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Sample records for lens nuclei increased

  1. Increased ionization supports growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, H.; Enghoff, M. B.; Shaviv, N. J.

    2017-01-01

    Ions produced by cosmic rays have been thought to influence aerosols and clouds. In this study, the effect of ionization on the growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei is investigated theoretically and experimentally. We show that the mass-flux of small ions can constitute an important...... and find good agreement with theory. Ion-induced condensation should be of importance not just in Earth’s present day atmosphere for the growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei under pristine marine conditions, but also under elevated atmospheric ionization caused by increased supernova activity....

  2. Acanthamoeba keratitis and contact lens wear: static or increasing problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2007-11-01

    The occurrence of Acanthamoeba keratitis is increasing in the United States because of an expanding population at risk of infection and sporadic outbreaks of infection. Such outbreaks are the result of lapses in contact lens wear and care and of alterations in water quality and water treatment procedures. Although improved techniques in diagnosis are available, better identification of infection alone does not explain an increase in the observed occurrence of the disease. Likewise, there does not appear to be an increase in the virulence or infectivity of the amoebae. Strategies for prevention, including patient education, improved decontaminating agents, maintenance of water treatment standards, and possible immunization of subjects at risk, are needed.

  3. Lens autofluorescence is not increased at high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between ambient environmental ultraviolet radiation exposure and lens fluorescence. METHODS: Non-invasive lens fluorometry measurements were compared in healthy Bolivian and Danish subjects. Background ultraviolet radiation was 4.5 times higher in Bolivia than in De...... living at sea level at 55 degrees northern latitude. These results suggest that lens ageing, as assessed by lens autofluorometry, is independent of exposure to ultraviolet radiation....

  4. Aspartic acid racemization rate in narwhal (Monodon monoceros) eye lens nuclei estimated by counting of growth layers in tusks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Eva; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    estimated: one by linear regression (r2=0.98) based on the assumption that age was known without error, and one based on a bootstrap study, taking into account the uncertainty in the age estimation (r2 between 0.88 and 0.98). The two estimated 2kAsp values were identical up to two significant figures. The 2......) technique has been used in age estimation studies of cetaceans, including narwhals. The purpose of this study was to estimate a species-specific racemization rate for narwhals by regressing aspartic acid D/L ratios in eye lens nuclei against growth layer groups in tusks (n=9). Two racemization rates were...

  5. Lens epithelial cell apoptosis and intracellular Ca2+ increase in the presence of xanthurenic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Christoph

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthurenic acid is an endogenous product of tryptophan degradation by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. We have previously reported that IDO is present in mammalian lenses, and xanthurenic acid is accumulated in the lenses with aging. Here, we studied the involvement of xanthurenic acid in the human lens epithelial cell physiology. Methods Human lens epithelial cells primary cultures were used. Control cells, and cells in the presence of xanthurenic acid grow in the dark. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence studies were performed. Results In the presence of xanthurenic acid human lens epithelial cells undergo apoptosis-like cell death. In the control cells gelsolin stained the perinuclear region, whereas in the presence of 10 μM xanthurenic acid gelsolin is translocated to the cytoskeleton, but does not lead to cytoskeleton breakdown. In the same condition caspase-3 activation, and DNA fragmentation was observed. At low (5 to 10 μM of xanthurenic acid concentration, the elongation of the cytoskeleton was associated with migration of mitochondria and cytochrome c release. At higher concentrations xanthurenic acid (20 μM and 40 μM damaged mitochondria were observed in the perinuclear region, and nuclear DNA cleavage was observed. We observed an induction of calpain Lp 82 and an increase of free Ca2+ in the cells in a xanthurenic acid concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions The results show that xanthurenic acid accumulation in human lens epithelial cells disturbs the normal cell physiology and leads to a cascade of pathological events. Xanthurenic acid induces calpain Lp82 and caspases in the cells growing in the dark and can be involved in senile cataract development.

  6. A Comparison of Three Methods to Increase Scleral Contact Lens On-Eye Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticak, Anita; Marsack, Jason D; Koenig, Darren E; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Shi, Yue; Nguyen, Lan Chi; Applegate, Raymond A

    2015-11-01

    To quantify on-eye rotational and translational stability of three scleral contact lens stabilization methods and to model the variation in visual acuity when these movements occur in a wavefront-guided correction for highly aberrated eyes. Three lens stabilization methods were integrated into the posterior periphery of a scleral contact lens designed at the Visual Optics Institute. For comparison, a lens with no stabilization method (rotationally symmetric posterior periphery) was designed. The lenses were manufactured and lens movements were quantified on 8 eyes as the average SD of the observed translations and rotations over 60 min of wear. In addition, the predicted changes in acuity for five eyes with keratoconus wearing a simulated wavefront-guided correction (full correction through the fifth order) were modeled using the measured movements. For each lens design, no significant differences in the translation and rotation were found between left and right eyes, and lenses behaved similarly on all subjects. All three designs with peripheral stability modifications exhibited no statistically significant differences in translation and rotation distributions of lens movement and were statistically more stable than the spherical lens in rotation. When the measured movements were used to simulate variation in visual performance, the 3 lenses with integrated stability methods showed a predicted average loss in acuity from the perfectly aligned condition of approximately 0.06 logMAR (3 letters), compared with the loss of over 0.14 logMAR (7 letters) for the lens with the spherical periphery. All three stabilization methods provided superior stability, as compared with the spherical lens design. Simulations of the optical and visual performance suggest that all three stabilization designs can provide desirable results when used in the delivery of a wavefront-guided correction for a highly aberrated eye.

  7. A Comparision of Three Methods to Increase Scleral Contact Lens On-eye Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticak, Anita; Marsack, Jason D.; Koenig, Darren E.; Ravikumar, Ayeswarya; Shi, Yue; Nguyen, Lan Chi; Applegate, Raymond A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To: 1) quantify on-eye rotational and translational stability of three scleral contact lens stabilization methods and 2) model the variation in visual acuity when these movements occur in a wavefront-guided correction for highly aberrated eyes. Methods Three lens stabilization methods were integrated into the posterior periphery of a scleral contact lens designed at the Visual Optics Institute. For comparison, a lens with no stabilization method (rotationally symmetric posterior periphery) was designed. The lenses were manufactured and lens movements were quantified on eight eyes as the average standard deviation of the observed translations and rotations over 60 minutes of wear. In addition, the predicted changes in acuity for 5 eyes with keratoconus wearing a simulated wavefront-guided correction (full correction through the fifth order) were modeled using the measured movements. Results For each lens design, no significant differences in the translation and rotation were found between left and right eyes, and lenses behaved similarly on all subjects. All three designs with peripheral stability modifications exhibited no statistically significant differences in translation and rotation distributions of lens movement and were statistically more stable than the spherical lens in rotation. When the measured movements were used to simulate variation in visual performance, the three lenses with integrated stability methods showed a predicted average loss in acuity from the perfectly aligned condition of approximately 0.06 logMAR (3 letters), compared to the loss of over 0.14 logMAR (7 letters) for the lens with the spherical periphery. Conclusions All three stabilization methods provided superior stability, as compared to the spherical lens design. Simulations of the optical and visual performance suggest that all three stabilization designs can provide desirable results when utilized in the delivery of a wavefront-guided correction for a highly aberrated eye

  8. Winter sowing of adapted lines as a potential yield increase strategy in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, A.; Aparicio, T.; Rodríguez, M.J.; Pérez de la Vega, M.; Caminero, C.

    2016-11-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. subsp. culinaris) is a traditional crop in Spain although current grain yield in Spain is relatively low and unstable. The effect of an early sowing date (winter sowing) on yield in the Spanish Central Plateau (meseta) was analyzed comparing it to the traditional spring sowing. Yield from eleven cultivars currently available for sowing in Spain and two F6:7 populations of recombinant inbred lines (RIL), ´Precoz´ × ´WA8649041´ (89 lines) and ´BGE016365´ × ´ILL1918´ (118 lines), was evaluated in winter and spring sowing dates for three seasons (2005/06, 2006/07 and 2007/08) and two localities. Yield and stability were assessed by the method of consistency of performance with some modifications. When comparing with the best currently available cultivars sown in the traditional spring sowing date, (with an estimated average yield of 43.9 g/m in our experimental conditions), winter sowing using adapted breeding lines proved to be a suitable strategy for increasing lentil yield and yield stability in the Spanish meseta, with an average yield increase of 111% (reaching an estimated yield of 92.8 g/m). Results point to that lentil production can greatly increase in the Spanish meseta if adequate plant materials, such as some of the lines analyzed, are sown at late fall. (Author)

  9. Presbyopia and heat: changes associated with aging of the human lens suggest a functional role for the small heat shock protein, alpha-crystallin, in maintaining lens flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, Karl R; Friedrich, Michael G; Truscott, Roger J W

    2007-12-01

    Presbyopia, the inability to focus up close, affects everyone by age 50 and is the most common eye condition. It is thought to result from changes to the lens over time making it less flexible. We present evidence that presbyopia may be the result of age-related changes to the proteins of the lens fibre cells. Specifically, we show that there is a progressive decrease in the concentration of the chaperone, alpha-crystallin, in human lens nuclei with age, as it becomes incorporated into high molecular weight aggregates and insoluble protein. This is accompanied by a large increase in lens stiffness. Stiffness increases even more dramatically after middle age following the disappearance of free soluble alpha-crystallin from the centre of the lens. These alterations in alpha-crystallin and aggregated protein in human lenses can be reproduced simply by exposing intact pig lenses to elevated temperatures, for example, 50 degrees C. In this model system, the same protein changes are also associated with a progressive increase in lens stiffness. These data suggest a functional role for alpha-crystallin in the human lens acting as a small heat shock protein and helping to maintain lens flexibility. Presbyopia may be the result of a loss of alpha-crystallin coupled with progressive heat-induced denaturation of structural proteins in the lens during the first five decades of life.

  10. BIX-01294 increases pig cloning efficiency by improving epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hongyong; Yao, Jing; Qin, Guosong; Wang, Feng; Wang, Xianlong; Luo, Ailing; Zheng, Qiantao; Cao, Chunwei; Zhao, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that faulty epigenetic reprogramming leads to the abnormal development of cloned embryos and results in the low success rates observed in all mammals produced through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The aberrant methylation status of H3K9me and H3K9me2 has been reported in cloned mouse embryos. To explore the role of H3K9me2 and H3K9me in the porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming, BIX-01294, known as a specific inhibitor of G9A (histone-lysine methyltransferase of H3K9), was used to treat the nuclear-transferred (NT) oocytes for 14-16 h after activation. The results showed that the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos was significantly enhanced both in vitro (blastocyst rate 16.4% vs 23.2%, Pcloning rate 1.59% vs 2.96%) after 50 nm BIX-01294 treatment. BIX-01294 treatment significantly decreased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K9me at the 2- and 4-cell stages, which are associated with embryo genetic activation, and increased the transcriptional expression of the pluripotency genes SOX2, NANOG and OCT4 in cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, the histone acetylation levels of H3K9, H4K8 and H4K12 in cloned embryos were decreased after BIX-01294 treatment. However, co-treatment of activated NT oocytes with BIX-01294 and Scriptaid rescued donor nuclear chromatin from decreased histone acetylation of H4K8 that resulted from exposure to BIX-01294 only and consequently improved the preimplantation development of SCNT embryos (blastocyst formation rates of 23.7% vs 21.5%). These results indicated that treatment with BIX-01294 enhanced the developmental competence of porcine SCNT embryos through improvements in epigenetic reprogramming and gene expression. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Comparison of lens oxidative damage induced by vitrectomy and/or hyperoxia in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare of lens oxidative damage induced by vitrectomy and/or hyperoxia in rabbit. METHODS: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits (2.4-2.5 kg were randomly divided into two groups (Group A, n=12; Group B, n=4. In Group A, the right eyes were treated with vitrectomy and systemic hyperoxia (oxygen concentration: 80%-85%, 1 ATA, 4h/d (Group A-right, and the left eyes were treated with hyperoxia without vitrectomy surgery (Group A-left. Four rabbits in group B (eight eyes were untreated as the controls. Lens transparency was monitored with a slit lamp and recorded before and after vitrectomy. After hyperoxic treatment for 6mo, the eyeballs were removed and the lens cortices (containing the capsules and nuclei were separated for further morphological and biochemical evaluation. RESULTS: Six months after treatments, there were no significant morphological changes in the lenses in any experimental group when observed with a slit lamp. However, the levels of water-soluble proteins and ascorbate, and the activities of catalase and Na+-K+-ATPase were significantly reduced, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde and transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2 were significantly elevated, in both the cortices and nuclei of eyes treated with vitrectomy and hyperoxia. The increase in protein-glutathione mixed disulfides and the reduction in water-soluble proteins were more obvious in the lens nuclei. The levels of ascorbate in the vitreous fluid were also reduced after vitrectomy, whereas TGF-β2 increased after vitrectomy and hyperoxia. Systemic hyperoxia exposure increased these effects. CONCLUSION: Removal of the intact vitreous gel with vitrectomy and exposing the lens to increased oxygen from the retina induce lens oxidation and aggregation. Thus, an intact vitreous gel structure may protect the lens from oxidative insult and maintain lens transparency.

  12. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  13. [Analysis of spectacle lens prescriptions shows no increase of myopia in Germany from 2000 to 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, W

    2017-11-06

    To determine whether the prevalence and magnitude of myopia among children and young adults wearing spectacles has increased in Germany from 2000 to 2015. A total of 1,223,410 refraction values from 278,432 male and 333,273 female subjects between 5 and 30 years of age were analyzed. All subjects had received a new pair of spectacles between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2015. The parameter studied was the spherical equivalent averaged over both eyes of each subject (N = 611,705). In order to identify temporal changes, the entire period of 16 years was divided into 4 time intervals of 4 years each. In the subjects three evaluation criteria were studied as a function of age: a) the frequency of myopic subjects among all spectacle wearers, b) the mean spherical equivalent and c) the distribution of the individual spherical equivalents. a) The frequency of myopic corrections among all spectacle wearers did not increase from 2000 to 2015. At 5 years of age, 9% of all children wearing glasses were myopic (≤-0.5 D) and 80% were hyperopic (≥+0.5 D). At the age of 10, 20 and 25 years, 46%, 75% and 79%, respectively, of all spectacle wearers were myopic and 42%, 13% and 10% hyperopic. b) The mean spherical equivalent, averaged across all spectacle wearers of the same age, did not show a myopic shift from 2000 to 2015. At the age of 5, 10.3 and 27 years, the mean spherical equivalent all subjects wearing glasses was +1.74 D, 0.0 D and -1.91D. c) The refractive power distribution of the individual spherical equivalents did not change significantly from 2000 to 2015. Neither low nor high myopias were more abundant in the period 2012-2015 compared to the previous years. The frequency and the refractive power of myopia did not increase in Germany over the last 16 years.

  14. Applying a Total Market Lens: Increased IUD Service Delivery Through Complementary Public- and Private-Sector Interventions in 4 Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Julia N; Corker, Jamaica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increasing access to the intrauterine device (IUD), as part of a comprehensive method mix, is a key strategy for reducing unintended pregnancy and maternal mortality in low-income countries. To expand access to IUDs within the framework of informed choice, Population Services International (PSI) has historically supported increased IUD service delivery through private providers. In applying a total market lens to better understand the family planning market and address major market gaps, PSI identified a lack of high-quality public provision of IUDs. In 2013, PSI started a pilot in 4 countries (Guatemala, Laos, Mali, and Uganda) to grow public-provider IUD service delivery through increased public-sector engagement while maintaining its ongoing focus on private providers. In collaboration with country governments, PSI affiliates carried out family planning market analyses in the 4 pilot countries to identify gaps in IUD service delivery and create sustainable strategies for scaling up IUD services in the public sector. Country-specific interventions to increase service delivery were implemented across all levels of the public health system, including targeted advocacy at the national level to promote government ownership and program sustainability. Mechanisms to ensure government ownership were built into the program design, including a proof-of-concept approach to convince governments of the feasibility and value of taking over and scaling up interventions. In the first 2 years of the pilot (2013–2014), 102,055 IUD services were provided to women at 417 targeted public-sector facilities. These preliminary results suggest that there is untapped demand for IUD service delivery in the public sector that can be met in part through greater participation of the public sector in family planning and IUD provision. PMID:27540122

  15. Applying a Total Market Lens: Increased IUD Service Delivery Through Complementary Public- and Private-Sector Interventions in 4 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Julia N; Corker, Jamaica

    2016-08-11

    Increasing access to the intrauterine device (IUD), as part of a comprehensive method mix, is a key strategy for reducing unintended pregnancy and maternal mortality in low-income countries. To expand access to IUDs within the framework of informed choice, Population Services International (PSI) has historically supported increased IUD service delivery through private providers. In applying a total market lens to better understand the family planning market and address major market gaps, PSI identified a lack of high-quality public provision of IUDs. In 2013, PSI started a pilot in 4 countries (Guatemala, Laos, Mali, and Uganda) to grow public-provider IUD service delivery through increased public-sector engagement while maintaining its ongoing focus on private providers. In collaboration with country governments, PSI affiliates carried out family planning market analyses in the 4 pilot countries to identify gaps in IUD service delivery and create sustainable strategies for scaling up IUD services in the public sector. Country-specific interventions to increase service delivery were implemented across all levels of the public health system, including targeted advocacy at the national level to promote government ownership and program sustainability. Mechanisms to ensure government ownership were built into the program design, including a proof-of-concept approach to convince governments of the feasibility and value of taking over and scaling up interventions. In the first 2 years of the pilot (2013-2014), 102,055 IUD services were provided to women at 417 targeted public-sector facilities. These preliminary results suggest that there is untapped demand for IUD service delivery in the public sector that can be met in part through greater participation of the public sector in family planning and IUD provision. © White et al.

  16. Objective lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Eugene G. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens and a method for using same. The objective lens has a first end, a second end, and a plurality of optical elements. The optical elements are positioned between the first end and the second end and are at least substantially symmetric about a plane centered between the first end and the second end.

  17. Amphibian oocyte nuclei expressing lamin A with the progeria mutation E145K exhibit an increased elastic modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anna; Heinemann, Fabian; Radmacher, Manfred; Stick, Reimer

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the human lamin A gene (LMNA) cause a wide range of diseases (laminopathies). Among these is the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare premature aging disease. Most HGPS patients carry a silent point mutation, which activates a cryptic splice site resulting in the expression of a permanently isoprenylated and truncated lamin AΔ50/progerin. Another type of mutant lamin A namely, E145K-lamin A, also causes HGPS. E145K-lamin A induces profound changes in the nuclear architecture of patient cells as well as after expression in cultured cells. The E145K mutation is located in the α-helical central domain of lamin A, which is involved in lamin filament assembly. In vitro analyses of purified E145K-lamin A have revealed severe assembly defects into higher order lamin structures, which indicates an abnormal lateral association of protofilaments. To analyze how the altered assembly observed in vitro might influence the mechanics of a nuclear lamina formed by E145K-lamin A, mutant and wild type lamin A were ectopically expressed in amphibian oocytes. Both types form a lamina consisting of multi-layered sheets of filaments at the inner side of the nuclear envelope. The mechanical properties of isolated nuclei were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). From the resulting force curves, the stiffness of the lamina was estimated. The thickness of the resulting lamin A layer was then measured by TEM. The two parameters allowed us to estimate the elastic modulus (Young's modulus) of the lamina. Lamin A sheets made from E145K filaments have a higher Young's modulus compared to wild type filaments, i.e. the E145K-lamin A sheets are more rigid than wild type laminae of comparable thickness.

  18. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  19. Prevalence of antiseptic resistance genes increases in staphylococcal isolates from orthokeratology lens wearers over initial six-month period of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guang-Sen, Shi; Boost, Maureen; Cho, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of antiseptic-resistance (QAC) genes in staphylococci colonizing periorbital tissues and accessories of orthokeratology (ortho-k) lens wearers over a 6-month period and determine the effect of their presence on minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of disinfectants and log reduction of multipurpose contact lens solutions (MPS). Staphylococci were isolated from periorbital tissues and accessories of patients before commencing ortho-k therapy and at two subsequent visits. Presence of QAC genes in 116 S. aureus and 67 CNS isolates was determined by PCR and association with period of ortho-k use determined. MICs and MBCs of staphylococci gene-positive were compared with gene-negative strains and the effectiveness of four MPS for rigid contact lenses investigated. S. aureus carriage rates in the conjunctiva decreased significantly from 41.2 % (baseline) to 11.8 % (3-months), and 13.3 % (6-months) (p trend 0.03), while CNS increased from 58.8 %(baseline) to 94.1 % (3-months), and 93.3 % (6-months) (p trend 0.02). Prevalence of qacA/B increased considerably over time (S. aureus: 4.4 % to 15.4 %, CNS: 6.7 % to 25 %), but frequency of smr was relatively stable. Only five CNS isolates harboured qacH. MICs and MBCs of gene-positive isolates were significantly increased and three MPS did not achieve a 3-log reduction of many QAC-positive strains. Ortho-k lens wear contributed to changes of staphylococcal carriage rates in the conjunctival sac. Use of MPS containing quaternary ammonium compounds may select for the carriage of organisms harbouring QAC genes, as the low concentration of disinfecting agents is not adequate for killing gene-positive strains.

  20. Viscous froth lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T. E.; Bramley, A.; Lue, L.; Grassia, P.

    2006-11-01

    Microscale models of foam structure traditionally incorporate a balance between bubble pressures and surface tension forces associated with curvature of bubble films. In particular, models for flowing foam microrheology have assumed this balance is maintained under the action of some externally imposed motion. Recently, however, a dynamic model for foam structure has been proposed, the viscous froth model, which balances the net effect of bubble pressures and surface tension to viscous dissipation forces: this permits the description of fast-flowing foam. This contribution examines the behavior of the viscous froth model when applied to a paradigm problem with a particularly simple geometry: namely, a two-dimensional bubble “lens.” The lens consists of a channel partly filled by a bubble (known as the “lens bubble”) which contacts one channel wall. An additional film (known as the “spanning film”) connects to this bubble spanning the distance from the opposite channel wall. This simple structure can be set in motion and deformed out of equilibrium by applying a pressure across the spanning film: a rich dynamical behavior results. Solutions for the lens structure steadily propagating along the channel can be computed by the viscous froth model. Perturbation solutions are obtained in the limit of a lens structure with weak applied pressures, while numerical solutions are available for higher pressures. These steadily propagating solutions suggest that small lenses move faster than large ones, while both small and large lens bubbles are quite resistant to deformation, at least for weak applied back pressures. As the applied back pressure grows, the structure with the small lens bubble remains relatively stiff, while that with the large lens bubble becomes much more compliant. However, with even further increases in the applied back pressure, a critical pressure appears to exist for which the steady-state structure loses stability and unsteady

  1. Prolonging contact lens wear and making contact lens wear safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2006-02-01

    To summarize the present status of safety and efficacy of contact lens wear. Literature review. Ovid Medline searches were performed on records from 1966 through 2005 using keywords: keratitis, contact lens complications, extended-wear contact lenses, and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses. Patients desire comfort, clarity of vision, and prolonged contact lens wear when contact lenses are used to correct refractive error. Practitioners desire patient satisfaction but also require maintenance of the integrity of the eye and no complications that jeopardize vision or health of the eye. Improvements in the oxygen permeability of the contact lens materials, design of the contact lens and its surface, and solutions for the maintenance of the lens have reduced but not eliminated the risks of infection, inflammation, and conjunctival papillary reaction associated with contact lens wear. The lessons of past and recent history suggest that patient education and practitioner participation in the management of contact lens wear continue to be critical factors for patient satisfaction and safety in the extended wear of contact lenses. The availability of highly oxygen permeable contact lenses has increased the tolerance and safety of extended contact lens wear, but patient instruction and education in proper use and care of lenses is required and caution is advised.

  2. Primordial nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The recent detection of intergalactic helium by NASA's Astro-2 mission backs up two earlier measurements by ESA and the University of California, San Diego, using instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Taken together, these results give strong evidence that this helium is primordial, confirming a key prediction of the Big Bang theory. The amount of helium the results imply could also account for some of the Universe's invisible dark matter - material which affects galactic motion but is otherwise undetectable. According to theory, helium nuclei formed at around 100 seconds after the Big Bang, but the amount of helium depended on even earlier events. Initially, protons turned into neutrons with the same probability that neutrons turned into protons. But after about one second, the Universe had cooled down enough for the weak interaction to freeze out. Neutrons continued to decay into the slightly lighter protons, whilst the opposite reaction became much more scarce. At around 100 seconds, thermonuclear fusion reactions could begin, and all the neutrons that were left became absorbed into helium nuclei, leaving the remaining protons locked up in hydrogen. The ratio of helium to hydrogen was therefore determined by events occurring when the Universe was just one second old. Standard models of primordial nucleosynthesis fix this ratio at slightly less than 2 5% by mass. All heavier elements were cooked up much later in the stars, and amount to less than 1 % of the Universe's mass. These predictions have been borne out remarkably well by observation, although proof of the primordial origins of hydrogen and helium has remained elusive until now. Big Bang nucleosynthesis goes on to estimate that primordial baryonic matter in the form of light nuclei could account for around 10% of the Universe's dark matter. All three recent measurements used the same technique of looking at distant quasars, some of the most luminous objects in the Universe, to

  3. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory...

  4. [Correct contact lens hygiene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümle, S; Kaercher, T; Khaireddin, R

    2013-06-01

    Although contact lenses have long been established in ophthalmology, practical aspects of handling contact lenses is becoming increasingly less important in the clinical training as specialist for ophthalmology. Simultaneously, for many reasons injuries due to wearing contact lenses are increasing. In order to correct this discrepancy, information on contact lenses and practical experience with them must be substantially increased from a medical perspective. This review article deals with the most important aspects for prevention of complications, i.e. contact lens hygiene.

  5. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  6. Contact Lens Related Corneal Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, KY; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. Th...

  7. Potential risk of weed outbreak by increasing biochar's application rates in slow-growth legume, lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei Khorram, Mahdi; Fatemi, Akram; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Kiefer, Rudolf; Jafarnia, Sasan

    2018-04-01

    Biochar amendment is a promising tool to improve the soil quality and, consequently, higher crop yield has received more attention during last decades. The positive effects of biochar have been attracting more attention especially in the areas with low precipitation rates, such as the Middle East, due to low soil organic carbon content, higher drought intensity, and increasing demands for food production. However, biochar can lead to lower herbicide efficacy, resulting in higher consumption of herbicides. In this study, the impact of two biochars on soil properties, plant growth, and fomesafen efficacy under rain-fed condition was investigated. Biochar amendment at the rate of 5 t ha -1 improved soil quality and plant growth by 40-200% and 46-57%, respectively, compared to the control. The increase of biochar application rate from 5 t ha -1 to 15 t ha -1 showed small additional positive effects on soil and lentil as the tested crop plant, whereas the growth of weeds elevated by 200% in this case. Albeit biochar application could be an effective way to improve the soil fertility, the potential risk of weed outbreak in the long term should be evaluated carefully before the use of biochar amendment at field scale. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...... and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes....

  9. Contact lens in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha M Rathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL, hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL.

  10. Contact lens in keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  11. Inter-specific and intraspecific eye lens protein differences in some sciaenid fishes from Goa coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of sciaenid fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Four distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  12. Soluble lens protein polymorphism in flying fishes from the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of flying-fishes were studied by cellogel electrophoresis. Three distinct patterns characterized by the number of bands, mobility and staining intensity were observed. Morphological studies of these fishes showed...

  13. An electrophoretic study of the soluble lens proteins from the Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuv)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens nuclei proteins of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta were studied by cellogel electrophoresis, to see whether there are any intra species variations. A distinct pattern characterised by the number of bands, mobility...

  14. Rotating clusters in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauling, L.; Robinson, A.B.

    1975-01-01

    Values of R, the radius of rotation of the rotating cluster, are calculated from the energy of the lowest 2 + level of even-even nuclei with the assumption that the cluster consists of p 2 or n 2 respectively, for N or P magic, and of a helion (α) for N or P differing from a magic number by +-2. The values as a function of A show a zigzag course, which is correlated with the polyspheron structure of the nuclei. If the mantle is not overcrowded the cluster glides over the surface of the mantle and the value of R increases by one spheron diameter, about 3.2 fm. At certain values of N a change in structure of the nucleus occurs, with increase in radius of the core by half a spheron diameter, permitting the cluster to drop back into the mantle, with decrease in R by half a spheron diameter. In the lanthanon region of permanent prolate deformation the rotating cluster is a polyhelion, containing the number of helions permitted by the difference between Z or N and the nearest magic number, and in the actinon region it contains all the nucleons beyond 208 Pb, with maximum p 10 n 16 . An explanation is given of the difference between these regions. (author)

  15. Barriers in the energy of deformed nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interaction energy between two nuclei considering to their deformations is studied. Coulomb and nuclear in-teraction energies, as well as the deformation energies of both nuclei, are taken into account at evaluation of the interaction energy. It is shown that the barrier related to the interaction energy of two nuclei depends on the de-formations and the height of the minimal barrier is evaluated. It is obtained that the heavier nucleus-nucleus sys-tems have large deformation values at the lowest barrier. The difference between the barrier between spherical nuclei and the lowest barrier between deformed nuclei increases with the mass and the charge of the interacting nuclei.

  16. Theory of magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosov, V.G.; Kamchatnov, A.M.

    A consistent theory of the shell and magic oscillations of the masses of spherical nuclei is developed on the basis of the Fermi liquid concept of the energy spectrum of nuclear matter. A ''magic'' relationship between the system's dimensions and the limiting momentum of the quasi-particle distribution is derived; an integer number of the de Broglie half-waves falls on the nuclear diameter. An expression for the discontinuity in the nucleon binding energy in the vicinity of a magic nucleus is obtained. The role of the residual interaction is analyzed. It is shown that the width of the Fermi-surface diffuseness due to the residual interaction is proportional to the squared vector of the quasi-particle orbital angular momentum. The values of the corresponding proportionality factors (the coupling constant for quasi particles) are determined from the experimental data for 52 magic nuclei. The rapid drop of the residual interaction with increasing nuclear size is demonstrated. (7 figures, 3 tables) (U.S.)

  17. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lens because they can be purchased over-the-counter or on the Internet," says Thomas Steinemann, MD, ... Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes ...

  18. Measurement of the absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring product nuclei (daughter) activity increase or by studing its radioactive decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.C. de.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for determining absolute activity of alpha or beta emitters by measuring daughter product radioactive decay is presented. The separation method of UX from hexahydrated uranyl nitrate UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 6H 2 O based on its dissolution in ethyl ether is described and the accuracy of this method is shown. The factors which accuate on total efficiency of a Geiger Mueller detector for beta particles are determined. The possibility to determine the mass of precursor element by daughter nuclei activity is shown. The results are compared with the one obtained by direct measurement of the mass (or number of atoms) of precursor radioactive substance and with theoretical values calculated for isotopes in secular equilibrium. (Author) [pt

  19. Nuclei and quantum worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gathers the slides and their commentaries that have been presented at the conference 'physics and fundamental questions' by P. Chomaz. The author reviews the different quantum aspects of nuclei: tunnel effect, symmetries, magic numbers, wave functions, size, shapes and deformations. The author shows that nuclei are quantum objects of great complexity, their structures are not yet well understood and the study of exotic nuclei will continue bringing valuable information

  20. High-spin excitations of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Furong; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics, Lanzhou; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2004-01-01

    The authors used the cranking shell model to investigate the high-spin motions and structures of atomic nuclei. The authors focus the collective rotations of the A∼50, 80 and 110 nuclei. The A∼50 calculations show complicated g spectroscopy, which can have significant vibration effects. The A≅80 N≅Z nuclei show rich shape coexistence with prolate and oblate rotational bands. The A≅110 nuclei near the r-process path can have well-deformed oblate shapes that become yrast and more stable with increasing rotational frequency. As another important investigation, the authors used the configuration-constrained adiabatic method to calculate the multi-quasiparticle high-K states in the A∼130, 180 and superheavy regions. The calculations show significant shape polarizations due to quasi-particle excitations for soft nuclei, which should be considered in the investigations of high-K states. The authors predicted some important high-K isomers, e.g., the 8 - isomers in the unstable nuclei of 140 Dy and 188 Pb, which have been confirmed in experiments. In superheavy nuclei, our calculations show systematic existence of high-K states. The high-K excitations can increase the productions of synthesis and the survival probabilities of superheavy nuclei. (authors)

  1. [Contact lens care and maintenance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, L

    2017-04-01

    All contact lenses with replacement schedules longer than daily must be maintained. At each step of their use, the lenses may be contaminated. Contact lens solutions perform the essential functions of cleaning, decontaminating and preserving the lenses to prevent infectious problems and improve wearing comfort. Contact lens contamination essentially comes from hands, cleaning solutions, cases, water and the environment. The pathogenic microorganisms are mainly Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and amoebae. Contact lens deposits may or may not have an organic origin. Their presence increases the risk of infection because they serve as a nutrient matrix for microbes, and they are responsible for wearing discomfort. Contact lens solutions differ in their composition, their mechanism of action and the concentration of the various agents. To prescribe the best lens care system to each wearer and for each material, it is necessary to be very familiar with them. Maintenance is the main cause of discomfort with contact lenses, either through improper use, solution-material incompatibility, or a reaction of the wearer to the components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Isobars in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurtey, R.

    1975-01-01

    The present situation of the theoretical studies and experimental material concerning the potential presence of virtual nucleon excited states (isobars) in nuclei is reported. Three particular aspects are examined: the theoretical work devoted to the isobar content of nuclei (especially deuteron), the experimental material concerning isobar exchange and the attempts to obtain a direct evidence for such objects in the deuteron (spectator method) [fr

  3. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  4. Nuclei in high forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, Z.; Berger, J.F.; Heenen, P.H.; Heyde, K.; Haas, B.; Janssens, R.; Paya, D.; Gogny, D.; Huber, G.; Bjoernholm, S.; Brack, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of 1991 Joliot-Curie Summer School is to review the most advances in the understanding of the nuclei physics after the considerable progress in gamma spectroscopy. It covers the following topics: Highly and super-deformed nuclei, nuclear structures, mean-field approach and beyond, fission isomers, nuclear excitations with long lifetime and metal clusters

  5. Eta mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of producing eta-mesic nuclei by the use of pions is discussed. If these nuclei are observed experimentally, then the binding energies of the eta in this new nuclear matter can be used to extract accurately the eta-N-N* coupling constant in a nucleus. The framework for these calculations is the coupled channel isobar model

  6. Tear film physiology and contact lens wear. II. Contact lens-tear film interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, F J

    1981-04-01

    The successful fitting of contact lenses requires the practitioner to take into account many properties of the specific lens type used but the practitioner must also understand patient factors including tear properties, use of appropriate solutions, procedures for lens cleaning, and efficiency of blinking. Selection of appropriate patients, selection of lens type, proper fitting, good maintenance, and training and monitoring of patients increase the probability of achieving success.

  7. Development of Fresnel lens for improvement of rear visibility; Shikai kojo Fresnel lens no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, K.; Sanada, C.; Tsukino, M. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Fresnel lenses have been widely used to increase the visual field around vehicles for drivers. However, internal reflection in these lenses has been an obstacle in producing dear images. This internal glow is generated by incident light from an unexpected direction reflecting on the non-lens surface or radiating from the non-lens surface of the Fresnel lens. The cause of internal glow has been made dear combining louver film with the lens. The newly developed technology removes obstacles in producing dear images by reducing internal glow. 7 figs.

  8. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N. N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  9. Contact lens in keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the En...

  10. Restoring lens capsule integrity enhances lens regeneration in New Zealand albino rabbits and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, A; Gruber, L J; Mantras, C

    1993-11-01

    In studies conducted by numerous investigators for 150 years, lenses regenerated following endocapsular lens extraction in New Zealand albino rabbits have been irregular in shape, appearing primarily doughnut-shaped as a result of lack of lens growth at the site of the anterior capsulotomy and its adhesion to the posterior capsule. In the present study, we restored the lens capsule integrity by inserting a collagen patch at the time of surgery to seal the anterior capsulotomy and to improve the shape and structure of the regenerated lenses. We then filled the capsule bag with air to prevent adhesions between the anterior and posterior capsule and maintain capsule tautness and shape. Lens regeneration was first noted as early as one to two weeks. Regenerated lens filled approximately 50% of the capsule bag at two weeks and 100% by five weeks. Subsequent growth was in the anterior-posterior direction and measured by A-scan biometry. Lens thickness increased by 0.3 mm per month. The regenerated lenses were spherical with normal cortical structure and a nuclear opacity. In conclusion, restoration of lens capsular integrity with a collagen patch following endocapsular lens extraction enhanced the shape, structure, and growth rate of the regenerated lenses. In addition, lens regeneration was shown to occur in two cats.

  11. Crystalline lens radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Pasquier, D.; Castelain, B.; Lartigau, E.; Warnet, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    During more than a half of century, numerous compounds have been tested in different models against radiation-induced cataract. In this report, we will review the radioprotectors that have been already tested for non-human crystalline lens protection. We will focus on the most important published studies in this topic and the mechanisms of cyto-protection reported in. vitro and in. vivo from animals. The most frequent mechanisms incriminated in the cyto-protective effect are: free radical scavenging, limitation of lipid peroxidation, modulation of cycle progression increase of intracellular reduced glutathione pool, reduction of DNA strand breaks and limitation of apoptotic cell death. Arnifostine (or Ethyol) and anethole dithiolethione (or Sulfarlem), already used clinically as chemo- and radio-protectants, could be further test?r for ocular radioprotection particularly for radiation-induced cataract. (author)

  12. Nanosecond KTN varifocal lens without electric field induced phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian; Henry, Michael; Yin, Stuart (Shizhuo); Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a nanosecond speed KTN varifocal lens. The tuning principle of varifocal lens is based on the high-speed refractive index modulation from the nanosecond speed tunable electric field. A response time on the order of nanoseconds was experimentally demonstrated, which is the fastest varifocal lens reported so far. The results confirmed that the tuning speed of the KTN varifocal lens could be significantly increased by avoiding the electric field induced phase transition. Such a nanosecond speed varifocal lens can be greatly beneficial for a variety of applications that demand high speed axial scanning, such as high-resolution 3D imaging and high-speed 3D printing.

  13. Electro-magnetic properties of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    1989-01-01

    Two topics of electro-magnetic properties of heavy nuclei are discussed. The first topic is the M1 excitation from well-deformed heavy nuclei, and the other is the sudden increase of the isotope shift as a function of N in going away from the closed shell. These problems are considered in terms of the particle-number projected (Nilsson-) BCS calculation. (author)

  14. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  15. Ultrastructural effects of silicone oil on the clear crystalline lens of the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Wael; Sharaf, Mohamed; Abdelazeem, Khaled; El-Gamal, Dalia; Nafady, Allam

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate light and electron microscopic changes of the anterior capsule and its epithelium after clear lens extraction of vitrectomized myopic eyes with silicone oil tamponade. This prospective, controlled, non-randomized, interventional study included 20 anterior lens capsular specimens that were excised during combined clear lens extraction and silicone oil removal from previously vitrectomized highly myopic patients with silicone oil tamponade for previous retinal detachment surgeries. The specimens were examined via light microscopy and electron microscopy and compared with 20 anterior capsule specimens removed during clear lens extraction of non-vitrectomized highly myopic eyes. Light microscopic examination of clear lens anterior capsule specimens of vitrectomized myopic eyes filled with silicone oil showed relatively more flat cells with irregular outline of lens' epithelial cells with wide intercellular spaces, deeply stained nuclei, and multiple intracytoplasmic vacuoles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed collagenous surfaces filled with multiple pits, depressions, and abnormal deposits. Transmission electron microscopy revealed lens epithelial cells with apoptotic changes, many cytoplasmic vacuoles, and filopodia-like protrusions between lens epithelial cells and the capsule. Epithelial proliferation and multilayering were also observed. silicone oil may play a role in the development of apoptotic and histopathological changes in clear lens epithelial cells. Clarity of the lens at the time of silicone oil removal does not indicate an absence of cataractous changes. We found justification of combined clear lens extraction and silicone oil removal or combined phacovitrectomy when silicone oil injection is planned, but further long-term studies with larger patient groups are required.

  16. How atomic nuclei cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebran, J-P; Khan, E; Nikšić, T; Vretenar, D

    2012-07-18

    Nucleonic matter displays a quantum-liquid structure, but in some cases finite nuclei behave like molecules composed of clusters of protons and neutrons. Clustering is a recurrent feature in light nuclei, from beryllium to nickel. Cluster structures are typically observed as excited states close to the corresponding decay threshold; the origin of this phenomenon lies in the effective nuclear interaction, but the detailed mechanism of clustering in nuclei has not yet been fully understood. Here we use the theoretical framework of energy-density functionals, encompassing both cluster and quantum liquid-drop aspects of nuclei, to show that conditions for cluster formation can in part be traced back to the depth of the confining nuclear potential. For the illustrative example of neon-20, we show that the depth of the potential determines the energy spacings between single-nucleon orbitals in deformed nuclei, the localization of the corresponding wavefunctions and, therefore, the degree of nucleonic density clustering. Relativistic functionals, in particular, are characterized by deep single-nucleon potentials. When compared to non-relativistic functionals that yield similar ground-state properties (binding energy, deformation, radii), they predict the occurrence of much more pronounced cluster structures. More generally, clustering is considered as a transitional phenomenon between crystalline and quantum-liquid phases of fermionic systems.

  17. Subjective assessment of contact lens wear by army aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, M R; Cornum, R L

    1993-07-01

    Because 23% of Army aviators are ametropic, contact lenses have drawn increased attention as a spectacle substitute to solve system compatibility problems. From November 1988 until October 1991, a series of contact lens research protocols were conducted to develop a comprehensive database on contact lens wear in varied environments. Questionnaires were used to assess suitability and acceptability of routine contact lens wear. Responses from 202 subjects were obtained from September 1989 through September 1991. The questions explored operational and safety of flight issues of contact lens wear. Subjects overwhelmingly approved of contact lens use in all settings: 95% expressed greater combat readiness and effectiveness with contact lenses, 98% felt contact lens use (and maintenance) in the cockpit had no adverse impact on safety of flight, and 98% endorsed the routine use of contact lenses. These data highlight Army aircrew acceptance of contact lens use.

  18. Structure of tellurium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizewski, J.A.; Henry, R.G.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The tellurium nuclei with two protons outside of the Z = 50 shell closure exhibit a complicated structure with signatures of collective vibrational, two-quasiparticle, possibly moderately deformed intruder configurations. To study further the structure of the tellurium nuclei the authors made extensive measurements of the (α,xnγ) reactions on even Sn targets, populating excitations in even- and odd-mass Te nuclei up to moderate angular momenta. By examining limits on possible intraband transitions, results suggest that a possible rotational band structure is not supported by the data, since intraband transitions are of comparable E2 strength to interband transitions. In the odd-A isotopes they concentrated on identifying the higher angular momentum negative-parity states (which probe the role of the h 11/2 neutron in the core), and the search for non-yrast negative-parity states, which are a sensitive measure of the shape of the collective excitations

  19. Vibrations in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprahamian, A.

    1992-01-01

    Quadrupole oscillations around a deformed shape give rise to vibrations in deformed nuclei. Single phonon vibrations of K = 0 (β) and K = 2 (γ) are a systematic feature in deformed nuclei, but the existence of multi-phonon vibrations had remained an open question until the recently reported results in 168 Er. In this nucleus, a two-phonon K = 4(γγ) band was observed at approximately 2.5 times the energy of the single γ vibration. The authors have studied several deformed rare-earth nuclei using the ( 4 He,2n) reaction in order to map out the systematic behavior of these multi-phonon vibrations. Recently, they have identified a similar K = 4 band in 154 Gd

  20. The total length of myocytes and capillaries, and total number of myocyte nuclei in the rat heart are time-dependently increased by growth hormone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüel, Annemarie; Oxlund, Hans; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    /kg/day) or vehicle for 5, 10, 20, 40, or 80 days. From the left ventricle (LV) histological sections were made and stereological methods applied. Linear regression showed that GH time-dependently increased: LV volume (r=0.96, P

  1. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  2. Disintegration of comet nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid V.

