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Sample records for lens lipid membranes

  1. Lipid-protein interactions in plasma membranes of fiber cells isolated from the human eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2014-03-01

    The protein content in human lens membranes is extremely high, increases with age, and is higher in the nucleus as compared with the cortex, which should strongly affect the organization and properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact membranes. To assess these effects, the intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from human lenses from 41- to 60-year-old donors were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling methods. Results were compared with those obtained for lens lipid membranes prepared from total lipid extracts from human eyes of the same age group [Mainali, L., Raguz, M., O'Brien, W. J., and Subczynski, W. K. (2013) Biochim. Biophys. Acta]. Differences were considered to be mainly due to the effect of membrane proteins. The lipid-bilayer portions of intact membranes were significantly less fluid than lipid bilayers of lens lipid membranes, prepared without proteins. The intact membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain. However, the cholesterol bilayer domain, which was detected in cortical and nuclear lens lipid membranes, was not detected in intact membranes. The relative amounts of bulk and trapped lipids were evaluated. The amount of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. Thus, it is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes is greater than that of cortical membranes. Also the permeability coefficients for oxygen measured in domains of nuclear membranes were significantly lower than appropriate coefficients measured in cortical membranes. Relationships between the organization of lipids into lipid domains in fiber cells plasma membranes and the organization of membrane proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L

    2015-12-01

    Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids-key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells.

  3. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  4. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger J W

    2015-03-11

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases.

  5. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  6. Properties of Fiber Cell Plasma Membranes Isolated from the Cortex and Nucleus of the Porcine Eye Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    The organization and physical properties of the lipid bilayer portion of intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes isolated from the eyes lenses of two-year-old pigs were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, and the oxygen transport parameter (OTP) were assessed from the EPR spectra of precisely positioned spin labels. Intact cortical and nuclear membranes, which include membrane proteins, were found to contain three distinct lipid environments. These lipid environments were termed the bulk lipid domain, boundary lipid domain, and trapped lipid domain (lipids in protein aggregates). The amount of boundary and trapped lipids was greater in intact nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The properties of intact membranes were compared with the organization and properties of lens lipid membranes made of the total lipid extracts from the lens cortex or nucleus. In cortical lens lipid membranes, only one homogenous environment was detected, which was designated as a bulk lipid domain (phospholipid bilayer saturated with cholesterol). Lens lipid membranes prepared from the lens nucleus possessed two domains, assigned as a bulk lipid domain and a cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). In intact nuclear membranes, it was difficult to discriminate the CBD, which was clearly detected in nuclear lens lipid membranes because the OTP measured in the CBD is the same as in the domain formed by trapped lipids. The two domains unique to intact membranes—namely, the domain formed by boundary lipids and the domain formed by trapped lipids—were most likely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins. It is concluded that formation of rigid and practically impermeable domains is enhanced in the lens nucleus, indicating changes in membrane composition that may help to maintain low oxygen concentration in this lens region. PMID:22326289

  7. Lysosomal degradation of membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2010-05-03

    The constitutive degradation of membrane components takes place in the acidic compartments of a cell, the endosomes and lysosomes. Sites of lipid degradation are intralysosomal membranes that are formed in endosomes, where the lipid composition is adjusted for degradation. Cholesterol is sorted out of the inner membranes, their content in bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate increases, and, most likely, sphingomyelin is degraded to ceramide. Together with endosomal and lysosomal lipid-binding proteins, the Niemann-Pick disease, type C2-protein, the GM2-activator, and the saposins sap-A, -B, -C, and -D, a suitable membrane lipid composition is required for degradation of complex lipids by hydrolytic enzymes. Copyright 2009 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipids and membrane lateral organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eSonnino

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the elucidation of the very basic structure and properties of cellular membranes, it became evident that cellular membranes are highly organized structures with multiple and multi-dimensional levels of order. Very early observations suggested that the lipid components of biological membranes might be active players in the creations of these levels of order. In the late 80’s, several different and diverse experimental pieces of evidence coalesced together giving rise to the lipid raft hypothesis. Lipid rafts became enormously (and, in the opinion of these authors, sometimes acritically popular, surprisingly not just within the lipidologist community (who is supposed to be naturally sensitive to the fascination of lipid rafts. Today, a PubMed search using the key word lipid rafts returned a list of 3767 papers, including 690 reviews (as a term of comparison, searching over the same time span for a very hot lipid-related key word, ceramide returned 6187 hits with 799 reviews, and a tremendous number of different cellular functions have been described as lipid raft-dependent. However, a clear consensus definition of lipid raft has been proposed only in recent times, and the basic properties, the ruling forces, and even the existence of lipid rafts in living cells have been recently matter of intense debate. The scenario that is gradually emerging from the controversies elicited by the lipid raft hypothesis emphasize multiple roles for membrane lipids in determining membrane order, that encompasses their tendency to phase separation but are clearly not limited to this. In this review, we would like to re-focus the attention of the readers on the importance of lipids in organizing the fine structure of cellular membranes.

  9. Sensing voltage across lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Kenton J.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of electrical potentials across lipid bilayers by specialized membrane proteins is required for many fundamental cellular processes such as the generation and propagation of nerve impulses. These membrane proteins possess modular voltage-sensing domains, a notable example being the S1-S4 domains of voltage-activated ion channels. Ground-breaking structural studies on these domains explain how voltage sensors are designed and reveal important interactions with the surrounding lipid membrane. Although further structures are needed to fully understand the conformational changes that occur during voltage sensing, the available data help to frame several key concepts that are fundamental to the mechanism of voltage sensing. PMID:19092925

  10. Mechanics of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas R.

    All cells have membranes. The plasma membrane encapsulates the cell's interior, acting as a barrier against the outside world. In cells with nuclei (eukaryotic cells), membranes also form internal compartments (organelles) which carry out specialized tasks, such as protein modification and sorting in the case of the Golgi apparatus, and ATP production in the case of mitochondria. The main components of membranes are lipids and proteins. The proteins can be channels, carriers, receptors, catalysts, signaling molecules, or structural elements, and typically contribute a substantial fraction of the total membrane dry weight. The equilibrium properties of pure lipid membranes are relatively well-understood, and will be the main focus of this article. The framework of elasticity theory and statistical mechanics that we will develop will serve as the foundation for understanding biological phenomena such as the nonequilibrium behavior of membranes laden with ion pumps, the role of membrane elasticity in ion channel gating, and the dynamics of vesicle fission and fusion. Understanding the mechanics of lipid membranes is also important for drug encapsulation and delivery.

  11. Electrodiffusion of Lipids on Membrane Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Y. C.

    2011-01-01

    Random lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when this lateral random diffusion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Though the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membrane of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregati...

  12. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol....

  13. Lipids as organizers of cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornmann, Benoît; Roux, Aurélien

    2012-08-01

    The 105th Boehringer Ingelheim Fonds International Titisee Conference 'Lipids as Organizers of Cell Membranes' took place in March 2012, in Germany. Kai Simons and Gisou Van der Goot gathered cell biologists and biophysicists to discuss the interplay between lipids and proteins in biological membranes, with an emphasis on how technological advances could help fill the gap in our understanding of the lipid part of the membrane.

  14. Electrodiffusion of lipids on membrane surfaces.

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    Zhou, Y C

    2012-05-28

    Lateral translocation of lipids and proteins is a universal process on membrane surfaces. Local aggregation or organization of lipids and proteins can be induced when the random lateral motion is mediated by the electrostatic interactions and membrane curvature. Although the lateral diffusion rates of lipids on membranes of various compositions are measured and the electrostatic free energies of predetermined protein-membrane-lipid systems can be computed, the process of the aggregation and the evolution to the electrostatically favorable states remain largely undetermined. Here we propose an electrodiffusion model, based on the variational principle of the free energy functional, for the self-consistent lateral drift-diffusion of multiple species of charged lipids on membrane surfaces. Finite sizes of lipids are modeled to enforce the geometrical constraint of the lipid concentration on membrane surfaces. A surface finite element method is developed to appropriate the Laplace-Beltrami operators in the partial differential equations of the model. Our model properly describes the saturation of lipids on membrane surfaces, and correctly predicts that the MARCKS peptide can consistently sequester three multivalent phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids through its basic amino acid residues, regardless of a wide range of the percentage of monovalent phosphatidylserine in the membrane.

  15. [Germ cell membrane lipids in spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Shi, Xiao; Quan, Song

    2016-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex developmental process in which a diploid progenitor germ cell transforms into highly specialized spermatozoa. During spermatogenesis, membrane remodeling takes place, and cell membrane permeability and liquidity undergo phase-specific changes, which are all associated with the alteration of membrane lipids. Lipids are important components of the germ cell membrane, whose volume and ratio fluctuate in different phases of spermatogenesis. Abnormal lipid metabolism can cause spermatogenic dysfunction and consequently male infertility. Germ cell membrane lipids are mainly composed of cholesterol, phospholipids and glycolipids, which play critical roles in cell adhesion and signal transduction during spermatogenesis. An insight into the correlation of membrane lipids with spermatogenesis helps us to better understand the mechanisms of spermatogenesis and provide new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  16. Pollen viability and membrane lipid composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilsen, van D.G.J.L.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis membrane lipid composition is studied in relation to pollen viability during storage. Chapter 1 reviews pollen viability, membranes in the dry state and membrane changes associated with cellular aging. This chapter is followed by a study of age-related changes in phospholipid

  17. Lipid organization of the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Melo, Manuel N; van Eerden, Floris J; Arnarez, Clément; Lopez, Cesar A; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Periole, Xavier; de Vries, Alex H; Tieleman, D Peter; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    The detailed organization of cellular membranes remains rather elusive. Based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we provide a high-resolution view of the lipid organization of a plasma membrane at an unprecedented level of complexity. Our plasma membrane model consists of 63 different

  18. Artificial Lipid Membranes: Past, Present, and Future.

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    Siontorou, Christina G; Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi; Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Karapetis, Stefanos K

    2017-07-26

    The multifaceted role of biological membranes prompted early the development of artificial lipid-based models with a primary view of reconstituting the natural functions in vitro so as to study and exploit chemoreception for sensor engineering. Over the years, a fair amount of knowledge on the artificial lipid membranes, as both, suspended or supported lipid films and liposomes, has been disseminated and has helped to diversify and expand initial scopes. Artificial lipid membranes can be constructed by several methods, stabilized by various means, functionalized in a variety of ways, experimented upon intensively, and broadly utilized in sensor development, drug testing, drug discovery or as molecular tools and research probes for elucidating the mechanics and the mechanisms of biological membranes. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art, discusses the diversity of applications, and presents future perspectives. The newly-introduced field of artificial cells further broadens the applicability of artificial membranes in studying the evolution of life.

  19. Simulations of simple Bovine and Homo sapiens outer cortex ocular lens membrane models with a majority concentration of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark; Wang, Eric; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2017-11-21

    The lipid composition of bovine and human ocular lens membranes has been probed, and a variety of lipids have been found including phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (CHOL) with cholesterol being present in particularly high concentrations. In this study, we use the all-atom CHARMM36 force field to simulate binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures as models of the ocular lens. High concentration of cholesterol, in combination with different and varying diversity of phospholipids (PL) and sphingolipids (SL), affect the structure of the ocular lens lipid bilayer. The following analyses were done for each simulation: surface area per lipid, component surface area per lipid, deuterium order parameters (S CD ), electron density profiles (EDP), membrane thickness, hydrogen bonding, radial distribution functions, clustering, and sterol tilt angle distribution. The S CD show significant bilayer alignment and packing in cholesterol-rich bilayers. The EDP show the transition from liquid crystalline to liquid ordered with the addition of cholesterol. Hydrogen bonds in our systems show the tendency for intramolecular interactions between cholesterol and fully saturated lipid tails for less complex bilayers. But with an increased number of components in the bilayer, the acyl chain of the lipids becomes a less important characteristic, and the headgroup of the lipid becomes more significant. Overall, cholesterol is the driving force of membrane structure of the ocular lens membrane where interactions between cholesterol, PL, and SL determine structure and function of the biomembrane. The goal of this work is to develop a baseline for further study of more physiologically realistic ocular lens lipid membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emergence of Complex Behavior in Biomembranes edited by Marjorie Longo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing the nature of lipid raft membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T

    2007-01-01

    of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins......-scale simulations to elucidate the properties of ternary raft mixtures with CHOL, palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM), and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. We simulate two bilayers of 1,024 lipids for 100 ns in the liquid-ordered phase and one system of the same size in the liquid-disordered phase. The studies provide...... heterogeneity more difficult. The findings reveal aspects of the role of favored (specific) lipid-lipid interactions within rafts and clarify the prominent role of CHOL in altering the properties of the membrane locally in its neighborhood. Also, we show that the presence of PSM and CHOL in rafts leads...

  1. Binding of Neurotransmitters to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    / acetylated g-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. This study was motivated by recent research results that suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by nonspecific interactions of NTs with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. Our results revealed...... backbone of the phospholipids. It is surprising that hydrophilic solutes can deeply penetrate into the membrane pointing to the fact that membrane affinity is governed by specific interactions. Our MD simulations identified the salt-bridge between the primary amine of NTs and the lipid phosphate group...

  2. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta eJain

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA. In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the last universal common ancestor LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria.

  3. Ballistic impact response of lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Zhaoxu; Qin, Xin; Keten, Sinan

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic agent loaded micro and nanoscale particles as high-velocity projectiles can penetrate cells and tissues, thereby serving as gene and drug delivery vehicles for direct and rapid internalization. Despite recent progress in developing micro/nanoscale ballistic tools, the underlying biophysics of how fast projectiles deform and penetrate cell membranes is still poorly understood. To understand the rate and size-dependent penetration processes, we present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the ballistic impact of spherical projectiles on lipid membranes. Our simulations reveal that upon impact, the projectile can pursue one of three distinct pathways. At low velocities below the critical penetration velocity, projectiles rebound off the surface. At intermediate velocities, penetration occurs after the projectile deforms the membrane into a tubular thread. At very high velocities, rapid penetration occurs through localized membrane deformation without tubulation. Membrane tension, projectile velocity and size govern which phenomenon occurs, owing to their positive correlation with the reaction force generated between the projectile and the membrane during impact. Two critical membrane tension values dictate the boundaries among the three pathways for a given system, due to the rate dependence of the stress generated in the membrane. Our findings provide broad physical insights into the ballistic impact response of soft viscous membranes and guide design strategies for drug delivery through lipid membranes using micro/nanoscale ballistic tools.

  4. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  5. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. PMID:26269359

  6. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-10-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches...

  8. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wüstner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC. We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  9. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  10. Interaction of Hematoporphyrin with Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stepniewski, M.; Kepczynski, M.; Jamroz, D.

    2012-01-01

    Natural or synthetic porphyrins are being used as photosensitizers in photodiagnosis (PD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignancies and some other diseases. Understanding the interactions between porphyrins and cell membranes is therefore important to rationalize the uptake of photosensitizers...... and their passive transport through cell membranes. In this study, we consider the properties of hematoporphyrin (Hp), a well-known photosensitizer for PD and PDT, in the presence of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer that we use as a model system for protein-free cell membranes....... The dianions, being in the aqueous phase, formed stable dimers with a strictly determined geometry. Our results fully supported the experimental data and provide a more detailed molecular-level description of the interactions of photosensitizers with lipid membranes....

  11. Anionic lipids and the maintenance of membrane electrostatics in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Jaillais, Yvon

    2017-02-01

    A wide range of signaling processes occurs at the cell surface through the reversible association of proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Some low abundant lipids are enriched at the membrane of specific compartments and thereby contribute to the identity of cell organelles by acting as biochemical landmarks. Lipids also influence membrane biophysical properties, which emerge as an important feature in specifying cellular territories. Such parameters are crucial for signal transduction and include lipid packing, membrane curvature and electrostatics. In particular, membrane electrostatics specifies the identity of the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Membrane surface charges are carried by anionic phospholipids, however the exact nature of the lipid(s) that powers the plasma membrane electrostatic field varies among eukaryotes and has been hotly debated during the last decade. Herein, we discuss the role of anionic lipids in setting up plasma membrane electrostatics and we compare similarities and differences that were found in different eukaryotic cells.

  12. Binding of Serotonin to Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Wang, Chunhua; Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a prevalent neurotransmitter throughout the animal kingdom. It exerts its effect through the specific binding to the serotonin receptor, but recent research has suggested that neural transmission may also be affected by its nonspecific interactions...... with the lipid matrix of the synaptic membrane. However, membrane–5-HT interactions remain controversial and superficially investigated. Fundamental knowledge of this interaction appears vital in discussions of putative roles of 5-HT, and we have addressed this by thermodynamic measurements and molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations. 5-HT was found to interact strongly with lipid bilayers (partitioning coefficient ∼1200 in mole fraction units), and this is highly unusual for a hydrophilic solute like 5-HT which has a bulk, oil–water partitioning coefficient well below unity. It follows that membrane affinity...

  13. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette eJouhet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterised by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organisation are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particular local structures within membranes. Since biological membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids, each with distinctive biophysical properties, lateral and transversal sorting of lipids can promote creation of domains inside the membrane through local modulation of the lipid phase. Lipid biophysical properties have been characterized for long based on in vitro analyses using non-natural lipid molecules; their re-examinations using natural lipids might open interesting perspectives on membrane architecture occurring in vivo in various cellular and physiological contexts.

  14. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhet, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterized by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organization are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particular local structures within membranes. Since biological membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids, each with distinctive biophysical properties, lateral and transversal sorting of lipids can promote creation of domains inside the membrane through local modulation of the lipid phase. Lipid biophysical properties have been characterized for long based on in vitro analyses using non-natural lipid molecules; their re-examinations using natural lipids might open interesting perspectives on membrane architecture occurring in vivo in various cellular and physiological contexts.

  15. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Quon; Christopher T. Beh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer...

  16. Lipid polymorphism and the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cullis, P.R.; Kruijff, B. de

    1979-01-01

    The reasons for the great variety of lipids found in biological membranes, and the relations between lipid composition and membrane function pose major unsolved problems in membrane biology. Perhaps the only major functional role of lipids which may be regarded as firmly established involves the

  17. Lipid corralling and poloxamer squeeze-out in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.H.; Majewski, J.; Ege, C.

    2004-01-01

    Using x-ray scattering measurements we have quantitatively determined the effect of poloxamer 188 (P188), a polymer known to seal damaged membranes, on the structure of lipid monolayers. P188 selectively inserts into low lipid-density regions of the membrane and "corrals" lipid molecules to pack...... tightly, leading to unexpected Bragg peaks at low nominal lipid density and inducing lipid/poloxamer phase separation. At tighter lipid packing, the once inserted P188 is squeezed out, allowing the poloxamer to gracefully exit when the membrane integrity is restored....

  18. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-15

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  19. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  20. Membrane Lipid Oscillation: An Emerging System of Molecular Dynamics in the Plant Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki

    2018-03-01

    Biological rhythm represents a major biological process of living organisms. However, rhythmic oscillation of membrane lipid content is poorly described in plants. The development of lipidomic technology has led to the illustration of precise molecular profiles of membrane lipids under various growth conditions. Compared with conventional lipid signaling, which produces unpredictable lipid changes in response to ever-changing environmental conditions, lipid oscillation generates a fairly predictable lipid profile, adding a new layer of biological function to the membrane system and possible cross-talk with the other chronobiological processes. This mini review covers recent studies elucidating membrane lipid oscillation in plants.

  1. Lipid domains in intact fiber-cell plasma membranes isolated from cortical and nuclear regions of human eye lenses of donors from different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguz, Marija; Mainali, Laxman; O'Brien, William J; Subczynski, Witold K

    2015-03-01

    The results reported here clearly document changes in the properties and the organization of fiber-cell membrane lipids that occur with age, based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis of lens membranes of clear lenses from donors of age groups from 0 to 20, 21 to 40, and 61 to 80 years. The physical properties, including profiles of the alkyl chain order, fluidity, hydrophobicity, and oxygen transport parameter, were investigated using EPR spin-labeling methods, which also provide an opportunity to discriminate coexisting lipid domains and to evaluate the relative amounts of lipids in these domains. Fiber-cell membranes were found to contain three distinct lipid environments: bulk lipid domain, which appears minimally affected by membrane proteins, and two domains that appear due to the presence of membrane proteins, namely boundary and trapped lipid domains. In nuclear membranes the amount of boundary and trapped phospholipids as well as the amount of cholesterol in trapped lipid domains increased with the donors' age and was greater than that in cortical membranes. The difference between the amounts of lipids in domains uniquely formed due to the presence of membrane proteins in nuclear and cortical membranes increased with the donors' age. It was also shown that cholesterol was to a large degree excluded from trapped lipid domains in cortical membranes. It is evident that the rigidity of nuclear membranes was greater than that of cortical membranes for all age groups. The amount of lipids in domains of low oxygen permeability, mainly in trapped lipid domains, were greater in nuclear than cortical membranes and increased with the age of donors. These results indicate that the nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes were less permeable to oxygen than cortical membranes and become less permeable to oxygen with age. In clear lenses, age-related changes in the lens lipid and protein composition and organization appear to occur in ways that increase fiber

  2. Membrane Contact Sites: Complex Zones for Membrane Association and Lipid Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Evan; Beh, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid transport between membranes within cells involves vesicle and protein carriers, but as agents of nonvesicular lipid transfer, the role of membrane contact sites has received increasing attention. As zones for lipid metabolism and exchange, various membrane contact sites mediate direct associations between different organelles. In particular, membrane contact sites linking the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represent important regulators of lipid and ion transfer. In yeast, cortical ER is stapled to the PM through membrane-tethering proteins, which establish a direct connection between the membranes. In this review, we consider passive and facilitated models for lipid transfer at PM–ER contact sites. Besides the tethering proteins, we examine the roles of an additional repertoire of lipid and protein regulators that prime and propagate PM–ER membrane association. We conclude that instead of being simple mediators of membrane association, regulatory components of membrane contact sites have complex and multilayered functions. PMID:26949334

  3. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  4. Imaging of blood plasma coagulation at supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxälv, Lars; Hume, Jasmin; Kasemo, Bengt; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-12-15

    The blood coagulation system relies on lipid membrane constituents to act as regulators of the coagulation process upon vascular trauma, and in particular the 2D configuration of the lipid membranes is known to efficiently catalyze enzymatic activity of blood coagulation factors. This work demonstrates a new application of a recently developed methodology to study blood coagulation at lipid membrane interfaces with the use of imaging technology. Lipid membranes with varied net charges were formed on silica supports by systematically using different combinations of lipids where neutral phosphocholine (PC) lipids were mixed with phospholipids having either positively charged ethylphosphocholine (EPC), or negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) headgroups. Coagulation imaging demonstrated that negatively charged SiO(2) and membrane surfaces exposing PS (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of PS) had coagulation times which were significantly shorter than those for plain PC membranes and EPC exposing membrane surfaces (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of EPC). Coagulation times decreased non-linearly with increasing negative surface charge for lipid membranes. A threshold value for shorter coagulation times was observed below a PS content of ∼6%. We conclude that the lipid membranes on solid support studied with the imaging setup as presented in this study offers a flexible and non-expensive solution for coagulation studies at biological membranes. It will be interesting to extend the present study towards examining coagulation on more complex lipid-based model systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The lipid organisation of the cell membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladha, S.

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipids and proteins in biological membranes are arranged in a mosaic of domains in the membrane. These domains represent small-scale heterogeneities in composition, shape and fluidity within the plane of the membrane, over the range of hundreds of nanometers to a few micrometers. They arise from the complex interactions of the heterogeneous mixtures of phospholipids, sterols, and proteins that make up all biological membranes.Los lípidos y las proteínas en las membranas biológicas están dispuestos en un mosaico de campos en la membrana. Estos campos representan heterogeneidades a pequeña escala en la composición, forma y fluidez dentro del plano de la membrana, en un rango que va de los cientos de nanómetros a los pocos micrómetros. Estos campos se originan de las complejas interacciones de las mezclas heterogéneas de fosfolípidos, esteroles y proteínas de las que están hechas todas y cada una de las membranas biológicas.

  6. Lipidomics in research on yeast membrane lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2017-08-01

    Mass spectrometry is increasingly used in research on membrane lipid homeostasis, both in analyses of the steady state lipidome at the level of molecular lipid species, and in pulse-chase approaches employing stable isotope-labeled lipid precursors addressing the dynamics of lipid metabolism. Here my experience with, and view on mass spectrometry-based lipid analysis is presented, with emphasis on aspects of quantification of membrane lipid composition of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: BBALIP_Lipidomics Opinion Articles edited by Sepp Kohlwein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Linearly concatenated cyclobutane (ladderane) lipids form a dense bacterial membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Strous, M.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Hopmans, E.C.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Duin, A.C.T. van; Niftrik, L.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid membranes are essential to the functioning of cells, enabling the existence of concentration gradients of ions and metabolites. Microbial membrane lipids can contain three-, five-, six- and even seven-membered aliphatic rings, but four-membered aliphatic cyclobutane rings have never been

  8. Role of mini-scleral lens in mucous membrane pemphigoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to report the use of mini-scleral contact lens in the management of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP with persistent epithelial defects. A 68-year-old male with a history of ocular pain and declining visual acuity was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of MMP. His corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA was 20/200 in the right eye and 20/100 in the left eye. Despite being on lubricants, topical steroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide, the patient developed persistent corneal epithelial defects in both eyes. He was then given a trial of mini-scleral lenses. Within 4 weeks, corneal epithelial defects healed, and at 6 months, the CDVA had improved to 20/50 in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. By improving the corneal surface integrity and visual function, mini-scleral lenses can play a role in the visual rehabilitation of patients with MMP.

  9. Homeoviscous adaptation and the regulation of membrane lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Robert; Ejsing, Christer S; Antonny, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold. This ada......Biological membranes are complex and dynamic assemblies of lipids and proteins. Poikilothermic organisms including bacteria, fungi, reptiles, and fish do not control their body temperature and must adapt their membrane lipid composition in order to maintain membrane fluidity in the cold....... This adaptive response was termed homeoviscous adaptation and has been frequently studied with a specific focus on the acyl chain composition of membrane lipids. Massspectrometry-based lipidomics can nowadays provide more comprehensive insights into the complexity of lipid remodeling during adaptive responses...... such as neurons maintain unique lipid compositions with specific physicochemical properties. To date little is known about the sensory mechanisms regulating the acyl chain profile in such specialized cells or during adaptive responses. Here we summarize our current understanding of lipid metabolic networks...

