a balance between bubble pressures and surface tension forces associated with curvature of bubble films. In particular, models for flowing foam microrheology have assumed this balance is maintained under the action of some externally imposed motion. Recently, however, a dynamic model for foam structure has been proposed, the viscous froth model, which balances the net effect of bubble pressures and surface tension to viscous dissipation forces: this permits the description of fast-flowing foam. This contribution examines the behavior of the viscous froth model when applied to a paradigm problem with a particularly simple geometry: namely, a two-dimensional bubble “lens.” The lens consists of a channel partly filled by a bubble (known as the “lens bubble”) which contacts one channel wall. An additional film (known as the “spanning film”) connects to this bubble spanning the distance from the opposite channel wall. This simple structure can be set in motion and deformed out of equilibrium by applying a pressure across the spanning film: a rich dynamical behavior results. Solutions for the lens structure steadily propagating along the channel can be computed by the viscous froth model. Perturbation solutions are obtained in the limit of a lens structure with weak applied pressures, while numerical solutions are available for higher pressures. These steadily propagating solutions suggest that small lenses move faster than large ones, while both small and large lens bubbles are quite resistant to deformation, at least for weak applied back pressures. As the applied back pressure grows, the structure with the small lens bubble remains relatively stiff, while that with the large lens bubble becomes much more compliant. However, with even further increases in the applied back pressure, a critical pressure appears to exist for which the steady-state structure loses stability and unsteady

  1. Activity-Regulated Cytoskeleton-Associated Protein Accumulates in the Nucleus in Response to Cocaine and Acts as a Brake on Chromatin Remodeling and Long-Term Behavioral Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salery, Marine; Dos Santos, Marc; Saint-Jour, Estefani; Moumné, Lara; Pagès, Christiane; Kappès, Vincent; Parnaudeau, Sébastien; Caboche, Jocelyne; Vanhoutte, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Addiction relies on persistent alterations of neuronal properties, which depends on gene regulation. Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) is an immediate early gene that modulates neuronal plasticity underlying learning and memory. Its role in cocaine-induced neuronal and behavioral adaptations remains elusive. Acute cocaine-treated mice were used for quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunocytochemistry, and confocal imaging from striatum. Live imaging and transfection assays for Arc overexpression were performed from primary cultures. Molecular and behavioral adaptations to cocaine were studied from Arc-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. Arc messenger RNA and proteins are rapidly induced in the striatum after acute cocaine administration, via an extracellular-signal regulated kinase-dependent de novo protein synthesis. Although detected in dendrites, Arc accumulates in the nucleus in active zones of transcription, where it colocalizes with phospho-Ser10-histone H3, an important component of nucleosomal response. In vitro, Arc overexpression downregulates phospho-Ser10-histone H3 without modifying extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in the nucleus. In vivo, Arc-deficient mice display decreased heterochromatin domains, a high RNA-polymerase II activity and enhanced c-Fos expression. These mice presented an exacerbated psychomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference induced by low doses of cocaine. Cocaine induces the rapid induction of Arc and its nuclear accumulation in striatal neurons. Locally, it alters the nucleosomal response, and acts as a brake on chromatin remodeling and gene regulation. These original observations posit Arc as a major homeostatic modulator of molecular and behavioral responses to cocaine. Thus, modulating Arc levels may provide promising therapeutic approaches in drug addiction. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by

  2. Statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction. Intranuclear cascade model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobov, G.A.; Stepanov, N.V.; Sibirtsev, A.A.; Trebukhovskij, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    A new version of the program of statistical simulation of hadron-nucleus and light nucleus-nucleus interaction is elaborated. The cascade part of the program is described. The comparison of model predictions with the proton-nucleus interaction experiments is performed. A satisfactory calculations-experiment agreement is obtained

  3. High energy nucleus-nucleus scattering and matter radius of unstable nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.; Okuhara, Y.

    1985-07-01

    The interaction cross sections of high energy nucleus-nucleus scattering have been studied with the Glauber Model and Hartree-Fock like variational calculation for the nuclear structure. It is found that the experimental interaction cross sections of the light unstable nucleus-stable nucleus scatterings measured by INS-LBL collaboration are well reproduceable. (author)

  4. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty a...

  5. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty...

  6. Clinical observation on different nucleus delivery methods in small incision cataract surgery with non-phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kui Ke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the clinical effect and characteristics of lens loop extracting nucleus method, water irrigation and nucleus fragmentation within anterior chamber in small incision cataract surgery with non-phacoemulsification. METHODS:There were 324 cases(324 eyeswith senile cataract randomly divided into three groups, by the lens loop extracting nucleus method(group A, water irrigation(group Band nucleus fragmentation within anterior chamber(group C, to complete the process of nucleus division. The time of nuclear removal, complication during operation, the degree of edema of corneal endothelium on the first day after the surgery and visual acuity after surgery were observed and recorded.RESULTS:The average extracting nucleus time was 45s in lens loop(group A; 34s in water irrigation(group Band 65s in manual fragmentation(group C.The differences of average time are statistically significant(PPP>0.05.Regarding the visual acuity on the first day after surgery, the difference between group A and group C, group B and group C were statistically significant(PPP>0.05.CONCLUSION:Manual fragmentation has obvious advantages in removing nuclear above Ⅳ grade; The water irrigation method has fewer complications with low incidence of corner edema, which is more preferable in removing the nuclear below Ⅳ grade.

  7. Multifragmentation in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, W.; Adloff, J.C.; Bouissou, P.; Hubele, J.; Imme, G.; Iori, I.; Kreutz, P.; Leray, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Liu, Z.; Lynen, U.; Meijer, R.J.; Milkau, U.; Moroni, A.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Ngo, C.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Pochodzalla, J.; Raciti, G.; Rudolf, G.; Schuettauf, A.; Stuttge, L.

    1993-10-01

    The complete fragmentation of highly excited nuclear systems into fragments of intermediate mass is observed in heavy-ion reactions at relativistic bombarding energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV per nucleon. Similar features are found for peripheral collisions between heavy nuclei and for more central collisions between a heavy and a light nucleus. The partition space explored in multifragment decays is well described by the statistical multifragmentation models. The expansion before breakup is confirmed by the analysis of the measured fragment energies of ternary events in their own rest frame. Collective radial flow is confined to rather small values in these peripheral-type reactions. Many conceptually different models seem to be capable of reproducing the charge correlations measured for the multifragment decays. (orig.)

  8. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Several facets of antinucleon-nucleus interactions are explored. The topics treated are: coherent interactions, production of unusual states and particles in the nuclear medium, and the creation of extreme states of matter by antimatter annihilation. It is found that temperatures of the magnitude necessary to achieve the predicted quark-gluon phase transition are obtained. 20 references

  9. Effects of x-irradiation on lens reducing systems. [Rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giblin, F.J.; Chakrapani, B.; Reddy, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    Studies have been made of the effects of x ray on various lens reducing systems including the levels of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS), and the activities of certain enzymes including glutathion reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). It was found that during several weeks following x irradiation but prior to cataract formation there was very little change in the number of reduced -SH groups per unit weight of lens protein but that, with the appearance of cataract, there was a sudden loss of protein -SH groups. In contrast, the concentration of GSH in the x-rayed lens decreased throughout the experimental period. Similarly, the concentration of NADPH in the x-rayed lens was found to decrease significantly relative to controls one week prior to cataract formation and the ratio of NADPH to NADP/sup +/ in the lens shifted at this time period from a value greater than 1.0 in the control lens to less than 1.0 in the x-rayed lens. A corresponding decrease occurred in the activity of the HMS in x-rayed lenses as measured by culture in the presence of 1-/sup 14/C-labelled glucose. G-6-PD was partially inactivated in the x-rayed lens. Of the eight enzymes studied, G-6-PD appeared to be the most sensitive to x-irradiation. The data indicate that x-irradiation results in a steady decrease in the effectiveness of lens reducing systems and that, when these systems reach a critically low point, sudden oxidation of protein -SH groups and formation of high molecular weight protein aggregates may be initiated.

  10. Effects of x-irradiation on lens reducing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giblin, F.J.; Chakrapani, B.; Reddy, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    Studies have been made of the effects of x ray on various lens reducing systems including the levels of NADPH and glutathione (GSH), the activity of the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS), and the activities of certain enzymes including glutathion reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD). It was found that during several weeks following x irradiation but prior to cataract formation there was very little change in the number of reduced -SH groups per unit weight of lens protein but that, with the appearance of cataract, there was a sudden loss of protein -SH groups. In contrast, the concentration of GSH in the x-rayed lens decreased throughout the experimental period. Similarly, the concentration of NADPH in the x-rayed lens was found to decrease significantly relative to controls one week prior to cataract formation and the ratio of NADPH to NADP + in the lens shifted at this time period from a value greater than 1.0 in the control lens to less than 1.0 in the x-rayed lens. A corresponding decrease occurred in the activity of the HMS in x-rayed lenses as measured by culture in the presence of 1- 14 C-labelled glucose. G-6-PD was partially inactivated in the x-rayed lens. Of the eight enzymes studied, G-6-PD appeared to be the most sensitive to x-irradiation. The data indicate that x-irradiation results in a steady decrease in the effectiveness of lens reducing systems and that, when these systems reach a critically low point, sudden oxidation of protein -SH groups and formation of high molecular weight protein aggregates may be initiated

  11. A catoptric lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambauske, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a catoptric lens for combining energies transmitted by several sources such as lasers; said lens comprising mirrors, the reflective surfaces of which have their focuses spaced from a common axis of symmetry. By means of these reflecting surfaces, which are generated by the nutation of portions of quadratic conics about the axis of symmetry, it is possible to focus the energy emmited by several lasers at the focus of the exit-mirror reflecting surface. This can be applied to thermonuclear fusion [fr

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  13. Study of Relativistic Nucleus - Nucleus Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to survey the reaction mechanisms involved in the collision of 60~GeV/nucleon and 200~GeV/nucleon light ions ($^{16}$0 and $^{32}$S provided by a new GSI-LBL injector) with different nuclei, to determine the stopping power of nuclear matter and to search for evidence of the formation of quark matter by comparison to hadron-nucleus reactions at the same incident energies. \\\\ The experimental set-up consists of a 2 m Streamer Chamber in the Vertex Magnet used to detect all the charged particles emerging from the interaction as well as the neutral strange particles that decay inside the chamber. The high energy of the forward-going particles are detected by four sets of calorimeters. A highly segmented Photon Position Detector (PPD) backed up by a 240 segment Ring Calorimeter will cover one unit of rapidity around mid-rapidity. An Intermediate Calorimeter will cover the rest of the forward phase space except for the region around beam rapidity, where a Veto Calorimeter will detect be...

  14. Effect of Age-Related Human Lens Sutures Growth on Its Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ho-Ting D; Howse, Louisa A; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Age-related nuclear cataract is the opacification of the clear ocular lens due to oxidative damage as we age, and is the leading cause of blindness in the world. A lack of antioxidant supply to the core of ever-growing ocular lens could contribute to the cause of this condition. In this project, a computational model was developed to study the sutural fluid inflow of the aging human lens. Three different SOLIDWORKS computational fluid dynamics models of the human lens (7 years old; 28 years old; 46 years old) were created, based on available literature data. The fluid dynamics of the lens sutures were modelled using the Stokes flow equations, combined with realistic physiological boundary conditions and embedded in COMSOL Multiphysics. The flow rate, volume, and flow rate per volume of fluid entering the aging lens were examined, and all increased over the 40 years modelled. However, while the volume of the lens grew by ∼300% and the flow rate increased by ∼400%, the flow rate per volume increased only by very moderate ∼38%. Here, sutural information from humans of 7 to 46 years of age was obtained. In this modelled age range, an increase of flow rate per volume was observed, albeit at very slow rate. We hypothesize that with even further increasing age (60+ years old), the lens volume growth would outpace its flow rate increases, which would eventually lead to malnutrition of the lens nucleus and onset of cataracts.

  15. Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy-Associated Mutant Forms of Lamin A Recruit the Stress Responsive Protein Ankrd2 into the Nucleus, Affecting the Cellular Response to Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Angori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankrd2 is a stress responsive protein mainly expressed in muscle cells. Upon the application of oxidative stress, Ankrd2 translocates into the nucleus where it regulates the activity of genes involved in cellular response to stress. Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy 2 (EDMD2 is a muscular disorder caused by mutations of the gene encoding lamin A, LMNA. As well as many phenotypic abnormalities, EDMD2 muscle cells also feature a permanent basal stress state, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are currently unclear. Methods: Experiments were performed in EDMD2-lamin A overexpressing cell lines and EDMD2-affected human myotubes. Oxidative stress was produced by H2O2 treatment. Co-immunoprecipitation, cellular subfractionation and immunofluorescence analysis were used to validate the relation between Ankrd2 and forms of lamin A; cellular sensibility to stress was monitored by the analysis of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS release and cell viability. Results: Our data demonstrate that oxidative stress induces the formation of a complex between Ankrd2 and lamin A. However, EDMD2-lamin A mutants were able to bind and mislocalize Ankrd2 in the nucleus even under basal conditions. Nonetheless, cells co-expressing Ankrd2 and EDMD2-lamin A mutants were more sensitive to oxidative stress than the Ankrd2-wild type lamin A counterpart. Conclusions: For the first time, we present evidence that in muscle fibers from patients affected by EDMD2, Ankrd2 has an unusual nuclear localization. By introducing a plausible mechanism ruling this accumulation, our data hint at a novel function of Ankrd2 in the pathogenesis of EDMD2-affected cells.

  16. Dating the time of birth: A radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye-lens crystallines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen; Jacobsen, Christina; Lynnerup, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth, in accordance with expectations. Moreover, it has been possible to develop an age model for the formation of the eye-lens crystallines. From this model a radiocarbon calibration curve for lens crystallines has been calculated. As a consequence, the time of birth of humans can be determined with an accuracy of a few years by radiocarbon dating.

  17. Dating the time of birth: A radiocarbon calibration curve for human eye-lens crystallines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Henrik; Heinemeier, Jan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    , in accordance with expectations. Moreover, it has been possible to develop an age model for the formation of the eye-lens crystallines. From this model a radiocarbon calibration curve for lens crystallines has been calculated. As a consequence, the time of birth of humans can be determined with an accuracy......Radiocarbon bomb-pulse dating has been used to measure the formation age of human eye-lens crystallines. Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye-lens that consist of virtually inert tissue. The experimental data show that the radiocarbon ages to a large extent reflect the time of birth...

  18. Quadrupole magnetic lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskunov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The following connection of windings of electromagnet is suggested for simplification of the design of qUadrupole magnetic lens intended for use in radiotechnical and electron-optical devices. The mentioned windings are connected with each other by a bridge scheme and the variable resistors are switched in its diagonals in the lens containing four electromagnet with windings connected with two variable resistors the mobile contacts of which are connected with a direct current source. Current redistribution between left windings and right windings takes place at shift of mobile contact of variable resistor, and current redistribution between upper and low coils of electromagnets takes place at shifting mobile contact of the other variable resistor. In this case smooth and independent electron-optical misalignment of lens by two mutually perpendicular directions proceeds. Use of the given design of the lens in the oscillograph permits to use printing assembly for alignment plate and to reduce the number of connections at the expense of decreasing the number of resistors

  19. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription. There is no such thing as a "one size fits all" contact lens. Lenses that are not properly fitted may scratch the eye or cause blood vessels to grow into the cornea. Even if you have perfect vision, you need to get an eye exam and a prescription ...

  20. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ...

  1. MISSING: BUBBLE CHAMBER LENS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Would the person who borrowed the large bubble chamber lens from the Microcosm workshops on the ISR please return it. This is a much used piece from our object archives. If anybody has any information about the whereabouts of this object, please contact Emma.Sanders@cern.ch Thank you

  2. The Lens of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  3. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wear any kind of contact lens. In Butler's case, the lenses caused an infection and left her with a corneal ... A recent article from U.S. News and World Report explains what ophthalmologists are and how they can ...

  4. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in a PS experiment. Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  5. Thermal Lens Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  6. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact ... After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter ...

  7. Clinical survey of lens care in contact lens patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ky, W; Scherick, K; Stenson, S

    1998-10-01

    Overall, contact lenses provide a safe and effective modality for vision correction. However, problems do occasionally arise. Up to 80% of contact lens complications can be traced to poor patient compliance with recommended lens care guidelines. We conducted a survey to evaluate the level of patient compliance in specific areas of lens care and maintenance and to assess patient knowledge of basic contact lens information. Patients were asked to complete an anonymous 15 question survey that focused on lens care--specifically the use of contact lens cleaners, methods of disinfection, enzyme treatments, use of rewetting drops, and the frequency of follow-up exams. In addition, the survey included six true/false questions relating to contact lens care and safety. There were a total of 103 participants in the study. Approximately 24% of patients stated they never cleaned their lenses prior to disinfection, and 5% used saline solutions as their primary mode of disinfection. A sizable portion of those surveyed (43% of soft lens wearers and 71% of rigid gas permeable lens wearers) either never used enzyme cleaners or used them less than once a month. Seventy percent of patients either never used rewetting drops or used them less than once a day. Twenty-nine percent of patients consulted their eye care professionals every 2 years and 6% less often than every two years. Six questions assessed patient knowledge of contact lens care safety. Of a possible six out of six correct answers, the mean number of correct responses was 3.74. A sizable proportion of contact lens wearers do not adequately adhere to recommended contact lens care, and many have an inadequate understanding of contact lens care guidelines. Therefore, it is important that practitioners place more emphasis on patient education at the time of initial contact lens fitting and reinforce such instruction during follow-up visits.

  8. Regulation of gene expression by Pax6 in ocular cells: a case of tissue-preferred expression of crystallins in lens

    OpenAIRE

    CVEKL, ALES; YANG, YING; CHAUHAN, BHARESH K.; CVEKLOVA, KVETA

    2004-01-01

    Lens development is an excellent model for genetic and biochemical studies of embryonic induction, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation and signal transduction. Differentiation of lens is characterized by lens-preferred expression and accumulation of water-soluble proteins, crystallins. Crystallins are required for light transparency, refraction and maintenance of lens integrity. Here, we review mechanisms of lens-preferred expression of crystallin genes by employing synergism betw...

  9. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Leukocyte nucleus segmentation and nucleus lobe counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yung-Kuan; Tsai, Meng-Hsiun; Huang, Der-Chen; Zheng, Zong-Han; Hung, Kun-Ding

    2010-11-12

    Leukocytes play an important role in the human immune system. The family of leukocytes is comprised of lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils. Any infection or acute stress may increase or decrease the number of leukocytes. An increased percentage of neutrophils may be caused by an acute infection, while an increased percentage of lymphocytes can be caused by a chronic bacterial infection. It is important to realize an abnormal variation in the leukocytes. The five types of leukocytes can be distinguished by their cytoplasmic granules, staining properties of the granules, size of cell, the proportion of the nuclear to the cytoplasmic material, and the type of nucleolar lobes. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency.Biomedical technologists can currently recognize abnormal leukocytes using human eyes. However, the quality and efficiency of diagnosis may be compromised due to the limitations of the biomedical technologists' eyesight, strength, and medical knowledge. Therefore, the development of an automatic leukocyte recognition system is feasible and necessary. It is essential to extract the leukocyte region from a blood smear image in order to develop an automatic leukocyte recognition system. The number of lobes increased when leukemia, chronic nephritis, liver disease, cancer, sepsis, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency occurred. Clinical neutrophil hypersegmentation has been widely used as an indicator of B12 or folate deficiency. The purpose of this paper is to contribute an automatic leukocyte nuclei image segmentation method for such recognition technology. The other goal of this paper is to develop the method of counting the number of lobes in a cell nucleus. The experimental results demonstrated impressive segmentation accuracy

  11. Association of time-dependent changes in mu opioid receptor mRNA, but not BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA and protein expression in the rat nucleus accumbens with incubation of heroin craving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Florence R. M.; Pickens, Charles L.; Goldart, Evan; Fanous, Sanya; Hope, Bruce T.; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives Responding to heroin cues progressively increases after cessation of heroin self-administration (incubation of heroin craving). We investigated whether this incubation is associated with time-dependent changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) signaling and mu opioid receptor (MOR) expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (DS), and medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC). We also investigated the effect of the preferential MOR antagonist naloxone on cue-induced heroin seeking during abstinence. Methods We trained rats to self-administer heroin or saline for 9–10 days and then dissected the NAc, DS, and mPFC at different abstinence days and measured mRNA and protein levels of BDNF, TrkB, and MeCP2, as well as MOR mRNA (Oprm1). In other groups, we assessed cue-induced heroin seeking in extinction tests after 1, 11, and 30 abstinence days, and naloxone’s (0–1.0 mg/kg) effect on extinction responding after 1 and 15 days. Results Cue-induced heroin seeking progressively increased or incubated during abstinence. This incubation was not associated with changes in BDNF, TrkB, or MeCP2 mRNA or protein levels in NAc, DS, or mPFC; additionally, no molecular changes were observed after extinction tests on day 11. In NAc, but not DS or mPFC, MOR mRNA decreased on abstinence day 1 and returned to basal levels over time. Naloxone significantly decreased cue-induced heroin seeking after 15 abstinence days but not 1 day. Conclusions Results suggest a role of MOR in incubation of heroin craving. As previous studies implicated NAc BDNF in incubation of cocaine craving, our data suggest that different mechanisms contribute to incubation of heroin versus cocaine craving. PMID:22790874

  12. Behavioral and structural responses to chronic cocaine require a feedforward loop involving ΔFosB and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Alfred J; Vialou, Vincent; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Feng, Jian; Kourrich, Saïd; Collins, Miles; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George; Turecki, Gustavo; Neve, Rachael; Thomas, Mark; Nestler, Eric J

    2013-03-06

    The transcription factor ΔFosB and the brain-enriched calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) are induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by chronic exposure to cocaine or other psychostimulant drugs of abuse, in which the two proteins mediate sensitized drug responses. Although ΔFosB and CaMKIIα both regulate AMPA glutamate receptor expression and function in NAc, dendritic spine formation on NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and locomotor sensitization to cocaine, no direct link between these molecules has to date been explored. Here, we demonstrate that ΔFosB is phosphorylated by CaMKIIα at the protein-stabilizing Ser27 and that CaMKII is required for the cocaine-mediated accumulation of ΔFosB in rat NAc. Conversely, we show that ΔFosB is both necessary and sufficient for cocaine induction of CaMKIIα gene expression in vivo, an effect selective for D1-type MSNs in the NAc shell subregion. Furthermore, induction of dendritic spines on NAc MSNs and increased behavioral responsiveness to cocaine after NAc overexpression of ΔFosB are both CaMKII dependent. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time induction of ΔFosB and CaMKII in the NAc of human cocaine addicts, suggesting possible targets for future therapeutic intervention. These data establish that ΔFosB and CaMKII engage in a cell-type- and brain-region-specific positive feedforward loop as a key mechanism for regulating the reward circuitry of the brain in response to chronic cocaine.

  13. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Y Choi

    Full Text Available Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30 showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3 were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5 in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs

  14. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Janet J Y; Ting, Chao-Tung; Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to defects

  15. The imaginary part of the nucleus - nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, S.C.; Sinha, B.

    1978-01-01

    The contribution to the imaginary nucleus - nucleus optical potential has been estimated by evaluating the energy - conserving seocond-order term in the perturbation series. The incoming nuclear field is supposed to excite nucleons in a nucleus in this calculation and the nuclear excitations are approximated by particle-hole excitations in a Fermi gas. The resulting imaginary potential compares favourably with phenomenological potentials. (author)

  16. [Correct contact lens hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümle, S; Kaercher, T; Khaireddin, R

    2013-06-01

    Although contact lenses have long been established in ophthalmology, practical aspects of handling contact lenses is becoming increasingly less important in the clinical training as specialist for ophthalmology. Simultaneously, for many reasons injuries due to wearing contact lenses are increasing. In order to correct this discrepancy, information on contact lenses and practical experience with them must be substantially increased from a medical perspective. This review article deals with the most important aspects for prevention of complications, i.e. contact lens hygiene.

  17. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Global features of nucleus-nucleus collisions in ultrarelativistic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savina, M.V.; Shmatov, S.V.; Slavin, N.V.; Zarubin, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    HIJING generator simulation of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies is presented. It is shown that the global characteristics of nucleus-nucleus collisions, such as distribution of a charged multiplicity, total and electromagnetic transverse energy over pseudorapidity are rather sensitive to some predictions of models of high-exited nuclear medium formation, namely parton energy losses in dense nuclear matter. These losses result in appearance of a broad maximum in global variable distributions over pseudorapidity. The most profound of this effect occurs at central heavy ion collisions at LHC energy

  19. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  20. Impact of taurine supplementation on blood pressure in gestational protein-restricted offspring: Effect on the medial solitary tract nucleus cell numbers, angiotensin receptors, and renal sodium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scabora, José Eduardo; de Lima, Marcelo Cardoso; Lopes, Agnes; de Lima, Ize Penhas; Mesquita, Flávia Fernandes; Torres, Daniele Bráz; Boer, Patrícia Aline; Gontijo, José Antonio Rocha

    2015-03-01

    The current study considers changes of the postnatal brainstem cell number and angiotensin receptors by maternal protein restriction (LP) and LP taurine supplementation (LPT), and its impact on arterial hypertension development in adult life. The brain tissue studies were performed by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and isotropic fractionator analysis. The current study shows that elevated blood pressure associated with decreased fractional urinary sodium excretion (FENa) in adult LP offspring was reverted by diet taurine supplementation. Also, that 12-day-old LP pups present a reduction of 21% of brainstem neuron counts, and, immunohistochemistry demonstrates a decreased expression of type 1 angiotensin II receptors (AT1R) in the entire medial solitary tract nuclei (nTS) of 16-week-old LP rats compared to age-matched NP and LPT offspring. Conversely, the immunostained type 2 AngII (AT2R) receptors in 16-week-old LP nTS were unchanged. The present investigation shows a decreased FENa that occurs despite unchanged creatinine clearance. It is plausible to hypothesize an association of decreased postnatal nTS cell number, AT1R/AT2R ratio and FENa with the higher blood pressure levels found in taurine-deficient progeny (LP) compared with age-matched NP and LPT offspring. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. c-Myc regulates cell proliferation during lens development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available Myc protooncogenes play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, growth, differentiation and survival during development. In various developing organs, c-myc has been shown to control the expression of cell cycle regulators and its misregulated expression is detected in many human tumors. Here, we show that c-myc gene (Myc is highly expressed in developing mouse lens. Targeted deletion of c-myc gene from head surface ectoderm dramatically impaired ocular organogenesis, resulting in severe microphtalmia, defective anterior segment development, formation of a lens stalk and/or aphakia. In particular, lenses lacking c-myc presented thinner epithelial cell layer and growth impairment that was detectable soon after its inactivation. Defective development of c-myc-null lens was not caused by increased cell death of lens progenitor cells. Instead, c-myc loss reduced cell proliferation, what was associated with an ectopic expression of Prox1 and p27(Kip1 proteins within epithelial cells. Interestingly, a sharp decrease in the expression of the forkhead box transcription factor Foxe3 was also observed following c-myc inactivation. These data represent the first description of the physiological roles played by a Myc family member in mouse lens development. Our findings support the conclusion that c-myc regulates the proliferation of lens epithelial cells in vivo and may, directly or indirectly, modulate the expression of classical cell cycle regulators in developing mouse lens.

  2. A novel mechanism for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II targeting to L-type Ca2+channels that initiates long-range signaling to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Marks, Christian R; Perfitt, Tyler L; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Lee, Amy; Jacobson, David A; Colbran, Roger J

    2017-10-20

    Neuronal excitation can induce new mRNA transcription, a phenomenon called excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. Among several pathways implicated in E-T coupling, activation of voltage-gated L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) in the plasma membrane can initiate a signaling pathway that ultimately increases nuclear CREB phosphorylation and, in most cases, expression of immediate early genes. Initiation of this long-range pathway has been shown to require recruitment of Ca 2+ -sensitive enzymes to a nanodomain in the immediate vicinity of the LTCC by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that activated Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) strongly interacts with a novel binding motif in the N-terminal domain of Ca V 1 LTCC α1 subunits that is not conserved in Ca V 2 or Ca V 3 voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel subunits. Mutations in the Ca V 1.3 α1 subunit N-terminal domain or in the CaMKII catalytic domain that largely prevent the in vitro interaction also disrupt CaMKII association with intact LTCC complexes isolated by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, these same mutations interfere with E-T coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our findings define a novel molecular interaction with the neuronal LTCC that is required for the initiation of a long-range signal to the nucleus that is critical for learning and memory. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Recovery of stress-impaired social behavior by an antagonist of the CRF binding protein, CRF6-33,in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mailton; Stein, Dirson J; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Miczek, Klaus A; de Almeida, Rosa Maria M

    2018-01-09

    Social stress is recognized to promote the development of neuropsychiatric and mood disorders. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is an important neuropeptide activated by social stress, and it contributes to neural and behavioral adaptations, as indicated by impaired social interactions and anhedonic effects. Few studies have focused on the role of the CRF binding protein (CRFBP), a component of the CRF system, and its activity in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), a limbic structure connecting amygdala and hypothalamus. In this study, animals' preference for sweet solutions was examined as an index of stress-induced anhedonic responses in Wistar rats subjected to four brief intermittent episodes of social defeat. Next, social approach was assessed after local infusions of the CRFBP antagonist, CRF fragment 6-33 (CRF 6-33 ) into the BNST. The experience of brief episodes of social defeat impaired social approach behaviors in male rats. However, intra-BNST CRF 6-33 infusions restored social approach in stressed animals to the levels of non-stressed rats. CRF 6-33 acted selectively on social interaction and did not alter general exploration in nether stressed nor non-stressed rats. These findings suggest that BNST CRFBP is involved in the modulation of anxiety-like responses induced by social stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prolonging contact lens wear and making contact lens wear safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2006-02-01

    To summarize the present status of safety and efficacy of contact lens wear. Literature review. Ovid Medline searches were performed on records from 1966 through 2005 using keywords: keratitis, contact lens complications, extended-wear contact lenses, and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses. Patients desire comfort, clarity of vision, and prolonged contact lens wear when contact lenses are used to correct refractive error. Practitioners desire patient satisfaction but also require maintenance of the integrity of the eye and no complications that jeopardize vision or health of the eye. Improvements in the oxygen permeability of the contact lens materials, design of the contact lens and its surface, and solutions for the maintenance of the lens have reduced but not eliminated the risks of infection, inflammation, and conjunctival papillary reaction associated with contact lens wear. The lessons of past and recent history suggest that patient education and practitioner participation in the management of contact lens wear continue to be critical factors for patient satisfaction and safety in the extended wear of contact lenses. The availability of highly oxygen permeable contact lenses has increased the tolerance and safety of extended contact lens wear, but patient instruction and education in proper use and care of lenses is required and caution is advised.

  5. Antiproton-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shastry, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    The operation of low energy antiproton ring at CERN has initiated antiproton-nucleus(antip - A) collision experiments. These give information on antiproton-nucleon(antiproton - N) interaction in the nuclei, structure of antiprotonic atoms, antiprotonic bound states in the nucleus, strange particle production etc. Considerable data on antiproton - A scattering cross sections at several incident energies for targets like 12 C, 16 O, 18 Ca etc. have become available. Both elastic and inelastic antiproton-A cross sections show diffractive oscillatory behaviour. As a result, it is possible to qualitatively understand antiproton-A cross sections by treating the target as a black sphere with diffused surface. Phenomenological optical potentials including those generated by the model independent Fourier-Bessel method show that the potential is highly absorptive; imaginary part dominates and has longer range than real part and the latter decreases with energy. Spin-orbit term is less important. Some of these can be understood in terms of meson exchange antiproton-N potentials. The large imaginary part is due to the availability of additional channels initiated by antiproton annihilation. Optical potentials show several ambiguities including the Igo ambiguity. More fundamental approaches to the potential based on antiproton-N t matrix and folding models have been attempted. A comparison of heavy ion scatering and antiproton-A scattering is made. It is shown that semi-classical WKB method is applicable for antiproton-A scattering. Some recent work on antiproton-p potentials, antiprotonic states and strange particle production is discussed. (author). 28 refs., 10 figs., 7 tables

  6. Compliance among soft contact lens wearers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzman, Tomislav; Barišić Kutija, Marija; Masnec, Sanja; Jandroković, Sonja; Mrazovac, Danijela; Jurišić, Darija; Škegro, Ivan; Kalauz, Miro; Kordić, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    Contact lens compliance is proven to be crucial for preventing lens wear-related complications because of the interdependence of the steps in lens care regime and their influence on lens system microbial contamination. Awareness of the patients' lens handling compliance as well as correct recognition of non-compliant behaviours is the basis for creating more targeted strategies for patient education. The aim of this study was to investigate compliance among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in ...