    2012-02-01

    The breaking up of comets into separate pieces, each with its own tail, was seen many times by astronomers of the past. The phenomenon was in sharp contrast to the idea of the eternal and unchangeable celestial firmament and was commonly believed to be an omen of impending disaster, especially for comets with tails stretching across half the sky. It is only now that we have efficient enough space exploration tools to see comet nuclei and even - in the particular case of small comet Hartley-2 in 2010 - to watch their disintegration stage. There are also other suspected candidates for disintegration in the vast family of comet nuclei and other Solar System bodies.

  3. Electromagnetic structure of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    A brief review is given of selected topics in the electromagnetic structure of nucleons and nuclei, including nucleon form factors from both quantum chromodynamics and electron scattering data, measurements of the deuteron and triton form factors, quasi-elastic scattering, and the EMC effect. 47 refs., 13 figs

  4. Mesons and light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlik, E.; Mach, R.

    1992-01-01

    62 papers and one summary talk were presented at the conference, on subject matters in between nuclear physics (mainly light nuclei) and elementary particle physics, as indicated by the session headings (1) Electroweak nuclear interaction (2) Nuclear physics with pions and antiprotons (3) Nuclear physics with strange particles (4) Relativistic nuclear physics (5) Quark degrees of freedom. (Quittner)

  5. Nucleons in nuclei (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This summary is a review of our understanding of nuclei in terms of hadrons exchanging mesons. The open problems are: the determination of the high momentum components of nuclear systems, the role of the three-body forces and the nature of the short range correlations. The ways of studying these problems are discussed

  6. Physics of Unstable Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoa, Dao Tien; Egelhof, Peter; Gales, Sydney; Giai, Nguyen Van; Motobayashi, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Studies at the RIKEN RI beam factory / T. Motobayashi -- Dilute nuclear states / M. Freer -- Studies of exotic systems using transfer reactions at GANIL / D. Beaumel et al. -- First results from the Magnex large-acceptance spectrometer / A. Cunsolo et al. -- The ICHOR project and spin-isospin physics with unstable beams / H. Sakai -- Structure and low-lying states of the [symbol]He exotic nucleus via direct reactions on proton / V. Lapoux et al. -- Shell gap below [symbol]Sn based on the excited states in [symbol]Cd and [symbol]In / M. Górska -- Heavy neutron-rich nuclei produced in the fragmentation of a [symbol]Pb beam / Zs. Podolyák et al. -- Breakup and incomplete fusion in reactions of weakly-bound nuclei / D.J. Hinde et al. -- Excited states of [symbol]B and [symbol]He and their cluster aspect / Y. Kanada-En'yo et al. -- Nuclear reactions with weakly-bound systems: the treatment of the continuum / C. H. Dasso, A. Vitturi -- Dynamic evolution of three-body decaying resonances / A. S. Jensen et al. -- Prerainbow oscillations in [symbol]He scattering from the Hoyle state of [symbol]C and alpha particle condensation / S. Ohkubo, Y. Hirabayashi -- Angular dispersion behavior in heavy ion elastic scattering / Q. Wang et al. -- Microscopic optical potential in relativistic approach / Z.Yu. Ma et al. -- Exotic nuclei studied in direct reactions at low momentum transfer - recent results and future perspectives at fair / P. Egelhof -- Isotopic temperatures and symmetry energy in spectator fragmentation / M. De Napoli et al. -- Multi-channel algebraic scattering theory and the structure of exotic compound nuclei / K. Amos et al. -- Results for the first feasibility study for the EXL project at the experimental storage ring at GSI / N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki et al. -- Coulomb excitation of ISOLDE neutron-rich beams along the Z = 28 chain / P. Van Duppen -- The gamma decay of the pygmy resonance far from stability and the GDR at finite temperature / G. Benzoni et al

  7. Alpha clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nucleon clustering in nuclei are described, with reference to both nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and the advantages of using the cluster formalism to describe a range of phenomena are discussed. It is shown that bound and scattering alpha-particle states can be described in a unified way using an energy-dependent alpha-nucleus potential. (author)

  8. Unilateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion induces serotonin increase in medial vestibular nuclei: a study using microdialysis in vivo coupled with HPLC-ECD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Qian; Xu, Jia; Liu, Junxiu; Ke, Jia; Kang, Wei; Li, Tao; Ma, Furong

    2015-06-07

    Unilateral single semicircular canal occlusion (USSCO) is an effective treatment for some cases of intractable vertigo. All patients suffer behavioural imbalance caused by surgery, and then recover with a resumption of vestibular function. However, the compensation mechanism has not been fully evaluated. Findings suggest that serotonin (5-HT) is released from nerve terminals, and plays a vital role in the plasticity of the central nervous system. In this study, we performed surgery of unilateral single semicircular canal occlusion (USSCO) on guinea pigs, and investigated the change of 5-HT by in vivo microdialysis of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). A total of 12 guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, namely the USSCO group and the control group. Animals in the USSCO group underwent surgery of lateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion, and those in the control group experienced the same operation but just to expose the horizontal semicircular canal without occlusion. Vestibular disturbance symptoms were observed in the case of the USSCO group, e.g. head tilting, and forced circular movements and spontaneous nystagmus at postoperative days 1 and 3. The basal level of 5-HT was determined to be 316.78 ± 16.62 nM. It elevated to 448.85 ± 24.56 nM at one day following occlusion (P = 0.001). The increase was completely abolished with the vestibular dysfunction recovery. The results showed that unilateral horizontal semicircular canal occlusion could increase the 5-HT level in MVN. 5-HT may play a significant role in the process of central vestibular compensation with residual vestibular function.

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... new application of artificial intelligence shows whether a patient’s eyes point to high blood pressure or risk ...

  10. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be purchased over-the-counter or on the Internet," says Thomas Steinemann, MD, professor of ophthalmology at ... ask for a prescription. There is no such thing as a "one size fits all" contact lens. ...

  11. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... had not been properly fitted by an eye care professional, the lenses stuck to my eye like ... lenses do not require the same level of care or consideration as a standard contact lens because ...

  12. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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  13. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Costume Contact Lenses Can Ruin Vision Eye Makeup Safety In fact, it is illegal to sell colored ...

  14. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with Colored Contact Lenses Julian: Teenager Blinded In One Eye By Non-Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision ... Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety ...

  15. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For ...

  16. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had "extreme pain in ... to wear any kind of contact lens. In Butler's case, the lenses caused an infection and left ...

  17. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... use of colored contact lenses , from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Are the colored lenses ...

  18. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

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    Full Text Available ... an impulsive buy from a souvenir shop, but 10 hours after she first put in a pair ... Prescription Contact Lens Laura: Vision Loss After Just 10 Hours Robyn: Blurry Vision and Daily Eye Drops ...

  19. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  20. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume Contacts May Contain Chemicals Harmful to Eyes Four Ways Over- ... without a prescription are breaking the law, and may be fined $11,000 per violation. "Many of ...

  1. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not require the same level of care or consideration as a standard contact lens because they can ... sell contacts without a prescription are breaking the law, and may be fined $11,000 per violation. " ...

  2. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ... an ophthalmologist — an eye medical doctor — who will measure each eye and talk to you about proper ...

  3. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

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  4. CONTACT LENS RELATED CORNEAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGARWAL P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are:overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection, severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss.

  5. Shape Deformations in Atomic Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamoto, Ikuko; Mottelson, Ben R.

    2011-01-01

    The ground states of some nuclei are described by densities and mean fields that are spherical, while others are deformed. The existence of non-spherical shape in nuclei represents a spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  6. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Shiels, Alan [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); FitzGerald, Paul G. [Cell Biology and Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Menon, Anil G. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mathias, Richard T. [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, NY (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  7. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  8. Adipocyte nuclei captured from VAT and SAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambati, Suresh; Yu, Ping; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K; Hartzell, Diane; Baile, Clifton A; Meagher, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    and increases the statistical significance of data collected on adipocytes. Isolated VAT and SAT adipocyte nuclei expressed distinct patterns of transcripts encoding chromatin remodeling factors and proteins relevant to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and thermogenesis. The MA-INTACT mouse is an useful model to test the impact of caloric intake, dietary nutrients, exercise, and pharmaceuticals on the epigenome-induced health risks of obesity.

  9. Pion coupling to nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumbrajs, O.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of the pion-nucleus coupling constants is discussed. Methods of their determination are reviewed. These include: forward dispersion relations, extrapolation of differential cross sections to the poles in the angular variable, analysis of data on electromagnetic form factors with the use of the PCAC and CVC hypotheses, pion photoproduction at threshold and low-energy theorems. Our present knowledge of the pion coupling to the He, Li, Be, C, N and O nuclei is summarized. (author)

  10. Chaotic behavior in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, G.; Shriner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although the predictions of Random Matrix Theory (RMT) were available by the early 1960s, data of sufficiently high quality to adequately test the theory were only obtained a decade later by Rainwater. It was another decade later that Bohigas, Haq and Pandey combined the best available nuclear resonance data - the Columbia neutron resonances in heavy nuclei and the TUNL proton resonances in lighter nuclei - to form the Nuclear Data Ensemble. They obtained excellent agreement for the level statistics with the RMT predictions. The expected Porter-Thomas (PT) distribution was considered very early. However, since the widths (amplitudes squared) are measured, the predicted Gaussian distribution for the amplitudes was only qualitatively confirmed. A much more sensitive test was performed by measuring two widths and the relative phase between the two amplitudes. By comparison of the width and amplitude correlations, the Gaussian distribution was confirmed at the 1% level. Following the Bohigas conjecture - that quantum analogs of classically chaotic systems obey RMT - there was an explosion of activity utilizing level statistics in many different quantum systems. In nuclei the focus was verifying the range of applicability of RMT. Of particular interest was the effect of collectivity and of excitation energy on statistical properties. The effect of symmetry breaking on level statistics was examined and early predictions by Dyson were confirmed. The effect of symmetry breaking on the width distribution was also measured for the first time. Although heuristic arguments predicted no change from the PT distribution, experimentally there was a large deviation from the PT prediction. Later theoretical efforts were consistent with this result. The stringent conditions placed on the experiments - for eigenvalue tests the data need to be essentially perfect (few or no missing levels or mis assigned quantum numbers) - has limited the amount of suitable experimental data. The

  11. Stability and production of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Nix, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Beyond uranium heavy elements rapidly become increasingly unstable with respect to spontaneous fission as the proton number Z increases, because of the disruptive effect of the long-range Coulomb force. However, in the region just beyond Z = 100 magic proton and neutron numbers and the associated shell structure enhances nuclear stability sufficient to allow observation of additional nuclei. Some thirty years ago it was speculated that an island of spherical, relatively stable superheavy nuclei would exist near the next doubly magic proton-neutron combination beyond 208 Pb, that is, at proton number Z 114 and neutron number N = 184. Theory and experiment now show that there also exists a rock of stability in the vicinity of Z = 110 and N = 162 between the actinide region, which previously was the end of the peninsula of known elements, and the predicted island of spherical superheavy nuclei slightly southwest of the magic numbers Z = 114 and N = 184. The authors review here the stability properties of the heavy region of nuclei. Just as the decay properties of nuclei in the heavy region depend strongly on shell structure, this structure also dramatically affects the fusion entrance channel. The six most recently discovered new elements were all formed in cold-fusion reactions. They discuss here the effect of the doubly magic structure of the target in cold-fusion reactions on the fusion barrier and on dissipation

  12. Hyperdeformed nuclei and the residual pseudo-SU(3) symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, J.; Werner, T.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses superdeformed and hypothetical hyperdeformed nuclei. Quadrupole deformations characteristic of these types of nuclei are defined. Symmetry features are also discussed. The characteristic cycle dependence of shell structures as functions of the deformation gives rise to chains of the deformed shell closures. Such a chain structure applies to moderately-, super- and hyper-deformed nuclei as well. The resulting total energy calculations give a systematic variation of super- and hyperdeformations with, e.g., increasing N at fixed Z, thus predicting the way nuclei deviate from the simple a:b = 2:1 and a:b = 3:1 symmetries

  13. Further studies of contact lens motion during blinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, H D; Knoll, H A

    1986-10-01

    Contact lens motion is felt to be of increasing importance in connection with debris elimination, particularly in extended wear lenses. Thus an improved analysis is made of a simple model for investigating the initial motion of a hard contact lens over the eye during blinking. It is shown that the assumption of constant tear film thickness is a reasonable one. This greatly simplifies the analysis. Various vertical force vs. time variations are considered and lens velocity/time graphs and maximum lens displacement calculated. These are in good agreement with the results of experiment.

  14. Training nuclei detection algorithms with simple annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Kost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generating good training datasets is essential for machine learning-based nuclei detection methods. However, creating exhaustive nuclei contour annotations, to derive optimal training data from, is often infeasible. Methods: We compared different approaches for training nuclei detection methods solely based on nucleus center markers. Such markers contain less accurate information, especially with regard to nuclear boundaries, but can be produced much easier and in greater quantities. The approaches use different automated sample extraction methods to derive image positions and class labels from nucleus center markers. In addition, the approaches use different automated sample selection methods to improve the detection quality of the classification algorithm and reduce the run time of the training process. We evaluated the approaches based on a previously published generic nuclei detection algorithm and a set of Ki-67-stained breast cancer images. Results: A Voronoi tessellation-based sample extraction method produced the best performing training sets. However, subsampling of the extracted training samples was crucial. Even simple class balancing improved the detection quality considerably. The incorporation of active learning led to a further increase in detection quality. Conclusions: With appropriate sample extraction and selection methods, nuclei detection algorithms trained on the basis of simple center marker annotations can produce comparable quality to algorithms trained on conventionally created training sets.

  15. A catoptric lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambauske, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a catoptric lens for combining energies transmitted by several sources such as lasers; said lens comprising mirrors, the reflective surfaces of which have their focuses spaced from a common axis of symmetry. By means of these reflecting surfaces, which are generated by the nutation of portions of quadratic conics about the axis of symmetry, it is possible to focus the energy emmited by several lasers at the focus of the exit-mirror reflecting surface. This can be applied to thermonuclear fusion [fr

  16. Universality and Halo Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomio L.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Universal aspects of few-body systems will be reviewed motivated by recent interest in atomic and nuclear physics. The critical conditions for the existence of excited states in three-body systems with two-identical particles will be explored. In particular, we consider halo nuclei that can be modeled as three-body nuclear systems, with two halo neutrons and a core. In this context, we also discuss the low-energy neutron−19C elastic scattering, near the conditions for the app earance of an Efimov state.

  17. Anomalous carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from a bubble chamber experiment to search for anomalous mean free path (MFP) phenomena for secondary multicharged fragments (Zsub(f)=5 and 6) of the beam carbon nucleus at 4.2 GeV/c per nucleon. A total of 50000 primary interactions of carbon with propane (C 3 H 8 ) were created. Approximately 6000 beam tragments with charges Zsub(f)=5 and 6 were analyzed in detail to find out an anomalous decrease of MFP. The anomaly is observed only for secondary 12 C nuclei

  18. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on the interaction of high energy Λ 6 He hypernuclear beams with atomic nuclei, the position-sensitive detector of a high spatial resolution on the basis of a multiwire gas electron multiplier, pseudorapidity hadron density at the LHC energy, high precision laser control of the ATLAS tile-calorimeter module mass production at JINR, a new approach to ECG's features recognition involving neural network, subcriticity of a uranium target enriched in 235 U, beam space charge effects in high-current cyclotron injector CI-5, a homogeneous static gravitational field and the principle of equivalence

  19. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Blandford, RD; Woltjer, L

    1990-01-01

    Starting with this volume, the Lecture Notes of the renowned Advanced Courses of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy will be published annually. In each course, three extensive lectures given by leading experts in their respective fields cover different and essential aspects of the subject. The 20th course, held at Les Diablerets in April 1990, dealt with current research on active galactic nuclei; it represents the most up-to-date views on the subject, presented with particular regard for clarity. The previous courses considered a wide variety of subjects, beginning with ""Theory

  20. Active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Volker

    2012-01-01

    This AGN textbook includes phenomena based on new results in the X-Ray domain from new telescopes such as Chandra and XMM Newton not mentioned in any other book. Furthermore, it considers also the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope with its revolutionary advances of unprecedented sensitivity, field of view and all-sky monitoring. Those and other new developments as well as simulations of AGN merging events and formations, enabled through latest super-computing capabilities. The book gives an overview on the current knowledge of the Active Galacitc Nuclei phenomenon. The spectral energy d

  1. Novel fabrication technique of hybrid structure lens array for 3D images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junsik; Kim, Junoh; Kim, Cheoljoong; Shin, Dooseub; Koo, Gyohyun; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    Tunable liquid lens arrays can produce three dimensional images by using electrowetting principle that alters surface tensions by applying voltage. This method has advantages of fast response time and low power consumption. However, it is challenging to fabricate a high fill factor liquid lens array and operate three dimensional images which demand high diopter. This study describes a hybrid structure lens array which has not only a liquid lens array but a solid lens array. A concave-shape lens array is unavoidable when using only the liquid lens array and some voltages are needed to make the lens flat. By placing the solid lens array on the liquid lens array, initial diopter can be positive. To fabricate the hybrid structure lens array, a conventional lithographic process in semiconductor manufacturing is needed. A negative photoresist SU-8 was used as chamber master molds. PDMS and UV adhesive replica molding are done sequentially. Two immiscible liquids, DI water and dodecane, are injected in the fabricated chamber, followed by sealing. The fabricated structure has a 20 by 20 pattern of cylindrical shaped circle array and the aperture size of each lens is 1mm. The thickness of the overall hybrid structure is about 2.8mm. Hybrid structure lens array has many advantages. Solid lens array has almost 100% fill factor and allow high efficiency. Diopter can be increased by more than 200 and negative diopter can be shifted to the positive region. This experiment showed several properties of the hybrid structure and demonstrated its superiority.

  2. Minimum Lens Size Supporting the Leaky-Wave Nature of Slit Dipole Antenna at Terahertz Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamat Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed a slit dipole antenna backed by an extended hemispherical silicon lens and investigated the minimum lens size in which the slit dipole antenna works as a leaky-wave antenna. The slit dipole antenna consists of a planar feeding structure, which is a center-fed and open-ended slot line. A slit dipole antenna backed by an extended hemispherical silicon lens is investigated over a frequency range from 0.2 to 0.4 THz with the center frequency at 0.3 THz. The numerical results show that the antenna gain responses exhibited an increased level of sensitivity to the lens size and increased linearly with increasing lens radius. The lens with the radius of 1.2λo is found to be the best possible minimum lens size for a slit dipole antenna on an extended hemispherical silicon lens.

  3. Stability of superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorski, K.; Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Bartel, J.; Schmitt, C.

    2018-03-01

    The potential-energy surfaces of an extended set of heavy and superheavy even-even nuclei with 92 ≤Z ≤126 and isospins 40 ≤N -Z ≤74 are evaluated within the recently developed Fourier shape parametrization. Ground-state and decay properties are studied for 324 different even-even isotopes in a four-dimensional deformation space, defined by nonaxiality, quadrupole, octupole, and hexadecapole degrees of freedom. Nuclear deformation energies are evaluated in the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic approach, with the Lublin-Strasbourg drop model and a Yukawa-folded mean-field potential. The evolution of the ground-state equilibrium shape (and possible isomeric, metastable states) is studied as a function of Z and N . α -decay Q values and half-lives, as well as fission-barrier heights, are deduced. In order to understand the transition from asymmetric to symmetric fission along the Fm isotopic chain, the properties of all identified fission paths are investigated. Good agreement is found with experimental data wherever available. New interesting features about the population of different fission modes for nuclei beyond Fm are predicted.

  4. Quadrupole magnetic lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskunov, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The following connection of windings of electromagnet is suggested for simplification of the design of qUadrupole magnetic lens intended for use in radiotechnical and electron-optical devices. The mentioned windings are connected with each other by a bridge scheme and the variable resistors are switched in its diagonals in the lens containing four electromagnet with windings connected with two variable resistors the mobile contacts of which are connected with a direct current source. Current redistribution between left windings and right windings takes place at shift of mobile contact of variable resistor, and current redistribution between upper and low coils of electromagnets takes place at shifting mobile contact of the other variable resistor. In this case smooth and independent electron-optical misalignment of lens by two mutually perpendicular directions proceeds. Use of the given design of the lens in the oscillograph permits to use printing assembly for alignment plate and to reduce the number of connections at the expense of decreasing the number of resistors

  5. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription. There is no such thing as a "one size fits all" contact lens. Lenses that are not properly fitted may scratch the eye or cause blood vessels to grow into the cornea. Even if you have perfect vision, you need to get an eye exam and a prescription ...

  6. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses ... One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter Costume ...

  7. MISSING: BUBBLE CHAMBER LENS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Would the person who borrowed the large bubble chamber lens from the Microcosm workshops on the ISR please return it. This is a much used piece from our object archives. If anybody has any information about the whereabouts of this object, please contact Emma.Sanders@cern.ch Thank you

  8. The Lens of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wear any kind of contact lens. In Butler's case, the lenses caused an infection and left her with a corneal ... A recent article from U.S. News and World Report explains what ophthalmologists are and how they can ...

  10. bubble chamber lens

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in a PS experiment. Before the days of electronic detectors, visual techniques were used to detect particles, using detectors such as spark chambers and bubble chambers. This plexiglass lens was used to focus the image of tracks so they could be photographed.

  11. Thermal Lens Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  12. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / News Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact ... After One Use Facts About Colored Contacts and Halloween Safety Colored Contact Lens Facts Over-the-Counter ...

  13. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  14. Clinical survey of lens care in contact lens patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ky, W; Scherick, K; Stenson, S

    1998-10-01

    Overall, contact lenses provide a safe and effective modality for vision correction. However, problems do occasionally arise. Up to 80% of contact lens complications can be traced to poor patient compliance with recommended lens care guidelines. We conducted a survey to evaluate the level of patient compliance in specific areas of lens care and maintenance and to assess patient knowledge of basic contact lens information. Patients were asked to complete an anonymous 15 question survey that focused on lens care--specifically the use of contact lens cleaners, methods of disinfection, enzyme treatments, use of rewetting drops, and the frequency of follow-up exams. In addition, the survey included six true/false questions relating to contact lens care and safety. There were a total of 103 participants in the study. Approximately 24% of patients stated they never cleaned their lenses prior to disinfection, and 5% used saline solutions as their primary mode of disinfection. A sizable portion of those surveyed (43% of soft lens wearers and 71% of rigid gas permeable lens wearers) either never used enzyme cleaners or used them less than once a month. Seventy percent of patients either never used rewetting drops or used them less than once a day. Twenty-nine percent of patients consulted their eye care professionals every 2 years and 6% less often than every two years. Six questions assessed patient knowledge of contact lens care safety. Of a possible six out of six correct answers, the mean number of correct responses was 3.74. A sizable proportion of contact lens wearers do not adequately adhere to recommended contact lens care, and many have an inadequate understanding of contact lens care guidelines. Therefore, it is important that practitioners place more emphasis on patient education at the time of initial contact lens fitting and reinforce such instruction during follow-up visits.

  15. Particle-rotation coupling in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recently an increased interest in the rotational nuclei has been spurred by the new experimental high-spin activities and by the possibilities for lower spins to interpret an impressive amount of experimental data by some comparatively simple model calculations. The author discusses the particle modes of excitation for rotational nuclei in the pairing regime where some puzzles in the theoretical description remain to be resolved. A model comparison is made between the particle-rotor and cranking models which have different definitions of the collective rotation. The cranking model is found to imply a smaller value of the quasiparticle spin alignment than the particle-rotor model. Rotational spectra for both even and odd nuclei are investigated with the use of the many-BCS-quasiparticles plus rotor model. This model gives an accurate description of the ground and S-bands in many even-even rare-earth nuclei. However, the discrepancies for odd-A nuclei between theory and experiments point to the importance of additional physical components. Therefore the rotationally induced quadrupole pair field is considered. This field has an effect on the low spin states in odd-A nuclei, but is not sufficient to account for the experimental data. Another topic considered is the interaction matrix element in crossings for given spin between quasiparticle rotational bands. The matrix elements are found to oscillate as a function of the number of particles, thereby influencing the sharpness of the backbending. Finally the low-spin continuation of the S-band is studied and it is shown that such states can be populated selectively by means of one-particle pickup reactions involving high angular momentum transfer. (Auth.)

  16. Intrinsic lens potential of neural retina inhibited by Notch signaling as the cause of lens transdifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hideaki; Ishii, Yasuo; Kondoh, Hisato

    2017-01-15

    Embryonic neural retinas of avians produce lenses under spreading culture conditions. This phenomenon has been regarded as a paradigm of transdifferentiation due to the overt change in cell type. Here we elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Retina-to-lens transdifferentiation occurs in spreading cultures, suggesting that it is triggered by altered cell-cell interactions. Thus, we tested the involvement of Notch signaling based on its role in retinal neurogenesis. Starting from E8 retina, a small number of crystallin-expressing lens cells began to develop after 20 days in control spreading cultures. By contrast, addition of Notch signal inhibitors to cultures after day 2 strongly promoted lens development beginning at day 11, and a 10-fold increase in δ-crystallin expression level. After Notch signal inhibition, transcription factor genes that regulate the early stage of eye development, Prox1 and Pitx3, were sequentially activated. These observations indicate that the lens differentiation potential is intrinsic to the neural retina, and this potential is repressed by Notch signaling during normal embryogenesis. Therefore, Notch suppression leads to lens transdifferentiation by disinhibiting the neural retina-intrinsic program of lens development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Y Choi

    Full Text Available Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30 showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3 were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5 in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs

  18. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Janet J Y; Ting, Chao-Tung; Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to defects

  19. Neutrino interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    We examine tests of the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam (GWS) Standard Theory of Electroweak Interactions. The tests are model-independent in the sense that they are relations between experimental quantities that are direct consequences of the GWS theory, but they are independent of the detailed structure of the nucleus. Such relationships were anticipated by Weinberg. Neutrino reactions with nuclei are considered, focusing largely on charged-lepton production, and it is demonstrated that intermediate-energy neutrino reactions have a central and unique role to play in our understanding of semileptonic weak interactions. This point is illustrated by discussing a complete kinematic experiment on the nucleon. A discussion of what neutrino reactions could teach us about nuclear structure is also given

  20. Electron scattering off nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gattone, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    Two recently developed aspects related to the scattering of electrons off nuclei are presented. On the one hand, a model is introduced which emphasizes the relativistic aspects of the problem in the impulse approximation, by demanding strict maintenance of the algebra of the Poincare group. On the other hand, the second model aims at a more sophisticated description of the nuclear response in the case of collective excitations. Basically, it utilizes the RPA formalism with a new development which enables a more careful treatment of the states in the continuum as is the case for the giant resonances. Applications of both models to the description of elastic scattering, inelastic scattering to discrete levels, giant resonances and the quasi-elastic region are discussed. (Author) [es

  1. Particles and nuclei, letters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present collection of letters from JINR, Dubna, contains eight separate records on liquid argon pollution tests of the ATLAS detector materials at IBR-2 reactor in Dubna, irradiation tests of readout chain components of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters, study of neutron induced outgassing from tungsten alloy for ATLAS FCAL, yields of nuclear reaction products from a thick beryllium target bombarded by beams of 7 Li, 11 B and 15 N ions as well as on the mass surface and the properties of nuclides close to hypothetic doubly magic lead-164, the Web-site of information-diagnostic system of IBR-2 pulsed neutron source state, discovery of η-mesic nuclei and calculation of the ion angular distributions after the ionization in ion-atom collisions

  2. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  3. Pion production in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afnan, I.R.; Thomas, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been suggested for relating μ-capture in nuclei to pion absorption through partially conserved axial vector current hypothesis. The success of the method relies heavily on the knowledge of the pion absorption amplitude at a momentum transfer equal to the μ-meson mass. That is we need to know the pion absorption amplitude off the mass-shell. The simplest nucleus for which this suggestion can be examined is μ-capture in deuterium. The Koltum-Reitan model is used to determine the pion absorption amplitude off the mass shell. In particular the senstivity of this off-mass-shell extrapolution to details of the N-N interaction is studied. (author)

  4. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors)

  6. International survey of contact lens prescribing for extended wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B; Woods, Craig A

    2012-02-01

    To determine the extent of extended wear (EW) contact lens prescribing worldwide and to characterize the associated demographics and fitting patterns. Up to 1000 survey forms were sent to contact lens fitters in up to 39 countries between January and March every year for five consecutive years (2006-2010). Practitioners were asked to record data relating to the first 10 contact lens fits or refits performed after receiving the survey form. Survey data collected since 1997 was also analyzed to assess EW fitting trends since that time. Details for lens modality were received for 107,094 rigid and soft lens fits of which 88,392 were for soft lens daily wear (DW) and 7470 were for soft lens EW. Overall, EW represents 7.8% of all soft lens fits, ranging from 0.6% in Malaysia to 27% Norway. Compared with DW fittings, EW fittings can be characterized as follows: older age (32.7 ± 13.6 vs. 29.4 ± 12.0 years for DW); males are over-represented; greater proportion of refits; 72% silicone hydrogel; higher proportion of presbyopia and spherical designs; and higher proportion of monthly lens replacement. Of those wearing EW lenses, 80% use multipurpose solutions, whereas 9% do not use any care system. Between 1997 and 1999, the rate of EW prescribing decreased from 5 to 1% of all soft lens fits; it increased to a peak of 12% in 2006, and settled back to 8% by 2010. EW prescribing has failed to break through the "glass ceiling" of 15% and is unlikely to become a mainstream lens wearing modality until the already low risks of ocular complications can be reduced to be equivalent to that for DW.

  7. Quarks in Few Body Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Roy J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron scattering at very high Bjorken x from hadrons provides an excellent test of models, has an important role in high energy physics, and from nuclei, provides a window into short range correlations. Light nuclei have a key role because of the relatively well-known nuclear structure. The development of a novel tritium target for Jefferson Lab has led to renewed interest in the mass three system. For example, deep inelastic scattering experiments in the light nuclei provide a powerful means to determine the neutron structure function. The isospin dependence of electron scattering from mass-3 nuclei provide information on short range correlations in nuclei. The program using the new tritium target will be presented along with a summary of other experiments aimed at revealing the large-x structure of the nucleon.

  8. Effect of infrared radiation on the lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Eman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infrared (IR radiation is becoming more popular in industrial manufacturing processes and in many instruments used for diagnostic and therapeutic application to the human eye. Aim : The present study was designed to investigate the effect of IR radiation on rabbit′s crystalline lens and lens membrane. Materials and Methods: Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were used in the present work. The rabbits were classified into three groups; one of them served as control. The other two groups were exposed to IR radiation for 5 or 10 minutes. Animals from these two irradiated groups were subdivided into two subgroups; one of them was decapitated directly after IR exposure, while the other subgroup was decapitated 1 hour post exposure. IR was delivered from a General Electric Lamp model 250R 50/10, placed 20 cm from the rabbit and aimed at each eye. The activity of Na + -K + ATPase was measured in the lens membrane. Soluble lens proteins were extracted and the following measurements were carried out: estimation of total soluble protein, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. For comparison between multiple groups, analysis of variance was used with significance level set at P < 0.001. Results: The results indicated a change in the molecular weight of different lens crystalline accompanied with changes in protein backbone structure. These changes increased for the groups exposed to IR for 10 minutes. Moreover, the activity of Na + -K + ATPase significantly decreased for all groups. Conclusions: The protein of eye lens is very sensitive to IR radiation which is hazardous and may lead to cataract.

  9. The cochlear nuclei of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M R

    1980-08-15

    The cochlear nuclei of three burrowing snakes (Xenopeltis unicolor, Cylindrophis rufus, and Eryx johni) and three non-burrowing snakes (Epicrates cenchris, Natrix sipedon, and Pituophis catenifer) were studied. The posterior branch of the statoacoustic nerve and its posterior ganglion were destroyed and the degenerated nerve fibers and terminals traced to primary cochlear nuclei in 13 specimens of Pituophis catenifer. All these snake species possess three primary and one secondary cochlear nuclei. The primary cochlear nuclei consist of a small nucleus angularis located at the cerebello-medullary junction and a fairly large nucleus magnocellularis forming a dorsal cap over the cephalic end of the alar eminence. Nucleus magnocellularis may be subdivided into a medially placed group of rounder cells, nucleus magnocellularis medialis, and a laterally placed group of more ovate and paler-staining cells, nucleus magnocellularis lateralis. A small but well-defined secondary nucleus which showed no degenerated nerve terminals after nerve root section, nucleus laminaris, underlies the cephalic part of both nucleus magnocellularis medialis and nucleus magnocellularis lateralis. Larger and better-developed cochlear nuclei were found in burrowing species than in non-burrowing species of snakes. Of the three burrowing species studied, Xenopeltis showed the greatest development of cochlear nuclei; Eryx cochlear nuclei were not quite as large but were better differentiated than in Xenopeltis; and Cylindrophis cochlear nuclei were fairly large but not as well developed nor as well differentiated as in either Xenopeltis or Eryx. The cochlear nuclei of the three non-burrowing snakes, Epicrates, Natrix, and Pituophis, were not as large nor as well developed as those of the burrowing snakes. There is some, but not complete, correlation between cochlear development and papilla basilaris length and number of hair cells. Thus, Xenopeltis and Eryx, with well-developed cochlear nuclei

  10. An image processing pipeline to detect and segment nuclei in muscle fiber microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanen; Xu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yaming; Xia, Shunren; Yang, Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Muscle fiber images play an important role in the medical diagnosis and treatment of many muscular diseases. The number of nuclei in skeletal muscle fiber images is a key bio-marker of the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. In nuclei segmentation one primary challenge is to correctly separate the clustered nuclei. In this article, we developed an image processing pipeline to automatically detect, segment, and analyze nuclei in microscopic image of muscle fibers. The pipeline consists of image pre-processing, identification of isolated nuclei, identification and segmentation of clustered nuclei, and quantitative analysis. Nuclei are initially extracted from background by using local Otsu's threshold. Based on analysis of morphological features of the isolated nuclei, including their areas, compactness, and major axis lengths, a Bayesian network is trained and applied to identify isolated nuclei from clustered nuclei and artifacts in all the images. Then a two-step refined watershed algorithm is applied to segment clustered nuclei. After segmentation, the nuclei can be quantified for statistical analysis. Comparing the segmented results with those of manual analysis and an existing technique, we find that our proposed image processing pipeline achieves good performance with high accuracy and precision. The presented image processing pipeline can therefore help biologists increase their throughput and objectivity in analyzing large numbers of nuclei in muscle fiber images. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Microbial contamination of soft contact lenses & accessories in asymptomatic contact lens users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Deeksha V; Gaikwad, Ujjwala N

    2014-08-01

    With increasing use of soft contact lenses the incidence of contact lens induced infections is also increasing. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge of new and existing contact lens users about the risk of microbial contamination associated with improper use and maintenance of contact lenses, type of microbial flora involved and their potential to cause ophthalmic infections. Four samples each from 50 participants (n=200) were collected from the lenses, lens care solutions, lens care solution bottles and lens cases along with a questionnaire regarding their lens use. The samples were inoculated onto sheep blood agar, Mac Conkey's agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar. Organisms were identified using standard laboratory protocols. Overall rate of microbial contamination among the total samples was 52 per cent. The most and the least contaminated samples were found to be lens cases (62%) and lens care solution (42%), respectively. The most frequently isolated contaminant was Staphylococcus aureus (21%) followed by Pseudomonas species (19.5%). Majority (64%) of the participants showed medium grade of compliance to lens cleaning practices. Rate of contamination was 100 and 93.75 per cent respectively in those participants who showed low and medium compliance to lens care practices as compared to those who had high level of compliance (43.75%) (PLens care practices amongst the participants were not optimum which resulted into high level contamination. Hence, creating awareness among the users about the lens care practices and regular cleaning and replacements of lens cases are required.

  12. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  13. Photon interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a progress report for DOE Grant No. FG05-89ER40501, A000. The grant began March, 1989. Our primary research effort has been expended at the LEGS project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report will summarize our present research effort at LEGS as well as data analysis and publications from previous experiments performed at SLAC. In addition the principal investigators are heavily involved in the CLAS collaboration in Hall B at CEBAF. We have submitted several letters of intent and proposals and have made commitments to construct experimental equipment for CEBAF. We expect our primary experimental effort to continue at LEGS until CEBAF becomes operational. This report will be divided into separate sections describing our progress at LEGS, SLAC, and CEBAF. We will also discuss our significant efforts in the education and training of both undergraduate and graduate students. Photon detectors are described as well as experiments on delta deformation in nuclei of quasielastic scattering and excitation of the delta by 4 He(e,e')

  14. Supersymmetry in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Jolie, J

    2002-01-01

    All the elementary particles that make up matter (as do quarks, electrons, neutrinos....) are fermions, the particles that convey the fundamental interactions (as do photons, gluons, W, Z...) are bosons. Composite particles are either bosons, or fermions according to the number of fermions they contain: if this number is even the particle is a boson, otherwise it is a fermion. According to this rule a proton is a fermion and the He sup 4 atom is a boson. Symmetry plays an important role in the standard model, a symmetry is a transformation that connect bosons with other bosons or fermions with other fermions. Supersymmetry associates a boson with a fermion or a fermion with a boson, in fact supersymmetry connects nuclei that are not generally considered as akin. Supersymmetry has just been observed in low energy levels of Gold sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 sup - sup 1 sup 9 sup 6 and Platinum sup 1 sup 9 sup 4 - sup 1 sup 9 sup 5 , it means that the description of these energy levels is simplified and can be made by a co...

  15. Collective excitations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author)

  16. Gluon density in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  17. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, T.

    2013-01-01

    An electron scattering facility is under construction in RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan, which is dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. This is the world's first and currently only facility of its type. The construction is nearly completed, and the first electron scattering experiment off short-lived nuclei will be carried out in the beginning of next year. The charge density distributions of short-lived nuclei will be precisely determined by elastic electron scattering for the first time. Physics pursued at this facility including future perspectives are explained

  18. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs.

  19. The delta in nuclei. Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy-Stephan, M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental aspects of the Δ excitation will be presented. The Δ excitation in nuclei will be compared to the free Δ excitation. Various probes will be reviewed and their specific features will be underlined [fr

  20. Nuclei Isolation from Nematode Ascaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Preparing nuclei is necessary in a variety of experimental paradigms to study nuclear processes. In this protocol, we describe a method for rapid preparation of large number of relatively pure nuclei from Ascaris embryos or tissues that are ready to be used for further experiments such as chromatin isolation and ChIP-seq, nuclear RNA analyses, or preparation of nuclear extracts (Kang et al., 2016; Wang et al., 2016). PMID:29082294

  1. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  2. Compliance among soft contact lens wearers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzman, Tomislav; Barišić Kutija, Marija; Masnec, Sanja; Jandroković, Sonja; Mrazovac, Danijela; Jurišić, Darija; Škegro, Ivan; Kalauz, Miro; Kordić, Rajko

    2014-01-01

    Contact lens compliance is proven to be crucial for preventing lens wear-related complications because of the interdependence of the steps in lens care regime and their influence on lens system microbial contamination. Awareness of the patients' lens handling compliance as well as correct recognition of non-compliant behaviours is the basis for creating more targeted strategies for patient education. The aim of this study was to investigate compliance among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in ...

  3. Panoramic lens applications revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Simon

    2008-04-01

    During the last few years, innovative optical design strategies to generate and control image mapping have been successful in producing high-resolution digital imagers and projectors. This new generation of panoramic lenses includes catadioptric panoramic lenses, panoramic annular lenses, visible/IR fisheye lenses, anamorphic wide-angle attachments, and visible/IR panomorph lenses. Given that a wide-angle lens images a large field of view on a limited number of pixels, a systematic pixel-to-angle mapping will help the efficient use of each pixel in the field of view. In this paper, we present several modern applications of these modern types of hemispheric lenses. Recently, surveillance and security applications have been proposed and published in Security and Defence symposium. However, modern hemispheric lens can be used in many other fields. A panoramic imaging sensor contributes most to the perception of the world. Panoramic lenses are now ready to be deployed in many optical solutions. Covered applications include, but are not limited to medical imaging (endoscope, rigiscope, fiberscope...), remote sensing (pipe inspection, crime scene investigation, archeology...), multimedia (hemispheric projector, panoramic image...). Modern panoramic technologies allow simple and efficient digital image processing and the use of standard image analysis features (motion estimation, segmentation, object tracking, pattern recognition) in the complete 360° hemispheric area.

  4. TU-E-201-03: Eye Lens Dosimetry in Radiotherapy Using Contact Lens-Shaped Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. [Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  5. TU-E-201-01: Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehani, M. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  6. Superheavy nuclei from 48Ca-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Utyonkov, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery and investigation of the new region of superheavy nuclei at the DGFRS separator based on fusion reactions of 48Ca with 238U-249Cf target nuclei are reviewed. The production cross sections and summaries of the decay properties, including the results of the posterior experiments performed at the SHIP, BGS, and TASCA separators, as well as at the chemistry setups, are discussed and compared with the theoretical calculations and the systematic trends in the α-decay and spontaneous fission properties. The properties of the new nuclei, isotopes of elements 112-118, and their decay products demonstrate significant increases in the stability of the heaviest nuclei with increasing neutron number and closer approach to magic number N = 184.

  7. c-Myc regulates cell proliferation during lens development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available Myc protooncogenes play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, growth, differentiation and survival during development. In various developing organs, c-myc has been shown to control the expression of cell cycle regulators and its misregulated expression is detected in many human tumors. Here, we show that c-myc gene (Myc is highly expressed in developing mouse lens. Targeted deletion of c-myc gene from head surface ectoderm dramatically impaired ocular organogenesis, resulting in severe microphtalmia, defective anterior segment development, formation of a lens stalk and/or aphakia. In particular, lenses lacking c-myc presented thinner epithelial cell layer and growth impairment that was detectable soon after its inactivation. Defective development of c-myc-null lens was not caused by increased cell death of lens progenitor cells. Instead, c-myc loss reduced cell proliferation, what was associated with an ectopic expression of Prox1 and p27(Kip1 proteins within epithelial cells. Interestingly, a sharp decrease in the expression of the forkhead box transcription factor Foxe3 was also observed following c-myc inactivation. These data represent the first description of the physiological roles played by a Myc family member in mouse lens development. Our findings support the conclusion that c-myc regulates the proliferation of lens epithelial cells in vivo and may, directly or indirectly, modulate the expression of classical cell cycle regulators in developing mouse lens.