  10. Thermal Adaptation of the Archaeal and Bacterial Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Yosuke

    2012-01-01

    The physiological characteristics that distinguish archaeal and bacterial lipids, as well as those that define thermophilic lipids, are discussed from three points of view that (1) the role of the chemical stability of lipids in the heat tolerance of thermophilic organisms: (2) the relevance of the increase in the proportion of certain lipids as the growth temperature increases: (3) the lipid bilayer membrane properties that enable membranes to function at high temperatures. It is concluded that no single, chemically stable lipid by itself was responsible for the adaptation of surviving at high temperatures. Lipid membranes that function effectively require the two properties of a high permeability barrier and a liquid crystalline state. Archaeal membranes realize these two properties throughout the whole biological temperature range by means of their isoprenoid chains. Bacterial membranes meet these requirements only at or just above the phase-transition temperature, and therefore their fatty acid composition must be elaborately regulated. A recent hypothesis sketched a scenario of the evolution of lipids in which the “lipid divide” emerged concomitantly with the differentiation of archaea and bacteria. The two modes of thermal adaptation were established concurrently with the “lipid divide.” PMID:22927779

  11. Thermal Adaptation of the Archaeal and Bacterial Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Koga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological characteristics that distinguish archaeal and bacterial lipids, as well as those that define thermophilic lipids, are discussed from three points of view that (1 the role of the chemical stability of lipids in the heat tolerance of thermophilic organisms: (2 the relevance of the increase in the proportion of certain lipids as the growth temperature increases: (3 the lipid bilayer membrane properties that enable membranes to function at high temperatures. It is concluded that no single, chemically stable lipid by itself was responsible for the adaptation of surviving at high temperatures. Lipid membranes that function effectively require the two properties of a high permeability barrier and a liquid crystalline state. Archaeal membranes realize these two properties throughout the whole biological temperature range by means of their isoprenoid chains. Bacterial membranes meet these requirements only at or just above the phase-transition temperature, and therefore their fatty acid composition must be elaborately regulated. A recent hypothesis sketched a scenario of the evolution of lipids in which the “lipid divide” emerged concomitantly with the differentiation of archaea and bacteria. The two modes of thermal adaptation were established concurrently with the “lipid divide.”

  12. Lipid clustering correlates with membrane curvature as revealed by molecular simulations of complex lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2, in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins.

  13. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Scheuring, Simon [Institut Curie, Equipe Inserm Avenir, UMR168-CNRS, 26 Rue d' Ulm, 75248 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sens, Pierre [ESPCI, CNRS-UMR 7083, 75231 Paris (France); Behar-Cohen, Francine, E-mail: simon.scheuring@curie.fr [UMRS Inserm 872, Universite Paris Descartes, Centre de Recherches des Cordeliers, 15 rue de l' Ecole de Medecine, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France)

    2011-08-15

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  14. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  15. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane...

  16. Differential Effect of Plant Lipids on Membrane Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Kevin; Mongrand, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The high diversity of the plant lipid mixture raises the question of their respective involvement in the definition of membrane organization. This is particularly the case for plant plasma membrane, which is enriched in specific lipids, such as free and conjugated forms of phytosterols and typical phytosphingolipids, such as glycosylinositolphosphoceramides. This question was here addressed extensively by characterizing the order level of membrane from vesicles prepared using various plant lipid mixtures and labeled with an environment-sensitive probe. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments showed that among major phytosterols, campesterol exhibits a stronger ability than β-sitosterol and stigmasterol to order model membranes. Multispectral confocal microscopy, allowing spatial analysis of membrane organization, demonstrated accordingly the strong ability of campesterol to promote ordered domain formation and to organize their spatial distribution at the membrane surface. Conjugated sterol forms, alone and in synergy with free sterols, exhibit a striking ability to order membrane. Plant sphingolipids, particularly glycosylinositolphosphoceramides, enhanced the sterol-induced ordering effect, emphasizing the formation and increasing the size of sterol-dependent ordered domains. Altogether, our results support a differential involvement of free and conjugated phytosterols in the formation of ordered domains and suggest that the diversity of plant lipids, allowing various local combinations of lipid species, could be a major contributor to membrane organization in particular through the formation of sphingolipid-sterol interacting domains. PMID:25575593

  17. Non-Brownian diffusion in lipid membranes: Experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, R; Jeon, J-H; Cherstvy, A G

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of constituents and the surface response of cellular membranes-also in connection to the binding of various particles and macromolecules to the membrane-are still a matter of controversy in the membrane biophysics community, particularly with respect to crowded membranes of living biological cells. We here put into perspective recent single particle tracking experiments in the plasma membranes of living cells and supercomputing studies of lipid bilayer model membranes with and without protein crowding. Special emphasis is put on the observation of anomalous, non-Brownian diffusion of both lipid molecules and proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer. While single component, pure lipid bilayers in simulations exhibit only transient anomalous diffusion of lipid molecules on nanosecond time scales, the persistence of anomalous diffusion becomes significantly longer ranged on the addition of disorder-through the addition of cholesterol or proteins-and on passing of the membrane lipids to the gel phase. Concurrently, experiments demonstrate the anomalous diffusion of membrane embedded proteins up to macroscopic time scales in the minute time range. Particular emphasis will be put on the physical character of the anomalous diffusion, in particular, the occurrence of ageing observed in the experiments-the effective diffusivity of the measured particles is a decreasing function of time. Moreover, we present results for the time dependent local scaling exponent of the mean squared displacement of the monitored particles. Recent results finding deviations from the commonly assumed Gaussian diffusion patterns in protein crowded membranes are reported. The properties of the displacement autocorrelation function of the lipid molecules are discussed in the light of their appropriate physical anomalous diffusion models, both for non-crowded and crowded membranes. In the last part of this review we address the upcoming field of membrane distortion by elongated membrane

  18. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs

    OpenAIRE

    Laat, S.W. de; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1984-01-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xaopus Levis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“HEDAF”) and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“TEDAF”) as probes. The preexisting plasma membrane of the animal side showed an inhomogeneous, dotted fluorescence pattern after labeling and the lateral mobility of both probes used was below the detection limits of the FP...

  19. Importance of the hexagonal lipid phase in biological membrane organization

    OpenAIRE

    Jouhet, Juliette

    2013-01-01

    Domains are present in every natural membrane. They are characterized by a distinctive protein and/or lipid composition. Their size is highly variable from the nano- to the micrometer scale. The domains confer specific properties to the membrane leading to original structure and function. The determinants leading to domain organization are therefore important but remain obscure. This review presents how the ability of lipids to organize into hexagonal II or lamellar phases can promote particu...

  20. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  1. Simulations of simple linoleic acid-containing lipid membranes and models for the soybean plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohong; Ou, Anna; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2017-06-07

    The all-atom CHARMM36 lipid force field (C36FF) has been tested with saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated lipids; however, it has not been validated against the 18:2 linoleoyl lipids with an unsaturated sn-1 chain. The linoleoyl lipids are common in plants and the main component of the soybean membrane. The lipid composition of soybean plasma membranes has been thoroughly characterized with experimental studies. However, there is comparatively less work done with computational modeling. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results show that the pure linoleoyl lipids, 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0/18:2) and 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (di-18:2), agree very well with the experiments, which demonstrates the accuracy of the C36FF for the computational study of soybean membranes. Based on the experimental composition, the soybean hypocotyl and root plasma membrane models are developed with each containing seven or eight types of linoleoyl phospholipids and two types of sterols (sitosterol and stigmasterol). MD simulations are performed to characterize soybean membranes, and the hydrogen bonds and clustering results demonstrate that the lipids prefer to interact with the lipids of the same/similar tail unsaturation. All the results suggest that these two soybean membrane models can be used as a basis for further research in soybean and higher plant membranes involving membrane-associated proteins.

  2. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  3. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, S.W. de; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van

    1984-01-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xaopus Levis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“HEDAF”) and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein (“TEDAF”) as probes. The

  4. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  5. Single Lipid Molecule Dynamics on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Membrane Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Cheney

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, lipids have the ability to organize into domains as a result of a variety of chemical and physical interactions. One feature of membranes that affects lipid domain formation is membrane curvature. To directly test the role of curvature in lipid sorting, we measured the accumulation of two similar lipids, 1,2-Dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE and hexadecanoic acid (HDA, using a supported lipid bilayer that was assembled over a nanopatterned surface to obtain regions of membrane curvature. Both lipids studied contain 16 carbon, saturated tails and a head group tag for fluorescence microscopy measurements. The accumulation of lipids at curvatures ranging from 28 nm to 55 nm radii was measured and fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulated more than fluorescein labeled HDA at regions of membrane curvature. We then tested whether single biotinylated DHPE molecules sense curvature using single particle tracking methods. Similar to groups of fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulating at curvature, the dynamics of single molecules of biotinylated DHPE was also affected by membrane curvature and highly confined motion was observed.

  6. Concerted diffusion of lipids in raft-like membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apajalahti, Touko; Niemela, Perttu; Govindan, Praveen Nedumpully; Miettinen, Markus S.; Salonen, Emppu; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no comprehensive model for the dynamics of cellular membranes. The understanding of even the basic dynamic processes, such as lateral diffusion of lipids, is still quite limited. Recent studies of one-component membrane systems have shown that instead of single-particle motions,

  7. Influence of membrane phospholipid composition and structural organization on spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, R; Markovska, T; Antonov, P; Ivanova, L; Momchilova, A

    2006-09-01

    Investigations were carried out on the influence of phospholipid composition of model membranes on the processes of spontaneous lipid transfer between membranes. Acceptor vesicles were prepared from phospholipids extracted from plasma membranes of control and ras-transformed fibroblasts. Acceptor model membranes with manipulated levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin and phosphatidic acid were also used in the studies. Donor vesicles were prepared of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and contained two fluorescent lipid analogues, NBD-PC and N-Rh-PE, at a self-quenching concentration. Lipid transfer rate was assessed by measuring the increase of fluorescence in acceptor membranes due to transfer of fluorescent lipid analogues from quenched donor to unquenched acceptor vesicles. The results showed that spontaneous NBD-PC transfer increased upon fluidization of acceptor vesicles. In addition, elevation of PE concentration in model membranes was also accompanied by an increase of lipid transfer to all series of acceptor vesicles. The results are discussed with respect to the role of lipid composition and structural order of cellular plasma membranes in the processes of spontaneous lipid exchange between membrane bilayers.

  8. Understanding carbon nanotube channel formation in the lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moon-ki; Kim, Hyunki; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Teayeop; Rho, Junsuk; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Kyunghoon

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered a prominent nano-channel in cell membranes because of their prominent ion-conductance and ion-selectivity, offering agents for a biomimetic channel platform. Using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we clarify a construction mechanism of vertical CNT nano-channels in a lipid membrane for a long period, which has been difficult to observe in previous CNT-lipid interaction simulations. The result shows that both the lipid coating density and length of CNT affect the suitable fabrication condition for a vertical and stable CNT channel. Also, simulation elucidated that a lipid coating on the surface of the CNT prevents the CNT from burrowing into the lipid membrane and the vertical channel is stabilized by the repulsion force between the lipids in the coating and membrane. Our study provides an essential understanding of how CNTs can form stable and vertical channels in the membrane, which is important for designing new types of artificial channels as biosensors for bio-fluidic studies.

  9. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    . The simulations suggest that this attraction mainly relies on electrostatic interactions of the amino group of the neurotransmitter and the lipid phosphate. We conclude that moderate attraction to lipid membranes occurs for some polar neurotransmitters and hence that one premise for a theory of bilayer-mediated......Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...

  10. A layer model of ethanol partitioning into lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizza, David T; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    The effect of membrane composition on ethanol partitioning into lipid bilayers was assessed by headspace gas chromatography. A series of model membranes with different compositions have been investigated. Membranes were exposed to a physiological ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l. The concentration of membranes was 20 wt% which roughly corresponds to values found in tissue. Partitioning depended on the chemical nature of polar groups at the lipid/water interface. Compared to phosphatidylcholine, lipids with headgroups containing phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin showed enhanced partitioning while headgroups containing phosphatidylethanolamine resulted in a lower partition coefficient. The molar partition coefficient was independent of a membrane's hydrophobic volume. This observation is in agreement with our previously published NMR results which showed that ethanol resides almost exclusively within the membrane/water interface. At an ethanol concentration of 20 mmol/l in water, ethanol concentrations at the lipid/water interface are in the range from 30-15 mmol/l, corresponding to one ethanol molecule per 100-200 lipids.

  11. Plasma membrane lipids and their role in fungal virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Antonella; Farnoud, Amir M; Del Poeta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable evidence in recent years suggesting that plasma membrane lipids are important regulators of fungal pathogenicity. Various glycolipids have been shown to impart virulent properties in several fungal species, while others have been shown to play a role in host defense. In addition to their role as virulence factors, lipids also contribute to other virulence mechanisms such as drug resistance, biofilm formation, and release of extracellular vesicles. In addition, lipids also affect the mechanical properties of the plasma membrane through the formation of packed microdomains composed mainly of sphingolipids and sterols. Changes in the composition of lipid microdomains have been shown to disrupt the localization of virulence factors and affect fungal pathogenicity. This review gathers evidence on the various roles of plasma membrane lipids in fungal virulence and how lipids might contribute to the different processes that occur during infection and treatment. Insight into the role of lipids in fungal virulence can lead to an improved understanding of the process of fungal pathogenesis and the development of new lipid-mediated therapeutic strategies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. How membrane lipids control the 3D structure and function of receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques Fantini; Francisco J. Barrantes

    2018-01-01

    The cohabitation of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells is controlled by specific biochemical and biophysical rules. Lipids may be either constitutively tightly bound to cell-surface receptors (non-annular lipids) or less tightly attached to the external surface of the protein (annular lipids). The latter are exchangeable with surrounding bulk membrane lipids on a faster time scale than that of non-annular lipids. Not only do non-annular lipids bind to membrane prote...

  13. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in dividing Xenopus eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteroo, P A; Bluemink, J G; Dictus, W J; van Zoelen, E J; de Laat, S W

    1984-07-01

    The lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids was analyzed during first cleavage of Xenopus laevis eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements, using the lipid analogs 5-(N-hexadecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("HEDAF") and 5-(N-tetradecanoyl)aminofluorescein ("TEDAF") as probes. The preexisting plasma membrane of the animal side showed an inhomogeneous, dotted fluorescence pattern after labeling and the lateral mobility of both probes used was below the detection limits of the FPR method (D much less than 10(-10) cm2/sec). In contrast, the preexisting plasma membrane of the vegetal side exhibited homogeneous fluorescence and the lateral diffusion coefficient of both probes used was relatively high (HEDAF, D = 2.8 X 10(-8) cm2/sec; TEDAF, D = 2.4 X 10(-8) cm2/sec). In the cleaving egg visible transfer of HEDAF or TEDAF from prelabeled plasma membrane to the new membrane in the furrow did not occur, even on the vegetal side. Upon labeling during cleavage, however, the new membrane was uniformly labeled and both probes were mobile, as in the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane. These data show that the membrane of the dividing Xenopus egg comprises three macrodomains: (i) the animal preexisting plasma membrane; (ii) the vegetal preexisting plasma membrane; (iii) the new furrow membrane.

  14. Membrane-sculpting BAR domains generate stable lipid microdomains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.

    2013-01-01

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR...... domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by "freezing" phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced...... phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved...

  15. Lipid Acrobatics in the Membrane Fusion Arena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markvoort, Albert J.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we describe the recent contribution of computer simulation approaches to unravel the molecular details of membrane fusion. Over the past decade, fusion between apposed membranes and vesicles has been studied using a large variety of simulation methods and systems. Despite the variety

  16. Lipid Directed Intrinsic Membrane Protein Segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Thompson, James R.; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach for direct reconstitution of membrane proteins during giant vesicle formation. We show that it is straightforward to create a tissue-like giant vesicle film swelled with membrane protein using aquaporin SoPIP2;1 as an illustration. These vesicles can also be easily h...

  17. Digital holographic microscopy of phase separation in multicomponent lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzam Rad, Vahideh; Moradi, Ali-Reza; Darudi, Ahmad; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-12-01

    Lateral in-homogeneities in lipid compositions cause microdomains formation and change in the physical properties of biological membranes. With the presence of cholesterol and mixed species of lipids, phospholipid membranes segregate into lateral domains of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Coupling of two-dimensional intralayer phase separations and interlayer liquid-crystalline ordering in multicomponent membranes has been previously demonstrated. By the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHMicroscopy), we quantitatively analyzed the volumetric dynamical behavior of such membranes. The specimens are lipid mixtures composed of sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. DHMicroscopy in a transmission mode is an effective tool for quantitative visualization of phase objects. By deriving the associated phase changes, three-dimensional information on the morphology variation of lipid stacks at arbitrary time scales is obtained. Moreover, the thickness distribution of the object at demanded axial planes can be obtained by numerical focusing. Our results show that the volume evolution of lipid domains follows approximately the same universal growth law of previously reported area evolution. However, the thickness of the domains does not alter significantly by time; therefore, the volume evolution is mostly attributed to the changes in area dynamics. These results might be useful in the field of membrane-based functional materials.

  18. Inducing morphological changes in lipid bilayer membranes with microfabricated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangjie; Collins, Liam F.; Ashkar, Rana; Heberle, Frederick A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Lateral organization of lipids and proteins into distinct domains and anchoring to a cytoskeleton are two important strategies employed by biological membranes to carry out many cellular functions. However, these interactions are difficult to emulate with model systems. Here we use the physical architecture of substrates consisting of arrays of micropillars to systematically control the behavior of supported lipid bilayers - an important step in engineering model lipid membrane systems with well-defined functionalities. Competition between attractive interactions of supported lipid bilayers with the underlying substrate versus the energy cost associated with membrane bending at pillar edges can be systematically investigated as functions of pillar height and pitch, chemical functionalization of the microstructured substrate, and the type of unilamellar vesicles used for assembling the supported bilayer. Confocal fluorescent imaging and AFM measurements highlight correlations that exist between topological and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and lateral lipid mobility in these confined environments. This study provides a baseline for future investigations into lipid domain reorganization on structured solid surfaces and scaffolds for cell growth.

  19. Factors Determining the Oxygen Permeability of Biological Membranes: Oxygen Transport Across Eye Lens Fiber-Cell Plasma Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold Karol; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman

    2017-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-label oximetry allows the oxygen permeability coefficient to be evaluated across homogeneous lipid bilayer membranes and, in some cases, across coexisting membrane domains without their physical separation. The most pronounced effect on oxygen permeability is observed for cholesterol, which additionally induces the formation of membrane domains. In intact biological membranes, integral proteins induce the formation of boundary and trapped lipid domains with a low oxygen permeability. The effective oxygen permeability coefficient across the intact biological membrane is affected not only by the oxygen permeability coefficients evaluated for each lipid domain but also by the surface area occupied by these domains in the membrane. All these factors observed in fiber cell plasma membranes of clear human eye lenses are reviewed here.

  20. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of Membrane Tension on the Electric Field and Dipole Potential of Lipid Bilayer Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Muellner, Michael J.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2011-01-01

    The dipole potential of lipid bilayer membrane controls the difference in permeability of the membrane to oppositely charged ions. We have combined molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies to determine changes in electric field and electrostatic potential of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer in response to applied membrane tension. MD simulations based on CHARMM36 force field showed that electrostatic potential of DOPC bilayer decreases by ~45 mV in the physiologically relevant range of membrane tension values (0 to 15 dyn/cm). The electrostatic field exhibits a peak (~0.8×109 V/m) near the water/lipid interface which shifts by 0.9 Å towards the bilayer center at 15 dyn/cm. Maximum membrane tension of 15 dyn/cm caused 6.4% increase in area per lipid, 4.7% decrease in bilayer thickness and 1.4% increase in the volume of the bilayer. Dipole-potential sensitive fluorescent probes were used to detect membrane tension induced changes in DOPC vesicles exposed to osmotic stress. Experiments confirmed that dipole potential of DOPC bilayer decreases at higher membrane tensions. These results are suggestive of a potentially new mechanosensing mechanism by which mechanically induced structural changes in the lipid bilayer membrane could modulate the function of membrane proteins by altering electrostatic interactions and energetics of protein conformational states. PMID:21722624

  2. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios; Drubin, David G.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes. PMID:24055060

  3. DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids: correlation with lipid mesomorphism, interfacial curvature, and membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C. (Northwestern)

    2010-01-18

    DNA release from lipoplexes is an essential step during lipofection and is probably a result of charge neutralization by cellular anionic lipids. As a model system to test this possibility, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between DNA and lipid covalently labeled with Cy3 and BODIPY, respectively, was used to monitor the release of DNA from lipid surfaces induced by anionic liposomes. The separation of DNA from lipid measured this way was considerably slower and less complete than that estimated with noncovalently labeled DNA, and depends on the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and anionic liposomes. This result was confirmed by centrifugal separation of released DNA and lipid. X-ray diffraction revealed a clear correlation of the DNA release capacity of the anionic lipids with the interfacial curvature of the mesomorphic structures developed when the anionic and cationic liposomes were mixed. DNA release also correlated with the rate of fusion of anionic liposomes with lipoplexes. It is concluded that the tendency to fuse and the phase preference of the mixed lipid membranes are key factors for the rate and extent of DNA release. The approach presented emphasizes the importance of the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and target membranes and suggests optimal transfection may be obtained by tailoring lipoplex composition to the lipid composition of target cells.

  4. Pressure effects on lipids and bio-membrane assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Brooks

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Membranes are amongst the most important biological structures; they maintain the fundamental integrity of cells, compartmentalize regions within them and play an active role in a wide range of cellular processes. Pressure can play a key role in probing the structure and dynamics of membrane assemblies, and is also critical to the biology and adaptation of deep-sea organisms. This article presents an overview of the effect of pressure on the mesostructure of lipid membranes, bilayer organization and lipid–protein assemblies. It also summarizes recent developments in high-pressure structural instrumentation suitable for experiments on membranes.

  5. Plant lipid environment and membrane enzymes: the case of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cedillo, Francisco; González-Solís, Ariadna; Gutiérrez-Angoa, Lizbeth; Cano-Ramírez, Dora Luz; Gavilanes-Ruiz, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Several lipid classes constitute the universal matrix of the biological membranes. With their amphipathic nature, lipids not only build the continuous barrier that confers identity to every cell and organelle, but they are also active actors that modulate the activity of the proteins immersed in the lipid bilayer. The plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, an enzyme from plant cells, is an excellent example of a transmembrane protein whose activity is influenced by the hydrophilic compartments at both sides of the membrane and by the hydrophobic domains of the lipid bilayer. As a result, an extensive documentation of the effect of numerous amphiphiles in the enzyme activity can be found. Detergents, membrane glycerolipids, and sterols can produce activation or inhibition of the enzyme activity. In some cases, these effects are associated with the lipids of the membrane bulk, but in others, a direct interaction of the lipid with the protein is involved. This review gives an account of reports related to the action of the membrane lipids on the H(+)-ATPase activity.

  6. Hydration dynamics of a lipid membrane: Hydrogen bond networks and lipid-lipid associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhinav; Debnath, Ananya

    2018-03-01

    reveal that the slow relaxation rates of interfacial waters in the vicinity of lipids are originated from the chemical confinement of concerted hydrogen bond networks. The analysis suggests that the networks in the hydration layer of membranes dynamically facilitate the water mediated lipid-lipid associations which can provide insights on the thermodynamic stability of soft interfaces relevant to biological systems in the future.

  7. Phosphoinositides, Major Actors in Membrane Trafficking and Lipid Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan-Owen De Craene

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositides are lipids involved in the vesicular transport of proteins and lipids between the different compartments of eukaryotic cells. They act by recruiting and/or activating effector proteins and thus are involved in regulating various cellular functions, such as vesicular budding, membrane fusion and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although detected in small concentrations in membranes, their role is essential to cell function, since imbalance in their concentrations is a hallmark of many cancers. Their synthesis involves phosphorylating/dephosphorylating positions D3, D4 and/or D5 of their inositol ring by specific lipid kinases and phosphatases. This process is tightly regulated and specific to the different intracellular membranes. Most enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis are conserved between yeast and human, and their loss of function leads to severe diseases (cancer, myopathy, neuropathy and ciliopathy.

  8. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  9. Probing protein-lipid interactions by FRET between membrane fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.; Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Deligeorgiev, Todor; Gadjev, Nikolai

    2016-09-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful fluorescence technique that has found numerous applications in medicine and biology. One area where FRET proved to be especially informative involves the intermolecular interactions in biological membranes. The present study was focused on developing and verifying a Monte-Carlo approach to analyzing the results of FRET between the membrane-bound fluorophores. This approach was employed to quantify FRET from benzanthrone dye ABM to squaraine dye SQ-1 in the model protein-lipid system containing a polycationic globular protein lysozyme and negatively charged lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. It was found that acceptor redistribution between the lipid bilayer and protein binding sites resulted in the decrease of FRET efficiency. Quantification of this effect in terms of the proposed methodology yielded both structural and binding parameters of lysozyme-lipid complexes.

  10. Photoperoxidation of lens lipids: prevention by vitamin E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, S.D.; Beachy, N.A.; Richards, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Light of visible frequency was observed to initiate peroxidative degradation of lipids of rat lenses when the latter were maintained in organ culture. The extent of degradation was monitored by measurement of malonaldehyde. This photodegradative process, which is possibly triggered by light catalyzed generation of superoxide and its subsequent transformation to other potent oxidants, was observed to be thwarted substantially if the medium of organ culture was fortified with 10 - 3 and 10 - 7 M vitamin E (αtochopherol). These studies suggest that vitamin E may be metabolically beneficial by protecting light exposed tissues, such as those in the eye, against photoperoxidative damage concomitant to light-catalyzed generation of oxygen-free radicals. The findings appear relevant to age-associated pathogenesis of cataracts and their possible attenuation. In addition, they provide a basis of pathogenesis in other ocular tissues such as the macula known to undergo age-dependent degeneration. (author)

  11. Photoperoxidation of lens lipids: prevention by vitamin E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, S.D.; Beachy, N.A.; Richards, R.D. (Maryland Univ., Baltimore (USA). School of Medicine)

    1982-12-01

    Light of visible frequency was observed to initiate peroxidative degradation of lipids of rat lenses when the latter were maintained in organ culture. The extent of degradation was monitored by measurement of malonaldehyde. This photodegradative process, which is possibly triggered by light catalyzed generation of superoxide and its subsequent transformation to other potent oxidants, was observed to be thwarted substantially if the medium of organ culture was fortified with 10/sup -3/ and 10/sup -7/ M vitamin E (..cap alpha..tochopherol). These studies suggest that vitamin E may be metabolically beneficial by protecting light exposed tissues, such as those in the eye, against photoperoxidative damage concomitant to light-catalyzed generation of oxygen-free radicals. The findings appear relevant to age-associated pathogenesis of cataracts and their possible attenuation. In addition, they provide a basis of pathogenesis in other ocular tissues such as the macula known to undergo age-dependent degeneration.

  12. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  13. Lipid reorganization induced by Shiga toxin clustering on planar membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Windschiegl

    Full Text Available The homopentameric B-subunit of bacterial protein Shiga toxin (STxB binds to the glycolipid Gb(3 in plasma membranes, which is the initial step for entering cells by a clathrin-independent mechanism. It has been suggested that protein clustering and lipid reorganization determine toxin uptake into cells. Here, we elucidated the molecular requirements for STxB induced Gb(3 clustering and for the proposed lipid reorganization in planar membranes. The influence of binding site III of the B-subunit as well as the Gb(3 lipid structure was investigated by means of high resolution methods such as fluorescence and scanning force microscopy. STxB was found to form protein clusters on homogenous 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC/cholesterol/Gb(3 (65:30:5 bilayers. In contrast, membranes composed of DOPC/cholesterol/sphingomyelin/Gb(3 (40:35:20:5 phase separate into a liquid ordered and liquid disordered phase. Dependent on the fatty acid composition of Gb(3, STxB-Gb(3 complexes organize within the liquid ordered phase upon protein binding. Our findings suggest that STxB is capable of forming a new membrane phase that is characterized by lipid compaction. The significance of this finding is discussed in the context of Shiga toxin-induced formation of endocytic membrane invaginations.