  7. Panoramic lens applications revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Simon

    2008-04-01

    During the last few years, innovative optical design strategies to generate and control image mapping have been successful in producing high-resolution digital imagers and projectors. This new generation of panoramic lenses includes catadioptric panoramic lenses, panoramic annular lenses, visible/IR fisheye lenses, anamorphic wide-angle attachments, and visible/IR panomorph lenses. Given that a wide-angle lens images a large field of view on a limited number of pixels, a systematic pixel-to-angle mapping will help the efficient use of each pixel in the field of view. In this paper, we present several modern applications of these modern types of hemispheric lenses. Recently, surveillance and security applications have been proposed and published in Security and Defence symposium. However, modern hemispheric lens can be used in many other fields. A panoramic imaging sensor contributes most to the perception of the world. Panoramic lenses are now ready to be deployed in many optical solutions. Covered applications include, but are not limited to medical imaging (endoscope, rigiscope, fiberscope...), remote sensing (pipe inspection, crime scene investigation, archeology...), multimedia (hemispheric projector, panoramic image...). Modern panoramic technologies allow simple and efficient digital image processing and the use of standard image analysis features (motion estimation, segmentation, object tracking, pattern recognition) in the complete 360° hemispheric area.

  8. Three-dimensional apoptotic nuclear behavior analyzed by means of Field Emission in Lens Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salucci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an essential biological function required during embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis, organ development and immune system regulation. It is an active cell death pathway involved in a variety of pathological conditions. During this process cytoskeletal proteins appear damaged and undergo an enzymatic disassembling, leading to formation of apoptotic features. This study was designed to examine the three-dimensional chromatin behavior and cytoskeleton involvement, in particular actin re-modeling. HL-60 cells, exposed to hyperthermia, a known apoptotic trigger, were examined by means of a Field Emission in Lens Scanning Electron Microscope (FEISEM. Ultrastructural observations revealed in treated cells the presence of apoptotic patterns after hyperthermia trigger. In particular, three-dimensional apoptotic chromatin rearrangements appeared involving the translocation of filamentous actin from cytoplasm to the nucleus. FEISEM immunogold techniques showed actin labeling and its precise three-dimensional localization in the diffuse chromatin, well separated from the condensed one. The actin presence in dispersed chromatin inside the apoptotic nucleus can be considered an important feature, indispensable to permit the apoptotic machinery evolution.

  9. Diabatic interaction potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Lukasiak, A.

    1984-01-01

    Within a refined method for the construction of diabatic states allowing for the treatment of the full spin-orbit coupling, characteristic features of the diabatic potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions are investigated. Approximately 90% of the strong repulsion results from diabatic particle-hole excitations, while only 10% is due to compression. The diabatic interaction potential describes a physical situation intermediate between adiabatic and sudden approximations. (orig.)

  10. Crystalline lens radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Pasquier, D.; Castelain, B.; Lartigau, E.; Warnet, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cyto-protection reported in. vitro and in. vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cyto-protective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathione pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Arnifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radio-protectants, could be further test?r for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. (author)

  11. The molecular background of the differential UV absorbance of the human lens in the 240-400 nm range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, Viktor; Tiboldi, Akos; Bae, Narkhyun; Li, Kongzhao; Kang, Sung Ung; Hopp, Béla; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Lubec, Gert; Nógrádi, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) absorption of various sections of the human lens was studied and compared with protein expression paralleling differential UV absorbance in anterior and posterior lenticular tissue. The UV absorbance of serial lens cryostat sections (60 μm) and that of lens capsules was determined using a Shimadzu scanning spectrophotometer, and the absorption coefficients were calculated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed using two pooled lenticular protein extracts (anterior and posterior sections). Protein spots were quantified and significantly different spots were identified by mass spectrometry following in-gel digestion with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The UV-C and UV-B absorption of the human lens increased toward the posterior parts of the lens. The anterior and posterior lens capsules also effectively absorbed UV radiation. Levels of molecular chaperone proteins Beta-crystallin B2 (UniProtKB ID:P43320), A3 (UniProtKB ID:P05813) and of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (UniProtKB ID:P04406) were significantly higher in the anterior part of the lens, whereas lens proteins Beta-crystallin B1 (UniProtKB ID:P53674) and Alpha-crystallin A chain (UniProtKB ID:P02489) were higher in the posterior sections. These results provide evidence that differential UV absorption in the anterior and posterior lens is accompanied by differential protein expression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  12. Goat's eye integrated with a human cataractous lens: A training model for phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Dhanapal, Praveen; Nath, Manas; Haripriya, Aravind; Venkatesh, Rengaraj

    2015-03-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive technique to train surgeons in phacoemulsification using a goat's eye integrated with a human cataractous nucleus is described. The goat's eye is placed on a bed of cotton within the lumen of a cylindrical container. This is then mounted on a rectangular thermocol so that the limbus is presented at the surgical field. After making a clear corneal entry with a keratome, the trainer makes a 5-5.5 mm continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in the anterior lens capsule, creates a crater of adequate depth in the cortex and inserts the human nucleus within this crater in the goat's capsular bag. The surgical wound is sutured, and the goat's eye is ready for training. Creating the capsulorhexis with precision and making the crater of adequate depth to snugly accommodate the human nucleus are the most important steps to prevent excessive wobbling of the nucleus while training.

  13. The subthalamic nucleus, Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    Part I. Development, cytology, topography and connections. This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology

  14. K+ nucleus total cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawafta, R.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of K + mesons from nuclei has attracted considerable interest in the last few years. The K + holds a very special position as the weakest of all strongly interaction probes. The average cross section is not larger than about 10 mb at lab momenta below 800 MeV/c, corresponding to a mean free path in the nucleus larger than 5 fm. Thus the K + is capable of probing the entire volume of the nucleus. Single scattering of the K + with a nucleon in the nucleus dominates the nuclear scattering, and only small and calculable higher order corrections are needed. The nucleon is a dynamical entity and its internal structure can, in principle, be altered by its surrounding nuclear environment. This work reports an experiment in which the K + is used to compare the nucleon in the nucleus with a free nucleon

  15. Stretch-dependent changes in surface profiles of the human crystalline lens during accommodation: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Hooman Mohammad; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Zarrabi, Khosrow; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    A non-linear isotropic finite element (FE) model of a 29-year-old human crystalline lens was constructed to study the effects of various geometrical parameters on lens accommodation. The model simulates dis-accommodation by stretching of the lens and predicts the change in surface profiles of the lens capsule, cortex and nucleus at select states of stretching/accommodation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) is used to develop a stretch-dependent mathematical model relating the lens sagittal height to the radial position of the lens surface as a function of dis-accommodative stretch. A load analysis is performed to compare the finite element results to empirical results from lens stretcher studies. Using the predicted geometrical changes, the optical response of the whole eye during accommodation was analysed by ray-tracing. Aspects of lens shape change relative to stretch were evaluated, including change in diameter, central thickness and accommodation. Maximum accommodation achieved was 10.29 D. From the multiple regression analysis, the stretch-dependent mathematical model of the lens shape related lens curvatures as a function of lens ciliary stretch well (maximum mean-square residual error 2.5 × 10(-3 ) μm, p < 0.001). The results are compared with those from in vitro studies. The finite element and ray-tracing predictions are consistent with Ex Vivo Accommodation Simulator (EVAS) studies in terms of load and power change versus change in thickness. The mathematical stretch-dependent model of accommodation presented may have utility in investigating lens behaviour at states other than the relaxed or fully accommodated states. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  16. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lingling, E-mail: liulingling2012@163.com; Luo, Qing, E-mail: qing.luo@cqu.edu.cn; Sun, Jinghui, E-mail: sunjhemail@163.com; Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn

    2016-10-15

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  17. Nucleus and nucleus-cytoskeleton connections in 3D cell migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Song, Guanbin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings, ranging from embryonic development to cancer metastasis. Currently, accumulating data suggest that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3D) environments show well-defined differences compared to their well-established two-dimensional (2D) counterparts. During 3D migration, the cell body and nucleus must deform to allow cellular passage through the available spaces, and the deformability of the relatively rigid nucleus may constitute a limiting step. Here, we highlight the key evidence regarding the role of the nuclear mechanics in 3D migration, including the molecular components that govern the stiffness of the nucleus and review how the nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by cytoskeleton-based migration machinery. Intriguingly, nuclear movement must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading and trailing edges, which in turn impact the cytoplasmic dynamics that affect the migration efficiency. Thus, we suggest that alterations in the nuclear structure may facilitate cellular reorganizations that are necessary for efficient migration. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representations of a cell migrating on a 2D substrate and a cell migrating in a 3D extracellular matrix environment. (A) Nucleus-cytoskeleton connections are essential to 3D migration. Mechanical signals are transduced by integrins at the cell surface and channeled to cytoskeletal proteins, which generates prestress. The nucleus-cytoskeleton connections can either act as a stable skeleton to anchor the nuclei or provide active force to move the nuclei. The LINC complex is responsible for the nucleo-cytoskeletal coupling. Nesprins connect the cytoskeletal proteins to the inner nuclear membrane proteins SUN1 and SUN2. The SUN proteins connect to the lamins that form the lamina, which attaches to the chromatin. This physical connectivity transmits the mechanical signals from receptors at

  18. Contact Lens Wear at Altitude: Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    incidence of (PMMA) lenses . Reported here are the results of contact lens subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at bubble studies with soft...vision from formation of large bubbles greater than 6,096 m (20,000 It). With soft contact lenses , bubble under their contact lenses . They also found...always located at the limbus and were without sequela to vision or corneal epithelial integrity. scleral lenses used by Jaeckle were permeable to gases

  19. Straylight Measurements in Contact Lens Wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Engelbrecht, Leonore A.; van Vliet, Johannes M. J.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To quantify the effect of contact lens wear on straylight in rigid and soft contact lens wearers and (2) to relate findings to morphological changes and subjective complaints. Methods: Straylight was measured using the Oculus C-Quant during contact lens wear and after contact lens

  20. Contact Lens Related Corneal Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, KY; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. Th...

  1. A course in lens design

    CERN Document Server

    Velzel, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A Course in Lens Design is an instruction in the design of image-forming optical systems. It teaches how a satisfactory design can be obtained in a straightforward way. Theory is limited to a minimum, and used to support the practical design work. The book introduces geometrical optics, optical instruments and aberrations. It gives a description of the process of lens design and of the strategies used in this process. Half of its content is devoted to the design of sixteen types of lenses, described in detail from beginning to end. This book is different from most other books on lens design because it stresses the importance of the initial phases of the design process: (paraxial) lay-out and (thin-lens) pre-design. The argument for this change of accent is that in these phases much information can be obtained about the properties of the lens to be designed. This information can be used in later phases of the design. This makes A Course in Lens Design a useful self-study book, and a suitable basis for an intro...

  2. Gabor lens theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irani, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The principle of using the space charge of an electron cloud to focus ion beams was first proposed by Gabor. Electrons are to be confined radially by means of an axial magnetic field B/sub z/ and axially by means of externally applied electric fields E/sub z/. An ion beam of charge density n/sub i/ much less than n/sub e/, the electron charge density can then be focused by the radial electric field set up by the electron cloud. The case considered here is that of a hollow cylindrical conductor charged to a potential +V with grounded rings on either side to set up the axial E/sub z/ field. A solenoid wound around the central conductor supplies the B/sub z/ field. Theoretical calculations are carried out for n/sub e/ maximum as a function of B/sub z/ due to radial confinement and V due to axial confinement and the focal length of the Gabor Lens is calculated

  3. The influence of gamma-irradiation on induced by ultraviolet light damages of rats' crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevich, I.B.; Pinchuk, S.V.; Vadetskaya, T.N.; Klimko, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Males of rats (8 - 10 month old) had been irradiated and then ultraviolet inducing oxidized glutathione, proteins and lipids dedicated from crystalline lens have been studied. The result evidences increasing of damage components after irradiation

  4. Heterogeneous calretinin expression in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, S; Williams, A; MacLeod, K M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are expressed at high levels and in complementary patterns in the auditory pathways of birds, mammals, and other vertebrates, but whether specific members of the CaBP family can be used to identify neuronal subpopulations is unclear. We used double immunofluorescence labeling of calretinin (CR) in combination with neuronal markers to investigate the distribution of CR-expressing neurons in brainstem sections of the cochlear nucleus in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). While CR was homogeneously expressed in cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, CR expression was highly heterogeneous in cochlear nucleus angularis (NA), a nucleus with diverse cell types analogous in function to neurons in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus. To quantify the distribution of CR in the total NA cell population, we used antibodies against neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), a postmitotic neuron-specific nuclear marker. In NA neurons, NeuN label was variably localized to the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the intensity of NeuN immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with the intensity of CR immunoreactivity. The percentage of CR + neurons in NA increased from 31 % in embryonic (E)17/18 chicks, to 44 % around hatching (E21), to 51 % in postnatal day (P) 8 chicks. By P8, the distribution of CR + neurons was uniform, both rostrocaudal and in the tonotopic (dorsoventral) axis. Immunoreactivity for the voltage-gated potassium ion channel Kv1.1, used as a marker for physiological type, showed broad and heterogeneous postsynaptic expression in NA, but did not correlate with CR expression. These results suggest that CR may define a subpopulation of neurons within nucleus angularis.

  5. Modeling internal stress distributions in the human lens: can opponent theories coexist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaidi, A; Pierscionek, B K

    2007-08-03

    The effects of material properties and equatorial stretching forces on the stress distribution and shape profile of human lenses were investigated to see whether support could be found for either or both current theories of accommodation. Finite element analysis was used to create models using shape parameters and material properties from published data. Models were constructed for two lenses of different ages. Material properties were varied to show differences between models with a single elastic modulus and those with different moduli for the cortex and the nucleus. Two levels of stretching forces were applied at the equator. Comparisons between experimental and model profiles were made, and stress distribution patterns were constructed. In all models, stretching produces a flattening in the peripheral curvature of the lens. In the younger lens, model and experimental results show that central curvature at some points is steeper for stretched than for unstretched profiles. In the older lens, gradients are flatter at all central points for stretched model and experimental profiles compared to the unstretched profile. In all models, there is a region of higher stress distribution within the lens that corresponds with the position of an inflection point that appears on the anterior surface and, in the older lens, also on the posterior surface. The results show that equatorial stretching forces can produce shape changes in support of both current theories of accommodation depending on the lens age, shape, and applied force.

  6. Efficacy on chopping with lens loop-pad in the small incision extracapsular cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ning Peng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the clinical effects of chopping with lens loop-pad in the small incision extracapsular cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation.METHODS:A total of 75 cases(80 eyes, in which loop-pad and chop knife were performed to chop nucleus before implanting intraocular lens. Visual acuity, postoperative astigmatism degree, intraoperative and postoperative complications were observed. The post-operative follow-up periods ranged from 3 to 12mo.RESULTS: The visual acuity was 0.3-0.5 in 37 eyes and 0.6 or better in 21 eyes at 1d, while was respectively in 43 eyes and in 26 eyes at 1mo. Compared with preoperative astigmatism(0.85±0.29D, there were significant difference at postoperative 1wk(1.75±0.55D(PP>0.05. Intraoperative posterior capsule rupture occurred in 4 eyes, which implantation was successful in 1 eye and 3 eyes was managed viaciliary sulcus. Two eyes had dermatoglyphic pattern edema in corneal endothelium which recovered after about 3d. Two eyes had local patchy opacities which recovered in 2wk. Two eyes had transient high intraocular pressure.CONCLUSION: The surgery is efficient, low cost, easy process and less complications, it is worth to be popularized.

  7. A novel non-lens betagamma-crystallin and trefoil factor complex from amphibian skin and its functional implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Bai Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, non-lens betagamma-crystallins are widely expressed in various tissues, but their functions are unknown. The molecular mechanisms of trefoil factors, initiators of mucosal healing and being greatly involved in tumorigenesis, have remained elusive.A naturally existing 72-kDa complex of non-lens betagamma-crystallin (alpha-subunit and trefoil factor (beta-subunit, named betagamma-CAT, was identified from frog Bombina maxima skin secretions. Its alpha-subunit and beta-subunit (containing three trefoil factor domains, with a non-covalently linked form of alphabeta(2, show significant sequence homology to ep37 proteins, a group of non-lens betagamma-crystallins identified in newt Cynops pyrrhogaster and mammalian trefoil factors, respectively. betagamma-CAT showed potent hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. The specific antiserum against each subunit was able to neutralize its hemolytic activity, indicating that the two subunits are functionally associated. betagamma-CAT formed membrane pores with a functional diameter about 2.0 nm, leading to K(+ efflux and colloid-osmotic hemolysis. High molecular weight SDS-stable oligomers (>240-kDa were detected by antibodies against the alpha-subunit with Western blotting. Furthermore, betagamma-CAT showed multiple cellular effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Low dosages of betagamma-CAT (25-50 pM were able to stimulate cell migration and wound healing. At high concentrations, it induced cell detachment (EC(50 10 nM and apoptosis. betagamma-CAT was rapidly endocytosed via intracellular vacuole formation. Under confocal microscope, some of the vacuoles were translocated to nucleus and partially fused with nuclear membrane. Bafilomycin A1 (a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar-type ATPase and nocodazole (an agent of microtuble depolymerizing, while inhibited betagamma-CAT induced vacuole formation, significantly inhibited betagamma-CAT induced cell detachment, suggesting

  8. [Contact lens care and maintenance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, L

    2017-04-01

    All contact lenses with replacement schedules longer than daily must be maintained. At each step of their use, the lenses may be contaminated. Contact lens solutions perform the essential functions of cleaning, decontaminating and preserving the lenses to prevent infectious problems and improve wearing comfort. Contact lens contamination essentially comes from hands, cleaning solutions, cases, water and the environment. The pathogenic microorganisms are mainly Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and amoebae. Contact lens deposits may or may not have an organic origin. Their presence increases the risk of infection because they serve as a nutrient matrix for microbes, and they are responsible for wearing discomfort. Contact lens solutions differ in their composition, their mechanism of action and the concentration of the various agents. To prescribe the best lens care system to each wearer and for each material, it is necessary to be very familiar with them. Maintenance is the main cause of discomfort with contact lenses, either through improper use, solution-material incompatibility, or a reaction of the wearer to the components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of Galectin-3 in the Nucleus and Cytoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Spronk, Kimberly J.; Voss, Patricia G.; Patterson, Ronald J.; Wang, John L.; Arnoys, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes selected studies on galectin-3 (Gal3) as an example of the dynamic behavior of a carbohydrate-binding protein in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. Within the 15-member galectin family of proteins, Gal3 (Mr ~30,000) is the sole representative of the chimera subclass in which a proline- and glycine-rich NH2-terminal domain is fused onto a COOH-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain responsible for binding galactose-containing glycoconjugates. The protein shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus on the basis of targeting signals that are recognized by importin(s) for nuclear localization and exportin-1 (CRM1) for nuclear export. Depending on the cell type, specific experimental conditions in vitro, or tissue location, Gal3 has been reported to be exclusively cytoplasmic, predominantly nuclear, or distributed between the two compartments. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic distribution of the protein must reflect, then, some balance between nuclear import and export, as well as mechanisms of cytoplasmic anchorage or binding to a nuclear component. Indeed, a number of ligands have been reported for Gal3 in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Most of the ligands appear to bind Gal3, however, through protein-protein interactions rather than through protein-carbohydrate recognition. In the cytoplasm, for example, Gal3 interacts with the apoptosis repressor Bcl-2 and this interaction may be involved in Gal3’s anti-apoptotic activity. In the nucleus, Gal3 is a required pre-mRNA splicing factor; the protein is incorporated into spliceosomes via its association with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex. Although the majority of these interactions occur via the carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal3 and saccharide ligands such as lactose can perturb some of these interactions, the significance of the protein’s carbohydrate-binding activity, per se, remains a challenge for future investigations. PMID:19616076

  10. Neutrino anomaly and -nucleus interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    neutrino nucleus interactions in the domain of low and intermediate energy. The nuclear physics inputs mainly enter through two types of processes. These are: A. The nuclear processes responsible for neutrino production in the calculation of solar and atmospheric neutrino fluxes. B. The nuclear processes in which ...

  11. The nucleus as a laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin-Stoyle, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The nucleus is a complicated many-body structure whose properties when carefully studied can frequently give important information about the underlying elementary particle interactions. This article reviews progress in research of this kind over the last twenty-five years. (author)

  12. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  13. Automated Fresnel lens tester system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, G.S.

    1981-07-01

    An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

  14. Compliance among soft contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzman, Tomislav; Kutija, Marija Barisić; Masnec, Sanja; Jandroković, Sonja; Mrazovac, Danijela; Jurisić, Darija; Skegro, Ivan; Kalauz, Miro; Kordić, Rajko

    2014-12-01

    Contact lens compliance is proven to be crucial for preventing lens wear-related complications because of the interdependence of the steps in lens care regime and their influence on lens system microbial contamination. Awareness of the patients' lens handling compliance as well as correct recognition of non-compliant behaviours is the basis for creating more targeted strategies for patient education. The aim of this study was to investigate compliance among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in different aspects of lens care handling and wearing habits. In our research 50 asymptomatic lens wearers filled out a questionnaire containing demographic data, lens type, hygiene and wearing habits, lenses and lens care system replacement schedule and self-evaluation of contact lens handling hygiene. We established criteria of compliance according to available manufacturer's recommendations, prior literature and our clinical experience. Only 2 (4%) of patients were fully compliant SCL wearers. The most common non-compliant behaviours were insufficient lens solution soaking time (62%), followed by failure to daily exchange lens case solution and showering while wearing lenses. 44% of patients reported storing lenses in saline solution. Mean lens storage case replacement was 3.6 months, with up to 78% patients replacing lens case at least once in 3 months. Average grade in self evaluating level of compliance was very good (4 +/- 0.78) (from 1-poor level of hygiene to 5-great level of hygiene). Lens wearers who reported excessive daily lens wear and more than 10 years of lens wearing experience were also found to be less compliant with other lens system care procedures. (t = -2.99, df=47, p lens system maintenance steps. Most common non-compliant behaviours were the ones that are crucial for maintaining lens sterility and preventing infection. Despite the low objective compliance rate, self grading was relatively high. Therefore, these results indicate the need for patient

  15. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  16. Computer-aided lens assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Richard; Alcock, Rob; Petzing, Jon; Coupland, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    We propose a computer-aided method of lens manufacture that allows assembly, adjustment, and test phases to be run concurrently until an acceptable level of optical performance is reached. Misalignment of elements within a compound lens is determined by a comparison of the results of physical ray tracing by use of an array of Gaussian laser beams with numerically obtained geometric ray traces. An estimate of misalignment errors is made, and individual elements are adjusted in an iterative manner until performance criteria are achieved. The method is illustrated for the alignment of an air-spaced doublet.

  17. Acanthamoeba keratitis. Contact lens and noncontact lens characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynn, E W; Lopez, M A; Pavan-Langston, D; Talamo, J H

    1995-09-01

    To identify potential differences in time to diagnosis and final visual outcome between contact lens and noncontact lens users with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Prior studies have shown early diagnosis and therapy to be related to outcome but have not analyzed differences among patients with and without contact lenses. A retrospective analysis of 11 consecutive cases (involving 13 eyes) of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed at one institution over a 3-year period. Mean time to diagnosis was significantly longer in noncontact lens users versus those who wore contact lenses (mean, 5.8 versus 3.3 weeks). Fifty percent of patients who did not wear contact lenses had a poor outcome (visual acuity worse than 20/40 or penetrating keratoplasty) versus 14% of patients who wore contact lenses. Diagnoses were made later in patients without contact lenses, and these patients had a worse visual outcome than those with Acanthamoeba keratitis who wore contact lenses. All patients with unresponsive microbial keratitis, even those without contact lens use, should be evaluated for Acanthamoeba.

  18. Colour of the nucleus as a marker of nuclear hardness, diameter and central thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullapalli Vamsi

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hundred and thirty patients, aged above 40 years, with senile cataract were examined. Age and colour were selected as the probable preoperative indicators of nuclear hardness. The lens material collected after manual extracapsular extraction was washed and the nucleus isolated. The diameter and central thickness of the nucleus were measured; the mean diameter and mean central thickness were 7.13 mm ± 0.76 and 3.05 mm ± 0.48, respectively. The hardness of the nucleus was measured with a lens guillotine designed by us. Regression analysis was applied to the parameters measured and these were compared with the colour and age. The parameters measured had the following relationship: Colour vs hardness (r value = 0.7569 (p < 0.001 Colour vs diameter (r value = 0.3962 (p < 0.001 Colour vs central thickness (r value = 0.4785 (p < 0.001 Age vs hardness (r value = -0.0499 (p > 0.05 Age vs diameter (r value = 0.0987 (p > 0.05 Age vs central thickness (r value = 0.1700 (p > 0.05 The values showed that colour had a statistically significant relationship with all the 3 parameters (p < 0.001, while age had no significant relationship with the same parameters. The results indicated that colour can be used more reliably to predict physical characteristics of the cataractous lens nucleus, the preoperative knowledge of which would help the surgeon in planning small-incision surgery including phacoemulsification.

  19. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  20. A microcapillary lens for X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dudchik, Y I

    1999-01-01

    A new design of a compound refractive lens for X-rays is proposed. The lens is made as a set of glue microlenses placed in a glass capillary. The technique of lens fabrication is described. Results of ray tracing calculations for 8 and 15 keV photons are represented.

  1. Aquaporin 0 plays a pivotal role in refractive index gradient development in mammalian eye lens to prevent spherical aberration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, S. Sindhu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Intact AQP0 functions as fiber cell-to-fiber cell adhesion protein. • AQP0 facilitates reduction in extracellular space and lens water content. • AQP0 adhesion function aids in lens refractive index gradient (RING) formation. • AQP0 prevents lens spherical aberration by establishing RING. • AQP0 is critical for lens transparency and homeostasis. - Abstract: Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is a transmembrane channel that constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane protein of the fiber cells in mammalian lens. It is critical for lens transparency and homeostasis as mutations and knockout cause autosomal dominant lens cataract. AQP0 functions as a water channel and as a cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) molecule in the lens. Our recent in vitro studies showed that the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial to establish lens refractive index gradient (RING). However, there is a lack of in vivo data to corroborate the role of AQP0 as a fiber CTCA molecule which is critical for creating lens RING. The present investigation is undertaken to gather in vivo evidence for the involvement of AQP0 in developing lens RING. Lenses of wild type (WT) mouse, AQP0 knockout (heterozygous, AQP0{sup +/−}) and AQP0 knockout lens transgenically expressing AQP1 (heterozygous AQP0{sup +/−}/AQP1{sup +/−}) mouse models were used for the study. Data on AQP0 protein profile of intact and N- and/or C-terminal cleaved AQP0 in the lens by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and SDS–PAGE revealed that outer cortex fiber cells have only intact AQP0 of ∼28 kDa, inner cortical and outer nuclear fiber cells have both intact and cleaved forms, and inner nuclear fiber cells have only cleaved forms (∼26–24 kDa). Knocking out of 50% of AQP0 protein caused light scattering, spherical aberration (SA) and cataract. Restoring the lost fiber cell membrane water permeability (P{sub f}) by transgene AQP1 did not reinstate complete lens transparency and the mouse lenses showed light scattering and SA

  2. Color oscillations of nucleons in a nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.A.; Smirnov, A.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    Possibility of nucleus description as an object consisting of quarks and gluons is considered. A model of two-nucleon interaction in a nucleus is presented and analytical expressions for the nucleus nucleon ground state wave functions and also for nuclear nucleon structure functions are obtained. The carried out analysis shows that the suggested model permits to express the nucleus structure functions at quark level only by means of nucleon and Δ-isobaric degrees of freedom

  3. The Ultrawideband Leaky Lens Antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruni, S.; Neto, A.; Marliani, F.

    2007-01-01

    A novel directive and nondispersive antenna is presented: the ultrawideband (UWB) leaky lens. It is based on the broad band Cherenkov radiation occurring at a slot printed between different infinite homogeneous dielectrics. The first part of the paper presents the antenna concept and the UWB design.

  4. ECTOPIC LENS EXTRACTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ectopia lentis continues to be a therapeutic challenge for ophthalmologists. It can occur as an isolated condition, after ocular trauma, in association with other ocular disorders, as part of a systemic mesodermal disease or a complication of general metabolic disorders. Minimal subluxation of the lens may cause no visual symptoms, but in more advanced cases serious optical disturbances arise. The most important is amblyopia. Surgical treatment options include iris manipulation, lens discission, aspiration, intracapsular or extracapsular extraction, and pars plana lensectomy. The choice of surgical technique remains controversial, in part because of the historically poor visual results and high rate of perioperative complications, including vitreous loss and retinal detachment.Methods. We describe a surgical technique based on the use of the Cionni endocapsular tension ring, dry irrigation aspiration of lens material, centration of the capsular bag and foldable intraocular lens implantation into the bag. With mentioned surgical technique 8 patients were operated; 4 boys and 4 girls, together 11 eyes.Results. The final BCVA after follow up period improved in 9 eyes and it remained the same as before operation in one eye. Statistical comparison of preoperative and postoperative visual acuities showed significant improvement. On the other hand there was no correlation between preoperative and postoperative visual acuity.Conclusions. This surgical procedure is an alternative approach in solving this challenging cases of ectopia lentis with good postoperative visual rehabilitation.

  5. Spinning pipe gas lens revisited

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available , there is little information on optical phase aberrations and no study to date on the propagation parameters of the laser beam, but has rather remained rooted in the domain of ray optics. Researchers revisit the spinning pipe gas lens in this paper with new...

  6. Tube entrance lens focus control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisser, D. C.; Fifield, L. K.; Kitchen, T. F. G.; Tunningley, T. B.; Lobanov, N. R.; Muirhead, A. G.

    2013-02-01

    The entrance of the accelerator tube in a large electrostatic accelerator imposes a strong lens that dominates the beam optics. The magnification of the lens is large because of the low injection energy, the high voltage gradient of the acceleration tube and the long distance to the terminal. In the absence of the acceleration, the magnification would produce an unacceptably large beam spot at the terminal. The tyranny of the lens is especially irksome when the accelerator is required to operate at a lower terminal voltage than the one corresponding to the nominal gradient at high voltage. One way around the difficulty, used in NEC Pelletron accelerators, is to insert a series of nylon and steel rods that short together units of the acceleration structure at the terminal leaving the ones near the entrance close to the nominal gradient for optimum transmission. This operation takes time and risks the loss of insulating gas. Another alternative used in the 25URC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is to focus the beam at the tube entrance, substantially diluting the effect of the entrance lens. The beam then diverges and so requires an additional lens part way to the terminal. This solution is only partially effective and still necessitates use of shorting rods for low voltage operation. The fact that these elaborate strategies are used is evidence that the alternative of lowering the injection energy as the terminal voltage is lowered imposes enough problems that it is not used in practice. We have modeled a solution that controls the voltage gradient at the tube entrance using an external power supply. This not only maintains the focusing effect of the lens but provides the opportunity to tune the beam by adjusting the entrance lens. A 150 kV power supply outside the pressure vessel feeds a controllable voltage through a high voltage feed-through to the fifth electrode of the accelerator tube. Thus 150 kV on this electrode creates the nominal gradient of 30 kV per

  7. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Scheuring, Simon [Institut Curie, Equipe Inserm Avenir, UMR168-CNRS, 26 Rue d' Ulm, 75248 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sens, Pierre [ESPCI, CNRS-UMR 7083, 75231 Paris (France); Behar-Cohen, Francine, E-mail: simon.scheuring@curie.fr [UMRS Inserm 872, Universite Paris Descartes, Centre de Recherches des Cordeliers, 15 rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France)

    2011-08-15

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  8. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  9. Comet Halley: nucleus and jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Avanesov, G.A.; Barinov, I.V.