  8. Hyperelastic modelling of the crystalline lens: Accommodation and presbyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanchares, Elena; Navarro, Rafael; Calvo, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The modification of the mechanical properties of the human crystalline lens with age can be a major cause of presbyopia. Since these properties cannot be measured in vivo, numerical simulation can be used to estimate them. We propose an inverse method to determine age-dependent change in the material properties of the tissues composing the human crystalline lens. Methods A finite element model of a 30-year-old lens in the accommodated state was developed. The force necessary to achieve full accommodation in a 30-year-old lens of known external geometry was computed using this model. Two additional numerical models of the lens corresponding to the ages of 40 and 50 years were then built. Assuming that the accommodative force applied to the lens remains constant with age, the material properties of nucleus and cortex were estimated by inverse analysis. Results The zonular force necessary to reshape the model of a 30-year-old lens from the accommodated to the unaccommodated geometry was 0.078 newton (N). Both nucleus and cortex became stiffer with age. The stiffness of the nucleus increased with age at a higher rate than the cortex. Conclusions In agreement with the classical theory of Helmholtz, on which we based our model, our results indicate that a major cause of presbyopia is that both nucleus and cortex become stiffer with age; therefore, a constant value of the zonular forces with aging does not achieve full accommodation, that is, the accommodation capability decreases.

  9. From heavy nuclei to super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of super-heavy nuclei has been predicted nearly fifty years ago. Due to the strong coulomb repulsion, the stabilisation of these nuclei is possible only through shell effects. The reasons for this fragile stability, as well as the theoretical predictions concerning the position of the island of stability are presented in the first part of this lecture. In the second part, experiments and experimental techniques which have been used to synthesize or search for super-heavy elements are described. Spectroscopic studies performed in very heavy elements are presented in the following section. We close this lecture with techniques that are currently being developed in order to reach the superheavy island and to study the structure of very-heavy nuclei. (author)

  10. Lens ion transport: from basic concepts to regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamere, Nicholas A.; Tamiya, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1960s, studies by George Duncan explained many of the basic principles that underlie lens ion homeostasis. The experiments pointed to a permeability barrier close to the surface of the lens and illustrated the requirement for continuous Na,K-ATPase-mediated active sodium extrusion. Without active sodium extrusion, lens sodium and calcium content increases resulting in lens swelling and deterioration of transparency. Later, Duncan's laboratory discovered functional muscarinic and purinergic receptors at the surface of the lens. Recent studies using intact lens suggest purinergic receptors might be involved in short-term regulation of Na,K-ATPase in the epithelium. Purinergic receptor agonists ATP and UTP selectively activate certain Src family tyrosine kinases and stimulate Na,K-ATPase activity. This might represent part of a control mechanism capable of adjusting, perhaps fine tuning, lens ion transport machinery. PMID:18614168

  11. Lentil (Lens culinaris) Lipid Transfer Protein Len c 3: A Novel Legume Allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, J.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Santos Magadán, S.; Knulst, A.; Fernandez-Rivas, M.; Asero, R.; van Ree, R.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lentils are increasingly consumed in many parts of the world. Two allergens, Len c 1 and 2, have been reported previously. Recently, peanut and green bean lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been identified as the first two members of an important group of allergens that might be

  12. Nuclei in a neutron star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, K.; Yamada, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in understanding the matter in the crust of a neutron star. For nuclides in the outer crust, recently measured masses of neutron-rich nuclei enable us to determine more accurately the stable nuclide as a function of the matter density. In the inner crust, the compressible liquid-drop model predicts successive change of the nuclear shape, from sphere to cylinder, slab, cylindrical hole and spherical hole at densities just before the transition to uniform matter. In order to go beyond the liquiddrop model, we performed the Thomas-Fermi calculation paying special attention to the surface diffuseness, and have recently calculated the shell energies of the non-spherical nuclei. We have found from these studies that all these non-spherical nuclei exist stably in the above order even if we include the surface diffuseness and shell energies. (author)

  13. Spinodal decomposition of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1996-01-01

    Multifragmentation of atomic nuclei is discussed. It is shown that this description of the dynamics of first order phase transitions in infinite and finite system is now partially achieved. An important conclusion is that in some specific cases well-defined collective motions were initiating the self-organisation of the unstable matter in fragments. In the case of finite systems the possible signals kept from this early fragmentation stage can inform on the possible occurrence of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei. (K.A.)

  14. Contact Lens Wear at Altitude: Subcontact Lens Bubble Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    incidence of (PMMA) lenses . Reported here are the results of contact lens subcontact lens bubble formation under scleral lenses at bubble studies with soft...vision from formation of large bubbles greater than 6,096 m (20,000 It). With soft contact lenses , bubble under their contact lenses . They also found...always located at the limbus and were without sequela to vision or corneal epithelial integrity. scleral lenses used by Jaeckle were permeable to gases

  15. Straylight Measurements in Contact Lens Wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Engelbrecht, Leonore A.; van Vliet, Johannes M. J.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To quantify the effect of contact lens wear on straylight in rigid and soft contact lens wearers and (2) to relate findings to morphological changes and subjective complaints. Methods: Straylight was measured using the Oculus C-Quant during contact lens wear and after contact lens

  16. Giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    Giant resonances built on an excited state of the nucleus at a finite temperature T are studied. The following questions are investigated: how long such collective effects occur in a nucleus when T increases. How the properties of the giant resonances vary when the temperature increases. How the study of giant resonances in hot nuclei can give information on the structure of the nucleus in a highly excited state. The special case of the giant dipole resonance is studied. Some of the experimental results are reviewed and in their theoretical interpretation is discussed. (K.A.). 56 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, B.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 x 10 10 , tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders

  18. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, B. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Chen, P. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  19. Intraocular Pressure After 2 Hours of Small-Diameter Scleral Lens Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Cherie B; Schornack, Muriel M; McLaren, Jay W; Sit, Arthur J

    2016-11-01

    Compression of episcleral veins or deformation of tissue in the Schlemm's canal beneath the landing zone of scleral lenses could elevate intraocular pressure (IOP). We examined the effect of 2 hr of small-diameter scleral lens wear on IOP. Twenty-nine participants, 29 ± 6 years old (mean ± SD) who experienced no history of eye disease or scleral lens wear, were included in the study. Each participant was fitted with a 15-mm Jupiter scleral lens on one eye (study eye). Intraocular pressure was measured in both eyes by pneumatonometry centrally on the cornea and peripherally on the sclera. The lens was then placed on one eye and was worn for 2 hr. Intraocular pressure was remeasured immediately after lens placement, at 1 and 2 hr of lens wear, and immediately after lens removal. Intraocular pressure after removal of the scleral lens was compared with IOP before placing the lens and to IOP in the control eye using paired t tests. Immediately after removing the scleral lens, mean central IOP in the study eye (13.9 ± 3.1 mm Hg) was not different from mean central IOP in the control eye (13.5 ± 2.2 mm Hg, P = 0.4) or in the same eye before lens wear (13.6 ± 1.9 mm Hg, P = 0.6). There were also no differences in IOP measured peripherally at 2 hr of lens wear (P = 0.8). Neophyte scleral lens wear of a 15-mm scleral lens for 2 hr does not increase IOP in healthy eyes.

  20. Association of the nuclear matrix component NuMA with the Cajal body and nuclear speckle compartments during transitions in transcriptional activity in lens cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbon, Chris; Dahm, Ralf; Prescott, Alan R; Quinlan, Roy A

    2002-10-01

    The transcriptional status of cells can be deduced from the staining pattern of various nuclear markers such as the Cajal body, nucleolus and nuclear speckles. In this study we have used these markers to correlate transcriptional status with cell differentiation in the lens. As a closed system with no cell loss and with each stage being spatially preserved, it is particularly well suited to such studies. To confirm that the nuclear markers in lens cells follow the same trends as in other cells, primary bovine lens epithelial cells were cultured and then treated with actinomycin D to inhibit transcription. This reduced the Cajal body markers to one or two foci per nucleus and the nucleoli became compacted as revealed by fibrillarin staining. The nuclear speckles, containing snRNPs (e.g. Sm) and the splicing factor, SC35, also became larger and more numerous while the signal for trimethylguanine (TMG) decreased suggesting a role hierarchy for the various speckle factors during transcriptional shutdown. The signal for survival of motor neurones gene product (SMN) also decreased at this point. In the lens epithelium, postmitotic cells near the equatorial region had one or two Cajal bodies per nucleus, indicating these cells had only basal levels of transcription. Sm was also present as large foci in these cells. Interestingly, both the speckles and Cajal bodies were NuMA-positive in these post-mitotic cells. At the epithelial-fibre cell transition, Cajal body number increased, while their size decreased indicative of increased transcriptional activity. Fibrillarin adopted the open floret pattern indicating increased transcriptional activity. The nuclear speckles adopted a more diffuse nucleoplasmic pattern, although some spots were still observed. All NuMA colocalisation with the Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles was lost at this stage of lens cell differentiation. Transcriptional shutdown occurs at a later stage in fibre cell differentiation, prior to programmed

  1. Spectroscopy of very heavy nuclei with a view to study super-heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalfallah, F.

    2007-08-01

    Within the recent years, the spectroscopic study of single particle orbitals of very heavy elements (VHE) has become possible with the development of increasingly efficient experimental setups. This allows us, through nuclear deformation, to access with these deformed nuclei to orbitals situated around the Fermi level in the spherical superheavy elements (SHE) and learn more about the nuclear structure of these nuclei. The aim of this work is the spectroscopic studies of heavy and very heavy elements. Because of the experimental difficulties associated with the fusion reactions in the VHE region, a detailed optimization studies is essential. Simulation of energy loss and angular straggling of these nuclei due to the interaction in the target and to neutron's evaporation was carried out and allowed us to optimize the angular acceptance of the separators according to the target thickness. An extensive survey and exploration in the VHE region was also conducted on the basis of cross section's systematics in the literature and simulations carried out using the statistical code Hivap. In this framework, the possible extension of the range of validity of a set of Hivap parameters was investigated. This work has enabled us to prepare a list of experiments of interest for the production of very heavy nuclei. In this thesis, our work was concentrated on the spectroscopy of the nuclei No 256 et Rf 256 for which two experimental proposals were accepted. The octupole deformations predicted in the actinides region is studied in another part of this thesis, a part witch is dedicated to the gamma spectroscopy of Pa 223 . The data from a new experiment carried out using the Jurogam-Ritu-Great setup are analysed and compared to previous results. They confirm the octupole deformed shape in this nucleus. (author)

  2. Effect of Age-Related Human Lens Sutures Growth on Its Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ho-Ting D; Howse, Louisa A; Vaghefi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Age-related nuclear cataract is the opacification of the clear ocular lens due to oxidative damage as we age, and is the leading cause of blindness in the world. A lack of antioxidant supply to the core of ever-growing ocular lens could contribute to the cause of this condition. In this project, a computational model was developed to study the sutural fluid inflow of the aging human lens. Three different SOLIDWORKS computational fluid dynamics models of the human lens (7 years old; 28 years old; 46 years old) were created, based on available literature data. The fluid dynamics of the lens sutures were modelled using the Stokes flow equations, combined with realistic physiological boundary conditions and embedded in COMSOL Multiphysics. The flow rate, volume, and flow rate per volume of fluid entering the aging lens were examined, and all increased over the 40 years modelled. However, while the volume of the lens grew by ∼300% and the flow rate increased by ∼400%, the flow rate per volume increased only by very moderate ∼38%. Here, sutural information from humans of 7 to 46 years of age was obtained. In this modelled age range, an increase of flow rate per volume was observed, albeit at very slow rate. We hypothesize that with even further increasing age (60+ years old), the lens volume growth would outpace its flow rate increases, which would eventually lead to malnutrition of the lens nucleus and onset of cataracts.

  3. Cholesterol Bilayer Domains in the Eye Lens Health: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    The most unique biochemical characteristic of the eye lens fiber cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content, the need for which is still unclear. It is evident, however, that the disturbance of Chol homeostasis may result in damages associated with cataracts. Electron paramagnetic resonance methods allow discrimination of two types of lipid domains in model membranes overloaded with Chol, namely, phospholipid-cholesterol domains and pure Chol bilayer domains. These domains are also detected in human lens lipid membranes prepared from the total lipids extracted from lens cortices and nuclei of donors from different age groups. Independent of the age-related changes in phospholipid composition, the physical properties of phospholipid-Chol domains remain the same for all age groups and are practically identical for cortical and nuclear membranes. The presence of Chol bilayer domains in these membranes provides a buffering capacity for cholesterol concentration in the surrounding phospholipid-Chol domains, keeping it at a constant saturating level and thus keeping the physical properties of the membrane consistent with and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. It seems that the presence of Chol bilayer domains plays an integral role in the regulation of cholesterol-dependent processes in fiber cell plasm membranes and in the maintenance of fiber cell membrane homeostasis.

  4. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-04

    Nov 4, 2014 ... A brand-new electron scattering facility, the SCRIT Electron Scattering Facility, will soon start its operation at RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan. This is the world's first electron scattering facility dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. The goal of this facility is to determine the charge density ...

  5. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    collaborators [1,2]. The importance of deformed valleys in the potential energy surfaces. (PES) is that they provide the most favoured fission channels for the decay of superheavy nuclei. For the dynamics study, one has to introduce the influence of mass tensor. We use the results from pairing calculations for the occupation ...

  6. Cavitation Nuclei: Experiments and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2009-01-01

    us a chance to reflect on the character of the unknown parameters. In this way non-concordant experimental results may hold the key to the development of better theories - and to new experiments for the testing of their validity. Cavitation and cavitation nuclei are phenomena of that character....

  7. Weak pion production from nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The charged current pion production induced by neutrinos in 12C, 16O and 56Fe nuclei has been studied. The calculations have been done for the coherent as well as the incoherent processes assuming dominance and takes into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the renormalization of in ...

  8. Percolation and multifragmentation of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmakov, S.Yu.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    A method to build the 'cold' nuclei as percolation clusters is suggested. Within the framework of definite assumptions of the character of nucleon-nucleon couplings breaking resulting from the nuclear reactions as description of the multifragmentation process in the hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies is obtained. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  9. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... ... nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential.

  10. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Recent improvements in the intensities and optical qualities of radioactive beams have made possible the study of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on unstable nuclei. The design and performances of an innovative silicon strip detector array devoted to such experiments are described. The quality of the data ...

  11. Nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Hans Otto Uldall

    2013-01-01

    A review of nuclear astrophysics of light nuclei using radioactive beams or techniques developed for radioactive beams is given. We discuss Big Bang nucleosynthesis, with special focus on the lithium problem, aspects of neutrino-physics, helium-burning and finally selected examples of studies...

  12. Unintegrated parton distributions in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, E. G.; Martin, A. D.; Navarra, F. S.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2013-09-01

    We study how unintegrated parton distributions in nuclei can be calculated from the corresponding integrated partons using the EPS09 parametrization. The role of nuclear effects is presented in terms of the ratio R A = uPDF A / A·PDF N for both large and small x domains.

  13. Weak pion production from nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The pion production processes from nucleons and nuclei at intermediate energies are important tools to study the hadronic structure. The dynamic models of the hadronic structure are used to calculate the various nucleon and transition form factors which are tested by using the experimental data on photo, electro and.

  14. A course in lens design

    CERN Document Server

    Velzel, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A Course in Lens Design is an instruction in the design of image-forming optical systems. It teaches how a satisfactory design can be obtained in a straightforward way. Theory is limited to a minimum, and used to support the practical design work. The book introduces geometrical optics, optical instruments and aberrations. It gives a description of the process of lens design and of the strategies used in this process. Half of its content is devoted to the design of sixteen types of lenses, described in detail from beginning to end. This book is different from most other books on lens design because it stresses the importance of the initial phases of the design process: (paraxial) lay-out and (thin-lens) pre-design. The argument for this change of accent is that in these phases much information can be obtained about the properties of the lens to be designed. This information can be used in later phases of the design. This makes A Course in Lens Design a useful self-study book, and a suitable basis for an intro...

  15. Gabor lens theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irani, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The principle of using the space charge of an electron cloud to focus ion beams was first proposed by Gabor. Electrons are to be confined radially by means of an axial magnetic field B/sub z/ and axially by means of externally applied electric fields E/sub z/. An ion beam of charge density n/sub i/ much less than n/sub e/, the electron charge density can then be focused by the radial electric field set up by the electron cloud. The case considered here is that of a hollow cylindrical conductor charged to a potential +V with grounded rings on either side to set up the axial E/sub z/ field. A solenoid wound around the central conductor supplies the B/sub z/ field. Theoretical calculations are carried out for n/sub e/ maximum as a function of B/sub z/ due to radial confinement and V due to axial confinement and the focal length of the Gabor Lens is calculated

  16. Microbial contamination of soft contact lenses & accessories in asymptomatic contact lens users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha V Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: With increasing use of soft contact lenses the incidence of contact lens induced infections is also increasing. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge of new and existing contact lens users about the risk of microbial contamination associated with improper use and maintenance of contact lenses, type of microbial flora involved and their potential to cause ophthalmic infections. Methods: Four samples each from 50 participants (n=200 were collected from the lenses, lens care solutions, lens care solution bottles and lens cases along with a questionnaire regarding their lens use. The samples were inoculated onto sheep blood agar, Mac Conkey′s agar and Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. Organisms were identified using standard laboratory protocols. Results: Overall rate of microbial contamination among the total samples was 52 per cent. The most and the least contaminated samples were found to be lens cases (62% and lens care solution (42%, respectively. The most frequently isolated contaminant was Staphylococcus aureus (21% followed by Pseudomonas species (19.5%. Majority (64% of the participants showed medium grade of compliance to lens cleaning practices. Rate of contamination was 100 and 93.75 per cent respectively in those participants who showed low and medium compliance to lens care practices as compared to those who had high level of compliance (43.75% ( p0 <0.05. Interpretation & conclusions: Lens care practices amongst the participants were not optimum which resulted into high level contamination. Hence, creating awareness among the users about the lens care practices and regular cleaning and replacements of lens cases are required.

  17. A New Optical System for Holographic Memory Applying a Finite Objective Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakage, Yuzuru; Uno, Kazushi; Iwamura, Yasumasa; Shimokawa, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyasu; Tezuka, Koichi; Ozaki, Kazuyuki

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a new objective lens for a holographic storage system to increase areal density. To balance focal length and working distance, we adopted a finite objective lens. By incorporating phase conjugate reproduction into the finite objective lens, we obtained practically applicable and adequate signal quality. We measured shift selectivity and the effect of crosstalk and evaluated book size, which was reduced by ca. 0.8. The areal density was estimated to increase by about 1.6 times when using the new objective lens.

  18. Inclusive charge longitudinal response in finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberico, W.M.; Molinari, A.; Czerski, P.; Czerski, P.; Ericson, M.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental dynamic and static longitudinal structure factors of 12 C, 40 Ca and 56 Fe are investigated with a semiclassical RPA theory. The parameters entering into the nuclear mean field (including the nucleon effective mass) and in the isoscalar and isovector particle-hole forces are set by best fitting procedures. Quite reasonable values of these quantities allow a satisfactory account of the experimental data over a wide range of momentum transfers in all the three nuclei. However, to achieve this result, the proton root mean square radius has to be increased over the conventional value of about 13% in 12 C and 22% in 40 Ca and 56 Fe

  19. Thin wetting film lens-less imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allier, C.P.; Poher, V.; Coutard, J.G.; Hiernard, G.; Dinten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lens-less imaging has recently attracted a lot of attention as a compact, easy-to-use method to image or detect biological objects like cells, but failed at detecting micron size objects like bacteria that often do not scatter enough light. In order to detect single bacterium, we have developed a method based on a thin wetting film that produces a micro-lens effect. Compared with previously reported results, a large improvement in signal to noise ratio is obtained due to the presence of a micro-lens on top of each bacterium. In these conditions, standard CMOS sensors are able to detect single bacterium, e.g. E. coli, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus thuringiensis, with a large signal to noise ratio. This paper presents our sensor optimization to enhance the SNR; improve the detection of sub-micron objects; and increase the imaging FOV, from 4.3 mm 2 to 12 mm 2 to 24 mm 2 , which allows the detection of bacteria contained in 0.5 μl to 4 μl to 10 μl, respectively. (authors)

  20. Tear film evaluation and management in soft contact lens wear: a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Laura E; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-09-01

    The human tear film is a highly ordered structure consisting of a thin layer of lipid on the surface and a thicker aqueous-mucin phase, which increases in mucin concentration toward the corneal epithelial cell layer. The health of the tear film and ocular surface influences the likelihood of being able to achieve successful contact lens wear. Contact lens discomfort and dryness are the most frequent reasons why contact lens wearers experience reduced wearing times, which can eventually lead to contact lens discontinuation. Comprehensive clinical assessment of tear film integrity and ocular surface health is therefore essential prior to commencing contact lens wear, to enable the ocular surface environment to be optimised to support lens wear. These parameters should also be evaluated over the course of contact lens wear, in order to identify any aspects requiring clinical management and ensure maintenance of optimal lens-wearing conditions. This review summarises current knowledge relating to the effects of soft contact lens wear on the tear film and ocular surface. It also provides a systematic approach to evaluating tear film and ocular surface integrity, in order to guide the clinical management of tear film anomalies with respect to contact lens wear. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  1. Beta-decay half-lives for the r-process nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, I.V.; Lutostansky, Yu.S.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2016-01-01

    For nucleosynthesis calculations of the r-process it is important to know beta-decay half-lives of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. In the present paper these characteristics are calculated for an extended number of neutron-rich nuclei, important for the r-process. In our calculations the model description of beta-strength functions based on Finite Fermi-Systems Theory is used. The comparison with other predictions and experimental data is done. It is shown that the accuracy of beta-decay half-lives of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei is increasing with increasing neutron excess and can be used for modeling of nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei in the r-process. For nuclei heavier than lead the half-lives of neutron-rich nuclei are on average 10 times smaller, than proposed of other predictions.

  2. A Class I UV-Blocking (senofilcon A) Soft Contact Lens Prevents UVA-induced Yellow Fluorescence and NADH loss in the Rabbit Lens Nucleus in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Frank J.; Lin, Li-Ren; Simpanya, Mukoma F.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Fick, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    It is known that fluorescence, much of it caused by UVA light excitation, increases in the aging human lens, resulting in loss of sharp vision. This study used an in vivo animal model to investigate UVA-excited fluorescence in the rabbit lens, which contains a high level of the UVA chromophore NADH, existing both free and bound to λ-crystallin. Also, the ability of a Class I (senofilcon A) soft contact lens to protect against UVA-induced effects on the rabbit lens was tested. Rabbit eyes were irradiated with UVA light in vivo (100 mW/cm2 on the cornea) for 1 hour using monochromatic 365 nm light. Irradiation was conducted in the presence of either a senofilcon A contact lens, a minimally UV-absorbing lotrafilcon A contact lens, or no contact lens at all. Eyes irradiated without a contact lens showed blue 365 nm-excited fluorescence initially, but this changed to intense yellow fluorescence after 1 hour. Isolated, previously irradiated lenses exhibited yellow fluorescence originating from the lens nucleus when viewed under 365 nm light, but showed normal blue fluorescence arising from the cortex. Previously irradiated lenses also exhibited a faint yellow color when observed under visible light. The senofilcon A contact lens protected completely against the UVA-induced effects on fluorescence and lens yellowing, whereas the lotrafilcon A lens showed no protection. The UVA-exposure also produced a 53% loss of total NADH (free plus bound) in the lens nucleus, with only a 13% drop in the anterior cortex. NADH loss in the nucleus was completely prevented with use of a senofilcon A contact lens, but no significant protection was observed with a lotrafilcon A lens. Overall, the senofilcon A lens provided an average of 67% protection against UVA-induced loss of four pyridine nucleotides in four different regions of the lens. HPLC analysis with fluorescence detection indicated a nearly six-fold increase in 365 nm-excited yellow fluorescence arising from lens nuclear

  3. Nuclear treasure island [superheavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Soon after the experiments at Dubna, which synthesized element 114 and made the first footprints on the beach of the "island of nuclear stability", two new superheavy elements have been discovered at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Element 118 and its immediate decay product, element 116, were manufactured at Berkeley's 88 inch cyclotron by fusing targets of lead-208 with an intense beam of 449 MeV krypton-86 ions. Although both new nuclei almost instantly decay into lighter ones, the decay sequence is consistent with theories that have long predicted the island of stability for nuclei with approximately 114 protons and 184 neutrons. Theorist Robert Smolanczuk, visiting from the Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Poland, had calculated that this reaction should have particularly favourable production rates. Now that this route has been signposted, similar reactions could be possible: new elements and isotopes, tests of nuclear stability and mass models, and a new under...

  4. Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716 Delaware (United States); Dussel, G. G. [Departamento de Fisica J.J. Giambiagi, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dukelsky, J.; Sarriguren, P. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-12-15

    We describe recent efforts to study Cooper pairs in atomic nuclei. We consider a self-consistent Hartree Fock mean field for the even Sm isotopes and compare results based on three treatments of pairing correlations: a BCS treatment, a number-projected BCS treatment and an exact treatment using the Richardson Ansatz. Significant differences are seen in the pairing correlation energies. Furthermore, because it does not average over the properties of the fermion pairs, the Richardson solution permits a more meaningful definition of the Cooper wave function and of the fraction of pairs that are collective. Our results confirm that only a few pairs near the Fermi surface in realistic atomic nuclei are collective. (Author)

  5. Relativistic description of deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The author has shown that relativistic Hartree calculations using parameters that have been fit to the properties of nuclear matter can provide a good description of both spherical and axially deformed nuclei. The quantitative agreement with experiment is equivalent to that which was obtained in non-relativistic calculations using Skyrme interactions. The equilibrium deformation is strongly correlated with the size of the spin-orbit splitting, and that parameter sets which give roughly the correct value for this splitting provide the best agreement with the quadrupole moments in the s-d shell. Finally, for closed shell +/- 1 nuclei, it was shown that the self-consistent calculations are able to reproduce the experimental magnetic moments. This was not possible in relativistic calculations which include only the effects of the valence orbital

  6. Multiple phonon excitation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Frascaria, N.

    1994-01-01

    The studies of multiphonon excitations in nuclei are reviewed both from the theoretical and experimental points of view. The presence of giant resonances in nuclei is described in the framework of macroscopic and microscopic models and the relative merits of different probes to excite such states are illustrated. The existence of giant resonances built on excited states is stressed. An exhaustive description of the theoretical estimates of the properties of the multiphonon states is presented. The theory predicts that such multiple collective excitations should closely follow a harmonic pattern. Recent experimental results on the double giant dipole resonance using the (π + π - ) double charge exchange reaction are shown. The status of the search for isoscalar multiphonon excitations by means of the strong nuclear potential produced by heavy ions is presented. Conclusions are drawn and new prospects are discussed. (authors) 293 refs., 67 figs., 8 tabs

  7. Spectroscopy of heavy fissionable nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-05

    Aug 5, 2015 ... A comparison of aligned angular momentum in these nuclei over the range of observed frequencies (up to ¯hω ≈ 0.25 MeV) reveals a possible, small but signifi- cant contribution from j15/2 neutrons in 249Cm, as evidenced from the higher degree of alignment compared to 247Cm over the observed range ...

  8. Density functional theory of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaki, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The density functional theory of nuclei has come to draw attention of scientists in the field of nuclear structure because the theory is expected to provide reliable numerical data in wide range on the nuclear chart. This article is organized to present an overview of the theory to the people engaged in the theory of other fields as well as those people in the nuclear physics experiments. At first, the outline of the density functional theory widely used in the electronic systems (condensed matter, atoms, and molecules) was described starting from the Kohn-Sham equation derived on the variational principle. Then the theory used in the field of nuclear physics was presented. Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation by using Skyrme interaction was explained. Comparison of the results of calculations and experiments of binding energies and ground state mean square charge radii of some magic number nuclei were shown. The similarity and dissimilarity between the two streams were summarized. Finally the activities of the international project of Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF) which was started recently lead by US scientist was reported. This project is programmed for five years. One of the applications of the project is the calculation of the neutron capture cross section of nuclei on the r-process, which is absolutely necessary for the nucleosynthesis research. (S. Funahashi)

  9. Thermodynamical description of excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, P.

    1989-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions it has been possible to obtain composite systems at rather high excitation energies corresponding to temperatures of several MeV. The theoretical studies of these systems are based on concepts borrowed from thermodynamics or statistical physics, such as the temperature. In these lectures, we present the concepts of statistical physics which are involved in the physics of heavy ion as they are produced nowadays in the laboratory and also during the final stage of a supernova collapse. We do not attempt to describe the reaction mechanisms which yield such nuclear systems nor their decay by evaporation or fragmentation. We shall only study their static properties. The content of these lectures is organized in four main sections. The first one gives the basic features of statistical physics and thermodynamics necessary to understand quantum mechanics at finite temperature. In the second one, we present a study of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear physics. A phenomenological approach of the stability of hot nuclei follows. The microscopic point of view is proposed in the third part. Starting from the basic concepts derived in the first part, it provides a description of excited or hot nuclei which confirms the qualitative results of the second part. Furthermore it gives a full description of most properties of these nuclei as a function of temperature. Finally in the last part, a microscopic derivation of the equation of state of nuclear matter is proposed to study the collapse of a supernova core

  10. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  11. Automated Fresnel lens tester system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, G.S.

    1981-07-01

    An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

  12. Compliance among soft contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzman, Tomislav; Kutija, Marija Barisić; Masnec, Sanja; Jandroković, Sonja; Mrazovac, Danijela; Jurisić, Darija; Skegro, Ivan; Kalauz, Miro; Kordić, Rajko

    2014-12-01

    Contact lens compliance is proven to be crucial for preventing lens wear-related complications because of the interdependence of the steps in lens care regime and their influence on lens system microbial contamination. Awareness of the patients' lens handling compliance as well as correct recognition of non-compliant behaviours is the basis for creating more targeted strategies for patient education. The aim of this study was to investigate compliance among soft contact lens (SCL) wearers in different aspects of lens care handling and wearing habits. In our research 50 asymptomatic lens wearers filled out a questionnaire containing demographic data, lens type, hygiene and wearing habits, lenses and lens care system replacement schedule and self-evaluation of contact lens handling hygiene. We established criteria of compliance according to available manufacturer's recommendations, prior literature and our clinical experience. Only 2 (4%) of patients were fully compliant SCL wearers. The most common non-compliant behaviours were insufficient lens solution soaking time (62%), followed by failure to daily exchange lens case solution and showering while wearing lenses. 44% of patients reported storing lenses in saline solution. Mean lens storage case replacement was 3.6 months, with up to 78% patients replacing lens case at least once in 3 months. Average grade in self evaluating level of compliance was very good (4 +/- 0.78) (from 1-poor level of hygiene to 5-great level of hygiene). Lens wearers who reported excessive daily lens wear and more than 10 years of lens wearing experience were also found to be less compliant with other lens system care procedures. (t = -2.99, df=47, p lens system maintenance steps. Most common non-compliant behaviours were the ones that are crucial for maintaining lens sterility and preventing infection. Despite the low objective compliance rate, self grading was relatively high. Therefore, these results indicate the need for patient

  13. Excess DNA in the nuclei of the subesophageal region of octopus brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marianis, B; Olmo, E; Giuditta, A

    1979-07-15

    Cytophotometric analyses of Feulgen-stained nuclei present in homogenates of vertical and subesophageal lobes of octopus brain have shown that the latter region contains larger nuclei with up to several times the amount of DNA present in vertical nuclei. No obvious relationship was found between DNA content and nuclear size. Except for a rather small minority, nuclei of the vertical lobe have a uniform size and the expected diploid amount of DNA. These parameters are not substantially dependent on body weight. In contrast, the DNA content of subesophageal nuclei increases progressively with body weight. The amount of DNA found in subesophageal nuclei does not seem to be a simple multiple of the diploid or haploid value.

  14. Computer-aided lens assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Richard; Alcock, Rob; Petzing, Jon; Coupland, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    We propose a computer-aided method of lens manufacture that allows assembly, adjustment, and test phases to be run concurrently until an acceptable level of optical performance is reached. Misalignment of elements within a compound lens is determined by a comparison of the results of physical ray tracing by use of an array of Gaussian laser beams with numerically obtained geometric ray traces. An estimate of misalignment errors is made, and individual elements are adjusted in an iterative manner until performance criteria are achieved. The method is illustrated for the alignment of an air-spaced doublet.

  15. Acanthamoeba keratitis. Contact lens and noncontact lens characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynn, E W; Lopez, M A; Pavan-Langston, D; Talamo, J H

    1995-09-01

    To identify potential differences in time to diagnosis and final visual outcome between contact lens and noncontact lens users with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Prior studies have shown early diagnosis and therapy to be related to outcome but have not analyzed differences among patients with and without contact lenses. A retrospective analysis of 11 consecutive cases (involving 13 eyes) of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed at one institution over a 3-year period. Mean time to diagnosis was significantly longer in noncontact lens users versus those who wore contact lenses (mean, 5.8 versus 3.3 weeks). Fifty percent of patients who did not wear contact lenses had a poor outcome (visual acuity worse than 20/40 or penetrating keratoplasty) versus 14% of patients who wore contact lenses. Diagnoses were made later in patients without contact lenses, and these patients had a worse visual outcome than those with Acanthamoeba keratitis who wore contact lenses. All patients with unresponsive microbial keratitis, even those without contact lens use, should be evaluated for Acanthamoeba.

  16. Synthesis and radioactive properties of the heaviest nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental investigations on the synthesis and study of properties of faraway transactinide elements confirm the predictions of macro-microscopic theory on the existence of closed shells in the region of heavy deformed nuclei. It has been demonstrated experimentally that nuclear structure plays a decisive role in the stability of superheavy nuclides. Based on the experimental confirmation of the main provisions of the theory and after the introduction of a necessary correction into the calculation the properties of heavier nuclides in the region of spherical shells Z=114 and N=180-184 have been predicted. Here a substantial increase in the stability of nuclei is also expected. All the nuclei synthesized by now, were obtained in fusion reactions with a formation of a compound nucleus, the transition of which to the ground state takes place with the emission of neutrons and gamma-rays. Both the reactions of cold and hot fusion of nuclei can be used for the synthesis of new nuclei. Nevertheless, new experimental data on the fusion mechanism are required, since a number of theoretical descriptions of the fusion dynamics of complex nuclear systems need a substantial revising. One can assume that the reactions of the type 244 Pu, 248 Cm + 48 Ca are still within the current potential of the accelerators and experimental technique. This potential, nevertheless, is still to be implemented. 37 refs., 6 figs

  17. Topology of White Stars in Relativistic Fragmentation of Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, N P; Vokal, S; Vokalova, A; Gaitinov, A Sh; Gerassimov, S G; Goncharova, L A; Dronov, V A; Zarubin, P I; Zarubina, I G; Kovalenko, A D; Kravchakova, A; Larionova, V G; Levitskaja, O V; Lepehin, F G; Malakhov, A I; Moiseenko, A A; Orlova, G I; Peresadko, N G; Polukhina, N G; Rukojatkin, P A; Rusakova, V V; Salmanova, N A; Sarkisian, V R; Simonov, B B; Stan, E; Stanoeva, R; Chernyavsky, M M; Haidue, M; Kharlamov, S P; Tsakov, I; Shchedrina, T V

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, experimental observation of the multifragmentation processes of light relativistic nuclei carried out by means of emulsions are reviewed. Events of the type of "white stars" in which the dissociation of relativistic nuclei is not accompanied by the production of mesons and the target-nucleus fragments are considered. A distinctive feature of the charge topology in the dissociation of the Ne, Mg, Si and S nuclei is an almost total suppression of the binary splitting of nuclei to fragments with charges higher than 2. The growth of the nuclear fragmentation degree is revealed in an increase in the multiplicity of singly and doubly charged fragments with decreasing charge of the main non-excited part of the fragmenting nucleus. The processes of dissociation of stable Li, Be, B, C, N, and O isotopes to charged fragments were used to study special features of the formation of systems consisting of the lightest nuclei - alpha, d and t. Clustering of the 3He nucleus can be detected in "white sta...

  18. Close collisions between light nuclei-orbiting and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.; Shivakumar, B.; Harmon, B.A.; Ayik, S.

    1987-01-01

    According to the authors, studies of close collisions in which nuclear matter, energy and angular momentum undergo substantial rearrangement should enhance understanding of the nuclear many-body system and of the behavior of bulk nuclear matter. The results and models based on studies of such processes between heavy nuclei bear this out. The lighter nuclei, on which this study focuses, are unique in several respects: their binding energy per nucleon increases with mass number - therefore the amalgamation of two such nuclei produces a composite at high excitation energies even for relatively low bombarding energies, and their fission into two complex fragments is also severely restricted. In these light systems the Coulomb and centrifugal barriers attain comparable magnitude and both barriers can influence the outcome of the collision. The study of collisions between light nuclei affords the possibility of full identification of all the detected reaction products, with a modest effort. The authors present their data which demonstrates that in collisions the two nuclei first form a rotating dinuclear complex (DNC) which can breakup into two complex fragments (orbiting) or evolve into a compound nucleus

  19. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  20. Ball Lens Fiber Optic Sensor based Smart Handheld Microsurgical Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L; Kang, Jin U

    2013-03-20

    During freehand performance of vitreoretinal microsurgery the surgeon must perform precise and stable maneuvers that achieve surgical objectives and avoid surgical risk. Here, we present an improved smart handheld microsurgical tool which is based on a ball lens fiber optic sensor that utilizes common path swept source optical coherence tomography. Improvements include incorporation of a ball lens single mode fiber optic probe that increases the working angle of the tool to greater than 45 degrees; and increases the magnitude of the distance sensing signal through water. Also presented is a cutting function with an improved ergonomic design.

  1. Magnetic system of the Tevatron electron lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, I.; Kozub, S.; Pleskach, V.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; Zintchenko, S.; Zubko, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Sery, A.; Shiltsev, V.

    2000-01-01

    The Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) system consisting of seven SC and four conventional magnets has been developed and fabricated in IHEP for increase of luminosity in Tevatron. The SC cable tension and preload of SC coils are calculated. The chosen cable design and cooling of the SC magnets ensure sufficient temperature margin for operating of SC magnets and their safety during quench. The system of conventional and SC solenoids create necessary trajectory of magnetic field lines for the TEL electron beam motion. SC dipoles and warm correctors permit to carry out correction of the electron beam motion [ru

  2. Scientific performance assessments through a gender lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2018-01-01

    The focus on excellence and quality assurance in the academy has spawned a signifi cant increase in the use of bibliometric measures in performance assessments of individual researchers. This article investigates the organizational consequences of this development through a gender lens. Based....... They adhere to the prevailing ethos of the academic meritocracy by standardizing the criteria for organizational advancement and ensuring transparency and accountability in the selection process. While bibliometric tools in this sense may lead to the recruitment of scientists with a strong CV and track record...

  3. A microcapillary lens for X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dudchik, Y I

    1999-01-01

    A new design of a compound refractive lens for X-rays is proposed. The lens is made as a set of glue microlenses placed in a glass capillary. The technique of lens fabrication is described. Results of ray tracing calculations for 8 and 15 keV photons are represented.

  4. Exotic light nuclei and nuclei in the lead region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppelier, N.A.F.M.

    1989-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for modifying, or renormalizing, a truncated nuclear hamiltonian such that the wave functions obtained by diagonalizing this modified or effective hamiltoniandescribe the nucleus as well as possible: deriving the hamiltonian directly from a realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction between free nucleons; parametrizing the hamiltonian in terms of a number of parameters and determining these parameters from a least-squares fit of calculated properties to experimental data; approximating the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction between two nucleons in a nucleus by a simple analytic expression. An effective hamiltonian derived following the second method is applied in a theoretical study of exotic nuclei in the region of Z=2-9 and A=4-30 and the problem of the neutron halo in 11 Li is discussed. Results of shell-model calculations of 20i Pb and nuclei in its neighbourhood are presented in which an effective hamiltonian was employed derived with the last method. The quenching of M1 strength in 208 Pb, and the spectroscopic factors measured in proton knock-out reactions could be described quite satisfactory. Finally, a method is presented for deriving the effective hamiltonian directly from the realistic NN interaction with algebraic techniques. (H.W.). 114 refs.; 34 figs.; 12 tabs.; schemes

  5. The pygmy dipole resonance in neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Nguyen Quang; Kiet, Hoang Anh Tuan; Duc, Huynh Ngoc; Chuong, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance (PDR), which has been observed via the enhancement of the electric dipole strength E 1 of atomic nuclei, is studied within a microscopic collective model. The latter employs the Hartree-Fock (HF) method with effective nucleon-nucleon interactions of the Skyrme types plus the random-phase approximation (RPA). The results of the calculations obtained for various even-even nuclei such as 16-28 O, 40-58 Ca, 100-120 Sn, and 182-218 Pb show that the PDR is significantly enhanced when the number of neutrons outside the stable core of the nucleus is increased, that is, in the neutron-rich nuclei. As the result, the relative ratio between the energy weighted sum of the strength of the PDR and that of the GDR (giant dipole resonance) does not exceed 4%. The collectivity of the PDR and GDR states will be also discussed. (paper)

  6. Study on decay of rare earth nuclei produced by fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawade, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Michihiro; Asai, Masato [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Tsukada, Kazuaki; Osa, Akihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Iimura, Hideki

    1996-01-01

    JAERI-ISOL utilizes charge particle induced fission by proton and heavy proton produced by the tandem type accelerator (JAERI). To study the decay mechanism and nuclei structure of neutron and excess nuclei produced by actinoid fission, JAERI-ISOL was improved by developing the multilayer target tank. So that, the intensity of mass separated ion beam increased enough to use. New 76.6 KeV {gamma}-ray with about 10s of half life was found in the preliminary experiment. (S.Y.)

  7. The Ultrawideband Leaky Lens Antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruni, S.; Neto, A.; Marliani, F.

    2007-01-01

    A novel directive and nondispersive antenna is presented: the ultrawideband (UWB) leaky lens. It is based on the broad band Cherenkov radiation occurring at a slot printed between different infinite homogeneous dielectrics. The first part of the paper presents the antenna concept and the UWB design.

  8. ECTOPIC LENS EXTRACTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ectopia lentis continues to be a therapeutic challenge for ophthalmologists. It can occur as an isolated condition, after ocular trauma, in association with other ocular disorders, as part of a systemic mesodermal disease or a complication of general metabolic disorders. Minimal subluxation of the lens may cause no visual symptoms, but in more advanced cases serious optical disturbances arise. The most important is amblyopia. Surgical treatment options include iris manipulation, lens discission, aspiration, intracapsular or extracapsular extraction, and pars plana lensectomy. The choice of surgical technique remains controversial, in part because of the historically poor visual results and high rate of perioperative complications, including vitreous loss and retinal detachment.Methods. We describe a surgical technique based on the use of the Cionni endocapsular tension ring, dry irrigation aspiration of lens material, centration of the capsular bag and foldable intraocular lens implantation into the bag. With mentioned surgical technique 8 patients were operated; 4 boys and 4 girls, together 11 eyes.Results. The final BCVA after follow up period improved in 9 eyes and it remained the same as before operation in one eye. Statistical comparison of preoperative and postoperative visual acuities showed significant improvement. On the other hand there was no correlation between preoperative and postoperative visual acuity.Conclusions. This surgical procedure is an alternative approach in solving this challenging cases of ectopia lentis with good postoperative visual rehabilitation.

  9. Spinning pipe gas lens revisited

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafusire, C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available , there is little information on optical phase aberrations and no study to date on the propagation parameters of the laser beam, but has rather remained rooted in the domain of ray optics. Researchers revisit the spinning pipe gas lens in this paper with new...

  10. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Nucleon transfer between heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Oertzen, W.