  14. Simulation of water transport through a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrink, S.J.; Berendsen, H.J.C. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1994-04-14

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly via computation of the free energy and diffusion rate profiles of a water molecule across the bilayer. We concluded that the permeation of water through a lipid membrane cannot be described adequately by a simple homogeneous solubility-diffusion model. Both the excess free energy and the diffusion rate strongly depend on the position in the membrane, as a result from the inhomogeneous nature of the membrane. The calculated excess free energy profile has a shallow slope and a maximum height of 26 kJ/mol. The diffusion rate is highest in the middle of the membrane where the lipid density is low. In the interfacial region almost all water molecules are bound by the lipid headgroups, and the diffusion turns out to be 1 order of magnitude smaller. The total transport process is essentially determined by the free energy barrier. 78 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Watching individual molecules flex within lipid membranes using SERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Richard W.; Benz, Felix; Sigle, Daniel O.; Bowman, Richard W.; Bao, Peng; Roth, Johannes S.; Heath, George R.; Evans, Stephen D.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2014-08-01

    Interrogating individual molecules within bio-membranes is key to deepening our understanding of biological processes essential for life. Using Raman spectroscopy to map molecular vibrations is ideal to non-destructively `fingerprint' biomolecules for dynamic information on their molecular structure, composition and conformation. Such tag-free tracking of molecules within lipid bio-membranes can directly connect structure and function. In this paper, stable co-assembly with gold nano-components in a `nanoparticle-on-mirror' geometry strongly enhances the local optical field and reduces the volume probed to a few nm3, enabling repeated measurements for many tens of minutes on the same molecules. The intense gap plasmons are assembled around model bio-membranes providing molecular identification of the diffusing lipids. Our experiments clearly evidence measurement of individual lipids flexing through telltale rapid correlated vibrational shifts and intensity fluctuations in the Raman spectrum. These track molecules that undergo bending and conformational changes within the probe volume, through their interactions with the environment. This technique allows for in situ high-speed single-molecule investigations of the molecules embedded within lipid bio-membranes. It thus offers a new way to investigate the hidden dynamics of cell membranes important to a myriad of life processes.

  16. Coupling of lipid membrane elasticity and in-plane dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Kuan-Yu; Lai, Yei-Chen; Chiang, Yun-Wei; Chen, Yi-Fan

    2017-07-01

    Biomembranes exhibit liquid and solid features concomitantly with their in-plane fluidity and elasticity tightly regulated by cells. Here, we present experimental evidence supporting the existence of the dynamics-elasticity correlations for lipid membranes and propose a mechanism involving molecular packing densities to explain them. This paper thereby unifies, at the molecular level, the aspects of the continuum mechanics long used to model the two membrane features. This ultimately may elucidate the universal physical principles governing the cellular phenomena involving biomembranes.

  17. Stabilization of Lipid Membranes With Dendritic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Langmuir - Blodgett (Takamato, et al., 2001) and solution techniques (Johnson, et al., 2002). However, BLMs are too unstable to be used to make effective...J.A., Ivanova, A.T., Schwartz, D.K., Yang, T., and Cremer, P.S., 2001: Stable Ordering in Langmuir - Blodgett Films, Science, 293, 1292-1295. Tully...Various dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers were evaluated. In addition, lipids with different head groups were used to probe the underlying

  18. Mobility of drugs in lipid membranes by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Mobility of drugs and biomembrane constituents is a key to elucidate the membrane transport mechanism in the cell. Lipid bilayer membrane is a dynamic structure where molecules are always fluctuating under physiological conditions. The mechanism of drug transport is related to the molecular dynamics in such soft, fluid membrane interface. To gain insight into molecular movements in membranes, we develop a noninvasive method to monitor dynamics properties of drugs and lipid components in membranes by applying multinuclear high-resolution solution NMR in combination with the pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) technique. We have quantified the diffusivity, the kinetics of membrane binding, and the bound fraction of the drug in situ by using large unilamellar vesicles of egg phosphatidylcholine as model cell membranes. The combination of 1D and PFG NMR serves to quantify the kinetics of membrane binding where the bound and the free components are unable to distinguish because of the rapid exchange on the NMR timescale. A small-sized 5-fluorouracil and fluorinated bisphenol A are used as model drug. (author)

  19. Radiation-induced lipid peroxidation: influence of oxygen concentration and membrane lipid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.; Tilburg, C.A.M. van; Konings, A.W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation -induced lipid peroxidation phospholipid liposomes was investigated in terms of its dependence on lipid composition and oxygen concentration. Non-peroxidizable lipid incorporated in the liposomes reduced the rate of peroxidation of the peroxidizable phospholipid acyl chains, possibly by restricting the length of chain reactions. The latter effect is believed to be caused by interference of the non-peroxidizable lipids in the bilayer. At low oxygen concentration lipid peroxidation was reduced. The cause of this limited peroxidation may be a reduced number of radical initiation reactions possibly involving oxygen-derived superoxide radicals. Killing of proliferating mammalian cells, irradiated at oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 100%, appeared to be independent of the concentration of peroxidizable phospholipids in the cell membranes. This indicates that lipid peroxidation is not the determining process in radiation-induced reproductive cell death. (author)

  20. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  1. Simulation of Water Transport through a Lipid Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Berendsen, Herman J.C.

    1994-01-01

    To obtain insight in the process of water permeation through a lipid membrane, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on a phospholipid (DPPC)/water system with atomic detail. Since the actual process of permeation is too slow to be studied directly, we deduced the permeation rate indirectly

  2. Interaction of Dendritic Polymers with Synthetic Lipid and Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecke, Almut; Hong, Seungpyo; Bielinska, Anna U.; Banaszak Holl, Mark M.; Orr, Bradford G.; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are promising candidates for the development of nanoscale therapeutic transport agents. Here we present studies on dendrimer-membrane interactions leading to a better understanding of possible uptake mechanisms into cells. Using synthetic lipid and natural cell membranes as model systems it is shown that the effect of PAMAM dendrimers on a membrane strongly depends on the dendrimer generation, architecture and chemical properties of the branch end groups. Atomic force microscopy data indicates that generation 7 dendrimers have the ability to form small ( 10-100 nm) holes in a lipid bilayer. When dendrimers with otherwise identical chemical properties are arranged in a covalently linked cluster, no hole formation occurs. Dendrimer-lipid micelle formation is proposed and investigated as a possible mechanism for this behavior. Smaller dendrimers (generation 5) have a greatly reduced ability to remove lipid molecules from a bilayer. In addition to the size of the dendrimer, the charge of the branch end groups plays a significant role for dendrimer-membrane interactions. These results agree well with biological studies using cultured cells and point to a new mechanism of specific targeting and uptake into cells.

  3. Semiconductor particle mediated photoelectron transfers in bilayer lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendler, J.H.; Baral, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor particles in situ generated on the cis surface of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs), that have been used to mediate photoelectric effects. The presence of semiconductors on the BLM surface is addressed. The observed photoelectric effects are rationalized and presented

  4. An ER Protein Functionally Couples Neutral Lipid Metabolism on Lipid Droplets to Membrane Lipid Synthesis in the ER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary...... phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic...... and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption....

  5. Thermal conductivity and rectification in asymmetric archaeal lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssefian, Sina; Rahbar, Nima; Van Dessel, Steven

    2018-05-01

    Nature employs lipids to construct nanostructured membranes that self-assemble in an aqueous environment to separate the cell interior from the exterior environment. Membrane composition changes among species and according to environmental conditions, which allows organisms to occupy a wide variety of different habitats. Lipid bilayers are phase-change materials that exhibit strong thermotropic and lyotropic phase behavior in an aqueous environment, which may also cause thermal rectification. Among different types of lipids, archaeal lipids are of great interest due to their ability to withstand extreme conditions. In this paper, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the nanostructures and thermal properties of different archaeols and to investigate thermal rectification effects in asymmetric archaeal membranes. In particular, we are interested in understanding the role of bridged phytanyl chains and cyclopentane groups in controlling the phase transition temperature and heat flow across the membrane. Our results indicate that the bridged phytanyl chains decrease the molecular packing of lipids, whereas the existence of cyclopentane rings on the tail groups increases the molecular packing by enhancing the interactions between isoprenoid chains. We found that macrocyclic archaeols have the highest thermal conductivity, whereas macrocyclic archaeols with two cyclopentane rings have the lowest. The effect of the temperature on the variation of thermal conductivity was found to be progressive. Our results further indicate that small thermal rectification effects occur in asymmetric archaeol bilayer membranes at around 25 K temperature gradient. The calculated thermal rectification factor was around 0.09 which is in the range of rectification factor obtained experimentally for nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes (0.07). Such phenomena may be of biological significance and could also be optimized for use in various engineering

  6. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...... a significant problem for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions; namely that antimicrobial peptides adsorb to surfaces of glass and plastic. Specifically, we demonstrate that under standard experimental conditions, this effect is significant for mastoparan X, melittin...... lead to inaccurate conclusions, or even completely wrong conclusions, when interpreting the FCS data. We show that, if all of the pitfalls are avoided, then FCS is a technique with a large potential for quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage of fluorescent markers from large...

  7. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degreif, Daniel; de Rond, Tristan; Bertl, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Cells modulate lipid metabolism in order to maintain membrane homeostasis. Here we use a metabolic engineering approach to manipulate the stoichiometry of fatty acid unsaturation, a regulator of cell membrane fluidity, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, reduced lipid unsaturation triggere...

  8. Role of charged lipids in membrane structures — Insight given by simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöyry, Sanja; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are the main components of cell membranes. It is becoming increasingly clear that lipids, in addition to providing an environment for proteins to work in, are in many cases also able to modulate the structure and function of those proteins. Particularly charged lipids...... to fruitful directions. In this paper, we review studies that have utilized molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the roles of charged lipids in membrane structures. We focus on lipids as active constituents of the membranes, affecting both general membrane properties as well as non-lipid membrane...

  9. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid...... aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model...

  10. On the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes: Effect of the lipid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T.; Nguyen, Trinh Q.; Dao, Uyen P. N.; Nguyen, Trang T.

    2018-02-01

    Molecular interaction between the antidepressant fluoxetine and lipid bilayers was investigated in order to provide insights into the drug's incorporation to lipid membranes. In particular, the effects of lipid's unsaturation degree and cholesterol content on the partitioning of fluoxetine into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) comprised of unsaturated 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and saturated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) were evaluated using second derivative spectrophotometry and Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). It was found that fluoxetine partitioned to a greater extent into the liquid-crystalline DOPC LUVs than into the solid-gel DPPC LUVs. The lipid physical state dependence of drug partitioning was verified by increasing the temperature in which the partition coefficient of fluoxetine significantly increased upon the change of the lipid phase from solid-gel to liquid-crystalline. The incorporation of 28 mol% cholesterol into the LUVs exerted a significant influence on the drug partitioning into both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. The ATR-FTIR study revealed that fluoxetine perturbed the conformation of DOPC more strongly than that of DPPC due to the cis-double bonds in the lipid acyl chains. Fluoxetine possibly bound to the carbonyl moiety of the lipids through the hydrogen bonding formation while displaced some water molecules surrounding the PO2- regions of the lipid head groups. Cholesterol, however, could lessen the interaction between fluoxetine and the carbonyl groups of both DOPC and DPPC LUVs. These findings provided a better understanding of the role of lipid structure and cholesterol on the interaction between fluoxetine and lipid membranes, shedding more light into the drug's therapeutic action.

  11. Single Molecule Kinetics of ENTH Binding to Lipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozovsky, Sharon [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Forstner, Martin B. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sondermann, Holger [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-04-03

    Transient recruitment of proteins to membranes is a fundamental mechanism by which the cell exerts spatial and temporal control over proteins’ localization and interactions. Thus, the specificity and the kinetics of peripheral proteins’ membrane residence are an attribute of their function. In this article, we describe the membrane interactions of the interfacial epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain with its target lipid phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2). The direct visualization and quantification of interactions of single ENTH molecules with supported lipid bilayers is achieved using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) with a time resolution of 13 ms. This enables the recording of the kinetic behavior of ENTH interacting with membranes with physiologically relevant concentrations of PtdIns(4,5)P2 despite the low effective binding affinity. Subsequent single fluorophore tracking permits us to build up distributions of residence times and to measure ENTH dissociation rates as a function of membrane composition. In addition, due to the high time resolution, we are able to resolve details of the motion of ENTH associated with a simple, homogeneous membrane. In this case ENTH’s diffusive transport appears to be the result of at least three different diffusion processes.

  12. Dynamical and structural properties of lipid membranes in relation to liposomal drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kent; Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Pedersen, Tina B.

    2001-01-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of DPPC liposomes containing lipopolymers (PEG-lipids) and charged DPPS lipids have been,studied in relation to the lipid membrane interaction of enzymes and peptides. The results suggest that both the lipid membrane structure and dynamics and in particular...

  13. Effects of pressure and electrical charge on macromolecular transport across bovine lens basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Nicholas; Cameron, Kathleen O; Groszek, Joseph J; Hofmann, Christina L; Li, Lingyan; Smith, Ross A; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Zydney, Andrew L; Fissell, William H

    2013-04-02

    Molecular transport through the basement membrane is important for a number of physiological functions, and dysregulation of basement membrane architecture can have serious pathological consequences. The structure-function relationships that govern molecular transport in basement membranes are not fully understood. The basement membrane from the lens capsule of the eye is a collagen IV-rich matrix that can easily be extracted and manipulated in vitro. As such, it provides a convenient model for studying the functional relationships that govern molecular transport in basement membranes. Here we investigate the effects of increased transmembrane pressure and solute electrical charge on the transport properties of the lens basement membrane (LBM) from the bovine eye. Pressure-permeability relationships in LBM transport were governed primarily by changes in diffusive and convective contributions to solute flux and not by pressure-dependent changes in intrinsic membrane properties. The solute electrical charge had a minimal but statistically significant effect on solute transport through the LBM that was opposite of the expected electrokinetic behavior. The observed transport characteristics of the LBM are discussed in the context of established membrane transport modeling and previous work on the effects of pressure and electrical charge in other basement membrane systems. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How membrane lipids control the 3D structure and function of receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Fantini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cohabitation of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells is controlled by specific biochemical and biophysical rules. Lipids may be either constitutively tightly bound to cell-surface receptors (non-annular lipids or less tightly attached to the external surface of the protein (annular lipids. The latter are exchangeable with surrounding bulk membrane lipids on a faster time scale than that of non-annular lipids. Not only do non-annular lipids bind to membrane proteins through stereoselective mechanisms, they can also help membrane receptors acquire (or maintain a functional 3D structure. Cholesterol is the prototype of membrane lipids that finely controls the 3D structure and function of receptors. However, several other lipids such as sphingolipids may also modulate the function of membrane proteins though conformational adjustments. All these concepts are discussed in this review in the light of representative examples taken from the literature.

  15. Lipid packing drives the segregation of transmembrane helices into disordered lipid domains in model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Lars V.; de Jong, Djurre H.; Holt, Andrea; Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; de Vries, Alex H.; Poolman, Bert; Killian, J. Antoinette; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes are comprised of multicomponent lipid and protein mixtures that exhibit a complex partitioning behavior. Regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity play a major role in the sorting and self-assembly of proteins, and their clustering into higher-order oligomers. Here, we use

  16. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10 8 –10 9 V m −1 , which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3

  17. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y., E-mail: flemming@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, IK 207 DTU, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the University of Missouri Research Reactor,University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V m{sup −1}, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1

  18. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  19. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid...... compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have...... the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic...

  20. Polymalic Acid Tritryptophan Copolymer Interacts with Lipid Membrane Resulting in Membrane Solubilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anionic polymers with membrane permeation functionalities are highly desirable for secure cytoplasmic drug delivery. We have developed tritryptophan containing copolymer (P/WWW of polymalic acid (PMLA that permeates membranes by a mechanism different from previously described PMLA copolymers of trileucine (P/LLL and leucine ethyl ester (P/LOEt that use the “barrel stave” and “carpet” mechanism, respectively. The novel mechanism leads to solubilization of membranes by forming copolymer “belts” around planar membrane “packages.” The formation of such packages is supported by results obtained from studies including size-exclusion chromatography, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence energy transfer. According to this “belt” mechanism, it is hypothesized that P/WWW first attaches to the membrane surface. Subsequently the hydrophobic tryptophan side chains translocate into the periphery and insert into the lipid bilayer thereby cutting the membrane into packages. The reaction is driven by the high affinity between the tryptophan residues and lipid side chains resulting in a stable configuration. The formation of the membrane packages requires physical agitation suggesting that the success of the translocation depends on the fluidity of the membrane. It is emphasized that the “belt” mechanism could specifically function in the recognition of abnormal cells with high membrane fluidity and in response to hyperthermia.

  1. Polymer-Induced Swelling of Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kreuzer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the interaction of charged polymers with solid-supported 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC membranes by in-situ neutron reflectivity. We observe an enormous swelling of the oligolamellar lipid bilayer stacks after incubation in solutions of poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH in D2O. The positively charged polyelectrolyte molecules interact with the lipid bilayers and induce a drastic increase in their d-spacing by a factor of ~4. Temperature, time, and pH influence the swollen interfacial lipid linings. From our study, we conclude that electrostatic interactions introduced by the adsorbed PAH are the main cause for the drastic swelling of the lipid coatings. The DMPC membrane stacks do not detach from their solid support at T > Tm. Steric interactions, also introduced by the PAH molecules, are held responsible for the stabilizing effect. We believe that this novel system offers great potential for fundamental studies of biomembrane properties, keeping the membrane’s natural fluidity and freedom, decoupled from a solid support at physiological conditions.

  2. Reorganization of plasma membrane lipid domains during conidial germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Filipa C; Fernandes, Andreia S; Antunes, Catarina A C; Moreira, Filipe P; Videira, Arnaldo; Marinho, H Susana; de Almeida, Rodrigo F M

    2017-02-01

    Neurospora crassa, a filamentous fungus, in the unicellular conidial stage has ideal features to study sphingolipid (SL)-enriched domains, which are implicated in fundamental cellular processes ranging from antifungal resistance to apoptosis. Several changes in lipid metabolism and in the membrane composition of N. crassa occur during spore germination. However, the biophysical impact of those changes is unknown. Thus, a biophysical study of N. crassa plasma membrane, particularly SL-enriched domains, and their dynamics along conidial germination is prompted. Two N. crassa strains, wild-type (WT) and slime, which is devoid of cell wall, were studied. Conidial growth of N. crassa WT from a dormancy state to an exponential phase was accompanied by membrane reorganization, namely an increase of membrane fluidity, occurring faster in a supplemented medium than in Vogel's minimal medium. Gel-like domains, likely enriched in SLs, were found in both N. crassa strains, but were particularly compact, rigid and abundant in the case of slime cells, even more than in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa, our results suggest that the melting of SL-enriched domains occurs near growth temperature (30°C) for WT, but at higher temperatures for slime. Regarding biophysical properties strongly affected by ergosterol, the plasma membrane of slime conidia lays in between those of N. crassa WT and S. cerevisiae cells. The differences in biophysical properties found in this work, and the relationships established between membrane lipid composition and dynamics, give new insights about the plasma membrane organization and structure of N. crassa strains during conidial growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel tilt-curvature coupling in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, M. Mert; Deserno, Markus

    2017-08-01

    On mesoscopic scales, lipid membranes are well described by continuum theories whose main ingredients are the curvature of a membrane's reference surface and the tilt of its lipid constituents. In particular, Hamm and Kozlov [Eur. Phys. J. E 3, 323 (2000)] have shown how to systematically derive such a tilt-curvature Hamiltonian based on the elementary assumption of a thin fluid elastic sheet experiencing internal lateral pre-stress. Performing a dimensional reduction, they not only derive the basic form of the effective surface Hamiltonian but also express its emergent elastic couplings as trans-membrane moments of lower-level material parameters. In the present paper, we argue, though, that their derivation unfortunately missed a coupling term between curvature and tilt. This term arises because, as one moves along the membrane, the curvature-induced change of transverse distances contributes to the area strain—an effect that was believed to be small but nevertheless ends up contributing at the same (quadratic) order as all other terms in their Hamiltonian. We illustrate the consequences of this amendment by deriving the monolayer and bilayer Euler-Lagrange equations for the tilt, as well as the power spectra of shape, tilt, and director fluctuations. A particularly curious aspect of our new term is that its associated coupling constant is the second moment of the lipid monolayer's lateral stress profile—which within this framework is equal to the monolayer Gaussian curvature modulus, κ¯ m. On the one hand, this implies that many theoretical predictions now contain a parameter that is poorly known (because the Gauss-Bonnet theorem limits access to the integrated Gaussian curvature); on the other hand, the appearance of κ¯ m outside of its Gaussian curvature provenance opens opportunities for measuring it by more conventional means, for instance by monitoring a membrane's undulation spectrum at short scales.

  4. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizatullina, Albina K. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shenkarev, Zakhar O. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  5. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizatullina, Albina K.; Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V.; Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V.; Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Arseniev, Alexander S.; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å 3 ). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours

  6. Bioactive Structure of Membrane Lipids and Natural Products Elucidated by a Chemistry-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Michio; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2015-08-01

    Determining the bioactive structure of membrane lipids is a new concept, which aims to examine the functions of lipids with respect to their three-dimensional structures. As lipids are dynamic by nature, their "structure" does not refer solely to a static picture but also to the local and global motions of the lipid molecules. We consider that interactions with lipids, which are completely defined by their structures, are controlled by the chemical, functional, and conformational matching between lipids and between lipid and protein. In this review, we describe recent advances in understanding the bioactive structures of membrane lipids bound to proteins and related molecules, including some of our recent results. By examining recent works on lipid-raft-related molecules, lipid-protein interactions, and membrane-active natural products, we discuss current perspectives on membrane structural biology. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Ultraviolet- and sunlight-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, T.K.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation and sunlight caused lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane (as detected by measurement of the oxidation index, A 233 /A 215 , and the amount of malondialdehyde formed) and made the membrane leaky (as revealed by the release of the trapped chromate anions). The oxidation index and the formation of malondialdehyde increased linearly with increasing dose of radiation and depended significantly on the dose rate. The effects were smaller in liposomes derived from Vibrio cholerae phospholipid than in those derived from egg lecithin. The effects of the radiation dose and dose rate on hemolysis and peroxidation (MDA formation) of the erythrocyte membrane followed a similar pattern. A direct correlation between the percentage leakage of chromate (Y) and the oxidation index (X) of the liposomal system was obtained as Y = 236.5 x X

  8. Elasto-plasticity in wrinkled polymerized lipid membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-01-15

    Biomembranes shown to behave like elastic sheets, can also suffer plastic deformations. Neutron scattering experiments on partially polymerised wrinkled membranes revealed that when a critical degree of polymerisation is crossed, the wrinkled membranes do not resume their spherical shapes. Instead they remain wrinkled and rigid while their non-polymerised counterparts resume their spherical floppy shapes. The yield stress of these membranes, measured for the first time via the fractal dimension, is intimately related to the degree of polymerisation probably through a 2D disorder that quenches the lateral diffusion of the lipid molecules. This work might shed light on the physical reason behind the irreversible deformation of echinocytes, acanthocytes and malaria infected red blood cells.

  9. Elasto-plasticity in wrinkled polymerized lipid membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Saharoui

    2014-01-01

    Biomembranes shown to behave like elastic sheets, can also suffer plastic deformations. Neutron scattering experiments on partially polymerised wrinkled membranes revealed that when a critical degree of polymerisation is crossed, the wrinkled membranes do not resume their spherical shapes. Instead they remain wrinkled and rigid while their non-polymerised counterparts resume their spherical floppy shapes. The yield stress of these membranes, measured for the first time via the fractal dimension, is intimately related to the degree of polymerisation probably through a 2D disorder that quenches the lateral diffusion of the lipid molecules. This work might shed light on the physical reason behind the irreversible deformation of echinocytes, acanthocytes and malaria infected red blood cells.

  10. A new look at lipid-membrane structure in relation to drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    1998-01-01

    Lipid-bilayer membranes are key objects in drug research in relation to (i) interaction of drugs with membrane-bound receptors, (ii) drug targeting, penetration, and permeation of cell membranes, and (iii) use of liposomes in micro-encapsulation technologies for drug delivery. Rational design...... of new drugs and drug-delivery systems therefore requries insight into the physical properties of lipid-bilayer membranes. This mini-review provides a perspective on the current view of lipid-bilayer structure and dynamics based on information obtained from a variety of recent experimental...... and theoretical studies. Special attention is paid to trans-bilayer structure, lateral molecular organization of the lipid bilayer, lipid-mediated protein assembly, and lipid-bilayer permeability. It is argued that lipids play a major role in lipid membrane-organization and functionality....

  11. Imaging lipid domains in cell membranes: the advent of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Myers Owen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The lipid bilayer of model membranes, liposomes reconstituted from cell lipids, and plasma membrane vesicles and spheres can separate into two distinct liquid phases to yield lipid domains with liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered properties. These observations are the basis of the lipid raft hypothesis that postulates the existence of cholesterol-enriched ordered-phase lipid domains in cell membranes that could regulate protein mobility, localization and interaction. Here we review the evidence that nano-scaled lipid complexes and meso-scaled lipid domains exist in cell membranes and how new fluorescence microscopy techniques that overcome the diffraction limit provide new insights into lipid organization in cell membranes.