    1986-06-01

    The VEGA-1 and VEGA-2 spacecrafts made their closest approach to Comet Halley on 6 and 9 March, respectively. In this paper results of the onboard imaging experiment are discussed. The nucleus of the comet was clearly identifyable as an irregularly shaped object with overall dimensions of (16+-1)x(8+-1)x(8+-1) km. The nucleus rotates around its axis which is nearly perpendicular to the orbital plane, with a period of 53+-2 hours. Its albedo is only 0.04+-002. Most of the jet features observed during the second fly-by were spatially reconstructed. These sources form a quasi-linear structure on the surface. The dust above the surface is shown to be optically thin except certain specific dust jets. Brightness features on the surface are clearly seen. Correlating the data with other measurements it is concluded that the dirty snow-ball model probably has to be revised. (author)

  10. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  11. Lens stem cells may reside outside the lens capsule: an hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Rita A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider the ocular lens in the context of contemporary developments in biological ideas. We attempt to reconcile lens biology with stem cell concepts and a dearth of lens tumors. Historically, the lens has been viewed as a closed system, in which cells at the periphery of the lens epithelium differentiate into fiber cells. Theoretical considerations led us to question whether the intracapsular lens is indeed self-contained. Since stem cells generate tumors and the lens does not naturally develop tumors, we reasoned that lens stem cells may not be present within the capsule. We hypothesize that lens stem cells reside outside the lens capsule, in the nearby ciliary body. Our ideas challenge the existing lens biology paradigm. We begin our discussion with lens background information, in order to describe our lens stem cell hypothesis in the context of published data. Then we present the ciliary body as a possible source for lens stem cells, and conclude by comparing the ocular lens with the corneal epithelium.

  12. Modern lens antennas for communications engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the modern design principles and analysis of lens antennas. It gives graduates and RF/Microwave professionals the design insights in order to make full use of lens antennas.  Why do we want to write a book in lens antennas? Because this topic has not been thoroughly publicized, its importance is underestimated. As antennas play a key role in communication systems, recent development in wireless communications would indeed benefit from the characteristics of lens antennas: low profile, and low cost etc.  The major advantages of lens antennas are na

  13. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  14. Lens decenter and tilt measurement by interferogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Min-Wei; Wu, Wen-Hong; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2009-11-01

    For the recent years, the vigorous development of the electro-optic industry, particularly the digital camera and the cellular phone camera, has placed a larger and larger demand for the optical devices. Among the optical lens, the aspherical optical lens plays the key component because the aspherical lens may provide better imaging quality then the spherical lens does. For the manufacturing reason, the aspherical lens is prone to a decenter or tilt issue with respect to the optical axes of its two surfaces. To measure decenter and tile error specifically would help to obviate the deficient lens, but most of the present measuring method can't provide this function. This paper proposed a new method to specifically measure the decenter and tile of lens by observing the interferogram of each surface. And the corresponding measuring instrument, which contains interferometer and motion stages, was introduced as well.

  15. Material Structure of a Graded Refractive Index Lens in Decapod Squid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Heiney, Paul; Sweeney, Alison

    2013-03-01

    Underwater vision with a camera-type eye that is simultaneously acute and sensitive requires a spherical lens with a graded distribution of refractive index. Squids have this type of lens, and our previous work has shown that its optical properties are likely achieved with radially variable densities of a single protein with multiple isoforms. Here we measure the spatial organization of this novel protein material in concentric layers of the lens and use these data to suggest possible mechanisms of self-assembly of the proteins into a graded refractive index structure. First, we performed small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to study how the protein is spatially organized. Then, molecular dynamic simulation allowed us to correlate structure to the possible dynamics of the system in different regions of the lens. The combination of simulation and SAXS data in this system revealed the likely protein-protein interactions, resulting material structure and its relationship to the observed and variable optical properties of this graded index system. We believe insights into the material properties of the squid lens system will inform the invention of self-assembling graded index devices.

  16. Applying the elastic model for various nucleus-nucleus fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HASSAN, G.S.; RAGAB, H.S.; SEDDEEK, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    The Elastic Model of two free parameters m,d given by Scalia has been used for wider energy regions to fit the available experimental data for potential barriers and cross sections. In order to generalize Scalia's formula in both sub- and above-barrier regions, we calculated m, d for pairs rather than those given by Scalia and compared the calculated cross sections with the experimental data. This makes a generalization of the Elastic Model in describing fusion process. On the other hand, Scalia's range of interacting systems was 24 ≤ A ≤194 where A is the compound nucleus mass number. Our extension of that model includes an example of the pairs of A larger than his final limit aiming to make it as a general formula for any type of reactants: light, intermediate or heavy systems. A significant point is the comparison of Elastic Model calculations with the well known methods studying complete fusion and compound nucleus formation, namely with the resultants of using Proximity potential with either Sharp or Smooth cut-off approximations

  17. Pion production at 1800 in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chessin, S.A.

    1983-05-01

    A survey experiment of pion production at 180 0 in nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. Beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 2.1 GeV/A protons, alphas, and carbon were used, as well as proton beams of 0.80 GeV, 3.5 GeV, and 4.89 GeV, and argon beams of 1.05 GeV/A and 1.83 GeV/A. This is the first such experiment to use the heavier beams. Targets used ranged from carbon to lead. An in-depth review of the literature, both experimental and theoretical, is also presented. The systematics of the data are discussed, and comparisons are made both with prior experiments and with the predictions of the models reviewed. The cross sections appear consistent with a simple single nucleon-nucleon collision picture, without the need for collective or other exotic effects. Suggestions for future work are made

  18. The nucleus-nucleus proximity potential and superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    Using up-to-date values of nuclear radii and of the nuclear surface tension, the 1977 proximity treatment of nucleus-nucleus interaction is confronted with 113 measured fusion barriers. The ∼4% overestimate of theory with respect to experiment, seen in a similar comparison in 1981, is no longer present. The calculated proximity barriers, when applied to fusion reactions used to produce heavy elements with atomic number Z = 102-118, suggest that the unexpectedly large cross section observed in the reaction 86 Kr + 208 Pb r a rrow 293 118 + 1n may be due to the sinking of the Coulomb barrier below the level of the bombarding energy. Tests of this hypothesis are suggested. Some consequences of the appearance of such unshielded reactions for very heavy systems are discussed. An Appendix supplies very accurate analytic formulas for the universal nuclear proximity force and potential functions φand Φ. This does away with the need to consult the tables published in 1977

  19. Looking beyond the perfect lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, W H; Pendry, J B

    2010-01-01

    The holy grail of imaging is the ability to see through anything. From the conservation of energy, we can easily see that to see through a lossy material would require lenses with gain. The aim of this paper therefore is to propose a simple scheme by which we can construct a general perfect lens, with gain-one that can restore both the phases and amplitudes of near and far fields.

  20. CONTACT LENS RELATED CORNEAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGARWAL P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are:overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection, severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss.

  1. Comparison of lens oxidative damage induced by vitrectomy and/or hyperoxia in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare of lens oxidative damage induced by vitrectomy and/or hyperoxia in rabbit. METHODS: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits (2.4-2.5 kg were randomly divided into two groups (Group A, n=12; Group B, n=4. In Group A, the right eyes were treated with vitrectomy and systemic hyperoxia (oxygen concentration: 80%-85%, 1 ATA, 4h/d (Group A-right, and the left eyes were treated with hyperoxia without vitrectomy surgery (Group A-left. Four rabbits in group B (eight eyes were untreated as the controls. Lens transparency was monitored with a slit lamp and recorded before and after vitrectomy. After hyperoxic treatment for 6mo, the eyeballs were removed and the lens cortices (containing the capsules and nuclei were separated for further morphological and biochemical evaluation. RESULTS: Six months after treatments, there were no significant morphological changes in the lenses in any experimental group when observed with a slit lamp. However, the levels of water-soluble proteins and ascorbate, and the activities of catalase and Na+-K+-ATPase were significantly reduced, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde and transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2 were significantly elevated, in both the cortices and nuclei of eyes treated with vitrectomy and hyperoxia. The increase in protein-glutathione mixed disulfides and the reduction in water-soluble proteins were more obvious in the lens nuclei. The levels of ascorbate in the vitreous fluid were also reduced after vitrectomy, whereas TGF-β2 increased after vitrectomy and hyperoxia. Systemic hyperoxia exposure increased these effects. CONCLUSION: Removal of the intact vitreous gel with vitrectomy and exposing the lens to increased oxygen from the retina induce lens oxidation and aggregation. Thus, an intact vitreous gel structure may protect the lens from oxidative insult and maintain lens transparency.

  2. Protective Effects of Acetylation on the Pathological Reactions of the Lens Crystallins with Homocysteine Thiolactone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Moafian

    Full Text Available Various post-translational lens crystallins modifications result in structural and functional insults, contributing to the development of lens opacity and cataract disorders. Lens crystallins are potential targets of homocysteinylation, particularly under hyperhomocysteinemia which has been indicated in various eye diseases. Since both homocysteinylation and acetylation primarily occur on protein free amino groups, we applied different spectroscopic methods and gel mobility shift analysis to examine the possible preventive role of acetylation against homocysteinylation. Lens crystallins were extensively acetylated in the presence of acetic anhydride and then subjected to homocysteinylation in the presence of homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL. Extensive acetylation of the lens crystallins results in partial structural alteration and enhancement of their stability, as well as improvement of α-crystallin chaperone-like activity. In addition, acetylation partially prevents HCTL-induced structural alteration and aggregation of lens crystallins. Also, acetylation protects against HCTL-induced loss of α-crystallin chaperone activity. Additionally, subsequent acetylation and homocysteinylation cause significant proteolytic degradation of crystallins. Therefore, further experimentation is required in order to judge effectively the preventative role of acetylation on the structural and functional insults induced by homocysteinylation of lens crystallins.

  3. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in the nucleus revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Chantale; Choufani, Faten; Avedanian, Levon; Bkaily, Ghassan; Gobeil, Fernand; Jacques, Danielle

    2010-03-01

    Recent work from our group showed that the nuclear envelope membranes contain several G protein-coupled receptors, including prostaglandin E2 (EP3R) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors. Activation of EP3R increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) RNA expression in nuclei. eNOS and inducible NOS (iNOS) are reported to also be present at the nuclear level. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also localized at the nuclear level. In this review, we show that stimulation with NO donor sodium nitroprusside results in an increase of intranuclear calcium that was dependent on guanylate cyclase activation, but independent of MAPK. This increase in nuclear calcium correlated with an increase in nuclear transcription of iNOS. H2O2 and ET-1 increase both cytosolic and nuclear ROS in human endocardial endothelial cells and in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. This increase in ROS levels by H2O2 and ET-1 was reversed by the antioxidant glutathione. In addition, our results strongly suggest that cytosolic signalization is not only transmitted to the nucleus but is also generated by the nucleus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that oxidative stress can be sensed by the nucleus. These results highly suggest that ROS formation is also generated directly by the nucleus and that free radicals may contribute to ET-1 regulation of nuclear Ca2+ homeostasis.

  4. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  5. Determination of Coil Inductances Cylindrical Iron Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeddine Mazouz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the investigation and development of a structure and performance characteristics of a coil iron nucleus cylindrical (C.I.N.C. The coil iron nucleus cylindrical is a nonlinear electro radio in which the moving of the nucleus in a sense or in other causes change in inductance and can reach extreme values at the superposition of nucleus and coil centers. The variation of the inductance and the degree of freedom of movement of the nucleus can lead to a device with electromechanical conversion The aim of this paper is the determination and visualization of self inductance and mutual of the (C.I.N.C based on geometric dimensions and the displacement of the nucleus.  

  6. Primary intraocular lens implantation for penetrating lens trauma in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R J; Yorston, D; Wood, M; Gilbert, C; Foster, A

    1998-09-01

    This study aimed to audit the surgical strategy of primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for cases of recent penetrating trauma involving the lens in an African population. Retrospective, noncomparative case series. Seventy-two cases are reported, including all patients who underwent primary intraocular lens implantation for traumatic cataract extraction performed within 1 month of injury between 1988 and 1996. Demographic characteristics and follow-up attendance rates are analyzed. Surgical technique and the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications are reported. Visual outcomes are reported with detailed analysis for cases of poor visual outcome. Mean age was 14.3 years (standard deviation = 11.1), 57 (79%) were male and 15 (21%) were female (chi-square = 23.66, P capsule had been breached by the trauma in 27 (38%) cases, and 15 of these required anterior vitrectomy. Capsular fixation of the implant was achieved in 49% of patients, the remainder having sulcus fixation. Intraoperative rupture of the posterior capsule occurred in four cases. The only common postoperative complication was acute fibrinous anterior uveitis, which occurred in 29 (40%) patients, and 32% of patients followed up for at least 6 months required secondary posterior capsulotomy. This was more common in younger patients (chi-square = 4.2, P < 0.05). Corrected postoperative visual acuities were available for 51 patients, of which 71% achieved 20/60 or better visual acuity. Patients 6 years of age or younger were less likely to achieve 20/60 (chi-square = 6.61, P = 0.01). This surgical strategy has proved successful, producing good visual results and causing no sight-threatening complications. Primary posterior capsulotomy may be appropriate for younger patients.

  7. Myo/Nog cells: targets for preventing the accumulation of skeletal muscle-like cells in the human lens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Gerhart

    Full Text Available Posterior capsule opacification (PCO is a vision impairing condition that arises in some patients following cataract surgery. The fibrotic form of PCO is caused by myofibroblasts that may emerge in the lens years after surgery. In the chick embryo lens, myofibroblasts are derived from Myo/Nog cells that are identified by their expression of the skeletal muscle specific transcription factor MyoD, the bone morphogenetic protein inhibitor Noggin, and the epitope recognized by the G8 monoclonal antibody. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that depletion of Myo/Nog cells will prevent the accumulation of myofibroblasts in human lens tissue. Myo/Nog cells were present in anterior, equatorial and bow regions of the human lens, cornea and ciliary processes. In anterior lens tissue removed by capsulorhexis, Myo/Nog cells had synthesized myofibroblast and skeletal muscle proteins, including vimentin, MyoD and sarcomeric myosin. Alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was detected in a subpopulation of Myo/Nog cells. Areas of the capsule denuded of epithelial cells were surrounded by Myo/Nog cells. Some of these cell free areas contained a wrinkle in the capsule. Depletion of Myo/Nog cells eliminated cells expressing skeletal muscle proteins in 5-day cultures but did not affect cells immunoreactive for beaded filament proteins that accumulate in differentiating lens epithelial cells. Transforming growth factor-betas 1 and 2 that mediate an epithelial-mesenchymal transition, did not induce the expression of skeletal muscle proteins in lens cells following Myo/Nog cell depletion. This study demonstrates that Myo/Nog cells in anterior lens tissue removed from cataract patients have undergone a partial differentiation to skeletal muscle. Myo/Nog cells appear to be the source of skeletal muscle-like cells in explants of human lens tissue. Targeting Myo/Nog cells with the G8 antibody during cataract surgery may reduce the incidence of PCO.

  8. Research on one manual zoom liquid lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cunhua; Shi, Yongpeng; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Congcong

    2011-11-01

    In liquid zoom lens, the accurate fixed-focus location needs the accurate calculation of focal length. That is to say, the accurate calculation of surface curvature must be obtained. Therefore, the research of their relation in liquid zoom lens becomes extremely important which has a directly theoretical instruction for the design of liquid zoom lenses. In our paper, the relation is studied. A manual liquid lens is reported which has upper and nether components with specificaton Φ12×5mm. The zoom lens is obtained by the upper component circumvolving down into the nether components.

  9. Numerical analyses of planer plasmonic focusing lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yen-Yu; Lee, Yeeu-Chang

    2018-03-01

    The use of polystyrene (PS) sphere lithography has been widely applied in the fabrication of micron and nano structures, due to their low cost and ease of fabrication in large scale applications. This study evaluated the feasibility of plasmonic lens base on metal thin films with nanohole structures fabricated by using PS sphere lithography through three-dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We calculated the intensity profile of lens with various wavelength of incident light, lens size, cutting positions, diameters of nanohole, and periods of nanohole to investigate the geometric parameters influence on the focusing properties of the plasmonic lens.

  10. Expression of truncated PITX3 in the developing lens leads to microphthalmia and aphakia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Wada

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia is a severe ocular disorder, and this condition is typically caused by mutations in transcription factors that are involved in eye development. Mice carrying mutations in these transcription factors would be useful tools for defining the mechanisms underlying developmental eye disorders. We discovered a new spontaneous recessive microphthalmos mouse mutant in the Japanese wild-derived inbred strain KOR1/Stm. The homozygous mutant mice were histologically characterized as microphthalmic by the absence of crystallin in the lens, a condition referred to as aphakia. By positional cloning, we identified the nonsense mutation c.444C>A outside the genomic region that encodes the homeodomain of the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 3 gene (Pitx3 as the mutation responsible for the microphthalmia and aphakia. We examined Pitx3 mRNA expression of mutant mice during embryonic stages using RT-PCR and found that the expression levels are higher than in wild-type mice. Pitx3 over-expression in the lens during developmental stages was also confirmed at the protein level in the microphthalmos mutants via immunohistochemical analyses. Although lens fiber differentiation was not observed in the mutants, strong PITX3 protein signals were observed in the lens vesicles of the mutant lens. Thus, we speculated that abnormal PITX3, which lacks the C-terminus (including the OAR domain as a result of the nonsense mutation, is expressed in mutant lenses. We showed that the expression of the downstream genes Foxe3, Prox1, and Mip was altered because of the Pitx3 mutation, with large reductions in the lens vesicles in the mutants. Similar profiles were observed by immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins. The expression profiles of crystallins were also altered in the mutants. Therefore, we speculated that the microphthalmos/aphakia in this mutant is caused by the expression of truncated PITX3, resulting in the abnormal expression of

  11. Regulation of gene expression by Pax6 in ocular cells: a case of tissue-preferred expression of crystallins in lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvekl, Ales; Yang, Ying; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Cveklova, Kveta

    2004-01-01

    Lens development is an excellent model for genetic and biochemical studies of embryonic induction, cell cycle regulation, cellular differentiation and signal transduction. Differentiation of lens is characterized by lens-preferred expression and accumulation of water-soluble proteins, crystallins. Crystallins are required for light transparency, refraction and maintenance of lens integrity. Here, we review mechanisms of lens-preferred expression of crystallin genes by employing synergism between developmentally regulated DNA-binding transcription factors: Pax6, c-Maf, MafA/L-Maf, MafB, NRL, Sox2, Sox1, RARbeta/RXRbeta, RORalpha, Prox1, Six3, gammaFBP-B and HSF2. These factors are differentially expressed in lens precursor cells, lens epithelium and primary and secondary lens fibers. They exert their function in combination with ubiquitously expressed factors (e.g. AP-1, CREB, pRb, TFIID and USF) and co-activators/chromatin remodeling proteins (e.g. ASC-2 and CBP/p300). A special function belongs to Pax6, a paired domain and homeodomain-containing protein, which is essential for lens formation. Pax6 is expressed in lens progenitor cells before the onset of crystallin expression and it serves as an important regulatory factor required for expression of c-Maf, MafA/L-Maf, Six3, Prox1 and retinoic acid signaling both in lens precursor cells and the developing lens. The roles of these factors are illustrated by promoter studies of mouse alphaA-, alphaB-, gammaF- and guinea pig zeta-crystallins. Pax6 forms functional complexes with a number of transcription factors including the retinoblastoma protein, pRb, MafA, Mitf and Sox2. We present novel data showing that pRb antagonizes Pax6-mediated activation of the alphaA-crystallin promoter likely by inhibiting binding of Pax6 to DNA.

  12. Exchange of tears under a contact lens is driven by distortions of the contact lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kara L; Ross, David S

    2014-12-01

    We studied the flow of the post-lens tear film under a soft contact lens to understand how the design parameters of contact lenses can affect ocular health. When a soft contact lens is inserted, the blinking eyelid causes the lens to stretch in order to conform to the shape of the eye. The deformed contact lens acts to assume its un-deformed shape and thus generates a suction pressure in the post-lens tear film. In consequence, the post-lens tear fluid moves; it responds to the suction pressure. The suction pressure may draw in fresh fluid from the edge of the lens, or it may eject fluid there, as the lens reassumes its un-deformed shape. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of the flow of the post-lens tear fluid in response to the mechanical suction pressure of a deformed contact lens. We predict the amount of exchange of fluid exchange under a contact lens and we explore the influence of the eye's shape on the rate of exchange of fluid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Blockade of protein geranylgeranylation inhibits Cdk2-dependent p27Kip1 phosphorylation on Thr187 and accumulates p27Kip1 in the nucleus: implications for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Carie, Adam; Blaskovich, Michelle A; Bucher, Cynthia; Thai, Van; Moulder, Stacy; Peng, Hairuo; Carrico, Dora; Pusateri, Erin; Pledger, Warren J; Berndt, Norbert; Hamilton, Andrew; Sebti, Saïd M

    2009-04-01

    We describe the design of a potent and selective peptidomimetic inhibitor of geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGTI), GGTI-2418, and its methyl ester GGTI-2417, which increases the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27(Kip1) and induces breast tumor regression in vivo. Experiments with p27(Kip1) small interfering RNA in breast cancer cells and p27(Kip1) null murine embryonic fibroblasts demonstrate that the ability of GGTI-2417 to induce cell death requires p27(Kip1). GGTI-2417 inhibits the Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of p27(Kip1) at Thr187 and accumulates p27(Kip1) in the nucleus. In nude mouse xenografts, GGTI-2418 suppresses the growth of human breast tumors. Furthermore, in ErbB2 transgenic mice, GGTI-2418 increases p27(Kip1) and induces significant regression of breast tumors. We conclude that GGTIs' antitumor activity is, at least in part, due to inhibiting Cdk2-dependent p27(Kip1) phosphorylation at Thr187 and accumulating nuclear p27(Kip1). Thus, GGTI treatment might improve the poor prognosis of breast cancer patients with low nuclear p27(Kip1) levels.

  14. Blockade of Protein Geranylgeranylation Inhibits Cdk2-Dependent p27Kip1 Phosphorylation on Thr187 and Accumulates p27Kip1 in the Nucleus: Implications for Breast Cancer Therapy▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Carie, Adam; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Bucher, Cynthia; Thai, Van; Moulder, Stacy; Peng, Hairuo; Carrico, Dora; Pusateri, Erin; Pledger, Warren J.; Berndt, Norbert; Hamilton, Andrew; Sebti, Saïd M.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the design of a potent and selective peptidomimetic inhibitor of geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGTI), GGTI-2418, and its methyl ester GGTI-2417, which increases the levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27Kip1 and induces breast tumor regression in vivo. Experiments with p27Kip1 small interfering RNA in breast cancer cells and p27Kip1 null murine embryonic fibroblasts demonstrate that the ability of GGTI-2417 to induce cell death requires p27Kip1. GGTI-2417 inhibits the Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of p27Kip1 at Thr187 and accumulates p27Kip1 in the nucleus. In nude mouse xenografts, GGTI-2418 suppresses the growth of human breast tumors. Furthermore, in ErbB2 transgenic mice, GGTI-2418 increases p27Kip1 and induces significant regression of breast tumors. We conclude that GGTIs' antitumor activity is, at least in part, due to inhibiting Cdk2-dependent p27Kip1 phosphorylation at Thr187 and accumulating nuclear p27Kip1. Thus, GGTI treatment might improve the poor prognosis of breast cancer patients with low nuclear p27Kip1 levels. PMID:19204084

  15. Nucleus behavior in violent collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, M.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.

    1985-01-01

    Thanks to new heavy ion beams (Argon, Krypton...) accelerated at Ganil and Sara to velocities of about 0.2 to 0.5 times the light one, very violent collisions, between complex nuclei can be made. During peripheral collisions, the projectile is strongly heated in '' wearing away'' the target and follows its way at high velocity in loosing nucleons. Resulting fragments can present themselves as nuclei very different from usual stable nuclei, often at existence limit. In more central collisions, the energy transferred is such that fusion of both leads to a new type of very hot nucleus near the immediate boiling. Another existence limit is reached by this way: where the bound nucleon system tend to become nucleon gas or a bulk of little fragments [fr

  16. Characterization of a novel Dp71 dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) present in the nucleus of HeLa cells: Members of the nuclear DAPC associate with the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Mera, Lizeth; Rodriguez-Munoz, Rafael; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Gonzalez, Everardo; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-01-01

    Dystrophin is an essential component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), which includes members of the dystroglycan, syntrophin, sarcoglycan and dystrobrevin protein families. Distinctive complexes have been described in the cell membrane of different tissues and cultured cells. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of a novel DAPC present in the nuclei of HeLa cells, which contains dystrophin Dp71 as a key component. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation analyses, we found the presence of Dp71, β-sarcoglycan, β-dystroglycan, α- and β-syntrophin, α1- and β-dystrobrevin and nNOS in the nuclei of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that most of these proteins form a complex in the nuclear compartment. Next, we analyze the possible association of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix. We found the presence of Dp71, β-dystroglycan, nNOS, β-sarcoglycan, α/β syntrophin, α1-dystrobrevin and β-dystrobrevin in the nuclear matrix protein fractions and in situ nuclear matrix preparations from HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that Dp71, β-dystroglycan and β-dystrobrevin co-immunoprecipitated with the nuclear matrix proteins lamin B1 and actin. The association of members of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix indicates that they may work as scaffolding proteins involved in nuclear architecture

  17. Chemical anatomy of the human paraventricular thalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, Victoria; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2004-03-01

    The paraventricular thalamic nucleus (Pa) lies in the most medial aspect of the thalamus and is considered one of the midline thalamic nuclei. In the present study, we carried out histochemical and immunohistochemical procedures in the Pa of normal individuals to visualize the pattern of distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP), substance P (SP), and enkephalin (ENK). Other cytoarchitectural and myeloarchitectural techniques, such as Nissl and Gallyas, were also employed to delineate the boundaries of the Pa. The main findings of this study are: 1) AChE staining in the Pa was heterogeneously distributed along its anteroposterior and mediolateral axes; 2) the Pa harbored numerous CB- and CR-immunoreactive (ir) cells and neuropil, but this nucleus was largely devoid of PV; 3) the Pa was highly enriched in LAMP and this protein appeared uniformly distributed through its whole extent; and, 4) the SP and ENK immunoreactivities in the Pa revealed numerous highly varicose fibers scattered throughout this nucleus, but no stained cells. This morphological study demonstrates that the Pa is a heterogeneous chemical structure in humans. The functional significance of these results is discussed in the light of similar data gathered in several mammalian species. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [Acanthamoeba isolation from contact lens solution of contact lens wearers without keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, R; Ishibashi, Y; Hommura, S; Ishii, K

    1994-05-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis seems to be associated with wearing contact lenses. As controls, we surveyed contact lens wearers without keratitis. Contact lens solutions of 93 persons were examined in order to identify risk factors for contamination by Acanthamoeba. Therefore, the contact lens disinfection system and storage schedules were studied in each case. Acanthamoeba organisms were isolated from 4 specimens (4.3%). The incidence of Acanthamoeba was higher in specimens of soft contact lens solution than in those of hard contact lens solution, and all the Acanthamoeba positive cases had been using tap water.

  19. Primary anterior chamber intraocular lens for the treatment of severe crystalline lens subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Subluxated cataractous and clear lenses are commonly treated by limbal or pars plana lensectomy followed by primary or secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Adjunctive capsular prosthetic devices have facilitated lens removal and IOL centration in these challenging cases but have also added complexity and potential complications to the procedure. Although crystalline lens extraction may be required to clear the visual axis in mild to moderate lens subluxations, we propose insertion of a primary anterior chamber IOL without lens extraction in severe subluxations when the eye is optically aphakic or can be made functionally aphakic following neodymium:YAG laser zonulysis. Two cases demonstrating this approach are presented.

  20. Action potentials: to the nucleus and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ramendra N; Dudek, Serena M

    2008-04-01

    The neuronal nucleus is now widely accepted as playing a vital role in maintaining long-term changes in synaptic effectiveness. To act, however, the nucleus must be appropriately relayed with information regarding the latest round of synaptic plasticity. Several constraints of doing so in a neuron pertain to the often significant spatial distance of synapses from the nucleus and the number of synapses required for such a signal to reach functional levels in the nucleus. Largely based on the sensitivity of transcriptional responses to NMDA receptor antagonists, it has been postulated that the signals are physically relayed by biochemical messengers from the synapse to the nucleus. Alternatively, a second, less often considered but equally viable method of signal transduction may be initiated by action potentials generated proximal to the nucleus, wherefrom the signal can be relayed directly by calcium or indirectly by biochemical second messengers. We consider action potential-dependent signaling to the nucleus to have its own computational advantages over the synapse-to-nucleus signal for some functions. This minireview summarizes the logic and experimental support for these two modes of signaling and attempts to validate the action potential model as playing an important role in transcriptional regulation relating specifically to long-term synaptic plasticity.

  1. Do migrating cells need a nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Rhoda J

    2018-03-05

    How the nucleus affects cell polarity and migration is unclear. In this issue, Graham et al. (2018. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201706097) show that enucleated cells polarize and migrate in two but not three dimensions and propose that the nucleus is a necessary component of the molecular clutch regulating normal mechanical responses. © 2018 Hawkins.

  2. Protection of the eye lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The limit of radiation exposure for eye lens is going to decrease dramatically from 150 to 20 mSv as a transposition into the French law of a CIPR (International Commission for Radiation Protection) directive. Sanitary studies have shown that radiologists are more likely by a factor of 3.8 to get eye lens opacities than the rest of the population. The wearing of protective glasses is recommended and in order to get a better monitoring of the radiation dose new dosimeters have been designed, they can be worn on the glass frame of directly stuck on the skin near the eyes. A study has shown that veterinary surgeons that are accustomed to stay near animals to keep them quiet during radiological exams are prone to receive high doses as well as physicians that use hypnosis to decrease the level of anxiety of their patients during radiological exams. Radiation exposure of radiologists can be mitigated through: the use of protective shields and equipment and the optimization of the dose delivered to the patient. (A.C.)

  3. Ultraviolet B Radiation Stimulates the Interaction between Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells 5 (NFAT5) and Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB) in Human Lens Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Inyoung; Hah, Young-Sool; Ju, SunMi; Kim, Ji-Hye; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Cho, Hee-Young; Yoo, Ji-Myong; Seo, Seong-Wook; Choi, Wan-Sung; Kim, Seong-Jae

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) has been proposed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cataracts. The authors investigated the relationship between nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) and NF-κB in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human lens epithelial (HLE) cells. Human lens epithelial B-3 (HLE-B3) cells were exposed to UVB light at a dose of 10 mJ/cm 2 and then incubated for 24 h. Cell viability was assessed by using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Gene expression level of NFAT5 was determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Protein expression levels of NFAT5, NF-κB p65, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and the association of NFAT5 with the NF-κB p65 subunit were measured by Western blot analysis and a co-immunoprecipitation assay, respectively. The cellular distribution of NFAT5 and NF-κB p65 was examined by triple immunofluorescence staining. At 24 h after UVB exposure, cell viability significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner, and UVB light (15 and 20 mJ/cm 2 ) significantly increased the ROS generation. UVB irradiation increased NFAT5 mRNA and protein levels and increased phosphorylation of NF-κB in HLE-B3 cells. α-SMA protein levels were increased in the irradiated cells. In addition, NFAT5 and NF-κB translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, and binding between the p65 subunit and NFAT5 was increased. Exposure to UVB radiation induces nuclear translocation and stimulates binding between NFAT5 and NF-κB proteins in HLE-B3 cells. These interactions may form part of the biochemical mechanism of cataractogenesis in UVB-irradiated HLECs.