    1984-02-01

    Nucleon transfer reactions between heavy nuclei are characterized by the classical behaviour of the scattering orbits. Thus semiclassical concepts are well suited for the description of these reactions. In the present contribution the characteristics of single and multinucleon transfer reactions at energies below and above the Coulomb barrier are shown for systems like Sn+Sn, Xe+U and Ni+Pb. The role of the pairing interaction in the transfer of nucleon pairs is illustrated. For strong transitions the coupling of channels and the absorption into more complicated channels is taken into account in a coupled channels calculation

  12. Quarks in hadrons and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns some of the ideas underlying quarks and their interactions, the way that quarks build up hadrons, and the extent to which the QCD theory can be applied to phenomena involving nuclei. The article is part of the Proceedings of the International School of Nuclear Physics, Erice, 1987. A description is given of quarks and multiplets. Colour is discussed with respect to: evidence for colour, a non abelian Su(3) theory, the pauli principle at work in hadrons, and spin flavour correlations and magnetic moments. Colour, gluons and the inter quark potential are also examined. (UK)

  13. Microscopic properties of superdeformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Lennart B

    1999-04-01

    Many high spin rotational bands in superdeformed nuclei have been found in the A 140 - 150 region, but so far no linking transitions to known normal-deformed states have been found in these nuclei. Therefore, configuration and spin assignments have to be based on indirect spectroscopic information. Identical bands were first discovered in this region of superdeformed states. At present, some identical bands have also been found at normal deformation, but such bands are more common at superdeformation. Recently lifetime measurements have given relative quadrupole moments with high accuracy. Spectroscopic quantities are calculated using the configuration constrained cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model with the modified oscillator potential. In a statistical study the occurrence of identical bands is tested. Comparing superdeformed and normal deformed nuclei, the higher possibility for identical bands at superdeformation is understood from calculated reduced widths of the E{sub {gamma}} and J{sup (2)} distributions. The importance of high-N orbitals for identical bands is also discussed. Additivity of electric quadrupole moment contributions in the superdeformed A - 150 region is discussed with the nucleus {sup 152}Dy as a `core`. In analytic harmonic oscillator calculations, the effective electric quadrupole moment q{sub eff}, i.e. the change in the total quadrupole moment caused by the added particle, is expressed as a simple function of the single-particle mass, quadrupole moment q{sub {nu}}. Also in realistic calculations, simple relations between q{sub eff} and q{sub {nu}} can be used to estimate the total electric quadrupole moment, e.g. for the nucleus {sup 142}Sm, by adding the effect of 10 holes, to the total electric quadrupole moment of {sup 152}Dy. Furthermore, tools are given for estimating the quadrupole moment for possible configurations in the superdeformed A - 150 region. For the superdeformed region around {sup 143}Eu, configuration and spin assignments

  14. [Corneal protection in contact lens users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, G B; Mitichkina, T S; Shamsudinova, A R

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of corneoprotective agents (Corneregel and Solcoseryl) in contact lens users. A total of 66 long-term contact lens wearers with dry eye symptoms and varying degrees of corneal epitheliopathy were monitored. All patients used artificial tears, which, however, were not effective enough to suppress manifestations of corneal epitheliopathy and to release the associated discomfort. The therapy was supplemented with Corneregel. The following examination methods were applied: biomicroscopy with fluorescent staining, Norn test, Schirmer's test, advanced tearscopy with digital image analysis of the precorneal tear film lipid layer, corneal confocal microscopy. In all cases the assessment was performed prior to starting Corneregel and repeated in 7 days, 14 days and 1 month. Complete corneal re-epithelization and restoration of the most superficial layer of the epithelium were achieved within 7-14 days. In case of severe initial epitheliopathy the effect of Corneregel was not sufficient and epithelium defects remained. These patients additionally received Solcoseryl Eye Gel. After the treatment course the condition of corneal epithelium ameliorated and contact lens wearing comfort increased. A longer precorneal tear film break-up time indicated an increase of tear film stability. The total tear production did not change significantly. The moistening effect of Corneregel and low-viscosity artificial tears together with intensive regeneration of corneal epithelium enables structural recovery of the epithelial membrane and considerable improvement of the anterior corneal stroma. At the first stage of corneoprotective treatment it is appropriate to use preservative-free artificial tears of low and high viscosity. If the effect of tear substitutive therapy is unsatisfactory it is recommended to prescribe Corneregel and Solcoseryl. The regimen is to be adjusted individually.

  15. Tube entrance lens focus control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisser, D. C.; Fifield, L. K.; Kitchen, T. F. G.; Tunningley, T. B.; Lobanov, N. R.; Muirhead, A. G.

    2013-02-01

    The entrance of the accelerator tube in a large electrostatic accelerator imposes a strong lens that dominates the beam optics. The magnification of the lens is large because of the low injection energy, the high voltage gradient of the acceleration tube and the long distance to the terminal. In the absence of the acceleration, the magnification would produce an unacceptably large beam spot at the terminal. The tyranny of the lens is especially irksome when the accelerator is required to operate at a lower terminal voltage than the one corresponding to the nominal gradient at high voltage. One way around the difficulty, used in NEC Pelletron accelerators, is to insert a series of nylon and steel rods that short together units of the acceleration structure at the terminal leaving the ones near the entrance close to the nominal gradient for optimum transmission. This operation takes time and risks the loss of insulating gas. Another alternative used in the 25URC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is to focus the beam at the tube entrance, substantially diluting the effect of the entrance lens. The beam then diverges and so requires an additional lens part way to the terminal. This solution is only partially effective and still necessitates use of shorting rods for low voltage operation. The fact that these elaborate strategies are used is evidence that the alternative of lowering the injection energy as the terminal voltage is lowered imposes enough problems that it is not used in practice. We have modeled a solution that controls the voltage gradient at the tube entrance using an external power supply. This not only maintains the focusing effect of the lens but provides the opportunity to tune the beam by adjusting the entrance lens. A 150 kV power supply outside the pressure vessel feeds a controllable voltage through a high voltage feed-through to the fifth electrode of the accelerator tube. Thus 150 kV on this electrode creates the nominal gradient of 30 kV per

  16. Lens stem cells may reside outside the lens capsule: an hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Rita A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider the ocular lens in the context of contemporary developments in biological ideas. We attempt to reconcile lens biology with stem cell concepts and a dearth of lens tumors. Historically, the lens has been viewed as a closed system, in which cells at the periphery of the lens epithelium differentiate into fiber cells. Theoretical considerations led us to question whether the intracapsular lens is indeed self-contained. Since stem cells generate tumors and the lens does not naturally develop tumors, we reasoned that lens stem cells may not be present within the capsule. We hypothesize that lens stem cells reside outside the lens capsule, in the nearby ciliary body. Our ideas challenge the existing lens biology paradigm. We begin our discussion with lens background information, in order to describe our lens stem cell hypothesis in the context of published data. Then we present the ciliary body as a possible source for lens stem cells, and conclude by comparing the ocular lens with the corneal epithelium.

  17. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements

  18. Characteristics of disintegration of different emulsion nuclei by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    value of mean multiplicity for Q = 0 (i.e., most central collision events) due to the violent collision of projectile nucleus with emulsion target nuclei, whereas, in CNO-events, mean multiplicity of shower particles and grey particles show almost a decreasing trend with increasing Q-values except at Q = 0, where a little deviation ...

  19. Model for pairing phase transition in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.

    2002-01-01

    A model is developed which allows the investigation and classification of the pairing phase transition in atomic nuclei. The regions of the parameter space are discussed for which a pairing phase transition can be observed. The model parameters include number of particles, attenuation of pairing correlations with increasing seniority, single-particle level spacing, and pairing gap parameter

  20. Exclusive description of multiple production on nuclei in the additive quark model. Multiplicity distributions in interactions with heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, B.B.; Nikolaev, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    In the framework of the additive quark model of multiple production on nuclei we calculate the multiplicity distributions of secondary particles and the correlations between secondary particles in πA and pA interactions with heavy nuclei. We show that intranuclear cascades are responsible for up to 50% of the nuclear increase of the multiplicity of fast particles. We analyze the sensitivity of the multiplicities and their correlations to the choice of the quark-hadronization function. We show that with good accuracy the yield of relativistic secondary particles from heavy and intermediate nuclei depends only on the number N/sub p/ of protons knocked out of the nucleus, and not on the mass number of the nucleus (N/sub p/ scaling)

  1. Athermal design and analysis of glass-plastic hybrid lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Cen, Zhaofeng; Li, Xiaotong

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid development of security market, the glass-plastic hybrid lens has gradually become a choice for the special requirements like high imaging quality in a wide temperature range and low cost. The reduction of spherical aberration is achieved by using aspherical surface instead of increasing the number of lenses. Obviously, plastic aspherical lens plays a great role in the cost reduction. However, the hybrid lens has a priority issue, which is the large thermal coefficient of expansion of plastic, causing focus shift and seriously affecting the imaging quality, so the hybrid lens is highly sensitive to the change of temperature. To ensure the system operates normally in a wide temperature range, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of temperature on the hybrid lens system. A practical design method named the Athermal Material Map is summarized and verified by an athermal design example according to the design index. It includes the distribution of optical power and selection of glass or plastic. The design result shows that the optical system has excellent imaging quality at a wide temperature range from -20 ° to 70 °. The method of athermal design in this paper has generality which could apply to optical system with plastic aspherical surface.

  2. Predicting scleral GP lens entrapped tear layer oxygen tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, Jared M; Edrington, Timothy B; Weissman, Barry A

    2015-02-01

    Over the past decade, utilization of scleral gas permeable (GP) contact lenses has steadily increased. Scleral GP lenses offer yet another option for patients suffering from visually debilitating corneal and tear conditions. Oxygen delivery to the cornea in the presence of a contact lens system continues to be a subject of interest, and scleral GP lenses are no exception. This paper utilizes an existing model based on simultaneous two lens systems (piggyback lenses) as a resistance to oxygen in series, and applies this model to scleral GP lens systems. Theoretical oxygen tensions are calculated for tear layers trapped beneath scleral contact lens systems and the anterior corneal surface with a simple single chamber corneal model using a computer software spreadsheet. Only the best case scenario for current scleral gas permeable lenses (thickness and Dk)/tear layer values allow sufficient tear layer oxygen tension (approximately 100 mmHg) to preclude corneal hypoxia. The results of the spreadsheet model suggest that clinicians would be prudent to prescribe scleral GP lenses manufactured in the highest Dk materials available and to fit without excessive corneal clearance to minimize anterior segment hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Customer loyalty among daily disposable contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neelam I; Naroo, Shehzad A; Eperjesi, Frank; Rumney, Nicholas J

    2015-02-01

    Optometric practices offer contact lenses as cash sale items or as part of monthly payment plans. With the contact lens market becoming increasingly competitive, patients are opting to purchase lenses from supermarkets and Internet suppliers. Monthly payment plans are often implemented to improve loyalty. This study aimed to compare behavioural loyalty between monthly payment plan members and non-members. BBR Optometry Ltd offers a monthly payment plan (Eyelife™) to their contact lens wearers. A retrospective audit of 38 Eyelife™ members (mean±SD: 42.7±15.0 years) and 30 non-members (mean±SD: 40.8±16.7 years) was conducted. Revenue and profits generated, service uptake and product sales between the two groups were compared over a fixed period of 18 months. Eyelife™ members generated significantly higher professional fee revenue (Ployalty among contact lens wearers, particularly service uptake and volume of lens purchases. Additionally the greater professional fees generated, render monthly payment plans an attractive business model and practice builder. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modern lens antennas for communications engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the modern design principles and analysis of lens antennas. It gives graduates and RF/Microwave professionals the design insights in order to make full use of lens antennas.  Why do we want to write a book in lens antennas? Because this topic has not been thoroughly publicized, its importance is underestimated. As antennas play a key role in communication systems, recent development in wireless communications would indeed benefit from the characteristics of lens antennas: low profile, and low cost etc.  The major advantages of lens antennas are na

  5. Laser method of free atom nuclei orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, A.L.

    1987-01-01

    Orientation process of free atom (atoms in beams) nuclei, scattering quanta of circularly polarized laser radiation is considered. A method for the evaluation of nuclei orientation parameters is developed. It is shown that in the process of pumping between the ground and first excited atomic states with electron shell spins J 1 and J 2 , so that J 2 = J 1 + 1, a complete orientation of nuclei can be attained

  6. Are there multiquark bags in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Scmatkov, M.Zh.

    1983-01-01

    Arguments are presented favouring the idea that multiquark bags do eXist in nuclei. Such hypothesis makes possible to reveal the relationship among three different scopes of phenomena: deep inelastic scattering of leptons by nUclei, large q 2 (where q 2 is a square of momentum transfer) behaviour of the form factors of light nuclei and yield of cumulative proton.s

  7. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  8. Deformation effect on spectral statistics of nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, H.; Jalili Majarshin, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we tried to get significant relations between the spectral statistics of atomic nuclei and their different degrees of deformations. To this aim, the empirical energy levels of 109 even-even nuclei in the 22 ≤ A ≤ 196 mass region are classified as their experimental and calculated quadrupole, octupole, hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole deformations values and analyzed by random matrix theory. Our results show an obvious relation between the regularity of nuclei and strong quadrupole, hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole deformations and but for nuclei that their octupole deformations are nonzero, we have observed a GOE-like statistics.

  9. Lens decenter and tilt measurement by interferogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Min-Wei; Wu, Wen-Hong; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2009-11-01

    For the recent years, the vigorous development of the electro-optic industry, particularly the digital camera and the cellular phone camera, has placed a larger and larger demand for the optical devices. Among the optical lens, the aspherical optical lens plays the key component because the aspherical lens may provide better imaging quality then the spherical lens does. For the manufacturing reason, the aspherical lens is prone to a decenter or tilt issue with respect to the optical axes of its two surfaces. To measure decenter and tile error specifically would help to obviate the deficient lens, but most of the present measuring method can't provide this function. This paper proposed a new method to specifically measure the decenter and tile of lens by observing the interferogram of each surface. And the corresponding measuring instrument, which contains interferometer and motion stages, was introduced as well.

  10. Development of a Laue lens for nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriere, N.

    2008-04-01

    The Laue lenses we study focuses in the domain of 0.1-1 MeV thanks to Bragg diffraction in the volume of a large number of small crystal tiles. The focal length of a typical Laue lens system is of the order of 100 m. This requirement calls for two formation flying satellites maintaining lens and detector at the focal distance. The major breakthrough of Laue lenses is to decouple collecting area from detector area. Concentrating a signal from the large area of a Laue lens onto a small focal spot dramatically increases the signal over background ratio with respect to present technologies. Here is the reason for the long awaited leap in sensitivity. The objective of the present thesis was to improve the concept, finding viable technical solutions towards a future space mission. Two aspects of the lens development have been highlighted in this thesis: the first one is an analytical model of the lens that is used to calculate and improve the performance of a certain configuration, the second aspect concerns the search and the characterization of diffracting media of interest. The lens model developed relies on a fast semi-analytical simulation library, permitting to build several design- and optimisation-tools. For the configuration of a given lens, this code computes the resulting effective area and point spread function in a handful of seconds. The model helps finding lens configurations (mass, pack ratio of the lens rings,...) which are automatically refined to match with effective area and energy coverage constraints. These tools have been used to investigate various design aspects, such as the influence of focal length, size, mosaic spread, structure and materials of crystals, etc... The central evaluation criterion in the model is a figure of merit, based on the compactness of the focal spot and the intensity of the collected signal. The second part of this work addresses the actual search and characterization of crystals potentially interesting for Laue lenses

  11. Patient compliance and its influence on contact lens wearing problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M J; Carney, L G

    1986-12-01

    One hundred consecutively presenting patients, fifty from each of two contact lens clinics, were questioned about the procedures encountered in care and maintenance of their contact lenses and asked to demonstrate their use of those procedures. Their clinic records were then analyzed for the occurrence of signs and symptoms that were related potentially to noncompliance with instructions and procedures, and that could not be otherwise explained. Only 26% of patients were fully complaint. Noncompliance with instructions was related strongly to the occurrence of signs and symptoms indicative of potential wearing problems. Improvements in the level of patient compliance with instructions is likely to bring about increased patient success with contact lens wearing.

  12. Subnanosecond lifetime measurements of excited states in nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettles, W.G.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Avignone, F.T. III; Carter, H.K.

    1980-01-01

    A system has been developed to measure the lifetimes of nuclear states in the range of 0.05 to 1 nanosecond in nuclei far from stability. A Gerholm magnetic lens was placed on-line with the UNISOR mass separator to observe conversion electrons in coincidence with γ rays detected in a plastic scintillator. With this system, the half-life of the 522 keV, 0 + level in 186 Hg was measured to be 155 +- 70 picoseconds. Improvements in this system should make possible on-line measurements of half-lives as short as approximately 50 picoseconds. (Auth.)

  13. Oral Morphine Consumption Reduces Lens Development in Rat Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bahadoran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Consumption of morphine, during pregnancy, in addition to inducing defects in the mother’s nervous system function, caused defects or delays in the formation and evolution of embryonic visual system. In the present study, changes in lens development was assessed in embryos exposed in utero to morphine. Material and Methods: Female Wistar rats (250-300 g were mated with male rats and pregnancy was determined by sperm observation in vaginal smear. This day was considered as embryonic day zero (E0. The females were then divided randomly into the experimental and the control groups. The control group received tap water and the experimental group received morphine (0.05 mg/ml in their water. On embryonic day 13 ( E13, blood samples were collected from the retro-orbital sinus of all animals for plasma corticosterone detection. On embryonic day 17(E17, the animals were killed by an overdose of chloroform and the embryos were taken out surgically. The embryos were fixed in 10% formalin for 30 days. At this time, the head of the embryos were removed for tissue processing and Hematoxylin- Eosin (H&E staining. The samples were evaluated using light microscope and MOTIC software. Results: Our data indicated that plasma corticosterone level was dramatically increased and the lens was thinner in the experimental group. (Although the proliferation of lens cells increased in the experiment group but that lens had delay in removing the proliferated and elongation cells with abnormal density in the lateral part of the lens in compare with control group. I have no idea what the authors are stating here. Moreover, the opening of the eyelids was delayed in the off springs of the mothers who received morphine. Conclusions: This study showed that morphine consumption during pregnancy leads to defects in fetal visual system development, particularly in the lens, and eyelids.

  14. Immunoglobulin concentration in tears of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rajendra P; Bhushan, Prashant; Singh, Virendra P; Singh, Mahendra K; Kumar, Prakash; Bhatia, Ravindra P S; Singh, Usha

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate changes in the concentration of tear immunoglobulins in contact lens wearers. A total of 45 cases including 23 contact lens wearers (43 eyes) and 22 age and sex matched healthy controls having no ocular pathology were studied for immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM) in their tears by single radial immunodiffusion method. Most of the cases used soft (56.6%) and semi-soft gas permeable (30.4%) contact lenses. Tear IgM was detected in only 17.4% and tear IgG in 43.6% of contact lens wearers, while in controls IgG was detected in 9.1% but none of the controls had IgM. There was a significant rise in total tear IgA (13.17 ± 4.44 mg/dl) in contact lens wearer as compared to controls (8.93 ± 3.79 mg/dl). Rise of tear IgA was more in symptomatic patients (15.38 ± 5.28 mg/dl) and in those wearing hard (19.73 ± 5.43 mg/dl) and semi-soft contact lenses (13.31 ± 5.43 mg/dl). A significant increase in tear IgA was noticed in subjects wearing lenses for >3 years (15.69 ± 5.39 mg/dl). About 43.4% of lens wearers were symptomatic and 80% of their lenses showed deposits and/or haziness. All cases with IgM in tear were symptomatic. The relation of immunoglobulin concentration with increasing duration of wear and material of contact lens shows that tear immunoglobulin rise accrues due to mechanical stimulation, hence contact lenses should not be used for a long period and lenses of hard nature should be discouraged. The maintenance, cleaning and deproteinization of the lenses are of high importance to avoid immunostimulation.

  15. Alpha-like resonances in nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, V. V.; Delion, D. S.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate normal dipole oscillations in a system of protons, neutrons and α-particles within the Brink approach. We introduce an effective mass of α-clusters in terms of the spectroscopic factor. The Pauli exclusion principle is taken into account by using the Wildermuth rule. The ratio between alpha and giant resonance energy weighted sum rule (EWSR) is investigated for N = Z and N> Z systems. In both cases we notice an unexpected decrease of this ratio versus the increase of the spectroscopic factor. Due to this fact the possibility to experimentally detect α-like oscillations is enhanced in nuclei above 100Sn. The occurrence of the pygmy mode in N> Z systems decreases the EWSR for the α-like oscillations.

  16. The asymptotic hadron spectrum, anti-nuclei, hyper-nuclei and quark phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    The only hope of determining the hadronic spectrum in the high mass region is through a study of matter produced in very high energy nuclear collisions. Along the way, exotic nuclei, i.e., anti-nuclei and hyper-nuclei may be produced in appreciable numbers, and the detection of a quark phase may be possible. (orig.) [de

  17. MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Integral Membrane Proteins from Ocular Lens and Retinal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Angus C.; Chaurand, Pierre; Caprioli, Richard M.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A tissue preparation protocol for MALDI (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization) imaging mass spectrometry of an integral membrane protein was developed using ocular lens and retina tissues as model samples. Frozen bovine and human lenses were cryosectioned equatorially or axially at −20 °C into 20 μm-thick tissue sections. Lens sections were mounted onto gold-coated MALDI targets by methanol soft-landing to maintain tissue integrity. Tissue sections underwent extensive water washing to deplete the samples of highly abundant water-soluble proteins. Automated matrix deposition was achieved using an acoustic reagent multispotter, with sinapinic acid as matrix and high percentage acetonitrile as solvent, with a center-to-center spot spacing of 200–300 μm. Molecular images of full-length Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and its most abundant truncation products were obtained from mass spectral data acquired across whole bovine and human lens sections. In equatorial and axial sections of bovine lenses, full-length AQP0 was detected throughout the lens. A truncation product corresponding to AQP0 (1–260) was detected in the bovine lens core at low abundance. In axial lens sections, no antero-posterior variation was detected. In 11 year-old human lens sections, full-length AQP0 was most abundant in the lens periphery, but was detected throughout the lens. The major truncation product, consisting of AQP0 residues 1–246, was absent from the lens periphery and increased in abundance in the lens core. This tissue preparation protocol was then applied to image the distribution of the G-protein coupled receptor, opsin, in the rabbit retina. This protocol has expanded the variety of target analytes which can be detected by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry to include integral membrane proteins. PMID:19326924

  18. Immunoglobulin Concentration in Tears of Contact Lens Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra P Maurya

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The relation of immunoglobulin concentration with increasing duration of wear and material of contact lens shows that tear immunoglobulin rise accrues due to mechanical stimulation, hence contact lenses should not be used for a long period and lenses of hard nature should be discouraged. The maintenance, cleaning and deproteinization of the lenses are of high importance to avoid immunostimulation.

  19. A theoretical lens for revealing the complexity of chronic care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgermans, L.; de Maeseneer, J.; Wollersheim, H.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Devroey, D.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of co-occurring multiple chronic conditions in an aging population has influenced the debate on complexity in chronic care and nowadays provides an impetus to the reform of numerous health systems. This article presents a theoretical lens for understanding the complexity of

  20. Cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation in children aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation in children aged 5-15 in local anaesthesia: visual outcomes and complications. ... The mean implanted IOL power was 22.01 ±3.16 D. IOL was succefuly implanted in 54 eyes (87.07%). Eight eyes (9.67%) were left aphakic. Increase in BCVA of 4 logMAR lines and above ...

  1. Neutron halo in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shangui; Meng Jie; Ring, P.; Zhao Enguang

    2010-01-01

    Halo phenomena in deformed nuclei are investigated within a deformed relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (DRHB) theory. These weakly bound quantum systems present interesting examples for the study of the interdependence between the deformation of the core and the particles in the halo. Contributions of the halo, deformation effects, and large spatial extensions of these systems are described in a fully self-consistent way by the DRHB equations in a spherical Woods-Saxon basis with the proper asymptotic behavior at a large distance from the nuclear center. Magnesium and neon isotopes are studied and detailed results are presented for the deformed neutron-rich and weakly bound nucleus 44 Mg. The core of this nucleus is prolate, but the halo has a slightly oblate shape. This indicates a decoupling of the halo orbitals from the deformation of the core. The generic conditions for the occurrence of this decoupling effects are discussed.

  2. Looking beyond the perfect lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wee, W H; Pendry, J B

    2010-01-01

    The holy grail of imaging is the ability to see through anything. From the conservation of energy, we can easily see that to see through a lossy material would require lenses with gain. The aim of this paper therefore is to propose a simple scheme by which we can construct a general perfect lens, with gain-one that can restore both the phases and amplitudes of near and far fields.

  3. Nuclei in neutrino-degenerate dense matter, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Ryusuke; Sato, Katsuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The properties of nuclei in cold dense matter with strongly degenerate neutrinos are investigated with the aid of an extended Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei. The following results are obtained. 1) The proton number of nucleus increases with the increasing density of the matter and it becomes very huge compared with that of the cold catalyzed matter due to the decrease of the Coulomb energy caused by the effect of the lattice-Coulomb energy. 2) The matter densities at the neutron-drip points, where the chemical potentials of neutrons equal zero are obtained as a function of the number of leptons per nucleon Y sub(L), and it is found that nuclei coalesce before neutron drip when Y sub(L) is greater than about 0.4 for the case b.c.c. lattice. 3) Along the neutron-drip points, an infinite network of linked nuclei may be formed at the matter density rho sub(P) asymptotically equals 9 x 10 13 g cm - 3 , and the bubble-phase appears at the matter density rho sub(B) asymptotically equals 1.1 x 10 14 g cm - 3 . When the matter density becomes higher than rho sub(H) asymptotically equals 1.7 x 10 14 g cm - 3 , the bubbles melt into a homogeneous matter. (author)

  4. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P.G. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  5. Thermodynamics of pairing phase transition in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Afaque; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2014-01-01

    The pairing gaps, pairing energy, heat capacity and entropy are calculated within BCS (Bardeen- Cooper-Schrieffer) based quasi particle approach, including thermal fluctuations on pairing field within pairing model for all nuclei (light, medium, heavy and super heavy nuclei). Quasi particles approach in BCS theory was introduced and reformulated to study various properties. For thermodynamic behavior of nuclei at finite temperatures, the anomalous averages of creation and annihilation operators are introduced. It is solved self consistently at finite temperatures to obtain BCS Hamiltonian. After doing unitary transformation, we obtained the Hamiltonian in the diagonal form. Thus, one gets temperature dependence gap parameter and pairing energy for nuclei. Moreover, the energy at finite temperatures is the sum of the condensation energy and the thermal energy of fermionic quasi particles. With the help of BCS Hamiltonian, specific heat, entropy and free energy are calculated for different nuclei. In this paper the gap parameter occupation number and pairing energy as a function of temperature which is important for all the light, medium, heavy and super heavy nuclei is calculated. Moreover, the various thermo dynamical quantities like specific heat, entropy and free energy is also obtained for different nuclei. Thus, the thermodynamics of pairing phase transition in nuclei is studied

  6. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Ploszajczak, M.

    2003-01-01

    Structure of exotic radioactive nuclei having extreme neutron-to-proton ratios is different from that around the stability line. This short review discusses the progress in modeling of exotic nuclei in the nuclear ''Terra Incognita''. The consistent theoretical description of weakly bound systems requires a synergy between nuclear structure and nuclear reaction methods. (orig.)

  7. RFP for the Comet Nuclei Tour (CONTOUR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program.......This document describes the ASC Star Tracker (performance, functionality, requirements etc.) to The Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory for their Comet Nuclei TOUR (CONTOUR) Program....

  8. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  9. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Deformed Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the notion of partial dynamical symmetry in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  10. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Deformed Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    1996-07-01

    We discuss the notion of partial dynamical symmetry in relation to nuclear spectroscopy. Explicit forms of Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. An analysis of the resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions demonstrates the relevance of such partial symmetry to the spectroscopy of axially deformed nuclei. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Single Particle Entropy in Heated Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Syed, N. U. H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal motion of single particles represents the largest contribution to level density (or entropy) in atomic nuclei. The concept of single particle entropy is presented and shown to be an approximate extensive (additive) quantity for mid-shell nuclei. A few applications of single particle entropy are demonstrated

  12. Aero-acoustics noise assessment for Wind-Lens turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, I.; Mohamed, M.H.; Hafiz, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces an aero-acoustic computational study that investigates the noise caused by one of the most promising wind energy conversion concepts, namely the 'Wind-Lens' technology. The hybrid method - where the flow field and acoustic field are solved separately, was deemed to be an appropriate tool to compute this study. The need to investigate this phenomenon increased gradually, since the feasibility of utilizing Wind-Lens turbine within densely populated cities and urban areas depends largely on their noise generation. Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation and its integral solution are used to predict the noise radiating to the farfield. CFD Simulations of transient three-dimensional flow field using (URANS) unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are computed to acquire the acoustic sources location and sound intensity. Then, the noise propagates from the before-mentioned sources to pre-defined virtual microphones positioned in different locations. ANSYS-FLUENT is used to calculate the flow field on and around such turbines which is required for the FW-H code. Some effective parameters are investigated such as Wind-Lens shape, brim height and tip speed ratio. Comparison of the noise emitted from the bare wind turbine and different types of Wind-Lens turbine reveals that, the Wind-Lens generates higher noise intensity. - Highlights: • Aero-acoustic noise generated by wind turbines are one of the major challenges. • Noise from wind turbine equipped with a brimmed diffuser is investigated. • A computational aero-acoustic study using the hybrid method is introduced. • Effective parameters are studied such Wind-Lens shape, brim height and speed ratio. • The optimal shape has a moderate power coefficient and the less noise generation.

  13. Temporal integration of visual signals in lens compensation (a review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoying

    2013-09-01

    Postnatal eye growth is controlled by visual signals. When wearing a positive lens that causes images to be focused in front of the retina (myopic defocus), the eye reduces its rate of ocular elongation and increases choroidal thickness to move the retina forward to meet the focal plane of the eye. When wearing a negative lens that causes images to be focused behind the retina (hyperopic defocus), the opposite happens. This review summarizes how the retina integrates the constantly changing visual signals in a non-linear fashion to guide eye growth in chicks: (1a) When myopic or hyperopic defocus is interrupted by a daily episode of normal vision, normal vision is more effective in reducing myopia caused by hyperopic defocus than in reducing hyperopia caused by myopic defocus; (1b) when the eye experiences alternating myopic and hyperopic defocus, the eye is more sensitive to myopic defocus than to hyperopic defocus and tends to develop hyperopia, even if the duration of hyperopic defocus is much longer than the duration of myopic defocus; (2) when the eye experiences brief, repeated episodes of defocus by wearing either positive or negative lenses, lens compensation depends on the frequency and duration of individual episodes of lens wear, not just the total daily duration of lens wear; and (3) further analysis of the time constants for the hypothesized internal emmetropization signals show that, while it takes approximately the same amount of time for the signals to rise and saturate during lens-wearing episodes, the decline of the signals between episodes depends strongly on the sign of defocus and the ocular component. Although most extensively studied in chicks, the nonlinear temporal integration of visual signals has been found in other animal models. These findings may help explain the complex etiology of myopia in school-aged children and suggest ways to slow down myopia progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Definition, aims, and implementation of GA(2) LEN Urticaria Centers of Reference and Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, M; Metz, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: GA²LEN, the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, has recently launched a program for the development, interaction, and accreditation of centers of reference and excellence in special areas of allergy embedded in its overall quality management of allergy centers of excellence...... such as urticaria. AIMS: Here, we describe the aims, the requirements and deliverables, the application process, and the audit and accreditation protocol for GA²LEN UCAREs. RESULTS: The main aims of GA²LEN UCAREs are to provide excellence in urticaria management, to increase the knowledge of urticaria by research...... and education, and to promote the awareness of urticaria by advocacy activities. To become a certified GA²LEN UCARE, urticaria centers have to apply and fulfill 32 requirements, defined by specific deliverables that are assessed during an audit visit. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The GA²LEN UCARE program...

  15. The Risk of Contact Lens Wear and the Avoidance of Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farihah Tariq

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Contact lenses are lenses placed on the surface of the cornea to correct refractive errors such as myopia (short-sightedness, hypermetropia (far-sightedness and astigmatism. Lens-related complications are becoming a greater health concern as increasing number of individuals are using them as an alternative to spectacles. Contact lenses alter the natural ocular environment and reduce the efficacy of the innate defences. Although many complications are minor, microbial keratitis is potentially blinding and suspected cases should be rapidly diagnosed and referred to an ophthalmologist for treatment. Several risk factors have been identified with extended wear, poor hand hygiene, inadequate lens and lens-case care being the most significant. Promotion of good contact lens hygiene and practices are essential to reduce the adverse effects of contact lens wear.

  16. Non-invasive bleaching of the human lens by femtosecond laser photolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, L.; Eskildsen, Lars; Poel, Mike van der

    2010-01-01

    were susceptible to photobleaching by a non-invasive procedure and whether this would lead to optical rejuvenation of the lens. Methodology/Principal Findings: Nine human donor lenses were treated with an 800 nm infra-red femtosecond pulsed laser in a treatment zone measuring 1 x 1 x 0.52 mm. After...... laser treatment the age-induced yellow discoloration of the lens was markedly reduced and the transmission of light was increased corresponding to an optical rejuvenation of 3 to 7 years. Conclusions/Significance: The results demonstrate that the age-induced yellowing of the human lens can be bleached...... by a non-invasive procedure based on femtosecond laser photolysis. Cataract is a disease associated with old age. At the current technological stage, lens aging is delayed but with a treatment covering the entire lens volume complete optical rejuvenation is expected. Thus, femtosecond photolysis has...

  17. Qualification of a Null Lens Using Image-Based Phase Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Aronstein, David L.; Hill, Peter C.; Smith, J. Scott; Zielinski, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    In measuring the figure error of an aspheric optic using a null lens, the wavefront contribution from the null lens must be independently and accurately characterized in order to isolate the optical performance of the aspheric optic alone. Various techniques can be used to characterize such a null lens, including interferometry, profilometry and image-based methods. Only image-based methods, such as phase retrieval, can measure the null-lens wavefront in situ - in single-pass, and at the same conjugates and in the same alignment state in which the null lens will ultimately be used - with no additional optical components. Due to the intended purpose of a Dull lens (e.g., to null a large aspheric wavefront with a near-equal-but-opposite spherical wavefront), characterizing a null-lens wavefront presents several challenges to image-based phase retrieval: Large wavefront slopes and high-dynamic-range data decrease the capture range of phase-retrieval algorithms, increase the requirements on the fidelity of the forward model of the optical system, and make it difficult to extract diagnostic information (e.g., the system F/#) from the image data. In this paper, we present a study of these effects on phase-retrieval algorithms in the context of a null lens used in component development for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission. Approaches for mitigation are also discussed.

  18. Opaque contact lens color choices among women of different ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Amber; Prager, Thomas C; Bergmanson, Jan P G; Quintero, Sam; Harden, John; Perrigin, Judith; Piccolo, Marc

    2003-04-01

    The opaque contact lens (OCL) market is profitable and expanding. This pilot study sought to identify OCL color preferences among women of three ethnic groups, African American (A), white (W), and Hispanic Americans (H). Sixty-three brown-eyed female subjects (19 A; 22 W; 22 H), 18 to 35 years of age, with uncorrected near visual accuity of at least 20/50 were recruited. Each subject was presented with OCLs of three different color pattern designs in each of four colors (blue, green, gray, and hazel). The subjects viewed their appearance in a mirror while wearing each lens. Once all lenses had been observed, the subjects chose their lens color preference. Using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test, an ethnic preference was shown for all but the gray contact lenses. In group A 47.4% rated the hazel lens as their first choice whereas 0% chose the blue lens. In contrast, 45.5% of group C chose the blue lens over the other colors but did not favor the hazel lens, which was their first choice only 4.5% of the time. Group H demonstrated the most diversity in color preference, however, 36.4% chose green as their overall lenscolor preference. Distinct differences exist in OCL color preferences among the three ethnic groups studied. Improved understanding of this ethnic difference could increase the efficiency of the trial lens process while possibly decreasing inventory costs when one ethnic group dominates a practice patient base.

  19. Optimising RGP lens fitting in normal eyes using 3D topographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Eef; de Brabander, John; Lubberman, Ben; Marin, Gildas; Hendrikse, Fred

    2002-06-01

    To analyse, retrospectively, the effect of fitting characteristics on comfort of wear and the role that 3D topographic data can play in attaining an optimal lens fit with rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lenses in normal eyes. Included were 60 normal myopic eyes (1.00-5.00 D) with astigmatism limited to 2.00 D. Lenses were ordered empirically, based on traditional fitting rules. The initial fit based on traditional computation was accepted in 40% of the eyes. To achieve an acceptable fit, 15% of the eyes needed an adaptation of the back optic zone radius, in 28% switching from a multicurve to an aspheric lens design was indicated and in 17% a non-rotational symmetric lens design was favoured. The reason for changing the lens parameters could in 88% be attributed to mid-peripheral differences between corneal shape as found with 3D corneal topography. Average comfort of wear improved statistically significantly (chi(2), P<0.05) from 5.2 initially to 7.7 after 3 months in the group with optimal lens fits, while comfort slightly decreased (not significant) in the group with sub-optimal fits. Switching to a non-rotational symmetric lens design, when indicated, improved comfort significantly (chi(2), P<0.05) from 5.0 to 7.3. In normal eyes, the measurement of corneal shape, especially in the mid-peripheral regions, is of importance to optimise RGP lens fit. Optimised lens fits increases comfort of wear.

  20. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  1. Primary intraocular lens implantation for penetrating lens trauma in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R J; Yorston, D; Wood, M; Gilbert, C; Foster, A

    1998-09-01

    This study aimed to audit the surgical strategy of primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for cases of recent penetrating trauma involving the lens in an African population. Retrospective, noncomparative case series. Seventy-two cases are reported, including all patients who underwent primary intraocular lens implantation for traumatic cataract extraction performed within 1 month of injury between 1988 and 1996. Demographic characteristics and follow-up attendance rates are analyzed. Surgical technique and the occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications are reported. Visual outcomes are reported with detailed analysis for cases of poor visual outcome. Mean age was 14.3 years (standard deviation = 11.1), 57 (79%) were male and 15 (21%) were female (chi-square = 23.66, P capsule had been breached by the trauma in 27 (38%) cases, and 15 of these required anterior vitrectomy. Capsular fixation of the implant was achieved in 49% of patients, the remainder having sulcus fixation. Intraoperative rupture of the posterior capsule occurred in four cases. The only common postoperative complication was acute fibrinous anterior uveitis, which occurred in 29 (40%) patients, and 32% of patients followed up for at least 6 months required secondary posterior capsulotomy. This was more common in younger patients (chi-square = 4.2, P < 0.05). Corrected postoperative visual acuities were available for 51 patients, of which 71% achieved 20/60 or better visual acuity. Patients 6 years of age or younger were less likely to achieve 20/60 (chi-square = 6.61, P = 0.01). This surgical strategy has proved successful, producing good visual results and causing no sight-threatening complications. Primary posterior capsulotomy may be appropriate for younger patients.

  2. A double potential model for neutron halo nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Afsar

    2003-01-01

    It is shown here that loosely bound halo structure of neutron rich nuclei and the ground state spin of single neutron halo nuclei are correlated and are consistently explained if one assumes a double potential shell model for these nuclei.

  3. A new spin on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.; Wadsworth, B.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic rotation is a new phenomenon that is forcing physicists to rethink their understanding of what goes on inside the nucleus The rotation of quantum objects has a long and distinguished history in physics. In 1912 the Danish scientist Niels Bjerrum was the first to recognize that the rotation of molecules is quantized. In 1938 Edward Teller and John Wheeler observed similar features in the spectra of excited nuclei, and suggested that this was caused by the nucleus rotating. But a more complete explanation had to wait until 1951, when Aage Bohr (the son of Niels) pointed out that rotation was a consequence of the nucleus deforming from its spherical shape. We owe much of our current understanding of nuclear rotation to the work of Bohr and Ben Mottelson, who shared the 1975 Nobel Prize for Physics with James Rainwater for developing a model of the nucleus that combined the individual and collective motions of the neutrons and protons inside the nucleus. What makes it possible for a nucleus to rotate? Quantum mechanically, a perfect sphere cannot rotate because it appears the same when viewed from any direction and there is no point of reference against which its change in position can be detected. To see the rotation the spherical symmetry must be broken to allow an orientation in space to be defined. For example, a diatomic molecule, which has a dumbbell shape, can rotate about the two axes perpendicular to its axis of symmetry. A quantum mechanical treatment of a diatomic molecule leads to a very simple relationship between rotational energy, E, and angular momentum. This energy is found to be proportional to J(J + 1), where J is the angular momentum quantum number. The molecule also has a magnetic moment that is proportional to J. These concepts can be applied to the atomic nucleus. If the distribution of mass and/or charge inside the nucleus becomes non-spherical then the nucleus will be able to rotate. The rotation is termed ''collective'' because many

  4. Ice Nuclei from Birch Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Seifried, Teresa; Winkler, Philipp; Schmale, David, III; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    While the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation in the atmosphere is known, we still know very little about the substances triggering these freezing events. Recent findings support the theory that biological ice nuclei (IN) exhibit the ability to play an important role in these processes. Huffman et al. (2013) showed a burst of biological IN over woodlands triggered by rain events. Birch pollen are known to release a high number of efficient IN if incubated in water (Pummer et al. 2012). Therefore birches are of interest in our research on this topic. Plants native to the timberline, such as birch trees, have to cope with very cold climatic conditions, rendering freezing avoidance impossible. These plants trigger freezing in their extracellular spaces to control the freezing process and avoid intracellular freezing, which would have lethal consequences. The plants hereby try to freeze at a temperature well above homogeneous freezing temperatures but still at temperatures low enough to not be effected by brief night frosts. To achieve this, IN are an important tool. The specific objective of our work was to study the potential sources and distribution of IN in birch trees. We collected leaves, fruit, bark, and trunk cores from a series of mature birch trees in Tyrol, Austria at different altitudes and sampling sites. We also collected samples from a birch tree in an urban park in Vienna, Austria. Our data show a sampling site dependence and the distribution of IN throughout the tree. Our data suggest that leaves, bark, and wood of birch can function as a source of IN, which are easily extracted with water. The IN are therefore not restricted to pollen. Hence, the amount of IN, which can be released from birch trees, is tremendous and has been underrated so far. Future work aims to elucidate the nature, contribution, and potential ecological roles of IN from birch trees in different habitats. Huffman, J.A., Prenni, A.J., DeMott, P.J., Pöhlker, C., Mason, R

  5. Metallic plates lens focalizing a high power microwave beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuffi, L.