  12. SAXS investigations on lipid membranes under osmotic stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubim, R.L.; Vieira, V.; Gerbelli, B.B.; Teixeira da Silva, E.R.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Oliveira, E.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work we, experimentally, investigate the interactions between lipid bilayers. A structural characterization is performed by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) on multilamellar systems under known osmotic pressure. Changes in the composition of membranes can modify their mechanical properties and structural parameters, like the flexibility of these membranes, which plays a key role on the determination of the tridimensional organization of bilayers. The membranes are composed of soya lecithin, where the major component is DPPC (Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine), and fatty acids are incorporated to the membrane in different concentrations, in order to turn the membrane more fluid. The membranes are inserted in a solution of PVP [poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) - 40000] and the polymer will apply an osmotic pressure on them. The osmotic pressure is controlled by preparing PVP solutions of desired composition and, as we know the concentration of polymer in solution, we can obtain the intensity of the osmotic pressure. SAXS experiments were done in order to determine the distance between the bilayer. From the position of the Bragg peaks, the lamellar periodicity (the thickness of the membranes plus their distance of separation) was determined. Using theoretical model for the form and structure factors we fitted those experimental data and determined the thickness of the membranes. The distance between the membranes was controlled by the osmotic pressure (P) applied to the membranes and, for a given pressure, we determine the distance between the bilayers (a) on equilibrium. The experimental curve P(a) is theoretically described by the different contributions from van der Waals, hydration and fluctuation forces. From the fitting of experimental curves, relevant parameters characterizing the strength of the different interactions are obtained, such as Hamaker and rigidity constant [2, 3]. We observe that the separation between the bilayers on equilibrium is

  13. Interaction pathways between soft lipid nanodiscs and plasma membranes: A molecular modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shixin; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Ren, Hao; Deng, Li; Zhang, Xianren; Huang, Fang; Yue, Tongtao

    2017-10-01

    Lipid nanodisc, a model membrane platform originally synthesized for study of membrane proteins, has recently been used as the carrier to deliver amphiphilic drugs into target tumor cells. However, the central question of how cells interact with such emerging nanomaterials remains unclear and deserves our research for both improving the delivery efficiency and reducing the side effect. In this work, a binary lipid nanodisc is designed as the minimum model to investigate its interactions with plasma membranes by using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Three typical interaction pathways, including the membrane attachment with lipid domain exchange of nanodiscs, the partial membrane wrapping with nanodisc vesiculation, and the receptor-mediated endocytosis, are discovered. For the first pathway, the boundary normal lipids acting as ligands diffuse along the nanodisc rim to gather at the membrane interface, repelling the central bola lipids to reach a stable membrane attachment. If bola lipids are positioned at the periphery and act as ligands, they diffuse to form a large aggregate being wrapped by the membrane, leaving the normal lipids exposed on the membrane exterior by assembling into a vesicle. Finally, by setting both central normal lipids and boundary bola lipids as ligands, the receptor-mediated endocytosis occurs via both deformation and self-rotation of the nanodiscs. All above pathways for soft lipid nanodiscs are quite different from those for rigid nanoparticles, which may provide useful guidelines for design of soft lipid nanodiscs in widespread biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of MLS laser radiation on cell lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Kamila; Wróbel, Dominika; Nowacka, Olga; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2018-03-14

    Authors of numerous publications have proved the therapeutic effect of laser irradiation on biological material, but the mechanisms at cellular and subcellular level are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of laser radiation emitted by the MLS M1 system (Multiwave Locked System) at two wavelengths (808 nm continuous and 905 nm pulsed) on the stability and fluidity of liposomes with a lipid composition similar to that of human erythrocyte membrane or made of phosphatidylocholine. Liposomes were exposed to low-energy laser radiation at surface densities 195 mW/cm2 (frequency 1,000 Hz) and 230 mW/cm2 (frequency 2,000 Hz). Different doses of radiation energy in the range 0-15 J were applied. The surface energy density was within the range 0.46 - 4.9 J/cm 2. The fluidity and stability of liposomes subjected to such irradiation changed depending on the parameters of radiation used. Since MLS M1 laser radiation, depending on the parameters used, affects fluidity and stability of liposomes with the lipid content similar to erythrocyte membrane, it may also cause structural and functional changes in cell membranes.

  15. Membrane lipid peroxidation by UV-A: Mechanism and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, B.; Agarwal, S.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    UV-A produced a dose-dependent linear increase of lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane, as detected by the assay of (i) conjugated dienes, (ii) lipid hydroperoxides, (iii) malondialdehydes (MDA), and (iv) the fluorescent adducts formed by the reaction of MDA with glycine and also a linear dose-dependent increase of [ 14 C]glucose efflux from the liposomes. UV-A-induced MDA production could not be inhibited by any significant degree by sodium formate, dimethyl sulfoxide, EDTA, or superoxide dismutase but was very significantly inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene, alpha-tocopherol, sodium azide, L-histidine, dimethylfuran, and beta-carotene. MDA formation increased with an increase in the D 2 O content in water, leading to a maximal amount of nearly 50% enhancement of lipid peroxidation in 100% D 2 O vis-a-vis water used as dispersion medium. The experimental findings indicate the involvement of singlet oxygen as the initiator of the UV-A-induced lipid peroxidation

  16. An ER protein functionally couples neutral lipid metabolism on lipid droplets to membrane lipid synthesis in the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markgraf, Daniel F; Klemm, Robin W; Junker, Mirco; Hannibal-Bach, Hans K; Ejsing, Christer S; Rapoport, Tom A

    2014-01-16

    Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG). During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p) facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An ER Protein Functionally Couples Neutral Lipid Metabolism on Lipid Droplets to Membrane Lipid Synthesis in the ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Markgraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells store neutral lipids such as triacylglycerol (TAG in lipid droplets (LDs. Here, we have addressed how LDs are functionally linked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We show that, in S. cerevisiae, LD growth is sustained by LD-localized enzymes. When LDs grow in early stationary phase, the diacylglycerol acyl-transferase Dga1p moves from the ER to LDs and is responsible for all TAG synthesis from diacylglycerol (DAG. During LD breakdown in early exponential phase, an ER membrane protein (Ice2p facilitates TAG utilization for membrane-lipid synthesis. Ice2p has a cytosolic domain with affinity for LDs and is required for the efficient utilization of LD-derived DAG in the ER. Ice2p breaks a futile cycle on LDs between TAG degradation and synthesis, promoting the rapid relocalization of Dga1p to the ER. Our results show that Ice2p functionally links LDs with the ER and explain how cells switch neutral lipid metabolism from storage to consumption.

  18. Fractional hereditariness of lipid membranes: Instabilities and linearized evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseri, L; Pollaci, P; Zingales, M; Dayal, K

    2016-05-01

    In this work lipid ordering phase changes arising in planar membrane bilayers is investigated both accounting for elasticity alone and for effective viscoelastic response of such assemblies. The mechanical response of such membranes is studied by minimizing the Gibbs free energy which penalizes perturbations of the changes of areal stretch and their gradients only (Deseri and Zurlo, 2013). As material instabilities arise whenever areal stretches characterizing homogeneous configurations lie inside the spinoidal zone of the free energy density, bifurcations from such configurations are shown to occur as oscillatory perturbations of the in-plane displacement. Experimental observations (Espinosa et al., 2011) show a power-law in-plane viscous behavior of lipid structures allowing for an effective viscoelastic behavior of lipid membranes, which falls in the framework of Fractional Hereditariness. A suitable generalization of the variational principle invoked for the elasticity is applied in this case, and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation is found together with a set of boundary and initial conditions. Separation of variables allows for showing how Fractional Hereditariness owes bifurcated modes with a larger number of spatial oscillations than the corresponding elastic analog. Indeed, the available range of areal stresses for material instabilities is found to increase with respect to the purely elastic case. Nevertheless, the time evolution of the perturbations solving the Euler-Lagrange equation above exhibits time-decay and the large number of spatial oscillation slowly relaxes, thereby keeping the features of a long-tail type time-response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipid Membrane Encapsulation of a 3D DNA Nano Octahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Steven D; Shih, William M

    2017-01-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology methods such as DNA origami allow for the synthesis of highly precise nanometer-scale materials (Rothemund, Nature 440:297-302, 2006; Douglas et al., Nature 459:414-418, 2009). These offer compelling advantages for biomedical applications. Such materials can suffer from structural instability in biological environments due to denaturation and nuclease digestion (Hahn et al., ACS Nano 2014; Perrault and Shih, ACS Nano 8:5132-5140, 2014). Encapsulation of DNA nanostructures in a lipid membrane compartmentalizes them from their environment and prevents denaturation and nuclease digestion (Perrault and Shih, ACS Nano 8:5132-5140, 2014). Here, we describe the encapsulation of a 50 nm DNA nanostructure having the geometry of a wireframe octahedron in a phospholipid membrane containing poly-(ethylene glycol), resulting in biocompatible DNA nanostructures.

  20. Mesoscale organization of domains in the plasma membrane - beyond the lipid raft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Stella M; Fairn, Gregory D

    2018-04-01

    The plasma membrane is compartmentalized into several distinct regions or domains, which show a broad diversity in both size and lifetime. The segregation of lipids and membrane proteins is thought to be driven by the lipid composition itself, lipid-protein interactions and diffusional barriers. With regards to the lipid composition, the immiscibility of certain classes of lipids underlies the "lipid raft" concept of plasmalemmal compartmentalization. Historically, lipid rafts have been described as cholesterol and (glyco)sphingolipid-rich regions of the plasma membrane that exist as a liquid-ordered phase that are resistant to extraction with non-ionic detergents. Over the years the interest in lipid rafts grew as did the challenges with studying these nanodomains. The term lipid raft has fallen out of favor with many scientists and instead the terms "membrane raft" or "membrane nanodomain" are preferred as they connote the heterogeneity and dynamic nature of the lipid-protein assemblies. In this article, we will discuss the classical lipid raft hypothesis and its limitations. This review will also discuss alternative models of lipid-protein interactions, annular lipid shells, and larger membrane clusters. We will also discuss the mesoscale organization of plasmalemmal domains including visible structures such as clathrin-coated pits and caveolae.

  1. No Evidence for Spontaneous Lipid Transfer at ER-PM Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merklinger, Elisa; Schloetel, Jan-Gero; Spitta, Luis; Thiele, Christoph; Lang, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Non-vesicular lipid transport steps play a crucial role in lipid trafficking and potentially include spontaneous exchange. Since membrane contact facilitates this lipid transfer, it is most likely to occur at membrane contact sites (MCS). However, to date it is unknown whether closely attached biological membranes exchange lipids spontaneously. We have set up a system for studying the exchange of lipids at MCS formed between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane. Contact sites were stably anchored and the lipids cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine (PC) were not capable of transferring spontaneously into the opposed bilayer. We conclude that physical contact between two associated biological membranes is not sufficient for transfer of the lipids PC and cholesterol.

  2. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Sheng; Yin, Guangyao; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Wong, Joseph T.Y.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium

  3. Effect of Amphotericin B antibiotic on the properties of model lipid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiryakova, S; Dencheva-Zarkova, M; Genova, J

    2014-01-01

    Model membranes formed from natural and synthetic lipids are an interesting object for scientific investigations due to their similarity to biological cell membrane and their simple structure with controlled composition and properties. Amphotericin B is an important polyene antifungal antibiotic, used for treatment of systemic fungal infections. It is known from the literature that the studied antibiotic has a substantial effect on the transmembrane ionic channel structures. When applied to the lipid membranes it has the tendency to create pores and in this way to affect the structure and the properties of the membrane lipid bilayer. In this work the thermally induced shape fluctuations of giant quasi-spherical liposomes have been used to study the influence of polyene antibiotic amphotericin B on the elastic properties of model lipid membranes. It have been shown experimentally that the presence of 3 mol % of AmB in the lipid membrane reduces the bending elasticity of the lipid membrane for both studied cases: pure SOPC membrane and mixed SOPC-Cholesterol membrane. Interaction of the amphotericin B with bilayer lipid membranes containing channels have been studied in this work. Model membranes were self-assembled using the patch-clamp and tip-dip patch clamp technique. We have found that amphotericin B is an ionophore and reduces the resistance of the lipid bilayer

  4. INTERACTION OF ALDEHYDES DERIVED FROM LIPID PEROXIDATION AND MEMBRANE PROTEINS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania ePizzimenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions.

  5. Age-dependent variation in membrane lipid synthesis in leaves of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    To study membrane lipid synthesis during the lifespan of a dicotyledon leaf, the second oldest leaf of 10-40-d-old plants of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) was labelled with [1-C- 14]acetate and the distribution of radioactivity between the major membrane lipids was followed for 3 d. In the expand......To study membrane lipid synthesis during the lifespan of a dicotyledon leaf, the second oldest leaf of 10-40-d-old plants of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) was labelled with [1-C- 14]acetate and the distribution of radioactivity between the major membrane lipids was followed for 3 d...

  6. How synthetic membrane systems contribute to the understanding of lipid-driven endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Thomas; Römer, Winfried

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic membrane systems, such as giant unilamellar vesicles and solid supported lipid bilayers, have widened our understanding of biological processes occurring at or through membranes. Artificial systems are particularly suited to study the inherent properties of membranes with regard to their components and characteristics. This review critically reflects the emerging molecular mechanism of lipid-driven endocytosis and the impact of model membrane systems in elucidating the complex interplay of biomolecules within this process. Lipid receptor clustering induced by binding of several toxins, viruses and bacteria to the plasma membrane leads to local membrane bending and formation of tubular membrane invaginations. Here, lipid shape, and protein structure and valency are the essential parameters in membrane deformation. Combining observations of complex cellular processes and their reconstitution on minimal systems seems to be a promising future approach to resolve basic underlying mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates. Effects of membrane lipid composition and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaca, C.; Ringdahl, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of lipid peroxidation has been followed in whole liver homogenates from mice using the TBA-method. Liver homogenates with different membrane fatty acid composition were obtained from mice fed diets containing different sources of fat i.e. sunflower seed oil (S), coconut oil (C) and hydrogenated lard (L). The yields of the TBA-chromophore (TBA-c) were 4 times higher in the liver homogenates S compared to C and L after 4 hour incubation at 37 0 C. Irradiation of the liver homogenates before incubation inhibited the formation of lipid peroxidation products in a dose dependent way. The catalytic capacity of the homogenates was investigated, followed as the autooxidation of cysteamine or modified by addition of the metal chelator EDTA. The rate of autooxidation of cysteamine, which is dependent on the presence of metal ions (Fe/sup 2+/ or Cu/sup 2+/), was decreased with increasing dose, thus indicating an alteration in the availability of metal catalysts in the system. The addition of Fe/sup 2+/ to the system restored the lipid peroxidation yields in the irradiated systems and the presence of EDTA inhibited the formation of lipid peroxidation products in all three dietary groups. It is suggested that irradiation alters the catalytic activity needed in the autooxidation processes of polyunsaturated fatty acids

  8. Changes induced to eye lens membrane characterization after treatments with beta radiation from Sr90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Refaei, F.M.; Morris, M.; Gamal, M.M.; Fadel, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The effect of β-particles on Na + and k + content, Na + -k + ATPase and histopathological changes of cell membrane were studied in the present work. One of the two eyes of New Zealand rabbits from both sexes were irradiated with β-particles from Sr 90 source to 10, 20, 40 and 60 Gy. The effect of β-particles on lens membrane after 3 months of exposure to 20 and 60 Gy was also studied. The results indicated that the treated and untreated eyes suffered pronounced injuries which deduced from the distribution of ATPase in comparison with the normal control which showed a decrease (reached 52%). As well as uncontrolled transport of the Na + and k + through the membrane and injuries appeared in the histopathological studies. (author). 12 refs, 15 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Rotavirus RRV associates with lipid membrane microdomains during cell entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa, Pavel; Realpe, Mauricio; Romero, Pedro; Lopez, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2004-01-01

    Rotavirus cell entry is a multistep process, not completely understood, which requires at least four interactions between the virus and cell surface molecules. In this work, we investigated the role of the sphingolipid- and cholesterol-enriched lipid microdomains (rafts) in the entry of rotavirus strain RRV to MA104 cells. We found that ganglioside GM1, integrin subunits α2 and β3, and the heat shock cognate protein 70 (hsc70), all of which have been implicated as rotavirus receptors, are associated with TX-100 and Lubrol WX detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Integrin subunits α2 and β3 were found to be particularly enriched in DRMs resistant to lysis by Lubrol WX. When purified RRV particles were incubated with cells at 4 deg. C, about 10% of the total infectious virus was found associated with DRMs, and the DRM-associated virus increased to 37% in Lubrol-resistant membrane domains after 60-min incubation at 37 deg. C. The virus was excluded from DRMs if the cells were treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Immunoblot analysis of the viral proteins showed that the virus surface proteins became enriched in DRMs upon incubation at 37 deg. C, being almost exclusively localized in Lubrol-resistant DRMs after 60 min. These data suggest that detergent-resistant membrane domains play an important role in the cell entry of rotaviruses, which could provide a platform to facilitate the efficient interaction of the rotavirus receptors with the virus particle

  10. Efficient replacement of plasma membrane outer leaflet phospholipids and sphingolipids in cells with exogenous lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangtao; Kim, JiHyun; Huang, Zhen; St Clair, Johnna R; Brown, Deborah A; London, Erwin

    2016-12-06

    Our understanding of membranes and membrane lipid function has lagged far behind that of nucleic acids and proteins, largely because it is difficult to manipulate cellular membrane lipid composition. To help solve this problem, we show that methyl-α-cyclodextrin (MαCD)-catalyzed lipid exchange can be used to maximally replace the sphingolipids and phospholipids in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of living mammalian cells with exogenous lipids, including unnatural lipids. In addition, lipid exchange experiments revealed that 70-80% of cell sphingomyelin resided in the plasma membrane outer leaflet; the asymmetry of metabolically active cells was similar to that previously defined for erythrocytes, as judged by outer leaflet lipid composition; and plasma membrane outer leaflet phosphatidylcholine had a significantly lower level of unsaturation than phosphatidylcholine in the remainder of the cell. The data also provided a rough estimate for the total cellular lipids residing in the plasma membrane (about half). In addition to such lipidomics applications, the exchange method should have wide potential for investigations of lipid function and modification of cellular behavior by modification of lipids.

  11. Lipid recognition propensities of amino acids in membrane proteins from atomic resolution data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Mizuki; Katta, AVSK Mohan; Ahmad, Shandar; Mori, Takaharu; Sugita, Yuji; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Protein-lipid interactions play essential roles in the conformational stability and biological functions of membrane proteins. However, few of the previous computational studies have taken into account the atomic details of protein-lipid interactions explicitly. To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of the recognition of lipid molecules by membrane proteins, we investigated amino acid propensities in membrane proteins for interacting with the head and tail groups of lipid molecules. We observed a common pattern of lipid tail-amino acid interactions in two different data sources, crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. These interactions are largely explained by general lipophilicity, whereas the preferences for lipid head groups vary among individual proteins. We also found that membrane and water-soluble proteins utilize essentially an identical set of amino acids for interacting with lipid head and tail groups. We showed that the lipophilicity of amino acid residues determines the amino acid preferences for lipid tail groups in both membrane and water-soluble proteins, suggesting that tightly-bound lipid molecules and lipids in the annular shell interact with membrane proteins in a similar manner. In contrast, interactions between lipid head groups and amino acids showed a more variable pattern, apparently constrained by each protein's specific molecular function

  12. Lipid recognition propensities of amino acids in membrane proteins from atomic resolution data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Mizuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-lipid interactions play essential roles in the conformational stability and biological functions of membrane proteins. However, few of the previous computational studies have taken into account the atomic details of protein-lipid interactions explicitly. Results To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of the recognition of lipid molecules by membrane proteins, we investigated amino acid propensities in membrane proteins for interacting with the head and tail groups of lipid molecules. We observed a common pattern of lipid tail-amino acid interactions in two different data sources, crystal structures and molecular dynamics simulations. These interactions are largely explained by general lipophilicity, whereas the preferences for lipid head groups vary among individual proteins. We also found that membrane and water-soluble proteins utilize essentially an identical set of amino acids for interacting with lipid head and tail groups. Conclusions We showed that the lipophilicity of amino acid residues determines the amino acid preferences for lipid tail groups in both membrane and water-soluble proteins, suggesting that tightly-bound lipid molecules and lipids in the annular shell interact with membrane proteins in a similar manner. In contrast, interactions between lipid head groups and amino acids showed a more variable pattern, apparently constrained by each protein's specific molecular function.

  13. Hydrostatic pressure decreases membrane fluidity and lipid desaturase expression in chondrocyte progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Kevin; Uchiyama, Hiroki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Ushida, Takashi

    2014-01-22

    Membrane biomechanical properties are critical in modulating nutrient and metabolite exchange as well as signal transduction. Biological membranes are predominantly composed of lipids, cholesterol and proteins, and their fluidity is tightly regulated by cholesterol and lipid desaturases. To determine whether such membrane fluidity regulation occurred in mammalian cells under pressure, we investigated the effects of pressure on membrane lipid order of mouse chondrogenic ATDC5 cells and desaturase gene expression. Hydrostatic pressure linearly increased membrane lipid packing and simultaneously repressed lipid desaturase gene expression. We also showed that cholesterol mimicked and cholesterol depletion reversed those effects, suggesting that desaturase gene expression was controlled by the membrane physical state itself. This study demonstrates a new effect of hydrostatic pressure on mammalian cells and may help to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in hydrostatic pressure sensing in chondrocytes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Shiga toxin induces membrane reorganization and formation of long range lipid order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovyeva, Vita; Johannes, Ludger; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2015-01-01

    membrane reordering. When Shiga toxin was added above the lipid chain melting temperature, the toxin interaction with the membrane induced rearrangement and clustering of Gb3 lipids that resulted in the long range order and alignment of lipids in gel domains. The toxin induced redistribution of Gb3 lipids...... inside gel domains is governed by the temperature at which Shiga toxin was added to the membrane: above or below the phase transition. The temperature is thus one of the critical factors controlling lipid organization and texture in the presence of Shiga toxin. Lipid chain ordering imposed by Shiga toxin...... binding can be another factor driving the reconstruction of lipid organization and crystallization of lipids inside gel domains....

  15. The membrane stress response buffers lethal effects of lipid disequilibrium by reprogramming the protein homeostasis network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Guillaume; Shui, Guanghou; Kim, Woong; McAlister, Graeme C; Ismail, Nurzian; Gygi, Steven P; Wenk, Markus R; Ng, Davis T W

    2012-10-12

    Lipid composition can differ widely among organelles and even between leaflets of a membrane. Lipid homeostasis is critical because disequilibrium can have disease outcomes. Despite their importance, mechanisms maintaining lipid homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we establish a model system to study the global effects of lipid imbalance. Quantitative lipid profiling was integral to monitor changes to lipid composition and for system validation. Applying global transcriptional and proteomic analyses, a dramatically altered biochemical landscape was revealed from adaptive cells. The resulting composite regulation we term the "membrane stress response" (MSR) confers compensation, not through restoration of lipid composition, but by remodeling the protein homeostasis network. To validate its physiological significance, we analyzed the unfolded protein response (UPR), one facet of the MSR and a key regulator of protein homeostasis. We demonstrate that the UPR maintains protein biogenesis, quality control, and membrane integrity-functions otherwise lethally compromised in lipid dysregulated cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstitution of a Kv channel into lipid membranes for structural and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsoo; Zheng, Hui; Shi, Liang; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-07-13

    To study the lipid-protein interaction in a reductionistic fashion, it is necessary to incorporate the membrane proteins into membranes of well-defined lipid composition. We are studying the lipid-dependent gating effects in a prototype voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, and have worked out detailed procedures to reconstitute the channels into different membrane systems. Our reconstitution procedures take consideration of both detergent-induced fusion of vesicles and the fusion of protein/detergent micelles with the lipid/detergent mixed micelles as well as the importance of reaching an equilibrium distribution of lipids among the protein/detergent/lipid and the detergent/lipid mixed micelles. Our data suggested that the insertion of the channels in the lipid vesicles is relatively random in orientations, and the reconstitution efficiency is so high that no detectable protein aggregates were seen in fractionation experiments. We have utilized the reconstituted channels to determine the conformational states of the channels in different lipids, record electrical activities of a small number of channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers, screen for conformation-specific ligands from a phage-displayed peptide library, and support the growth of 2D crystals of the channels in membranes. The reconstitution procedures described here may be adapted for studying other membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, especially for the investigation of the lipid effects on the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels.

  17. Fluorescent Lipids: Functional Parts of Fusogenic Liposomes and Tools for Cell Membrane Labeling and Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kleusch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a rapid and highly efficient method for controlled incorporation of fluorescent lipids into living mammalian cells is introduced. Here, the fluorescent molecules have two consecutive functions: First, they trigger rapid membrane fusion between cellular plasma membranes and the lipid bilayers of their carrier particles, so called fusogenic liposomes, and second, after insertion into cellular membranes these molecules enable fluorescence imaging of cell membranes and membrane traffic processes. We tested the fluorescent derivatives of the following essential membrane lipids for membrane fusion: Ceramide, sphingomyelin, phosphocholine, phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate, ganglioside, cholesterol, and cholesteryl ester. Our results show that all probed lipids could more efficiently be incorporated into the plasma membrane of living cells than by using other methods. Moreover, labeling occurred in a gentle manner under classical cell culture conditions reducing cellular stress responses. Staining procedures were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and it was observed that sphingolipids and cholesterol containing free hydroxyl groups exhibit a decreased distribution velocity as well as a longer persistence in the plasma membrane compared to lipids without hydroxyl groups like phospholipids or other artificial lipid analogs. After membrane staining, the fluorescent molecules were sorted into membranes of cell organelles according to their chemical properties and biological functions without any influence of the delivery system.

  18. Mechanism for translocation of fluoroquinolones across lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramariuc, O.; Rog, T.; Javanainen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Classical atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations, constrained free energy calculations, and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are employed to study the diffusive translocation of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) across lipid membranes. CPFX is considered here as a representative of the fluoroquinolone...... antibiotics class. Neutral and zwitterionic CPFX coexist at physiological pH, with the latter being predominant. Simulations reveal that only the neutral form permeates the bilayer, and it does so through a novel mechanism that involves dissolution of concerted stacks of zwitterionic ciprofloxacins....... Subsequent QM analysis of the observed molecular stacking shows the important role of partial charge neutralization in the stacks, highlighting how the zwitterionic form of the drug is neutralized for translocation. The findings propose a translocation mechanism in which zwitterionic CPFX molecules approach...

  19. Membrane Curvature and Lipid Composition Synergize To Regulate N-Ras Anchor Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik B.; Kennard, Celeste; Pedersen, Søren L.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins anchored to membranes through covalently linked fatty acids and/or isoprenoid groups play crucial roles in all forms of life. Sorting and trafficking of lipidated proteins has traditionally been discussed in the context of partitioning to membrane domains of different lipid composition. We...

  20. Engineering lipid structure for recognition of the liquid ordered membrane phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordovsky, Stefan S.; Wong, Christopher S.; Bachand, George D.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    The selective partitioning of lipid components in phase-separated membranes is essential for domain formation involved in cellular processes. Identifying and tracking the movement of lipids in cellular systems would be improved if we understood how to achieve selective affinity between fluorophore-labeled lipids and membrane assemblies. Furthermore, we investigated the structure and chemistry of membrane lipids to evaluate lipid designs that partition to the liquid ordered (L_o) phase. A range of fluorophores at the headgroup position and lengths of PEG spacer between the lipid backbone and fluorophore were examined. On a lipid body with saturated palmityl or palmitoyl tails, we found that although the lipid tails can direct selective partitioning to the L_o phase through favorable packing interactions, headgroup hydrophobicity can override the partitioning behavior and direct the lipid to the disordered membrane phase (L_d). The PEG spacer can serve as a buffer to mute headgroup–membrane interactions and thus improve L_o phase partitioning, but its effect is limited with strongly hydrophobic fluorophore headgroups. We present a series of lipid designs leading to the development of novel fluorescently labeled lipids with selective affinity for the L_o phase.