  4. The status of intercellular junctions in established lens epithelial cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Alpana; Craig, Jamie E; Sharma, Shiwani

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the major cause of vision-related disability worldwide. Mutations in the crystallin genes are the most common known cause of inherited congenital cataract. Mutations in the genes associated with intercellular contacts, such as Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS) and Ephrin type A receptor-2 (EPHA2), are other recognized causes of congenital cataract. The EPHA2 gene has been also associated with age-related cataract, suggesting that intercellular junctions are important in not only lens development, but also in maintaining lens transparency. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression and localization of the key cell junction and cytoskeletal proteins, and of NHS and EPHA2, in established lens epithelial cell lines to determine their suitability as model epithelial systems for the functional investigation of genes involved in intercellular contacts and implicated in cataract. The expression and subcellular localization of occludin and zona occludens protein-1 (ZO-1), which are associated with tight junctions; E-cadherin, which is associated with adherence junctions; and the cytoskeletal actin were analyzed in monolayers of a human lens epithelial cell line (SRA 01/04) and a mouse lens epithelial cell line (αTN4). In addition, the expression and subcellular localization of the NHS and EPHA2 proteins were analyzed in these cell lines. Protein or mRNA expression was respectively determined by western blotting or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and localization was determined by immunofluorescence labeling. Human SRA 01/04 and mouse αTN4 lens epithelial cells expressed either the proteins of interest or their encoding mRNA. Occludin, ZO-1, and NHS proteins localized to the cellular periphery, whereas E-cadherin, actin, and EPHA2 localized in the cytoplasm in these cell lines. The human SRA 01/04 and mouse αTN4 lens epithelial cells express the key junctional proteins. The localization patterns of these proteins suggest that

  5. Color corrected Fresnel lens for solar concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritchman, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    A new linear convex Fresnel lens with its groove side down is described. The design philosophy is similar to the highly concentrating two focal Fresnel lens but including a correction for chromatic aberration. A solar concentration ratio as high as 80 is achieved. For wide acceptance angles the concentration nears the theoretical maximum. (author)

  6. Modified suturing contact lens for penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S G; Stewart, H L

    1978-11-01

    The authors have previously described a suturing contact lens that protects the corneal endothelium by aiding in the maintenance of the anterior chamber during penetrating keratoplasty. This report describes structural modifications of the suturing contact lens, which improve its stability and effectiveness. An additional configuration for use in corneal lacerations is presented.

  7. Charged black lens in de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2018-02-01

    We obtain a charged black lens solution in the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a positive cosmological constant. It is shown that the solution obtained here describes the formation of a black hole with the spatial cross section of a sphere from that of the lens space of L (n ,1 ) in five-dimensional de Sitter space.

  8. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  9. Contact Lens Use in the Civil Airman Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakagawara, Van

    2002-01-01

    ...) aeromedical certificate. Although contact lens technology has advanced dramatically in recent years, the aviation environment may still have adverse effects on contact lens performance in some flight situations...

  10. Pedunculopontine nucleus cholinergic deficiency in cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Karin; Edwards, Nancy A; Urbano, Demelio; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Iacono, Diego; Alho, Ana Tereza Di Lorenzo; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Amaro, Edson; Horovitz, Silvina G; Hallett, Mark

    2018-03-06

    The etiology of cervical dystonia is unknown. Cholinergic abnormalities have been identified in dystonia animal models and human imaging studies. Some animal models have cholinergic neuronal loss in the striatum and increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of cholinergic abnormalities in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus in cervical dystonia human brain donors. Formalin-fixed brain tissues were obtained from 8 cervical dystonia and 7 age-matched control brains (controls). Pedunculopontine nucleus was available in only 6 cervical dystonia and 5 controls. Neurodegeneration was evaluated pathologically in the putamen, pedunculopontine nucleus, and other regions. Cholinergic neurons were detected using choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus. Putaminal cholinergic neurons were quantified. A total of 6 cervical dystonia patients and 6 age-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging to determine if there were white matter microstructural abnormalities around the pedunculopontine nucleus. Decreased or absent choline acetyltransferase staining was identified in all 6 pedunculopontine nucleus samples in cervical dystonia. In contrast, strong choline acetyltransferase staining was present in 4 of 5 pedunculopontine nucleus controls. There were no differences in pedunculopontine nucleus diffusion tensor imaging between cervical dystonia and healthy controls. There was no difference in numbers of putaminal cholinergic neurons between cervical dystonia and controls. Our findings suggest that pedunculopontine nucleus choline acetyltransferase deficiency represents a functional cholinergic deficit in cervical dystonia. Structural lesions and confounding neurodegenerative processes were excluded by absence of neuronal loss, gliosis, diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities, and beta-amyloid, tau, and alpha

  11. Corrected electrostatic lens systems for ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgish, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in our laboratory has introduced a new class of electrostatic focus forming element for beams, the ELCO lens. It compares favourably with the electrostatic and magnetic quadrupole elements conventionally used for microbeam formation. The ELCO lens does however have disadvantages associated with apertures and alignment. We have continued with the development of ion beam lenses and have evolved a further class of lens element which eliminates aperture and alignment problems. This new element can be combined like optical lenses into an aberration corrected system. Experimental measurement on the basic lens element has confirmed mathematical analysis of ion trajectories through the element. This mathematical analysis predicts that the basic element can be combined into a corrected lens system for, either: (1) high resolution microprobe formation with intrinsic rastering ability, the spot size limited only by the beam properties; or (2) high quality image formation with large magnification/demagnification ratio and wide angular aperture. (orig.)

  12. mCSF1, a nucleus-encoded CRM protein required for the processing of many mitochondrial introns, is involved in the biogenesis of respiratory complexes I and IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudjak, Michal; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Keren, Ido; Shaya, Felix; Belausov, Eduard; Small, Ian; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2013-07-01

    The coding regions of many mitochondrial genes in plants are interrupted by intervening sequences that are classified as group II introns. Their splicing is essential for the expression of the genes they interrupt and hence for respiratory function, and is facilitated by various protein cofactors. Despite the importance of these cofactors, only a few of them have been characterized. CRS1-YhbY domain (CRM) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain that is present in several characterized splicing factors in plant chloroplasts. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 16 CRM proteins, but these are largely uncharacterized. Here, we analyzed the intracellular location of one of these hypothetical proteins in Arabidopsis, mitochondrial CAF-like splicing factor 1 (mCSF1; At4 g31010), and analyzed the growth phenotypes and organellar activities associated with mcsf1 mutants in plants. Our data indicated that mCSF1 resides within mitochondria and its functions are essential during embryogenesis. Mutant plants with reduced mCSF1 displayed inhibited germination and retarded growth phenotypes that were tightly associated with reduced complex I and IV activities. Analogously to the functions of plastid-localized CRM proteins, analysis of the RNA profiles in wildtype and mcsf1 plants showed that mCSF1 acts in the splicing of many of the group II intron RNAs in Arabidopsis mitochondria. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Strangeness production in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions in the dual parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehring, H.; Ranft, J.; Capella, A.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1993-01-01

    Λ, bar Λ, and K S 0 production is studied in a Monte Carlo dual parton model for hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions with an SU(3) symmetric sea for chain formation (chain ends) but strangeness suppression in the chain fragmentation process. Additionally, (qq)-(bar q bar q) production from the sea was introduced into the chain formation process with the same probability as for the q→qq branching within the chain decay process. With these assumptions, multiplicity ratios and Feynman-x distributions for strange particles in h-h and multiplicity ratios in heavy ion collisions are reasonably well reproduced

  14. Long noncoding RNAs coordinate functions between mitochondria and the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yaru; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Hu, Ji-Fan; Cui, Jizhe

    2017-08-23

    In animal cells, mitochondria are the primary powerhouses and metabolic factories. They also contain genomes and can produce mitochondrial-specific nucleic acids and proteins. To maintain homeostasis of the entire cell, an intense cross-talk between mitochondria and the nucleus, mediated by encoded noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), as well as proteins, is required. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) contain characteristic structures, and they are involved in the regulation of almost every stage of gene expression, as well as being implicated in a variety of disease states, such as cancer. In the coordinated signaling system, several lncRNAs, transcribed in the nucleus but residing in mitochondria, play a key role in regulating mitochondrial functions or dynamics. For example, RMRP, a component of the mitochondrial RNase MRP, is important for mitochondrial DNA replication and RNA processing, and the steroid receptor RNA activator, SRA, is a key modulator of hormone signaling and is present in both the nucleus and mitochondria. Some RNA-binding proteins maybe play a role in the lncRNAs transport system, such as HuR, GRSF1, SHARP, SLIRP, PPR, and PNPASE. Furthermore, a series of nuclear DNA-encoded lncRNAs were implicated in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, mitochondrial bioenergetics and biosynthesis, and glutamine metabolism. The mitochondrial genome can also encode a set of lncRNAs, and they are divided into three categories: (1) lncND5, lncND6, and lncCyt b RNA; (2) chimeric mitochondrial DNA-encoded lncRNAs; and (3) putative mitochondrial DNA-encoded lncRNAs. It has been reported that the mitochondrial DNA-encoded lncRNAs appear to operate in the nucleus. The molecular mechanisms underlying trafficking of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded lncRNAs to the nucleus in mammals are only now beginning to emerge. In conclusion, both nuclear- and mitochondrial DNA-encoded lncRNAs mediate an intense intercompartmental cross-talk, which opens a rich field for investigation of the mechanism

  15. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  16. Cuba Through A New Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Stubbs

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered. Samuel Farber. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006. x + 212 pp. (Paper US$ 19.95 Cuba: A New History. Ric hard Gott . New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005. xii + 384 pp. (Paper US$ 17.00 Havana: The Making of Cuban Culture. Antoni Kapcia. Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2005. xx + 236 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Richard Gott, Antoni Kapcia, and Samuel Farber each approach Cuba through a new lens. Gott does so by providing a broad-sweep history of Cuba, which is epic in scope, attaches importance to social as much as political and economic history, and blends scholarship with flair. Kapcia homes in on Havana as the locus for Cuban culture, whereby cultural history becomes the trope for exploring not only the city but also Cuban national identity. Farber revisits his own and others’ interpretations of the origins of the Cuban Revolution.

  17. Radiation studies in Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.S.N.

    1977-01-01

    Estimation of chromosomal aberrations in flowers of Lens culinaris according to their sequence of development in the plants at 4, 8 and 12 Kr in the M 1 generation, showed that the later formed flowers had smaller percentages of cells with aberrations than those developed earlier. It is suggested that this may be the result of competition between more damaged and less damaged cells during the development of the shoot. There is consequently a decrease of sterility in successive flowers. The numbers of karyotypes taking part in the formation of lower and uppermost flowers were estimated cytologically at 4, 8 and 12 Kr. It was found that more karyotypes were involved in the formation of the lower flowers than in the upper ones. It appeared that at lower doses larger numbers of karyotypes were taking part in the formation of the chimaera than at higher doses. (auth.)

  18. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Joan E.; Wielgus, Albert R.; Boyes, William K.; Andley, Usha; Chignell, Colin F.

    2008-01-01

    The water-soluble, hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C 60 (OH) 22-26 ] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have assessed fullerol's potential ocular toxicity by measuring its cytotoxicity and phototoxicity induced by UVA and visible light in vitro with human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3). Accumulation of nano-C 60 (OH) 22-26 in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm and cell viability estimated using MTS and LDH assays. Fullerol was cytotoxic to HLE B-3 cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 20 μM. Exposure to either UVA or visible light in the presence of > 5 μM fullerol-induced phototoxic damage. When cells were pretreated with non-toxic antioxidants: 20 μM lutein, 1 mM N-acetyl cysteine, or 1 mM L-ascorbic acid prior to irradiation, only the singlet oxygen quencher-lutein significantly protected against fullerol photodamage. Apoptosis was observed in lens cells treated with fullerol whether or not the cells were irradiated, in the order UVA > visible light > dark. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that in the presence of the endogenous lens protein α-crystallin, large aggregates of fullerol were reduced. In conclusion, fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells. Although the acute toxicity of water-soluble nano-C 60 (OH) 22-26 is low, these compounds are retained in the body for long periods, raising concern for their chronic toxic effect. Before fullerols are used to deliver drugs to the eye, they should be tested for photo- and cytotoxicity in vivo

  19. c-Met must translocate to the nucleus to initiate calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Dawidson A; Rodrigues, Michele A; Leite, M Fatima; Gomez, Marcus V; Varnai, Peter; Balla, Tamas; Bennett, Anton M; Nathanson, Michael H

    2008-02-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is important for cell proliferation, differentiation, and related activities. HGF acts through its receptor c-Met, which activates downstream signaling pathways. HGF binds to c-Met at the plasma membrane, where it is generally believed that c-Met signaling is initiated. Here we report that c-Met rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon stimulation with HGF. Ca(2+) signals that are induced by HGF result from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation within the nucleus rather than within the cytoplasm. Translocation of c-Met to the nucleus depends upon the adaptor protein Gab1 and importin beta1, and formation of Ca(2+) signals in turn depends upon this translocation. HGF may exert its particular effects on cells because it bypasses signaling pathways in the cytoplasm to directly activate signaling pathways in the nucleus.

  20. Microbial contamination of contact lens storage cases and domestic tap water of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstüntürk, Miray; Zeybek, Zuhal

    2012-11-01

    Contact lenses have been widely used as an alternative to spectacles both in developed and developing countries. However, under certain circumstances, adverse responses can occur during contact lens wear and several microorganisms--including bacteria, fungi, and free living amoebae--can cause several eye infections in wearers. Extended wear of contact lenses is the major risk factor of eye infections such as microbial keratitis, besides contaminated contact lens storage case, contaminated lens care solutions, and inaccurate contact lens handling. In this study, we collected contact lens storage case and domestic tap water samples from 50 asymptomatic contact lens wearers. We determined that total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 45 (90 %), Gram negative rod bacteria were isolated in 20 (40 %), Pseudomonas spp. were isolated in 2 (4 %) and fungi were isolated in 18 (36 %) out of 50 contact lens storage cases. Free living amoebae were not detected in investigated contact lens storage cases. At the same time, out of 50, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 34 (68 %), fungi were isolated in 15 (30 %) and free living amoebae were isolated in 15 (30 %) domestic tap water samples. No Gram-negative rod bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in investigated water samples. Two contact lens case samples and two tap water samples were excluded from the analysis for Pseudomonas spp. for technical reasons. According to our findings, inadequate contact lens maintenance during lens wear may result in the contamination of contact lens storage cases. This situation can lead to severe eye infections in contact lens wearers over time.

  1. The protective effect of beta-casomorphin-7 via promoting Foxo1 activity and nuclear translocation in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihua; Li, Jia; Dayang, Wu; Bing, Li

    2018-03-08

    To investigate the protective effect of beta-casomorphin-7 (β-CM-7) in oxidative stressed human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) and to explore the possible mechanism for oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells induced by high glucose. We used HLECs to determine the effect of different concentrations of β-CM-7 on cell viability by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolimol/L bromide (MTT) assay. We used flow cytometry to determine the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by oxidative stress and a bioassay kit to determine the oxidant malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. We used Western blotting and an immunofluorescence assay to determine the expression of Forkhead box o1 (Foxo1), SP1, and the related protein glutathione peroxidase (GSH -px) at the molecular biology level as well as their intracellular localization. The expression of Foxo1 and SP1 were weakly expressed when the glucose concentration was 40 mM/L, but were highly expressed when cells were pretreated with an appropriate concentration of β-CM-7. After pretreatment with β-CM-7, the cells treated with 40 mM/L glucose for 48 h showed Foxo1 was transferred to the nucleus, and the expression of SP1 was increased. The content of ROS and MDA in the HLECs that were pretreated with β-CM-7 were lower than in those that were not pretreated (p <0.05). Accordingly, SOD was elevated in the cells pretreated with β-CM-7. The relative expression of GSH-px increased with increases of Foxo1 and SP1. β-CM-7 protects HLECs from oxidative damage by upregulating the relative expression of Foxo1 and promoting Foxo1 nuclear translocation.

  2. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  3. Action at a Distance in the Cell's Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, Jane

    Various functions performed by chromosomes involve long-range communication between DNA sequences that are tens of thousands of bases apart along the genome, and microns apart in the nucleus. In this talk I will discuss experiments and theory relating to two distinct modes of long-range communication in the nucleus, chromosome looping and protein hopping along the chromosome, both in the context of DNA-break repair in yeast. Yeast is an excellent model system for studies that link chromosome conformations to their function as there is ample experimental evidence that yeast chromosome conformations are well described by a simple, random-walk polymer model. Using a combination of polymer physics theory and experiments on yeast cells, I will demonstrate that loss of polymer entropy due to chromosome looping is the driving force for homology search during repair of broken DNA by homologous recombination. I will also discuss the spread of histone modifications along the chromosome and away from the DNA break point in the context of simple physics models based on chromosome looping and kinase hopping, and show how combining physics theory and cell-biology experiment can be used to dissect the molecular mechanism of the spreading process. These examples demonstrate how combined theoretical and experimental studies can reveal physical principles of long-range communication in the nucleus, which play important roles in regulation of gene expression, DNA recombination, and chromatin modification. This work was supported by the NSF DMR-1206146.

  4. Study of Hadron Production in Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Klochkov, V; Herve, A E; Kowalski, S; Kaptur, E A; Kowalik, K L; Dominik, W M; Matulewicz, T N; Krasnoperov, A; Feofilov, G; Vinogradov, L; Kovalenko, V; Johnson, S R; Planeta, R J; Rubbia, A; Marton, K; Messerly, B A; Puzovic, J; Bogomilov, M V; Bravar, A; Renfordt, R A E; Deveaux, M; Engel, R R; Grzeszczuk, A; Davis, N; Kuich, M; Lyubushkin, V; Kondratev, V; Kadija, K; Diakonos, F; Slodkowski, M A; Rauch, W H; Pistillo, C; Laszlo, A; Nakadaira, T; Hasegawa, T; Sadovskiy, A; Morozov, S; Petukhov, O; Mathes, H; Roehrich, D; Marcinek, A J; Marino, A D; Grebieszkow, K; Wlodarczyk, Z; Rybczynski, M A; Wojtaszek-szwarc, A; Nirkko, M C; Sakashita, K; Golubeva, M; Kurepin, A; Manic, D; Kolev, D I; Kisiel, J E; Koziel, M E; Rondio, E; Larsen, D T; Czopowicz, T R; Seyboth, P; Turko, L; Guber, F; Marin, V; Busygina, O; Strikhanov, M; Taranenko, A; Cirkovic, M; Roth, M A; Pulawski, S M; Aduszkiewicz, A M; Bunyatov, S; Vechernin, V; Nagai, Y; Anticic, T; Dynowski, K M; Mackowiak-pawlowska, M K; Stefanek, G; Pavin, M; Fodor, Z P; Nishikawa, K; Tada, M; Blondel, A P P; Stroebele, H W; Posiadala, M Z; Kolesnikov, V; Andronov, E; Zimmerman, E D; Antoniou, N; Majka, Z; Di luise, S; Veberic, D; Dumarchez, J; Naskret, M; Ivashkin, A; Tsenov, R V; Koziel, M G; Schmidt, K J; Melkumov, G; Popov, B; Panagiotou, A; Richter-was, E M; Morgala, S J; Paolone, V; Damyanova, A; Gazdzicki, M; Unger, M T; Wilczek, A G; Stepaniak, J M; Seryakov, A; Susa, T; Staszel, P P; Brzychczyk, J; Maksiak, B; Tefelski, D B

    2007-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE (SHINE = SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment is a large acceptance hadron spectrometer at the CERN SPS for the study of the hadronic final states produced in interactions of various beam particles (pions, protons, C, S and In) with a variety of fixed targets at the SPS energies. The main components of the current detector were constructed and used by the NA49 experiment. The physics program of NA61/SHINE consists of three main subjects. In the first stage of data taking (2007-2009) measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus interactions needed for neutrino (T2K) and cosmic-ray (Pierre Auger and KASCADE) experiments will be performed. In the second stage (2009-2011) hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions needed as reference data for a better understanding of nucleus-nucleus reactions will be studied. In the third stage (2009-2013) energy dependence of hadron production properties will be measured in nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as in p+p a...

  5. Nucleus accumbens surgery for addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xue-lian; Chang, Chong-wang; Ge, Shun-nan; Gao, Li; Wu, He-ming; Zhao, Hai-kang; Geng, Ning; Gao, Guo-dong

    2013-01-01

    Opiate addiction remains intractable in a large percentage of patients, and relapse is the biggest hurdle to recovery because of psychological dependence. Multiple studies identify a central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in addiction; several studies note decreased addictive behavior after interventions in this area. Based on animal experiments, our institute started the clinical trial for the treatment of drug addicts' psychological dependence by making lesions in the bilateral NAc with stereotactic surgery from July 2000. The short-term outcomes were encouraging and triggered rapid application of this treatment in China from 2003 to 2004. However, lack of long-term outcomes and controversy eventually led to halting the surgery for addiction by the Ministry of Health of China in November 2004 and a nationwide survey about it later. Our institute had performed this surgery in 272 patients with severe heroin addiction. The follow-up study showed that the 5-year nonrelapse rate was 58% and the quality of life was significantly improved. Patients had several kinds of side effects, but the incidence rate was relatively low. The patients gradually recovered more than 5 years after the surgery. The side effects did not severely influence an individual's life or work. Nationwide surgery showed that the nonrelapse rate was 50% in the sample of 150 cases, from 1167 patients overall who underwent stereotactic surgery in China. Although sometimes accompanied by neuropsychological adverse events, stereotactic ablation of NAc may effectively treat opiate addiction. Lesion location has a significant impact on treatment efficacy and requires further study. Because ablation is irreversible, the NAc surgery for addiction should be performed with cautiousness, and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an ideal alternative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pion-nucleus cross sections approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Polanski, A.; Sosnin, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical approximation of pion-nucleus elastic and inelastic interaction cross-section is suggested, with could be applied in the energy range exceeding several dozens of MeV for nuclei heavier than beryllium. 3 refs.; 4 tabs

  7. The nucleus in Finland - The second report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurela, Jorma; Korteniemi, Virpi; Halme-Tapanainen, Kristina

    1993-01-01

    The Finnish Nuclear Society (FNS) started the distribution of the Nucleus bulletin at the beginning of 1988. The volume of distribution has been extended since, including today nearly 1,000 persons. Both the English and the Finnish version of the bulletin is sent to various opinion leaders of society, i.e. the members of the parliament, ministries, the media, representatives of industry and other decision-makers of the energy field. After the five-year history of the Nucleus in Finland, it is time to look back and sum up the present status of the Nucleus. This report gives a short summary concerning the present distribution and its efficiency, the experiences gained and the influence of the bulletin in Finland. The first questionnaire was sent in November 1988, and the survey was repeated among the Finnish readers of the Nucleus in autumn 1992. The results of the latter survey are given in this report

  8. K sup + nucleus total cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawafta, R.

    1990-01-01

    The scattering of K{sup +} mesons from nuclei has attracted considerable interest in the last few years. The K{sup +} holds a very special position as the weakest of all strongly interaction probes. The average cross section is not larger than about 10 mb at lab momenta below 800 MeV/c, corresponding to a mean free path in the nucleus larger than 5 fm. Thus the K{sup +} is capable of probing the entire volume of the nucleus. Single scattering of the K{sup +} with a nucleon in the nucleus dominates the nuclear scattering, and only small and calculable higher order corrections are needed. The nucleon is a dynamical entity and its internal structure can, in principle, be altered by its surrounding nuclear environment. This work reports an experiment in which the K{sup +} is used to compare the nucleon in the nucleus with a free nucleon.

  9. Kaon-nucleus reactions and hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in hypernuclear physics and kaon-nucleus scattering are discussed, with emphasis on the spectroscopy of Λ single particle states in heavy systems, as revealed by the (π + ,K + ) reaction. 26 refs., 8 figs

  10. Contact lens compliance among a group of young, university-based lens users in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noushad, Babu; Saoji, Yeshwant; Bhakat, Premjit; Thomas, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the rate of compliance with the soft contact lens care and maintenance procedures with a focus on contact lens wearing habits, cleaning and disinfecting procedures, and maintenance of lens care accessories in a group of young, university-based contact lens wearers Two hundred and sixteen young soft contact lens wearers with an age range of 18-22 years were selected conveniently from the student population of Manipal University, Manipal, India. After receiving informed consent from the participants, their level of compliance with contact lenses was assessed using a questionnaire. The mean (±SD) age of the participants was 21.86±2.35 years. Out of 216 subjects, only 34% of the lens users were identified to be compliant with the least level of compliance observed in the maintenance of lens care accessories. Conventional users showed significantly (p=0.001) better level of compliance compared to disposable wearers and so did the users who acquired their lenses from clinicians (p=0.001) compared to over-the-counter lens receipt. The gender (p=0.496) and years of experience in contact lens use (p=0.142) did not show any statistically significant difference in the level of compliance. This study demonstrated that non-compliance with lens care procedures among a group of young, university-based soft contact lens wearers is common. The results indicated that all subjects had some degree of non-compliance and the least level of compliance observed in the care of lens accessories.

  11. Tear film physiology and contact lens wear. II. Contact lens-tear film interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, F J

    1981-04-01

    The successful fitting of contact lenses requires the practitioner to take into account many properties of the specific lens type used but the practitioner must also understand patient factors including tear properties, use of appropriate solutions, procedures for lens cleaning, and efficiency of blinking. Selection of appropriate patients, selection of lens type, proper fitting, good maintenance, and training and monitoring of patients increase the probability of achieving success.

  12. Polarization and alignment of nucleus fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.; Grechukhin, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Correlation of fragment orientation with orientation axis of fissile nucleus and with n-vector f vector of fragment divergence is considered. Estimations of polarization and alignment of fission fragments of preliminarily oriented nuclei in correlation (with n-vector f recording) and integral (with n-vector f averaging) experiments were conducted. It is shown that high sensitivity of polarization and fragment alignment to the character of nucleus movement at the stage of descent from barrier to rupture point exists

  13. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-17

    Oct 17, 2012 ... Cx43 in the LECs. Alterations in cell junction proteins may play a role during formation of different types of cataract. [Arora AI, Johar K, Gajjar DU, Ganatra DA, Kayastha FB, Pal AK, Patel AR, Rajkumar S and Vasavada AR 2012 Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens epithelial cells.

  14. Targeting the red nucleus for cerebellar tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, M; Manto, M; Merle, P; Tir, M; Montpellier, D; Constant, J-M; Le Gars, D; Macron, J-M; Krystkowiak, P

    2014-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the thalamus (and especially the ventral intermediate nucleus) does not significantly improve a drug-resistant, disabling cerebellar tremor. The dentato-rubro-olivary tract (Guillain-Mollaret triangle, including the red nucleus) is a subcortical loop that is critically involved in tremor genesis. We report the case of a 48-year-old female patient presenting with generalized cerebellar tremor caused by alcohol-related cerebellar degeneration. Resistance to pharmacological treatment and the severity of the symptoms prompted us to investigate the effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the red nucleus. Intra-operative microrecordings of the red nucleus revealed intense, irregular, tonic background activity but no rhythmic components that were synchronous with upper limb tremor. The postural component of the cerebellar tremor disappeared during insertion of the macro-electrodes and for a few minutes after stimulation, with no changes in the intentional (kinetic) component. Stimulation per se did not reduce postural or intentional tremor and was associated with dysautonomic symptoms (the voltage threshold for which was inversed related to the stimulation frequency). Our observations suggest that the red nucleus is (1) an important centre for the genesis of cerebellar tremor and thus (2) a possible target for drug-refractory tremor. Future research must determine how neuromodulation of the red nucleus can best be implemented in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

  15. Placement of a crystalline lens and intraocular lens: Retinal image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Damian; Nowak, Jerzy; Zajac, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The influence of changes of both crystalline lens and intraocular lens (IOL) misalignment on the retinal image quality was investigated. The optical model of the eye used in investigations was the Liou-Brennan model, which is commonly considered as one of the most anatomically accurate. The original crystalline lens from this model was replaced with an IOL, made of rigid polymethylmethacrylate, in a way that recommend obligatory procedures. The modifications that were made both for crystalline lens and IOL were the longitudinal, the transversal, and the angular displacement.

  16. Restoring lens capsule integrity enhances lens regeneration in New Zealand albino rabbits and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, A; Gruber, L J; Mantras, C

    1993-11-01

    In studies conducted by numerous investigators for 150 years, lenses regenerated following endocapsular lens extraction in New Zealand albino rabbits have been irregular in shape, appearing primarily doughnut-shaped as a result of lack of lens growth at the site of the anterior capsulotomy and its adhesion to the posterior capsule. In the present study, we restored the lens capsule integrity by inserting a collagen patch at the time of surgery to seal the anterior capsulotomy and to improve the shape and structure of the regenerated lenses. We then filled the capsule bag with air to prevent adhesions between the anterior and posterior capsule and maintain capsule tautness and shape. Lens regeneration was first noted as early as one to two weeks. Regenerated lens filled approximately 50% of the capsule bag at two weeks and 100% by five weeks. Subsequent growth was in the anterior-posterior direction and measured by A-scan biometry. Lens thickness increased by 0.3 mm per month. The regenerated lenses were spherical with normal cortical structure and a nuclear opacity. In conclusion, restoration of lens capsular integrity with a collagen patch following endocapsular lens extraction enhanced the shape, structure, and growth rate of the regenerated lenses. In addition, lens regeneration was shown to occur in two cats.

  17. Development of Fresnel lens for improvement of rear visibility; Shikai kojo Fresnel lens no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, K.; Sanada, C.; Tsukino, M. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Fresnel lenses have been widely used to increase the visual field around vehicles for drivers. However, internal reflection in these lenses has been an obstacle in producing dear images. This internal glow is generated by incident light from an unexpected direction reflecting on the non-lens surface or radiating from the non-lens surface of the Fresnel lens. The cause of internal glow has been made dear combining louver film with the lens. The newly developed technology removes obstacles in producing dear images by reducing internal glow. 7 figs.

  18. Night Vision Goggles Objectives Lens Focusing Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinkus, Alan; Task, H. L

    2000-01-01

    ...: interpupillary distance, tilt, eye relief, height, eyepiece and objective lens focus. Currently, aircrew use a Hoffman 20/20 test unit to pre-focus their NVG objective lenses at optical infinity before boarding their aircraft...

  19. Contractual considerations in contact lens practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classé, J G

    1986-03-01

    The use of forms in contact lens practice can save time, promote patient education, and reduce the opportunity for legal or economic disputes. The most commonly employed forms are those for contact lens fitting agreements, instructions for care and maintenance of lenses, prepaid service agreements, clinical investigations of investigatory lenses or solutions, and for extended wear patients. Sample forms are utilized for purposes of illustration.

  20. Evolution and the Calcite Eye Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Vernon L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcite is a uniaxial, birefringent crystal, which in its optically transparent form, has been used for animal eye lenses, the trilobite being one such animal. Because of the calcite birefringence there is a difficulty in using calcite as a lens. When the propagation direction of incoming light is not exactly on the c-axis, the mages blur. In this paper, calcite blurring is evaluated, and the non-blurring by a crystallin eye lens is compared to a calcite one.

  1. Acute lens-induced glaucomas: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shoeb Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lens-induced factors are important and common mechanisms causing acute elevation of intraocular pressure. While in most cases, the diagnosis and management are straight-forward, in others it is difficult and can lead to improper procedures, complications and poor visual outcomes. This review was done with the aim of studying the various types of lens-induced glaucomas, classifying them in an easy way to understand manner, their clinical features, current management and future possibilities.

  2. Ionizing radiation response of primary normal human lens epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Hamada

    Full Text Available Whilst the cataractogenic potential of ionizing radiation has been known for over the past 120 years, little is known about radiation responses of lens cells. Our previous work was the first to evaluate the radiosensitivity of lens cells with the clonogenic assay, documenting that the survival of HLEC1 human lens epithelial cells is comparable to that of WI-38 human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, HLEC1 cells were found to contain subsets where irradiation stimulates proliferation or facilitates formation of abortive colonies with fewer cells than human fibroblasts. This study aims to gain insights into these mechanisms. Irradiation of HLEC1 cells with 10% survival dose caused a growth delay but did not reduce viability. HLEC1 cells at high cumulative population doubling level were more susceptible to radiogenic premature senescence than WI-38 cells. Concerning p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1 foci, HLEC1 cells harbored less spontaneous foci but more radiogenic foci than in WI-38 cells, and the focus number returned to spontaneous levels within 48 h postirradiation both in HLEC1 and WI-38. The chemical inhibition of DNA repair kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated, DNA-dependent protein kinase or both delayed and attenuated the appearance and disappearance of radiogenic 53BP1 foci, increased radiogenic premature senescence and enhanced clonogenic inactivation. The DNA microarray analysis suggested both radiogenic stimulation and inhibition of cell proliferation. Treatment with conditioned medium from irradiated cells did not change growth and the plating efficiency of nonirradiated cells. These results partially explain mechanisms of our previous observations, such that unrepaired or incompletely repaired DNA damage causes a growth delay in a subset of HLEC1 cells without changing viability through induction of premature senescence, thereby leading to clonogenic inactivation, but that growth is stimulated in another subset via as yet unidentified

  3. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Park, Kwan Kyu; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing.