    1987-08-01

    A metallic grating composed of thin parallel plates opportunely spaced, permits to correct the phase of an incident high power microwave beam. In this work we show how it is possible to obtain a beam focalisation (lens), a beam deflection (prisma), or a variation in the polarization (polarizer) using parallel metallic plates. The main design parameters are here presented, in order to obtain the wanted phase modification keeping low the diffraction, the reflected power, the ohmic losses and avoiding breakdowns. Following the given criteria, a metallic plate lens has been realized to focalize the 200 KW, 100 msec 60 GHz beam used in the ECRH experiment on the TFR tokamak. The experimental beam concentration followed satisfactory the design requirements. In fact, the maximum intensity increased about twice the value without lens. In correspondence of this distance a reduction of the beam size of about 50% have been measured for the -3 dB radius. The lens supported high power tests without breakdowns or increase of the reflected power

  6. Time lens assisted photonic sampling extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Keith Gordon

    Telecommunication bandwidth demands have dramatically increased in recent years due to Internet based services like cloud computing and storage, large file sharing, and video streaming. Additionally, sensing systems such as wideband radar, magnetic imaging resonance systems, and complex modulation formats to handle large data transfer in telecommunications require high speed, high resolution analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) to interpret the data. Accurately processing and acquiring the information at next generation data rates from these systems has become challenging for electronic systems. The largest contributors to the electronic bottleneck are bandwidth and timing jitter which limit speed and reduce accuracy. Optical systems have shown to have at least three orders of magnitude increase in bandwidth capabilities and state of the art mode locked lasers have reduced timing jitters into thousands of attoseconds. Such features have encouraged processing signals without the use of electronics or using photonics to assist electronics. All optical signal processing has allowed the processing of telecommunication line rates up to 1.28 Tb/s and high resolution analog-to-digital converters in the 10s of gigahertz. The major drawback to these optical systems is the high cost of the components. The application of all optical processing techniques such as a time lens and chirped processing can greatly reduce bandwidth and cost requirements of optical serial to parallel converters and push photonically assisted ADCs into the 100s of gigahertz. In this dissertation, the building blocks to a high speed photonically assisted ADC are demonstrated, each providing benefits to its own respective application. A serial to parallel converter using a continuously operating time lens as an optical Fourier processor is demonstrated to fully convert a 160-Gb/s optical time division multiplexed signal to 16 10-Gb/s channels with error free operation. Using chirped processing, an

  7. Research on one manual zoom liquid lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cunhua; Shi, Yongpeng; Li, Wenjiao; Li, Congcong

    2011-11-01

    In liquid zoom lens, the accurate fixed-focus location needs the accurate calculation of focal length. That is to say, the accurate calculation of surface curvature must be obtained. Therefore, the research of their relation in liquid zoom lens becomes extremely important which has a directly theoretical instruction for the design of liquid zoom lenses. In our paper, the relation is studied. A manual liquid lens is reported which has upper and nether components with specificaton Φ12×5mm. The zoom lens is obtained by the upper component circumvolving down into the nether components.

  8. Numerical analyses of planer plasmonic focusing lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yen-Yu; Lee, Yeeu-Chang

    2018-03-01

    The use of polystyrene (PS) sphere lithography has been widely applied in the fabrication of micron and nano structures, due to their low cost and ease of fabrication in large scale applications. This study evaluated the feasibility of plasmonic lens base on metal thin films with nanohole structures fabricated by using PS sphere lithography through three-dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. We calculated the intensity profile of lens with various wavelength of incident light, lens size, cutting positions, diameters of nanohole, and periods of nanohole to investigate the geometric parameters influence on the focusing properties of the plasmonic lens.

  9. Symmetry and Phase Transitions in Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iachello, F.

    2009-01-01

    Phase transitions in nuclei have received considerable attention in recent years, especially after the discovery that, contrary to expectations, systems at the critical point of a phase transition display a simple structure. In this talk, quantum phase transitions (QPT), i.e. phase transitions that occur as a function of a coupling constant that appears in the quantum Hamiltonian, H, describing the system, will be reviewed and experimental evidence for their occurrence in nuclei will be presented. The phase transitions discussed in the talk will be shape phase transitions. Different shapes have different symmetries, classified by the dynamic symmetries of the Interacting Boson Model, U(5), SU(3) and SO(6). Very recently, the concept of Quantum Phase Transitions has been extended to Excited State Quantum Phase Transitions (ESQPT). This extension will be discussed and some evidence for incipient ESQPT in nuclei will be presented. Systems at the critical point of a phase transition are called 'critical systems'. Approximate analytic formulas for energy spectra and other properties of 'critical nuclei', in particular for nuclei at the critical point of the second order U(5)-SO(6) transition, called E(5), and along the line of first order U(5)-SU(3) transitions, called X(5), will be presented. Experimental evidence for 'critical nuclei' will be also shown. Finally, the microscopic derivation of shape phase transitions in nuclei within the framework of density functional methods will be briefly discussed.(author)

  10. Exchange of tears under a contact lens is driven by distortions of the contact lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kara L; Ross, David S

    2014-12-01

    We studied the flow of the post-lens tear film under a soft contact lens to understand how the design parameters of contact lenses can affect ocular health. When a soft contact lens is inserted, the blinking eyelid causes the lens to stretch in order to conform to the shape of the eye. The deformed contact lens acts to assume its un-deformed shape and thus generates a suction pressure in the post-lens tear film. In consequence, the post-lens tear fluid moves; it responds to the suction pressure. The suction pressure may draw in fresh fluid from the edge of the lens, or it may eject fluid there, as the lens reassumes its un-deformed shape. In this article, we develop a mathematical model of the flow of the post-lens tear fluid in response to the mechanical suction pressure of a deformed contact lens. We predict the amount of exchange of fluid exchange under a contact lens and we explore the influence of the eye's shape on the rate of exchange of fluid. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Evolution of planetary nebula nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of planetary nebula nuclei (PNNs) is examined with the aid of the most recent available stellar evolution calculations and new observations of these objects. Their expected distribution in the log L-log T plane is calculated based upon the stellar evolutionary models of Paczynski, Schoenberner and Iben, the initial mass function derived by Miller and Scalo, and various assumptions concerning mass loss during post-main sequence evolution. The distribution is found to be insensitive both to the assumed range of main-sequence progenitor mass and to reasonable variations in the age and the star forming history of the galactic disk. Rather, the distribution is determined by the strong dependence of the rate of stellar evolution upon core mass, the steepness of the initial mass function, and to a lesser extent the finite lifetime of an observable planetary nebula. The theoretical distributions are rather different than any of those inferred from earlier observations. Possible observational selection effects that may be responsible are examined, as well as the intrinsic uncertainties associated with the theoretical model predictions. An extensive photometric and smaller photographic survey of southern hemisphere planetary nebulae (PNs) is presented

  12. Clusters in Nuclei. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This second volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol.1), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics: - Microscopic cluster models - Neutron halo and break-up reactions - Break-up reaction models for two- and three-cluster projectiles - Clustering effects within the di-nuclear model - Nuclear alpha-particle condensates - Clusters in nuclei: experimental perspectives By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical style of presentation throughout, these lectures will serve as both a reference and an advanced teaching manual for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  13. Ku80 Counters Oxidative Stress-Induced DNA Damage and Cataract Formation in the Human Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew John Oliver; Ball, Simon Sidney Robert; Manzar, Kamal; Bowater, Richard Peter; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the human lens leads to a wide range of damage including DNA strand breaks, which are likely to contribute to cataract formation. The protein Ku80 is a fundamental component of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double strand breaks. This study investigates the putative impact of Ku80 in cataract prevention in the human lens. The present study used the human lens epithelial cell line FHL124 and whole human lens organ culture. Targeted siRNA was used to deplete Ku80, with Western blot and immunocytochemistry employed to assess Ku80 expression levels. Oxidative stress was induced with hydrogen peroxide and DNA strand breaks measured by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci counts. Visual quality of whole human lenses was measured with image analysis software. Expression of Ku80 was predominately found in the cell nucleus of both FHL124 cells and native human lens epithelium. Treatment of FHL124 cells and whole lens cultures with siRNA targeted against Ku80 resulted in a significant knockdown at the protein level. Application of oxidative stress (30 μM H2O2) created more DNA strand breaks when added to Ku80 knockdown cells than in scrambled siRNA control cells as determined by the alkaline comet assay and the number of γH2AX foci. In whole lens cultures, exposure to 1 mM H2O2 resulted in more lens opacity in Ku80 knockdown lenses than match-paired controls. Depletion of Ku80 in the lens through acute change or a consequence of aging is likely to increase levels of DNA strand breaks, which could negatively influence physiological function and promote lens opacity. It is therefore feasible that Ku80 plays a role in retarding cataract formation.

  14. LED package with Dome/side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens achieved by dispensing and geometry transferring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Chien, Chien-Lin; Huang, Yu-Che; Hu, Syue-Fong; Sun, Chang-Wen; Chang, Chung-Min; Hsu, Chih-Peng; Yip, Ming-Chuen; Fang, Weileun

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a structure design and process method for lens type LED package. Dome type or side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens without molding process are achieved. The ceramic ring is adopted as the confine for the encapsulant. The surface intension along the sidewall of ceramic ring and silicone surface, the cohesion force and the gravity of silicone determine the shape of dome type silicone lens. The cone shape tooling coated with a releasing material is immersed into the dome type silicone lens before the silicone fully hardening. After curing simultaneously, to remove the tooling from package, the package with side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens is finished. With the mentioned architecture and process, this LED package herein has three merits, (1) to improve light extraction efficiency: reduce the chance of total internal reflection by the geometry of dome type silicone lens. (2)To enhance the flexibility of LED package design, the die placement location would be constrained by the mold in the traditional package process. (3) Mold-less side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens. Furthermore, two types of cone shape tooling are implemented and compared for side-emitting-enhancement silicone lens. Measurement results show the ratio between the lens high and lens radius could achieve 0.9:1. The view angles of dome type and side-emitting-enhancement LED packaged devices can reach 153° and 180 °, respectively. As using the same brightness grade of LED chip, the luminous flux is increasing 15% as compared the dome type package with the commercial PLCC (Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier) type package. The luminous flux of side-emitting-enhancement LED package decreases 8% as compared with the dome type one.

  15. Formation of hydroxyl radicals in the human lens is related to the severity of nuclear cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2000-01-01

    was significantly more intense in the nuclear region of the type IV compared to the type II lenses. The ability of individual lens nuclei and cortices to stimulate HO. production was positively correlated. The DMPO-HO. signal was competitively inhibited by ethanol, confirming that the DMPO-HO. signal was due to HO...... of redox-active metal ions in the tissue. Analysis of lenses for total Fe and Cu (using atomic absorption spectrometry) showed that the more advanced type IV lenses tended to have higher Fe, but similar Cu, levels compared to the type II lenses. The levels of both metals were lower in non...

  16. Coupled-cluster computations of atomic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, G; Papenbrock, T; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Dean, D J

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade, coupled-cluster theory has seen a renaissance in nuclear physics, with computations of neutron-rich and medium-mass nuclei. The method is efficient for nuclei with product-state references, and it describes many aspects of weakly bound and unbound nuclei. This report reviews the technical and conceptual developments of this method in nuclear physics, and the results of coupled-cluster calculations for nucleonic matter, and for exotic isotopes of helium, oxygen, calcium, and some of their neighbors.

  17. Hot nuclei: high temperatures, high angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1991-01-01

    A review is made of the present status concerning the production of hot nuclei above 5 MeV temperature, concentrating mainly on the possible experimental evidences for the attainment of a critical temperature, on the existence of dynamical limitations to the energy deposition and on the experimental signatures for the formation of hot spinning nuclei. The data strongly suggest a nuclear disassembly in collisions involving very heavy ions at moderate incident velocities. Furthermore, hot nuclei seem to be quite stable against rotation on a short time scale. (author) 26 refs.; 12 figs

  18. The influence of gamma-irradiation on induced by ultraviolet light damages of rats' crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevich, I.B.; Pinchuk, S.V.; Vadetskaya, T.N.; Klimko, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Males of rats (8 - 10 month old) had been irradiated and then ultraviolet inducing oxidized glutathione, proteins and lipids dedicated from crystalline lens have been studied. The result evidences increasing of damage components after irradiation

  19. Octupole deformation in neutron-rich actinides and superheavy nuclei and the role of nodal structure of single-particle wavefunctions in extremely deformed structures of light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.; Agbemava, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    Octupole deformed shapes in neutron-rich actinides and superheavy nuclei as well as extremely deformed shapes of the N∼ Z light nuclei have been investigated within the framework of covariant density functional theory. We confirmed the presence of new region of octupole deformation in neutron-rich actinides with the center around Z∼ 96,N∼ 196 but our calculations do not predict octupole deformation in the ground states of superheavy Z≥slant 108 nuclei. As exemplified by the study of 36Ar, the nodal structure of the wavefunction of occupied single-particle orbitals in extremely deformed structures allows to understand the formation of the α-clusters in very light nuclei, the suppression of the α-clusterization with the increase of mass number, the formation of ellipsoidal mean-field type structures and nuclear molecules.

  20. Environmental properties related to active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzer, Lianne H.

    There continues to be significant controversy regarding the mechanisms responsible for the initiation of activity in galactic nuclei. It is well understood that the non-thermal energy produced by an AGN is due to accretion onto a supermassive black hole. It has not yet been determined, however, what leads particular galaxies to become active. An accurate exploration into what triggers an AGN demands an analysis of a large sample of galaxies across a diverse set of environments. In this work, we investigate possible environmental influences by carrying out a statistical investigation of galaxy groups. Using the catalogue of Yang et al. (2007), in which groups of galaxies containing between 2 and 20 members with redshifts between 0.01 -- 0.20 were taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we investigate the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within these groups and compare it to the sample of isolated galaxies also obtained from Yang et al. (2007). After correcting our spectroscopic data for extinction and underlying stellar absorption, we classify the galaxy sample using relevant emission-line ratios. We propose an alternate method for classifying emission-line galaxies, including AGN, which builds upon standard diagnostic utilities used for optical classification and includes uncertainties. Such classification probabilities offer a more robust and consistent method of investigating the effect of group environments with galaxy type. We find our sample to be a fair representation of the local universe by comparing the luminosity function of our entire data set to that of Blanton et al. (2001), Blanton et al. (2003b), and Montero-Dorta & Prada (2009). The evidence also suggests that the luminosity function of galaxies differs between isolated galaxies and galaxies in groups. We find a significant increase in the fraction of AGNs identified in grouped environments. On the other hand, we find a higher fraction of starforming galaxies within isolated systems. We

  1. New possible properties of atomic nuclei investigated by non linear methods: Fractal and recurrence quantification analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Conte, Elio; Khrennikov, Andrei Yu.; Zbilut, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time we apply the methodologies of nonlinear analysis to investigate atomic matter. We use these methods in the analysis of Atomic Weights and of Mass Number of atomic nuclei. Using the AutoCorrelation Function and Mutual Information we establish the presence of nonlinear effects in the mechanism of increasing mass of atomic nuclei considered as a function of the atomic number. We find that increasing mass is divergent, possibly chaotic. We also investigate the possible existenc...

  2. Fish-eye lens designs and their relative performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumler, James J.; Bauer, Martin L.

    2000-10-01

    New panoramic and immersive digital imaging developments have generated increased interest in high performance fisheye camera lenses suitable for 35 mm single lens reflex (SLR) cameras. Special concerns for such applications are the uniformity of illumination and radial image mapping. Because two hemispherical images are digitally stitched together to form a complete 360-degree x 180-degree image, the performance of the lens at the 90 degree (preferably more than 90 degree) edge of the fisheye image is just as important as the center of the image. Lateral color, high order distortion (edge compression) and severe drop-off of illumination at the full field become obvious image defects and cause seams in the immersive image. Fisheye lens designs have widely varying relative illumination and distortion across the hemispherical field of view of the lens. After describing the contributing factors to relative illumination, we survey a collection of fisheye designs and compare their illumination performance, radial mapping and lateral color. A new method of measuring relative illumination and radial mapping in the laboratory is described and results on commercially available fish-eye lenses are presented.

  3. TU-E-201-02: Eye Lens Dosimetry From CT Perfusion Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.

    2015-01-01

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  4. TU-E-201-02: Eye Lens Dosimetry From CT Perfusion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. [Toshiba America Medical Systems (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  5. TU-E-201-00: Eye Lens Dosimetry for Patients and Staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Madan M. Rehani, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston Methods for Eye Lens Dosimetry and Studies On Lens Opacities with Interventionalists Radiation induced cataract is a major threat among staff working in interventional suites. Nearly 16 million interventional procedures are performed annually in USA. Recent studies by the principal investigator’s group, primarily among interventional cardiologists, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, show posterior subcapsular (PSC) changes in the eye lens in 38–53% of main operators and 21–45% of support staff. These changes have potential to lead to cataract in future years, as per information from A-Bomb survivors. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has reduced dose limit for staff by a factor of 7.5 (from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y). With increasing emphasis on radiation induced cataracts and reduction in threshold dose for eye lens, there is a need to implement strategies for estimating eye lens dose. Unfortunately eye lens dosimetry is at infancy when it comes to routine application. Various approaches are being tried namely direct measurement using active or passive dosimeters kept close to eyes, retrospective estimations and lastly correlating patient dose in interventional procedures with staff eye dose. The talk will review all approaches available and ongoing active research in this area, as well as data from surveys done in Europe on status of eye dose monitoring in interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The talk will provide update on how good is Hp(10) against Hp(3), estimations from CTDI values, Monte Carlo based simulations and current status of eye lens dosimetry in USA and Europe. The cataract risk among patients is in CT examinations of the head. Since radiation induced cataract predominantly occurs in posterior sub-capsular (PSC) region and is thus distinguishable from age or drug related cataracts and is also preventable, actions on

  6. Design of Novel Compound Fresnel Lens for High-Performance Photovoltaic Concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new design of compound Fresnel-R concentrator which is composed of two lenses: a primary lens (Fresnel lens that works by total internal reflection at outer sawteeth but refraction at inner sawteeth, and a ringed secondary lens that works by refraction. In contrast to previous Fresnel lens concentrators, this design increases the acceptance angle, improves the irradiance uniformity on the solar cell, and reduces the aspect ratio significantly. Meanwhile several sawteeth of the primary Fresnel lens can correspond to a same ring of secondary lens, which will efficiently lower the complexity of designing and manufacturing. Moreover, in order to reduce the influence of manufacturing tolerances and to increase the optical efficiency further, the central part of the bottom of the secondary lens which directly adhered to the solar cell is designed as a cone-shaped prism to collect the sunlight that does not reach the solar cell. Finally, we provide simulations and analyses of the design method an optical efficiency more than 80% and an aspect ratio smaller than 0.5 can be achieved.

  7. Microbial contamination of soft contact lenses & accessories in asymptomatic contact lens users

    OpenAIRE

    Deeksha V Thakur; Ujjwala N Gaikwad

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: With increasing use of soft contact lenses the incidence of contact lens induced infections is also increasing. This study was aimed to assess the knowledge of new and existing contact lens users about the risk of microbial contamination associated with improper use and maintenance of contact lenses, type of microbial flora involved and their potential to cause ophthalmic infections. Methods: Four samples each from 50 participants (n=200) were collected from the l...

  8. [Acanthamoeba isolation from contact lens solution of contact lens wearers without keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, R; Ishibashi, Y; Hommura, S; Ishii, K

    1994-05-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis seems to be associated with wearing contact lenses. As controls, we surveyed contact lens wearers without keratitis. Contact lens solutions of 93 persons were examined in order to identify risk factors for contamination by Acanthamoeba. Therefore, the contact lens disinfection system and storage schedules were studied in each case. Acanthamoeba organisms were isolated from 4 specimens (4.3%). The incidence of Acanthamoeba was higher in specimens of soft contact lens solution than in those of hard contact lens solution, and all the Acanthamoeba positive cases had been using tap water.

  9. Primary anterior chamber intraocular lens for the treatment of severe crystalline lens subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard S; Fine, I Howard; Packer, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Subluxated cataractous and clear lenses are commonly treated by limbal or pars plana lensectomy followed by primary or secondary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Adjunctive capsular prosthetic devices have facilitated lens removal and IOL centration in these challenging cases but have also added complexity and potential complications to the procedure. Although crystalline lens extraction may be required to clear the visual axis in mild to moderate lens subluxations, we propose insertion of a primary anterior chamber IOL without lens extraction in severe subluxations when the eye is optically aphakic or can be made functionally aphakic following neodymium:YAG laser zonulysis. Two cases demonstrating this approach are presented.

  10. Parton distributions in nuclei: Quagma or quagmire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information on the way quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on Drell-Yan and /psi/ production on nuclei and caution against premature use of these as signals for quagma in heavy-ion collisions. If we are to identify the formation of quark-gluon plasma in heavy-ion collisions by changes in the production rates for /psi/ relative to Drell-Yan lepton pairs, then it is important that we first understand the ''intrinsic'' changes in parton distributions in nuclei relative to free nucleons. So, emerging knowledge on how quark, antiquark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons is reviewed, and the emerging theoretical concensus is briefly summarized.

  11. New vistas of exotic heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocks, J.F.C.; Butler, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    We report studies of examples of reflection-asymmetric nuclei which are difficult to access using compound nucleus reactions. The most octupole deformed nuclei should be uranium isotopes with N ∼ 132; preliminary measurements of these very fissile nuclei suggest that they are within reach of current spectroscopic techniques. The octupole radium isotopes with N > 132 and radon isotopes are not accessible by reactions employing stable targets and beams; we have shown that multinucleon transfer reactions can populate these nuclei with sufficient yield for their structure to be determined. We report high spin studies in 218,220,222 Rn and 222,224,226 Ra which reveal upbending effects in this mass region for the first time and show that the electric dipole moment is constant with spin. (author)

  12. Superheavy nuclei: a relativistic mean field outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasjev, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of quasi-particle spectra in the heaviest A∼250 nuclei with spectroscopic data provides an additional constraint for the choice of effective interaction for the description of superheavy nuclei. It strongly suggests that only the parametrizations which predict Z = 120 and N = 172 as shell closures are reliable for superheavy nuclei within the relativistic mean field theory. The influence of the central depression in the density distribution of spherical superheavy nuclei on the shell structure is studied. A large central depression produces large shell gaps at Z = 120 and N = 172. The shell gaps at Z = 126 and N = 184 are favoured by a flat density distribution in the central part of the nucleus. It is shown that approximate particle number projection (PNP) by means of the Lipkin-Nogami (LN) method removes pairing collapse seen at these gaps in the calculations without PNP

  13. Nuclear Computational Low Energy Initiative (NUCLEI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Sanjay K. [University of Washington

    2017-08-14

    This is the final report for University of Washington for the NUCLEI SciDAC-3. The NUCLEI -project, as defined by the scope of work, will develop, implement and run codes for large-scale computations of many topics in low-energy nuclear physics. Physics to be studied include the properties of nuclei and nuclear decays, nuclear structure and reactions, and the properties of nuclear matter. The computational techniques to be used include Quantum Monte Carlo, Configuration Interaction, Coupled Cluster, and Density Functional methods. The research program will emphasize areas of high interest to current and possible future DOE nuclear physics facilities, including ATLAS and FRIB (nuclear structure and reactions, and nuclear astrophysics), TJNAF (neutron distributions in nuclei, few body systems, and electroweak processes), NIF (thermonuclear reactions), MAJORANA and FNPB (neutrino-less double-beta decay and physics beyond the Standard Model), and LANSCE (fission studies).

  14. Observation of spinodal decomposition in nuclei?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarnera, A.; Colonna, M.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    Multifragmentation in heavy ion collisions is investigated in the framework of mean-field theory, in order to gain information on the equation of state of nuclear matter. Spinodal decomposition in nuclei is studied. (K.A.)

  15. Infrared Observations of Cometary Dust and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey

    2004-01-01

    This bibliography lists citations for publications published under the grant. Subjects of the publications include cometary dust, instellar and interplanetary dust, comet nuclei and comae, Comet Hale-Bopp, infrared observations of comets, mass loss, and comet break-up.

  16. Critical-Point Structure in Finite Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leviatan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Properties of quantum shape-phase transitions in finite nuclei are considered in the framework of the interacting boson model. Special emphasis is paid to the dynamics at the critical-point of a general first-order phase transition

  17. Protection of the eye lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The limit of radiation exposure for eye lens is going to decrease dramatically from 150 to 20 mSv as a transposition into the French law of a CIPR (International Commission for Radiation Protection) directive. Sanitary studies have shown that radiologists are more likely by a factor of 3.8 to get eye lens opacities than the rest of the population. The wearing of protective glasses is recommended and in order to get a better monitoring of the radiation dose new dosimeters have been designed, they can be worn on the glass frame of directly stuck on the skin near the eyes. A study has shown that veterinary surgeons that are accustomed to stay near animals to keep them quiet during radiological exams are prone to receive high doses as well as physicians that use hypnosis to decrease the level of anxiety of their patients during radiological exams. Radiation exposure of radiologists can be mitigated through: the use of protective shields and equipment and the optimization of the dose delivered to the patient. (A.C.)

  18. Color corrected Fresnel lens for solar concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritchman, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    A new linear convex Fresnel lens with its groove side down is described. The design philosophy is similar to the highly concentrating two focal Fresnel lens but including a correction for chromatic aberration. A solar concentration ratio as high as 80 is achieved. For wide acceptance angles the concentration nears the theoretical maximum. (author)

  19. Modified suturing contact lens for penetrating keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, S G; Stewart, H L

    1978-11-01

    The authors have previously described a suturing contact lens that protects the corneal endothelium by aiding in the maintenance of the anterior chamber during penetrating keratoplasty. This report describes structural modifications of the suturing contact lens, which improve its stability and effectiveness. An additional configuration for use in corneal lacerations is presented.

  20. Charged black lens in de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2018-02-01

    We obtain a charged black lens solution in the five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a positive cosmological constant. It is shown that the solution obtained here describes the formation of a black hole with the spatial cross section of a sphere from that of the lens space of L (n ,1 ) in five-dimensional de Sitter space.

  1. High energy particle interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czyz, W.

    1978-01-01

    The recent interest in multiparticle production processes on nuclei was triggered by re-discovering their 'enigmatic simplicity' which has been known to cosmic ray physicists for over 20 years: the mean multiplicity and angular distributions of relativistic secondaries produced on nuclei do not differ markedly from what emerges from p-p collisions. The author considers how such reactions may provide a way of obtaining details of hadron structure. (Auth.)

  2. Nuclei far off the stability line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenyes, T.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of the formation of some ''exotic'' nuclei far off the stability line were reviewed in addition to the relevant results of research in this field. Results in beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, heavy-ion-spectroscopy, achievements in the fields of measuring the atomic mass, the moment, and the radius of the nuclei as well as some astronomical aspects were described. (Z.P.)

  3. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  4. Oscillations of atomic nuclei in crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Vdovenkov, V. A.

    2002-01-01

    Oscillations of atomic nuclei in crystals are considered in this paper. It is shown that elastic nuclei oscillations relatively electron envelops (inherent, I-oscillations) and waves of such oscillations can exist in crystals at adiabatic condition. The types and energy quantums of I-oscillations for different atoms are determined. In this connection the adiabatic crystal model is offered. Each atom in the adiabatic model is submitted as I-oscillator whose stationary oscillatory terms are sho...

  5. Hot nuclei, limiting temperatures and excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.

    1986-09-01

    Hot fusion nuclei are produced in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies (20-100 MeV/U). Information on the maximum excitation energy per nucleon -and temperatures- indicated by the experimental data is compared to the predictions of static and dynamical calculations. Temperatures around 5-6 MeV are reached and seem to be the limit of formation of thermally equilibrated fusion nuclei

  6. Thomas Fermi model of finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Rafelski, J.

    1977-01-01

    A relativistic Thomas-Fermi model of finite-nuclei is considered. The effective nuclear interaction is mediated by exchanges of isoscalar scalar and vector mesons. The authors include also a self-interaction of the scalar meson field and the Coulomb repulsion of the protons. The parameters of the model are constrained by the average nuclear properties. The Thomas-Fermi equations are solved numerically for finite, stable nuclei. The particular case of 208 82 Pb is considered in more detail. (Auth.)

  7. Parity and time reversal violation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1987-01-01

    The current status of investigations into parity (P) and time-reversal (T) violation in nuclei is considered. Nuclear P-violation is an expected consequence of the standard model. It has been observed in a wide variety of nuclei (from A=2, to A∼ 200) by using a wide variety of reactions (reactions induced by polarized neutrons and polarized protons, γ-decay, α-decay, and (α, γ) reactions)

  8. The Giant Dipole Resonance in hot nuclei. Experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.

    1994-12-01

    Some of the most recent experimental results on the GDR in hot nuclei are presented. All data on the γ-decay of the GDR show a saturation of the apparent width and a saturation of the yield. However, it is not clear until now, if these effects are related to a GDR width which either saturates or increases continuously with the excitation energy. Very new data associated to selected exit channels could help to clarify the situation. (author). 14 refs., 7 figs

  9. Isolated HeLa cell nuclei synthesize meaningful DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensen, T; Prydz, H

    1985-01-01

    DNA replicated at the beginning of S phase was labelled by incubating nuclei isolated from cells arrested at the G/S border with radioactive deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate in a reaction mixture sustaining DNA synthesis. By hybridization against ribosomal RNA bound to nitrocellulose, the fraction of the labelled DNA which was complementary to rRNA could be quantified, and the stability of the RNA-DNA hybrids could be estimated by sequential elution of DNA at increasing temperatures. The resu...

  10. Disappearance of collective motion in very hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piattelli, P.; Suomijaervi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gillibert, A.; Le Faou, J.H.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Roynette, J. C.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A

    1999-03-29

    Gamma-rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies above 300 MeV, formed in the {sup 36}Ar + {sup 98}Mo reaction at 37 AMeV, have been measured. A comparison with previous experiments at lower bombarding energies shows a decrease of the {gamma}-yield with increasing incident energy. A tentative interpretation based on dynamical calculations is proposed.

  11. Disappearance of collective motion in very hot nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattelli, P.; Suomijärvi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gillibert, A.; Le Faou, J. H.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Roynette, J. C.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma-rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies above 300 MeV, formed in the 36Ar + 98Mo reaction at 37 AMeV, have been measured. A comparison with previous experiments at lower bombarding energies shows a decrease of the γ-yield with increasing incident energy. A tentative interpretation based on dynamical calculations is proposed.

  12. Disappearance of collective motion in very hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piattelli, P.; Suomijaervi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gillibert, A.; Le Faou, J.H.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Roynette, J. C.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies above 300 MeV, formed in the 36 Ar + 98 Mo reaction at 37 AMeV, have been measured. A comparison with previous experiments at lower bombarding energies shows a decrease of the γ-yield with increasing incident energy. A tentative interpretation based on dynamical calculations is proposed

  13. Disappearance of collective motion in very hot nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Piattelli, P; Blumenfeld, Y; Santonocito, D; Agodi, C; Alamanos, N; Alba, R; Auger, F; Bellia, G; Chomaz, P; Colonna, M; Coniglione, R; Del Zoppo, A; Finocchiaro, P; Frascaria, N; Gillibert, A; Le Faou, J H; Loukachine, K; Maiolino, C; Migneco, E; Roynette, J C; Sapienza, P; Scarpaci, J A

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies above 300 MeV, formed in the sup 3 sup 6 Ar + sup 9 sup 8 Mo reaction at 37 AMeV, have been measured. A comparison with previous experiments at lower bombarding energies shows a decrease of the gamma-yield with increasing incident energy. A tentative interpretation based on dynamical calculations is proposed.

  14. Contact Lens Use in the Civil Airman Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakagawara, Van

    2002-01-01

    ...) aeromedical certificate. Although contact lens technology has advanced dramatically in recent years, the aviation environment may still have adverse effects on contact lens performance in some flight situations...

  15. Opto-mechatronics issues in solid immersion lens based near-field recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Cheol; Yoon, Yong-Joong; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Gon; Kim, Wan-Chin; Choi, Hyun; Lim, Seungho; Yang, Tae-Man; Choi, Moon-Ho; Yang, Hyunseok; Rhim, Yoon-Chul; Park, Young-Pil

    2007-06-01

    We analyzed the effects of an external shock on a collision problem in a solid immersion lens (SIL) based near-field recording (NFR) through a shock response analysis and proposed a possible solution to this problem with adopting a protector and safety mode. With this proposed method the collision between SIL and media can be avoided. We showed possible solution for contamination problem in SIL based NFR through a numerical air flow analysis. We also introduced possible solid immersion lens designs to increase the fabrication and assembly tolerances of an optical head with replicated lens. Potentially, these research results could advance NFR technology for commercial product.

  16. Major new sources of biological ice nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T.; Henderson-Begg, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Almost all research on biological ice nucleation has focussed on a limited number of bacteria. Here we characterise several major new sources of biogenic ice nuclei. These include mosses, hornworts, liverworts and cyanobacteria. Ice nucleation in the eukaryotic bryophytes appears to be ubiquitous. The temperature at which these organisms nucleate is that at which the difference in vapour pressure over ice and water is at or close to its maximum. At these temperatures (-8 to -18 degrees C) ice will grow at the expense of supercooled water. These organisms are dependent for their water on occult precipitation - fog, dew and cloudwater which by its nature is not collected in conventional rain gauges. Therefore we suggest that these organism produce ice nuclei as a water harvesting mechanism. Since the same mechanism would also drive the Bergeron-Findeisen process, and as moss is known to become airborne, these nuclei may have a role in the initiation of precipitation. The properties of these ice nuclei are very different from the well characterised bacterial nuclei. We will also present DNA sequence data showing that, although related, the proteins responsible are only very distantly related to the classical bacterial ice nuclei.

  17. Elastic magnetic form factors of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Tiekuang; Guo Yanqing; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-01-01

    How to identify the orbital of the valence nucleon(s) of exotic nuclei is an important problem. The elastic magnetic electron scattering is an excellent probe to determine the valence structure of odd-A nuclei. The relativistic mean-field theory has been successfully applied to systematic studies of the elastic charge electron scattering from even-even exotic nuclei. The extension of this method to investigate the elastic magnetic electron scattering from odd-A exotic nuclei is a natural generalization. The experimental form factors of 17 O and 41 Ca are reproduced very well with the help of the spectroscopic factors which are introduced into the relativistic treatment of the magnetic electron scattering for the first time. The emphases are put on the magnetic form factors of 15,17,19 C, 23 O, 17 F, and 49,59 Ca calculated in the relativistic impulse approximation. Great differences have been found in the form factors of the same nucleus with different configurations. Therefore, the elastic magnetic electron scattering can be used to determine the orbital of the last nucleon of odd-A exotic nuclei. Our results can provide references for the electron scattering from exotic nuclei in the near future

  18. The anatomy of the vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highstein, Stephen M; Holstein, Gay R

    2006-01-01

    The vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve informs the brain about the linear and angular movements of the head in space and the position of the head with respect to gravity. The termination sites of these eighth nerve afferents define the territory of the vestibular nuclei in the brainstem. (There is also a subset of afferents that project directly to the cerebellum.) This chapter reviews the anatomical organization of the vestibular nuclei, and the anatomy of the pathways from the nuclei to various target areas in the brain. The cytoarchitectonics of the vestibular brainstem are discussed, since these features have been used to distinguish the individual nuclei. The neurochemical phenotype of vestibular neurons and pathways are also summarized because the chemical anatomy of the system contributes to its signal-processing capabilities. Similarly, the morphologic features of short-axon local circuit neurons and long-axon cells with extrinsic projections are described in detail, since these structural attributes of the neurons are critical to their functional potential. Finally, the composition and hodology of the afferent and efferent pathways of the vestibular nuclei are discussed. In sum, this chapter reviews the morphology, chemoanatomy, connectivity, and synaptology of the vestibular nuclei.

  19. Corrected electrostatic lens systems for ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgish, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent work in our laboratory has introduced a new class of electrostatic focus forming element for beams, the ELCO lens. It compares favourably with the electrostatic and magnetic quadrupole elements conventionally used for microbeam formation. The ELCO lens does however have disadvantages associated with apertures and alignment. We have continued with the development of ion beam lenses and have evolved a further class of lens element which eliminates aperture and alignment problems. This new element can be combined like optical lenses into an aberration corrected system. Experimental measurement on the basic lens element has confirmed mathematical analysis of ion trajectories through the element. This mathematical analysis predicts that the basic element can be combined into a corrected lens system for, either: (1) high resolution microprobe formation with intrinsic rastering ability, the spot size limited only by the beam properties; or (2) high quality image formation with large magnification/demagnification ratio and wide angular aperture. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Time on Scleral Lens Settling and Change in Corneal Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otchere, Heinz; Jones, Lyndon W; Sorbara, Luigina

    2017-09-01

    With the increase in the use of scleral contact lenses among practitioners, questions regarding lens settling are gradually gaining attention. This is because current studies support the notion that scleral lenses settle back over time. More research is needed to understand the exact cause and the factors that underpin such phenomenon. The present study aims to assess the effect of time on topographic corneal clearance of three scleral contact lenses of varying sagittal depths. Three scleral contact lenses were fitted to 20 subjects with previous diagnosis of keratoconus (n = 18) or pellucid marginal degeneration (n = 2). The fit was based on corneal sagittal height measured with the Visante optical coherence tomographer (OCT) at 15 mm along the horizontal meridian. To select an appropriate lens from the diagnostic lens set, values of 325 μm (lens 1), 375 μm (lens 2), and 425 μm (lens 3) were randomly added in sequence to the corneal sagittal height. Subjects wore each lens for 1 hour. Corneal clearance was measured at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour using a custom ultra-long OCT. To assess change in clearance, central point and two mid-peripheral points (+3 mm and -3 mm) along an 8-mm chord were measured by taking differences at each time point up to 1 hour. Measurements were repeated for the two other lenses. Mean central corneal clearance loss for all three lenses was 33.83 ± 48.40 μm. This was 26 ± 27 μm (13 ± 14 μm, +3 mm; 34 ± 37 μm, -3 mm), lens 1; 35 ± 59 μm (38 ± 61 μm, +3 mm; 52 ± 69 μm, -3 mm), lens 2; and 41 ± 54 μm (33 ± 26 μm, +3 mm; 52 ± 48 μm, -3 mm), lens 3, respectively. There was no significant difference (P = 0.06) at central and other locations for lens 1 (location and over time). There were significant differences for both lenses 2 and 3 (P < .001, P = .01, respectively) for all three locations and over time. There is a likelihood of clearance loss after 1 hour of lens wear. This varies between subjects, initial lens

  1. Mechanism research of miR-181 regulating human lens epithelial cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the expression of miR-181 in the lens tissue of cataract and the regulating mechanism of miR-181 on apoptosis of human lens epithelial cell.METHODS:Real time q-PCR was used to measure the expression of miR-181 in the anterior lens capsules of age-related cataract and human lens epithelial cell apoptosis model. miR-181 mimic and inhibitor were transfected using Lipofectamine 2 000 to regulate the expression of miR-181, and then Real time q-PCR was used to verify transfection efficiency. Flow cytometry was used to detect the change of cell apoptosis rate. RESULTS: Compared with control group, the expression of miR-181 was significantly higher in both the anterior lens capsules of age-related cataract and human lens epithelial cell apoptosis model; the relative expression of miR-181 in lens epithelial cells transfected with miR-181 mimic was increased, whereas decreased in cells transfected with miR-181 inhibitor; the apoptosis rate of cells transfected with miR-181 mimic was increased, while reduced in miR-181 inhibitor group. Each result was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: High expression of miR-181 is detected in anterior lens capsule of age-related cataract. miR-181 might play a certain role in the pathogenesis of cataract via promoting human lens epithelial cell apoptosis. miR-181 probably becomes a new approach for the nonoperative treatment of cataract, but the concrete mechanism still needs to be further studied.

  2. [Advantage of higher oxygen transmissibility material Piggyback lens for keratoconus correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Pei-Ying; Chi, Hui; Yang, Li-Na

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the oxygen transmissibility of new material Piggyback lens combined with silicone hydrogel lens and higher Dk RGPCL. To investigate the improving of visual acuity, ocular shape and comfortable, also orthokeratology results and safety of this new system for keratoconus correction. Calculating the oxygen transmission (Dk/t) of the new Piggyback system involves Ohm's Law. Compare the changes of ocular surface curves and astigmatism with or without Si-SCL fitting, RGPCL vision and Piggyback lens vision. Investigate the comfortable improving and ocular complications, and changes of corneal shape after fitted with Piggyback lens by using corneal topography. Selected silicone hydrogel lens was pure vision (B&L PV, 36% water, Dk/t 110) lens, RGPCL material was Menicon Z, Dk/t 95.9 and Boston XO, Dk/t 58.8. It was calculated to 44.4 Dk/t and 34.4 Dk/t with these two combinations. Twenty two moderate and severe keratoconus patients (28 eyes) fitted with the Piggyback lens successfully. Corneal K reading and astigmatism decreased significantly after wore the Si-SCL. Compared with RGPCL vision(4.82 ± 0.11), Piggyback lens vision (4.93 ± 0.08) was significant increased (t = -10.395, P < 0.01) 90% cases improved comfort vs prior RGPCL wear alone. Only few cases appeared slight conjunctival hyperemia and corneal staining. Corneal topography showed corneal flatter, spherical and regular reshaping results after 6 months wore the Piggyback lens. By fitting Piggyback systems using new Si-SCL and higher Dk RGPCL materials may help problematic keratoconic patients improve visual acuity, comfort and safety, increase wearing time and orthokeratology results further.

  3. Intraocular and crystalline lens protection from ultraviolet damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H

    2011-07-01

    Although the risks of excess solar ultraviolet (UV) exposure of the skin are well recognized, the need for eye protection is frequently overlooked, or when sunglasses are also recommended, specific guidance is wrong or is not explained. Guidance from the World Health Organization at its InterSun webpage advises people to wear "wrap-around" sunglasses under many conditions. The objective of this study was to examine the need for UV filtration in prescription lenses, contact lenses, and sunglasses. The geometry of UV exposure of both eyes, solar position, ground reflection, pupil size, and lid opening were studied. Because an accurate determination of cumulative ocular exposure is difficult, the cornea itself can serve as a biologic dosimeter, because photokeratitis is not experienced on a daily basis but does under certain ground-surface and sunlight conditions. From a knowledge of the UV-threshold dose required to produce photokeratitis, we have an upper level of routine ocular exposure to ambient UV. From ambient UV measurements and observed photokeratitis, the upper limits of UV exposure of the crystalline lens or an intraocular lens implant are estimated. The risk of excess UV exposure of the germinative cells of the lens is greatest from the side. Sunglasses can actually increase UV exposure of the germinative region of the crystalline lens and the corneal limbus by disabling the eyes' natural protective mechanisms of lid closure and pupil constriction! The level of UV-A risk is difficult to define. Proper UV-absorbing contact lenses offer the best mode for filtering needless exposure of UV radiation of the lens and limbus.

  4. Changes of enzyme activities in lens after glaucoma trabecular resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ping Wang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the change of lens antioxidant enzyme activity after glaucoma trabecular resection. METHODS: Thirty-two eyes of sixteen New-Zealand rabbits(2.2-2.4kgwere divided into two groups. The left eyes of rabbits underwent standard glaucoma trabecular resection were treatment group, and the normal right eyes served as controls. Transparency of lenses was monitored by a slit-lamp biomicroscopy before and after glaucoma trabecular resection. The morphology of lens cells was observed under the light microscope.The activities of Na+-K+-ATPase,catalase(CAT, glutathion peroxidase(GSH-px, glutathione reductase(GR, superoxide dismutase(SODand content of malondialdehyde(MDAin lenses were detected six months after trabecular resection. RESULTS: Lenses were clear in both treatment group and normal control group during the six months after operation. The morphology and structure of lens cells were normal under the light microscope in both operation group and normal group. The activity of lens cells antioxidant enzyme activity were significantly decreased in operation group compared with control group, Na+-K+-ATPase declined by 20.97%, CAT declined by 16.36%, SOD declined by 4.46%, GR declined by 4.85%, GSH-px declined by 10.02%, and MDA increased by 16.31%. CONCLUSION: Glaucoma trabecular resection can induce the change of Na+-K+-ATPase, CAT, GSH-px, GR, SOD and MDA in lens of rabbit. Glaucoma filtration surgery for the occurrence of cataract development mechanism has important guiding significance.