  1. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Lenz, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model

  2. Membrane-lipid therapy: A historical perspective of membrane-targeted therapies - From lipid bilayer structure to the pathophysiological regulation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    Our current understanding of membrane lipid composition, structure and functions has led to the investigation of their role in cell signaling, both in healthy and pathological cells. As a consequence, therapies based on the regulation of membrane lipid composition and structure have been recently developed. This novel field, known as Membrane Lipid Therapy, is growing and evolving rapidly, providing treatments that are now in use or that are being studied for their application to oncological disorders, Alzheimer's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and neuropathic pain. This field has arisen from relevant discoveries on the behavior of membranes in recent decades, and it paves the way to adopt new approaches in modern pharmacology and nutrition. This innovative area will promote further investigation into membranes and the development of new therapies with molecules that target the cell membrane. Due to the prominent roles of membranes in the cells' physiology and the paucity of therapeutic approaches based on the regulation of the lipids they contain, it is expected that membrane lipid therapy will provide new treatments for numerous pathologies. The first on-purpose rationally designed molecule in this field, minerval, is currently being tested in clinical trials and it is expected to enter the market around 2020. However, it seems feasible that during the next few decades other membrane regulators will also be marketed for the treatment of human pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Structural properties of lipid reconstructs and lipid composition of normotensive and hypertensive rat vascular smooth muscle cell membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cell membrane alterations have been reported to be the cause of various forms of hypertension. The present study focuses on the lipid portion of the membranes, characterizing the microviscosity of membranes reconstituted with lipids extracted from the aorta and mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and normotensive control rat strains (WKY and NWR. Membrane-incorporated phospholipid spin labels were used to monitor the bilayer structure at different depths. The packing of lipids extracted from both aorta and mesenteric arteries of normotensive and hypertensive rats was similar. Lipid extract analysis showed similar phospholipid composition for all membranes. However, cholesterol content was lower in SHR arteries than in normotensive animal arteries. These findings contrast with the fact that the SHR aorta is hyporeactive while the SHR mesenteric artery is hyperreactive to vasopressor agents when compared to the vessels of normotensive animal strains. Hence, factors other than microviscosity of bulk lipids contribute to the vascular smooth muscle reactivity and hypertension of SHR. The excess cholesterol in the arteries of normotensive animal strains apparently is not dissolved in bulk lipids and is not directly related to vascular reactivity since it is present in both the aorta and mesenteric arteries. The lower cholesterol concentrations in SHR arteries may in fact result from metabolic differences due to the hypertensive state or to genes that co-segregate with those that determine hypertension during the process of strain selection.

  4. Ionic protein-lipid interaction at the plasma membrane: what can the charge do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lunyi; Shi, Xiaoshan; Guo, Xingdong; Li, Hua; Xu, Chenqi

    2014-03-01

    Phospholipids are the major components of cell membranes, but they have functional roles beyond forming lipid bilayers. In particular, acidic phospholipids form microdomains in the plasma membrane and can ionically interact with proteins via polybasic sequences, which can have functional consequences for the protein. The list of proteins regulated by ionic protein-lipid interaction has been quickly expanding, and now includes membrane proteins, cytoplasmic soluble proteins, and viral proteins. Here we review how acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane regulate protein structure and function via ionic interactions, and how Ca(2+) regulates ionic protein-lipid interactions via direct and indirect mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. First integrals of the axisymmetric shape equation of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Heng; McDargh, Zachary; Tu, Zhan-Chun

    2018-03-01

    The shape equation of lipid membranes is a fourth-order partial differential equation. Under the axisymmetric condition, this equation was transformed into a second-order ordinary differential equation (ODE) by Zheng and Liu (Phys. Rev. E 48 2856 (1993)). Here we try to further reduce this second-order ODE to a first-order ODE. First, we invert the usual process of variational calculus, that is, we construct a Lagrangian for which the ODE is the corresponding Euler–Lagrange equation. Then, we seek symmetries of this Lagrangian according to the Noether theorem. Under a certain restriction on Lie groups of the shape equation, we find that the first integral only exists when the shape equation is identical to the Willmore equation, in which case the symmetry leading to the first integral is scale invariance. We also obtain the mechanical interpretation of the first integral by using the membrane stress tensor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274046) and the National Science Foundation of the United States (Grant No. 1515007).

  6. The effect of EGb 761 on retinal lipid peroxidation and glutathione peroxidase level in experimental lens induced uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, A; Aricioğlu, A; Bilgihan, K; Onol, M; Hasanreisoğlu, B; Türközkan, N

    1994-01-01

    An acute lens-induced necrotizing intraocular inflammation was produced in pigmented guinea pigs. Treatment of these animals by 100 mg/kg/day EGb 761 a free oxygen radical scavenger for 10 days, reduced retinal lipid peroxidation (p > 0.05) and increased the retinal glutathione peroxidase level (p > 0.05). Although not significantly, these findings suggest that EGb 761 could be combined with other antiinflammatory drugs and may be beneficial in the treatment of uveitis.

  7. Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wallace

    Full Text Available The crystallization of membrane proteins in amphiphile-rich materials such as lipidic cubic phases is an established methodology in many structural biology laboratories. The standard procedure employed with this methodology requires the generation of a highly viscous lipidic material by mixing lipid, for instance monoolein, with a solution of the detergent solubilized membrane protein. This preparation is often carried out with specialized mixing tools that allow handling of the highly viscous materials while minimizing dead volume to save precious membrane protein sample. The processes that occur during the initial mixing of the lipid with the membrane protein are not well understood. Here we show that the formation of the lipidic phases and the incorporation of the membrane protein into such materials can be separated experimentally. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different initial monoolein-based lipid phase states on the crystallization behavior of the colored photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We find that the detergent solubilized photosynthetic reaction center spontaneously inserts into and concentrates in the lipid matrix without any mixing, and that the initial lipid material phase state is irrelevant for productive crystallization. A substantial in-situ enrichment of the membrane protein to concentration levels that are otherwise unobtainable occurs in a thin layer on the surface of the lipidic material. These results have important practical applications and hence we suggest a simplified protocol for membrane protein crystallization within amphiphile rich materials, eliminating any specialized mixing tools to prepare crystallization experiments within lipidic cubic phases. Furthermore, by virtue of sampling a membrane protein concentration gradient within a single crystallization experiment, this crystallization technique is more robust and increases the efficiency of identifying productive

  8. Refractive changes after lens-sparing vitrectomy for macular hole and epiretinal membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto T

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tetsuya Muto,1 Tomoharu Nishimura,1 Takefumi Yamaguchi,2 Makoto Chikuda,1 Shigeki Machida1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Dokkyo Medical University Koshigaya Hospital, Koshigaya, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College Ichikawa General Hospital, Ichikawa, Japan Purpose: Cataract progression after lens-sparing vitrectomy might differ according to original posterior segment diseases. Our objective was to analyze the refractive values after lens-sparing vitrectomy for macular hole (MH and epiretinal membrane (ERM. Materials and methods: We reviewed the medical records of 25 MH patients (25 eyes and 23 ERM patients (23 eyes who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Refractive changes in both groups were compared. All patients underwent 20-gauge three-port pars plana vitrectomy. Fluid–air exchange was performed during vitrectomy only in the MH group. The results were analyzed using the unpaired t-test, chi-square test, or Fisher exact probability test, and multivariate analysis. Results: There were no significant differences in the patient’s age (P=0.45. The myopia progression rate (D/month was higher in the MH group after surgery than that in the ERM group (P=0.035. MH group had more females (P=0.043, longer surgical time (P<0.001, and higher frequencies of surgical adjuvants use (triamcinolone acetonide, P=0.019; brilliant blue G, P<0.001. The myopia progression rate in the MH group (R=0.568, P<0.001 correlated with female gender. However, no correlation was observed between longer surgical time and the use of surgical adjuvants. Conclusion: The rate of myopia progression was higher in the MH group. Fluid–air exchange and gender may affect the rate of myopia progression. Keywords: cataract, vitrectomy, macular hole, epiretinal membrane

  9. Membrane interaction of antimicrobial peptides using E. coli lipid extract as model bacterial cell membranes and SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soblosky, Lauren; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are used as a convenient model cell membrane system to study biologically important molecule-lipid interactions in situ. However, the lipid bilayer models are often simple and the acquired results with these models may not provide all pertinent information related to a real cell membrane. In this work, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular-level interactions between the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) MSI-594, ovispirin-1 G18, magainin 2 and a simple 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (dDPPG)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) bilayer. We compared such interactions to those between the AMPs and a more complex dDPPG/Escherichia coli (E. coli) polar lipid extract bilayer. We show that to fully understand more complex aspects of peptide-bilayer interaction, such as interaction kinetics, a heterogeneous lipid composition is required, such as the E. coli polar lipid extract. The discrepancy in peptide-bilayer interaction is likely due in part to the difference in bilayer charge between the two systems since highly negative charged lipids can promote more favorable electrostatic interactions between the peptide and lipid bilayer. Results presented in this paper indicate that more complex model bilayers are needed to accurately analyze peptide-cell membrane interactions and demonstrates the importance of using an appropriate lipid composition to study AMP interaction properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Amniotic membrane welded to contact lens by 1470-nm diode laser:a novel method for sutureless amniotic membrane transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Rasier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To avoid the side effects of the suture usage by welding amniotic membrane (AM to contact lens (CL with laser.METHODS:AM was taken from pregnant women and cleaned from blood clots with sterile phosphate-buffered physiological saline solution which included antibiotics. Stromal side of the AM was spread inside of the CL and it was welded to CL by 1470 nm diode laser. 600 μm diameter fiber tip of the laser was contacted with the epithelial side of the AM from 4 separate points. After welding excess amniotic membrane around the CL was cut with a scalpel.RESULTS:Stromal side of the AM was spread inside of the CL and then with laser fiber, different power levels and exposure times were applied on the epithelium of AM and 340 mW for seven seconds was found optimal. CL and AM attached with the spot welding effect in 4 points by touching fiber tip. CL-AM welded complex did not separated from each other while holding AM that extend beyond the CL with the help of two forceps.CONCLUSION:As a conclusion, it was aimed in this study to achieve the success of the conventional amniotic membrane transplantation (AMTwith the easiness of applying a CL and to avoid risks and side effects of corneal or conjunctival suturing. The results showed that the application of the CL–AM complex will be as easy as the application of a CL and lasts shortly.

  11. Changes in lipid membrane mechanics induced by di- and tri-phenyltins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybyło, Magda; Drabik, Dominik; Szostak, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    properties of biological membranes. It was found that the membrane/water partition coefficient equals 4, a value significantly higher than octanol/water partition coefficient. In addition, the effect of di- and tri-phenyltin chlorides on the mechanics of model lipid membranes was measured for the first time...

  12. Yeast lipids can phase separate into micrometer-scale membrane domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Christian; Ejsing, Christer S; Garcia-Saez, Ana J

    2010-01-01

    The lipid raft concept proposes that biological membranes have the potential to form functional domains based on a selective interaction between sphingolipids and sterols. These domains seem to be involved in signal transduction and vesicular sorting of proteins and lipids. Although there is bioc......The lipid raft concept proposes that biological membranes have the potential to form functional domains based on a selective interaction between sphingolipids and sterols. These domains seem to be involved in signal transduction and vesicular sorting of proteins and lipids. Although...... there is biochemical evidence for lipid raft-dependent protein and lipid sorting in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, direct evidence for an interaction between yeast sphingolipids and the yeast sterol ergosterol, resulting in membrane domain formation, is lacking. Here we show that model membranes formed from yeast...... total lipid extracts possess an inherent self-organization potential resulting in Ld-Lo phase coexistence at physiologically relevant temperature. Analyses of lipid extracts from mutants defective in sphingolipid metabolism as well as reconstitution of purified yeast lipids in model membranes of defined...

  13. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    whose lipid composition and transmembrane distribution are to a large extent consistent with real plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells. To this end, we use a model system which comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The simulations...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment...

  14. Membrane proteins bind lipids selectively to modulate their structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Allison, Timothy M; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Baldwin, Andrew J; Robinson, Carol V

    2014-06-05

    Previous studies have established that the folding, structure and function of membrane proteins are influenced by their lipid environments and that lipids can bind to specific sites, for example, in potassium channels. Fundamental questions remain however regarding the extent of membrane protein selectivity towards lipids. Here we report a mass spectrometry approach designed to determine the selectivity of lipid binding to membrane protein complexes. We investigate the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and aquaporin Z (AqpZ) and the ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli, using ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which reports gas-phase collision cross-sections. We demonstrate that folded conformations of membrane protein complexes can exist in the gas phase. By resolving lipid-bound states, we then rank bound lipids on the basis of their ability to resist gas phase unfolding and thereby stabilize membrane protein structure. Lipids bind non-selectively and with high avidity to MscL, all imparting comparable stability; however, the highest-ranking lipid is phosphatidylinositol phosphate, in line with its proposed functional role in mechanosensation. AqpZ is also stabilized by many lipids, with cardiolipin imparting the most significant resistance to unfolding. Subsequently, through functional assays we show that cardiolipin modulates AqpZ function. Similar experiments identify AmtB as being highly selective for phosphatidylglycerol, prompting us to obtain an X-ray structure in this lipid membrane-like environment. The 2.3 Å resolution structure, when compared with others obtained without lipid bound, reveals distinct conformational changes that re-position AmtB residues to interact with the lipid bilayer. Our results demonstrate that resistance to unfolding correlates with specific lipid-binding events, enabling a distinction to be made between lipids that merely bind from those that modulate membrane

  15. Phospatidylserine or ganglioside--which of anionic lipids determines the effect of cationic dextran on lipid membrane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Cetnar, Andrzej; Włodarczyk, Grzegorz

    2015-02-01

    In this work the influence of cationic polymer, namely diethylaminoethyl DEAE-dextran on model lipid membranes was investigated. This polymer is of a wide application as a biomaterial and a drug carrier and its cytotoxicity toward various cancer cells was also confirmed. It was suggested that anticancer effect of cationic dextran is connected with the binding of the polymer to the negatively charged sialic acid residues overexpressed in cancer membrane. This fact encouraged us to perform the studies aimed at verifying whether the effect of cationic DEAE-dextran on membrane is determined only by the presence of the negatively charged lipid in the system or the kind of anionic lipid is also important. To reach this goal systematic investigations on the effect of dextran on various one-component lipid monolayers and multicomponent hepatoma cell model membranes differing in the level and the kind of anionic lipids (phosphatidylserine, sialic acid-containing ganglioside GM3 or their mixture) were done. As evidenced the results the effect of DEAE-dextran on the model system is determined by anionic lipid-polymer electrostatic interactions. However, the magnitude of the effect of cationic polymer is strongly dependent on the kind of anionic lipid in the model system. Namely, the packing and ordering of the mixtures containing ganglioside GM3 were more affected by DEAE-dextran than phosphatidylserine-containing monolayers. Although the experiments were done on model systems and therefore further studies are highly needed, the collected data may indicate that ganglioside may be important in the differentiation of the effect of cationic dextran on membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lipid raft localization of TLR2 and its co-receptors is independent of membrane lipid composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hellwing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Toll like receptors (TLRs are an important and evolutionary conserved class of pattern recognition receptors associated with innate immunity. The recognition of Gram-positive cell wall constituents strongly depends on TLR2. In order to be functional, TLR2 predominantly forms a heterodimer with TLR1 or TLR6 within specialized membrane microdomains, the lipid rafts. The membrane lipid composition and the physicochemical properties of lipid rafts are subject to modification by exogenous fatty acids. Previous investigations of our group provide evidence that macrophage enrichment with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA induces a reordering of lipid rafts and non-rafts based on the incorporation of supplemented PUFA as well as their elongation and desaturation products. Methods In the present study we investigated potential constraining effects of membrane microdomain reorganization on the clustering of TLR2 with its co-receptors TLR1 and TLR6 within lipid rafts. To this end, RAW264.7 macrophages were supplemented with either docosahexaenoic acid (DHA or arachidonic acid (AA and analyzed for receptor expression and microdomain localization in context of TLR stimulation. Results and Conclusions Our analyses showed that receptor levels and microdomain localization were unchanged by PUFA supplementation. The TLR2 pathway, in contrast to the TLR4 signaling cascade, is not affected by exogenous PUFA at the membrane level.

  18. Chemotherapy drugs form ion pores in membranes due to physical interactions with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Duszyk, Marek; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the effects on membrane of the tubulin-binding chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside and taxol. Electrophysiology recordings across lipid membranes in aqueous phases containing drugs were used to investigate the drug effects on membrane conductance. Molecular dynamics simulation of the chemotherapy drug-lipid complexes was used to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level. Both drugs are observed to induce stable ion-flowing pores across membranes. Discrete pore current-time plots exhibit triangular conductance events in contrast to rectangular ones found for ion channels. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that drugs and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short periods of time when found within each other's proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides and lipids due to mainly their charge properties while forming peptide-induced ion channels in lipid bilayers. Experimental and in silico studies together suggest that the chemotherapy drugs induce ion pores inside lipid membranes due to drug-lipid physical interactions. The findings reveal cytotoxic effects of drugs on the cell membrane, which may aid in novel drug development for treatment of cancer and other diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Extended synaptotagmins are Ca2+-dependent lipid transfer proteins at membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haijia; Liu, Yinghui; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Paine, Alex; Rathore, Shailendra S; Shen, Jingshi

    2016-04-19

    Organelles are in constant communication with each other through exchange of proteins (mediated by trafficking vesicles) and lipids [mediated by both trafficking vesicles and lipid transfer proteins (LTPs)]. It has long been known that vesicle trafficking can be tightly regulated by the second messenger Ca(2+), allowing membrane protein transport to be adjusted according to physiological demands. However, it remains unclear whether LTP-mediated lipid transport can also be regulated by Ca(2+) In this work, we show that extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), poorly understood membrane proteins at endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites, are Ca(2+)-dependent LTPs. Using both recombinant and endogenous mammalian proteins, we discovered that E-Syts transfer glycerophospholipids between membrane bilayers in the presence of Ca(2+) E-Syts use their lipid-accommodating synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid binding protein (SMP) domains to transfer lipids. However, the SMP domains themselves cannot transport lipids unless the two membranes are tightly tethered by Ca(2+)-bound C2 domains. Strikingly, the Ca(2+)-regulated lipid transfer activity of E-Syts was fully recapitulated when the SMP domain was fused to the cytosolic domain of synaptotagmin-1, the Ca(2+)sensor in synaptic vesicle fusion, indicating that a common mechanism of membrane tethering governs the Ca(2+)regulation of lipid transfer and vesicle fusion. Finally, we showed that microsomal vesicles isolated from mammalian cells contained robust Ca(2+)-dependent lipid transfer activities, which were mediated by E-Syts. These findings established E-Syts as a novel class of LTPs and showed that LTP-mediated lipid trafficking, like vesicular transport, can be subject to tight Ca(2+)regulation.

  20. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  1. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: from rafts to submicrometric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-01-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicholson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decade, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (> min vs sec) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryotes to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution. PMID:26738447

  2. Biosynthesis of membrane lipids of thermophilic archaebacteria and its implication to early evolution of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Tairo

    1995-01-01

    The unit lipid of cell membranes of archaebacteria is unique ether lipids, O-dialkylated glycerol with a polar head group at sn-1 position. The chirality of glycerol moiety of the lipids is opposite to that of other kingdoms. The hydrophobic potion consists of saturated C 20 isoprenoid hydrocarbon backbone and is connected to glycerol by an ether linkage. In addition, cell membrane of some of thermophilic archaebacteria are monolayer (in stead of bilayer) of tetraether lipids in which both tails of hydrocarbon chains of two diether lipids are covalently connected in a tail-to-tail fashion. Although the host cell from which contemporary eukaryotes have been derived by endosymbiosis, is speculated to be an archaebacterium, the unique ether lipids raised a serious question to the idea of archabacterial origin of eukaryote cells; why the unique ether lipids are not used to construct cytoplasmic membranes of eukaryotes? The author and his colleagues have studied biosynthesis of membrane liquids of two thermo-acidophilic archaebacteria, Thermoplasma and Sulfolobus. It was found that origins of stereospecificity of glycerol moiety of archaebacterial ether lipids differs form species to species. In Sulfolobus sn-glycerol-1-phosphate (the abnormal isomer of glycerol phosphate) seems to be directly synthesized from glycerol, whereas in Halobacterium stereospecificity of glycerol phosphate is inverted during the lipid synthesis. Recently we found that specific inhibitors for eukaryotes squalene epoxidase inhibit the condensation of diether lipids to tetraether lipids in cell-free extracts of these thermophilic archaebacteria. The results suggest evolutionary implication of archaebacterial tetraether condensing enzyme to eukaryote sterol biosynthesis. Relationships between chemical structures of membrane lipids and early evolution of life will be discussed. (author). Abstract only

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of T-Cell Lipid Metabolism: Implications for Plasma Membrane Lipid Rafts and T-Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Robinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that cholesterol and glycosphingolipids are enriched in the plasma membrane (PM and form signaling platforms called lipid rafts, essential for T-cell activation and function. Moreover, changes in PM lipid composition affect the biophysical properties of lipid rafts and have a role in defining functional T-cell phenotypes. Here, we review the role of transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism including liver X receptors α/β, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, estrogen receptors α/β (ERα/β, and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins in T-cells. These receptors lie at the interface between lipid metabolism and immune cell function and are endogenously activated by lipids and/or hormones. Importantly, they regulate cellular cholesterol, fatty acid, glycosphingolipid, and phospholipid levels but are also known to modulate a broad spectrum of immune responses. The current evidence supporting a role for lipid metabolism pathways in controlling immune cell activation by influencing PM lipid raft composition in health and disease, and the potential for targeting lipid biosynthesis pathways to control unwanted T-cell activation in autoimmunity is reviewed.

  4. Lipids in the Assembly of Membrane Proteins and Organization of Protein Supercomplexes: Implications for Lipid-Linked Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Dowhan, William

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play important roles in cellular dysfunction leading to disease. Although a major role for phospholipids is in defining the membrane permeability barrier, phospholipids play a central role in a diverse range of cellular processes and therefore are important factors in cellular dysfunction and disease. This review is focused on the role of phospholipids in normal assembly and organization of the membrane proteins, multimeric protein complexes, and higher order supercomplexes. Since lipi...

  5. Specific membrane lipid composition is important for plasmodesmata function in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Magali S; Brocard, Lysiane; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nicolas, William; Wewer, Vera; Dörmann, Peter; Nacir, Houda; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Claverol, Stéphane; Germain, Véronique; Boutté, Yohann; Mongrand, Sébastien; Bayer, Emmanuelle M

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are nano-sized membrane-lined channels controlling intercellular communication in plants. Although progress has been made in identifying PD proteins, the role played by major membrane constituents, such as the lipids, in defining specialized membrane domains in PD remains unknown. Through a rigorous isolation of "native" PD membrane fractions and comparative mass spectrometry-based analysis, we demonstrate that lipids are laterally segregated along the plasma membrane (PM) at the PD cell-to-cell junction in Arabidopsis thaliana. Remarkably, our results show that PD membranes display enrichment in sterols and sphingolipids with very long chain saturated fatty acids when compared with the bulk of the PM. Intriguingly, this lipid profile is reminiscent of detergent-insoluble membrane microdomains, although our approach is valuably detergent-free. Modulation of the overall sterol composition of young dividing cells reversibly impaired the PD localization of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Plasmodesmata Callose Binding 1 and the β-1,3-glucanase PdBG2 and altered callose-mediated PD permeability. Altogether, this study not only provides a comprehensive analysis of the lipid constituents of PD but also identifies a role for sterols in modulating cell-to-cell connectivity, possibly by establishing and maintaining the positional specificity of callose-modifying glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins at PD. Our work emphasizes the importance of lipids in defining PD membranes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipid self-assembly and lectin-induced reorganization of the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, Taras; Mély, Yves; Römer, Winfried

    2018-05-26

    The plasma membrane represents an outstanding example of self-organization in biology. It plays a vital role in protecting the integrity of the cell interior and regulates meticulously the import and export of diverse substances. Its major building blocks are proteins and lipids, which self-assemble to a fluid lipid bilayer driven mainly by hydrophobic forces. Even if the plasma membrane appears-globally speaking-homogeneous at physiological temperatures, the existence of specialized nano- to micrometre-sized domains of raft-type character within cellular and synthetic membrane systems has been reported. It is hypothesized that these domains are the origin of a plethora of cellular processes, such as signalling or vesicular trafficking. This review intends to highlight the driving forces of lipid self-assembly into a bilayer membrane and the formation of small, transient domains within the plasma membrane. The mechanisms of self-assembly depend on several factors, such as the lipid composition of the membrane and the geometry of lipids. Moreover, the dynamics and organization of glycosphingolipids into nanometre-sized clusters will be discussed, also in the context of multivalent lectins, which cluster several glycosphingolipid receptor molecules and thus create an asymmetric stress between the two membrane leaflets, leading to tubular plasma membrane invaginations.This article is part of the theme issue 'Self-organization in cell biology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  7. A Coarse Grained Model for a Lipid Membrane with Physiological Composition and Leaflet Asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyan Sharma

    Full Text Available The resemblance of lipid membrane models to physiological membranes determines how well molecular dynamics (MD simulations imitate the dynamic behavior of cell membranes and membrane proteins. Physiological lipid membranes are composed of multiple types of phospholipids, and the leaflet compositions are generally asymmetric. Here we describe an approach for self-assembly of a Coarse-Grained (CG membrane model with physiological composition and leaflet asymmetry using the MARTINI force field. An initial set-up of two boxes with different types of lipids according to the leaflet asymmetry of mammalian cell membranes stacked with 0.5 nm overlap, reliably resulted in the self-assembly of bilayer membranes with leaflet asymmetry resembling that of physiological mammalian cell membranes. Self-assembly in the presence of a fragment of the plasma membrane protein syntaxin 1A led to spontaneous specific positioning of phosphatidylionositol(4,5bisphosphate at a positively charged stretch of syntaxin consistent with experimental data. An analogous approach choosing an initial set-up with two concentric shells filled with different lipid types results in successful assembly of a spherical vesicle with asymmetric leaflet composition. Self-assembly of the vesicle in the presence of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin 2 revealed the correct position of the synaptobrevin transmembrane domain. This is the first CG MD method to form a membrane with physiological lipid composition as well as leaflet asymmetry by self-assembly and will enable unbiased studies of the incorporation and dynamics of membrane proteins in more realistic CG membrane models.