  4. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Kyu Park, Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing. (paper)

  5. LENS: Science Scope and Development Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) experiment will resolve the solar metallicity question via measurement of the CNO neutrino flux, as well as test the predicted equivalence of solar luminosity as measured by photon versus neutrinos. The LENS detector uses charged-current interaction of neutrinos on Indium-115 (loaded in a scintillator, InLS) to reveal the complete solar neutrino spectrum. LENS's optically segmented 3D lattice geometry achieves precise time and spatial resolution and unprecedented background rejection and sensitivity for low-energy neutrino events. This first-of-a-kind lattice design is also suited for a range of other applications where high segmentation and large light collection are required (eg: sterile neutrinos with sources, double beta decay, and surface detection of reactor neutrinos). The physics scope, detector design, and logic driving the microLENS and miniLENS prototyping stages will be presented. The collaboration is actively running programs; building, operating, developing, and simulating these prototypes using the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF). New members are welcome to the LENS Collaboration, and interested parties should contact R. Bruce Vogelaar.

  6. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Lee [Boston University

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  7. Sharing of secondary electrons by in-lens and out-lens detector in low-voltage scanning electron microscope equipped with immersion lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    To understand secondary electron (SE) image formation with in-lens and out-lens detector in low-voltage scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM), we have evaluated SE signals of an in-lens and an out-lens detector in LV-SEM. From the energy distribution spectra of SEs with various boosting voltages of the immersion lens system, we revealed that the electrostatic field of the immersion lens mainly collects electrons with energy lower than 40eV, acting as a low-pass filter. This effect is also observed as a contrast change in LV-SEM images taken by in-lens and out-lens detectors.

  8. Antioxidant status of dog aqueous humor after extracapsular lens extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros P.S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the antioxidant status of the aqueous humor after extracapsular lens extraction in 14 mongrel dogs weighing about 10 kg. The animals were examined by slit lamp biomicroscopy, applanation tonometry and indirect ophthalmoscopy. One eye was submitted to conventional extracapsular lens extraction and the other was used as control. Samples of aqueous humor were obtained by anterior chamber paracentesis before and at days 1, 2, 3, 7 and 15 after surgery. Total antioxidant status was determined as the capacity of aqueous humor to inhibit free radical generation by 2,2-azobis(2-amidopropane chlorine. Ascorbic acid concentration was measured by HPLC with UV detection. Protein content was determined with the biuret reagent. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer test. Protein concentration increased from 0.61 to 22 mg/ml 24 h after surgery. These levels were maintained and returned to normal at day 7. Total antioxidant capacity was reduced from 50 to about 30 min until day 3 and at day 7 it was equal to control. Ascorbic acid levels were reduced from 252 to about 110 µM and then returned to control values at day 15. Considering the importance of ascorbic acid concentration in aqueous humor for the maintenance of the antioxidant status of the anterior segment of the eye, the decrease of antioxidant defenses suggests that the surgical procedures promote an oxidative stress condition in the eye.

  9. α-Crystallin localizes to the leading edges of migrating lens epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Vasantha Rao, P.

    2005-01-01

    α-crystallin (αA and αB) is a major lens protein, which belongs to the small heat-shock family of proteins and binds to various cytoskeletal proteins including actin, vimentin and desmin. In this study, we investigated the cellular localization of αA and αB-crystallins in migrating epithelial cells isolated from porcine lens. Immunofluorescence localization and confocal imaging of αB-crystallin in confluent and in migrating subconfluent cell cultures revealed a distinct pattern of subcellular distribution. While αB-crystallin localization was predominantly cytoplasmic in confluent cultures, it was strongly localized to the leading edges of cell membrane or the lamellipodia in migrating cells. In accordance with this pattern, we found abundant levels of αB-crystallin in membrane fractions compared to cytosolic and nuclear fractions in migrating lens epithelial cells. αA-crystallin, which has 60% sequence identity to αB-crystallin, also exhibited a distribution profile localizing to the leading edge of the cell membrane in migrating lens epithelial cells. Localization of αB-crystallin to the lamellipodia appears to be dependent on phosphorylation of residue serine-59. An inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase (SB202190), but not the ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059, was found to diminish localization of αB-crystallin to the lamellipodia, and this effect was found to be associated with reduced levels of Serine-59 phosphorylated αB-crystallin in SB202190-treated migrating lens epithelial cells. αB-crystallin localization to the lamellipodia was also altered by the treatment with RGD (Arg-Ala-Asp) peptide, dominant negative N17 Rac1 GTPase, cytochalasin D and Src kinase inhibitor (PP2), but not by the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 or the myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Additionally, in migrating lens epithelial cells, αB-crystallin exhibited a clear co-localization with the actin meshwork, β-catenin, WAVE-1, a promoter of actin nucleation, Abi-2, a component of WAVE

  10. High density nuclear Mach shock waves in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.; Hofmann, J.; Scheid, W.; Greiner, W.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrence of high density nuclear Mach shock waves in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions and related phenomena, as density isomers, highly isobaric and hot nuclear matter, pionization and granulation of dense matter, compressibility and soundwaves in nuclear matter, are discussed

  11. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the description of an experiment for the search of -nucleus bound state using ...

  12. Surface modification of fluorosilicone acrylate RGP contact lens via low-temperature argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Shiheng; Wang Yingjun; Ren Li; Zhao Lianna; Kuang Tongchun; Chen Hao; Qu Jia

    2008-01-01

    A fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens was modified via argon plasma to improve surface hydrophilicity and resistance to protein deposition. The influence of plasma treatment on surface chemical structure, hydrophilicity and morphology of RGP lens was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The contact angle results showed that the hydrophilicity of the contact lens was improved after plasma treatment. XPS results indicated that the incorporation of oxygen-containing groups on surface and the transformation of silicone into hydrophilic silicate after plasma treatment are the main reasons for the surface hydrophilicity improvement. SEM results showed that argon plasma with higher power could lead to surface etching

  13. Cell Biology of the Caenorhabditis elegans Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Fix, Orna; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the Caenorhabditis elegans nucleus have provided fascinating insight to the organization and activities of eukaryotic cells. Being the organelle that holds the genetic blueprint of the cell, the nucleus is critical for basically every aspect of cell biology. The stereotypical development of C. elegans from a one cell-stage embryo to a fertile hermaphrodite with 959 somatic nuclei has allowed the identification of mutants with specific alterations in gene expression programs, nuclear morphology, or nuclear positioning. Moreover, the early C. elegans embryo is an excellent model to dissect the mitotic processes of nuclear disassembly and reformation with high spatiotemporal resolution. We review here several features of the C. elegans nucleus, including its composition, structure, and dynamics. We also discuss the spatial organization of chromatin and regulation of gene expression and how this depends on tight control of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Finally, the extensive connections of the nucleus with the cytoskeleton and their implications during development are described. Most processes of the C. elegans nucleus are evolutionarily conserved, highlighting the relevance of this powerful and versatile model organism to human biology. PMID:28049702

  14. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons. PMID:21738832

  15. Acanthamoeba keratitis and contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Richard G; Watters, Grant; Johnson, Richard; Ormonde, Susan E; Snibson, Grant R

    2007-09-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but serious complication of contact lens wear that may cause severe visual loss. The clinical picture is usually characterised by severe pain, sometimes disproportionate to the signs, with an early superficial keratitis that is often misdiagnosed as herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. Advanced stages of the infection are usually characterised by central corneal epithelial loss and marked stromal opacification with subsequent loss of vision. In this paper, six cases of contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis that occurred in Australia and New Zealand over a three-year period are described. Three of the patients were disposable soft lens wearers, two were hybrid lens wearers and one was a rigid gas permeable lens wearer. For all six cases, the risk factors for Acanthamoeba keratitis were contact lens wear with inappropriate or ineffective lens maintenance and exposure of the contact lenses to tap or other sources of water. All six patients responded well to medical therapy that involved topical use of appropriate therapeutic agents, most commonly polyhexamethylene biguanide and propamidine isethionate, although two of the patients also subsequently underwent deep lamellar keratoplasty due to residual corneal surface irregularity and stromal scarring. Despite the significant advances that have been made in the medical therapy of Acanthamoeba keratitis over the past 10 years, prevention remains the best treatment and patients who wear contact lenses must be thoroughly educated about the proper use and care of the lenses. In particular, exposure of the contact lenses to tap water or other sources of water should be avoided.

  16. Properties of the cathode lens combined with a focusing magnetic/immersion-magnetic lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvalina, I.; Muellerova, I.

    2011-01-01

    The cathode lens is an electron optical element in an emission electron microscope accelerating electrons from the sample, which serves as a source for a beam of electrons. Special application consists in using the cathode lens first for retardation of an illuminating electron beam and then for acceleration of reflected as well as secondary electrons, made in the directly imaging low energy electron microscope or in its scanning version discussed here. In order to form a real image, the cathode lens has to be combined with a focusing magnetic lens or a focusing immersion-magnetic lens, as used for objective lenses of some commercial scanning electron microscopes. These two alternatives are compared with regards to their optical properties, in particular with respect to predicted aberration coefficients and the spot size, as well as the optimum angular aperture of the primary beam. The important role of the final aperture size on the image resolution is also presented.

  17. Distinct subsets of nucleus basalis neurons exhibit similar sensitivity to excitotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, Tibor; Varga, Csaba; Grosche, Jens; Mulder, Jan; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Penke, Botond; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Excitotoxic lesions in the magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN) lead to a significant damage of cholinergic neurons concomitant with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression in the cerebral cortex. However, the sensitivity of non-cholinergic neurons to excitotoxicity, and changes of APP

  18. CREB activity in the nucleus accumbens shell controls gating of behavioral responses to emotional stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrot, Michel; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Perrotti, Linda I; DiLeone, Ralph J; Berton, Olivier; Eisch, Amelia J; Impey, Soren; Storm, Daniel R; Neve, Rachael L; Yin, Jerry C; Zachariou, Venetia; Nestler, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) has been shown to regulate neural plasticity. Drugs of abuse activate CREB in the nucleus accumbens, an important part of the brain's reward pathways, and local manipulations of CREB activity have been shown to affect

  19. Role of the nucleus in apoptosis: signaling and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, Evgeniia A; Zamaraev, Alexey V; Kopeina, Gelina S; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Lavrik, Inna N

    2015-12-01

    Since their establishment in the early 1970s, the nuclear changes upon apoptosis induction, such as the condensation of chromatin, disassembly of nuclear scaffold proteins and degradation of DNA, were, and still are, considered as the essential steps and hallmarks of apoptosis. These are the characteristics of the execution phase of apoptotic cell death. In addition, accumulating data clearly show that some nuclear events can lead to the induction of apoptosis. In particular, if DNA lesions resulting from deregulation during the cell cycle or DNA damage induced by chemotherapeutic drugs or viral infection cannot be efficiently eliminated, apoptotic mechanisms, which enable cellular transformation to be avoided, are activated in the nucleus. The functional heterogeneity of the nuclear organization allows the tight regulation of these signaling events that involve the movement of various nuclear proteins to other intracellular compartments (and vice versa) to initiate and govern apoptosis. Here, we discuss how these events are coordinated to execute apoptotic cell death.

  20. Lens exposure during brain scans using multidetector row CT scanners: methods for estimation of lens dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Furui, S; Ishitake, T; Abe, T; Machida, H; Takei, R; Ibukuro, K; Watanabe, A; Kidouchi, T; Nakano, Y

    2010-05-01

    Some recent studies on radiation lens injuries have indicated much lower dose thresholds than specified by the current radiation protection guidelines. The purpose of this research was to measure the lens dose during brain CT scans with multidetector row CT and to assess methods for estimating the lens dose. With 8 types of multidetector row CT scanners, both axial and helical scans were obtained for the head part of a human-shaped phantom by using normal clinical settings with the orbitomeatal line as the baseline. We measured the doses on both eyelids by using an RPLGD during whole-brain scans including the orbit with the starting point at the level of the inferior orbital rim. To assess the effect of the starting points on the lens doses, we measured the lens doses by using 2 other starting points for scanning (the orbitomeatal line and the superior orbital rim). The CTDIvols and the lens doses during whole-brain CT including the orbit were 50.9-113.3 mGy and 42.6-103.5 mGy, respectively. The ratios of lens dose to CTDIvol were 80.6%-103.4%. The lens doses decreased as the starting points were set more superiorly. The lens doses during scans from the superior orbital rim were 11.8%-20.9% of the doses during the scans from the inferior orbital rim. CTDIvol can be used to estimate the lens dose during whole-brain CT when the orbit is included in the scanning range.

  1. Dynamics of hadron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    Recent progress in diffraction theory shows that proton-nucleus scattering at nonforward angles is dominated by the interference of waves from two or more bright spots. Analytic formulas based on asymptotic theories of diffraction yield valuable new insights into the scattering and these formulas can be readily extended to illuminate the role of dynamical ingredients, i.e., the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes. The governing parameters of the diffraction and some direct connections between the observed cross sections and the input dynamics are reviewed. New information regarding the nucleon-nucleon parameters based on recent phase shift analyses show some systematic differences from the effective NN amplitudes which produce fits to proton-nucleus diffraction data. Recent progress in understanding the role of Δ-isobars in proton-nucleus dynamics is reviewed. 126 references

  2. Selectivity and localization of lysozyme uptake in contemporary hydrogel contact lens materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynen, Miriam; Babaei Omali, Negar; Fadli, Zohra; Coles-Brennan, Chantal; Subbaraman, Lakshman N; Jones, Lyndon

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the early and selective uptake of lysozyme and the location of deposited lysozyme on contemporary hydrogel contact lens (CL) materials after exposure to an artificial tear solution (ATS) for 16 h. Seven different hydrogel CL materials [polymacon, omafilcon A, nelfilcon A, nesofilcon A, ocufilcon B, etafilcon A (Acuvue Moist), and etafilcon A (Acuvue Define)] were incubated in an ATS for various times. Total protein deposition was determined using a modified Bradford technique. Lysozyme, lactoferrin, and albumin deposition on CLs were determined using 125 I-radiolabeling method. A confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) technique was utilized to map the location of lysozyme uptake in an asymmetric environment. All lens materials had significant amounts of lysozyme after 1 min of exposure to ATS. After 16 h of incubation, higher levels of total protein deposited on the two etafilcon A-based lenses (Moist and Define), followed by ocufilcon B and both were significantly higher than all other CLs tested (p = 0.0001). The two etafilcon A materials (Moist and Define) also deposited the highest amounts of lysozyme (514.8 ± 28.4 and 527.1 ± 14.7 μg/lens respectively) when compared to other test CLs (p = 0.0001). The CLSM technique revealed that the non-ionic CLs tended to have symmetric distribution of lysozyme throughout the lens materials, while the ionic CLs had an asymmetric distribution, with the highest concentration of lysozyme on and near the exposed surface. The quantity and nature of proteins deposited on CLs varies, depending upon the chemical composition of the material. Among the various lenses tested, etafilcon A deposited the highest amount of total protein, most of it represented by lysozyme, which was largely located near the surface of the lens.

  3. Development of Powerhouse Using Fresnel lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Dohani Nawar Saif

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an alternative source of renewable energy. Sultanate of Oman government showed initiation on utilization of solar energy for domestic and industrial applications. Fresnel lens is one of the methods to collect maximum energy by gathering heat of the sun in the concentrated form (using solar collectors. Earlier research work discloses that Fresnel lens gave better result in terms of power output and produces lower heat loss as compared to linear –parabolic solar collectors. In this work, development of a proto Fresnel lens power house was made to generate electricity. The focused heat from Fresnel lens was used to heat the molten salt in a heat exchanger to produce the steam. The generated steam was used to rotate the steam engine coupled to a generator. In the current work, a maximum power of 30 W was produced. In addition, comparative study was carried out regarding solar salts and heat exchanger materials to understand the Fresnel powerhouse performance. Overall the present study gave valuable information regarding usage of Fresnel lens for electricity generation in Oman.

  4. Non-compliance in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, B E; Efron, N

    1994-10-01

    Non-compliance is emerging as a critical issue in the contact lens field. This problem has been studied at depth in general health care situations and is seen as the responsibility of both practitioner and patient (client) working in a health care partnership. The contact lens practitioner and patient present a specific case for the study of non-compliance in areas such as hygiene, solution use, appointment attendance and wearing times. From 40 to 91% of contact lens patients have been reported as non-complaint in the use of recommended care and maintenance regimens and many of these are confused or ignorant about their behaviour. In order to arrive at a general set of conclusions from the studies published to date, it is important to understand the methodology of each study, it purpose, the definition of non-compliance used and the way the results were analysed and described. This review summarizes the research into non-compliance in the contact lens field to data. A set of general conclusions is drawn and a model for compliance in the context of contact lens practice is proposed.

  5. Spherical aberration in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskoog Pettersson, A; Jarkö, C; Alvin, A; Unsbo, P; Brautaset, R

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present studies was to investigate the effect on spherical aberration of different non custom-made contact lenses, both with and without aberration control. A wavefront analyser (Zywave, Bausch & Lomb) was used to measure the aberrations in each subject's right eye uncorrected and with the different contact lenses. The first study evaluated residual spherical aberration with a standard lens (Focus Dailies Disposable, Ciba Vision) and with an aberration controlled contact lens (ACCL) (Definition AC, Optical Connection Inc.). The second study evaluated the residual spherical aberrations with a monthly disposable silicone hydrogel lens with aberration reduction (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb). Uncorrected spherical aberration was positive for all pupil sizes in both studies. In the first study, residual spherical aberration was close to zero with the standard lens for all pupil sizes whereas the ACCL over-corrected spherical aberration. The results of the second study showed that the monthly disposable lens also over-corrected the aberration making it negative. The changes in aberration were statistically significant (plenses. Since the amount of aberration varies individually we suggest that aberrations should be measured with lenses on the eye if the aim is to change spherical aberration in a certain direction.

  6. A lazy way to design infrared lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, RongSheng; Wu, JianDong; Chen, LongJiang; Yu, Kun; Pang, HaoJun; Hu, BaiZhen

    2017-08-01

    We designed a compact middle-wave infrared (MWIR) lens with a large focal length ratio (about 1.5:1), used in the 3.7 to 4.8 μm range. The lens is consisted of a compact front group and a re-imaging group. Thanks to the compact front group configuration, it is possible to install a filter wheel mechanism in such a tight space. The total track length of the lens is about 50mm, which includes a 2mm thick protective window and a cold shield of 12mm. The full field of view of the lens is about 3.6°, and F number is less than 1.6, the image circle is about 4.6mm in diameter. The design performance of the lens reaches diffraction limitation, and doesn't change a lot during a temperature range of -40°C +60°C. This essay proposed a stepwise design method of infrared optical system guided by the qualitative approach. The method fully utilize the powerful global optimization ability, with a little effort to write code snippet in optical design software, frees optical engineer from tedious calculation of the original structure.

  7. TESS Lens-Bezel Assembly Modal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Brandon J.; Karlicek, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) program, led by the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will be the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey. MIT Lincoln Laboratory is responsible for the cameras, including the lens assemblies, detector assemblies, lens hoods, and camera mounts. TESS is scheduled to be launched in August of 2017 with the primary goal to detect small planets with bright host starts in the solar neighborhood, so that detailed characterizations of the planets and their atmospheres can be performed. The TESS payload consists of four identical cameras and a data handling unit. Each camera consists of a lens assembly with seven optical elements and a detector assembly with four charge-coupled devices (CCDs) including their associated electronics. The optical prescription requires that several of the lenses are in close proximity to a neighboring element. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to estimate the relative deflections between each lens-bezel assembly under launch loads to predict that there are adequate clearances preventing the lenses from making contact. Modal tests using non-contact response measurements were conducted to experimentally estimate the modal parameters of the lens-bezel assembly, and used to validate the initial FEM assumptions. Key Words Non-contact measurements, modal analysis, model validation

  8. Decoding calcium signaling across the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Guimarães, Erika S; Andrade, Lídia M; Menezes, Gustavo B; Fatima Leite, M

    2014-09-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an important multifaceted second messenger that regulates a wide range of cellular events. A Ca(2+)-signaling toolkit has been shown to exist in the nucleus and to be capable of generating and modulating nucleoplasmic Ca(2+) transients. Within the nucleus, Ca(2+) controls cellular events that are different from those modulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). This review focuses on nuclear Ca(2+) signals and their role in regulating physiological and pathological processes. ©2014 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  9. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina); Agüero, M. P. [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, and CONICET (Argentina); Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M. [Gemini Observatory, AURA (United States); Bosch, G., E-mail: gunth@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mpaguero@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu, E-mail: pgomez@gemini.edu, E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu, E-mail: guille@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina)

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  10. Acanthamoeba, bacterial, and fungal contamination of contact lens storage cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T B; Cursons, R T; Sherwan, J F; Rose, P R

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Microbial corneal infection is the most serious complication of contact lens wear. Contact lens cases are a recognised potential source of pathogens associated with corneal ulcers. METHODS--This survey established the incidence of protozoal, bacterial, and fungal contact lens case contamination in 101 asymptomatic daily wear cosmetic contact lens wearers from a domiciliary contact lens practice. RESULTS--Eighty two (81%) contact lens cases were found to be contaminated, with 19 (19%) sterile. Of all contact lens cases, 78 (77%) grew bacteria, 24 (24%) fungi, and 20 (20%) protozoa. Acanthamoeba spp were isolated from eight (8%) contact lens cases. Fifty six (55%) contact lens cases yielded mixed bacterial contamination. This is the first contact lens case survey in which hydrogen peroxide disinfection was the major method of contact lens disinfection (75% of subjects) and no home made saline was used. All the contaminating organisms were shown to possess the enzyme catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The polymicrobial nature of the biofilms found in many contact lens cases is illustrated electron micrographically. CONCLUSION--Based on data from this and previous studies, the authors conclude with recommendations for contact lens wearers: (1) regular scrubbing of contact lens case interior to disrupt biofilms; (2) exposure of contact lens case to very hot water (> or = 70 degrees C) will kill Acanthamoeba contaminants; (3) allow contact lens case to air dry between uses; (4) if hydrogen peroxide disinfection is preferred, use a two step system; (5) replace contact lens case regularly. Images PMID:7626578

  11. Direct projection from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to hypophysiotrophic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus demonstrated...

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrang, N.; Larsen, P.J.; Mikkelsen, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry......Suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, circadian rhythms, phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin, corticotropin-releasing factor, dual immunocytochemistry...

  12. Characterization of lens based photoacoustic imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalloor Joseph Francis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the challenges in translating photoacoustic (PA imaging to clinical applications includes limited view of the target tissue, low signal to noise ratio and the high cost of developing real-time systems. Acoustic lens based PA imaging systems, also known as PA cameras are a potential alternative to conventional imaging systems in these scenarios. The 3D focusing action of lens enables real-time C-scan imaging with a 2D transducer array. In this paper, we model the underlying physics in a PA camera in the mathematical framework of an imaging system and derive a closed form expression for the point spread function (PSF. Experimental verification follows including the details on how to design and fabricate the lens inexpensively. The system PSF is evaluated over a 3D volume that can be imaged by this PA camera. Its utility is demonstrated by imaging phantom and an ex vivo human prostate tissue sample.

  13. Freeform micromachining of an infrared Alvarez lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Lineberger, Jennifer L.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    In 1967, Luis Alvarez introduced a novel concept for a focusing lens whereby two transmitting elements with cubic polynomial surfaces yield a composite lens of variable focal length with small lateral shifts. Computer simulations have demonstrated the behavior of these devices, but fabricating the refractive cubic surfaces of the types needed with adequate precision and depth modulation has proven to be challenging using standard methods, and, to the authors' knowledge, Alvarez lens elements have not been previously machined in infrared materials. Recent developments in freeform diamond machining capability have enabled the fabrication of such devices. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of freeform refractive Alvarez elements in germanium using diamond micro-milling on a five-axis Moore Nanotech® 350FG Freeform Generator. Machining approaches are discussed, and measurements of surface figure and finish are presented. Initial experimental tests of optical performance are also discussed.

  14. Invited review article: the electrostatic plasma lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-01

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  15. 3D printed helical antenna with lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-12-19

    The gain of an antenna can be enhanced through the integration of a lens, however this technique has traditionally been restricted to planar antennas due to fabrication limitations of standard manufacturing processes. Here, with a unique combination of 3D and 2D inkjet printing of dielectric and metallic inks respectively, we demonstrate a Fresnel lens that has been monolithically integrated to a non-planar antenna (helix) for the first time. Antenna measurements show that the integration of a Fresnel lens enhances the gain of a 2-turn helix by around 4.6 dB giving a peak gain of about 12.9 dBi at 8.8 GHz.

  16. An "ESA-affordable" Laue-lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2005-01-01

    With ESA's INTEGRAL mission gamma-ray astronomy has advanced to the point where major scientific advances must be expected from detailed studies of the many new point sources. The interest in developing focusing telescopes operating in the soft gamma-ray regime up to 1 MeV is therefore mounting r...... constraints of a specific medium size launch vehicle. The introduction of the lens mass as a primary design driver has some surprising effects for the choice of material for the crystals and new tradeoff considerations are introduced....... rapidly. Telescopes based on Laue diffraction of gamma-rays from crystals appear as one promising route, although the practical difficulties of realizing a large scale Laue lens are certainly not small. In this paper I have attempted to develop an optimized lens design considering the size and mass...

  17. The effectiveness of soft contact lens disinfection systems against Acanthamoeba on the lens surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedel, K K; Begley, C G

    1996-03-01

    This investigation compared the efficacy of three widely used contact lens disinfection systems against an ocular isolate of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Twenty-seven worn Ciba NewVues lenses were quartered, heat sterilized and inoculated with Acanthamoeba. Lens quarters were then randomly assigned to three experimental groups, with Group A lenses exposed to cleaner and saline rinse only, Group B to disinfection only, and Group C to both cleaner and disinfection. One quarter of each lens served as a control and the other three quarters were experimental. Quantification of viable Acanthamoeba remaining on the lens was performed after each step of the disinfection process. Group A lenses showed no significant difference between the treatments, or the treatments and the control. Group B lenses demonstrated a significant difference (p = 0.0001) between the treatments and the control. In Group C (cleaning and disinfection), the control lens quarters were significantly different (p = 0.037) from the experimental group, but there was no significant difference between the treatments. All three disinfection regimens were very effective in reducing the number of viable Acanthamoeba on the contact lens surface. In the absence of proper cleaning (Group B), AOSept was the most effective of the three. These results also show the importance of thoroughly rubbing the contact lens surface to decrease the number of Acanthamoeba.

  18. Non-compliance with lens care and maintenance in diabetic contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Clare; Efron, Nathan

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesize that diabetic contact lens wearers may represent a special group displaying higher levels of compliance with their lens care regimens as a result of learned behaviour relating to maintenance of their diabetic condition. To test this hypothesis, a prospective, single centre, controlled, masked study was performed whereby 29 diabetic contact lens patients and 29 non-diabetic control subjects were issued with disposable hydrogel contact lenses and a multipurpose lens care regimen. All participants were given identical instruction on lens care and maintenance. Compliance levels were assessed at a 12-month aftercare appointment by demonstration and questionnaire. Twenty-four different aspects of compliance were scored, 12 by observation and 12 by questionnaire report, of which only two showed a significant difference between the diabetic and control groups. Although the combined population of contact lens wearers was generally compliant, there were examples of non-compliance in both groups. Neither the duration of diabetes nor the degree of metabolic control appeared to have a significant effect on compliance. The results suggest that eye care practitioners cannot assume that diabetic patients will be more compliant with contact lens care and maintenance than non-diabetic patients.

  19. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Amyloid β Production in the Human Lens Epithelial Cell Stimulated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Kotani, Sachiyo; Mano, Yu; Ueno, Akina; Ito, Yoshimasa; Kitaba, Toshio; Takata, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stresses induce the production of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain, lens, and retina, leading to age-related diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ferulic acid on the Aβ levels in H2O2-stimulated human lens epithelial (HLE) SRA 01/04 cells. Three types of Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and Aβ1-43) were measured by ELISA, and the levels of mRNA for the expressed proteins related to Aβ production (APP, BACE1, and PS proteins) and degradation (ADAM10, NEP, and ECE1 proteins) were determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. H2O2 stimulation augmented gene expression of the proteins related to Aβ production, resulting in the production of three types of Aβ peptides. Treatment with 0.1 μM ferulic acid attenuated the augmentations of gene expression and production of the proteins related to the secretion of three types of Aβ peptides in the H2O2-stimulated HLE cells. These results provided evidence of antioxidative functions of ferulic acid for lens epithelial cells. PMID:28409157

  20. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sérsic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sérsic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses

  1. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  2. [Clinical study of the auxiliary management with iris retractor for subluxated lens combined with cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Liu-Xueying; Zheng, Dan-Ying; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    To study the clinical effects and safety of the auxiliary management with iris retractor for subluxated lens combined with cataract. Thirty-one eyes lens subluxation with cataract come from 27 patients were reviewed, all of them were 30 - 78 years old and III - IV grade of nuclear. Among these patients, 14 were traumatic cataracts, 12 Marfan syndromes, two over-mature phase of cataracts, one caused suspensory ligament broken during phacoemulsification, and one unclear reason. 1 to 4 iris retractors were used during surgeries, according to the extension of zonular loss and nuclear hardness. Anterior vitrectomy would be taken if vitreous prolapsed. Visual acuities and reactions post-operative were observed, too. And correlation analysis would be used to study the relationship of those objections. There were no serious complications during the surgeries such as tearing of capsular, falling of nuclear, bleeding of intraocular, and so on. Only 9 of 31 eyes (29.0%) had vitreous prolapsed interoperation, which appeared a significant correlated with range of zonular loss (Spearman r = 0.453, P = 0.010). However, none of them happened during the phacoemulsification for lens nucleus and only 6 eyes took the anterior vitrectomy. The best corrected postoperative visual acuity of these patients attended to 0.2 - 1.2 at a half to 1 month, increased by 1 - 12 lines [average of (6.0 ± 2.7) lines] compared with preoperative. Twenty-three eyes visual acuity of them were no less than 0.5. Corneal edema postoperatively appeared a significant correlated with vitrectomy (Spearman r = 0.398, P = 0.026), while seemed no associated with the range of zonular loss, the number of iris retractors, energy and duration of ultrasound burst or type of intraocular lens (IOL) (P > 0.05). Phacoemulsification assists with iris retractor can simplify the process of cataract surgery of subluxated lens. Individualized surgical planning and flexible and decisive measures intra-operative achieved good

  3. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZM, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases.

  4. The corneal stroma during contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Isabelle; Stapleton, Fiona

    2005-03-01

    Recent technological advances have lead to novel descriptions of the microanatomy of the corneal stroma. In the first section of this review, these findings and the role they play in the maintenance of vital properties such as corneal transparency, mechanical strength, homeostasis, wound-healing response and metabolism are described. In the second part, contact lens induced stromal alterations such as acidosis, oedema, striae, thinning and opacities are reviewed as well as the more recently described phenomenon of microdot deposits and keratocyte loss with an emphasis on how lens wearing stromal effects can be minimised.

  5. Sterilization potential of contact lens solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada Vijay

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In a dynamic field of Contact Lens Solutions maintenance of high standards of anti-microbial activity is a must Resterilization Activity Time′ is a universally accepted yardstick for such an evaluation. In this study eight brands of indigenous popular solutions alongwith two FDA approved solutions were tested for their sterilization efficacy: Standardized suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus were used for the purpose. It was observed that the contact lens solutions available ir, the domestic market were not upto the mark Suggestions for improvement have also been made.

  6. Rotman lens for mm-wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leonard T.; Hansen, Hedley J.; Abbott, Derek

    2002-11-01

    The 77 GHz band has been reserved for intelligent cruise control in luxury cars and some public transport services in America and the United Kingdom. The Rotman lens offers a cheap and compact means to extend the single beam systems generally used, to fully functional beam staring arrangements. Rotman lenses have been built for microwave frequencies with limited success. The flexibility of microstrip transmission lines and the advent of fast accurate simulation packages allow practical Rotman lenses to be designed at mm-wavelengths. This paper discusses the limitations of the conventional design approach and predicts the performance of a new Rotman lens designed at 77 GHz.