  5. Aquaporin 0 plays a pivotal role in refractive index gradient development in mammalian eye lens to prevent spherical aberration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, S. Sindhu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan, E-mail: kulandaiappan.varadaraj@stonybrook.edu [Physiology and Biophysics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); SUNY Eye Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    . Transmission and scanning electron micrographs of lenses of both mouse models showed increased extracellular space between fiber cells. Water content determination study showed increase in water in the lenses of these mouse models. In summary, lens transparency, CTCA and compact packing of fiber cells were affected due to the loss of 50% AQP0 leading to larger extracellular space, more water content and SA, possibly due to alteration in RING. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying the role of AQP0 in RING development to ward off lens SA during focusing.

  6. The molecular background of the differential UV absorbance of the human lens in the 240-400 nm range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajer, Viktor; Tiboldi, Akos; Bae, Narkhyun; Li, Kongzhao; Kang, Sung Ung; Hopp, Béla; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Lubec, Gert; Nógrádi, Antal

    2013-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) absorption of various sections of the human lens was studied and compared with protein expression paralleling differential UV absorbance in anterior and posterior lenticular tissue. The UV absorbance of serial lens cryostat sections (60 μm) and that of lens capsules was determined using a Shimadzu scanning spectrophotometer, and the absorption coefficients were calculated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed using two pooled lenticular protein extracts (anterior and posterior sections). Protein spots were quantified and significantly different spots were identified by mass spectrometry following in-gel digestion with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The UV-C and UV-B absorption of the human lens increased toward the posterior parts of the lens. The anterior and posterior lens capsules also effectively absorbed UV radiation. Levels of molecular chaperone proteins Beta-crystallin B2 (UniProtKB ID:P43320), A3 (UniProtKB ID:P05813) and of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (UniProtKB ID:P04406) were significantly higher in the anterior part of the lens, whereas lens proteins Beta-crystallin B1 (UniProtKB ID:P53674) and Alpha-crystallin A chain (UniProtKB ID:P02489) were higher in the posterior sections. These results provide evidence that differential UV absorption in the anterior and posterior lens is accompanied by differential protein expression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Structure of light neutron-rich nuclei through Coulomb dissociation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The physics of exotic nuclei has attracted much interest during the past decade. The prop- erties of nuclei with large neutron excess have turned out to be very different compared to those of stable nuclei in many respects. One outstanding observation in exotic nuclei is the halo structure. The halo structure arises from the ...

  8. A Class I UV-blocking (senofilcon A) soft contact lens prevents UVA-induced yellow fluorescence and NADH loss in the rabbit lens nucleus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Frank J; Lin, Li-Ren; Simpanya, Mukoma F; Leverenz, Victor R; Fick, Catherine E

    2012-09-01

    It is known that fluorescence, much of it caused by UVA light excitation, increases in the aging human lens, resulting in loss of sharp vision. This study used an in vivo animal model to investigate UVA-excited fluorescence in the rabbit lens, which contains a high level of the UVA chromophore NADH, existing both free and bound to λ-crystallin. Also, the ability of a Class I (senofilcon A) soft contact lens to protect against UVA-induced effects on the rabbit lens was tested. Rabbit eyes were irradiated with UVA light in vivo (100 mW/cm(2) on the cornea) for 1 h using monochromatic 365 nm light. Irradiation was conducted in the presence of either a senofilcon A contact lens, a minimally UV-absorbing lotrafilcon A contact lens, or no contact lens at all. Eyes irradiated without a contact lens showed blue 365 nm-excited fluorescence initially, but this changed to intense yellow fluorescence after 1 h. Isolated, previously irradiated lenses exhibited yellow fluorescence originating from the lens nucleus when viewed under 365 nm light, but showed normal blue fluorescence arising from the cortex. Previously irradiated lenses also exhibited a faint yellow color when observed under visible light. The senofilcon A contact lens protected completely against the UVA-induced effects on fluorescence and lens yellowing, whereas the lotrafilcon A lens showed no protection. The UVA-exposure also produced a 53% loss of total NADH (free plus bound) in the lens nucleus, with only a 13% drop in the anterior cortex. NADH loss in the nucleus was completely prevented with use of a senofilcon A contact lens, but no significant protection was observed with a lotrafilcon A lens. Overall, the senofilcon A lens provided an average of 67% protection against UVA-induced loss of four pyridine nucleotides in four different regions of the lens. HPLC analysis with fluorescence detection indicated a nearly six-fold increase in 365 nm-excited yellow fluorescence arising from lens nuclear

  9. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  10. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  11. Prediction of energies of yrast band in some even-even nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, A.K.; Singh, Yuvraj; Gupta, D.K.; Singh, M.; Gupta, K.K.; Bihari, Chhail; Dhiman, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    The deformation parameter β and γ of the collective model of Bohr and Mottelson are basic descriptors of the nuclear equilibrium shape and structure. The researchers found that the values of γ obtained from energies (= γ e ) are nearly equal to the value of γ derived from transition rate (= γ b ) in even Xe, Ba and Ce nuclei (A∼120-140) and Hf, W, Os, Pt and Hg nuclei (A∼160-200) using rigid triaxial rotor model of Davydov-Filippov. In the present study, the relatively light mass nuclei (Mo, Ru and Pd) have been taken. As far as γ is concerned, it is known that the Ru chains of nuclei is intermediate between the two having opposite trends for parameter γ, decreasing for Mo and increasing for Pd, and has an irregular behaviour in itself with the increase of neutron number

  12. Photodisintegration of Light Nuclei with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Yordanka Yordanova [University of South Carolina; Zachariou, Nicholas [University of South Carolina

    2013-08-01

    We report preliminary results of photodisintegration of deuteron and {sup 3}He measured with CLAS at Jefferson Lab. We have extracted the beam-spin asymmetry for the {vector {gamma}}d {yields} pn reaction at photon energies from 1.1 GeV to 2.3 GeV and proton center-of-mass (c.m.) angles between 35{degrees} and 135{degrees} . Our data show interesting evolution of the angular dependence of the observable as the photon energy increases. The energy dependence of the beam-spin asymmetry at 90 shows a change of slope at photon energy of 1.6 GeV. A comparison of our data with model calculations suggests that a fully non-perturbative treatment of the underlying dynamics may be able to describe the data better than a model based on hard scattering. We have observed onset of dimensional scaling in the cross section of two-body photodisintegration of {sup 3}He at remarkably low energy and momentum transfer, which suggests that partonic degrees of freedom may be relevant for the description of nuclei at energies lower than previously considered.

  13. New progress on monolithic X-ray lens in diffraction application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yude; He Yejun; Chen Jun; Luo Ping; Wang Dachun; Yan Yiming

    1999-12-01

    The basic physical properties for monolithic X-ray lens are introduced. The X-ray diffraction for macromolecular crystallography using monolithic X-ray lens were investigated. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 7 times, and the resolution was improved by 0.2 x 10 -10 -0.6 x 10 -10 m. The signal to noise ratio was also improved, and the time of measurement was reduced. The X-ray diffraction of Au thin films on the Si(100) single crystal substrates were investigated in a X-ray powder diffractometer. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 2 times, and the angular resolution of the diffractometer was enhanced

  14. Auxetic nuclei in embryonic stem cells exiting pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Franze, Kristian; McClain, Crystal R.; Wylde, George W.; Fisher, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Chalut, Kevin J.

    2014-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self-renew in a state of naïve pluripotency in which they are competent to generate all somatic cells. It has been hypothesized that, before irreversibly committing, ESCs pass through at least one metastable transition state. This transition would represent a gateway for differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells. Here, we show that during the transition, the nuclei of ESCs are auxetic: they exhibit a cross-sectional expansion when stretched and a cross-sectional contraction when compressed, and their stiffness increases under compression. We also show that the auxetic phenotype of transition ESC nuclei is driven at least in part by global chromatin decondensation. Through the regulation of molecular turnover in the differentiating nucleus by external forces, auxeticity could be a key element in mechanotransduction. Our findings highlight the importance of nuclear structure in the regulation of differentiation and reprogramming.

  15. Particles and nuclei an introduction to the physical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, Bogdan; Scholz, Christoph; Zetsche, Frank; Rodejohann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    This well-known introductory textbook gives a uniform presentation of nuclear and particle physics from an experimental point of view.   The first part, Analysis, is devoted to disentangling the substructure of matter. This part shows that experiments designed to uncover the substructures of nuclei and nucleons have a similar conceptual basis, and lead to the present picture of all matter being constructed from a small number of elementary building blocks and a small number of fundamental interactions.   The second part, Synthesis, shows how the elementary particles may be combined to build hadrons and nuclei. The fundamental interactions, which are responsible for the forces in all systems, become less and less evident in increasingly complex systems. Such systems are in fact dominated by many-body phenomena. A section on neutrino oscillations and one on nuclear matter at high temperatures bridge the field of "nuclear and particle physics" and "modem astrophysics and cosmology.   The seventh revised and e...

  16. Particles and Nuclei an introduction to the physical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, B; Scholz, C; Zetsche, F

    2008-01-01

    This well-established textbook gives a uniform and unique presentation of both nuclear and particle physics. Analysis, Part 1, is devoted to disentangling the substructure of matter. This part shows that experiments designed to uncover the substructures of nuclei and nucleons have a similar conceptual basis, and lead to the present picture of all matter being built out of a small number of elementary building blocks and a small number of fundamental interactions. Synthesis, Part 2, shows how the elementary particles may be combined to build hadrons and nuclei. The fundamental interactions responsible for the forces in all systems become less and less evident in increasingly complex systems. A section on neutrino oscillations and one on nuclear matter at high temperatures bridge the field of "nuclear and particle physics" and "modern astrophysics and cosmology". The new edition incorporates a large amount of new experimental results on deep inelastic scattering (obtained at the Electron-Proton Collider HERA at...

  17. Particles and Nuclei An Introduction to the Physical Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, Bogdan; Scholz, Christoph; Zetsche, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This well-known introductory textbook gives a uniform presentation of nuclear and particle physics from an experimental point of view. The new edition has been extensively revised and updated. The first part, Analysis, is devoted to disentangling the substructure of matter. This part shows that experiments designed to uncover the substructures of nuclei and nucleons have a similar conceptual basis, and lead to the present picture of all matter being constructed from a small number of elementary building blocks and a small number of fundamental interactions. The second part, Synthesis, shows how the elementary particles may be combined to build hadrons and nuclei. The fundamental interactions, which are responsible for the forces in all systems, become less and less evident in increasingly complex systems. Such systems are in fact dominated by many-body phenomena. A section on neutrino oscillations and one on nuclear matter at high temperatures bridge the field of "nuclear and particle physics" and "modern ast...

  18. Cavitation nuclei in water exposed to transient pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    A model of skin-stabilized interfacial cavitation nuclei and their response to tensile and compressive stressing is presented. The model is evaluated in relation to experimental tensile strength results for water at rest at the bottom of an open water-filled container at atmospheric pressure...... and room temperature. These results are obtained by recording the initial growth of cavities generated by a short tensile pulse applied to the bottom of the container. It is found that the cavitation nuclei shift their tensile strength depending on their pressure history. Static pressurization...... for an extended period of time prior to testing is known to increase the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on how it is affected by compression pulses of short duration. This is addressed by imposing compression pulses of approximately 1 ms duration and a peak intensity of a few bar...

  19. Towards limiting temperatures in nuclei: The behavior of collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Faou, J.H.; Suomijaervi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Piattelli, P.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, P.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Garron, J.P.; Gillibert, A.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Liguori-Neto, R.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Russo, G.; Roynette, J.C.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Smerzi, A.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies between 350 and 500 MeV, formed in the 36 Ar + 90 Zr reaction at 27 MeV/nucleon have been measured. The γ-ray yield from the decay of the giant dipole resonance in these nuclei remains constant over the excitation energy range studied. This quenching of the γ multiplicity cannot be explained by a continuous increase with temperature of the width of the resonance. Better agreement with the data is obtained by assuming a cutoff of γ emission from the resonance above an excitation energy of 250 MeV. The existing data do not show entrance channel effects

  20. Towards limiting temperatures in nuclei: The behavior of collective motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Faou, J.H.; Suomijaervi, T.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Piattelli, P.; Agodi, C.; Alamanos, N.; Alba, R.; Auger, F.; Bellia, G.; Chomaz, P.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frascaria, N.; Gaardhoje, J.J.; Garron, J.P.; Gillibert, A.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Liguori-Neto, R.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Russo, G.; Roynette, J.C.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Smerzi, A. (Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91406 Orsay (France) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, via A. Doria, Catania (Italy) Service de Physique Nucleaire, DAPNIA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay , 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France) Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds BP 5027, 14021 Caen (France) The Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 O (Denmark))

    1994-05-23

    Gamma rays emitted from hot nuclei with mass around 115 and excitation energies between 350 and 500 MeV, formed in the [sup 36]Ar + [sup 90]Zr reaction at 27 MeV/nucleon have been measured. The [gamma]-ray yield from the decay of the giant dipole resonance in these nuclei remains constant over the excitation energy range studied. This quenching of the [gamma] multiplicity cannot be explained by a continuous increase with temperature of the width of the resonance. Better agreement with the data is obtained by assuming a cutoff of [gamma] emission from the resonance above an excitation energy of 250 MeV. The existing data do not show entrance channel effects.

  1. Reactions of Proton Halo Nuclei in a Relativistic Optical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Rashdan, M

    2003-01-01

    The reaction cross section, sigma sub R; of the proton halo nuclei sup 1 sup 7 Ne and sup 1 sup 2 N on Si is calculated using an optical potential derived from the solution of the Dirac-Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equation, starting from the one-boson-exchange potential of Bonn. The nuclear densities are generated from self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations using the recent Skyrme interaction SKRA. It is found that the enhancement in the reaction cross section found experimentally for the sup 1 sup 7 Ne + Si system in comparison to sup 1 sup 5 O + Si, where sup 1 sup 5 O has been considered as a core of sup 1 sup 7 Ne, is mainly due to the proton halo structure of sup 1 sup 7 Ne which increases the interaction, in the surface and tail regions. Glauber model calculations did not produce this enhancement in sigma sub R for proton halo nuclei

  2. Cuba Through A New Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Stubbs

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Origins of the Cuban Revolution Reconsidered. Samuel Farber. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2006. x + 212 pp. (Paper US$ 19.95 Cuba: A New History. Ric hard Gott . New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005. xii + 384 pp. (Paper US$ 17.00 Havana: The Making of Cuban Culture. Antoni Kapcia. Oxford: Berg Publishers, 2005. xx + 236 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Richard Gott, Antoni Kapcia, and Samuel Farber each approach Cuba through a new lens. Gott does so by providing a broad-sweep history of Cuba, which is epic in scope, attaches importance to social as much as political and economic history, and blends scholarship with flair. Kapcia homes in on Havana as the locus for Cuban culture, whereby cultural history becomes the trope for exploring not only the city but also Cuban national identity. Farber revisits his own and others’ interpretations of the origins of the Cuban Revolution.

  3. Radiation studies in Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.S.N.

    1977-01-01

    Estimation of chromosomal aberrations in flowers of Lens culinaris according to their sequence of development in the plants at 4, 8 and 12 Kr in the M 1 generation, showed that the later formed flowers had smaller percentages of cells with aberrations than those developed earlier. It is suggested that this may be the result of competition between more damaged and less damaged cells during the development of the shoot. There is consequently a decrease of sterility in successive flowers. The numbers of karyotypes taking part in the formation of lower and uppermost flowers were estimated cytologically at 4, 8 and 12 Kr. It was found that more karyotypes were involved in the formation of the lower flowers than in the upper ones. It appeared that at lower doses larger numbers of karyotypes were taking part in the formation of the chimaera than at higher doses. (auth.)

  4. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  5. Microbial contamination of contact lens storage cases and domestic tap water of contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstüntürk, Miray; Zeybek, Zuhal

    2012-11-01

    Contact lenses have been widely used as an alternative to spectacles both in developed and developing countries. However, under certain circumstances, adverse responses can occur during contact lens wear and several microorganisms--including bacteria, fungi, and free living amoebae--can cause several eye infections in wearers. Extended wear of contact lenses is the major risk factor of eye infections such as microbial keratitis, besides contaminated contact lens storage case, contaminated lens care solutions, and inaccurate contact lens handling. In this study, we collected contact lens storage case and domestic tap water samples from 50 asymptomatic contact lens wearers. We determined that total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 45 (90 %), Gram negative rod bacteria were isolated in 20 (40 %), Pseudomonas spp. were isolated in 2 (4 %) and fungi were isolated in 18 (36 %) out of 50 contact lens storage cases. Free living amoebae were not detected in investigated contact lens storage cases. At the same time, out of 50, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 34 (68 %), fungi were isolated in 15 (30 %) and free living amoebae were isolated in 15 (30 %) domestic tap water samples. No Gram-negative rod bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in investigated water samples. Two contact lens case samples and two tap water samples were excluded from the analysis for Pseudomonas spp. for technical reasons. According to our findings, inadequate contact lens maintenance during lens wear may result in the contamination of contact lens storage cases. This situation can lead to severe eye infections in contact lens wearers over time.

  6. Evaluation of lens dose from anterior electron beams: comparison of Pinnacle and Gafchromic EBT3 film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonier, Marcus; Wronski, Matt; Yeboah, Collins

    2015-03-08

    Lens dose is a concern during the treatment of facial lesions with anterior electron beams. Lead shielding is routinely employed to reduce lens dose and minimize late complications. The purpose of this work is twofold: 1) to measure dose pro-files under large-area lead shielding at the lens depth for clinical electron energies via film dosimetry; and 2) to assess the accuracy of the Pinnacle treatment planning system in calculating doses under lead shields. First, to simulate the clinical geometry, EBT3 film and 4 cm wide lead shields were incorporated into a Solid Water phantom. With the lead shield inside the phantom, the film was positioned at a depth of 0.7 cm below the lead, while a variable thickness of solid water, simulating bolus, was placed on top. This geometry was reproduced in Pinnacle to calculate dose profiles using the pencil beam electron algorithm. The measured and calculated dose profiles were normalized to the central-axis dose maximum in a homogeneous phantom with no lead shielding. The resulting measured profiles, functions of bolus thickness and incident electron energy, can be used to estimate the lens dose under various clinical scenarios. These profiles showed a minimum lead margin of 0.5 cm beyond the lens boundary is required to shield the lens to ≤ 10% of the dose maximum. Comparisons with Pinnacle showed a consistent overestimation of dose under the lead shield with discrepancies of ~ 25% occur-ring near the shield edge. This discrepancy was found to increase with electron energy and bolus thickness and decrease with distance from the lead edge. Thus, the Pinnacle electron algorithm is not recommended for estimating lens dose in this situation. The film measurements, however, allow for a reasonable estimate of lens dose from electron beams and for clinicians to assess the lead margin required to reduce the lens dose to an acceptable level.

  7. Growth studies on Lens culinaris after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bokhari, F.S.; Shahnaz, F.

    1996-01-01

    A study on growth parameters was carried out on two varieties of Lens culinaris after gamma irradiation. Experiment was conducted at Botanical Garden, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan in 1993. The germination percentage, survival percentage, height, branch number, pods per plant and 100-seed weight decreased with the increasing dose of radiation. Comparing the two varieties, variety-86642 appeared more sensitive to radiation than variety-87528

  8. The myosin chaperone UNC45B is involved in lens development and autosomal dominant juvenile cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Comyn, Sophie; Mang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    in this region, in ACACA and UNC45B. As alterations of the UNC45B protein have been shown to affect eye development in model organisms, effort was focused on the heterozygous UNC45B missense mutation. UNC45B encodes a myosin-specific chaperone that, together with the general heat shock protein HSP90, is involved...... in myosin assembly. The mutation changes p.Arg805 to Trp in the UCS domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved from yeast to human. UNC45B is strongly expressed in the heart and skeletal muscle tissue, but here we show expression in human embryo eye and zebrafish lens. The zebrafish mutant steif......, carrying an unc45b nonsense mutation, has smaller eyes than wild-type embryos and shows accumulation of nuclei in the lens. Injection of RNA encoding the human wild-type UNC45B protein into the steif homozygous embryo reduced the nuclei accumulation and injection of human mutant UNC45B cDNA in wild...

  9. Indirect evaluation of corneal apoptosis in contact lens wearers by estimation of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contact lens induced trauma to the corneal epithelium results in increased release of inflammatory mediators. The keratocyte apoptosis is directly related to epithelial injury and has been correlated with increased production of nitric oxide. Potent antioxidant enzymes protect cells from oxidative damage by inactivating reactive oxygen species and thus inhibiting apoptosis. This study aims at determination of total nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears which will be an indirect criteria for assessing apoptosis. Materials and Methods : Nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes were estimated in tears of 25 soft contact lens wearers and compared with 25 age and sex matched controls. Results : Statistically significant increase of nitric oxide (P< 0.001, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.001 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.001 levels was seen in tears of contact lens wearers as compared to controls. There was also statistically significant increase in the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.05 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.01, with increase in the total duration of contact lens wear in years. Conclusions : Increase in the level of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears of contact lens wearers suggested that contact lens wear suppresses the process of apoptosis. However, it was also postulated that the increased levels of nitric oxide balances the anti-apoptotic activities of increased levels of antioxidant enzymes by its pro-apoptotic activity leading to protective outcomes in contact lens wearers.

  10. Pollen grains are efficient cloud condensation nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, F D, E-mail: fdp21@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    This letter presents a laboratory study investigating the ability of pollen grains to act as cloud condensation nuclei. The hygroscopicity of pollen is measured under subsaturated relative humidities using an electrodynamic balance. It is found, along with other results, that pollen exhibits bulk uptake of water under subsaturated conditions. Through the use of an environmental scanning electron microscope it was observed that the surface of pollen is wettable at high subsaturated humidities. The hygroscopic response of the pollen to subsaturated relative humidities is parametrized using {kappa}-Koehler theory and values of the parameter {kappa} for pollen are between 0.05 and 0.1. It is found that while pollen grains are only moderately hygroscopic, they can activate at critical supersaturations of 0.001% and lower, and thus pollen grains will readily act as cloud condensation nuclei. While the number density of pollen grains is too low for them to represent a significant global source of cloud condensation nuclei, the large sizes of pollen grains suggest that they will be an important source of giant cloud condensation nuclei. Low temperature work using the environmental scanning electron microscope indicated that pollen grains do not act as deposition ice nuclei at temperatures warmer than - 15 deg. C.

  11. Relativistic mean field theory for unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the properties of unstable nuclei in the framework of the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory. We take the RMF theory as a phenomenological theory with several parameters, whose form is constrained by the successful microscopic theory (RBHF), and whose values are extracted from the experimental values of unstable nuclei. We find the outcome with the newly obtained parameter sets (TM1 and TMA) is promising in comparison with various experimental data. We calculate systematically the ground state properties of even-even nuclei up to the drip lines; about 2000 nuclei. We find that the neutron magic shells (N=82, 128) at the standard magic numbers stay at the same numbers even far from the stability line and hence provide the feature of the r-process nuclei. However, many proton magic numbers disappear at the neutron numbers far away from the magic numbers due to the deformations. We discuss how to describe giant resonances for the case of the non-linear coupling terms for the sigma and omega mesons in the relativistic RPA. We mention also the importance of the relativistic effect on the spin observables as the Gamow-Teller strength and the longitudinal and transverse spin responses. (author)

  12. Fast neutron inelastic scattering from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachkar, J.

    1978-01-01

    The need for accurate values of inelastic scattering cross sections appears when the requests for neutron data for reactors and other applied purposes are considered. These requests are partly related to values for spherical nuclei, well studied over many years. These studies were extensively considered in two review papers presented, in 1976, at the International Conference on the Interactions of Neutrons with nuclei. Other requests are related to vibrational and rotational nuclei, and relevant studies have been recently performed. The quality of these investigations and the large number of recent results have lead to concentration on them as the topic of the present review. The constant improvements of the experimental techniques permits precise measurements of inelastic scattering cross sections to the first excited levels over a range of incident energies, such that different reactions mechanisms are predominant in different parts of that range of energies. Quadrupole, hexadecapole and octupole deformation parameters of the target nuclei can be deduced from the data using phenomenological models. The successful application of the analysis over the range of energies leads to the conclusion that reliable information on the shape of the nuclei has been derived. The validity of the various models, which include direct interaction and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms, is discussed in connection with analyses of recent experiments. (author) [fr

  13. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  14. Vitreous Humor Changes Expression of Iron-Handling Proteins in Lens Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goralska, Malgorzata; Fleisher, Lloyd N.; McGahan, M. Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In humans, vitrectomy is associated with development of nuclear cataracts. Iron catalyzes free radical formation causing oxidative damage, which is implicated in cataract formation. This study was designed to determine if vitreous humor, which can initiate differentiation of lens epithelial cells, would have an effect on iron-handling proteins. Methods Cultured canine lens epithelial cells were treated with collected canine vitreous humor. Lysates of treated and control cells were separated by SDS-PAGE. Ferritin H- and L-chains, transferrin receptor 1, and aquaporin 0 were immunodetected and quantitated with specific antibodies. Morphologic changes in treated cells were assessed. Results Treatment of lens epithelial cells with a 33% (vol/vol) solution of vitreous humor changed the morphology of lens cells and induced expression of aquaporin 0, a marker of fiber cell differentiation that was undetectable in control cells. Treatment did not modify the size of iron-handling proteins but significantly increased content of ferritin from 2.9- to 8.8-fold over control and decreased levels of transferrin receptor by 37% to 59%. Conclusions Vitreous humor may significantly limit iron uptake by transferrin/transferrin receptor pathway, and by increasing ferritin levels could profoundly increase the iron-storage capacity of ferritin in lens cells. Vitreous humor may play a significant protective role against iron-catalyzed oxidative damage of lens epithelial cells and therefore in the formation of cataracts. PMID:28245299

  15. Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Lynnerup

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lens crystallines are special proteins in the eye lens. Because the epithelial basement membrane (lens capsule completely encloses the lens, desquamation of aging cells is impossible, and due to the complete absence of blood vessels or transport of metabolites in this area, there is no subsequent remodelling of these fibers, nor removal of degraded lens fibers. Human tissue ultimately derives its (14C content from the atmospheric carbon dioxide. The (14C content of the lens proteins thus reflects the atmospheric content of (14C when the lens crystallines were formed. Precise radiocarbon dating is made possible by comparing the (14C content of the lens crystallines to the so-called bomb pulse, i.e. a plot of the atmospheric (14C content since the Second World War, when there was a significant increase due to nuclear-bomb testing. Since the change in concentration is significant even on a yearly basis this allows very accurate dating. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results allow us to conclude that the crystalline formation in the lens nucleus almost entirely takes place around the time of birth, with a very small, and decreasing, continuous formation throughout life. The close relationship may be further expressed as a mathematical model, which takes into account the timing of the crystalline formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Such a life-long permanence of human tissue has hitherto only been described for dental enamel. In confront to dental enamel it must be held in mind that the eye lens is a soft structure, subjected to almost continuous deformation, due to lens accommodation, yet its most important constituent, the lens crystalline, is never subject to turnover or remodelling once formed. The determination of the (14C content of various tissues may be used to assess turnover rates and degree of substitution (for example for brain cell DNA. Potential targets may be nervous tissues in terms of senile or pre

  16. Contact lens compliance among a group of young, university-based lens users in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noushad, Babu; Saoji, Yeshwant; Bhakat, Premjit; Thomas, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the rate of compliance with the soft contact lens care and maintenance procedures with a focus on contact lens wearing habits, cleaning and disinfecting procedures, and maintenance of lens care accessories in a group of young, university-based contact lens wearers Two hundred and sixteen young soft contact lens wearers with an age range of 18-22 years were selected conveniently from the student population of Manipal University, Manipal, India. After receiving informed consent from the participants, their level of compliance with contact lenses was assessed using a questionnaire. The mean (±SD) age of the participants was 21.86±2.35 years. Out of 216 subjects, only 34% of the lens users were identified to be compliant with the least level of compliance observed in the maintenance of lens care accessories. Conventional users showed significantly (p=0.001) better level of compliance compared to disposable wearers and so did the users who acquired their lenses from clinicians (p=0.001) compared to over-the-counter lens receipt. The gender (p=0.496) and years of experience in contact lens use (p=0.142) did not show any statistically significant difference in the level of compliance. This study demonstrated that non-compliance with lens care procedures among a group of young, university-based soft contact lens wearers is common. The results indicated that all subjects had some degree of non-compliance and the least level of compliance observed in the care of lens accessories.

  17. Critical and shape-unstable nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Cailliau, M; Husson, J P; Letessier, J; Mang, H J

    1973-01-01

    The authors' experimental work on the decay of neutron deficient mercury osmium nuclei, some other studies at ISOLDE (CERN) and their first theoretical analysis show that the nuclei around /sup 186/Pt (Z=78, N=108) are at the limit of spherical, oblate, prolate nuclei, have (the even one) their first 0/sup +/ excited states at very low energy; quasi- rotational bands are associated to these states. The energy of this O/sup +/ state in /sup 186-/Pt deviate from the Kumar value: angular shape instability is not enough to explain this result. The authors look at radial shape and pairing fluctuations. The position of the 4p-4n state must also be known. (0 refs).

  18. Structure and reactions of light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Yabana, Y.; Lovas, R.G.; Varga, K.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of radioactive beams, light exotic nuclei have come to the focus of a great number of investigations. The most prominent phenomena found are the neutron halos. A fundamental and yet feasible microscopic approach has been developed to the description of light exotic nuclei. A comprehensive and didactically balanced review of the structure and reaction theory of light exotic nuclei is being developed. This general structure theory has been written up. This is followed by a brief review of cluster models, and that paves the way before introducing the multicluster approximation. That is the apt point to clarify the relationship of the microscopic multicluster approach to other microscopic approaches and to macroscopic models. The structure theory part is then completed with a review of calculations for actual cases. (K.A.)

  19. Reflections on cavitation nuclei in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2007-01-01

    to explaining why the tensile strength of water varies so dramatically between the experiments reported. A model for calculation of the critical pressure of skin-covered free gas bubbles as well as that of interfacial gaseous nuclei covered by a skin is presented. This model is able to bridge the apparently......The origin of cavitation bubbles, cavitation nuclei, has been a subject of debate since the early years of cavitation research. This paper presents an analysis of a representative selection of experimental investigations of cavitation inception and the tensile strength of water. At atmospheric...... pressure, the possibility of stabilization of free gas bubbles by a skin has been documented, but only within a range of bubble sizes that makes them responsible for tensile strengths up to about 1.5 bar, and values reaching almost 300 bar have been measured. However, cavitation nuclei can also be harbored...

  20. Superscaling and nucleon momentum distributions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, A.

    2005-01-01

    The scaling functions f(ψ ' ) and F(y) from the ψ ' - and y-scaling analyses of inclusive electron scattering from nuclei are constructed within the Coherent Density Fluctuation Model (CDFM) using its two equivalent formulations based on either the local density or the nucleon momentum distribution (NMD). The approach is a natural extension of the relativistic Fermi-gas model to finite realistic nuclear systems. The calculations show that the high-momentum components of NMD in the CDFM and their similarity for different nuclei lead to quantitative description of the super-scaling phenomenon and to a good agreement with the experimental data for y ' ' ' - and y-scaling are informative for NMDs at momenta not larger than 2.0-2.5 fm -1 . The work shows the role of both basic quantities, the momentum and density distributions, for the explanation of super-scaling in inclusive electron scattering from nuclei

  1. Taurine Protects Lens Epithelial Cells Against Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayang, Wu; Dongbo, Pang

    2017-10-01

    The massive uptake of compatible osmolytes is a self-protective response shared by lens exposed to hypertonic stress and ultraviolet stress. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of taurine against ultraviolet B-induced cytotoxicity in the lens epithelial cells. Real-time PCR was used to measure osmolytes transport. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure osmolytes uptake. Cell counting kit-8 assays were used to measure cellular viability. Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure apoptosis level. Compared with normotonic stress, hypertonic stress-induced osmolytes uptake into the lens epithelial cells such as betaine, myoinositol and taurine. UVB exposure increased osmolytes transporter mRNA expression together with osmolytes uptake. Moreover, taurine suppressed UVB-induced cell apoptosis in the lens epithelial cells significantly. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on cell survival rate may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  2. Placement of a crystalline lens and intraocular lens: Retinal image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Damian; Nowak, Jerzy; Zajac, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The influence of changes of both crystalline lens and intraocular lens (IOL) misalignment on the retinal image quality was investigated. The optical model of the eye used in investigations was the Liou-Brennan model, which is commonly considered as one of the most anatomically accurate. The original crystalline lens from this model was replaced with an IOL, made of rigid polymethylmethacrylate, in a way that recommend obligatory procedures. The modifications that were made both for crystalline lens and IOL were the longitudinal, the transversal, and the angular displacement.

  3. Night Vision Goggles Objectives Lens Focusing Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinkus, Alan; Task, H. L

    2000-01-01

    ...: interpupillary distance, tilt, eye relief, height, eyepiece and objective lens focus. Currently, aircrew use a Hoffman 20/20 test unit to pre-focus their NVG objective lenses at optical infinity before boarding their aircraft...

  4. Contact Lens Visual Rehabilitation in Keratoconus and Corneal Keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Ozkurt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is the most common corneal distrophy. It’s a noninflammatory progressive thinning process that leads to conical ectasia of the cornea, causing high myopia and astigmatism. Many treatment choices include spectacle correction and contact lens wear, collagen cross linking, intracorneal ring segments implantation and finally keratoplasty. Contact lenses are commonly used to reduce astigmatism and increase vision. There are various types of lenses are available. We reviewed soft contact lenses, rigid gas permeable contact lenses, piggyback contact lenses, hybrid contact lenses and scleral-semiscleral contact lenses in keratoconus management. The surgical option is keratoplasty, but even after sutur removal, high astigmatism may stil exists. Therefore, contact lens is an adequate treatment option to correct astigmatism after keratoplasty.

  5. Medium energy hadron scattering from nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.; Wenes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The Glauber approximation for medium energy scattering of hadronic projectiles from nuclei is combined with the interacting boson model of nuclei to produce a transition matrix for elastic and inelastic scattering in algebraic form which includes coupling to all the intermediate states. We present closed form analytic expresions for the transition matrix elements for the three dynamical symmetries of the interacting boson model; that is for, a spherical quadrupole vibrator, a γ unstable rotor, and both prolate and oblate axially symmetric rotors. We give examples of application of this formalism to proton scattering from 154 Sm and 154 Gd. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.; Martins, M.N.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of an isochromat of the virtual photon spectrum, obtained by measuring the number of ground-state protons emitted by the 16.28 MeV isobaric analogue state in 90 Zr as a function of electron incident energy in the range 17-105 MeV, are compared with the values predicted by a calculation of the E1 DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei. It is found that the calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The DWBA virtual photon spectra for finite nuclei for E2 and M1 multipoles are also assessed. (author) [pt

  7. Maris polarization in neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubhchintak; Bertulani, C. A.; Aumann, T.

    2018-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the Maris polarization effect and its application in quasi-free reactions to assess information on the structure of exotic nuclei. In particular, we explore the dependence of the polarization effect on neutron excess and neutron-skin thickness. We discuss the uncertainties in the calculations of triple differential cross sections and of analyzing powers due the choices of various nucleon-nucleon interactions and optical potentials and the limitations of the method. Our study implies that polarization variables in (p, 2p) reactions in inverse kinematics can be an effective probe of single-particle structure of nuclei in radioactive-beam facilities.

  8. MAGIC NUCLEI: Tin-100 turns up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    In the same way as the Periodic Table of chemical elements reflects the successive filling of orbital electron shells, in nuclear physics the socalled 'magic' numbers correspond to closed shells of 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82, 126,... neutrons and/or protons. More tightly bound than other nuclei, these are the nuclear analogues of the inert gases. 'Doubly magic' nuclei have closed shells of both neutrons and protons. Examples in nature are helium-4 (2 protons and 2 neutrons), oxygen-16 (8 and 8), calcium-40 (20 and 20) and calcium-48 (20 and 28). Radioactive tin-132 (50+82) has been widely studied

  9. Dissipation and the population of compound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Beene, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of nuclear dissipative efforts on the formation of compound nuclei is studied with the γ-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) built on highly excited states. The compound nuclei 164 Yb, 160 Er, and 110 Sn were produced with very mass-asymmetric and with more mass-symmetric target/projectile combinations. The large deviation from statistical model prediction observed in the γ-ray spectra from the more symmetrically formed 160 Er and 164 Yb can be qualitatively explained within the particle exchange model

  10. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of 16 O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs

  11. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of {sup 16}O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Selfconsistent theory of Coulomb mixing in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatov, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of isobaric states is considered according to the Coulomb mixing in nuclei. For a given form of the isovestor potential the separable residual interactions are constructed by means of the isotopic invariance principle. The strength parameter of the force is found from a selfconsistency condition. The charge dependent force is represented by the Coulomb effective potential. The theory of the isobaric states is developed using the random phase approximation. The Coulomb mixing effects in the ground and isobaric 0 + states of even-mass nuclei are investigated

  13. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  14. Weak and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapdor, H.V.

    1986-01-01

    The International Symposium W.E.I.N. 1986 brought together leading experts in the fields of nuclear and elementary particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In addition to current problems in nuclear physics (weak and electromagnetic nuclear properties, electroweak interactions in nuclei, exotic nuclei) this book presents fascinating contributions that arise from the interaction among these fields: lepton number violation and neutrino mass; muon physics; weak interactions and fundamental symmetries; fundamental decays; basic experiments for GUTs; weak interactions and astrophysics; GUTs, SUSYs and the early Universe. The book demonstrates that in this context nuclear physics promises exciting future developments. (orig.)

  15. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today`s nuclear science is the ``journey to the limits``: of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective.

  16. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Warsaw Univ.

    1997-11-01

    One of the frontiers of today's nuclear science is the ''journey to the limits'': of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The new data on exotic nuclei are expected to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk, current developments in nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed from a theoretical perspective

  17. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm 2 -sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm 2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm 2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  18. Staff exposure in pediatric interventional neuroradiology: focus on the operator's eye lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolomey, C.; Fasel, G.; Le Coultre, R.; Ryckx, N.

    2016-01-01

    Previously at 150 mSv year -1 , the ICRP now recommends limiting the equivalent dose to the eye lens to 20 mSv year -1 . For pediatric interventional neuroradiology, the exposure of the operator's eye lens may be increased by the use of a biplane fluoroscopy system and by the proximity of the physician to the patient. In practice, the efficiency of leaded glasses depends on many factors. This study addresses both aspects. First, the eye lens dose of a neuro-radiologist was measured during 12 procedures using 36 TLDs placed on his surgical cap. Secondly, in order to determine the efficiency of leaded glasses, measurements were carried out by reproducing the clinical conditions. A detector was placed on the left eye of a phantom representing the operator. Four pairs of leaded glasses were selected to test various parameters. During the 12 procedures, an individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07) of 45μSv was obtained for the eye lens closest to the tube. This study shows an eye lens dose to DAP ratio 5 times higher than for procedures performed on adult patients. The eye lens dose might be reduced by a factor of approximately 3 with the use of appropriate leaded glasses. The eye wear model with the most coverage reduces the dose by up to 50% more than the model with the least coverage. The addition of lateral protection increases the attenuation by up to 13% compared with the same model without side protection. (authors)

  19. Growth of the human lens in the Indian adult population: Preliminary observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashik Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The eye lens grows throughout life by the addition of new cells inside the surrounding capsule. How this growth affects the properties of the lens is essential for understanding disorders such as cataract and presbyopia. Aims: To examine growth of the human lens in the Indian population and compare this with the growth in Western populations by measuring in vitro dimensions together with wet and dry weights. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at the research wing of a tertiary eye care center in South India and the study design was prospective. Materials and Methods: Lenses were removed from eye bank eyes and their dimensions measured with a digital caliper. They were then carefully blotted dry and weighed before being placed in 5% buffered formalin. After 1 week fixation, the lenses were dried at 80 °C until constant weight was achieved. The constant weight was noted as the dry weight of the lens. Statistical Analysis Used: Lens parameters were analyzed as a function of age using linear and logarithmic regression methods. Results: Data were obtained for 251 lenses, aged 16-93 years, within a median postmortem time of 22 h. Both wet and dry weights increased linearly at 1.24 and 0.44 mg/year, respectively, throughout adult life. The dimensions also increased continuously throughout this time. Conclusions: Over the age range examined, lens growth in the Indian population is very similar to that in Western populations.

  20. Growth of the human lens in the Indian adult population: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ashik; Sangwan, Virender S; Augusteyn, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The eye lens grows throughout life by the addition of new cells inside the surrounding capsule. How this growth affects the properties of the lens is essential for understanding disorders such as cataract and presbyopia. To examine growth of the human lens in the Indian population and compare this with the growth in Western populations by measuring in vitro dimensions together with wet and dry weights. The study was conducted at the research wing of a tertiary eye care center in South India and the study design was prospective. Lenses were removed from eye bank eyes and their dimensions measured with a digital caliper. They were then carefully blotted dry and weighed before being placed in 5% buffered formalin. After 1 week fixation, the lenses were dried at 80 °C until constant weight was achieved. The constant weight was noted as the dry weight of the lens. Lens parameters were analyzed as a function of age using linear and logarithmic regression methods. Data were obtained for 251 lenses, aged 16-93 years, within a median postmortem time of 22 h. Both wet and dry weights increased linearly at 1.24 and 0.44 mg/year, respectively, throughout adult life. The dimensions also increased continuously throughout this time. Over the age range examined, lens growth in the Indian population is very similar to that in Western populations.

  1. Biologically inspired LED lens from cuticular nanostructures of firefly lantern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Youngseop; Kim, Ha Gon; Choi, Ki-Ju; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Park, Seongchong; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2012-01-01

    Cuticular nanostructures found in insects effectively manage light for light polarization, structural color, or optical index matching within an ultrathin natural scale. These nanostructures are mainly dedicated to manage incoming light and recently inspired many imaging and display applications. A bioluminescent organ, such as a firefly lantern, helps to out-couple light from the body in a highly efficient fashion for delivering strong optical signals in sexual communication. However, the cuticular nanostructures, except the light-producing reactions, have not been well investigated for physical principles and engineering biomimetics. Here we report a unique observation of high-transmission nanostructures on a firefly lantern and its biological inspiration for highly efficient LED illumination. Both numerical and experimental results clearly reveal high transmission through the nanostructures inspired from the lantern cuticle. The nanostructures on an LED lens surface were fabricated by using a large-area nanotemplating and reconfigurable nanomolding with heat-induced shear thinning. The biologically inspired LED lens, distinct from a smooth surface lens, substantially increases light transmission over visible ranges, comparable to conventional antireflection coating. This biological inspiration can offer new opportunities for increasing the light extraction efficiency of high-power LED packages. PMID:23112185

  2. Contractual considerations in contact lens practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classé, J G

    1986-03-01

    The use of forms in contact lens practice can save time, promote patient education, and reduce the opportunity for legal or economic disputes. The most commonly employed forms are those for contact lens fitting agreements, instructions for care and maintenance of lenses, prepaid service agreements, clinical investigations of investigatory lenses or solutions, and for extended wear patients. Sample forms are utilized for purposes of illustration.

  3. Evolution and the Calcite Eye Lens

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Vernon L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcite is a uniaxial, birefringent crystal, which in its optically transparent form, has been used for animal eye lenses, the trilobite being one such animal. Because of the calcite birefringence there is a difficulty in using calcite as a lens. When the propagation direction of incoming light is not exactly on the c-axis, the mages blur. In this paper, calcite blurring is evaluated, and the non-blurring by a crystallin eye lens is compared to a calcite one.