  8. Insertion of Neurotransmitters into a Lipid Bilayer Membrane and Its Implication on Membrane Stability: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Xue, Minmin; Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-03-17

    The signaling molecules in neurons, called neurotransmitters, play an essential role in the transportation of neural signals, during which the neurotransmitters interact with not only specific receptors, but also cytomembranes, such as synaptic vesicle membranes and postsynaptic membranes. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the atomic-scale insertion dynamics of typical neurotransmitters, including methionine enkephalin (ME), leucine enkephalin (LE), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), and aspartic acid (ASP), into lipid bilayers is investigated. The results show that the first three neurotransmitters (ME, LE, and DA) are able to diffuse freely into both 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) membranes, and are guided by the aromatic residues Tyr and Phe. Only a limited number of these neurotransmitters are allowed to penetrate into the membrane, which suggests an intrinsic mechanism by which the membrane is protected from being destroyed by excessive inserted neurotransmitters. After spontaneous insertion, the neurotransmitters disturb the surrounding phospholipids in the membrane, as indicated by the altered distribution of components in lipid leaflets and the disordered lipid tails. In contrast, the last two neurotransmitters (ACh and ASP) cannot enter the membrane, but instead always diffuse freely in solution. These findings provide an understanding at the atomic level of how neurotransmitters interact with the surrounding cytomembrane, as well as their impact on membrane behavior. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lipid transfer proteins do their thing anchored at membrane contact sites… but what is their thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Louise H; Levine, Tim P

    2016-04-15

    Membrane contact sites are structures where two organelles come close together to regulate flow of material and information between them. One type of inter-organelle communication is lipid exchange, which must occur for membrane maintenance and in response to environmental and cellular stimuli. Soluble lipid transfer proteins have been extensively studied, but additional families of transfer proteins have been identified that are anchored into membranes by transmembrane helices so that they cannot diffuse through the cytosol to deliver lipids. If such proteins target membrane contact sites they may be major players in lipid metabolism. The eukaryotic family of so-called Lipid transfer proteins Anchored at Membrane contact sites (LAMs) all contain both a sterol-specific lipid transfer domain in the StARkin superfamily (related to StART/Bet_v1), and one or more transmembrane helices anchoring them in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), making them interesting subjects for study in relation to sterol metabolism. They target a variety of membrane contact sites, including newly described contacts between organelles that were already known to make contact by other means. Lam1-4p target punctate ER-plasma membrane contacts. Lam5p and Lam6p target multiple contacts including a new category: vacuolar non-NVJ cytoplasmic ER (VancE) contacts. These developments confirm previous observations on tubular lipid-binding proteins (TULIPs) that established the importance of membrane anchored proteins for lipid traffic. However, the question remaining to be solved is the most difficult of all: are LAMs transporters, or alternately are they regulators that affect traffic more indirectly? © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  10. The structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Or; Steiner, Ariel; Szekely, Pablo; Amit, Einav; Asor, Roi; Tamburu, Carmen; Raviv, Uri

    2011-06-21

    In pure water, zwitterionic lipids form lamellar phases with an equilibrium water gap on the order of 2 to 3 nm as a result of the dominating van der Waals attraction between dipolar bilayers. Monovalent ions can swell those neutral lamellae by a small amount. Divalent ions can adsorb onto dipolar membranes and charge them. Using solution X-ray scattering, we studied how the structure of ions and zwitterionic lipids regulates the charge of dipolar membranes. We found that unlike monovalent ions that weakly interact with all of the examined dipolar membranes, divalent and trivalent ions adsorb onto membranes containing lipids with saturated tails, with an association constant on the order of ∼10 M(-1). One double bond in the lipid tail is sufficient to prevent divalent ion adsorption. We suggest that this behavior is due to the relatively loose packing of lipids with unsaturated tails that increases the area per lipid headgroup, enabling their free rotation. Divalent ion adsorption links two lipids and limits their free rotation. The ion-dipole interaction gained by the adsorption of the ions onto unsaturated membranes is insufficient to compensate for the loss of headgroup free-rotational entropy. The ion-dipole interaction is stronger for cations with a higher valence. Nevertheless, polyamines behave as monovalent ions near dipolar interfaces in the sense that they interact weakly with the membrane surface, whereas in the bulk their behavior is similar to that of multivalent cations. Advanced data analysis and comparison with theory provide insight into the structure and interactions between ion-induced regulated charged interfaces. This study models biologically relevant interactions between cell membranes and various ions and the manner in which the lipid structure governs those interactions. The ability to monitor these interactions creates a tool for probing systems that are more complex and forms the basis for controlling the interactions between dipolar

  11. Involvement of membrane lipids in radiation damage to potassium-ion permeability of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Medical Science; Akamatsu, Y

    1978-02-01

    Radiation damage to K/sup +/ permeability of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of E.coli grown with oleate or linolenate was investigated at different temperatures. A remarkable effect of radiation was observed at 0/sup 0/C with cells that had been grown in linolenate at 42/sup 0/C. This indicates that, besides protein, membrane lipids at least are involved in the radiation damage. The damage also seems to be affected by the fluidity of membrane lipids.

  12. G protein-membrane interactions II: Effect of G protein-linked lipids on membrane structure and G protein-membrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Jesús; Ibarguren, Maitane; Álvarez, Rafael; Terés, Silvia; Lladó, Victoria; Piotto, Stefano P; Concilio, Simona; Busquets, Xavier; López, David J; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    G proteins often bear myristoyl, palmitoyl and isoprenyl moieties, which favor their association with the membrane and their accumulation in G Protein Coupled Receptor-rich microdomains. These lipids influence the biophysical properties of membranes and thereby modulate G protein binding to bilayers. In this context, we showed here that geranylgeraniol, but neither myristate nor palmitate, increased the inverted hexagonal (H II ) phase propensity of phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes. While myristate and palmitate preferentially associated with phosphatidylcholine membranes, geranylgeraniol favored nonlamellar-prone membranes. In addition, Gαi 1 monomers had a higher affinity for lamellar phases, while Gβγ and Gαβγ showed a marked preference for nonlamellar prone membranes. Moreover, geranylgeraniol enhanced the binding of G protein dimers and trimers to phosphatidylethanolamine-containing membranes, yet it decreased that of monomers. By contrast, both myristate and palmitate increased the Gαi 1 preference for lamellar membranes. Palmitoylation reinforced the binding of the monomer to PC membranes and myristoylation decreased its binding to PE-enriched bilayer. Finally, binding of dimers and trimers to lamellar-prone membranes was decreased by palmitate and myristate, but it was increased in nonlamellar-prone bilayers. These results demonstrate that co/post-translational G protein lipid modifications regulate the membrane lipid structure and that they influence the physico-chemical properties of membranes, which in part explains why G protein subunits sort to different plasma membrane domains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Life as a matter of fat : lipids in a membrane biophysics perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    The present book gives a multi-disciplinary perspective on the physics of life and the particular role played by lipids (fats) and the lipid-bilayer component of cell membranes. The emphasis is on the physical properties of lipid membranes seen as soft and molecularly structured interfaces. By combining and synthesizing insights obtained from a variety of recent studies, an attempt is made to clarify what membrane structure is and how it can be quantitatively described. Furthermore, it is shown how biological function mediated by membranes is controlled by lipid membrane structure and organization on length scales ranging from the size of the individual molecule, across molecular assemblies of proteins and lipid domains in the range of nanometers, to the size of whole cells. Applications of lipids in nanotechnology and biomedicine are also described.   The first edition of the present book was published in 2005 when lipidomics was still very much an emerging science and lipids about to be recognized as being...

  14. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Sheng; Yin, Guangyao; Lee, Yi-Kuen; Wong, Joseph T.Y.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → MD simulations show that deformability and thermal motion of membrane affect electroporation. → Stiffer membrane inhibits electroporation and makes water penetrate from both sides. → Higher temperature accelerates electroporation. -- Abstract: Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0 kcal/(mol A 2 ) in the external electric field of 1.4 kcal/(mol A e), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2 kcal/(mol A 2 ) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0 kcal/(mol A e), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease.

  15. Differential Interaction of Synthetic Glycolipids with Biomimetic Plasma Membrane Lipids Correlates with the Plant Biological Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Lins, Laurence; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Ongena, Marc; Dorey, Stephan; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Clément, Christophe; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Sarazin, Catherine; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Nott, Katherine; Deleu, Magali

    2017-09-26

    Natural and synthetic amphiphilic molecules including lipopeptides, lipopolysaccharides, and glycolipids are able to induce defense mechanisms in plants. In the present work, the perception of two synthetic C14 rhamnolipids, namely, Alk-RL and Ac-RL, differing only at the level of the lipid tail terminal group have been investigated using biological and biophysical approaches. We showed that Alk-RL induces a stronger early signaling response in tobacco cell suspensions than does Ac-RL. The interactions of both synthetic RLs with simplified biomimetic membranes were further analyzed using experimental and in silico approaches. Our results indicate that the interactions of Alk-RL and Ac-RL with lipids were different in terms of insertion and molecular responses and were dependent on the lipid composition of model membranes. A more favorable insertion of Alk-RL than Ac-RL into lipid membranes is observed. Alk-RL forms more stable molecular assemblies than Ac-RL with phospholipids and sterols. At the molecular level, the presence of sterols tends to increase the RLs' interaction with lipid bilayers, with a fluidizing effect on the alkyl chains. Taken together, our findings suggest that the perception of these synthetic RLs at the membrane level could be related to a lipid-driven process depending on the organization of the membrane and the orientation of the RLs within the membrane and is correlated with the induction of early signaling responses in tobacco cells.

  16. Free energies of stable and metastable pores in lipid membranes under tension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, Wouter K.

    2009-01-01

    The free energy profile of pore formation in a lipid membrane, covering the entire range from a density fluctuation in an intact bilayer to a large tension-stabilized pore, has been calculated by molecular dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained lipid model. Several fixed elongations are used to

  17. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  18. Structure formation of lipid membranes: Membrane self-assembly and vesicle opening-up to octopus-like micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We briefly review our recent studies on self-assembly and vesicle rupture of lipid membranes using coarse-grained molecular simulations. For single component membranes, lipid molecules self-assemble from random gas states to vesicles via disk-shaped clusters. Clusters aggregate into larger clusters, and subsequently the large disks close into vesicles. The size of vesicles are determined by kinetics than by thermodynamics. When a vesicle composed of lipid and detergent types of molecules is ruptured, a disk-shaped micelle called bicelle can be formed. When both surfactants have negligibly low critical micelle concentration, it is found that bicelles connected with worm-like micelles are also formed depending on the surfactant ratio and spontaneous curvature of the membrane monolayer.

  19. Randomly organized lipids and marginally stable proteins: a coupling of weak interactions to optimize membrane signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Anne M; Mahling, Ryan; Fealey, Michael E; Rannikko, Anika; Dunleavy, Katie; Hendrickson, Troy; Lohese, K Jean; Kruggel, Spencer; Heiling, Hillary; Harren, Daniel; Sutton, R Bryan; Pastor, John; Hinderliter, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Eukaryotic lipids in a bilayer are dominated by weak cooperative interactions. These interactions impart highly dynamic and pliable properties to the membrane. C2 domain-containing proteins in the membrane also interact weakly and cooperatively giving rise to a high degree of conformational plasticity. We propose that this feature of weak energetics and plasticity shared by lipids and C2 domain-containing proteins enhance a cell's ability to transduce information across the membrane. We explored this hypothesis using information theory to assess the information storage capacity of model and mast cell membranes, as well as differential scanning calorimetry, carboxyfluorescein release assays, and tryptophan fluorescence to assess protein and membrane stability. The distribution of lipids in mast cell membranes encoded 5.6-5.8bits of information. More information resided in the acyl chains than the head groups and in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane than the outer leaflet. When the lipid composition and information content of model membranes were varied, the associated C2 domains underwent large changes in stability and denaturation profile. The C2 domain-containing proteins are therefore acutely sensitive to the composition and information content of their associated lipids. Together, these findings suggest that the maximum flow of signaling information through the membrane and into the cell is optimized by the cooperation of near-random distributions of membrane lipids and proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel biotinylated lipid raft reporter for electron microscopic imaging of plasma membrane microdomains[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krager, Kimberly J.; Sarkar, Mitul; Twait, Erik C.; Lill, Nancy L.; Koland, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The submicroscopic spatial organization of cell surface receptors and plasma membrane signaling molecules is readily characterized by electron microscopy (EM) via immunogold labeling of plasma membrane sheets. Although various signaling molecules have been seen to segregate within plasma membrane microdomains, the biochemical identity of these microdomains and the factors affecting their formation are largely unknown. Lipid rafts are envisioned as submicron membrane subdomains of liquid ordered structure with differing lipid and protein constituents that define their specific varieties. To facilitate EM investigation of inner leaflet lipid rafts and the localization of membrane proteins therein, a unique genetically encoded reporter with the dually acylated raft-targeting motif of the Lck kinase was developed. This reporter, designated Lck-BAP-GFP, incorporates green fluorescent protein (GFP) and biotin acceptor peptide (BAP) modules, with the latter allowing its single-step labeling with streptavidin-gold. Lck-BAP-GFP was metabolically biotinylated in mammalian cells, distributed into low-density detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and was readily detected with avidin-based reagents. In EM images of plasma membrane sheets, the streptavidin-gold-labeled reporter was clustered in 20–50 nm microdomains, presumably representative of inner leaflet lipid rafts. The utility of the reporter was demonstrated in an investigation of the potential lipid raft localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor. PMID:22822037

  1. Capsular 'pits' in the human lens.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, M. L.; Brown, N. A.; Shun-Shin, G. A.; Smith, G. T.

    1992-01-01

    The lens capsule is an atypical basement membrane surrounding the lens epithelial cells and lens fibres which make up the remainder of the human lens. A seemingly unreported morphological change visible in the lens capsule with the biomicroscope is described.

  2. PLASMA-MEMBRANE LIPID ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY NACL IN WINTER-WHEAT ROOTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSOUR, MMF; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    A highly enriched plasma membrane fraction was isolated by two phase partitioning from wheat roots (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vivant) grown with and without 100 mM NaCl. The lipids of the plasma membrane fraction were extracted and characterized. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were

  3. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation...

  4. Regional differences in the lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Speksnijder, J.E.; Dohmen, M.R.; Tertoolen, L.G.J.; Laat, S.W. de

    1985-01-01

    Regional and temporal differences in plasma membrane lipid mobility have been analyzed during the first three cleavage cycles of the embryo of the polar-lobe-forming mollusc Nassarius reticulatus by the fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) method, using 1,1′-ditetradecyl 3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine iodide (C14diI) as a fluorescent lipid probe. During this period of development the lateral diffusion coefficient of membrane lipids is consistently greater in the vegetal polar lob...

  5. Ultraviolet radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane: modification by capsaicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, A. K.; Ghosh, J. J.; Mandal, T. K. [University College of Science, Department of Biochemistry, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Calcutta 700-019 (India)

    1993-07-01

    Ultraviolet-radiation has been reported to cause lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. In the present study, treatment with capsaicin, (8-methyl-n-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the pungent principle of red hot pepper, was shown to modify UV-induced lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. Treatment with low doses of capsaicin (less than 0.1 μg/mL of phosphatidyl choline liposome) produced a significant increase in UV-induced lipid peroxidation, while high doses (0.1-0.5 μg/mL of PC liposome) caused a significant decrease of UV-induced peroxidation.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomal membrane: modification by capsaicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, A.K.; Ghosh, J.J.; Mandal, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet-radiation has been reported to cause lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. In the present study, treatment with capsaicin, (8-methyl-n-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the pungent principle of red hot pepper, was shown to modify UV-induced lipid peroxidation in the liposomal membrane. Treatment with low doses of capsaicin (less than 0.1 μg/mL of phosphatidyl choline liposome) produced a significant increase in UV-induced lipid peroxidation, while high doses (0.1-0.5 μg/mL of PC liposome) caused a significant decrease of UV-induced peroxidation

  7. Lipid diffusion in the distal and proximal leaflets of supported lipid bilayer membranes studied by single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rafael L.; Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Haran, Gilad

    2018-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been studied extensively as simple but powerful models for cellular membranes. Yet, potential differences in the dynamics of the two leaflets of a SLB remain poorly understood. Here, using single particle tracking, we obtain a detailed picture of bilayer dynamics. We observe two clearly separate diffusing populations, fast and slow, that we associate with motion in the distal and proximal leaflets of the SLB, respectively, based on fluorescence quenching experiments. We estimate diffusion coefficients using standard techniques as well as a new method based on the blur of images due to motion. Fitting the observed diffusion coefficients to a two-leaflet membrane hydrodynamic model allows for the simultaneous determination of the intermonolayer friction coefficient and the substrate-membrane friction coefficient, without any prior assumptions on the strengths of the relevant interactions. Remarkably, our calculations suggest that the viscosity of the interfacial water confined between the membrane and the substrate is elevated by ˜104 as compared to bulk water. Using hidden Markov model analysis, we then obtain insight into the transbilayer movement of lipids. We find that lipid flip-flop dynamics are very fast, with half times in the range of seconds. Importantly, we find little evidence for membrane defect mediated lipid flip-flop for SLBs at temperatures well above the solid-to-liquid transition, though defects seem to be involved when the SLBs are cooled down. Our work thus shows that the combination of single particle tracking and advanced hydrodynamic modeling provides a powerful means to obtain insight into membrane dynamics.

  8. Combining reflectometry and fluorescence microscopy: an assay for the investigation of leakage processes across lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Milena; Mey, Ingo; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-02-04

    The passage of solutes across a lipid membrane plays a central role in many cellular processes. However, the investigation of transport processes remains a serious challenge in pharmaceutical research, particularly the transport of uncharged cargo. While translocation reactions of ions across cell membranes is commonly measured with the patch-clamp, an equally powerful screening method for the transport of uncharged compounds is still lacking. A combined setup for reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) and fluorescence microscopy measurements is presented that allows one to investigate the passive exchange of uncharged compounds across a free-standing membrane. Pore-spanning lipid membranes were prepared by spreading giant 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) vesicles on porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes, creating sealed attoliter-sized compartments. The time-resolved leakage of different dye molecules (pyranine and crystal violet) as well as avidin through melittin induced membrane pores and defects was investigated.

  9. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragán Vidal, I. A., E-mail: vidal@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de; Müller, M., E-mail: mmueller@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rosetti, C. M., E-mail: carla@dqb.fcq.unc.edu.ar [Centro de Investigaciones en Química Biológica de Córdoba, Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, Córdoba (Argentina); Pastorino, C., E-mail: pastor@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, CNEA/CONICET, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-21

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models—a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated.

  10. Measuring the composition-curvature coupling in binary lipid membranes by computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragán Vidal, I. A.; Müller, M.; Rosetti, C. M.; Pastorino, C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling between local composition fluctuations in binary lipid membranes and curvature affects the lateral membrane structure. We propose an efficient method to compute the composition-curvature coupling in molecular simulations and apply it to two coarse-grained membrane models—a minimal, implicit-solvent model and the MARTINI model. Both the weak-curvature behavior that is typical for thermal fluctuations of planar bilayer membranes as well as the strong-curvature regime corresponding to narrow cylindrical membrane tubes are studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results are analyzed by using a phenomenological model of the thermodynamics of curved, mixed bilayer membranes that accounts for the change of the monolayer area upon bending. Additionally the role of thermodynamic characteristics such as the incompatibility between the two lipid species and asymmetry of composition are investigated

  11. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    Lysolipids and fatty acids are the natural products formed by the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Lysolipids and fatty acids form micelles in solution and acts as detergents in the presence of lipid membranes. In this study, we investigate the detergent strength of a homologous series of lyso......-chain mismatch between LPC and POPC determines the magnitude of the membrane mechanical perturbation per LPC molecule in the membrane. Finally, the three-stage model describing detergent membrane interaction has been extended by a parameter D-MCI, which governs the membrane curvature stability in the detergent...

  12. Models of dynamic extraction of lipid tethers from cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Sarah A; Chou, Tom

    2010-01-01

    When a ligand that is bound to an integral membrane receptor is pulled, the membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton can deform before either the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton or the ligand detaches from the receptor. If the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton, it may be further extruded and form a membrane tether. We develop a phenomenological model for this process by assuming that deformations obey Hooke's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. We compute the probability of tether formation and show that tethers can be extruded only within an intermediate range of force loading rates and pulling velocities. The mean tether length that arises at the moment of ligand detachment is computed as are the force loading rates and pulling velocities that yield the longest tethers

  13. Structural studies of the lipid membranes at the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, M. A.; Ermakova, E. V.; Ryabova, N. Yu.; Nayda, O. V.; Zabelin, A. V.; Pogorely, D. K.; Korneev, V. N.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid membranes are a subject of contemporary interdisciplinary studies at the junction of biology, biophysics, pharmacology, and bionanotechnology. The results of the structural studies of several types of lipid membranes by the lamellar and lateral diffraction of X-ray synchrotron radiation are presented. The experiments were performed at the Mediana and DICSI stations of the Siberia-2 synchrotron radiation source at the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute. The data obtained are compared with the results of studying lipid membranes at the small-angle scattering beamlines D22 and D24 at LURE (France) and at the A2 beamline at DESY (Germany). The parameters of the DICSI station are shown to meet the basic requirements for the structural study of lipid systems, which are of fundamental and applied interest.

  14. Lipid rafts generate digital-like signal transduction in cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2012-06-01

    Lipid rafts are meso-scale (5-200 nm) cell membrane domains where signaling molecules assemble and function. However, due to their dynamic nature, it has been difficult to unravel the mechanism of signal transduction in lipid rafts. Recent advanced imaging techniques have revealed that signaling molecules are frequently, but transiently, recruited to rafts with the aid of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and/or lipid-lipid interactions. Individual signaling molecules within the raft are activated only for a short period of time. Immobilization of signaling molecules by cytoskeletal actin filaments and scaffold proteins may facilitate more efficient signal transmission from rafts. In this review, current opinions of how the transient nature of molecular interactions in rafts generates digital-like signal transduction in cell membranes, and the benefits this phenomenon provides, are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out......Cl saline solution and the PE leaflet is exposed to KCl, the outcome is that the effects of asymmetric lipid and salt ion distributions essentially cancel one another almost completely. Overall, our study highlights the complex nature of the intrinsic potential of cell membranes under physiological...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces a Na...

  16. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S.; Gaus, Katharina

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin...... and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation...... domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate...

  17. Analysis of a Lipid/Polymer Membrane for Bitterness Sensing with a Preconditioning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yatabe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to evaluate the taste of foods or medicines using a taste sensor. The taste sensor converts information on taste into an electrical signal using several lipid/polymer membranes. A lipid/polymer membrane for bitterness sensing can evaluate aftertaste after immersion in monosodium glutamate (MSG, which is called “preconditioning”. However, we have not yet analyzed the change in the surface structure of the membrane as a result of preconditioning. Thus, we analyzed the change in the surface by performing contact angle and surface zeta potential measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS and gas cluster ion beam time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (GCIB-TOF-SIMS. After preconditioning, the concentrations of MSG and tetradodecylammonium bromide (TDAB, contained in the lipid membrane were found to be higher in the surface region than in the bulk region. The effect of preconditioning was revealed by the above analysis methods.

  18. Xanthophylls and alpha-tocopherol decrease UVB-induced lipid peroxidation and stress signaling in human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Bomser, Joshua A; Glamm, Jayme E; Failla, Mark L

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that consumption of vegetables rich in the xanthophylls lutein (LUT) and zeaxanthin (ZEA) reduces the risk for developing age-related cataract, a leading cause of vision loss. Although LUT and ZEA are the only dietary carotenoids present in the lens, direct evidence for their photoprotective effect in this organ is not available. The present study examined the effects of xanthophylls and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TC) on lipid peroxidation and the mitogen-activated stress signaling pathways in human lens epithelial (HLE) cells following ultraviolet B light (UVB) irradiation. When presented with LUT, ZEA, astaxanthin (AST), and alpha-TC as methyl-beta-cyclodextrin complexes, HLE cells accumulated the lipophiles in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with uptake of LUT exceeding that of ZEA and AST. Pretreatment of cultures with either 2 micromol/L xanthophyll or 10 micromol/L alpha-TC for 4 h before exposure to 300 J/m(2) UVB radiation decreased lipid peroxidation by 47-57% compared with UVB-treated control HLE cells. Pretreatment with the xanthophylls and alpha-TC also inhibited UVB-induced activation of c-JUN NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 by 50-60 and 25-32%, respectively. There was substantial inhibition of UVB-induced JNK and p38 activation for cells containing xanthophylls/mg, respectively, whereas >2.3 nmol alpha-TC/mg protein was required to significantly decrease UVB-induced stress signaling. These data suggest that xanthophylls are more potent than alpha-TC for protecting human lens epithelial cells against UVB insult.

  19. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...... of diffusive water motion: bulk-like, confined, and bound. The motion of bulk-like and confined water molecules is fast compared to those bound to the lipid head groups (7-10 H2O molecules per lipid), which move on the same nanosecond time scale as H atoms within the lipid molecules. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  20. Membrane Lipid Replacement for chronic illnesses, aging and cancer using oral glycerolphospholipid formulations with fructooligosaccharides to restore phospholipid function in cellular membranes, organelles, cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Garth L; Ash, Michael E

    2017-09-01

    Membrane Lipid Replacement is the use of functional, oral supplements containing mixtures of cell membrane glycerolphospholipids, plus fructooligosaccharides (for protection against oxidative, bile acid and enzymatic damage) and antioxidants, in order to safely replace damaged, oxidized, membrane phospholipids and restore membrane, organelle, cellular and organ function. Defects in cellular and intracellular membranes are characteristic of all chronic medical conditions, including cancer, and normal processes, such as aging. Once the replacement glycerolphospholipids have been ingested, dispersed, complexed and transported, while being protected by fructooligosaccharides and several natural mechanisms, they can be inserted into cell membranes, lipoproteins, lipid globules, lipid droplets, liposomes and other carriers. They are conveyed by the lymphatics and blood circulation to cellular sites where they are endocytosed or incorporated into or transported by cell membranes. Inside cells the glycerolphospholipids can be transferred to various intracellular membranes by lipid globules, liposomes, membrane-membrane contact or by lipid carrier transfer. Eventually they arrive at their membrane destinations due to 'bulk flow' principles, and there they can stimulate the natural removal and replacement of damaged membrane lipids while undergoing further enzymatic alterations. Clinical trials have shown the benefits of Membrane Lipid Replacement in restoring mitochondrial function and reducing fatigue in aged subjects and chronically ill patients. Recently Membrane Lipid Replacement has been used to reduce pain and other symptoms as well as removing hydrophobic chemical contaminants, suggesting that there are additional new uses for this safe, natural medicine supplement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Impact of monoolein on aquaporin1-based supported lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Ding, Wande; Wang, Miaoqi; Gao, Congjie; Qi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) based biomimetic membranes have attracted considerable attention for their potential water purification applications. In this paper, AQP1 incorporated biomimetic membranes were prepared and characterized. The morphology and structure of the biomimetic membranes were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The nanofiltration performance of the AQP1 incorporated membranes was investigated at 4 bar by using 2 g l −1 NaCl as feed solution. Lipid mobility plays an important role in the performance of the AQP1 incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membranes. We demonstrated that the lipid mobility is successfully tuned by the addition of monoolein (MO). Through in situ AFM and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) measurements, the membrane morphology and the molecular mobility were studied. The lipid mobility increased in the sequence DPPC < DPPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC, which is consistent with the flux increment and salt rejection. This study may provide some useful insights for improving the water purification performance of biomimetic membranes. (paper)

  2. Membrane-membrane interactions in a lipid-containing bacteriophage system. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, W.