  7. Pulse transformer for the AA lithium lens

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The antiprotons emanating from the target were initially focused by a magnetic horn. Later on, a Li-lens was used during operation for the SPS collider, until 1992. A Li-rod (130 mm long, 34 mm in diameter) constituted the secondary of a 1:23 pulse-transformer. The half-sine pulse rose to 1000 kA in 900 microsec. The angular acceptance was 95 mrad. In operation after 1992, for LEAR only, a more modest Li-lens was used (155 mm long, diameter 20 mm, 480 kA, risetime 240 microsec, angular acceptance 75 mrad).

  8. Consequences of hadron-nucleus multiplicity parametrization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.P.; Shyam, M.

    1986-01-01

    Some interesting consequences are analyzed of a new parametrization for the hadron-nucleus multiplicity distributions and they are compared with the experimental data. Further, it is illustrated how the scaling property for the average multiplicity will be modified and it is found that the experimental data support this behaviour. (orig.)

  9. The Nucleus Retroambiguus Control of Respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using D, L-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory

  10. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs

  11. Correlations in hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1976-09-01

    The correlations between the particles produced in interactions of hadrons with emulsion nuclei were investigated. The data are in qualitative agreement with the models which describe the interactions with nuclei as subsequent collisions of the fast part of excited hadronic matter inside the nucleus. (author)

  12. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia. E-mail: kanchanp@magnum.barc.ernet.in. Abstract. We locate resonances in η-light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the t-matrices and hence ...

  13. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Keklikoglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  14. Iliacus Abscess with Radiculopathy Mimicking Herniated Nucleus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... radiculopathy mimicking herniated nucleus pulposus: Aadditional diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:392-3. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  15. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We locate resonances in -light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body equations within the finite rank approximation in order to calculate the -matrices and hence the time delay for the - 3He and - 4He systems. We find a resonance very close to the threshold in - 3 He elastic ...

  16. Strategies for the prevention of contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnt, Nicole; Stapleton, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a severe, often sight threatening, corneal infection which in Western countries is predominantly seen in daily wear of contact lenses. This review aims to summarise the pathobiology and epidemiology of contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis, and to present strategies for prevention, particularly with respect to modifiable risk factors in contact lens wear. The virulence of Acanthamoeba and resistance to treatment in keratitis appears to be linked with the production of a low molecular weight protease MIP133 by the organism, in response to binding to corneal epithelial cells through a mannose binding protein, and to the ability of the organism to convert from the trophozoite to the resistant cyst form. Recent epidemiological studies in contact lens relate disease have confirmed the link between solution topping up and Acanthamoeba keratitis and have reinforced the importance of avoidance of tap water, either as part of the care for the contact lens or storage case, handling lenses with wet hands or showering while wearing lenses. In the most recent analysis from the USA, there were no strong effects for solution type, water source or water disinfection process. Wearer age, lens wear time and history to appear to be linked with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Daily disposable contact lens use would be expected to reduce the prevalence of Acanthamoeba disease although this is unproven. While Acanthamoeba keratitis remains challenging to diagnose and manage, strategies to limit the disease severity in contact lens wearers should include attention to recently identified risk factors, particularly those related to water contact. Public health awareness measures, the use of daily disposable contact lenses, a better understanding of the contribution of the host immunity and the development of standardised methods for culture of amoeba and testing of contact lens care systems against Acanthamoeba in the licensing process may be of value. Alternative

  17. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataract Surgery vs. Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Pictures and Videos: What Do ... Mar. 27, 2018 An intraocular lens (or IOL) is a tiny, artificial lens for the eye. It replaces the eye's ...

  18. cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of bovine lens alpha-crystallin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, A.; Chiesa, R.; Sredy, J.; Garner, W.

    1985-01-01

    This communication reports that the A1 and B1 chains of bovine lens alpha-crystallin are phosphorylated. The conclusion is based on the following evidence: (i) When soluble preparations from lens cortex are incubated with [gamma- 32 P]ATP, a cAMP-dependent labeling of a high molecular weight protein is obtained. (ii) After NaDodSO 4 /PAGE, the label is found in two bands with Mr 22,000 and 20,000, corresponding to the B and A chains of alpha-crystallin, respectively. (iii) Isoelectric focusing indicates that the radioactivity is almost exclusively in bands with pI values of 5.58 and 6.70, corresponding to the A1 and B1 chains, respectively. (iv) Similar results are obtained in experiments of [ 32 P]orthophosphate incorporation in lens organ culture. (v) Analyses of the digested protein indicate the label is exclusively in phosphoserine. (vi) 31 P NMR analyses of native, proteolytically digested, and urea-treated alpha-crystallin gives a chemical shift of 4.6 ppm relative to 85% H 3 PO 4 at pH 7.4, suggesting that the phosphate is covalently bound to a serine in the protein. An abundance of approximately one phosphate per four or five monomer units was found. (vii) Similar results were obtained by chemical analyses of independently prepared alpha-crystallin samples. The results are consistent with the view that the A1 and B1 chains arise as result of the phosphorylation of directly synthesized A2 and B2 polypeptides. It is suggested that this metabolically controlled phosphorylation may be associated with the terminal differentiation of the lens epithelial cell and the intracellular organization of the lens fiber cell

  19. Modulation of lens cell adhesion molecules by particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M. P.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; Chou, W.; Lockett, S. J.; Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins which anchor cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but whose functions also include signal transduction, differentiation, and apoptosis. We are testing a hypothesis that particle radiations modulate CAM expression and this contributes to radiation-induced lens opacification. We observed dose-dependent changes in the expression of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 in exponentially-growing and confluent cells of a differentiating human lens epithelial cell model after exposure to particle beams. Human lens epithelial (HLE) cells, less than 10 passages after their initial culture from fetal tissue, were grown on bovine corneal endothelial cell-derived ECM in medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum and supplemented with 5 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). Multiple cell populations at three different stages of differentiation were prepared for experiment: cells in exponential growth, and cells at 5 and 10 days post-confluence. The differentiation status of cells was characterized morphologically by digital image analysis, and biochemically by Western blotting using lens epithelial and fiber cell-specific markers. Cultures were irradiated with single doses (4, 8 or 12 Gy) of 55 MeV protons and, along with unirradiated control samples, were fixed using -20 degrees C methanol at 6 hours after exposure. Replicate experiments and similar experiments with helium ions are in progress. The intracellular localization of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 was detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies specific for each CAM. Cells known to express each CAM were also processed as positive controls. Both exponentially-growing and confluent, differentiating cells demonstrated a dramatic proton-dose-dependent modulation (upregulation for exponential cells, downregulation for confluent cells) and a change in the intracellular distribution of the beta 1-integrin, compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast

  20. Lens autofluorescence is not increased at high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between ambient environmental ultraviolet radiation exposure and lens fluorescence. METHODS: Non-invasive lens fluorometry measurements were compared in healthy Bolivian and Danish subjects. Background ultraviolet radiation was 4.5 times higher in Bolivia than in De...... living at sea level at 55 degrees northern latitude. These results suggest that lens ageing, as assessed by lens autofluorometry, is independent of exposure to ultraviolet radiation....

  1. Tools for visualization of phosphoinositides in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalasova, Ilona; Fáberová, Veronika; Kalendová, Alžběta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Uličná, Lívia; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) are glycerol-based phospholipids containing hydrophilic inositol ring. The inositol ring is mono-, bis-, or tris-phosphorylated yielding seven PIs members. Ample evidence shows that PIs localize both to the cytoplasm and to the nucleus. However, tools for direct visualization of nuclear PIs are limited and many studies thus employ indirect approaches, such as staining of their metabolic enzymes. Since localization and mobility of PIs differ from their metabolic enzymes, these approaches may result in incomplete data. In this paper, we tested commercially available PIs antibodies by light microscopy on fixed cells, tested their specificity using protein-lipid overlay assay and blocking assay, and compared their staining patterns. Additionally, we prepared recombinant PIs-binding domains and tested them on both fixed and live cells by light microscopy. The results provide a useful overview of usability of the tools tested and stress that the selection of adequate tools is critical. Knowing the localization of individual PIs in various functional compartments should enable us to better understand the roles of PIs in the cell nucleus.

  2. The suprachiasmatic nucleus-paraventricular nucleus interactions: a bridge to the neuroendocrine and autonomic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, R. M.; Hermes, M. H.; Kalsbeek, A.

    1998-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP) is one of the principal neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). By means of anatomical, physiological and electrophysiological techniques we have demonstrated that VP containing pathways from the SCN serve to affect neuroendocrine and 'autonomic' neurons in the

  3. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Interaction with the Arcuate Nucleus; Essential for Organizing Physiological Rhythms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Frederik N.; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; León-Mercado, Luis; Basualdo, Mari Carmen; Escobar, Carolina; Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2017-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is generally considered the master clock, independently driving all circadian rhythms. We recently demonstrated the SCN receives metabolic and cardiovascular feedback adeptly altering its neuronal activity. In the present study, we show that microcuts effectively

  4. 21 CFR 886.1420 - Ophthalmic lens gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic lens gauge. 886.1420 Section 886.1420...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1420 Ophthalmic lens gauge. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic lens gauge is a calibrated device intended to manually measure the curvature of a...

  5. In vivo study of lens regeneration in Rana cyanophlyctis under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-12

    Mar 12, 2014 ... enhanced the percentage lens regeneration not only in young tadpoles but also in froglets. Lens regeneration ability ... Influence of vitamin A and ascorbic acid on lens regeneration in young, mature tadpoles and froglets of the frog Rana cyanophlyctis. Group .... ingested by macrophages. Dorsal iris cells ...

  6. 21 CFR 800.10 - Contact lens solutions; sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contact lens solutions; sterility. 800.10 Section...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL Requirements for Specific Medical Devices § 800.10 Contact lens solutions... ophthalmic use, including contact lens solutions, should be sterile. It is further evident that such...

  7. Initial Experience With Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens Implant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant at the Jos University Teaching Hospital are reviewed. The results suggest that despite lack of facilities to calculate the lens power for emmetropia, the use of a standard lens of about 19.0D will provide a good number of our ...

  8. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  9. Sirt3 confers protection against acrolein-induced oxidative stress in cochlear nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Juan; Wu, Yong-Xiang; Zhang, Ting; Qiu, Yang; Ding, Zhong-Jia; Zha, Ding-Jun

    2018-03-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous dietary and environmental pollutant, which can also be generated endogenously during cellular stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein-induced neurotoxicity, especially in ototoxicity conditions, have not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms on acrolein-induced toxicity in primary cultured cochlear nucleus neurons with focus on Sirt3, a mitochondrial deacetylase. We found that acrolein treatment induced neuronal injury and programmed cell death (PCD) in a dose dependent manner in cochlear nucleus neurons, which was accompanied by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation. Acrolein exposure also significantly reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) levels, promoted cytochrome c release and decreased mitochondrial ATP production. In addition, increased ER tracker fluorescence and activation of ER stress factors were observed after acrolein treatment, and the ER stress inhibitors were shown to attenuate acrolein-induced toxicity in cochlear nucleus neurons. The results of western blot and RT-PCR showed that acrolein markedly decreased the expression of Sirt3 at both mRNA and protein levels, and reduced the activity of downstream mitochondrial enzymes. Furthermore, overexpression of Sirt3 by lentivirus transfection partially prevented acrolein-induced neuronal injury in cochlear nucleus neurons. These results demonstrated that acrolein induces mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in cochlear nucleus neurons, and Sirt3 acts as an endogenous protective factor in acrolein-induced ototoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The plant cell nucleus: a true arena for the fight between plants and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandes, Laurent; Rivas, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is a fundamental feature shared by both plant and animal cells. Cellular factors involved in the transport of macromolecules through the nuclear envelope, including nucleoporins, importins and Ran-GTP related components, are conserved among a variety of eukaryotic systems. Interestingly, mutations in these nuclear components compromise resistance signalling, illustrating the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking in plant innate immunity. Indeed, spatial restriction of defence regulators by the nuclear envelope and stimulus-induced nuclear translocation constitute an important level of defence-associated gene regulation in plants. A significant number of effectors from different microbial pathogens are targeted to the plant cell nucleus. In addition, key host factors, including resistance proteins, immunity components, transcription factors and transcriptional regulators shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and their level of nuclear accumulation determines the output of the defence response, further confirming the crucial role played by the nucleus during the interaction between plants and pathogens. Here, we discuss recent findings that situate the nucleus at the frontline of the mutual recognition between plants and invading microbes.

  11. Theory of and effects from elastoplasticity in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Technische Hochschule Darmstadt

    1985-02-01

    Elastoplasticity of finite Fermi systems results from a coherent coupling between collective and intrinsic degrees of freedom and subsequent equilibration essentially due to two-body collisions. Within a non-markovian transport-theoretical approach referred to as dissipative diabatic dynamics (DDD), elastoplastical forms the link between giant vibrations and overdamped motion of nuclear. Obersvable effects resulting from this non-markovian behaviour in nucleus-nucleus collisions are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. May 2006 physics pp. 943–946. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus bound state. V JHA1, B J ROY1, A CHATTERJEE1 and H MACHNER2 ... are being carried out or proposed in different laboratories around the world. In this work we .... be due to a virtual state near the η-threshold. 4.

  13. Ceftriaxone attenuates acute cocaine-evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, J L; Rasmussen, B A; Tallarida, C S; Scholl, J L; Forster, G L; Unterwald, E M; Rawls, S M

    2015-11-01

    Ceftriaxone is a β-lactam antibiotic and glutamate transporter activator that reduces the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants. Ceftriaxone also reduces locomotor activation following acute psychostimulant exposure, suggesting that alterations in dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens contribute to its mechanism of action. In the present studies we tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with ceftriaxone disrupts acute cocaine-evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or ceftriaxone (200 mg kg(-1) , i.p. × 10 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15 mg kg(-1) , i.p.). Motor activity, dopamine efflux (via in vivo microdialysis) and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the dopamine transporter and organic cation transporter as well as α-synuclein, Akt and GSK3β were analysed in the nucleus accumbens. Ceftriaxone-pretreated rats challenged with cocaine displayed reduced locomotor activity and accumbal dopamine efflux compared with saline-pretreated controls challenged with cocaine. The reduction in cocaine-evoked dopamine levels was not counteracted by excitatory amino acid transporter 2 blockade in the nucleus accumbens. Pretreatment with ceftriaxone increased Akt/GSK3β signalling in the nucleus accumbens and reduced levels of dopamine transporter, TH and phosphorylated α-synuclein, indicating that ceftriaxone affects numerous proteins involved in dopaminergic transmission. These results are the first evidence that ceftriaxone affects cocaine-evoked dopaminergic transmission, in addition to its well-described effects on glutamate, and suggest that its ability to attenuate cocaine-induced behaviours, such as psychomotor activity, is due in part to reduced dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Vitrectorhexis and lens aspiration with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in spherophakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haddad, Christiane; Khatib, Lama

    2012-07-01

    We describe a technique that uses the vitrector to perform successful lens aspiration and posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in children with spherophakia and anterior lens subluxation. After an anterior chamber maintainer is placed, the ocutome is introduced through a limbal incision to perform a circular vitrectorhexis to avoid excessive manipulation of the unstable lens followed by gentle cortex aspiration. A foldable IOL is injected into the sulcus (3-piece IOL) or bag (1-piece IOL) if the capsule is sufficiently stable. Through a pars plana incision, the ocutome is then used to perform a posterior capsulotomy to prevent late posterior capsule opacification. In our patient, sulcus IOL placement was more stable than in-the-bag placement. Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solar powered desalination system using Fresnel lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, M. T. B. F.

    2016-11-01

    The Philippines is surrounded by coastal areas and these areas can be a potential source for potable water. This study aims to design and construct a solar powered desalination system using Fresnel lens. The experimental study was conducted using polluted salt water for the sample and desalination was carried out using the designed system. The desalination system was composed of the solar concentrator, solar still and the condenser system. The Fresnel lens was made of acrylic plastic and was an effective solar concentrator. Solar stills made of dark colored glass bottles were effective in absorbing the solar energy. The condenser system made of polybutylene and polystyrene were effective in condensing the vapor at ambient temperature. The shortest time of vaporization of the salt water was at 293 sec and the optimum angle of position of the lens was 36.42°. The amount of condensate collected was directly proportional to the amount of salt water in the solar still. The highest mean efficiency of the designed set-up was 34.82%. The water produced by the solar powered desalination system using Fresnel lens passed the standards set by WHO (World Health Organization) for drinking water.

  16. Electronic states in a quantum lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Arezky H.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Ulloa, S. E.; Marin-Antuna, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present a model to find analytically the electronic states in self-assembled quantum dots with a truncated spherical cap (''lens'') geometry. A conformal analytical image is designed to map the quantum dot boundary into a dot with semispherical shape. The Hamiltonian for a carrier confined in the quantum lens is correspondingly mapped into an equivalent operator and its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the corresponding Dirichlet problem are analyzed. A modified Rayleigh-Schro''dinger perturbation theory is presented to obtain analytical expressions for the energy levels and wave functions as a function of the spherical cap height b and radius a of the circular cross section. Calculations for a hard wall confinement potential are presented, and the effect of decreasing symmetry on the energy values and eigenfunctions of the lens-shape quantum dot is studied. As the degeneracies of a semicircular geometry are broken for b≠a, our perturbation approach allows tracking of the split states. Energy states and electronic wave functions with m=0 present the most pronounced influence on the reduction of the lens height. The method and expressions presented here can be straightforwardly extended to deal with more general Hamiltonians, including strains and valence-band coupling effects in Group III--V and Group II--VI self-assembled quantum dots

  17. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  18. READING SCRIPTURE THROUGH A MYSTICAL LENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reading scripture through a mystical lens. 144 the illuminatory function of scripture which confirms and explains experience, rather than in its philological or scientific status. Elisabeth often juxtaposes several texts when quoting from memory and the biblical foundation of her writings is clearly evident in certain cases which ...

  19. Corneal ring infiltration in contact lens wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Tabatabaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To report a case of atypical sterile ring infiltrates during wearing soft silicone hydrogel contact lens due to poor lens care. A 29-year-old woman presented with complaints of pain, redness, and morning discharge. She was wearing soft silicone hydrogel contact lens previously; her current symptoms began 1 week before presentation. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/40 in that eye. Slit-lamp examination revealed dense, ring-shaped infiltrate involving both the superficial and deep stromal layers with lucid interval to the limbus, edema of the epithelium, epithelial defect, and vascularization of the superior limbus. Cornea-specific in vivo laser confocal microscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 2 Rostock Cornea Module, HRT 2-RCM, Heidelberg Engineering GmbH, Dossenheim, Germany revealed Langerhans cells and no sign of Acanthamoeba or fungal features, using lid scraping and anti-inflammatory drops; her vision completely recovered. We reported an atypical case of a sterile corneal ring infiltrate associated with soft contact lens wearing; smear, culture, and confocal microscopy confirmed a sterile inflammatory reaction.

  20. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupalatha Maddala

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations

  1. Taxon-specific zeta -crystallin in Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica) lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y; Kimoto, H; Ishikawa, K; Watanabe, K; Yokota, Y; Nakai, N; Taketo, A

    2001-07-27

    The present study demonstrated that the 38-kDa protein, instead of rho-crystallin (36 kDa), is expressed taxon specifically in the lens of Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). The 38-kDa protein was distinguished from rho-crystallin expressed in the lenses of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and European common frog (Rana temporaria) immunochemically. Although the N terminus of the 38-kDa protein was blocked, the analyses of partial amino acid sequences showed that the protein was zeta-crystallin. Analysis of cDNA sequence encoding zeta-crystallin of the tree frog lens demonstrated that the deduced protein consisted of 329 amino acids including initial methionine and having 62.2 and 62.9% identity with zeta-crystallin of camel and guinea pig lenses, respectively. The molecular mass of the deduced structure was calculated to be 35,564 Da. zeta-Crystallin of the tree frog lens exhibited the intrinsic enzymatic activity of quinone reductase (EC, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase). The crystallin specifically catalyzed the reduction of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (Km, 42 microm) using NADPH (Km, 60 microm) as a cofactor. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by dicumarol, anti-coagulant drug, with IC50 of 4 microm. On gel filtration chromatography, the crystallin was recovered as 150-kDa molecular mass complex, indicating that the crystallin was homotetramer consisting of 38-kDa subunits. The crystallin gene was expressed specifically in the lens. These results show that taxon-specific crystallins such as zeta- and rho-crystallins may be available for the biochemical discrimination of Hyla- and Rana groups among frogs.

  2. Properties of the cathode lens combined with a focusing magnetic/immersion-magnetic lens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalina, Ivo; Müllerová, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 645, č. 1 (2011), s. 55-59 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : cathode lens * compound objective lens * aberration coefficients * spot size * field calculations Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  3. The use of contact lenses among university students in Chengdu: Knowledge and practice of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiurong; Yang, Bi; Deng, Nan; Li, Yifan; Wang, Tingwei; Qi, Huang; Liu, Longqian

    2018-04-01

    To assess the prevalence and general knowledge of contact lens wearers among college students in Chengdu, a metroplolitan of Chinaand find out the routine habits of use and hygienic conditions when wearing contact lenses. The questionnaire was distributed to 1,600 ametropic participants who were from 8 different universities. Data about demographics, general contact lens handling habits, personal attitudes, hygiene behaviors and eye health conditions were collected. We made the analysis ofthe demographics and wearing of contact lenses. Possible reasons for behaviors related to the care of contact lenses were analyzed. The prevalence of contact lens use was 19.80%. Most users (82.15%) were females. An aesthetic effect was cited as the first reason for using (57.91%). The comfort of eyes was the first consideration (75.76%) when buying. To keep clean and use safe, 86.20% subjects washed hands before handling and 83.50% cleaned the lens carefully after removing. There was significant difference between males and females regarding the replacement of the solution (p=0.014). 32.66% wears knew the removal of protein deposits. A total of 54.88% were not informed of the potential complications of contact lens. The incidence of ocular discomfort was 44.78%. Only 3.03% of the students paid regular visits to ophthalmic clinics. The prevalence of contact lenses was relatively low in Chengdu. The wears had limited knowledge about using and careof contact lens. More education on standard lens wear and care should be provided to wearers. Copyright © 2018 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Why do we have a caudate nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villablanca, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the physiological role of the caudate nucleus, we combine here our laboratory data on cats with reports of patients with selective damage to this nucleus. Cats with bilateral removal of the caudate nuclei showed a stereotyped behavior consisting of persistently approaching and then following a person, another cat, or any object, and attempting to contact the target. Simultaneously, the animals exhibited a friendly disposition and persistent docility together with purring and forelimbs treading/kneading. The magnitude and duration of this behavior was proportional to the extent of the removal reaching a maximum after ablations of 65% or more of the caudate tissue. These cats were hyperactive but they had lost the feline elegance of movements. Additional features of acaudate cats were: (1) postural and accuracy deficits (plus perseveration) in paw usage tasks including bar pressing for food reward; (2) cognitive and perceptual impairments on a T-maze battery of tasks and on the bar pressing tasks; (3) blockage or blunting of the species-specific behavioral response to a single injection of morphine; Unilateral caudate nucleus removal did not produce global behavioral effects, but only deficit in the contralateral paw contact placing reaction and paw usage/bar pressing. Moreover and surprisingly, we found hypertrophy of the ipsilateral caudate nucleus following prenatal focal neocortical removal. The findings in human were also behavioral (not neurological) and also occurred with unilateral caudate damage. The main manifestations consisted of loss of drive (apathy), obsessive-compulsive behavior, cognitive deficits, stimulus-bound perseverative behavior, and hyperactivity. Based on all of the above data we propose that the specific function of the caudate nucleus is to control approach-attachment behavior, ranging from plain approach to a target, to romantic love. This putative function would account well for the caudate involvement in the

  5. The Baryon Production and Baryon Number Transfer in Hadron-Hadron, Hadron-Nucleus and Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, P.

    2006-09-01

    This work concerns soft hadronic interactions which in the Standard Model carry most of the observable cross-section but are not amenable to quantitative predictions due to the very nature of the QCD (Theory of Strong Interactions). In the low momentum transfer region the evolving coupling constant caused perturbation theory to break down. In this situation better experimental understanding of the physics phenomena is needed. One aspect of the soft hadronic interactions will be discussed in this work: transfer of the baryon number from the initial to the final state of the interaction. The past experimental knowledge on this process is presented, reasons for its unsatisfactory status are discussed and condition necessary for improvement are outlined: that is experimental apparatus with superior performance over the full range of available interactions: hadron-hadron collision, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. A consistent model-independent picture of the baryon number transfer process emerging from the data on the full range of interactions is shown. It offers serious challenge to theory to provide quantitative and detailed explanation of the measurements. (author)

  6. Intrinsic lens potential of neural retina inhibited by Notch signaling as the cause of lens transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hideaki; Ishii, Yasuo; Kondoh, Hisato

    2017-01-15

    Embryonic neural retinas of avians produce lenses under spreading culture conditions. This phenomenon has been regarded as a paradigm of transdifferentiation due to the overt change in cell type. Here we elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Retina-to-lens transdifferentiation occurs in spreading cultures, suggesting that it is triggered by altered cell-cell interactions. Thus, we tested the involvement of Notch signaling based on its role in retinal neurogenesis. Starting from E8 retina, a small number of crystallin-expressing lens cells began to develop after 20 days in control spreading cultures. By contrast, addition of Notch signal inhibitors to cultures after day 2 strongly promoted lens development beginning at day 11, and a 10-fold increase in δ-crystallin expression level. After Notch signal inhibition, transcription factor genes that regulate the early stage of eye development, Prox1 and Pitx3, were sequentially activated. These observations indicate that the lens differentiation potential is intrinsic to the neural retina, and this potential is repressed by Notch signaling during normal embryogenesis. Therefore, Notch suppression leads to lens transdifferentiation by disinhibiting the neural retina-intrinsic program of lens development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Doxorubicin Prodrug with GRP78 Recognition and Nucleus-Targeting Ability for Safe and Effective Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guo-Bin; Sun, Junqing; Yang, Peng; Li, Binchun; Gao, Ying; Li, Zhuoyu

    2018-01-02

    Glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa (GRP78) has become an attractive and novel target for tumor therapy. Design and construction of powerful delivery systems that could efficiently transport doxorubicin (DOX) to a tumor-cell nucleus remains a formidable challenge for improving the tumor therapeutic index and mitigating side effects to normal tissues. Herein, a novel doxorubicin prodrug (NDP) with GRP78 recognition and nucleus-targeting ability was synthesized by a facile chemical route. NDP exhibited an enhanced antiproliferative activity against colorectal cancer cells and could efficiently enter the cell nucleus. Furthermore, it is inspiring to note that NDP displayed a much stronger inhibitory efficacy against the growth of colorectal cancer xenografts in nude mice than free DOX and showed superior in vivo safety. Together, the work provides a novel GRP78 and nucleus-targeting strategy, and the NDP holds great promise to be used as a potent and safe chemotherapeutic agent.

  8. Nanosecond KTN varifocal lens without electric field induced phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian; Henry, Michael; Yin, Stuart (Shizhuo); Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a nanosecond speed KTN varifocal lens. The tuning principle of varifocal lens is based on the high-speed refractive index modulation from the nanosecond speed tunable electric field. A response time on the order of nanoseconds was experimentally demonstrated, which is the fastest varifocal lens reported so far. The results confirmed that the tuning speed of the KTN varifocal lens could be significantly increased by avoiding the electric field induced phase transition. Such a nanosecond speed varifocal lens can be greatly beneficial for a variety of applications that demand high speed axial scanning, such as high-resolution 3D imaging and high-speed 3D printing.

  9. Nucleus spectroscopy: extreme masses and deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, Ch.

    2009-12-01

    The author proposes a synthesis of research activities performed since 1995 in the field of experimental nuclear physics, and more particularly in the investigation of two nucleus extreme states: deformation on the one hand, heavy and very heavy nuclei on the other hand. After a presentation of the context of investigations on deformation, rotation, and heavy nuclei, he gives an overview of developments regarding instruments (gamma spectrometers, detection of fission fragments, and detection at the focal plane of spectrometers or separators) and analysis techniques. Experiments and results are then reported and discussed, concerning super-deformed states with a high angular moment, spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, very heavy nuclei close to nucleus map borders. He finally draws perspectives for middle and long term studies on the heaviest nuclei

  10. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  11. Resonances in η-light nucleus systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We locate resonances in η-light nucleus elastic scattering using the time delay method. We solve few-body ... We planned to study the resonances in η-light nuclei systems since the few-body systems can be treated .... In an eigenphase formu- lation of the S-matrix, S = ηe2iδ (with η being the inelasticity factor), one can.

  12. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G. E.; Crawford, B. E.; Grossmann, C. A.; Lowie, L. Y.; Bowman, J. D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S. J.; Smith, D. A.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Yuan, V. W.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Stephenson, S. L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized

  13. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  14. Oxygen transport through soft contact lens and cornea: Lens characterization and metabolic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Mahendra

    The human cornea requires oxygen to sustain metabolic processes critical for its normal functioning. Any restriction to corneal oxygen supply from the external environment (e.g., by wearing a low oxygen-permeability contact lens) can lead to hypoxia, which may cause corneal edema (swelling), limbal hyperemia, neovascularization, and corneal acidosis. The need for adequate oxygen to the cornea is a major driving force for research and development of hypertransmissible soft contact lenses (SCLs). Currently, there is no standard technique for measuring oxygen permeability (Dk) of hypertransmissible silicone-hydrogel SCLs. In this work, an electrochemistry-based polarographic apparatus was designed, built, and operated to measure oxygen permeability in hypertransmissible SCLs. Unlike conventional methods where a range of lens thickness is needed for determining oxygen permeabilities of SCLs, this apparatus requires only a single lens thickness. The single-lens permeameter provides a reliable, efficient, and economic tool for measuring oxygen permeabilities of commercial hypertransmissible SCLs. The single-lens permeameter measures not only the product Dk, but, following modification, it measures separately diffusivity, D, and solubility, k, of oxygen in hypertransmissible SCLs. These properties are critical for designing better lens materials that ensure sufficient oxygen supply to the cornea. Metabolism of oxygen in the cornea is influenced by contact-lens-induced hypoxia, diseases such as diabetes, surgery, and drug treatment, Thus, estimation of the in-vivo corneal oxygen consumption rate is essential for gauging adequate oxygen supply to the cornea. Therefore, we have developed an unsteady-state reactive-diffusion model for the cornea-contact-lens system to determine in-vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate. Finally, a metabolic model was developed to determine the relation between contact-lens oxygen transmissibility (Dk/L) and corneal oxygen deficiency. A

  15. Antinucleon-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.; Millener, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the utility of antinucleon (anti N)-nucleus inelastic scattering studies is presented, emphasizing both the sensitivity of the cross sections to various components of the N anti N transition amplitudes and the prospects for the exploration of some novel aspects of nuclear structure. We start with an examination of the relation between NN and N anti N potentials, focusing on the coherences predicted for the central, spin-orbit and tensor components, and how these may be revealed by measurements of two-body spin observables. We next discuss the role of the nucleus as a spin and isospin filter, and show how, by a judicious choice of final state quantum numbers (natural or unnatural parity states, isospin transfer ΔT = 0 or 1) and momentum transfer q, one can isolate different components of the N anti N transition amplitude. Various models for the N anti N interaction which give reasonable fits to the available two-body data are shown to lead to strikingly different predictions for certain spin-flip nuclear transitions. We suggest several possible directions for future anti N-nucleus inelastic scattering experiments, for instance the study of spin observables which would be accessible with polarized anti N beams, charge exchange reactions, and higher resolution studies of the (anti p, anti p') reaction. We compare the antinucleon and the nucleon as a probe of nuclear modes of excitation. 40 refs., 13 figs

  16. Subjective assessment of contact lens wear by army aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, M R; Cornum, R L

    1993-07-01

    Because 23% of Army aviators are ametropic, contact lenses have drawn increased attention as a spectacle substitute to solve system compatibility problems. From November 1988 until October 1991, a series of contact lens research protocols were conducted to develop a comprehensive database on contact lens wear in varied environments. Questionnaires were used to assess suitability and acceptability of routine contact lens wear. Responses from 202 subjects were obtained from September 1989 through September 1991. The questions explored operational and safety of flight issues of contact lens wear. Subjects overwhelmingly approved of contact lens use in all settings: 95% expressed greater combat readiness and effectiveness with contact lenses, 98% felt contact lens use (and maintenance) in the cockpit had no adverse impact on safety of flight, and 98% endorsed the routine use of contact lenses. These data highlight Army aircrew acceptance of contact lens use.