  4. Acute lens-induced glaucomas: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shoeb Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lens-induced factors are important and common mechanisms causing acute elevation of intraocular pressure. While in most cases, the diagnosis and management are straight-forward, in others it is difficult and can lead to improper procedures, complications and poor visual outcomes. This review was done with the aim of studying the various types of lens-induced glaucomas, classifying them in an easy way to understand manner, their clinical features, current management and future possibilities.

  5. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Park, Kwan Kyu; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing.

  6. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Kyu Park, Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing. (paper)

  7. LENS: Science Scope and Development Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) experiment will resolve the solar metallicity question via measurement of the CNO neutrino flux, as well as test the predicted equivalence of solar luminosity as measured by photon versus neutrinos. The LENS detector uses charged-current interaction of neutrinos on Indium-115 (loaded in a scintillator, InLS) to reveal the complete solar neutrino spectrum. LENS's optically segmented 3D lattice geometry achieves precise time and spatial resolution and unprecedented background rejection and sensitivity for low-energy neutrino events. This first-of-a-kind lattice design is also suited for a range of other applications where high segmentation and large light collection are required (eg: sterile neutrinos with sources, double beta decay, and surface detection of reactor neutrinos). The physics scope, detector design, and logic driving the microLENS and miniLENS prototyping stages will be presented. The collaboration is actively running programs; building, operating, developing, and simulating these prototypes using the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF). New members are welcome to the LENS Collaboration, and interested parties should contact R. Bruce Vogelaar.

  8. DNA Measurement of Overlapping Cell Nuclei in Thick Tissue Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an improved image analysis procedure for measuring the DNA content of cell nuclei in thick sections of liver tissue by absorption densitometry. Whereas previous methods only permitted the analysis of isolated nuclei, the new technique enables both isolated and overlapping nuclei to be measured. A 3D segmentation procedure determines whether each object is an isolated nucleus or a pair of overlapping nuclei; in the latter case the combined optical density is redistributed to the individual nuclei. A selection procedure ensures that only complete nuclei are measured.

  9. Relativistic exotic nuclei as projectile beams. New perspectives of studies on the properties of nuclei; Relativistische exotische Kerne als Projektilstrahlen. Neue Perspektiven zum Studium der Kerneigenschaften

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geissel, H.

    1997-03-01

    Examinations of the production cross-sections and the kinematics permitted refinement of model concepts of the peripheral reactions in exotic nuclei at energies from 100 to 1000 A MeV. Due to the strong selectivity and resolution achieved it was possible to discover a large number of novel isotopes at the fragment separator FRS, despite the relatively low projectile beam intensities of the SIS. The two twice magic nuclei found, Ni 78 and Sn 100, are particularly interesting, as they could not be measured so far with other experimental systems. Fission of relativistic uranium ions proved to be a particularly successful process yielding many medium-heavy, neutron-rich nuclei. Insight into the structure of light neutron halos could be improved. The superlarge spatial dimensions of the nuclear halos is discussed. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Untersuchungen der Produktionsquerschnitte und der Kinematik fuehr ten zu einer Verfeinerung der Modellvorstellungen der peripheren Kernr eaktionen an exotischen Kernen bei Energien im Bereich von 100- 1000 A MeV. Die hohe Selektivitaet und Aufloesung waren die Voraussetzung, da ss schon bei den vergleichsweise niedrigen Projektilstrahlintensitaete n des SIS eine grosse Anzahl von neuen Isotopen am Fragmentseparator F RS entdeckt werden konnten. Besonders erwaehnenswert sind die beiden d oppelt magischen Kerne Ni 78 und Sn 100, die mit anderen experimentel len Anlagen vorher nicht zugaenglich waren.Die Spaltung relativistisch er Uranionen hat sich als eine besonders ergiebige Quelle fuer mittels chwere neutronenreiche Kerne erwiesen. Die Kenntnisse der Struktur lei chter Neutronen- Halokerne konnten erweitert werden. Die uebergrosse r aeumliche Ausdehnung der Halokerne wurde aufgezeigt.

  10. Sharing of secondary electrons by in-lens and out-lens detector in low-voltage scanning electron microscope equipped with immersion lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2009-03-01

    To understand secondary electron (SE) image formation with in-lens and out-lens detector in low-voltage scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM), we have evaluated SE signals of an in-lens and an out-lens detector in LV-SEM. From the energy distribution spectra of SEs with various boosting voltages of the immersion lens system, we revealed that the electrostatic field of the immersion lens mainly collects electrons with energy lower than 40eV, acting as a low-pass filter. This effect is also observed as a contrast change in LV-SEM images taken by in-lens and out-lens detectors.

  11. Enlargement of thalamic nuclei in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Ann M; Bansal, Ravi; Hao, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    : Morphological abnormalities in the thalamus, together with the disturbances reported in the sensorimotor cortex, striatum, and globus pallidus, support the hypothesis of a circuitwide disorder within motor pathways in TS. The connectivity and function of the numerous and diverse thalamic nuclei within cortical...... in motor circuits to attenuate the severity of tics....

  12. High energy spin isospin modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanfray, G.; Ericson, M.

    1984-01-01

    The high energy response of nuclei to a spin-isospin excitation is investigated. We show the existence of a strong contrast between the spin transverse and spin longitudinal responses. The second one undergoes a shadow effect in the Δ region and displays the occurrence of the pionic branch

  13. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-27

    Mar 27, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 4. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei. K P Santhosh. Volume 82 Issue 4 April 2014 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  14. Test of Pseudospin Symmetry in Deformed Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Ginocchio, J. N.; Leviatan, A.; Meng, J.; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2003-01-01

    Pseudospin symmetry is a relativistic symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian with scalar and vector mean fields equal and opposite in sign. This symmetry imposes constraints on the Dirac eigenfunctions. We examine extensively the Dirac eigenfunctions of realistic relativistic mean field calculations of deformed nuclei to determine if these eigenfunctions satisfy these pseudospin symmetry constraints.

  15. Cloud condensation nuclei from biomass burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.F.; Hudson, J.G.; Zielinska, B.; Tanner, R.L.; Hallett, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the authors have analyzed biomass and crude oil smoke samples for ionic and organic species. The cloud condensation nuclei activities of the smoke particles are discussed in terms of the measured chemical compositions of the smoke samples. The implications of biomass burning to global climatic change are discussed

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of Exotic Nuclei at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Experiment IS50 is designed to: a) Investigate the full range of the @b strength function of heavy (A~$>$~48)~K nuclei b)~Study the decay of isomeric states in n-deficient bromine nuclei (A~=~72 and 70). The heavy K isotopes appeared to have complex decay schemes, including feeding by the @b-decay of levels having open neutron channels (Beta decay energy Q(@b) exceeds neutron binding energy S^n); in addition, a large fraction of the delayed transitions populate excited levels in the daughter nuclei. The allowed @b-decay selects states in the daughter nucleus with wave functions having a large overlap with the initial state. Hence, the @b strength functions, deduced from these deca reveal simple structures correlated to the particle-hole excitation energies in the Ca nuclei. These results are valuable for the application of the shell-model calculations far from stability. The delayed neutron spectra are measured with a large area curved scintillator in coincidence either with high resolution Ge(Li) detectors, ...

  17. Physics of the continuum of borromean nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaagen, J.S.; Rogde, T. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Bergen (Norway); Danilin, B.V. [RRC The Kurchatov Inst., Kurchatov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S.N. [JINR, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation); Thompson, I.J. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Zhukov, M.V. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology and Goeteborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); RNBT Collaboration

    1998-06-01

    The continuum states of two-neutron halo nuclei are calculated in the method of hyperspherical harmonics. Using DWIA theory appropriate for dilute halo matter we have probed the structure of the low-lying {sup 6}He continuum via calculations of charge-exchange and inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  18. Fisica degli atomi e dei nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Carlo

    1965-01-01

    Evidenza della struttura atomica della materia ; le proprietà degli atomi e la meccanica atomica ; gli atomi e le radiazioni elettromagnetiche ; struttura microscopica dello stato gassoso ; struttura microscopica dello stato liquido ; struttura microscopica della stato solido ; proprietà elettriche e magnetiche delle sostanze ; proprietà dei nuclei degli atomi ; le particelle elementari.

  19. Quasars: Active nuclei of young galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komberg, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    The hypothetical properties of 'young' galaxies and possible methods of observing them are discussed. It is proposed that star formation first takes place in the central regions of protogalaxies which may appear as quasar-like objects. An evolutionary scheme is outlined in which the radio quasars are transformed in time into the nuclei of radio galaxies.

  20. Parity non-conservation in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadic, D.

    1980-01-01

    Since parity non-conservation in nuclei is an inescapable consequence of weak interactions this review starts with derivation of the effective weak Hamiltonian which then acts as a perturbation mixing states of the opposite parity in nuclei. The connection between the effective weak Hamiltonian and various models of weak interactions (or quantum flavour dynamics, QFD) and the strong quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is briefly reviewed. The effective weak Hamiltonian serves as an input for determining the weak parity-violating potential. This weak potential is the main tool for connecting elementary particles with nuclear physics. Its derivation is discussed with special attention to one-boson-exchange (rho meson, pion, etc) contributions. Examples of theoretical and semi-empirical weak parity-violating potentials are given. Nuclear physics aspects of parity non-conservation in nuclei are discussed including, the gauge invariance of electromagnetic effects and the parity-violating nucleon-nucleon-photon vertex, two-body problems, processes involving α-particles, photon decays of complex nuclei, parity non-conservation in nuclear scattering, and similar effects. 329 references. (U.K.)

  1. Stability of the spherical form of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, A.A.

    1976-08-01

    An extension of the mass formula for a spherical nucleus in the drop model to include a largely deformed nucleus of different forms is investigated. It is found that although the spherical form is stable under small deformations from equilibrium, there exists for heavier nuclei another more favourable stable form, which can be approximated by two, or three touching prolate ellipsoids of revolution

  2. Properties of semi-infinite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Jaick, L.J.; Kodama, T.

    1976-04-01

    Several relations among density distributions and energies of semi-infinite and infinite nuclei are iventigated in the framework of Wilets's statistical model. The model is shown to be consistent with the theorem of surface tension given by Myers and Swiatecki. Some numerical results are shown by using an appropriate nuclear matter equation of state

  3. Thomas-Fermi model of warm nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchler, J.R.; Epstein, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    The average nuclear level density of spherical nuclei is computed with a finite temperature Thomas-Fermi model. More than 80% of the low energy nuclear excitations can be accounted for in terms of this statistical model. The relevance for stellar collapse is discussed

  4. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    November 2014 physics pp. 683–693. Viscosity: From air to hot nuclei. NGUYEN DINH DANG1,2. 1RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako City,. 351-0198 Saitama, Japan. 2Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, 179 Hoang Quoc Viet, Nghia Do,. Cau Giay Hanoi, Vietnam.

  5. Test of pseudospin symmetry in deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginocchio, J.N.; Leviatan, A.; Meng, J.; Zhou Shangui

    2004-01-01

    Pseudospin symmetry is a relativistic symmetry of the Dirac Hamiltonian with scalar and vector mean fields equal and opposite in sign. This symmetry imposes constraints on the Dirac eigenfunctions. We examine extensively the Dirac eigenfunctions of realistic relativistic mean field calculations of deformed nuclei to determine if these eigenfunctions satisfy these pseudospin symmetry constraints

  6. Growth and Interaction of Colloid Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael-Angelo; Khusid, Boris; Meyer, William; Kondic, Lou

    2017-11-01

    We study evolution of colloid systems under zero-gravity conditions. In particular, we focus on the regime where there is a coexistence between a liquid and a solid state. Under zero gravity, the dominating process in the bulk of the fluid phase and the solid phase is diffusion. At the moving solid/liquid interface, osmotic pressure is balanced by surface tension, as well as balancing fluxes (conservation of mass) with the kinematics of nuclei growth (Wilson-Frenkel law). Due to the highly nonlinear boundary condition at the moving boundary, care has to be taken when performing numerical simulations. In this work, we present a nonlinear model for colloid nuclei growth. Numerical simulations using a finite volume method are compared with asymptotic analysis of the governing equation and experimental results for nuclei growth. Novel component in our numerical simulations is the inclusion of nonlinear (collective) diffusion terms that depend on the chemical potentials of the colloid in the solid and fluid phase. The results include growth and dissolution of a single colloidal nucleus, as well as evolution of multiple interacting nuclei. Supported by NASA Grant No. NNX16AQ79G.

  7. Electronuclear sum rules for the lightest nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efros, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the model-independent longitudinal electronuclear sum rules for nuclei with A = 3 and A = 4 have an accuracy on the order of a percent in the traditional single-nucleon approximation with free nucleons for the nuclear charge-density operator. This makes it possible to test this approximation by using these sum rules. The longitudinal sum rules for A = 3 and A = 4 are calculated using the wave functions of these nuclei corresponding to a large set of realistic NN interactions. The values of the model-independent sum rules lie in the range of values calculated by this method. Model-independent expressions are obtained for the transverse sum rules for nuclei with A = 3 and A = 4. These sum rules are calculated using a large set of realistic wave functions of these nuclei. The contribution of the convection current and the changes in the results for different versions of realistic NN forces are given. 29 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Radiative muon capture on nuclei and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuelos, G.; Gorringe, T.P.; Henderson, R.; Macdonald, J.A.; Poutissou, J.M.; Azuelos, G.; Depommier, P.; Poutissou, R.; Ahmad, S.; Burnham, A.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Larabee, A.J.; Waltham, C.E.; Wright, D.H.; Armstrong, D.S.; Blecher, M.; Serna-Angel, A.; Bertl, W.; Chen, C.Q.; Zhang, N.S.; McDonald, S.C.; Taylor, G.N.; Robertson, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is made of the study of gp, the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant, in radiative muon capture on light nuclei, and of motivations for a measurement on hydrogen, with particular emphasis on recent and ongoing experiments at TRIUMF [fr

  9. Superheavy nuclei – cold synthesis and structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    120 and Ж = 172 or 184, for superheavy nuclei. This result is discussed in ... 1980 [7] on the basis of the QMFT, once again prior to its observation in 1984. Thus, cold ... On the other hand, based on a rather complete deformed relativistic mean field (DRMF) calculation, using the NL1 parameter set, we [16] predicted. = 120.

  10. Efimov effect in 2-neutron halo nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents an overview of our theoretical investigations in search of Efimov states in light 2-neutron halo nuclei. The calculations have been carried out within a three-body formalism, assuming a compact core and two valence neutrons forming the halo. The calculations provide strong evidence for the occurrence ...

  11. Symmetrical optical imaging system with bionic variable-focus lens for off-axis aberration correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Zhu, Shi-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    A bionic variable-focus lens with symmetrical layered structure was designed to mimic the crystalline lens. An optical imaging system based on this lens and with a symmetrical structure that mimics the human eye structure was proposed. The refractive index of the bionic variable-focus lens increases from outside to inside. The two PDMS lenses with a certain thickness were designed to improve the optical performance of the optical imaging system and minimise the gravity effect of liquid. The paper presents the overall structure of the optical imaging system and the detailed description of the bionic variable-focus lens. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity, the surface curvatures of the rear PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change in the focal length. The focal length range of the optical imaging system was 20.71-24.87 mm. The optical performance of the optical imaging system was evaluated by imaging experiments and analysed by ray tracing simulations. On the basis of test and simulation results, the optical performance of the system was quite satisfactory. Off-axis aberrations were well corrected, and the image quality was greatly improved.

  12. Results and complications of scleral fixated (Sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoozadeh J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical rehabilitation of the patient with aphakia who cannot tolerate contact lenses present a therapeutic challenge. In the absence of capsular support, anterior chamber lenses have been widely used. On the other hand intraocular lens implantation of scleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens during penterating keratoplasty or insufficient iris support is recommended. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcome and complication in 17 patients who underwent scleral-fixation of an intraocular lens.We studied prospectively the results of posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation by scleral fixation in 17 eyes of 17 patients without a complete posterior lens capsule support at farabi Eye Hospital. Uncorrected visual acuity improved from counting finger to 20/40 or better in 9 eyes (53 percent. The following complications were observed during the mean postoperative follow-up of 7.2 (range 3-12 months; increased intraocular pressure in 5 eyes, vitreous hemorrhage and icr hyphema in 2 eyes, cystoid macular edema (CME and vitritis in one eye, and endophthalmitis and retinal detachment in one eye. Posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation by scleral fixation is a relatively safe procedure and can be recommended for many patients

  13. Detecting High Hyperopia: The Plus Lens Test and the Spot Vision Screener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Samuel; Peterseim, Mae Millicent W; Trivedi, Rupal H; Edward Wilson, M; Cheeseman, Edward W; Papa, Carrie E

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the Plus Lens (Goodlite Company, Elgin, IL) test and the Spot Vision Screener (Welch Allyn, Skaneateles Falls, NY) in detecting high hyperopia in a pediatric population. Between June and August 2015, patients were screened with the Spot Vision Screener and the Plus Lens test prior to a scheduled pediatric ophthalmology visit. The following data were analyzed: demographic data, Plus Lens result, Spot Vision Screener result, cycloplegic refraction, and examination findings. Sensitivity/specificity and positive/negative predictive values were calculated for the Plus Lens test and Spot Vision Screener in detecting hyperopia as determined by the "gold-standard" cycloplegic refraction. A total of 109 children (average age: 82 months) were included. Compared to the ophthalmologist's cycloplegic refraction, the Spot Vision Screener sensitivity for +3.50 diopters (D) hyperopia was 31.25% and the specificity was 100%. The Plus Lens sensitivity for +3.50 D hyperopia was 43.75% and the specificity was 89.25%. Spot Vision Screener sensitivity increased with higher degrees of hyperopia. In this preliminary study, the Plus Lens test and the Spot Vision Screener demonstrated moderate sensitivity with good specificity in detecting high hyperopia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017;54(3):163-167.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. 51Cr release and oxidative stress in the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart-DeHaan, P.J.; Sanwal, M.; Creighton, M.O.; Inch, W.R.; Trevithick, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the opaque areas of human cortical cataracts has shown that a large portion of the opacity could be attributed to the globules found there. We tested models involving globule formation as a result of oxidative damage to rat lens cells in culture and whole chick embryo lenses. When cell monolayers from a lens cell line were exposed to oxidizing conditions they developed globules on the cell surface. The cells were protected from damage by the addition of glutathione and vitamin C. Thirteen-day chick embryo lenses were also incubated in oxidizing conditions and the amount of cellular damage was assessed using a chromium-51 release assay we have developed. After 24 hr the percent 51Cr in the medium increased by an average of 20% as a result of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment. The addition of the 10 mM vitamin C to the hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the 51Cr leakage to the control level. Light microscopy of sections of the lens showed a breakdown of the equatorial fibre arrangement in the presence of H2O2, while addition of vitamin C restored the fibre organization to almost normal. The findings suggest that oxidative stress is an important step in cataractogenesis and point towards the use of water soluble antioxidants as protective agents

  15. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape.

  16. Nuclear moments of nuclei near sphericity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hajjaji, O.

    1987-05-01

    Magnetic and electric hyperfine interactions are studied by means of low temperature nuclear orientation. The magnetic moment of the 149 Gd isotope and that of 151 Gd are determined. The values follow the same trend as literature values of neighbouring nuclei. The calculated moments of the 7/2 - states using the Mottelson-Nilsson model without configuration mixing are nearly independent of deformation. Thus we assign the decrease of the magnetic moment versus neutron number to many particle coupling in the f shell. The Moessbauer effect detection of nuclear orientation is discussed. Two series of experiences are performed with different finalities. In the first one we determined the electric quadrupole moments of 125m Te and 129 Te. The quadrupole moments confirm the nearly spherical shape of these nuclei. In the second series we describe the Moessbauer effect of the radiation emitted by the daigleter nucleus of 125 I, implanted in two semiconductor matrices, locally oriented at low temperature by the electric field gradient of impurity-vacancy coupling. Despite the difficulty of the cooling down of Te nuclei to lattice temperature, we have shown the existence of the electric field gradient of implanted I into Si and α-Sn and determined their signs. The level mixing resonance is applied on oriented nuclei technique to determine the weak prolate deformation of silver nuclei. Studying the Δm = 3 resonance of 107 Ag m , we etablished the quadrupole moment of this state, which is in good agreement with the theoretical estimations of Moeller and Nix [fr

  17. Ice Nuclei Production in Volcanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper [Durant et al., 2008] includes a review of research on ice nucleation in explosive volcanic clouds in addition to reporting their own research on laboratory measurements focused on single-particle ice nucleation. Their research as well as the research they reviewed were concerned with the freezing of supercooled water drops (250 to 260 K) by volcanic ash particles acting as ice freezing nuclei. Among their conclusions are: Fine volcanic ash particles are very efficient ice freezing nuclei. Volcanic clouds likely contain fine ash concentrations 104 to 105 times greater than found in meteorological clouds. This overabundance of ice nuclei will produce a cloud with many small ice crystals that will not grow larger as they do in meteorological clouds because the cloud water content is widely distributed among the numerous small ice crystals. The small ice crystals have a small fall velocity, thus volcanic clouds are very stable. The small ice crystals are easily lofted into the stratosphere transporting water and adsorbed trace gasses. In this paper we examine the mechanism for the production of the small ice nuclei and develop a simple model for calculating the size of the ice nuclei based upon the distribution of magma around imbedded bubbles. We also have acquired a volcanic bomb that exhibits bubble remnants on its entire surface. The naturally occurring fragments from the volcanic bomb reveal a size distribution consistent with that predicted by the simple model. Durant, A. J., R. A. Shaw, W. I. Rose, Y. Mi, and G. G. J. Ernst (2008), Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D09206, doi:10.1029/2007JD009064.

  18. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  19. Harm reduction through a social justice lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Bernadette

    2008-02-01

    People who are street involved such as those experiencing homelessness and drug use face multiple inequities in health and access to health care. Morbidity and mortality are significantly increased among those who are street involved. Incorporation of a harm reduction philosophy in health care has the potential to shift the moral context of health care delivery and enhance access to health care services. However, harm reduction with a primary focus on reducing the harms of drug use fails focus on the harms associated with the context of drug use such as homelessness, violence and poverty. Ethical analysis of the underlying values of harm reduction and examination of different conceptions of justice are discussed as a basis for action that addresses a broad range of harms associated with drug use. Theories of distributive justice that focus primarily on the distribution of material goods are limited as theoretical frameworks for addressing the root causes of harm associated with drug use. Social justice, reconceptualised and interpreted through a critical lens as described by Iris Marion Young, is presented as a promising alternative ethical framework. A critical reinterpretation of social justice leads to insights that can illuminate structural inequities that contribute to the harms associated with the context of drug use. Such an approach provides promise as means of informing policy that aims to reduce a broad range of harms associated with drug use such as homelessness and poverty.

  20. Acanthamoeba keratitis and contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Richard G; Watters, Grant; Johnson, Richard; Ormonde, Susan E; Snibson, Grant R

    2007-09-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but serious complication of contact lens wear that may cause severe visual loss. The clinical picture is usually characterised by severe pain, sometimes disproportionate to the signs, with an early superficial keratitis that is often misdiagnosed as herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. Advanced stages of the infection are usually characterised by central corneal epithelial loss and marked stromal opacification with subsequent loss of vision. In this paper, six cases of contact lens-related Acanthamoeba keratitis that occurred in Australia and New Zealand over a three-year period are described. Three of the patients were disposable soft lens wearers, two were hybrid lens wearers and one was a rigid gas permeable lens wearer. For all six cases, the risk factors for Acanthamoeba keratitis were contact lens wear with inappropriate or ineffective lens maintenance and exposure of the contact lenses to tap or other sources of water. All six patients responded well to medical therapy that involved topical use of appropriate therapeutic agents, most commonly polyhexamethylene biguanide and propamidine isethionate, although two of the patients also subsequently underwent deep lamellar keratoplasty due to residual corneal surface irregularity and stromal scarring. Despite the significant advances that have been made in the medical therapy of Acanthamoeba keratitis over the past 10 years, prevention remains the best treatment and patients who wear contact lenses must be thoroughly educated about the proper use and care of the lenses. In particular, exposure of the contact lenses to tap water or other sources of water should be avoided.

  1. Properties of the cathode lens combined with a focusing magnetic/immersion-magnetic lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvalina, I.; Muellerova, I.

    2011-01-01

    The cathode lens is an electron optical element in an emission electron microscope accelerating electrons from the sample, which serves as a source for a beam of electrons. Special application consists in using the cathode lens first for retardation of an illuminating electron beam and then for acceleration of reflected as well as secondary electrons, made in the directly imaging low energy electron microscope or in its scanning version discussed here. In order to form a real image, the cathode lens has to be combined with a focusing magnetic lens or a focusing immersion-magnetic lens, as used for objective lenses of some commercial scanning electron microscopes. These two alternatives are compared with regards to their optical properties, in particular with respect to predicted aberration coefficients and the spot size, as well as the optimum angular aperture of the primary beam. The important role of the final aperture size on the image resolution is also presented.

  2. Sub-barrier quasifission in heavy element formation reactions with deformed actinide target nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, D. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Prasad, E.; Wakhle, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Evers, M.; Luong, D. H.; du Rietz, R.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.

    2018-02-01

    Background: The formation of superheavy elements (SHEs) by fusion of two massive nuclei is severely inhibited by the competing quasifission process. Low excitation energies favor SHE survival against fusion-fission competition. In "cold" fusion with spherical target nuclei near 208Pb, SHE yields are largest at beam energies significantly below the average capture barrier. In "hot" fusion with statically deformed actinide nuclei, this is not the case. Here the elongated deformation-aligned configurations in sub-barrier capture reactions inhibits fusion (formation of a compact compound nucleus), instead favoring rapid reseparation through quasifission. Purpose: To determine the probabilities of fast and slow quasifission in reactions with prolate statically deformed actinide nuclei, through measurement and quantitative analysis of the dependence of quasifission characteristics at beam energies spanning the average capture barrier energy. Methods: The Australian National University Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE fission spectrometer have been used to measure fission and quasifission mass and angle distributions for reactions with projectiles from C to S, bombarding Th and U target nuclei. Results: Mass-asymmetric quasifission occurring on a fast time scale, associated with collisions with the tips of the prolate actinide nuclei, shows a rapid increase in probability with increasing projectile charge, the transition being centered around projectile atomic number ZP=14 . For mass-symmetric fission events, deviations of angular anisotropies from expectations for fusion fission, indicating a component of slower quasifission, suggest a similar transition, but centered around ZP˜8 . Conclusions: Collisions with the tips of statically deformed prolate actinide nuclei show evidence for two distinct quasifission processes of different time scales. Their probabilities both increase rapidly with the projectile charge. The probability of fusion can be severely

  3. Lens exposure during brain scans using multidetector row CT scanners: methods for estimation of lens dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Furui, S; Ishitake, T; Abe, T; Machida, H; Takei, R; Ibukuro, K; Watanabe, A; Kidouchi, T; Nakano, Y

    2010-05-01

    Some recent studies on radiation lens injuries have indicated much lower dose thresholds than specified by the current radiation protection guidelines. The purpose of this research was to measure the lens dose during brain CT scans with multidetector row CT and to assess methods for estimating the lens dose. With 8 types of multidetector row CT scanners, both axial and helical scans were obtained for the head part of a human-shaped phantom by using normal clinical settings with the orbitomeatal line as the baseline. We measured the doses on both eyelids by using an RPLGD during whole-brain scans including the orbit with the starting point at the level of the inferior orbital rim. To assess the effect of the starting points on the lens doses, we measured the lens doses by using 2 other starting points for scanning (the orbitomeatal line and the superior orbital rim). The CTDIvols and the lens doses during whole-brain CT including the orbit were 50.9-113.3 mGy and 42.6-103.5 mGy, respectively. The ratios of lens dose to CTDIvol were 80.6%-103.4%. The lens doses decreased as the starting points were set more superiorly. The lens doses during scans from the superior orbital rim were 11.8%-20.9% of the doses during the scans from the inferior orbital rim. CTDIvol can be used to estimate the lens dose during whole-brain CT when the orbit is included in the scanning range.

  4. Neutron emission study after muon capture by nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyssy, Alain.

    1974-01-01

    Muon capture by nuclei, used in the beginning for checking the weak interaction, is now a method of investigation of nuclear structure. Study of spectrum, asymmetry and polarization of emitted neutrons after polarized muon capture has been done in three directions: weak coupling constants, final state interaction, nuclear wave functions. The neutron intensity and helicity are very dependent of the neutron - residual nucleus interaction, while the asymmetry is sensitive to the wave functions used for the proton. Moreover if the induced tensor coupling constant is different from zero the asymmetry is increased. Longitudinal polarization experiments, with those for neutron intensity, would be of great interest to give informations on neutron asymmetry [fr

  5. A new generation of electromagnetic probes of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, W.; Negele, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that because the electromagnetic interaction is sufficiently weak that it does not unduly disrupt a nuclear target, electromagnetic probes provide unambiguous quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the nuclear wave function. They represent a new generation of experimental techniques, now coming into operation, that will greatly increase the variety and quality of results. Three applications of this new technique are described - application to (e,e'p) and (γ,p) reactions, application to inelastic electron scattering from rotational nuclei; and application to magnetic scattering. High-q probes of few-body systems are also discussed. (U.K.)

  6. Transport of ice nuclei over the north pacific ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Peter V.; Bluhm, George C.; Ohtake, T.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements have been made over extended periods of time of the relative concentrations of ice nuclei in the air at stations in Alaska, Hawaii and Washington State. On occasions large increases in ice nucleus counts lasting for a week or more (“ice nucleus storms”) were observed. The ice nucleus storms sometimes occurred in close proximity in time at different stations and it is shown that in some cases this can be explained by the advection of particles in the lower troposphere...

  7. Pax6- and Six3-mediated induction of lens cell fate in mouse and human ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M Anchan

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem (ES cells provide a potentially useful in vitro model for the study of in vivo tissue differentiation. We used mouse and human ES cells to investigate whether the lens regulatory genes Pax6 and Six3 could induce lens cell fate in vitro. To help assess the onset of lens differentiation, we derived a new mES cell line (Pax6-GFP mES that expresses a GFP reporter under the control of the Pax6 P0 promoter and lens ectoderm enhancer. Pax6 or Six3 expression vectors were introduced into mES or hES cells by transfection or lentiviral infection and the differentiating ES cells analyzed for lens marker expression. Transfection of mES cells with Pax6 or Six3 but not with other genes induced the expression of lens cell markers and up-regulated GFP reporter expression in Pax6-GFP mES cells by 3 days post-transfection. By 7 days post-transfection, mES cell cultures exhibited a>10-fold increase over controls in the number of colonies expressing γA-crystallin, a lens fiber cell differentiation marker. RT-PCR and immunostaining revealed induction of additional lens epithelial or fiber cell differentiation markers including Foxe3, Prox1, α- and β-crystallins, and Tdrd7. Moreover, γA-crystallin- or Prox1-expressing lentoid bodies formed by 30 days in culture. In hES cells, Pax6 or Six3 lentiviral vectors also induced lens marker expression. mES cells that express lens markers reside close to but are distinct from the Pax6 or Six3 transduced cells, suggesting that the latter induce nearby undifferentiated ES cells to adopt a lens fate by non-cell autonomous mechanisms. In sum, we describe a novel mES cell GFP reporter line that is useful for monitoring induction of lens fate, and demonstrate that Pax6 or Six3 is sufficient to induce ES cells to adopt a lens fate, potentially via non-cell autonomous mechanisms. These findings should facilitate investigations of lens development.

  8. Refractive lens exchange and piggyback intraocular lens implantation in nanophthalmos: Visual and structural outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi, Masoomeh; Fallah-Tafti, Mohammad-Reza; Fadakar, Kaveh; Katoozpour, Ramon; Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Fallah-Tafti, Zahra; Khorami, Azita

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the best piggyback intraocular lens (IOL) implantation method and the outcomes in nanophthalmos eyes and to define the postoperative structural changes. Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Prospective case series. Candidates for refractive surgery who were nanophthalmic were recruited. Patients had refractive lens exchange followed by implantation of both IOLs in the bag or 1 IOL in the bag and 1 IOL in the sulcus. The baseline and follow-up visual acuity, refractive status, and structural Scheimpflug imaging were evaluated. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was performed 6 months postoperatively. The study comprised 9 nanophthalmic patients (18 eyes) with a mean preoperative uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) of 1.53 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) ± 0.3 (SD), mean corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of 0.34 ± 0.2 logMAR, and mean spherical equivalent (SE) of +13.55 ± 4.0 diopters (D). The mean postoperative UDVA improved from baseline. There was no significant difference in the mean UDVA and CDVA between the 2 IOL groups. Postoperatively, both groups had a significant improvement in SE, a significant rise in anterior chamber depth and angle, and similar UBM measurements. Piggyback IOL implantation was an effective refractive procedure in nanophthalmic eyes. Both implantation methods resulted in similar outcomes; however, the small number of patients in each group made it less likely that possible differences would be found. The increase in angle values might help prevent the development of closed-angle glaucoma. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Steady-State Diffusion of Water through Soft-Contact LensMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasiero, Francesco; Krull, Florian; Radke, Clayton J.; Prausnitz, JohnM.

    2005-01-31

    Water transport through soft contact lenses (SCL) is important for acceptable performance on the human eye. Chemical-potential gradient-driven diffusion rates of water through soft-contact-lens materials are measured with an evaporation-cell technique. Water is evaporated from the bottom surface of a lens membrane by impinging air at controlled flow rate and humidity. The resulting weight loss of a water reservoir covering the top surface of the contact-lens material is recorded as a function of time. New results are reported for a conventional hydrogel material (SofLens{trademark} One Day, hilafilcon A, water content at saturation W{sub 10} = 70 weight %) and a silicone hydrogel material (PureVision{trademark}, balafilcon A, W{sub 10} = 36 %), with and without surface oxygen plasma treatment. Also, previously reported data for a conventional HEMA-SCL (W{sub 10} = 38 %) hydrogel are reexamined and compared with those for SofLens{trademark} One Day and PureVision{trademark} hydrogels. Measured steady-state water fluxes are largest for SofLens{trademark} One Day, followed by PureVision{trademark} and HEMA. In some cases, the measured steady-state water fluxes increase with rising relative air humidity. This increase, due to an apparent mass-transfer resistance at the surface (trapping skinning), is associated with formation of a glassy skin at the air/membrane interface when the relative humidity is below 55-75%. Steady-state water-fluxes are interpreted through an extended Maxwell-Stefan diffusion model for a mixture of species starkly different in size. Thermodynamic nonideality is considered through Flory-Rehner polymer-solution theory. Shrinking/swelling is self-consistently modeled by conservation of the total polymer mass. Fitted Maxwell-Stefan diffusivities increase significantly with water concentration in the contact lens.

  10. Development of Powerhouse Using Fresnel lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Dohani Nawar Saif

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an alternative source of renewable energy. Sultanate of Oman government showed initiation on utilization of solar energy for domestic and industrial applications. Fresnel lens is one of the methods to collect maximum energy by gathering heat of the sun in the concentrated form (using solar collectors. Earlier research work discloses that Fresnel lens gave better result in terms of power output and produces lower heat loss as compared to linear –parabolic solar collectors. In this work, development of a proto Fresnel lens power house was made to generate electricity. The focused heat from Fresnel lens was used to heat the molten salt in a heat exchanger to produce the steam. The generated steam was used to rotate the steam engine coupled to a generator. In the current work, a maximum power of 30 W was produced. In addition, comparative study was carried out regarding solar salts and heat exchanger materials to understand the Fresnel powerhouse performance. Overall the present study gave valuable information regarding usage of Fresnel lens for electricity generation in Oman.

  11. Non-compliance in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, B E; Efron, N

    1994-10-01

    Non-compliance is emerging as a critical issue in the contact lens field. This problem has been studied at depth in general health care situations and is seen as the responsibility of both practitioner and patient (client) working in a health care partnership. The contact lens practitioner and patient present a specific case for the study of non-compliance in areas such as hygiene, solution use, appointment attendance and wearing times. From 40 to 91% of contact lens patients have been reported as non-complaint in the use of recommended care and maintenance regimens and many of these are confused or ignorant about their behaviour. In order to arrive at a general set of conclusions from the studies published to date, it is important to understand the methodology of each study, it purpose, the definition of non-compliance used and the way the results were analysed and described. This review summarizes the research into non-compliance in the contact lens field to data. A set of general conclusions is drawn and a model for compliance in the context of contact lens practice is proposed.

  12. Spherical aberration in contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskoog Pettersson, A; Jarkö, C; Alvin, A; Unsbo, P; Brautaset, R

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present studies was to investigate the effect on spherical aberration of different non custom-made contact lenses, both with and without aberration control. A wavefront analyser (Zywave, Bausch & Lomb) was used to measure the aberrations in each subject's right eye uncorrected and with the different contact lenses. The first study evaluated residual spherical aberration with a standard lens (Focus Dailies Disposable, Ciba Vision) and with an aberration controlled contact lens (ACCL) (Definition AC, Optical Connection Inc.). The second study evaluated the residual spherical aberrations with a monthly disposable silicone hydrogel lens with aberration reduction (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb). Uncorrected spherical aberration was positive for all pupil sizes in both studies. In the first study, residual spherical aberration was close to zero with the standard lens for all pupil sizes whereas the ACCL over-corrected spherical aberration. The results of the second study showed that the monthly disposable lens also over-corrected the aberration making it negative. The changes in aberration were statistically significant (plenses. Since the amount of aberration varies individually we suggest that aberrations should be measured with lenses on the eye if the aim is to change spherical aberration in a certain direction.

  13. A lazy way to design infrared lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, RongSheng; Wu, JianDong; Chen, LongJiang; Yu, Kun; Pang, HaoJun; Hu, BaiZhen

    2017-08-01

    We designed a compact middle-wave infrared (MWIR) lens with a large focal length ratio (about 1.5:1), used in the 3.7 to 4.8 μm range. The lens is consisted of a compact front group and a re-imaging group. Thanks to the compact front group configuration, it is possible to install a filter wheel mechanism in such a tight space. The total track length of the lens is about 50mm, which includes a 2mm thick protective window and a cold shield of 12mm. The full field of view of the lens is about 3.6°, and F number is less than 1.6, the image circle is about 4.6mm in diameter. The design performance of the lens reaches diffraction limitation, and doesn't change a lot during a temperature range of -40°C +60°C. This essay proposed a stepwise design method of infrared optical system guided by the qualitative approach. The method fully utilize the powerful global optimization ability, with a little effort to write code snippet in optical design software, frees optical engineer from tedious calculation of the original structure.

  14. TESS Lens-Bezel Assembly Modal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Brandon J.; Karlicek, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) program, led by the Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) will be the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey. MIT Lincoln Laboratory is responsible for the cameras, including the lens assemblies, detector assemblies, lens hoods, and camera mounts. TESS is scheduled to be launched in August of 2017 with the primary goal to detect small planets with bright host starts in the solar neighborhood, so that detailed characterizations of the planets and their atmospheres can be performed. The TESS payload consists of four identical cameras and a data handling unit. Each camera consists of a lens assembly with seven optical elements and a detector assembly with four charge-coupled devices (CCDs) including their associated electronics. The optical prescription requires that several of the lenses are in close proximity to a neighboring element. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to estimate the relative deflections between each lens-bezel assembly under launch loads to predict that there are adequate clearances preventing the lenses from making contact. Modal tests using non-contact response measurements were conducted to experimentally estimate the modal parameters of the lens-bezel assembly, and used to validate the initial FEM assumptions. Key Words Non-contact measurements, modal analysis, model validation

  15. Probing the density tail of radioactive nuclei with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Obertelli, Alexandre; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Corsi, Anna; Pollacco, Emmanuel; Flavigny, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    We propose an experiment to determine the proton and neutron content of the radial density tail in short-lived nuclei. The objectives are to (i) to evidence new proton and neutron halos, (ii) to understand the development of neutron skins in medium-mass nuclei, (iii) to provide a new observable that characterises the density tail of short-lived nuclei.

  16. The Role of Broken Cooper Pairs in Warm Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Chankova, R.; Larsen, A.C.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Syed, N.U.H.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand warm nuclei and describe the underlying microscopic structure, entropy is measured for several even-even and odd-mass nuclei. Mid-shell nuclei show significant odd-even entropy differences interpreted as the single-particle entropy introduced by the valence nucleon. A method to extract critical temperatures for the pair breaking process is demonstrated. (author)

  17. The Effects of the Local Environment on Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzer, L. H.; De Robertis, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    There continues to be significant controversy regarding the mechanism(s) responsible for the initiation and maintenance of activity in galactic nuclei. In this paper we will investigate possible environmental triggers of nuclear activity through a statistical analysis of a large sample of galaxy groups. The focus of this paper is to identify active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other emission-line galaxies in these groups and to compare their frequency with a sample of over 260,000 isolated galaxies from the same catalog. The galaxy groups are taken from the catalog of Yang et al., in which over 20,000 virialized groups of galaxies (2 extinction and underlying Balmer stellar absorption, we classify galaxies in the sample using traditional emission-line ratios, while incorporating measurement uncertainties. We find a significantly higher fraction of AGNs in groups compared with the isolated sample. Likewise, a significantly higher fraction of absorption-line galaxies are found in groups, while a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies prefer isolated environments. Within grouped environments, AGNs and star-forming galaxies are found more frequently in small- to medium-richness groups, while absorption-line galaxies prefer groups with larger richnesses. Groups containing only emission-line galaxies have smaller virial radii, velocity dispersions, and masses compared with those containing only absorption-line galaxies. Furthermore, the AGN fraction increases with decreasing distance to the group centroid, independent of galaxy morphology. Using properties obtained from Galaxy Zoo, there is an increased fraction of AGNs within merging systems, unlike star-forming galaxies. These results provide some indication that the local environment does play a role in initiating activity in galactic nuclei, but it is by no means simple or straightforward.