    1979-06-01

    Progress is reported on research on two aspects of the life cycle of PM2, a lipid-containing bacteriophage. The first concerns the initial interaction of PM2 with the outer membrane of its host cell, Pseudomonas BAL-31. The second concerns the assembly of PM2 in infected cells and the structural features of hydrophobic membrane perturbers that inhibit PM2 assembly. Several other projects have been completed: distribution of PM2 receptors; effects of adamantance derivatives on PM2 production; hydrophobic membrane perturbers as antiviral and virucidal agents; hydrophobic photosensitizers; and other technique development

  3. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in Xenopus eggs: Regional differences related to animal/vegetal polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, S.W. de; Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Tertoolen, L.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Regional differences in the lateral mobility properties of plasma membrane lipids were studied in unfertilized and fertilized Xenopus eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements. Out of a variety of commonly used lipid probes only the aminofluorescein- -1abelled fatty

  4. Design and fabrication of PMMA-micromachined fluid lens based on electromagnetic actuation on PMMA–PDMS bonded membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, June Kyoo; Park, Kyung-Woo; Choi, Ju Chan; Kim, Hak-Rin; Kong, Seong Ho

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-micromachined fluid lens with an optimally designed built-in electromagnetic actuator was demonstrated in this study. Through a finite element method, the number of winding turns and the distance between magnetic moments were estimated to design an effective and miniaturized electromagnetic actuator. The lens body composed of PMMA structures was simply and rapidly micromachined using computer numerical control micro-milling. The poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membranes for electromagnetic actuation were bonded to the PMMA structures by using the proposed PMMA–PDMS bonding technique, which uses an SiO 2 intermediate layer. A physical repulsive force produced by the electromagnetic actuator applies a controllable fluidic pressure to a fluidic chamber that is sealed with the PDMS membrane, thus allowing dynamic focusing. The focus tunability of the fabricated lens was 67 diopters with a focus hysteresis of less than 1 mm and a response time of 2 ms. The solenoid of the built-in actuator showed negligible thermal crosstalk to the lens. (paper)

  5. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0kcal/(molÅ2) in the external electric field of 1.4kcal/(molÅe), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2kcal/(molÅ2) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0kcal/(molÅe), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camley, Brian A. [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lerner, Michael G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana 47374 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Pastor, Richard W. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Brown, Frank L. H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  7. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model

  8. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  9. Salt Bridge Formation between the I-BAR Domain and Lipids Increases Lipid Density and Membrane Curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Suetsugu, Shiro; Kitao, Akio

    2017-07-28

    The BAR domain superfamily proteins sense or induce curvature in membranes. The inverse-BAR domain (I-BAR) is a BAR domain that forms a straight "zeppelin-shaped" dimer. The mechanisms by which IRSp53 I-BAR binds to and deforms a lipid membrane are investigated here by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation (MD), binding energy analysis, and the effects of mutation experiments on filopodia on HeLa cells. I-BAR adopts a curved structure when crystallized, but adopts a flatter shape in MD. The binding of I-BAR to membrane was stabilized by ~30 salt bridges, consistent with experiments showing that point mutations of the interface residues have little effect on the binding affinity whereas multiple mutations have considerable effect. Salt bridge formation increases the local density of lipids and deforms the membrane into a concave shape. In addition, the point mutations that break key intra-molecular salt bridges within I-BAR reduce the binding affinity; this was confirmed by expressing these mutants in HeLa cells and observing their effects. The results indicate that the stiffness of I-BAR is important for membrane deformation, although I-BAR does not act as a completely rigid template.

  10. Neutron scattering to study membrane systems: from lipid vesicles to living cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, Jonathan D. [ORNL; Chatterjee, Sneha [ORNL; Stanley, Christopher B. [ORNL; Qian, Shuo [ORNL; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F. [ORNL; Elkins, James G. [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    The existence and role of lateral lipid organization in biological membranes has been studied and contested for more than 30 years. Lipid domains, or rafts, are hypothesized as scalable compartments in biological membranes, providing appropriate physical environments to their resident membrane proteins. This implies that lateral lipid organization is associated with a range of biological functions, such as protein co-localization, membrane trafficking, and cell signaling, to name just a few. Neutron scattering techniques have proven to be an excellent tool to investigate these structural features in model lipids, and more recently, in living cells. I will discuss our recent work using neutrons to probe the structure and mechanical properties in model lipid systems and our current efforts in using neutrons to probe the structure and organization of the bilayer in a living cell. These efforts in living cells have used genetic and biochemical strategies to generate a large neutron scattering contrast, making the membrane visible. I will present our results showing in vivo bilayer structure and discuss the outlook for this approach.

  11. Wrinkled1 accelerates flowering and regulates lipid homeostasis between oil accumulation and membrane lipid anabolism in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing eLi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wrinkled1 (WRI1 belongs to the APETALA2 transcription factor family; it is unique to plants and is a central regulator of oil synthesis in Arabidopsis. The effects of WRI1 on comprehensive lipid metabolism and plant development were unknown, especially in crop plants. This study found that BnWRI1 in Brassica napus accelerated flowering and enhanced oil accumulation in both seeds and leaves without leading to a visible growth inhibition. BnWRI1 decreased storage carbohydrates and increased soluble sugars to facilitate the carbon flux to lipid anabolism. BnWRI1 is localized to the nucleus and directly binds to the AW-box at proximal upstream regions of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly. The overexpression (OE of BnWRI1 resulted in the up-regulation of genes involved in glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, lipid assembly, and flowering. Lipid profiling revealed increased galactolipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG, and phosphatidylcholine (PC in the leaves of OE plants, whereas it exhibited a reduced level of the galactolipids DGDG and MGDG and increased levels of PC, phosphatidylethanolamide (PE, and oil (triacylglycerol, TAG in the siliques of OE plants during the early seed development stage. These results suggest that BnWRI1 is important for homeostasis among TAG, membrane lipids and sugars, and thus facilitates flowering and oil accumulation in B. napus.

  12. Vizualizing spatial lipid distribution in porcine lens by MALDI imaging high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidová, V.; Pól, Jaroslav; Volný, Michael; Novák, Petr; Wiedmer, S. K.; Holopainen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 8 (2010), s. 2295-2302 ISSN 0022-2275 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ocular lens * sphingolipid * matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.115, year: 2010

  13. Neuronal sphingolipidoses: Membrane lipids and sphingolipid activator proteins regulate lysosomal sphingolipid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Konrad

    2016-11-01

    Glycosphingolipids and sphingolipids of cellular plasma membranes (PMs) reach luminal intra-lysosomal vesicles (LVs) for degradation mainly by pathways of endocytosis. After a sorting and maturation process (e.g. degradation of sphingomyelin (SM) and secretion of cholesterol), sphingolipids of the LVs are digested by soluble enzymes with the help of activator (lipid binding and transfer) proteins. Inherited defects of lipid-cleaving enzymes and lipid binding and transfer proteins cause manifold and fatal, often neurodegenerative diseases. The review summarizes recent findings on the regulation of sphingolipid catabolism and cholesterol secretion from the endosomal compartment by lipid modifiers, an essential stimulation by anionic membrane lipids and an inhibition of crucial steps by cholesterol and SM. Reconstitution experiments in the presence of all proteins needed, hydrolase and activator proteins, reveal an up to 10-fold increase of ganglioside catabolism just by the incorporation of anionic lipids into the ganglioside carrying membranes, whereas an additional incorporation of cholesterol inhibits GM2 catabolism substantially. It is suggested that lipid and other low molecular modifiers affect the genotype-phenotype relationship observed in patients with lysosomal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Prolonged Intake of Dietary Lipids Alters Membrane Structure and T Cell Responses in LDLr-/- Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Abigail H; Tedla, Nicodemus; Hancock, Sarah E; Cornely, Rhea; Mitchell, Todd W; Yang, Zhengmin; Kockx, Maaike; Parton, Robert G; Rossy, Jérémie; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-05-15

    Although it is recognized that lipids and membrane organization in T cells affect signaling and T cell activation, to what extent dietary lipids alter T cell responsiveness in the absence of obesity and inflammation is not known. In this study, we fed low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice a Western high-fat diet for 1 or 9 wk and examined T cell responses in vivo along with T cell lipid composition, membrane order, and activation ex vivo. Our data showed that high levels of circulating lipids for a prolonged period elevated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation and resulted in an increased proportion of CD4(+) central-memory T cells within the draining lymph nodes following induction of contact hypersensitivity. In addition, the 9-wk Western high-fat diet elevated the total phospholipid content and monounsaturated fatty acid level, but decreased saturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin within the T cells. The altered lipid composition in the circulation, and of T cells, was also reflected by enhanced membrane order at the activation site of ex vivo activated T cells that corresponded to increased IL-2 mRNA levels. In conclusion, dietary lipids can modulate T cell lipid composition and responses in lipoprotein receptor knockout mice even in the absence of excess weight gain and a proinflammatory environment. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  16. Asymmetric Hybrid Polymer-Lipid Giant Vesicles as Cell Membrane Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyret, Ariane; Ibarboure, Emmanuel; Le Meins, Jean-François; Lecommandoux, Sebastien

    2018-01-01

    Lipid membrane asymmetry plays an important role in cell function and activity, being for instance a relevant signal of its integrity. The development of artificial asymmetric membranes thus represents a key challenge. In this context, an emulsion-centrifugation method is developed to prepare giant vesicles with an asymmetric membrane composed of an inner monolayer of poly(butadiene)- b -poly(ethylene oxide) (PBut- b -PEO) and outer monolayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The formation of a complete membrane asymmetry is demonstrated and its stability with time is followed by measuring lipid transverse diffusion. From fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, the lipid half-life is estimated to be 7.5 h. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique, the diffusion coefficient of 1,2-dioleoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl) (DOPE-rhod, inserted into the POPC leaflet) is determined to be about D = 1.8 ± 0.50 μm 2 s -1 at 25 °C and D = 2.3 ± 0.7 μm 2 s -1 at 37 °C, between the characteristic values of pure POPC and pure polymer giant vesicles and in good agreement with the diffusion of lipids in a variety of biological membranes. These results demonstrate the ability to prepare a cell-like model system that displays an asymmetric membrane with transverse and translational diffusion properties similar to that of biological cells.

  17. Acyl transfer from membrane lipids to peptides is a generic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Robert H; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mosely, Jackie A; Sanderson, John M

    2013-11-15

    The generality of acyl transfer from phospholipids to membrane-active peptides has been probed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of peptide-lipid mixtures. The peptides examined include melittin, magainin II, PGLa, LAK1, LAK3 and penetratin. Peptides were added to liposomes with membrane lipid compositions ranging from pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) to mixtures of PC with phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol. Experiments were typically conducted at pH7.4 at modest salt concentrations (90 mM NaCl). In favorable cases, lipidated peptides were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry methods to determine the sites of acylation. Melittin and magainin II were the most reactive peptides, with significant acyl transfer detected under all conditions and membrane compositions. Both peptides were lipidated at the N-terminus by transfer from PC, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, as well as at internal sites: lysine for melittin; serine and lysine for magainin II. Acyl transfer could be detected within 3h of melittin addition to negatively charged membranes. The other peptides were less reactive, but for each peptide, acylation was found to occur in at least one of the conditions examined. The data demonstrate that acyl transfer is a generic process for peptides bound to membranes composed of diacylglycerophospholipids. Phospholipid membranes cannot therefore be considered as chemically inert toward peptides and by extension proteins. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  19. Characterization of membrane lipid fluidity in human embryo cells malignantly transfer med post 238Pu α irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zirong; Sun Ling; Liu Guolian; Shen Zhiyuan

    1992-01-01

    The membrane lipid fluidity of malignantly transformed human embryo cells following 238 Pu α particlce irradiation in vitro has been studied. The results indicate that the ontogenesis depends on irradiation dose (Gy) and the membrane lipid fluidity in malignantly transformed cells is higher than that in normal embryo cells. With the microviscosity (η) of cells plotted against the cell counts, the correlation coefficient (γ) is calculated to be between 0.9936 and 0.9999. Since the malignant transformation of irradiated embryo cells is manifested early on cell membrane lipid, the fluidity of membrane lipid can be used as an oncologic marker

  20. Polymeric and Lipid Membranes-From Spheres to Flat Membranes and vice versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleva, Mariia S; Lengert, Ekaterina V; Gorin, Dmitry A; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Skirtach, Andre G

    2017-08-15

    Membranes are important components in a number of systems, where separation and control of the flow of molecules is desirable. Controllable membranes represent an even more coveted and desirable entity and their development is considered to be the next step of development. Typically, membranes are considered on flat surfaces, but spherical capsules possess a perfect "infinite" or fully suspended membranes. Similarities and transitions between spherical and flat membranes are discussed, while applications of membranes are also emphasized.

  1. Lipid-Mediated Clusters of Guest Molecules in Model Membranes and Their Dissolving in the Presence of Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardash, Maria E; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2017-05-25

    The clustering of molecules is an important feature of plasma membrane organization. It is challenging to develop methods for quantifying membrane heterogeneities because of their transient nature and small size. Here, we obtained evidence that transient membrane heterogeneities can be frozen at cryogenic temperatures which allows the application of solid-state experimental techniques sensitive to the nanoscale distance range. We employed the pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the electron spin echo (ESE) technique, for spin-labeled molecules in multilamellar lipid bilayers. ESE decays were refined for pure contribution of spin-spin magnetic dipole-dipolar interaction between the labels; these interactions manifest themselves at a nanometer distance range. The bilayers were prepared from different types of saturated and unsaturated lipids and cholesterol (Chol); in all cases, a small amount of guest spin-labeled substances 5-doxyl-stearic-acid (5-DSA) or 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DChl) was added. The local concentration found of 5-DSA and DChl molecules was remarkably higher than the mean concentration in the bilayer, evidencing the formation of lipid-mediated clusters of these molecules. To our knowledge, formation of nanoscale clusters of guest amphiphilic molecules in biological membranes is a new phenomenon suggested only recently. Two-dimensional 5-DSA molecular clusters were found, whereas flat DChl molecules were found to be clustered into stacked one-dimensional structures. These clusters disappear when the Chol content is varied between the boundaries known for lipid raft formation at room temperatures. The room temperature EPR evidenced entrapping of DChl molecules in the rafts.

  2. Ion Channels Induced by Antimicrobial Agents in Model Lipid Membranes are Modulated by Plant Polyphenols Through Surrounding Lipid Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, Svetlana S; Zakharova, Anastasiia A; Medvedev, Roman Ya; Ostroumova, Olga S

    2018-03-16

    The potential therapeutic applications of plant polyphenols in various neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and malignant disorders determine the relevance of studying the molecular mechanisms of their action on the cell membranes. Here, the quantitative changes in the physical parameters of model bilayer lipid membranes upon the adsorption of plant polyphenols were evaluated. It was shown that butein and naringenin significantly decreased the intrinsic dipole potential of cholesterol-free and cholesterol-enriched membranes. Cardamonin, 4'-hydroxychalcone, licochalcone A and liquiritigenin demonstrated the average efficiency, while resveratrol did not characterized by the ability to modulate the bilayer electrostatics. At the same time, the tested polyphenols affected melting of phospholipids with saturated acyl chains. The effects were attributed to the lipid disordering and a promotion of the positive curvature stress. According to DSC data and results of measurements of the threshold voltages that cause bilayer breakdown licochalcone A is the most effective agent. Furthermore, the role of the polyphenol induced changes in the electric and elastic properties of lipid host in the regulation of reconstituted ion channels was examined. The ability of the tested polyphenols to decrease the conductance of single ion channels produced by the antifungal cyclic lipopeptide syringomycin E was in agreement with their effects on the dipole potential of the lipid bilayers. The greatest effect of licochalcone A on the steady-state membrane conductance induced by the antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotic nystatin correlated with its greatest efficacy to induce the positive curvature stress. We also found that butein and naringenin bind specifically to a single pore formed by α-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide VI on the structure of multilamellar lipid membranes at water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabova, N. Yu.; Kiselev, M. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The structural changes in the multilamellar lipid membranes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide VI binary systems during hydration and dehydration have been studied by neutron diffraction. The effect of cholesterol and ceramide on the kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membranes is characterized. Compared to pure DPPC, membranes of binary systems swell faster during hydration (with a characteristic time of ∼30 min). Both compounds, ceramide VI and cholesterol, similarly affect the hydration of DPPC membranes, increasing the repeat distance due to the bilayer growth. However, in contrast to cholesterol, ceramide significantly reduces the thickness of the membrane water layer. The introduction of cholesterol into a DPPC membrane slows down the change in the parameters of the bilayer internal structure during dehydration. In the DPPC/ceramide VI/cholesterol ternary system (with a molar cholesterol concentration of 40%), cholesterol is partially released from the lamellar membrane structure into the crystalline phase.

  4. Folding DNA into a Lipid-Conjugated Nanobarrel for Controlled Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuanchen; Chen, Shuobing; Zhang, Shijian; Sodroski, Joseph; Yang, Zhongqiang; Liu, Dongsheng; Mao, Youdong

    2018-02-19

    Building upon DNA origami technology, we introduce a method to reconstitute a single membrane protein into a self-assembled DNA nanobarrel that scaffolds a nanodisc-like lipid environment. Compared with the membrane-scaffolding-protein nanodisc technique, our approach gives rise to defined stoichiometry, controlled sizes, as well as enhanced stability and homogeneity in membrane protein reconstitution. We further demonstrate potential applications of the DNA nanobarrels in the structural analysis of membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Organic and inorganic osmolytes at lipid membrane interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, P.; Peters, Günther H.j.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter discusses the interactions of organic osmolytes and membranous interfaces, and the effects of these interactions on the properties of the membrane. It also includes a treatment of inorganic ions at the membrane interface since osmolyte effects involve a balance between organic...... and inorganic components. Before turning to the physicochemical discussion of interfacial interactions, the chapter outlines some central parts of the biology and biotechnology of organic osmolytes. It reviews the central relationships in preferential interaction theory, which we use in subsequent paragraphs...

  6. HAMLET interacts with lipid membranes and perturbs their structure and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Puchades, Maja; Halskau, Øyvind; Baumann, Anne; Lanekoff, Ingela; Chao, Yinxia; Martinez, Aurora; Svanborg, Catharina; Karlsson, Roger

    2010-02-23

    Cell membrane interactions rely on lipid bilayer constituents and molecules inserted within the membrane, including specific receptors. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a tumoricidal complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin (HLA) and oleic acid that is internalized by tumor cells, suggesting that interactions with the phospholipid bilayer and/or specific receptors may be essential for the tumoricidal effect. This study examined whether HAMLET interacts with artificial membranes and alters membrane structure. We show by surface plasmon resonance that HAMLET binds with high affinity to surface adherent, unilamellar vesicles of lipids with varying acyl chain composition and net charge. Fluorescence imaging revealed that HAMLET accumulates in membranes of vesicles and perturbs their structure, resulting in increased membrane fluidity. Furthermore, HAMLET disrupted membrane integrity at neutral pH and physiological conditions, as shown by fluorophore leakage experiments. These effects did not occur with either native HLA or a constitutively unfolded Cys-Ala HLA mutant (rHLA(all-Ala)). HAMLET also bound to plasma membrane vesicles formed from intact tumor cells, with accumulation in certain membrane areas, but the complex was not internalized by these vesicles or by the synthetic membrane vesicles. The results illustrate the difference in membrane affinity between the fatty acid bound and fatty acid free forms of partially unfolded HLA and suggest that HAMLET engages membranes by a mechanism requiring both the protein and the fatty acid. Furthermore, HAMLET binding alters the morphology of the membrane and compromises its integrity, suggesting that membrane perturbation could be an initial step in inducing cell death.

  7. [The effects of electromagnetic pulse on fluidity and lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changzhen; Cong, Jianbo; Xian, Hong; Cao, Xiaozhe; Sun, Cunpu; Wu, Ke

    2002-08-01

    To study the effects of intense electromagnetic pulse(EMP) on the biological effects of mitochondrial membrane. Rat liver mitochondrial suspension was exposed to EMP at 60 kV/m level. The changes of membrane lipid fluidity and membrane protein mobility were detected by ESR and spin label technique. Malondialdehyde(MDA) was detected by spectrophotometer. The mobility of membrane protein decreased significantly(P < 0.05). Correlation time (tau c) of control group was (0.501 +/- 0.077) x 10(-9)s, and tau c of EMP group was (0.594 +/- 0.049) x 10(-9)s, indicating that the mobility of protein was restricted. The fluidity of mitochondrial membrane increased significantly(P < 0.05) at the same time. Order parameter(S) of mitochondrial membrane lipid in control group was 0.63 +/- 0.01, while S of EMP group was 0.61 +/- 0.01(P < 0.05). MDA decreased significantly. The mobility and lipid peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane may be disturbed after EMP exposure.

  8. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  9. Plasma lipid pattern and red cell membrane structure in β-thalassemia patients in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seruni K.U. Freisleben

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last 10 years, we have investigated thalassemia patients in Jakarta to obtain a comprehensive picture of iron overload, oxidative stress, and cell damage.Methods: In blood samples from 15 transfusion-dependent patients (group T, 5 non-transfused patients (group N and 10 controls (group C, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, lipid-soluble vitamin E, malondialdehyde (MDA and thiol status were measured. Isolated eryhtrocyte membranes were investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy using doxyl-stearic acid and maleimido-proxyl spin lables. Data were analyzed statistically with ANOVA.Results: Plasma triglycerides were higher and cholesterol levels were lower in thalassemic patients compared to controls. Vitamin E, group C: 21.8 vs T: 6.2 μmol/L and reactive thiols (C: 144 vs. T: 61 μmol/L were considerably lower in transfused patients, who exert clear signs of oxidative stress (MDA, C: 1.96 vs T: 9.2 μmol/L and of tissue cell damage, i.e., high transaminases plasma levels. Non-transfused thalassemia patients have slight signs of oxidative stress, but no significant indication of cell damage. Erythrocyte membrane parameters from EPR spectroscopy differ considerably between all groups. In transfusion-dependent patients the structure of the erythrocyte membrane and the gradients of polarity and fluidity are destroyed in lipid domains; binding capacity of protein thiols in the membrane is lower and immobilized.Conclusion: In tranfusion-dependent thalassemic patients, plasma lipid pattern and oxidative stress are associated with structural damage of isolated erythrocyte membranes as measured by EPR spectroscopy with lipid and proteinthiol spin labels. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:178-84Keywords: electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, erythrocyte membrane, lipoproteins, oxidative stress, thalassemia, plasma lipids.

  10. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  11. Spatial orientation and electric-field-driven transport of hypericin inside of bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strejčková, Alena; Staničová, Jana; Jancura, Daniel; Miškovský, Pavol; Bánó, Gregor

    2013-02-07

    Fluorescence experiments were carried out to investigate the interaction of hypericin (Hyp), a natural hydrophobic photosensitizer, with artificial bilayer lipid membranes. The spatial orientation of Hyp monomers incorporated in diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) membranes was determined by measuring the dependence of the Hyp fluorescence intensity on the angle of incidence of p- and s-polarized excitation laser beams. Inside of the membrane, Hyp monomers are preferentially located in the layers near the membrane/water interface and are oriented with the S(1) ← S(0) transition dipole moments perpendicular to the membrane surface. Transport of Hyp anions between the two opposite sides of the lipid bilayer was induced by applying rectangular electric field pulses to the membrane. The characteristic time for Hyp transport through the membrane center was evaluated by the analysis of the Hyp fluorescence signal during the voltage pulses. In the zero-voltage limit, the transport time approached 70 ms and gradually decreased with higher voltage applied to the membrane. In addition, our measurements indicated an apparent pK(a) constant of 8 for Hyp deprotonation in the membrane.

  12. Influences of the Structure of Lipids on Thermal Stability of Lipid Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai Nan-Nan; Zhou Xin; Li Ming

    2015-01-01

    The binding free energy (BFE) of lipid to lipid bilayer is a critical factor to determine the thermal or mechanical stability of the bilayer. Although the molecular structure of lipids has significant impacts on BFE of the lipid, there lacks a systematic study on this issue. In this paper we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to investigate this problem for several typical phospholipids. We find that both the tail length and tail unsaturation can significantly affect the BFE of lipids but in opposite way, namely, BFE decreases linearly with increasing length, but increases linearly with addition of unsaturated bonds. Inspired by the specific structure of cholesterol which is a crucial component of biomembrane, we also find that introduction of carbo-ring-like structures to the lipid tail or to the bilayer may greatly enhance the stability of the bilayer. Our simulation also shows that temperature can influence the bilayer stability and this effect can be significant when the bilayer undergoes phase transition. These results may be helpful to the design of liposome or other self-assembled lipid systems. (paper)

  13. Changes in membrane lipids and carotenoids during light ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-07-24

    Jul 24, 2012 ... increased their content, the changes of PG(18:3/16:0) and MGDG(18:3/16:0) being primarily significant. Major lipid changes were also ... reported to increase with exposure to high light in Cyano- bacteria (Masamoto and .... Absorption spectrum of the other carotenoid (unkn1) has absorption maxima at 448/.

  14. The enzymatic hydrolysis of lipids in a hydrophilic membrane bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, W.

    1991-01-01

    The production of fatty acids from lipids (fats and oils) currently takes place in a physical chemical process at a high temperature and pressure. Fatty acids are applied in numerous products such as soaps, detergents and chemicals for pharmaceutical, household and industrial applications.

  15. Effect of cholesterol on structural and mechanical properties of membranes depends on lipid chain saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jianjun; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of cholesterol on membrane bending modulus K C , membrane thickness D HH , the partial and apparent areas of cholesterol and lipid, and the order parameter S xray are shown to depend upon the number of saturated hydrocarbon chains in the lipid molecules. Particularly striking is the result that up to 40% cholesterol does not increase the bending modulus K C of membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine lipids with two cis monounsaturated chains, although it does have the expected stiffening effect on membranes composed of lipids with two saturated chains. The B fluctuational modulus in the smectic liquid crystal theory is obtained and used to discuss the interactions between bilayers. Our K C results motivate a theory of elastic moduli in the high cholesterol limit and they challenge the relevance of universality concepts. Although most of our results were obtained at 30 deg. C, additional data at other temperatures to allow consideration of a reduced temperature variable do not support universality for the effect of cholesterol on all lipid bilayers. If the concept of universality is to be valid, different numbers of saturated chains must be considered to create different universality classes. The above experimental results were obtained from analysis of x-ray scattering in the low angle and wide angle regions.

  16. ToF-SIMS observation for evaluating the interaction between amyloid β and lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kawashima, Tomoko; Iwai, Hideo

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption behaviour of amyloid beta (Aβ), thought to be a key peptide for understanding Alzheimer's disease, was investigated by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Aβ aggregates depending on the lipid membrane condition though it has not been fully understood yet. In this study, Aβ samples on different lipid membranes, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), were observed with ToF-SIMS and the complex ToF-SIMS data of the Aβ samples was interpreted using data analysis techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), gentle-SIMS (G-SIMS) and g-ogram. DOPC and DMPC are liquid crystal at room temperature, while DPPC is gel at room temperature. As primary ion beams, Bi3(+) and Ar cluster ion beams were used and the effect of an Ar cluster ion for evaluating biomolecules was also studied. The secondary ion images of the peptide fragment ions indicated by G-SIMS and g-ogram were consistent with the PCA results. It is suggested that Aβ is adsorbed homogeneously on the liquid-crystalline-phase lipid membranes, while it aggregates along the lipid on the gel-phase lipid membrane. Moreover, in the results using the Ar cluster, the influence of contamination was reduced.