  17. Pars Plana Vitrectomy in Treatment of Lens Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi Avcı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lens injury due to traumas may present as loss of capsule integrity, cataract, lens subluxation, or lens luxation. In addition, lens subluxation and lens luxation may occur in pseudophakic patients due to trauma. Clear corneal, scleral or sclero-corneal phacoemulsification surgery, pars plana vitrectomy, pars plana vitrectomy with phaco-fragmentation, or pars plana vitrectomy with removal through corneal incision techniques are used in the treatment of lens injury due to traumas. Intraocular lens can be implanted in the bag, sulcus, or anterior chamber during the surgery. Depending on the circumstances, scleral fixated intraocular lenses or iris-claw lenses may also be preferred. Rehabilitation of such patients is not of a great concern today, with the advanced level of vitreoretinal surgery and cataract surgery techniques and with the current state of technology. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 51-4

  18. Protective effect of cannabidiol on hydrogen peroxide‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Hou, Chen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Dong; Yang, Pinglin; He, Xijing; Zhou, Jinsong; Li, Haopeng

    2016-09-01

    Cannabidiol, a major component of marijuana, protects nerves, and exerts antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory and anti‑anxiety effects. In the current study, the protective effect of cannabidiol was observed to prevent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress in nucleus pulposus cells. Nucleus pulposus cells were isolated from rats and cultured in vitro, and H2O2 was used to construct the nucleus pulposus cell model. Cell viability of the nucleus pulposus cells was assessed using a 3‑(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The ratio of apoptotic cells, and caspase‑3 or cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) mRNA expression was analyzed by annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium‑iodide staining and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The quantities of interleukin (IL)‑1β and interleukin‑6 were measured using a series of assay kits. B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels were analyzed using western blotting. The present study identified that cannabidiol enhanced cell viability and reduced apoptosis in H2O2‑treated nucleus pulposus cells in vitro using a lumbar disc herniation (LDH) model. In addition, cannabidiol reduced caspase‑3 gene expression and augmented the Bcl‑2 protein expression levels in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Pre‑treatment with cannabidiol suppressed the promotion of COX‑2, iNOS, IL‑1β and IL‑6 expression in the nucleus pulposus cells following H2O2 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that cannabidiol potentially exerts its protective effect on LDH via the suppression of anti‑apoptosis, anti‑inflammation and anti‑oxidative activities in nucleus pulposus cells.

  19. Differential regulation of fos family genes in the ventrolateral and dorsomedial subdivisions of the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, W J; Carpino, A; de la Iglesia, H O; Baler, R; Klein, D C; Nakabeppu, Y; Aronin, N

    2000-01-01

    Extensive studies have established that light regulates c-fos gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the site of an endogenous circadian clock, but relatively little is known about the expression of genes structurally related to c-fos, including fra-1, fra-2 and fosB. We analysed the photic and temporal regulation of these genes at the messenger RNA and immunoreactive protein levels in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus, and we found different expression patterns after photic stimulation and depending on location in the ventrolateral or dorsomedial subdivisions. In the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus, c-fos, fra-2 and fosB expression was stimulated after a subjective-night (but not subjective-day) light pulse. Expression of the fra-2 gene was prolonged following photic stimulation, with elevated messenger RNA and protein levels that appeared unchanged for at least a few hours beyond the c-fos peak. Unlike c-fos and fra-2, the fosB gene appeared to be expressed constitutively in the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus throughout the circadian cycle; immunohistochemical analysis suggested that delta FosB was the protein product accounting for this constitutive expression, while FosB was induced by the subjective-night light pulse. In the dorsomedial suprachiasmatic nucleus, c-fos and fra-2 expression exhibited an endogenous circadian rhythm, with higher levels during the early subjective day, although the relative abundance was much lower than that measured after light pulses in the ventrolateral suprachiasmatic nucleus. Double-label immunohistochemistry suggested that some of the dorsomedial cells responsible for the circadian expression of c-Fos also synthesized arginine vasopressin. No evidence of suprachiasmatic nucleus fra-1 expression was found. In summary, fos family genes exhibit differences in their specific expression patterns in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, including their photic and circadian regulation in separate cell populations in the

  20. Jefferson Lab's Journey into the Nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2004-01-01

    The year 1969 saw the publication of the first results indicating that hard scattering centres exist deep inside protons. A collaboration between the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was using SLAC's new high-energy electron LINAC to pioneer a rich new field in the study of the nucleus--deep inelastic scattering. Their measurements revealed that nucleons are made up of point-like particles, which Richard Feynman dubbed ''partons''. Thirty-five years on, studies of the parton-nature of the nucleus continue, not only at the traditional high-energy centres, but also at lower-energy laboratories, and in particular at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Virginia. Jefferson Lab is home to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Its main mission is to explore the atomic nucleus and the fundamental building-blocks of matter. As part of this mission, researchers there study the transition from the picture of the nucleus as a bound state of neutrons and protons to its deeper structure in terms of quarks and gluons--in other words, the transition from the hadronic degrees of freedom of nuclear physics to the quark-gluon degrees of freedom of high-energy physics. In exploring this transition, a wide range of experiments has been performed, from measurements of elastic form factors at large momentum transfers to studies of deep inelastic scattering. An array of spectrometers together with electron-beam energies of up to 5.7 GeV has allowed the laboratory to make significant contributions to this field. This article describes three experiments, each aimed at improving our understanding of a different aspect of the partonic nature of matter. The first, a classic deep inelastic scattering experiment, seeks to further our understanding of the composition of nucleon spin. The second experiment studies the concept of quark-hadron duality--a link between the deep inelastic

  1. The Role of Type IV Collagen in Developing Lens in Mouse Fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jalali

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sExtracellular matrix (ECM and basement membrane (BM play important roles in many developmental processes during development and after birth. Among the components of the BM, collagen fibers specially type IV are the most important parts. The aim of this study was to determine the time when collagen type IV appears in the BM of lens structure during mouse embryonic development.Materials and MethodsIn this experimental study, 22 female Balb/C mice were randomly selected and were kept under normal condition, finding vaginal plug was assumed as day zero of pregnancy. From embryonic day 10 to 20, all specimens were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and their heads were fixed, serially sectioned and immunohistochemistry study for tracing collagen type IV in lens were carried out.ResultsOur data revealed that collagen type IV appeared at the early stage of gestation day 12 in BM of anterior epithelial lens cells and the amount of this protein gradually increased until days 15-17 in ECM and posterior capsule epithelium. After this period, severe reaction was not observed in any part of the lens.ConclusionThese findings establish the important role of collagen IV in developing optic cup and any changes during critical period of pregnancy may be result in severe visual system defect

  2. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery - unusual complication of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mehul A; Shah, Shreya M; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare. We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsulotomy, the patient presented with sudden decrease of vision. On anterior segment examination, the intraocular lens with bag was dislocated into the anterior chamber. It was managed with intraocular lens explantation with bag, anterior vitrectomy and sclera fixated intraocular lens. Spontaneous intraocular lens dislocation with bag is possible after 1.5 years of uneventful surgery which may be managed using different techniques.

  3. Effects of LAR and PTP-BL phosphatase deficiency on adult mouse retinal cells activated by lens injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorber, B.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Berry, M.; Logan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Using intact and lens-lesioned wildtype, leucocyte common antigen-related phosphatase deficient (LARDeltaP) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-BAS-like phosphatase deficient (PTP-BLDeltaP) mice, we have evaluated the role of LAR and PTP-BL in retinal ganglion cell survival and neuritogenesis,

  4. The yellow colour of the lens of the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis leucotis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G. F.; Robson, J. G.

    1969-01-01

    1. The absorption spectrum of the lens of the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis leucotis) has been measured, revealing an absorption maximum at 370 nm. Peak densities in the intact lens ranged from 12 to 20. 2. This peak is not present in the lenses of horse, cow, pig, dog, cat, ferret (Mustelo furo), or guinea-pig (Cavia porcellus). 3. The pigment responsible for this absorption is water-soluble and aqueous extracts have been examined. Protein-free aqueous extracts show an additional maximum at 265 nm, which can only partially be accounted for by the presence of ascorbic acid. 4. The absorption spectrum of extracts of lens material from the ground squirrel (Citellus mexicanus) also had maxima at 265 and 370 nm. 5. Chromatography of the protein-free solution separated two yellow components, both of which had a yellow fluorescence. The faster component had a very similar absorption spectrum to the original protein-free solution. 6. Possible functions of the yellow pigment are discussed. PMID:5796470

  5. Gravitational Lens Time Delays Using Polarization Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Biggs

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational lens time delays provide a means of measuring the expansion of the Universe at high redshift (and therefore in the ‘Hubble flow’ that is independent of local calibrations. It was hoped that many of the radio lenses found in the JVAS/CLASS survey would yield time delays as these were selected to have flat spectra and are dominated by multiple compact components. However, despite extensive monitoring with the Very Large Array (VLA, time delays have only been measured for three of these systems (out of 22. We have begun a programme to reanalyse the existing VLA monitoring data with the goal of producing light curves in polarized flux and polarization position angle, either to improve delay measurements or to find delays for new sources. Here, we present preliminary results on the lens system B1600+434 which demonstrate the presence of correlated and substantial polarization variability in each image.

  6. Complications caused by contact lens wearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljan, Jasna; Beljan, Kristina; Beljan, Zdravko

    2013-04-01

    Complications in wearing contact lenses are very rare and caused by poor maintenance, over-extended wear and wearing of contact lenses in a polluted environment. Regular control by a professional person can efficiently reduce the number of complications. This paper describes the most common risks factors for complications, and complications of wearing contact lenses with the classification according to the anatomic parts of the eye: eyelids, tear film, limbus, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma and corneal endothelium. Every complication has been described by the characteristic signs and symptoms, etiology and pathology, as well as therapy and prognosis. The paper describes how to select adequate customers as contact lens users, with proper education in order to ensure minimal incidence of complications due to contact lens wear, thus attracting a lot of satisfied and healthy customers.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Hybrid Lens Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askins, Steve; Victoria, Marta; Herrero, Rebeca; Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    In hybrid Silicone-on-glass Fresnel lenses, an optical silicone is molded onto a glass substrate and forms the Fresnel structure. These lenses offer a cost effective solution as a primary optical element in point-focus concentrator photovoltaic modules, as well as performance advantages. However, these lenses have a high performance variation with temperature due both to the change in index of refraction of silicone as well as to deformations in the facets caused by coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch. In this study we perform measurements of the light flux at the focal plane of a family of SOG lenses, varying temperature and lens-to-receiver distances. The effect of varying silicone cure temperature and the depth of the silicone between the lens and the glass substrate on temperature dependence was investigated. A preliminary computer model of this behavior is presented.

  8. A Tribute to Dr. Willy Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Willy Lens, born on December 10th, 1943, passed away on August 29th, 2014. With his passing, the motivation community has lost a seminal member, a mentor, and a friend. Dr. Lens – a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and Founding Fellow of the American Educational Research Association – made fundamental contributions to the study of motivation both through his own work and through his caring and thoughtful mentorship of a large community of scholars. With this tribute, we want to honor Dr. Willy Lens’ significance to psychology and education as well as his positive influence, both personally and professionally, on the lives of dozens of scholars. With his contagious enthusiasm and caring mentorship, Willy was an example for our academic community and with this tribute we express our gratitude for the privilege to have collaborated with him.

  9. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  10. Intraocular lens implantation in microphthalmic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinskey, R M; Amin, P; Stoppel, J

    1992-09-01

    Microphthalmos is a developmental disorder of the eye consisting of a smaller than normal eye. This disorder can present as an isolated condition or associated with other systemic alterations. It is not uncommon for patients with microphthalmos to have congenital cataracts along with other ocular and systemic abnormalities. This paper reports the experience with 11 microphthalmic eyes of seven patients who had primary or secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation over a six-year period from 1985 to 1991. In all cases the IOL had a 13.5 mm or 14.0 mm overall diameter and a 6.0 mm or 6.5 mm optic. It was difficult to obtain documentation of objective visual improvement in many of these cases because of the associated nystagmus. However, all patients reported subjective improvements. These results suggest that with proper technique and lens selection microphthalmic patients should be considered for IOL implantation with relative safety and success.

  11. Pulser for the Tevatron electron lens gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri Terechkine et al.

    2004-05-18

    To compensate for beam-beam interaction in Tevatron, an ''electron lens'' is considered to be an effective instrument. When a bunch of electrons with energy in the range (10-16) kV is overlapping with a bunch of antiprotons, the resulting focusing force for antiprotons can be adjusted by changing the electron beam current and by profiling its radial distribution. There exist several scenarios of how the system must function. According to one of them, an electron gun that supplies electrons must be fed by voltage pulses that follow with the frequency of antiproton bunches circulating in the Tevatron, which is about 2.5 MHz. To provide focusing tailored for each individual antiproton bunch, a modulator of the gun (pulser) must allow pulse-to-pulse voltage change. This report will cover main approaches to a design of a pulser for use with the gun of the Tevatron Electron Lens.

  12. Intraocular Lens Subluxation in Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Bolaños-Jiménez; Paulina, López-Lizárraga E; Francesc, March de R; Eduardo, Telich-Tarriba J; Alejandro, Navas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : Ectopia lentis (EL) is a major criteria for the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome, it may vary from an asymptomatic mild displacement to a significant subluxation that places the equator of the lens in the pupillary axis. The purpose of this work is to present the case of a patient with Marfan syndrome who received treatment for subluxation at our institution. Case Report : A 51-year-old female diagnosed with Marfan syndrome presented to the emergency department with bilateral eye redness, foreign body sensation and crusting around the eyes on awakening. She had the following history of cardiac and ophthalmologic complications, including: 1. Lens subluxation 2. High myopia 3. Aortic root dilation, 4. Mitral valve prolapse and 5. Tricuspid insufficiency. Conclusion : The ophthalmological management of Marfan patients is challenging and periodical follow-up is needed. Surgical versus conservative management is controversial, each case needs to be evaluated individually to analyze the risks and benefits of the procedures. PMID:25279020

  13. J/$\\psi$ production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castanier, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The NA38 and NA50 experiments at the CERN SPS have measured charmonium production in different colliding systems with the aim of observing a phase transition from ordinary hadronic matter towards a state in which quarks and gluons are deconfined (quark-gluon plasma, QGP). This experimental research is based on the prediction that the J/ psi yield should be suppressed in deconfined matter. The analysis of the data collected by the NA50 experiment with Pb-Pb collisions at 158 GeV/c per nucleon shows that the J/ psi is anomalously suppressed with respect to the pattern observed in proton-nucleus and light ion reactions. (9 refs).

  14. Limits to the formation of hot fusion nuclei in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.; Tamain, B.

    1987-01-01

    The maximum temperature which can be sustained by a nucleus is discussed. Methods used to measure the temperature; values measured in fusion reactors; theoretical investigations on the value of the limiting temperature; and information about dynamical limitations on excitation energy storage in nuclei are reviewed. It is concluded that thermalized fusion nuclei are formed at temperatures up to 5 MeV for heavy systems and 6 MeV for medium mass systems. Thermal energy in central nucleus-nucleus collisions might not exceed some saturation value due to two effects: a sharing of the deposited energy into compressional and thermal energies; and a dynamical competition between thermal energy deposition and fast pre-equilibrium emission

  15. Sterilization potential of contact lens solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Dada Vijay; Mehta Manoj

    1988-01-01

    In a dynamic field of Contact Lens Solutions maintenance of high standards of anti-microbial activity is a must Resterilization Activity Time′ is a universally accepted yardstick for such an evaluation. In this study eight brands of indigenous popular solutions alongwith two FDA approved solutions were tested for their sterilization efficacy: Standardized suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus were used for the purpose. ...

  16. Performance of a Be Refractive Lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Khounsary, A.M.; Mancini, D.C.; Saleem, K. Abu

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a beryllium compound refractive lens (CRL) was tested in the energy range of 11.5 to 8.0 keV. The beryllium refractive lens consists of 50 aligned, 1-mm-diameter, hollow spheres in a solid block of beryllium, 30 mm x 20 mm x 55 mm. The minimum web between each hollow sphere was 0.10 mm. The measured focal length of the lens for x-rays close to the axis of the beam was 147.7 cm +/- 2.0 cm at 10 keV and 120.2 +/- 2.0 cm at 9.1 keV. These values agree well with the theoretical values of 146.6 cm and 121.4 cm, respectively. The diameter of the best focus obtained at 10 keV was 35 μm horizontal and 45 μm vertical. For the modified version of the lens used in the 9.1 keV experiment these values were 25 μm horizontal and 35 μm vertical. The x-ray beam cross section for the 10 keV and the 9.1 keV experiments were 0.50 mm x 0.50 mm and 0.30 mm x 0.30 mm, respectively. The enhancement of the flux (photons per sq. mm) was 50:1 at 10 keV and 80:1 in the 9.1 keV experiment

  17. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. IV. SMOOTH LENS MODELS FOR THE BELLS GALLERY SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Yiping [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Bolton, Adam S.; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Zheng, Zheng; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Mao, Shude [Physics Department and Tsinghua Centre for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Marques-Chaves, Rui [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Oguri, Masamune [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ménard, Brice, E-mail: yiping.shu@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope F606W-band imaging observations of 21 galaxy-Ly α emitter lens candidates in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) for the GALaxy-Ly α EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) survey. Seventeen systems are confirmed to be definite lenses with unambiguous evidence of multiple imaging. The lenses are primarily massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts of approximately 0.55, while the lensed sources are Ly α emitters (LAEs) at redshifts from two to three. Although most of the lens systems are well fit by smooth lens models consisting of singular isothermal ellipsoids in an external shear field, a thorough exploration of dark substructures in the lens galaxies is required. The Einstein radii of the BELLS GALLERY lenses are, on average, 60% larger than those of the BELLS lenses because of the much higher source redshifts. This will allow for a detailed investigation of the radius evolution of the mass profile in ETGs. With the aid of the average ∼13× lensing magnification, the LAEs are frequently resolved into individual star-forming knots with a wide range of properties. They have characteristic sizes from less than 100 pc to several kiloparsecs, rest-frame far-UV apparent AB magnitudes from 29.6 to 24.2, and typical projected separations of 500 pc to 2 kpc.

  18. [Congenital lens subluxation: visual acuity outcomes and intraocular lens postoperative position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraes, Caroline; Endriss, Daniela; Lobato, Francisco; Arraes, João; Ventura, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the visual acuity outcomes and to investigate the intraocular lens (IOL) and endocapsular ring positions with ultrasound biomicroscopy in 17 eyes of 10 patients with congenital lens subluxation who underwent the same surgical technique, by the same surgeon. The study was performed in the ''Hospital de Olhos de Pernambuco'' and ''Fundação Altino Ventura''. The surgical technique consisted of phacoaspiration with implant of endocapsular ring and intraocular lens with one loop haptic amputated. The age varied from 7 to 22 years. Data on visual acuity (VA) before and after surgery, surgery follow-up period, and complications were analyzed. All patients underwent ultrasound biomicroscopy. The mean follow-up period was 2.8 years. There was a VA improvement in 17 (100%) eyes: in 12 eyes (70.6%) the visual acuity was better than 20/40; 4 (23.5%) ranged from 20/40 to 20/100, and 1 (5.9%) had visual acuity worse than 20/100, however better than the preoperative visual acuity. The posterior capsular opacification occurred in 10 eyes (58.9%). Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed that all IOL were partially decentralized, however without surpassing the pupil border limit. Endocapsular ring position was correct and there was a good capsular support in all cases. The evaluated surgical treatment provided good intraocular lens and endocapsular ring position, with VA improvement Thus, this technique is a viable, effective and safe option for the visual rehabilitation of patients with congenital lens subluxation.

  19. Primary culture and growth characteristics of four different species of lens epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xia Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the primary culture conditions for four kinds of lens epithelial cells(LECsof rat, rabbit, dog, and human, and measure their growth characteristics. METHODS: The lens capsule or anterior capsular tissue of rat, rabbit, dog and patient were removed by different methods, and they were cut into tiny pieces for primary culture by modified tissue adherent method. The morphological features of four kinds of LECs were observed under an inverted microscope.RESULTS: Four kinds of LECs of rat, rabbit, dog and human could be cultured primarily by tissue adherent method. With the evolution of tissue source, the adherent capacity of LECs gradually strengthened, cells form were changed from irregular polygon to oval, nucleus rounded and cytoplasm enriched gradually. Four kinds of LECs had fibrotic changes after several passages.CONCLUSION: LECs of rat, rabbit, dog and human can be primarily cultured. This method lays the foundation for the mechanism research of caratact and related fields on the cellular and molecular levels.

  20. Two families of astrophysical diverging lens models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Xinzhong; Rogers, Adam

    2018-03-01

    In the standard gravitational lensing scenario, rays from a background source are bent in the direction of a foreground lensing mass distribution. Diverging lens behaviour produces deflections in the opposite sense to gravitational lensing, and is also of astrophysical interest. In fact, diverging lensing due to compact distributions of plasma has been proposed as an explanation for the extreme scattering events that produce frequency-dependent dimming of extragalactic radio sources, and may also be related to the refractive radio wave phenomena observed to affect the flux density of pulsars. In this work we study the behaviour of two families of astrophysical diverging lenses in the geometric optics limit, the power law, and the exponential plasma lenses. Generally, the members of these model families show distinct behaviour in terms of image formation and magnification, however the inclusion of a finite core for certain power-law lenses can produce a caustic and critical curve morphology that is similar to the well-studied Gaussian plasma lens. Both model families can produce dual radial critical curves, a novel distinction from the tangential distortion usually produced by gravitational (converging) lenses. The deflection angle and magnification of a plasma lens vary with the observational frequency, producing wavelength-dependent magnifications that alter the amplitudes and the shape of the light curves. Thus, multiwavelength observations can be used to physically constrain the distribution of the electron density in such lenses.

  1. Dynamic metasurface lens based on MEMS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapashree Roy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, metasurfaces, being flat and lightweight, have been designed to replace bulky optical components with various functions. We demonstrate a monolithic Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS integrated with a metasurface-based flat lens that focuses light in the mid-infrared spectrum. A two-dimensional scanning MEMS platform controls the angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by ±9°, thus enabling dynamic beam steering. The device could be used to compensate for off-axis incident light and thus correct for aberrations such as coma. We show that for low angular displacements, the integrated lens-on-MEMS system does not affect the mechanical performance of the MEMS actuators and preserves the focused beam profile as well as the measured full width at half maximum. We envision a new class of flat optical devices with active control provided by the combination of metasurfaces and MEMS for a wide range of applications, such as miniaturized MEMS-based microscope systems, LIDAR scanners, and projection systems.

  2. Adaptive Liquid Lens Actuated by Droplet Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an adaptive liquid lens actuated by droplet movement. Four rectangular PMMA (Polymethyl Methacrylate substrates are stacked to form the device structure. Two ITO (Indium Tin Oxide sheets stick on the bottom substrate. One PMMA sheet with a light hole is inserted in the middle of the device. A conductive droplet is placed on the substrate and touches the PMMA sheet to form a small closed reservoir. The reservoir is filled with another immiscible non-conductive liquid. The non-conductive liquid can form a smooth concave interface with the light hole. When the device is applied with voltage, the droplet stretches towards the reservoir. The volume of the reservoir reduces, changing the curvature of the interface. The device can thus achieve the function of an adaptive lens. Our experiments show that the focal length can be varied from −10 to −159 mm as the applied voltage changes from 0 to 65 V. The response time of the liquid lens is ~75 ms. The proposed device has potential applications in many fields such as information displays, imaging systems, and laser scanning systems.

  3. Thin wetting film lens-less imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allier, C.P.; Poher, V.; Coutard, J.G.; Hiernard, G.; Dinten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lens-less imaging has recently attracted a lot of attention as a compact, easy-to-use method to image or detect biological objects like cells, but failed at detecting micron size objects like bacteria that often do not scatter enough light. In order to detect single bacterium, we have developed a method based on a thin wetting film that produces a micro-lens effect. Compared with previously reported results, a large improvement in signal to noise ratio is obtained due to the presence of a micro-lens on top of each bacterium. In these conditions, standard CMOS sensors are able to detect single bacterium, e.g. E. coli, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus thuringiensis, with a large signal to noise ratio. This paper presents our sensor optimization to enhance the SNR; improve the detection of sub-micron objects; and increase the imaging FOV, from 4.3 mm 2 to 12 mm 2 to 24 mm 2 , which allows the detection of bacteria contained in 0.5 μl to 4 μl to 10 μl, respectively. (authors)

  4. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.; Cahn, R.; Cederstrom, B.; Danielsson, M.; Vestlund, J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point

  5. Laboratory Demonstration of Axicon-Lens Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeho; Jea, Geonho

    2018-01-01

    The results of laboratory based experiments of the proposed coronagraph using axicon-lenses that is conjunction with a method of noninterferometric quantitative phase imaging for direct imaging of exoplanets is will present. The light source is passing through tiny holes drilled on the thin metal plate is used as the simulated stellar and its companions. Those diffracted light at the edge of the holes bears a similarity to the light from the bright stellar. Those images are evaginated about the optical axis after the maximum focal length of the first axicon lens. Then the evaginated images of have cut off using the motorized iris which means the suppressed the central stellar light preferentially. Various length between the holes which represent the angular distance are examined. The laboratory experimental results are shown that the axicon-lens coronagraph has feature of ability to achieve the smaller IWA than l/D and high-contrast direct imaging. The laboratory based axicon-lens coronagraph imaging support the symbolic computation results which has potential in direct imaging for finding exoplanet and various astrophysical activities. The setup of the coronagraph is simple to build and is durable to operate. Moreover it can be transported the planets images to a broadband spectrometric instrument that able to investigate the constituent of the planetary system.

  6. Metasurface axicon lens design at visible wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyammahi, Saleimah; Zhan, Qiwen

    2017-08-01

    The emerging field of metasurfaces is promising to realize novel optical devices with miniaturized flat format and added functionalities. Metasurfaces have been demonstrated to exhibit full control of amplitude, phase and polarization of electromagnetic waves. Using the metasurface, the wavefront of light can be manipulated permitting new functionalities such as focusing and steering of the beams and imaging. One optical component which can be designed using metasurfaces is the axicon. Axicons are conical lenses used to convert Gaussian beams into nondiffraction Bessel beams. These unique devices are utilized in different applications ranging from optical trapping and manipulation, medical imaging, and surgery. In this work, we study axicon lens design comprising of planar metasurfaces which generate non-diffracting Bessel beams at visible wavelengths. Dielectric metasurfaces have been used to achieve high efficiency and low optical loss. We measured the spot size of the resulted beams at different planes to demonstrate the non-diffraction properties of the resulted beams. We also investigated how the spot size is influenced by the axicon aperture. Furthermore, we examined the achromatic properties of the designed axicon. Comparing with the conventional lens, the metasurface axicon lens design enables the creation of flat optical device with wide range of depth of focus along its optical axis.

  7. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Dose to the Eye Lens: Does Positioning Really Matter? C. Baun1, K. Falch1, K.D. Nielsen2, S. Shanmuganathan1, O. Gerke1, P.F. Høilund-Carlsen1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. 2University College Lillebaelt, Odense, Denmark. Aim: The scan...... field in oncology patients undergoing eyes-to-thighs PET/CT must always include the base of the scull according to department guidelines. The eye lens is sensitive to radiation exposure and if possible it should be avoided to scan the eye. If the patient’s head is kipped backwards during the scan one...... might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...

  8. Dynamic metasurface lens based on MEMS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tapashree; Zhang, Shuyan; Jung, Il Woong; Troccoli, Mariano; Capasso, Federico; Lopez, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    In the recent years, metasurfaces, being flat and lightweight, have been designed to replace bulky optical components with various functions. We demonstrate a monolithic Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) integrated with a metasurface-based flat lens that focuses light in the mid-infrared spectrum. A two-dimensional scanning MEMS platform controls the angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by ±9°, thus enabling dynamic beam steering. The device could be used to compensate for off-axis incident light and thus correct for aberrations such as coma. We show that for low angular displacements, the integrated lens-on-MEMS system does not affect the mechanical performance of the MEMS actuators and preserves the focused beam profile as well as the measured full width at half maximum. We envision a new class of flat optical devices with active control provided by the combination of metasurfaces and MEMS for a wide range of applications, such as miniaturized MEMS-based microscope systems, LIDAR scanners, and projection systems.

  9. Quantitative microlocalization of diffusible ions in normal and galactose cataractous rat lens by secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M S; File, D M

    1986-11-01

    , to a lesser degree, of potassium from the cortex to the nucleus. Development of galactose-induced cataract was heterogeneous by morphological criteria, beginning at the lens equator and spreading from the cortex into the nucleus. However, the loss of potassium and increase in sodium concentration occurred at early stages in both the cortex and nucleus cells, possibly because these cells are interconnected by gap junctions. There is a local alteration in elemental content prior to morphologically demonstrable cataract formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  10. Radiation dose to the lens and cataract formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, J.M.; Whitelocke, R.A.F.; Warrington, A.P.; Bessell, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the radiation tolerance of the lens of the eye and the incidence of radiation-induced lens changes in patients treated by fractionated supervoltage radiation therapy for orbital tumors. Forty patients treated for orbital lymphoma and pseudotumor with tumor doses of 20--40 Gy were studied. The lens was partly shielded using lead cylinders in most cases. The dose to the germinative zone of the lens was estimated by measurements in a tissue equivalent phantom using both film densitometry and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Opthalmological examination was performed at 6 monthly intervals after treatment. The lead shield was found to reduce the dose to the germinative zone of the lens to between 36--50% of the tumor dose for Cobalt beam therapy, and to between 11--18% for 5 MeV x-rays. Consequently, the lens doses were in the range 4.5--30 Gy in 10--20 fractions. Lens opacities first appeared from between 3 and 9 years after irradiation. Impairment of visual acuity ensued in 74% of the patients who developed lens opacities. The incidence of lens changes was strongly dose-related. None was seen after doses of 5 Gy or lower, whereas doses of 16.5 Gy or higher were all followed by lens opacities which impaired visual acuity. The largest number of patients received a maximum lens dose of 15 Gy; in this group the actuarial incidence of lens opacities at 8 years was 57% with visual impairment in 38%. The adult lens can tolerate a total dose of 5 Gy during a fractionated course of supervoltage radiation therapy without showing any changes. Doses of 16.5 Gy or higher will almost invariably lead to visual impairment. The dose which causes a 50% probability of visual impairment is approximately 15 Gy. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN: Signatures, physical observables and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions have become available with the recent experiments at CERN utilizing 200 GeV/n oxygen and sulfur beams. Physics motivations for these experiments are presented: a description of predicted signatures for possible formation of a quark-gluon plasma and physical observables that are expected to provide important information for understanding the dynamics of these collisions. A presentation will be made of some of the first experimental results to emerge from this new field. 28 refs., 9 figs

  12. Proton rapidity distribution in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    The proton rapidity distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies are analysed by the revised thermalized cylinder model. The calculated results are compared and found to he in agreement with the experimental data of Si-AI and Si-Pb collisions at 14.6 A GeV/c, Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c, and S-S collisions at 200 A GeV/c. (Author)

  13. Subthreshold pion production from nucleus-nucleus collisions around 100 MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Several global variables were tested with the aim to determine the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions producing pions at incident energies around 100 MeV/nucleon. The experimental set-up includes the MEDEA multidetector, part of which is used as a π 0 spectrometer, and an additional hodoscope of plastic scintillators to cover very forward angles. A statistical model was used to generate both inclusive and pion-triggered events. Selection of well measured events was made through the measured total parallel momentum. Among the different global variables which were tested, the average parallel velocity was seen to give the best correlation with the impact parameter.