  18. Production of light nuclei and anti-nuclei in pp and Pb-Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263188; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355079615; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070139032; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374837627; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362845670; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080192; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-g.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461684; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32823219X; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-p.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319628; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326095721; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, Marco|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250599171; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413533751; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/330542133; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369509307; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-k.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The production of (anti-)deuteron and (anti-)He 3 nuclei in Pb-Pb collisions at s NN − − − √ =2.76 TeV has been studied using the ALICE detector at the LHC. The spectra exhibit a significant hardening with increasing centrality. Combined blast-wave fits of several particles support the

  19. Acanthamoeba, bacterial, and fungal contamination of contact lens storage cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T B; Cursons, R T; Sherwan, J F; Rose, P R

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Microbial corneal infection is the most serious complication of contact lens wear. Contact lens cases are a recognised potential source of pathogens associated with corneal ulcers. METHODS--This survey established the incidence of protozoal, bacterial, and fungal contact lens case contamination in 101 asymptomatic daily wear cosmetic contact lens wearers from a domiciliary contact lens practice. RESULTS--Eighty two (81%) contact lens cases were found to be contaminated, with 19 (19%) sterile. Of all contact lens cases, 78 (77%) grew bacteria, 24 (24%) fungi, and 20 (20%) protozoa. Acanthamoeba spp were isolated from eight (8%) contact lens cases. Fifty six (55%) contact lens cases yielded mixed bacterial contamination. This is the first contact lens case survey in which hydrogen peroxide disinfection was the major method of contact lens disinfection (75% of subjects) and no home made saline was used. All the contaminating organisms were shown to possess the enzyme catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The polymicrobial nature of the biofilms found in many contact lens cases is illustrated electron micrographically. CONCLUSION--Based on data from this and previous studies, the authors conclude with recommendations for contact lens wearers: (1) regular scrubbing of contact lens case interior to disrupt biofilms; (2) exposure of contact lens case to very hot water (> or = 70 degrees C) will kill Acanthamoeba contaminants; (3) allow contact lens case to air dry between uses; (4) if hydrogen peroxide disinfection is preferred, use a two step system; (5) replace contact lens case regularly. Images PMID:7626578

  20. LENS repair and modification of metal NW components:materials and applications guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smugeresky, John E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gill, David Dennis; Oberhaus, Jason (BWXT Y-12); Adams, Thad (Savannah River National Laboratory); VanCamp, Chad (Kansas City Plant)

    2006-11-01

    welded metal. Tool wear is slightly higher in LENS material than in wrought material, but not so much that one would be concerned with increased tooling cost. The LENS process achieved process qualification for the AY1E0125 D-Bottle Bracket from the W80-3 LEP program, and in the effort, also underwent testing in weapons environments. These tests included structural dynamic response testing and drop testing. The LENS deposited parts were compared in these tests with conventionally machined parts and showed equivalency to such an extent that the parts were accepted for use in parallel path subsystem-level weapon environment testing. The evaluation of LENS has shown that the process can be a viable option when either complete metal parts are needed or existing metal parts require modification or repair. The LENS Qualification Technology Investment team successfully investigated new applications for the LENS process and showed that it has great applicability across the Nuclear Weapons Complex as well as in other high rigor applications.

  1. Medullary raphe nuclei activate the lumbosacral defecation center through the descending serotonergic pathway to regulate colorectal motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Hiroyuki; Naitou, Kiyotada; Horii, Yuuki; Shimaoka, Hiroki; Horii, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Hiroki; Yamada, Akihiro; Furue, Hidemasa; Shiina, Takahiko; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal motility is regulated by two defecation centers located in the brain and spinal cord. In previous studies, we have shown that administration of serotonin (5-HT) in the lumbosacral spinal cord causes enhancement of colorectal motility. Because spinal 5-HT is derived from neurons of the medullary raphe nuclei, including the raphe magnus, raphe obscurus, and raphe pallidus, we examined whether stimulation of the medullary raphe nuclei enhances colorectal motility via the lumbosacral defecation center. Colorectal pressure was recorded with a balloon in vivo in anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the medullary raphe nuclei failed to enhance colorectal motility. Because GABAergic neurons can be simultaneously activated by the raphe stimulation and released GABA masks accelerating actions of the raphe nuclei on the lumbosacral defecation center, a GABA A receptor antagonist was preinjected intrathecally to manifest excitatory responses. When spinal GABA A receptors were blocked by the antagonist, electrical stimulation of the medullary raphe nuclei increased colorectal contractions. This effect of the raphe nuclei was inhibited by intrathecal injection of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2 (5-HT 2 ) and type 3 (5-HT 3 ) receptor antagonists. In addition, injection of a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor in the lumbosacral spinal cord augmented the raphe stimulation-induced enhancement of colorectal motility. Transection of the pelvic nerves, but not transection of the colonic nerves, prevented the effect of the raphe nuclei on colorectal motility. These results demonstrate that activation of the medullary raphe nuclei causes augmented contractions of the colorectum via 5-HT 2 and 5-HT 3 receptors in the lumbosacral defecation center. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We have shown that electrical stimulation of the medullary raphe nuclei causes augmented contractions of the colorectum via pelvic nerves in rats. The effect of the medullary raphe nuclei on colorectal motility is

  2. Characterization of lens based photoacoustic imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalloor Joseph Francis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Some of the challenges in translating photoacoustic (PA imaging to clinical applications includes limited view of the target tissue, low signal to noise ratio and the high cost of developing real-time systems. Acoustic lens based PA imaging systems, also known as PA cameras are a potential alternative to conventional imaging systems in these scenarios. The 3D focusing action of lens enables real-time C-scan imaging with a 2D transducer array. In this paper, we model the underlying physics in a PA camera in the mathematical framework of an imaging system and derive a closed form expression for the point spread function (PSF. Experimental verification follows including the details on how to design and fabricate the lens inexpensively. The system PSF is evaluated over a 3D volume that can be imaged by this PA camera. Its utility is demonstrated by imaging phantom and an ex vivo human prostate tissue sample.

  3. Freeform micromachining of an infrared Alvarez lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Lineberger, Jennifer L.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    In 1967, Luis Alvarez introduced a novel concept for a focusing lens whereby two transmitting elements with cubic polynomial surfaces yield a composite lens of variable focal length with small lateral shifts. Computer simulations have demonstrated the behavior of these devices, but fabricating the refractive cubic surfaces of the types needed with adequate precision and depth modulation has proven to be challenging using standard methods, and, to the authors' knowledge, Alvarez lens elements have not been previously machined in infrared materials. Recent developments in freeform diamond machining capability have enabled the fabrication of such devices. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of freeform refractive Alvarez elements in germanium using diamond micro-milling on a five-axis Moore Nanotech® 350FG Freeform Generator. Machining approaches are discussed, and measurements of surface figure and finish are presented. Initial experimental tests of optical performance are also discussed.

  4. Invited review article: the electrostatic plasma lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-01

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  5. 3D printed helical antenna with lens

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-12-19

    The gain of an antenna can be enhanced through the integration of a lens, however this technique has traditionally been restricted to planar antennas due to fabrication limitations of standard manufacturing processes. Here, with a unique combination of 3D and 2D inkjet printing of dielectric and metallic inks respectively, we demonstrate a Fresnel lens that has been monolithically integrated to a non-planar antenna (helix) for the first time. Antenna measurements show that the integration of a Fresnel lens enhances the gain of a 2-turn helix by around 4.6 dB giving a peak gain of about 12.9 dBi at 8.8 GHz.

  6. An "ESA-affordable" Laue-lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2005-01-01

    With ESA's INTEGRAL mission gamma-ray astronomy has advanced to the point where major scientific advances must be expected from detailed studies of the many new point sources. The interest in developing focusing telescopes operating in the soft gamma-ray regime up to 1 MeV is therefore mounting r...... constraints of a specific medium size launch vehicle. The introduction of the lens mass as a primary design driver has some surprising effects for the choice of material for the crystals and new tradeoff considerations are introduced....... rapidly. Telescopes based on Laue diffraction of gamma-rays from crystals appear as one promising route, although the practical difficulties of realizing a large scale Laue lens are certainly not small. In this paper I have attempted to develop an optimized lens design considering the size and mass...

  7. Isospin Mixing In N $\\approx$ Z Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Srnka, D; Versyck, S; Zakoucky, D

    2002-01-01

    Isospin mixing in N $\\approx$ Z nuclei region of the nuclear chart is an important phenomenon in nuclear physics which has recently gained theoretical and experimental interest. It also forms an important nuclear physics correction in the precise determination of the $ft$-values of superallowed 0$^+ \\rightarrow 0^+ \\beta$- transitions. The latter are used in precision tests of the weak interaction from nuclear $\\beta$- decay. We propose to experimentally measure isospin mixing into nuclear ground states in the N $\\approx$ Z region by determining the isospin forbidden Fermi-component in the Gamow-Teller dominated $J^{\\pi} \\rightarrow J^{\\pi} \\beta$- transitions through the observation of anisotropic positron emission from oriented nuclei. First measurements were carried out with $^{71}$As and are being analyzed now.

  8. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.S.

    1987-08-01

    High energy is being conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This includes inclusive electron scattering, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region, the q 2 dependence of 4 He(e,e'p), deep inelastic scattering from nuclei, transverse and longitudinal response in the resonance region, nuclear physics at PEP and 1.6 GeV spectrometer properties. Additional high energy research on electron scattering on 3 H and 3 He and the nuclear structure of 205 Tl and 206 Pb are being conducted at MIT-Bates. Other activities are being carried out at Saclay and research and development for Monte Carlo studies of Hall A spectrometers for CEBAF is being conducted

  9. Monopole Strength Function of Deformed Superfluid Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoitsov, M. V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kortelainen, E. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nakatsukasa, T. [RIKEN, Japan; Losa, C. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste, Italy; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method for calculating strength functions using the finite amplitude method (FAM) for deformed superfluid heavy nuclei within the framework of the nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrate that FAM reproduces strength functions obtained with the fully self-consistent quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) at a fraction of computational cost. As a demonstration, we compute the isoscalar and isovector monopole strength for strongly deformed configurations in ^{240}Pu by considering huge quasi-particle QRPA spaces. Our approach to FAM, based on Broyden's iterative procedure, opens the possibility for large-scale calculations of strength distributions in well-bound and weakly bound nuclei across the nuclear landscape.

  10. Tensor coupling and pseudospin symmetry in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberto, P.; Castro, A.S. de; Lisboa, R.; Malheiro, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we study the contribution of the isoscalar tensor coupling to the realization of pseudospin symmetry in nuclei. Using realistic values for the tensor coupling strength, we show that this coupling reduces noticeably the pseudospin splittings, especially for single-particle levels near the Fermi surface. By using an energy decomposition of the pseudospin energy splittings, we show that the changes in these splittings come mainly through the changes induced in the lower radial wave function for the low-lying pseudospin partners and through changes in the expectation value of the pseudospin-orbit coupling term for surface partners. This allows us to confirm the conclusion already reached in previous studies, namely that the pseudospin symmetry in nuclei is of a dynamical nature

  11. Electron interactions with nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Research includes work at SLAC, Bates, and Saclay research facilities. The high energy program at SLAC concerns inclusive electron scattering from nuclei, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, and the design of an electron detection system for the SLAC 1.6 GeV/c magnetic spectrometer. The high energy program at Bates includes quasielastic electron scattering from 1 H, 2 H, 3 He, and 4 He, and electron scattering from 3 H and 3 He. Nuclear structure studies are based on high resolution inelastic electron scattering and include electron scattering from 208 Pb and mercury isotopes, charge densities from low lying states in 86 Sr, and magnetization densities of 205 Tl and 207 Pb. (DWL) 72 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab

  12. SP (4,R) symmetry in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    A classification of nuclear states according to the noncompact sympletic Lie algebras sp(2n,R), n = 1, 2, 3, is investigated. Such a classification has recently been shown to be physically meaningful. This classification scheme is the appropriate generalization fo Elliott's SU 3 model of rotational states in deformed light nuclei to include core excitations. A restricted classification according to the Lie algebra, sp(4,R), is motivated. Truncation of the model space to a single sp(4,R) irreducible representation allows the inclusion of states possessing very high excitation energy. An sp(4,R) model study is performed on S = T = 0 positive-parity rotational bands in the deformed light nuclei 16 O and 24 Mg. States are included in the model space that possess up to 10h ω in excitation energy. Results for the B(E2) transition rates compare favorable with experiment, without resort to effective charges

  13. Nuclear structure investigations on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisenberg, J.; Calarco, J.; Dawson, J.; Hersman, F.W.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: electron scattering studies on spherical nuclei; electron scattering from collective states in deformed nuclei; proton and pion scattering studies; 12 C(e,e'p) and 16 O(e,e'p); 12 C(e,e'α) and 16 O(e,e'α); studies at high q at Bates; measurements with rvec e at Bates; 12 C(γ,p); future directions in giant resonance studies; proton knockout from 16 O; quasielastic studies at Bates; triple coincidence studies of nuclear correlations; contributions to (e,e'2p) at KIKHEF; contributions to instrumentation at CEBAF; instrumentation development at UNH; the Bates large acceptance spectrometer toroid; shell model and core polarization calculations; and the relativistic nuclear model

  14. Nuclei at HERA and heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, S.; Strikman, M.

    1995-01-01

    Copies of 16 viewgraph sets from a workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 17-18 November, 1995. Titles of talks: HERA: The Present; HERA: Potential with Nuclei; Review of Hadron-Lepton Nucleus Data; Fermilab E665: results in muon scattering; Interactions of Quarks and Gluons with Nuclear Matter; Rescattering in Nuclear Targets for Photoproduction and DIS; Structure Functions and Nuclear Effect at PHENIX; Probing Spin-Averaged and Spin-Dependent Parton Distributions Using the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR); Jet Quenching in eA, pA, AA; Nuclear Gluon Shadowing via Continuum Lepton Pairs; What can we learn from HERA with a colliding heavy ion beam? The limiting curve of leading particles at infinite A; Coherent Production of Vector Mesons off Light Nuclei in DIS; A Model of High Parton Densities in PQCD; Gluon Production for Weizaecker-Williams Field in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions; Summary Talk

  15. Disappearance of collective motion in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santonocito, D.; Piattelli, P.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Hongmei, F.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Sapienza, P. [INFN-LNS, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Blumenfeld, Y.; Delaunay, F.; Frascaria, N.; Lima, V.; Scarpaci, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, 91 - Orsay (France); Migneco, E. [Catania Univ., Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    The evolution of the GDR {gamma} yield for excitation energies between 160 and 300 MeV has been investigated in nuclei of mass A {approx} 126 through the reactions {sup 116}Sn + {sup 12}C and {sup 24}Mg at 17 and 23 A*MeV. Gamma-rays were detected with MEDEA array in coincidence with residues detected in MACISTE. The evolution of the GDR parameters has been investigated as a function of the linear momentum transferred to the fused system. This procedure allowed us to select hot nuclei produced in incomplete fusion reactions with different excitation energies. The analysis of the {gamma} spectra and their comparison with CASCADE calculations is presented. Results suggest a saturation of the GDR yield between 200 and 300 MeV excitation energy. (authors)

  16. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  17. EMC effect and multiquark bags in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.; Shmatikov, M.

    1984-01-01

    Assuming existence of 9q- and 12q bags in niclei the form factors of light nuclei at large momentum transfers and structure functions of deep inelastic scattering of leptons on nuclei are described. It is shown that the existing experimental data can be described in a unified way provided the momentum distribution of quarks in multiquark bags at k 0 has the exponential form PSIsub(q)sup(2)(k) approximately esup(-k/k 0 ) with the parameter k 0 approximately 50-60 MeV. Theoretical results agree well the EMC experimental data on the ratio of the iron and deuteron structure functions with the 20% admixture of 12q-bags in the Fe nucleus

  18. Light-Nuclei Spectra from Chiral Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarulli, M.; Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Lovato, A.; Lusk, Ewing; Marcucci, L. E.; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, R.; Viviani, M.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years local chiral interactions have been derived and implemented in quantum Monte Carlo methods in order to test to what extent the chiral effective field theory framework impacts our knowledge of few- and many-body systems. In this Letter, we present Green's function Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei based on the family of local two-body interactions presented by our group in a previous paper in conjunction with chiral three-body interactions fitted to bound- and scattering-state observables in the three-nucleon sector. These interactions include Δ intermediate states in their two-pion-exchange components. We obtain predictions for the energy levels and level ordering of nuclei in the mass range A =4 - 12 , accurate to ≤2 % of the binding energy, in very satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  19. The structure of nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganjar, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    Studies on nuclei near Z=82 contributed to the establishment of a new region of nuclear deformation and a new class of nuclear structure at closed shells. A important aspect of this work is the establishment of the connection between low-lying 0 + states in even endash even nuclei and the occurrence of shape coexistence in the odd-mass neighbors (E0 transitions in 185 Pt, shape coexistence in 184 Pt and 187 Au). A new type of picosecond lifetime measurement system capable of measuring the lifetime of states that decay only by internal conversion was developed and applied to the 186,188 Tl decay to determine the lifetime of the 0 2 + and 2 2 + deformed states in 186,188 Hg. A search for the population of superdeformed states in 192 Hg by the radioactive decay of 192 Tl was accomplished by using a prototype internal pair formation spectrometer

  20. Decay and fission of the oriented nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kadmenskij, S G

    2002-01-01

    The fragment angular distributions for binary decay of oriented spherical and deformed nuclei with taking into account the correct transformational properties of wave functions under time inversion have been investigated. It has been shown that for description of fragment angular distributions the adiabatic approximation for collective rotational nuclear degrees of freedom is not correct. It has been demonstrated that this approximation is valid for description of spontaneous and induced low-energy nuclear fission. The dependence of partial fission widths on the orientation of the internal axes spins, projections of spins, and relative angular moments of fission fragments has been analyzed. It has been shown that the adiabatic approximation results in coherent interference of wave functions of fragments relative movement. This interference forms fragments the universal angular distributions of fission fragments for oriented nuclei. For these distributions the deviations from A. Bohr's formula have been invest...

  1. Realistic microscopic level densities for spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear level densities play an important role in nuclear reactions such as the formation of the compound nucleus. We develop a microscopic calculation of the level density based on a combinatorial evaluation from a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation makes use of a fast Monte Carlo algorithm allowing us to consider large shell model spaces which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. Since our model relies on a microscopic basis, it can be applied to exotic nuclei with more confidence than the commonly used semiphenomenological formuals. An exhaustive comparison of our predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented

  2. Fabrication of a Micro-Lens Array Mold by Micro Ball End-Milling and Its Hot Embossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hot embossing is an efficient technique for manufacturing high-quality micro-lens arrays. The machining quality is significant for hot embossing the micro-lens array mold. This study investigates the effects of micro ball end-milling on the machining quality of AISI H13 tool steel used in the micro-lens array mold. The micro ball end-milling experiments were performed under different machining strategies, and the surface roughness and scallop height of the machined micro-lens array mold are measured. The experimental results showed that a three-dimensional (3D offset spiral strategy could achieve a higher machining quality in comparison with other strategies assessed in this study. Moreover, the 3D offset spiral strategy is more appropriate for machining the micro-lens array mold. With an increase of the cutting speed and feed rate, the surface roughness of the micro-lens array mold slightly increases, while a small step-over can greatly reduce the surface roughness. In addition, a hot embossing experiment was undertaken, and the obtained results indicated higher-quality production of the micro-lens array mold by the 3D offset spiral strategy.

  3. The effectiveness of soft contact lens disinfection systems against Acanthamoeba on the lens surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedel, K K; Begley, C G

    1996-03-01

    This investigation compared the efficacy of three widely used contact lens disinfection systems against an ocular isolate of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Twenty-seven worn Ciba NewVues lenses were quartered, heat sterilized and inoculated with Acanthamoeba. Lens quarters were then randomly assigned to three experimental groups, with Group A lenses exposed to cleaner and saline rinse only, Group B to disinfection only, and Group C to both cleaner and disinfection. One quarter of each lens served as a control and the other three quarters were experimental. Quantification of viable Acanthamoeba remaining on the lens was performed after each step of the disinfection process. Group A lenses showed no significant difference between the treatments, or the treatments and the control. Group B lenses demonstrated a significant difference (p = 0.0001) between the treatments and the control. In Group C (cleaning and disinfection), the control lens quarters were significantly different (p = 0.037) from the experimental group, but there was no significant difference between the treatments. All three disinfection regimens were very effective in reducing the number of viable Acanthamoeba on the contact lens surface. In the absence of proper cleaning (Group B), AOSept was the most effective of the three. These results also show the importance of thoroughly rubbing the contact lens surface to decrease the number of Acanthamoeba.

  4. Non-compliance with lens care and maintenance in diabetic contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Clare; Efron, Nathan

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesize that diabetic contact lens wearers may represent a special group displaying higher levels of compliance with their lens care regimens as a result of learned behaviour relating to maintenance of their diabetic condition. To test this hypothesis, a prospective, single centre, controlled, masked study was performed whereby 29 diabetic contact lens patients and 29 non-diabetic control subjects were issued with disposable hydrogel contact lenses and a multipurpose lens care regimen. All participants were given identical instruction on lens care and maintenance. Compliance levels were assessed at a 12-month aftercare appointment by demonstration and questionnaire. Twenty-four different aspects of compliance were scored, 12 by observation and 12 by questionnaire report, of which only two showed a significant difference between the diabetic and control groups. Although the combined population of contact lens wearers was generally compliant, there were examples of non-compliance in both groups. Neither the duration of diabetes nor the degree of metabolic control appeared to have a significant effect on compliance. The results suggest that eye care practitioners cannot assume that diabetic patients will be more compliant with contact lens care and maintenance than non-diabetic patients.

  5. Photoproduction of vector messons off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossov, M.

    1994-04-01

    Vector mesons play an important role in photonuclear reactions because they carry the same quantum numbers as the incident photon. It has recently been suggested by G.E. Brown and M. Rho that the mass of vector mesons could decrease with increasing baryon density. This phenomenon would provide a physical observable for chiral symmetry ({xi}{sup S}) restoration at high baryon density, an essential non-perturbative phenomenon associated with the structure of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). According to the constituent quark model the difference between the mass of the valence quark m{sub v} and the mass of the current quark m{sub c} is expected to be proportional to the mean vacuum value of the quark condensate: m{sub v}-m{sub c} {proportional_to} ({psi}{psi}){sub v}. The mass difference appears because of chiral symmetry breaking {xi}{sup SB}. QCD sum rule calculations show that the value of this difference is about 300 MeV for all quarks. If the mean vacuum value differs from that for the hadron density in nuclei, then the constituent quark mass should be renormalized as follows: m{sub v}{sup l}=m{sub c} + ({psi}{psi})n/({psi}{psi})v {center_dot}300MeV, where the indices n correspond to nuclear matter and v to vacuum. The same conclusion was reached in a nuclear matter model based on quark degrees of freedom. Using the symmetry properties of QCD in an effective Lagrangian theory, Brown and Rho have found a scaling law for the vector meson masses at finite baryon density: M{sub N}{sup n}/M{sub N}{sup v}=M{sub V}{sup n}/M{sub V}{sup v}=f{sub {pi}}{sup n}/f{sub {pi}}{sup v}, where f{sub {pi}} is the {pi} {r_arrow}{mu}{nu} decay constant playing the role of an order parameter for the chiral symmetry restoration. At nuclear density the value of f{sub {pi}} was found to be 15-20% smaller than in vacuum. In contrast to the constituent quark model, it was found that M{sup n}/M=({sub n}/{sub v}){sup 1/3}.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  7. AMS with light nuclei at small accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Enachescu, M.

    2017-06-01

    AMS applications with lighter nuclei are presented. It will be shown how Carbon-14, Boron-10, Beryllium-10, and Tritium-3 can be used to provide valuable information in forensic science, environmental physics, nuclear pollution, in material science and for diagnose of the plasma confinement in fusion reactors. Small accelerators are reliable, efficient and possess the highest ion beam transmissions that confer high precision in measurements.

  8. Production and identification of very exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougheon, F.

    1986-01-01

    New very exotic nuclei have been produced by fragmentation of the projectile at intermediate energy at GANIL. They have been identified through time of flight and ΔE-E measurements after a magnetic separation with the 0 0 LISE spectrometer. New neutron rich isotopes have been identified up to Z = 26 and evidence for the stability of the new series Tz = -5/2 has been shown. These results improve the knowledge of the neutron and proton drip lines

  9. Fission of nuclei far from stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J.; Junghans, A.R.

    2000-11-01

    The secondary-beam facility of GSI provided the technical equipment for a new kind of fission experiment. Fission properties of short-lived neutron-deficient nuclei have been investigated in inverse kinematics. The measured element distributions reveal new kinds of systematics on shell structure and even-odd effects and lead to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. Prospects for further experimental studies are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Electromagnetic interactions with nuclei and nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, S.T.; Sealock, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: general LEGS work; photodisintegration of the deuteron; progress towards other experiments; LEGS instrumentation; major LEGS software projects; NaI detector system; nucleon detector system; waveshifting fibers; EGN prototype detector for CEBAF; photon beam facility at CEBAF; delta electroproduction in nuclei; quasielastic scattering and excitation of the Delta by 4 He(e,e'); and quasielastic scattering at high Q 2

  11. Order and chaos in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1991-01-01

    The interplay between regular and chaotic motion in nuclei is investigated in the framework of an open quantum mechanical system. The effect of avoided resonance overlapping (trapping) leads to long-lived traps which correspond to the formation of quantum chaos. They are hidden by short-lived states which correspond to the formation of a new order with less degrees of freedom. The quantum chaos in the nuclear system may be investigated by means of rare decays. (author)

  12. Some Aspects of Collective Properties of Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, S.T.

    1963-01-01

    Certain questions connected with the collective properties of nuclei will be considered in this paper. There are two different complementary approaches in the consideration of collective motions. One method - we shall call it the phenomenological one - consists of directly introducing collective degrees of freedom and the corresponding collective Hamiltonian, H coll , with some phenomenological parameters. The aim of such a theory is, first, to solve the Schrodinger equation with the Hamiltonian H coll , and secondly to calculate the parameters in Hcoil under certain assumptions or using certain models. The Davydov-Filippov model can serve as an example of such an approach to the investigation of collective properties of nuclei. There it is supposed that Hc0udescribes a non-axial rotator and the parameters of the Hamiltonian are then chosen so as to obtain the best fit to experimental data. The second possible method of investigating collective excitations of nuclei - let us call it the microscopic one - works right from the beginning with a many-body Hamiltonian H = H o + H int . Then such excitations in a system of nucleons, the nature of which is collective, are studied. In this method no additional collective degrees of freedom, and hence no additional phenomenological parameters, are introduced a priori. In principle, everything is determined by the nucleon-nucleon interaction H int . As a matter of fact, the interaction H int must practically be introduced phenomenologically, since it has not been possible to derive it from first principles so far. The actual difference is in the ''degree of phenomenologicality'', i.e . in the number of parameters introduced into the theory. One needs only one or two parameters, which in principle determine the various properties of all nuclei, to determine H int . whereas in the above-mentioned example of a non-axial rotator, two parameters are introduced for each nucleus (the value of the first 2 + level and the degree of

  13. Shell effects and nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhan, A.R.; Sharma, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear shell effects across the magic numbers N = 50, 82 and 126 near the r-process path are crucial to understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei. Since nuclei near the r-process path are extremely neutron rich and are not accessible in the laboratory, the current understanding of the nuclear abundances is based much upon extrapolations of various mass formulae. In this talk, we will discuss as to how the shell effects evolve in going from the stability line to the r-process path and towards drip line in the heavy mass region. Within the framework of to the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theory with the vector self-coupling of omega meson, it will be shown that the shell effects across N = 82 show a significant decline in going from the r-process path to the drip line, whereas those at N = 126 remain resilient to the change in isospin in going from the r-process path to the neutron drip line. This behaviour of the microscopic RHB calculations is consistent with the recent r-process calculations suggesting that a shell quenching at N = 82 would be useful, however, a quenching is not necessary for reproducing r-process abundances near the peak at A ∼ 190. We will also show that due to an onset of deformation for nuclei above N = 126, an additional stability in some nuclei beyond the neutron drip line is provided. Consequently, this would contribute to r-process nuclear abundances in the third peak. A comparative analysis of shell effects with the microscopic RMF theory and with the macroscopic-microscopic mass formulae shows that the microscopic RMF theory possesses the potential of describing nuclear abundances in the peaks about A ∼ 130 and A ∼ 190. (author)

  14. The Skyrmions and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1984-08-01

    It is proposed that the quark-bag description and the Skyrmion description of baryons are related to each other by quantized parameters. Topology (through a chiral anomaly) plays an important role in bridging the fundamental theory of the strong interactions (QCD) to effective theories. Some consequences on the efforts to see quark degrees of freedom in nuclear matter are discussed. It is suggested that at low energies there will be no ''smoking gun'' evidences for quark presence in nuclei

  15. Dynamical timescales in hot rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoennessen, M.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    1996-01-01

    The effects of dissipation in fission of hot nuclei as well as in heavy-ion reactions are still not well understood and quite controversial. The deformation and/or temperature dependence of the dissipation coefficient as well as the influence of the curvatures of the potential energy surface will be discussed. Evidence for particle/γ-ray decay during compound nucleus formation in certain heavy-ion reactions will be compared to other reactions where no effects were observed. (orig.)

  16. Chiral bags, skyrmions and quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1984-09-01

    Recent developments on an intriguing connection between the quark-bag description of the baryons (nucleons in particular) and the Skyrmion model are discussed in terms of the constraints coming from chiral anomalies. Topics treated are the leaking baryon charge, axial charge and energy density; the role of chiral anomalies; the role of Skyrme's quartic term and the connection to the meson degrees of freedom; and finally some qualitative implications in nuclei. The presentation is purposely descriptive and intuitive instead of mathematically precise

  17. Decay of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study on the feasibility of observing α decay chains from the isotopes of the superheavy nuclei. Z = 115 in the range 271 ≤ A ≤ 294 and the isotopes of Z = 117 in the range 270 ≤ A ≤ 301, within the Coulomb and .... For Ri we use semiempirical formula in terms of mass number Ai as [3]. Ri = 1.28A. 1/3 i. − 0.76 + 0.8A.

  18. ''Identical'' bands in normally-deformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.; Baktash, C.; Yu, C.H.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray transitions energies in neighboring odd- and even-mass nuclei for normally-deformed nuclear configurations are analyzed in a manner similar to recent analyses for superdeformed states. The moment of inertia is shown to depend on pair correlations and the aligned angular momentum of the odd nucleon. The implications of this analysis for ''identical'' super-deformed bands are discussed. 26 refs., 9 figs

  19. Soft radiative strength in warm nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Garrett, P E; Nelson, R O; Schiller, A; Voinov, A; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Chankova, R; Guttormsen, M; Mitchell, G E; Rekstad, J; Siem, S

    2004-01-01

    Unresolved transitions in the nuclear γ-ray cascade produced in the decay of excited nuclei are best described by statistical concepts: a continuous radiative strength function (RSF) and level density yield mean values of transition matrix elements. Data on the soft (E γ < 3-4 MeV) RSF for transitions between warm states (i.e. states several MeV above the yrast line) have, however, remained elusive

  20. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2009-01-01

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sérsic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sérsic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses

  1. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  2. Double charge exchange of pions on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhibuti, R.I.; Kezerashvili, R.Y.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is made of the results of experimental and theoretical studies during the last ten years of a unique process: double charge exchange of pions on nuclei. On the one hand, the commissioning of meson factories and the use of new and more accurate experimental methods have led to the accumulation of rich and reliable material for not only light but also medium and heavy nuclei. On the other hand, the development and application of new microscopic theoretical approaches have led to a deepening of our ideas about the mechanism of these exotic reactions at low, intermediate, and high energies. The currently existing methods of theoretical investigation and all possible reaction mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is devoted to double charge exchange of pions on the lightest nuclei, for the theoretical description of which it is possible to use the well-developed methods for investigating few-particle systems. The experimental investigations of double-isobar analog and nonanalog transitions in the reaction of double charge exchange are systematized

  3. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  4. History of cluster structure in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, D M

    2008-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the history of clustering in nuclei. Elementary alpha models treat light 4-n nuclei as systems of alpha-particles obeying Bose Einstein statistics. These models neglect the internal structure of the alphas and effects of the Pauli principle between the nucleons in the alpha clusters are taken into account by introducing a short range repulsion between the clusters. The orthogonality condition model and excluded state model treat the alphas as elementary particles, but include effects of the Pauli principle in a more microscopic way. Wheeler's resonating group method is a fully microscopic theory for calculating properties of cluster systems. It makes simplifying assumptions about the internal structure of the clusters but takes the Pauli principle explicitly. Hartree-Fock theory can be used for a microscopic theory of nuclear structure but it is not suitable for light nuclei because there is no well defined mean field. Margenau's microscopic cluster model avoids this problem by using trial wave functions which are antisymmetrized products of parametrized single particle wave functions

  5. Toward yrast spectroscopy in soft vibrational nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumori, Toshio; Kuriyama, Atsushi; Sakata, Fumihiko.

    1979-10-01

    In a formally parallel way with that exciting progress has been recently achieved in understanding the yrast spectra of the rotational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion in the rotating frame, an attempt to understand the yrast spectra of the vibrational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion is proposed. The essential idea is to introduce the quasi-particle motion in a generalized vibrating frame, which can be regarded as a rotating frame in the gauge space of ''physical'' phonons where the number of the physical phonons plays the role of the angular momentum. On the basis of a simple fundamental principle called as the ''invariance principle of the Schroedinger equation'', which leads us to the ''maximal decoupling'' between the physical phonon and the intrinsic modes, it is shown that the vibrational frame as well as the physical-phonon-number operator represented by the quasi-particles can be self-consistently determined. A new scope toward the yrast spectroscopy of the vibrational nuclei in terms of the quasi-particle motion is discussed. (author)

  6. Gamow-Teller Transitions in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Dzhioev, A.; Ponomarev, V.; Wambach, J.

    2007-01-01

    A temperature dependence of collective nuclear excitations (giant resonances (GR) in particular) is a subject of theoretical and experimental investigations for many years. One of the reasons of this interest is that the GR properties at finite temperatures are quite important in understanding various astrophysical processes. For example, electron or neutrino capture on nuclei plays an essential role in the early presupernova collapse. In that context, it is important to know the dependence of the charge-exchange and/or magnetic resonance strength distribution from stellar media temperature. To study the problem, we apply the formalism based on the quasiparticle phonon model extended to finite temperature using the thermo field dynamics. Following the TFD prescriptions we have constructed a microscopic thermal Hamiltonian which describes collective vibrations in a hot nucleus. In this approach, the fragmentation of the giant vibrations at T≠0 is due to the coupling with thermal two-phonon configurations. The calculations are performed for selected nuclei from the Fe region. The Gamow-Teller strength distributions are calculated within the thermal RPA at different temperatures. Then they are used to study a temperature dependence of -decay rates for these nuclei in stellar media.

  7. The corneal stroma during contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Isabelle; Stapleton, Fiona

    2005-03-01

    Recent technological advances have lead to novel descriptions of the microanatomy of the corneal stroma. In the first section of this review, these findings and the role they play in the maintenance of vital properties such as corneal transparency, mechanical strength, homeostasis, wound-healing response and metabolism are described. In the second part, contact lens induced stromal alterations such as acidosis, oedema, striae, thinning and opacities are reviewed as well as the more recently described phenomenon of microdot deposits and keratocyte loss with an emphasis on how lens wearing stromal effects can be minimised.

  8. Sterilization potential of contact lens solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dada Vijay

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available In a dynamic field of Contact Lens Solutions maintenance of high standards of anti-microbial activity is a must Resterilization Activity Time′ is a universally accepted yardstick for such an evaluation. In this study eight brands of indigenous popular solutions alongwith two FDA approved solutions were tested for their sterilization efficacy: Standardized suspensions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus were used for the purpose. It was observed that the contact lens solutions available ir, the domestic market were not upto the mark Suggestions for improvement have also been made.

  9. Rotman lens for mm-wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leonard T.; Hansen, Hedley J.; Abbott, Derek

    2002-11-01

    The 77 GHz band has been reserved for intelligent cruise control in luxury cars and some public transport services in America and the United Kingdom. The Rotman lens offers a cheap and compact means to extend the single beam systems generally used, to fully functional beam staring arrangements. Rotman lenses have been built for microwave frequencies with limited success. The flexibility of microstrip transmission lines and the advent of fast accurate simulation packages allow practical Rotman lenses to be designed at mm-wavelengths. This paper discusses the limitations of the conventional design approach and predicts the performance of a new Rotman lens designed at 77 GHz.

  10. Pulse transformer for the AA lithium lens

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The antiprotons emanating from the target were initially focused by a magnetic horn. Later on, a Li-lens was used during operation for the SPS collider, until 1992. A Li-rod (130 mm long, 34 mm in diameter) constituted the secondary of a 1:23 pulse-transformer. The half-sine pulse rose to 1000 kA in 900 microsec. The angular acceptance was 95 mrad. In operation after 1992, for LEAR only, a more modest Li-lens was used (155 mm long, diameter 20 mm, 480 kA, risetime 240 microsec, angular acceptance 75 mrad).

  11. Immunochemical analyses of soluble lens proteins in some marine fishes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.

    Soluble eye lens proteins of 10 fishes, belonging to the families Clupeidae, Hemirhamphidae, Lactaridae, Scombridae, Stromatidae, Psettodidae, Bothidae and Soleidae were studied by immunoelectrophoresis using the lens antiserum of Sardinella...

  12. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataract Surgery vs. Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Pictures and Videos: What Do ... Mar. 27, 2018 An intraocular lens (or IOL) is a tiny, artificial lens for the eye. It replaces the eye's ...

  13. Flow cytometry of DNA in mouse sperm and testis nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meistrich, M.L. (Univ. of Texas, Houston); Lake, S.; Steinmetz, L.L.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    Mutations that occur in spermatogenic cells may be expressed as changes in DNA content, but developmentally-dependent alteration of its staining properties complicates the quantitation of DNA in individual germ cells. These alterations have been studied with flow cytometric techniques. Nuclei from mouse testis cells and sperm were stained by the acriflavine--Feulgen method. The fluorescence intensity frequency distribution of nuclei of testis cells was characterized by 2 major and 5 minor peaks. Nuclei sorted from the various peaks with a fluorescence-activated cell sorter were identified microscopically. These data were confirmed by generation of peaks with nuclei prepared from cell suspensions enriched in specific cell types. One of the major peaks corresponded to round spermatid nuclei. The other major peak, located at 0.6 of the fluorescence intensity of the round nuclei, corresponded to elongated spermatid nuclei. Purified nuclei of epididymal and vas deferens spermatozoa displayed asymmetric fluorescence distributions. A minor peak at 0.8 the intensity of the round spermatid nuclei was tentatively assigned to elongating spermatids. 2 of the minor peaks, located at 1.7 and 2.0 times the fluorescence intensity of the round nuclei, corresponded to clumps of 2 haploid and diploid nuclei.

  14. Fiber-optic Raman probe couples ball lens for depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Jianhua; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we present a fiber-optic ball lens Raman probe design for improving depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that tissue Raman collection efficiency can be improved by properly selecting the refractive index and the diameter of the ball lens for the Raman probe design and the depth-selectivity of Raman measurements can also be improved by either increasing the refractive index or reducing the diameter of the ball lens. An a...

  15. Noncollimating MmW polyethylene lens mitigating dual-source offset from a Tx/Rx WiGig module

    OpenAIRE

    Bisognin, A.; Titz, D.; Ferrero, F.; Jacquemod, G.; Pilard, R.; Gianesello, F.; Gloria, D.; Lugara, D.; Lima, E. B.; Costa, Jorge R.; Fernandes, C. A.; Luxe, C.

    2015-01-01

    WOS:000367739000075 (Nº de Acesso Web of Science) The design of a micromachined polyethylene lens for WiGig modules is described and its electromagnetic characteristics are measured. The lens is electromagnetically fed by linearly polarized Tx and Rx patch antennas integrated in an existing ball-grid-array (BGA) organic module. Antennas are separated from each other by a distance of 4.45 mm (0.89lambda at 60 GHz). The goal of the lens is to increase the gain of each antenna while lowering ...

  16. Low-lying dipole response in stable and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenna, M; Colò, G; Bortignon, P F; Pozzi, G; Roca-Maza, X; Mizuyama, K

    2013-01-01

    The presence of some low-lying (pygmy) strength in the dipole spectrum, at excitation energy well below the isovector giant dipole energy, has been confirmed in several nuclei. The microscopic structure and the nature of these states, in particular the possible collective nature and the isospin character, are currently under strong debate. In addition, a relation with the isovector properties of the equation of state of nuclear matter, such as the symmetry energy or its slope, has been proposed. We present a detailed analysis of Skyrme Hartree–Fock plus random phase approximation (RPA) predictions for both the isoscalar and isovector dipole responses, of different neutron-rich nuclei ( 68 Ni, 132 Sn and 208 Pb). All of them show a low-energy peak that increases in magnitude with increasing values of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation. Eventually, the collectivity associated with the RPA states contributing to this peak is more pronounced in the isoscalar than in the isovector channel. (paper)

  17. Electric monopole transitions from low energy excitations in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, J L; De Coster, C; Heyde, Kris L G

    1999-01-01

    Electric monopole (E0) properties are studied across the entire nuclear mass surface. Besides an introductory discussion of various model results (shell model, geometric vibrational and rotational models, algebraic models), we point out that many of the largest E0 transition strengths, $\\rho^2$(E0), are associated with shape mixing. We discuss in detail the manifestation of E0 transitions and present extensive data for~: single-closed shell nuclei, vibrational nuclei, well-deformed nuclei, nuclei that exhibit sudden ground-state changes, and nuclei that exhibit shape coexistence and intruder states. We also give attention to light nuclei, odd-A nuclei, and illustrate a suggested relation between $\\rho^2$(E0) and isotopic shifts.

  18. Peripheral myopization and visual performance with experimental rigid gas permeable and soft contact lens design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauné, J; Queiros, A; Quevedo, L; Neves, H; Lopes-Ferreira, D; González-Méijome, J M

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the performance of two experimental contact lenses (CL) designed to induce relative peripheral myopic defocus in myopic eyes. Ten right eyes of 10 subjects were fitted with three different CL: a soft experimental lens (ExpSCL), a rigid gas permeable experimental lens (ExpRGP) and a standard RGP lens made of the same material (StdRGP). Central and peripheral refraction was measured using a Grand Seiko open-field autorefractometer across the central 60° of the horizontal visual field. Ocular aberrations were measured with a Hartman-Shack aberrometer, and monocular contrast sensitivity function (CSF) was measured with a VCTS6500 without and with the three contact lenses. Both experimental lenses were able to increase significantly the relative peripheral myopic defocus up to -0.50 D in the nasal field and -1.00 D in the temporal field (p0.05). RGP lens design seems to be more effective to induce a significant myopic change in the relative peripheral refractive error. Both lenses preserve a good visual performance. The worsened optical quality observed in ExpRGP was due to an increased coma-like and spherical-like HOA. However, no impact on the visual quality as measured by CSF was observed. Copyright © 2014 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN) addresses the epidemic of allergy and asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Petr Cáp Petr Burney Peter Zuberbier Torsten; van Cauvenberg, Paul; Bousquet, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a major health problem in Europe. They are increasing in prevalence, severity and costs. GA2LEN, an FP6 Network of Excellence, was created in 2005 as a vehicle to ensure excellence in research bringing together research and clinical institutions to combat fragmentation in the European research area and to tackle Allergy in its globality. GA2LEN benefited greatly from the voluntary efforts of researchers who are strongly committed to this model of pan-European collaboration. The network was organized in order to increase networking for scientific projects in allergy and asthma around Europe and to make GA2LEN the world leader in the field. Besides these activities, research has been jointly made and the first papers are being published. GA2LEN achievements in general can be grouped as those for a durable infrastructure built up during the project phase those which are project-related work based on these novel infrastructures, and the development and implementations of guidelines. The major achievements of GA2LEN are reported in this paper.

  20. Radiation-induced eye lens changes and risk for cataract in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M; Minamoto, A; Sim, K H; Liew, H B; Vano, E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a significant increase in eye lens opacities among staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory but indicated further studies are needed to confirm the findings. To evaluate the prevalence of opacities in eyes of cardiologists, radiographers and nurses working in interventional cardiology. The eyes of 52 staff in interventional cardiology facilities and 34 age- and sex-matched unexposed controls were screened in a cardiology conference held in Kuala Lumpur by dilated slit-lamp examination, and posterior lens changes were graded. Individual cumulative lens X-ray exposures were calculated from responses to a questionnaire in terms of workload and working practice. The prevalence of posterior lens opacities among interventional cardiologists was 53%, while in nurses and radiographers it was 45%. Corresponding relative risks were 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2-5.4) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.98-4.9), for interventional cardiologists and support staff, respectively. This study confirms a statistically significant increase in radiation-associated posterior lens changes in the eyes of interventional cardiology staff. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.