  14. Biochemical studies on the ocular lens in relation to cataractogenesis. Final report, July 1, 1968--December 31, 1978J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, V.E.; Reddy, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    As indicated in the scope and purpose of this program, the broad aim of these investigations was to provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which various inorganic ions and a number of organic substances, particularly amino acids, enter and leave the ocular lens and to assay the role of these mechanisms in the physiological and pathological conditions of the eye. The studies also dealt with the mechanisms of glutathione in the lens and its relationship to amino acid transport, the effect of x-ray on the protein aggregation mechanism as well as the studies of the biochemical changes associated with the development of the experimentally induced galactose cataract

  15. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear locali...

  16. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  17. The basic elementary particles as martensitic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguinaco-Bravo, V. J.; Onoro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The martensitic transformation is a diffusional structural change that produces an important modification of the microstructure and properties of materials. In this paper we propose how the martensitic phase is nucleated from a basic elementary particle (bep). The bep is formed in several stages. Vacancies, divacancies, etc. are formed at high temperature, which collapse into prismatic dislocation loops during the cooling process. We define a bep as a dislocation loop reaching a critical radius and fulfilling certain elastic energy conditions. A martensitic nucleus is a bep that coincides crystallographically with the habit plane of the matrix. (Author) 16 refs

  18. An exceptionally bright, compact starburst nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Mateo, Mario; Fich, Michel; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Observations are reported of a remarkably bright (V about 13) starburst nucleus, 0833 + 652, which has been detected at radio, infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray wavelengths. Despite an observed flux at each of these wavelengths which is comparable to that of NGC 7714, often considered the 'prototypical' example of the starburst phenomenon, 0833 + 652 appears to be a previously uncataloged object. Its ease of detectability throughout the electromagnetic spectrum should make it useful for a variety of problems in the study of compact emission-line galaxies.

  19. From the nucleus discovery to DWBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, B.

    2007-01-01

    The author presents a brief review of the main events in the field of nuclear reactions that are acknowledged as milestones because of their importance due to either experimental setting or physical interpretation. It is shown that the pace of discoveries has been strongly dependent on the technical progress in detection means at the beginning of nuclear physics and now is linked to the development of simulation means. The discovery of the neutron, the development of the Geiger counter, the theory of the compound nucleus or the first direct reactions are among these milestones

  20. Lectures on the theory of the nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, Aleksej Grigorevich

    1975-01-01

    Provides an advanced and up-to-date account of the theory of nuclear structure and discusses in considerable detail both the superfluid and collective models of the nucleus, in addition to earlier complementary models and theories. The book also examines other important topics such as the rotational and vibrational spectra of nuclei which have not previously been treated in such depth. To summarize, it covers a large amount of theoretical ground in one volume and attempts to fill a serious gap in the literature. Many problems are included

  1. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.; Crawford, B.E.; Grossmann, C.A.; Lowie, L.Y.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S.J.; Smith, D.A.; Yen, Y.; Yuan, V.W.; Delheij, P.P.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N.R.; Sharapov, E.I.; Stephenson, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Contemporary models of the atomic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Nemirovskii, P E

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary Models of the Atomic Nucleus discusses nuclear structure and properties, expounding contemporary theoretical concepts of the low-energy nuclear processes underlying in nuclear models. This book focuses on subjects such as the optical nuclear model, unified or collective model, and deuteron stripping reaction. Other topics discussed include the basic nuclear properties; shell model; theoretical analysis of the shell model; and radiative transitions and alpha-decay. The deuteron theory and the liquid drop nuclear model with its application to fission theory are also mentioned, but o

  3. A high excitation magnetic quadrupole lens quadruplet incorporating a single octupole lens for a low spherical aberration probe forming lens system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yanxin; Jamieson, David N.; Liu, Jianli; Li, Liyi

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a new probe forming lens system consisting of a high excitation magnetic quadrupole lens quadruplet that incorporates a single magnetic octupole lens. This system achieves both a high demagnification and a low spherical aberration compared to conventional high excitation systems and is intended for deployment for the Harbin 300 MeV proton microprobe for applications in space science and ion beam therapy. This relative simplicity of the ion optical design to include a single octupole lens minimizes the risks associated with the constructional and operational precision usually needed for the probe forming lens system and this system could also be deployed in microprobe systems that operate with less magnetically rigid ions. The design of the new system is validated with reference to two independent ion optical computer codes.

  4. Opi1p translocation to the nucleus is regulated by hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo, Carolina; Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Cepeda, Andreia Pereira; Real, Carla; Barros-Martins, Joana; Pinto, Francisco; Soares, Helena; Marinho, H Susana; Cyrne, Luisa

    2017-09-01

    During exposure of yeast cells to low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), the expression of several genes is regulated for cells to adapt to the surrounding oxidative environment. Such adaptation involves modification of plasma membrane lipid composition, reorganization of ergosterol-rich microdomains and altered gene expression of proteins involved in lipid and vesicle traffic, to decrease permeability to exogenous H 2 O 2 . Opi1p is a transcriptional repressor that is inactive when present at the nuclear membrane/endoplasmic reticulum, but represseses transcription of inositol upstream activating sequence (UAS INO )-containing genes, many of which are involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and fatty acids, when it is translocated to the nucleus. We investigated whether H 2 O 2 in concentrations inducing adaptation regulates Opi1p function. We found that, in the presence of H 2 O 2 , GFP-Opi1p fusion protein translocates to the nucleus and, concomitantly, the expression of UAS INO -containing genes is affected. We also investigated whether cysteine residues of Opi1p were implicated in the H 2 O 2 -mediated translocation of this protein to the nucleus and identified cysteine residue 159 as essential for this process. Our work shows that Opi1p is redox-regulated and establishes a new mechanism of gene regulation involving Opi1p, which is important for adaptation to H 2 O 2 in yeast cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The neutron silicon lens. An update of the thermal neutron lens results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.W.; Daymond, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of the Neutron Silicon Lens (NSL) and provides and update on the experimental results achieved to date. The NSL design is a cylindrical neutron lens based on the use of multiple neutron mirrors supported and separated by silicon wafers. Such lenses would have many applications in both the primary and scattered beams on neutron instruments, and would lead to immediate improvements where the sample to be illuminated is small, as in high pressure or engineering strain scanning instruments. (author)

  6. Forensic Analysis of a Contact Lens in a Murder Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwerling, Charles S

    2016-03-01

    Contact lenses have had rare relevance in trials and/or investigations. After 5 years of burial, orbital remnants were retrieved from an exhumed body and subsequently identified as a key piece of material evidence in a murder trial. The exhumed case materials were evaluated under laboratory conditions and were determined to be contact lens remnants. Contact lens fracture and burial simulation studies were performed to provide additional corroboration of the physical findings of the exhumed contact lens remnants. This material evidence was instrumental in providing factual proof refuting the defendant's testimony in the murder trial. A brief history of contact lens composition and use is provided for understanding the methods and observational results. This forensic case study represents the first published documentation of a contact lens from an exhumed body being used in a murder investigation and establishes an operational procedure for future forensic contact lens examinations. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. DNA Cross-Bridging Shapes a Single Nucleus from a Set of Mitotic Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwer, Matthias; Schneider, Maximilian W G; Hoefler, Rudolf; Schmalhorst, Philipp S; Jude, Julian G; Zuber, Johannes; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2017-08-24

    Eukaryotic cells store their chromosomes in a single nucleus. This is important to maintain genomic integrity, as chromosomes packaged into separate nuclei (micronuclei) are prone to massive DNA damage. During mitosis, higher eukaryotes disassemble their nucleus and release individualized chromosomes for segregation. How numerous chromosomes subsequently reform a single nucleus has remained unclear. Using image-based screening of human cells, we identified barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) as a key factor guiding membranes to form a single nucleus. Unexpectedly, nuclear assembly does not require BAF's association with inner nuclear membrane proteins but instead relies on BAF's ability to bridge distant DNA sites. Live-cell imaging and in vitro reconstitution showed that BAF enriches around the mitotic chromosome ensemble to induce a densely cross-bridged chromatin layer that is mechanically stiff and limits membranes to the surface. Our study reveals that BAF-mediated changes in chromosome mechanics underlie nuclear assembly with broad implications for proper genome function. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of nucleon exchange in dissipative and absorptive nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Santanu

    1988-01-01

    When a heavy nucleus impinges upon another, a number of nucleons can be exchanged between them. The number of such exchanges is a measure of the flux (a part of it) removed from the elastic channel and hence could give rise to an absorptive component in the nucleus-nucleus optical model potential. The transferred nucleons also carry certain amount of momentum which can cause an energy dissipation from the relative motion between the two nuclei. Both of these approaches have been studied in the last few years. However calculations of the flux to obtain the absorptive potential were based on nuclear models, such as fermi gas, where the tail region of the nucleus (which should be the most important region for transfer to occur) is treated inadequately. On the other hand, the proximity type of nuclear friction relies on a nucleon flux which is defined in pure classical terms. A model is presented to obtain a quantum mechanically defined particle flux. The time-dependent wave functions of single particle states in the field of two moving potential pockets are calulated. From the calculated flux, both the absorptive potential and the radial friction coefficient are obtained. The results are compared with phenomenological values for sup(16)O+sup(40)Ca and sup(40)Ca+sup(40)Ca systems. (author). 13 refs., 8 figs

  9. Experimental study of collective flow phenomena in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chkhaidze, L V; Kharkhelauri, L L

    2002-01-01

    The results of the experimental study of collective flow phenomena, such as the sideward and elliptic flow of nuclear matter, discovered during the last 10-15 years in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions are presented in this review. Sideward (often termed directed) and elliptic flows have been observed for protons, antiprotons, light nuclei, pions, kaons, and lambdas emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 0.1-1.8 GeV/nucleon of LBL Bevalac and GSI/SIS by Plastic-Ball, Streamer Chamber, EOS-NPC, FOPI, LAND, TAPS, and KAOS collaborations; at 2-4 GeV/nucleon of Dubna JINR by SKM-200-GIBS, Propane Buble Chamber, and Emulsion Chamber collaborations; at 2-14 GeV/nucleon of BNL AGS, by the E877, E895, and E917 collaborations; and at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon of CERN SPS, by the WA98 and NA49 collaborations and more recently by the STAR at RHIC BNL. In the review, the results of the SKM-200-GIBS collaboration of JINR are presented and compared with the results of different experiments by Bevalac, GSI/SIS, BNL, and...

  10. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The question of possible existence of η-mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. An- swer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of η-nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of η-mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it.

  11. Thermal Bremsstrahlung probing nuclear multifragmentation in nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Enterria, D.G.

    2000-05-01

    The thermodynamical properties of nuclear matter at moderate temperatures and densities, in the vicinity of the predicted nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, are studied using as experimental probe the hard-photons (E γ > 30 MeV) emitted in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Photon and charged-particle production in four different heavy-ion reactions (Ar 36 + Au 197 , Ag 107 , Ni 58 , C 12 at 60 A*MeV) is measured exclusively and inclusively coupling the TAPS photon spectrometer with two charged-particle and intermediate-mass-fragment detectors covering nearly 4π. We confirm that Bremsstrahlung emission in first-chance (off-equilibrium) proton-neutron collisions (pnγ) is the dominant origin of hard photons. We also firmly establish the existence of a thermal radiation component emitted in second-chance proton-neutron collisions. This thermal Bremsstrahlung emission takes place in semi-central and central nucleus-nucleus reactions involving heavy targets. We exploit this observation i) to demonstrate that thermal equilibrium is reached during the reaction, ii) to establish a new thermometer of nuclear matter based on Bremsstrahlung photons, iii) to derive the thermodynamical properties of the excited nuclear sources and, in particular, to establish a 'caloric curve' (temperature versus excitation energy), and iv) to assess the time-scales of the nuclear break-up process. (author)

  12. Study of η-nucleus interaction through the formation of η-nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The question of possible existence of -mesic nuclei is quite intriguing. Answer to this question will deeply enrich our understanding of -nucleus interaction which is not so well-understood. We review the experimental efforts for the search of -mesic nuclei and describe the physics motivation behind it. We present the ...

  13. Lens regeneration in mice under the influence of vitamin A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of vitamin A has been studied on lens regeneration in young (7 days old) as well as adult mice. A longitudinal slit was made under local anesthesia in the cornea over the lens. The lens was extracted intact through the incision. Intraperitonial injection of vitamin A (0.05 ml of 30 IU/ml in young and 0.05 ml of 50 ...

  14. Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation under Low Atmospheric Pressure Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    of subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at altitudes greater than 18,000 ft. Later, after many advances in contact lens fitting and...Reported here are the results of contact lens bubble studies with soft hydrophilic nd rigid gas-permeable lenses . Testing was accomplished in simulated...ccurred at altitudes greater than 20,000 ft. For soft contact lenses , bubble formation was etected in 22 of 92 eyes tested, and occurred at altitudes

  15. Analysis of phakic before intraocular lens implantation for fundus examination

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Chen; Zhong-Ping Chen; Rui-Ling Zhu

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the findings of the eyes which were examined preoperatively by three mirror contact lens before the implantation of implantable collamer lens(ICL). To analysis the retinal pathological changes and to explore the clinical analysis of early diagnosis and treatment in retinopathy on fundus examination before operation. METHODS:The retrospective case series study included 127 eyes of 64 patients who underwent phakic intraocular lens implantation were received the fundus examina...

  16. Haemophilus influenzae corneal ulcer in a therapeutic contact lens wearer.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. R.; Cohen, K. L.; McCarthy, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an unusual corneal pathogen and an unusual cause of corneal ulcers in Western society. In previous reports corneal complications from H. influenzae have been secondary to a conjunctivitis. The first case of a primary H. influenzae corneal ulcer as a complication of therapeutic contact lens wear is presented. Since other uncommon bacteria have been reported as causes of contact lens related corneal ulcers, the bacteriology of contact lens related corneal ulcers is rev...

  17. Prestress mediates force propagation into the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaohua; Chen Jianxin; Butler, James P.; Wang Ning

    2005-01-01

    Several reports show that the nucleus is 10 times stiffer than the cytoplasm. Hence, it is not clear if intra-nuclear structures can be directly deformed by a load of physiologic magnitudes. If a physiologic load could not directly deform intra-nuclear structures, then signaling inside the nucleus would occur only via the mechanisms of diffusion or translocation. Using a synchronous detection approach, we quantified displacements of nucleolar structures in cultured airway smooth muscle cells in response to a localized physiologic load (∼0.4 μm surface deformation) via integrin receptors. The nucleolus exhibited significant displacements. Nucleolar structures also exhibited significant deformation, with the dominant strain being the bulk strain. Increasing the pre-existing tensile stress (prestress) in the cytoskeleton significantly increased the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus (defined as nucleolus displacement per surface deformation) whereas decreasing the prestress significantly lowered the stress propagation efficiency to the nucleolus. Abolishing the stress fibers/actin bundles by plating the cells on poly-L-lysine-coated dishes dramatically inhibited stress propagation to the nucleolus. These results demonstrate that the prestress in the cytoskeleton is crucial in mediating stress propagation to the nucleolus, with implications for direct mechanical regulation of nuclear activities and functions

  18. Research Resource: Gene Profiling of G Protein–Coupled Receptors in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Female

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Chunguang; Nestor, Casey C.; Mao, Peizhong; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus controls many critical homeostatic functions including energy homeostasis, reproduction, and motivated behavior. Although G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in the regulation of these functions, relatively few of the GPCRs have been identified specifically within the arcuate nucleus. Here, using TaqMan low-density arrays we quantified the mRNA expression of nonolfactory GPCRs in mouse arcuate nucleus. An unprecedented number of GPCRs (total of 292) were found to be expressed, of which 183 were known and 109 were orphan GPCRs. The known GPCR genes expressed were classified into several functional clusters including hormone/neurotransmitter, growth factor, angiogenesis and vasoactivity, inflammation and immune system, and lipid messenger receptors. The plethora of orphan genes expressed in the arcuate nucleus were classified into 5 structure-related classes including class A (rhodopsin-like), class B (adhesion), class C (other GPCRs), nonsignaling 7-transmembrane chemokine-binding proteins, and other 7-transmembrane proteins. Therefore, for the first time, we provide a quantitative estimate of the numerous GPCRs expressed in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Finally, as proof of principle, we documented the expression and function of one of these receptor genes, the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (Glp1r), which was highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that Glp1r mRNA was localized in proopiomelanocortin neurons, and using whole-cell recording we found that the glucagon-like peptide 1-selective agonist exendin-4 robustly excited proopiomelanocortin neurons. Thus, the quantitative GPCR data emphasize the complexity of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and furthermore provide a valuable resource for future neuroendocrine/endocrine-related experiments. PMID:24933249

  19. A wide-angle gradient index optical model of the crystalline lens and eye of the octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagger, W S; Sands, P J

    1999-08-01

    Cephalopods and fish have had no common ancestor since the Cambrian, and their eyes are a classic example of convergent evolution. The octopus has no cornea, and immerson renders the trout cornea optically ineffective. As a result, the nearly spherical lens is responsible for all refraction in these eyes. In spite of the fact that the octopus lens consists of two joined parts, while the trout lens consists of one part, we show here that their optical properties are very similar. An index gradient bends rays within these lenses, adding power and correcting spherical aberration. High spherical symmetry in both lenses strongly reduces other monochromatic aberrations and yields a wide field of vision, advantageous in attack and evasion. The octopus Mattheissen's ratio, 2.83, an inverse measure of light-gathering power, lies above the trout value of 2.38 but within the range of values reported for fish. Strong uncorrected longitudinal chromatic aberration is nearly identical in both animals as a result of similar lens protein optical properties, and will limit resolution. We discuss how animal lifestyle requirements and lens material properties influence the design of these eyes.

  20. Disposable contact lenses vs. contact lens maintenance for extended wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, J E; Caffery, B E; Campbell, I; Slomovic, A R

    1990-01-01

    We compared a disposable extended wear contact lens modality with conventional extended wear over a 6-week period. To do so, we refit 31 patients who had successfully worn conventional extended wear contact lenses for more than 1 year. One eye was fit with the AcuvueR disposable contact lens, and a new extended wear lens of the type the patient had been wearing was placed on the other eye. At weekly intervals the disposable lens was discarded and a new disposable lens inserted. At the same time, the conventional lens on the fellow eye was cleaned, disinfected, and reinserted. After 6 weeks the ocular response, subjective impressions, and condition of the lenses in the two eyes were compared. Both lenses were then cultured. Three subjects had to discontinue disposable lens wear because of adverse reactions to trapped cellular debris and corneal microcysts. Although the results were not statistically significant, the Acuvue lens appeared to perform better than or equal to the conventional lens in biomicroscopic observation, visual acuity measurement, and subjective patient preference. Eighty-seven percent of patients preferred to continue with the disposable system. There were no differences found in the type or degree of microbial contamination of the lenses.

  1. Further studies of contact lens motion during blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, H D; Knoll, H A

    1986-10-01

    Contact lens motion is felt to be of increasing importance in connection with debris elimination, particularly in extended wear lenses. Thus an improved analysis is made of a simple model for investigating the initial motion of a hard contact lens over the eye during blinking. It is shown that the assumption of constant tear film thickness is a reasonable one. This greatly simplifies the analysis. Various vertical force vs. time variations are considered and lens velocity/time graphs and maximum lens displacement calculated. These are in good agreement with the results of experiment.

  2. Geometry-invariant gradient refractive index lens: analytical ray tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2012-05-01

    A new class of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lens is introduced and analyzed. The interior iso-indicial contours mimic the external shape of the lens, which leads to an invariant geometry of the GRIN structure. The lens model employs a conventional surface representation using a coincoid of revolution with a higher-order aspheric term. This model has a unique feature, namely, it allows analytical paraxial ray tracing. The height and the angle of an arbitrary incident ray can be found inside the lens in a closed-form expression, which is used to calculate the main optical characteristics of the lens, including the optical power and third-order monochromatic aberration coefficients. Moreover, due to strong coupling of the external surface shape to the GRIN structure, the proposed GRIN lens is well suited for studying accommodation mechanism in the eye. To show the power of the model, several examples are given emphasizing the usefulness of the analytical solution. The presented geometry-invariant GRIN lens can be used for modeling and reconstructing the crystalline lens of the human eye and other types of eyes featuring a GRIN lens.

  3. Particle swarm optimization applied to automatic lens design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hua

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a novel application of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique to lens design. A mathematical model is constructed, and merit functions in an optical system are employed as fitness functions, which combined radiuses of curvature, thicknesses among lens surfaces and refractive indices regarding an optical system. By using this function, the aberration correction is carried out. A design example using PSO is given. Results show that PSO as optical design tools is practical and powerful, and this method is no longer dependent on the lens initial structure and can arbitrarily create search ranges of structural parameters of a lens system, which is an important step towards automatic design with artificial intelligence.

  4. [Phacoemulsification of subluxated lens with capsular tension ring implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorecka, Mariola; Rokicki, Wojciech; Nita, Malgorzata; Krysik, Katarzyna; Nita, Ewa; Sikorska, Aleksandra; Romaniuk, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate long term results of phacoemulsification with PC IOL and capsular tension ring (CTR) implantation in lens subluxation. The study comprised of 134 patients--146 eyes with subluxated lens. In all cases phacoemulsification with PC IOL and CTR implantation was performed. No intaroperative complications has occured. Postoperative complications included: inflammation in the anterior chamber in 3 eyes (2.1%), retinal detachment in 2 eyes (1.4%). In all cases there was no PC IOL decentration. (1) CTR facilitates phacoemulsification with PC IOL implantation in lens subluxation. (2) Phacoemulsification of subluxated lens with PC IOL and CTR implantation seems to be safe and effective procedure.

  5. Acoustic Luneburg lens using orifice-type metamaterial unit cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choon Mahn; Lee, Sang Hun

    2018-02-01

    A two-dimensional acoustic Luneburg lens that can be easily expanded into a three-dimensional sphere is fabricated. The required spatial distribution of the refractive index for this Luneburg lens is realized using the characteristics of orifice-type metamaterial unit cells. Typical characteristics of the resulting acoustic Luneburg lens, such as its aberration-free performance and capability for antipodal focusing of the lens for the incident plane waves, are investigated through experiments and simulations with the attenuation loss at frequencies that satisfy the homogeneous medium condition of the metamaterial. With the designed metamaterial, we achieved the minimum spot that lies within the classical diffraction limit at the focal point.

  6. Distribution of AVP and Ca2+-dependent PKC-isozymes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the mouse and rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, Eddy A. van der; Bult, Abel

    1995-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the circadian pacemaker in mammals and contains a network of arginine-vasopressin-immunoreactive (AVP-ir) neurons. AVP-recipient cells contain the V1a class of receptors linked to phosphoinositol turnover and protein kinase C (PKC). The present study describes

  7. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery ? unusual complication of cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare.Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsul...

  8. LENS - the Low-Energy Neutrino Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the recent successes of SNO and KamLAND, the only detectors sensitive to <1 MeV-neutrinos have been the radiochemical chlorine and gallium solar neutrino experiments. LENS is being developed to measure in real time the charge-current fluxes and energy spectra of the lowest energy solar neutrinos, from the pp and 7Be branches (91% and 7% of solar neutrinos). The detector medium will be a metal-loaded liquid scintillator (M-LS), with indium as the metal, which serves as the target for neutrino capture in the LS. 115In has 95.71% natural abundance and a 114.2-keV neutrino-capture Q-value. Neutrino capture in 115In produces a β particle and preferentially feeds an excited state of 115Sn that de-excites by delayed emission of two γ rays. This triple-coincidence 'tag' in time and space in principle is a very powerful tool to discriminate neutrino-capture events from backgrounds. The International LENS R and D Collaboration is working to develop an In-LS neutrino detector, with special properties, such as high indium content, high light yield, high optical transparency, long-term chemical stability, and good signal-to-background ratio. Success in preparing the In-LS has been achieved via the synthesis of In-carboxylates that are soluble in pseudocumene LS (note that these methods may also be applicable to the preparation of Gd-LS for reactor antineutrino experiments). Testing of some prototype LENS In-LS detector modules has begun recently at the Gran Sasso Laboratory

  9. [Corneal protection in contact lens users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, G B; Mitichkina, T S; Shamsudinova, A R

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of corneoprotective agents (Corneregel and Solcoseryl) in contact lens users. A total of 66 long-term contact lens wearers with dry eye symptoms and varying degrees of corneal epitheliopathy were monitored. All patients used artificial tears, which, however, were not effective enough to suppress manifestations of corneal epitheliopathy and to release the associated discomfort. The therapy was supplemented with Corneregel. The following examination methods were applied: biomicroscopy with fluorescent staining, Norn test, Schirmer's test, advanced tearscopy with digital image analysis of the precorneal tear film lipid layer, corneal confocal microscopy. In all cases the assessment was performed prior to starting Corneregel and repeated in 7 days, 14 days and 1 month. Complete corneal re-epithelization and restoration of the most superficial layer of the epithelium were achieved within 7-14 days. In case of severe initial epitheliopathy the effect of Corneregel was not sufficient and epithelium defects remained. These patients additionally received Solcoseryl Eye Gel. After the treatment course the condition of corneal epithelium ameliorated and contact lens wearing comfort increased. A longer precorneal tear film break-up time indicated an increase of tear film stability. The total tear production did not change significantly. The moistening effect of Corneregel and low-viscosity artificial tears together with intensive regeneration of corneal epithelium enables structural recovery of the epithelial membrane and considerable improvement of the anterior corneal stroma. At the first stage of corneoprotective treatment it is appropriate to use preservative-free artificial tears of low and high viscosity. If the effect of tear substitutive therapy is unsatisfactory it is recommended to prescribe Corneregel and Solcoseryl. The regimen is to be adjusted individually.

  10. Abnormal lens morphogenesis and ectopic lens formation in the absence of beta-catenin function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krešlová, Jana; Machoň, Ondřej; Růžičková, Jana; Láchová, Jitka; Wawrousek, E.F.; Kemler, R.; Krauss, S.; Piatigorsky, J.; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2007), s. 157-168 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/1358 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Wnt * beta-catenin * gene * lens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.516, year: 2007

  11. Magnetic system of the Tevatron electron lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, I.; Kozub, S.; Pleskach, V.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; Zintchenko, S.; Zubko, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Sery, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2000-01-01

    The Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) system consisting of seven SC and four conventional magnets has been developed and fabricated in IHEP for increase of luminosity in Tevatron. The SC cable tension and preload of SC coils are calculated. The chosen cable design and cooling of the SC magnets ensure sufficient temperature margin for operating of SC magnets and their safety during quench. The system of conventional and SC solenoids create necessary trajectory of magnetic field lines for the TEL electron beam motion. SC dipoles and warm correctors permit to carry out correction of the electron beam motion [ru

  12. Septic lens implantation syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalesandro, Nicole; Stiles, Jean; Miller, Margaret

    2011-09-01

    A 13-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented initially for a change in the appearance of the left eye. On initial examination, a small penetrating wound was suspected as the cause for a corneal scar, an anterior cortical incipient cataract and mild iritis. The cat was not re-presented until 1 year later at which time ocular pain was marked. Severe anterior uveitis and glaucoma were diagnosed and the eye enucleated. Histopathology documented intralenticular coccoid bacteria and septic lens implantation syndrome. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  13. [Contact lens-associated Paecilomyces lilacinus keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, N; Alnawaiseh, M; Zumhagen, L; Eter, N

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old otherwise healthy female patient with contact lens-associated Paecilomyces lilacinus keratitis. The clinical findings stabilized after initial local antimycotic and antibacterial treatment; however, in the further course of local therapy an extensive relapse occurred which required treatment by perforating keratoplasty à chaud due to a penetrating corneal ulcer. The patient responded well to subsequent treatment with systemic and local antimycotic medication. After a few months HLA-matched keratoplasty was performed. During the follow-up time of 14 months there were no signs of recurrence of the infection.

  14. Scleral lens for keratoconus: technology update

    OpenAIRE

    Rathi, Varsha; Taneja,Mukesh; Mandathara,Preeji; Sangwan,Virender; Dumpati,Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    Varsha M Rathi,1 Preeji S Mandathara,2 Mukesh Taneja,1 Srikanth Dumpati,1 Virender S Sangwan1 1L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India; 2School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia Abstract: Scleral lenses are large diameter lenses which rest over the sclera, unlike the conventional contact lenses which rest on the cornea. These lenses are fitted to not touch the cornea and there is a space created between the cornea and the lens. Th...

  15. Scientific performance assessments through a gender lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2018-01-01

    The focus on excellence and quality assurance in the academy has spawned a signifi cant increase in the use of bibliometric measures in performance assessments of individual researchers. This article investigates the organizational consequences of this development through a gender lens. Based....... They adhere to the prevailing ethos of the academic meritocracy by standardizing the criteria for organizational advancement and ensuring transparency and accountability in the selection process. While bibliometric tools in this sense may lead to the recruitment of scientists with a strong CV and track record...

  16. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Ranjbar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  17. Spectroscopic Studies of the Nucleus GOLD-195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susan Marie

    The nucleus ^{195}Au has been studied via in-beam gamma -ray and electron spectroscopy with the reactions ^{196}Pt(p,2n)^ {195}Au at beam energies of 12 and 16 MeV, and the reaction ^{rm nat }Ir(alpha,2n) ^{195}Au at a beam energy of 26 MeV. All experiments were performed at the University of Notre Dame tandem accelerator facility and utilized elements of the University of Pittsburgh multi-detector gamma-array and ICEBall mini-orange electron spectrometer. Fifty-five new transitions and thirty-six new energy levels have been observed. The U(6/4) supersymmetric algebra has been proposed to provide a simultaneous description for the positive parity states of the pair of nuclei ^{194 }Pt and ^{195}Au. The observed energy spectra for these nuclei show satisfactory agreement with the U(6/4) predicted spectra. The collective properties including relative B(E2) values for the Pt and Au nuclei in this mass region are also consistent with theoretical predictions. However, the measured E2/M1 mixing ratios for transitions in ^{195} Au indicate that the single particle description for the odd-A nucleus is incomplete. The new data for ^{195}Au is further combined with the existing data for ^{194} Pt and ^{195}Pt within the context of the larger U_{ nu}(6/12) otimes U_{pi}(6/4) supersymmetry. A consistent fit to the energy eigenvalue equation is obtained and a modified prediction for the negative parity states in the odd-odd nucleus ^{196} Au is made. Thus, the proposal of an underlying supersymmetry for the quartet of nuclei ^ {194}Pt-^{195} Pt-^{195}Au- ^{196}Au also appears valid. New transitions and levels involved in the negative parity h_{11/2} decoupled band in ^{195}Au have also been observed. The band appears to be much more fragmented at high spins than the analogous structures in the lighter odd-A Au nuclei, but it is unclear what the source of this difference is. It is, however, proposed that a consistent description for both the positive and negative parity

  18. Candidate gravitational microlensing events for future direct lens imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C. B.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Park, H.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bozza, V. [Department of Physics, University of Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H. [Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Fukui, A. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-10

    The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 to 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with μ ≳ 8 mas yr{sup –1}. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In ≲12 yr from the time of each event the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.

  19. International survey of contact lens prescribing for extended wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Woods, Craig A

    2012-02-01

    To determine the extent of extended wear (EW) contact lens prescribing worldwide and to characterize the associated demographics and fitting patterns. Up to 1000 survey forms were sent to contact lens fitters in up to 39 countries between January and March every year for five consecutive years (2006-2010). Practitioners were asked to record data relating to the first 10 contact lens fits or refits performed after receiving the survey form. Survey data collected since 1997 was also analyzed to assess EW fitting trends since that time. Details for lens modality were received for 107,094 rigid and soft lens fits of which 88,392 were for soft lens daily wear (DW) and 7470 were for soft lens EW. Overall, EW represents 7.8% of all soft lens fits, ranging from 0.6% in Malaysia to 27% Norway. Compared with DW fittings, EW fittings can be characterized as follows: older age (32.7 ± 13.6 vs. 29.4 ± 12.0 years for DW); males are over-represented; greater proportion of refits; 72% silicone hydrogel; higher proportion of presbyopia and spherical designs; and higher proportion of monthly lens replacement. Of those wearing EW lenses, 80% use multipurpose solutions, whereas 9% do not use any care system. Between 1997 and 1999, the rate of EW prescribing decreased from 5 to 1% of all soft lens fits; it increased to a peak of 12% in 2006, and settled back to 8% by 2010. EW prescribing has failed to break through the "glass ceiling" of 15% and is unlikely to become a mainstream lens wearing modality until the already low risks of ocular complications can be reduced to be equivalent to that for DW.

  20. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)