  17. The interaction of antibodies with lipid membranes unraveled by fluorescence methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Tiago N.; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The interest and investment in antibody therapies has reached an overwhelming scale in the last decade. Yet, little concern has been noticed among the scientific community to unravel important interactions of antibodies with biological structures other than their respective epitopes. Lipid membranes are particularly relevant in this regard as they set the stage for protein-protein recognition, a concept potentially inclusive of antibody-antigen recognition. Fluorescence techniques allow experimental monitoring of protein partition between aqueous and lipid phases, deciphering events of adsorption, insertion and diffusion. This review focuses on the available fluorescence spectroscopy methodologies directed to the study of antibody-membrane interactions.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Telenius, Jelena; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many such molecu......Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many...

  19. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also...... without necessarily destroying the membrane. We confirm by high-performance liquid chromatography the preferential hydrolysis of DMPC within the phase coexistence region of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, showing that this preferential hydrolysis is accentuated close to the solidus phase boundary...

  20. Lipid engineering reveals regulatory roles for membrane fluidity in yeast flocculation and oxygen-limited growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degreif, Daniel [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); de Rond, Tristan [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bertl, Adam [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany); Keasling, Jay D. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Budin, Itay [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-18

    Cells modulate lipid metabolism in order to maintain membrane homeostasis. In this paper, we use a metabolic engineering approach to manipulate the stoichiometry of fatty acid unsaturation, a regulator of cell membrane fluidity, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, reduced lipid unsaturation triggered cell-cell adhesion (flocculation), a phenomenon characteristic of industrial yeast but uncommon in laboratory strains. We find that ER lipid saturation sensors induce expression of FLO1 – encoding a cell wall polysaccharide binding protein – independently of its canonical regulator. In wild-type cells, Flo1p-dependent flocculation occurs under oxygen-limited growth, which reduces unsaturated lipid synthesis and thus serves as the environmental trigger for flocculation. Transcriptional analysis shows that FLO1 is one of the most highly induced genes in response to changes in lipid unsaturation, and that the set of membrane fluidity-sensitive genes is globally activated as part of the cell's long-term response to hypoxia during fermentation. Finally, our results show how the lipid homeostasis machinery of budding yeast is adapted to carry out a broad response to an environmental stimulus important in biotechnology.

  1. Mitochondrial cardiolipin/phospholipid trafficking: the role of membrane contact site complexes and lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlattner, Uwe; Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Rousseau, Denis; Boissan, Mathieu; Mannella, Carmen; Epand, Richard; Lacombe, Marie-Lise

    2014-04-01

    Historically, cellular trafficking of lipids has received much less attention than protein trafficking, mostly because its biological importance was underestimated, involved sorting and translocation mechanisms were not known, and analytical tools were limiting. This has changed during the last decade, and we discuss here some progress made in respect to mitochondria and the trafficking of phospholipids, in particular cardiolipin. Different membrane contact site or junction complexes and putative lipid transfer proteins for intra- and intermembrane lipid translocation have been described, involving mitochondrial inner and outer membrane, and the adjacent membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. An image emerges how cardiolipin precursors, remodeling intermediates, mature cardiolipin and its oxidation products could migrate between membranes, and how this trafficking is involved in cardiolipin biosynthesis and cell signaling events. Particular emphasis in this review is given to mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphate kinase D and mitochondrial creatine kinases, which emerge to have roles in both, membrane junction formation and lipid transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Oetter, Kay-Marcus; Meyers, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  3. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aberle

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor.

  4. Exclusive photorelease of signalling lipids at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, André; Yushchenko, Dmytro A; Müller, Rainer; Stein, Frank; Feng, Suihan; Mulle, Christophe; Carta, Mario; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-12-21

    Photoactivation of caged biomolecules has become a powerful approach to study cellular signalling events. Here we report a method for anchoring and uncaging biomolecules exclusively at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by employing a photocleavable, sulfonated coumarin derivative. The novel caging group allows quantifying the reaction progress and efficiency of uncaging reactions in a live-cell microscopy setup, thereby greatly improving the control of uncaging experiments. We synthesized arachidonic acid derivatives bearing the new negatively charged or a neutral, membrane-permeant coumarin caging group to locally induce signalling either at the plasma membrane or on internal membranes in β-cells and brain slices derived from C57B1/6 mice. Uncaging at the plasma membrane triggers a strong enhancement of calcium oscillations in β-cells and a pronounced potentiation of synaptic transmission while uncaging inside cells blocks calcium oscillations in β-cells and causes a more transient effect on neuronal transmission, respectively. The precise subcellular site of arachidonic acid release is therefore crucial for signalling outcome in two independent systems.

  5. The Role of Lipid Membranes in Life’s Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Deamer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At some point in early evolution, life became cellular. Assuming that this step was required for the origin of life, there would necessarily be a pre-existing source of amphihilic compounds capable of assembling into membranous compartments. It is possible to make informed guesses about the properties of such compounds and the conditions most conducive to their self-assembly into boundary structures. The membranes were likely to incorporate mixtures of hydrocarbon derivatives between 10 and 20 carbons in length with carboxylate or hydroxyl head groups. Such compounds can be synthesized by chemical reactions and small amounts were almost certainly present in the prebiotic environment. Membrane assembly occurs most readily in low ionic strength solutions with minimal content of salt and divalent cations, which suggests that cellular life began in fresh water pools associated with volcanic islands rather than submarine hydrothermal vents.

  6. Adjusting membrane lipids under salt stress: the case of the moderate halophilic organism Halobacillus halophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopalco, Patrizia; Angelini, Roberto; Lobasso, Simona; Köcher, Saskia; Thompson, Melanie; Müller, Volker; Corcelli, Angela

    2013-04-01

    The lipid composition of Halobacillus halophilus was investigated by combined thin-layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses of the total lipid extract. Main polar lipids were found to be sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol, while cardiolipin was a minor lipid together with phosphatidic acid, alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol and two not yet fully identified lipid components. In addition the analyses of residual lipids, associated with denatured proteins after the lipid extraction, revealed the presence of significant amounts of cardiolipin, indicating that it is a not readily extractable phospholipid. Post decay source mass spectrometry analyses allowed the determination of acyl chains of main lipid components. On increasing the culture medium salinity, an increase in the shorter chains and the presence of chain unsaturations were observed. These changes in the lipid core structures might compensate for the increase in packing and rigidity of phospholipid and sulfoglycolipid polar heads in high-salt medium, therefore contributing to the homeostasis of membrane fluidity and permeability in salt stress conditions. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    the apoprotein. Escherichia coli lipid and DOPG (and to a smaller extent DOPC) increase Ffh's α-helical content, possibly related to Ffh's role in guiding membrane proteins to the membrane. Binding is largely mediated by electrostatic interactions but does not protect Ffh against trypsinolysis. We conclude...... that Ffh is a structurally flexible and dynamic protein whose stability is significantly modulated by the environment. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  8. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  9. Lipid diffusion in planar membranes investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Hof, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1798, č. 7 (2010), s. 1377-1391 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0114; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported lipid bilayer * giant unilamellar vesicle * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.647, year: 2010

  10. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haarmann, Raimund; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Stevanovic, Mara; Bredemeier, Rolf; Schleiff, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The β-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  11. Saturation recovery EPR spin-labeling method for quantification of lipids in biological membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Laxman; Camenisch, Theodore G; Hyde, James S; Subczynski, Witold K

    2017-12-01

    The presence of integral membrane proteins induces the formation of distinct domains in the lipid bilayer portion of biological membranes. Qualitative application of both continuous wave (CW) and saturation recovery (SR) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-labeling methods allowed discrimination of the bulk, boundary, and trapped lipid domains. A recently developed method, which is based on the CW EPR spectra of phospholipid (PL) and cholesterol (Chol) analog spin labels, allows evaluation of the relative amount of PLs (% of total PLs) in the boundary plus trapped lipid domain and the relative amount of Chol (% of total Chol) in the trapped lipid domain [ M. Raguz, L. Mainali, W. J. O'Brien, and W. K. Subczynski (2015), Exp. Eye Res., 140:179-186 ]. Here, a new method is presented that, based on SR EPR spin-labeling, allows quantitative evaluation of the relative amounts of PLs and Chol in the trapped lipid domain of intact membranes. This new method complements the existing one, allowing acquisition of more detailed information about the distribution of lipids between domains in intact membranes. The methodological transition of the SR EPR spin-labeling approach from qualitative to quantitative is demonstrated. The abilities of this method are illustrated for intact cortical and nuclear fiber cell plasma membranes from porcine eye lenses. Statistical analysis (Student's t -test) of the data allowed determination of the separations of mean values above which differences can be treated as statistically significant ( P ≤ 0.05) and can be attributed to sources other than preparation/technique.

  12. Effects of seaweed sterols fucosterol and desmosterol on lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Duelund, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Higher sterols are universally present in large amounts (20–30%) in the plasma membranes of all eukaryotes whereas they are universally absent in prokaryotes. It is remarkable that each kingdom of the eukaryotes has chosen, during the course of evolution, its preferred sterol: cholesterol...

  13. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  14. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J.; Calero, C.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10 −5 cm 2 /s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10 −8 cm 2 /s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of its interaction

  15. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J., E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Calero, C. [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Center for Polymer Studies, Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  16. Effect of tea catechins on the structure of lipid membrane and beta-ray induced lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, M.; Haga, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Okuno, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibiting effect of four tea catechins, (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on the lipid peroxidation induced by β-ray in tritiated water was examined using a spin probe method. 16-Doxylstearic acid (16NS) was incorporated into the liposome prepared from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and the rate of the decrease of ESR intensity of 16NS was used as a measure of the inhibiting effect. In the low concentration region below 10 -5 M, catechins showed their inhibitions on the lipid peroxidation according to the order of ECG>EGCG>EC>EGC. This result was explained by a model that the initiator of the peroxidation is the hydroxyl radical (·OH) and the catechins adsorbed on the lipid membrane surface acting as scavengers of ·OH. In the high concentration range, however, the effect was diverse and it decreased with the increase of it in the case of EGCG. EGCG in this range was considered to enter into the interior of the membrane and break the structure, which causes the decrease of 16NS. Observation with transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed that the size of the liposome became larger with the increasing concentration of EGCG and finally it was broken into fragments, showing that EGCG broadened the area of the liposome as expected from the result of ESR. (author)

  17. Drug binding and mobility relating to the thermal fluctuation in fluid lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Emiko; Yoshii, Noriyuki

    2008-12-01

    Drug binding and mobility in fluid lipid bilayer membranes are quantified in situ by using the multinuclear solution NMR combined with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. One-dimensional and pulsed-field-gradient F19 and H1 NMR signals of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) are analyzed at 283-313 K in the presence of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) as model cell membranes. The simultaneous observation of the membrane-bound and free 5FU signals enables to quantify in what amount of 5FU is bound to the membrane and how fast 5FU is moving within the membrane in relation to the thermal fluctuation of the soft, fluid environment. It is shown that the mobility of membrane-bound 5FU is slowed down by almost two orders of magnitude and similar to the lipid movement in the membrane, the movement closely related to the intramembrane fluidity. The mobility of 5FU and EPC is, however, not similar at 313 K; the 5FU movement is enhanced in the membrane as a result of the loose binding of 5FU in the lipid matrices. The membrane-bound fraction of 5FU is ˜0.1 and almost unaltered over the temperature range examined. It is also independent of the 5FU concentration from 2 to 30 mM with respect to the 40-50 mM LUV. The free energy of the 5FU binding is estimated at -4 to -2 kJ/mol, the magnitude always close to the thermal fluctuation, 2.4-2.6 kJ/mol.

  18. Quantification of Protein-Induced Membrane Remodeling Kinetics In Vitro with Lipid Multilayer Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Troy W.; Hariri, Hanaa; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey; Vafai, Nicholas; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Van Winkle, David H.; Stagg, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at micro- and nanoscopic scales. Consequently, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of supramolecular remodeling such as vesicle formation from planar lipid bilayers or multilayers are needed to understand cellular self-organization. Here, a new nanotechnology-based method for quantitative measurements of lipid–protein interactions is presented and its suitability for quantifying the membrane binding, inflation, and budding activity of the membrane-remodeling protein Sar1 is demonstrated. Lipid multilayer gratings are printed onto surfaces using nanointaglio and exposed to Sar1, resulting in the inflation of lipid multilayers into unilamellar structures, which can be observed in a label-free manner by monitoring the diffracted light. Local variations in lipid multilayer volume on the surface is used to vary substrate availability in a microarray format. A quantitative model is developed that allows quantification of binding affinity (KD) and kinetics (kon and koff). Importantly, this assay is uniquely capable of quantifying membrane remodeling. Upon Sar1-induced inflation of single bilayers from surface supported multilayers, the semicylindrical grating lines are observed to remodel into semispherical buds when a critical radius of curvature is reached. PMID:26649649

  19. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaindl, T; Oelke, J; Kaufmann, S; Tanaka, M; Pasc, A; Konovalov, O V; Funari, S S; Engel, U; Wixforth, A

    2010-01-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling α-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  20. Marine crenarchaeotal membrane lipids in decapods: Implications for the TEX86 paleothermometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huguet, C.; Cartes, J.E.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2006-01-01

    Pelagic Crenarchaeota produce glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) as membrane lipids, and the GDGT composition changes according to growth temperature. This forms the basis of the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy. This ratio correlates with sea surface temperature (SST) despite the fact

  1. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppressor mutants devoid of the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, X.

    2018-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant membrane lipid in most eukaryotes and considered essential. The yeast double deletion mutant cho2opi3 lacks the methyltransferases converting phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to PC. As a consequence, the cho2opi3 mutant is a choline auxotroph that relies on

  2. Clearing the outer mitochondrial membrane from harmful proteins via lipid droplets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bischof, J.; Salzmann, M.; Streubel, M.K.; Hašek, Jiří; Geltinger, F.; Duschl, J.; Bresgen, N.; Briza, P.; Hašková, Danuša; Lejsková, Renata; Sopjani, M.; Richter, K.; Rinnerthaler, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 3, March 20 (2017), č. článku 17016. E-ISSN 2058-7716 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05497S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB16AT006 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mitochondrial membrane * harmful protein s * lipid droplets Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology

  3. Lipids and proteins in membranes: From in silico to in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cebecauer, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2012), s. 115-117 ISSN 0968-7688 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/0459 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : lipids * proteins * membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.130, year: 2012

  4. Regional differences in the lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, J.E.; Dohmen, M.R.; Tertoolen, L.G.J.; Laat, S.W. de

    1985-01-01

    Regional and temporal differences in plasma membrane lipid mobility have been analyzed during the first three cleavage cycles of the embryo of the polar-lobe-forming mollusc Nassarius reticulatus by the fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) method, using 1,1′-ditetradecyl

  5. ROLE OF MEMBRANE LIPID-COMPOSITION IN THE CYTOTOXICITY OF THE SESQUITERPENE LACTONE EUPATORIOPICRIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDE, JCC; WOERDENBAG, HJ; MALINGRE, TM; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate a possible role of lipid peroxidation in the cytotoxicity of eupatoriopicrin, the principal sesquiterpene lactone from Eupatorum cannabinum L. Incorporation of arachidonic acid acyl chains in the phospholipids of cellular membranes of mouse fibroblast

  6. Synergistic permeability enhancing effect of lysophospholipids and fatty acids on lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    The permeability-enhancing effects of the two surfactants, 1-paltnitoyl-2-lyso-sn-gycero-3-pllosplloclloline (lysoPPC) and palmitic acid (PA), on lipid membranes that at physiological temperatures are in the gel, fluid, and liquid-ordered phases were determined using the concentration-dependent s...

  7. Constraints on the sources of branched tetraether membrane lipids in distal marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, J.W.H.; Schefuß, E.; Kim, J.-H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Schouten, S.

    2014-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are membrane lipids produced by soil bacteria and occur in near coastal marine sediments as a result of soil organic matter input. Their abundance relative to marine-derived crenarchaeol, quantified in the BIT index, generally decreases

  8. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13 C line widths and <0.5 ppm 15 N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  9. Free energies of stable and metastable pores in lipid membranes under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Otter, Wouter K

    2009-11-28

    The free energy profile of pore formation in a lipid membrane, covering the entire range from a density fluctuation in an intact bilayer to a large tension-stabilized pore, has been calculated by molecular dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained lipid model. Several fixed elongations are used to obtain the Helmholtz free energy as a function of pore size for thermodynamically stable, metastable, and unstable pores, and the system-size dependence of these elongations is discussed. A link to the Gibbs free energy at constant tension, commonly known as the Litster model, is established by a Legendre transformation. The change of genus upon pore formation is exploited to estimate the saddle-splay modulus or Gaussian curvature modulus of the membrane leaflets. Details are provided of the simulation approach, which combines the potential of mean constraint force method with a reaction coordinate based on the local lipid density.

  10. Structure and distribution of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Stroh, Cordula; Zhu Rong; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry δ-endotoxins cause death of susceptible insect larvae by forming lytic pores in the midgut epithelial cell membranes. The 65 kDa trypsin activated Cry4Ba toxin was previously shown to be capable of permeabilizing liposomes and forming ionic channels in receptor-free planar lipid bilayers. Here, magnetic ACmode (MACmode) atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the lateral distribution and the native molecular structure of the Cry4Ba toxin in the membrane. Liposome fusion and the Langmuir-Blodgett technique were employed for supported lipid bilayer preparations. The toxin preferentially inserted in a self-assembled structure, rather than as a single monomeric molecule. In addition, the spontaneous insertion into receptor-free lipid bilayers lead to formation of characteristic pore-like structures with four-fold symmetry, suggesting that tetramers are the preferred oligomerization state of this toxin

  11. Phototransformation of membrane lipids and its role in biomembrane function change under the effect of UV-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, D.I.; Anosov, A.K.; Murina, M.A.; Lordkipanidze, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    The papers devoted to the investigation of photochemical transformations of lipid under the effect of UV radiation of biological membranes are reviewed. The mechanism of peroxide photooxidation of mebrane lipid is considered. Data on the effect of antioxidants and the structure state of membranes on the process of peroxide photooxidation of lipid are presented. The problem on the role of this process under the effect of UV-radiation on blood and skin of mammals is discussed. 48 refs.; 4 refs

  12. MICOS and phospholipid transfer by Ups2-Mdm35 organize membrane lipid synthesis in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Mari J; Friedman, Jonathan R; Osman, Christof; Salin, Bénédicte; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Nunnari, Jodi; Langer, Thomas; Tatsuta, Takashi

    2016-06-06

    Mitochondria exert critical functions in cellular lipid metabolism and promote the synthesis of major constituents of cellular membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylcholine. Here, we demonstrate that the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase Psd1, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane, promotes mitochondrial PE synthesis via two pathways. First, Ups2-Mdm35 complexes (SLMO2-TRIAP1 in humans) serve as phosphatidylserine (PS)-specific lipid transfer proteins in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, allowing formation of PE by Psd1 in the inner membrane. Second, Psd1 decarboxylates PS in the outer membrane in trans, independently of PS transfer by Ups2-Mdm35. This latter pathway requires close apposition between both mitochondrial membranes and the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS). In MICOS-deficient cells, limiting PS transfer by Ups2-Mdm35 and reducing mitochondrial PE accumulation preserves mitochondrial respiration and cristae formation. These results link mitochondrial PE metabolism to MICOS, combining functions in protein and lipid homeostasis to preserve mitochondrial structure and function. © 2016 Aaltonen et al.

  13. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Castorph, S; Salditt, T [Institute for X-ray Physics, University of Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Konovalov, O [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Jahn, R; Holt, M, E-mail: sghosh1@gwdg.d, E-mail: mholt@gwdg.d, E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.d [Department of Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). Although PIP{sub 2} is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP{sub 2} incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP{sub 2} incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca{sup 2+} ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  14. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S K; Castorph, S; Salditt, T; Konovalov, O; Jahn, R; Holt, M

    2010-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Although PIP 2 is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP 2 incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP 2 incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca 2+ ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  15. Interactions between the intermediate filaments of vimentin and natural or artificial lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perides, G.

    1986-01-01

    The study has provided evidence to prove that intermediate filaments (IF) are not only encountered in the vicinity of several cellular membrane systems but even become attached to those membranes by stable mechanical bonds. Studies using photoaffinity markers permitted to show in vivo that vimentin occurs in the immediate neighbourhood of membrane lipids. Titration of cellular membranes with radioactively labelled vimentin and desmin pointed to the fact that there is a large excess of acceptor molecules for IF proteins, from which it was concluded that vimentin directly binds to the lipids. This is also consistent with the finding that vesicles made up of cellular lipids readily bind to vimentin filaments and may even interfere with the formation of the latter. The highest vimentin affinity was observed for negatively charged phospholipids, which led to the theory that the association of IF and cellular membranes is firstly attributable to an interaction between the positive N-terminals of IF proteins and upper polar groups of negative phospholipids. The binding of vimentin to cellular mebranes changes under the influence of cellular growth processes and extracellular factors. This was also suggested by the reduced amounts of membrane-bound vimentin found after the incubation of cells in a serum-free medium and the prompt increases in the vimentin content of those membranes, after serum was added. This is one example, among several others, to show that the reactions between IF and cellular membranes are of a reversible nature and controlled and shaped by the cell itself. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Impact of two different saponins on the organization of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchowiec, Beata; Gorczyca, Marcelina; Wojszko, Kamila; Janikowska, Maria; Henry, Max; Rogalska, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    Saponins, naturally occurring plant compounds are known for their biological and pharmacological activity. This activity is strongly related to the amphiphilic character of saponins that allows them to aggregate in aqueous solution and interact with membrane components. In this work, Langmuir monolayer techniques combined with polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and Brewster angle microscopy were used to study the interaction of selected saponins with lipid model membranes. Two structurally different saponins were used: digitonin and a commercial Merck Saponin. Membranes of different composition, namely, cholesterol, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) were formed at the air/water and air/saponin solution interfaces. The saponin-lipid interaction was characterized by changes in surface pressure, surface potential, surface morphology and PM-IRRAS signal. Both saponins interact with model membranes and change the physical state of membranes by perturbing the lipid acyl chain orientation. The changes in membrane fluidity were more significant upon the interaction with Merck Saponin. A higher affinity of saponins for cholesterol than phosphatidylglycerols was observed. Moreover, our results indicate that digitonin interacts strongly with cholesterol and solubilize the cholesterol monolayer at higher surface pressures. It was shown, that digitonin easily penetrate to the cholesterol monolayer and forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxyl groups. These findings might be useful in further understanding of the saponin action at the membrane interface and of the mechanism of membrane lysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Formation of Bimolecular Membranes from Lipid Monolayers and a Study of Their Electrical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montal, M.; Mueller, P.

    1972-01-01

    Bimolecular membranes are formed from two lipid monolayers at an air-water interface by the apposition of their hydrocarbon chains when an aperture in a Teflon partition separating two aqueous phases is lowered through the interface. Formation of the membrane is monitored by an increase of the electrical capacity, as measured with a voltage clamp. Electrical resistance of the unmodified membrane is analogous to that of conventional planar bilayers (black lipid membranes) prepared in the presence of a hydrocarbon solvent, i.e., 106-108 ohm cm2; the resistance can be lowered to values of 103 ohm cm2 by gramicidin, an antibiotic that modifies the conductance only when the membranes are of biomolecular thickness. In contrast to the resistance, there is a significant difference between the capacity of bilayers made from mono-layers and that of hydrocarbon-containing bilayers made by phase transition; the average values are 0.9 and 0.45 μF cm-2, respectively. The value of 0.9 μF cm-2 approximates that of biological membranes. Assuming a dielectric constant of 2.1 for the hydrocarbon region, the dielectric thickness, as calculated from a capacity of 0.9 μF cm-2, is 22 Å. This value is 6-10 Å smaller than the actual thickness of the hydrocarbon region of bilayers and cell membranes, as determined by x-ray diffraction. The difference may be due to a limited penetration of water into the hydrocarbon region near the ester groups that would lower the electrical resistance of this region and reduce the dielectric thickness. Asymmetric membranes have been formed by adjoining two lipid monolayers of different chemical composition. Images PMID:4509315

  18. Radiation effects on membranes. I. Vitamin E deficiency and lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, A.W.T.; Drijver, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    Mice which had received a vitamin E-deficient diet from weaning on, were more sensitive to x irradiation than were normal mice, LD/sub 50/30/ being decreased by 0.25 Gy. The vitamin E-deficient mice also showed an increased spleen shrinkage. The cellular membranes of the vitamin E-deficient mice were more vulnerable to lipid peroxidation. X irradiation in vivo shortened the lag period prior to rapid lipid peroxidation as measured in vitro. Injection of the mice with glutathione prior to x irradiation protected the membranes in the in vitro test of peroxidation capacity as was demonstrated by an extended lag period. The possible meaning of these results with respect to the concept that membranes may be important sites for radiation damage is discussed

  19. Effect of Galactosylceramide on the Dynamics of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, A.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We use atom-scale molecular dynamics simulations to clarify the role of glycosphingolipids in the dynamics of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. To this end, we consider lipid membranes that contain varying. amounts of galactosylceramide (GalCer), sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine....... The results indicate that increasing the portion of GalCer molecules greatly slows down the lateral diffusion, Only 5-10 mol % of GalCer causes a decrease of almost an order of magnitude compared to corresponding membranes without GalCer. The slowing down is not related to interdigitation, which becomes...... weaker with increasing GalCer concentration. Instead, the decrease in diffusion is found to correlate with the increasing number of hydrogen bonds formed between GalCer and the phospholipid molecules, which is also observed to have other effects, such as to increase the friction between the membrane...

  20. COMPLETE RESOLUTION OF LARGE RETINAL FOLD AFTER TRANSECTION OF RETROLENTAL MEMBRANE DURING LENS-SPARING VITRECTOMY FOR RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY: A 15-YEAR FOLLOW-UP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin J; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Trese, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    To describe the long-term anatomical and visual outcomes of a patient with retinopathy of prematurity characterized by a prominent retinal fold adherent to the posterior lens capsule, treated by lens-sparing vitrectomy with surgical transection of the retrolental membrane. A premature infant was born at a gestational age of 25 weeks and birthweight of 636 g. She developed threshold retinopathy of prematurity bilaterally and was subsequently treated with laser ablative therapy. The left eye responded favorably, with regression of neovascularization; however, the right eye progressed to Stage 4A with a prominent retinal fold adherent to the posterior lens capsule. The patient underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy with dissection of the retrolental membrane at postmenstrual age of 44 weeks. At 15-year follow-up, the patient has maintained a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/60 and, of note, demonstrated complete resolution of the previous retinal fold. Surgical treatment for retinopathy of prematurity was considerably advanced by the introduction of lens-sparing vitrectomy techniques; however, cases developing retrolental membranes often persisted with poor visual outcomes, and lensectomy is conventionally performed. However, in select cases of Stage 4A retinopathy of prematurity, careful transection of retrolental membranes during lens-sparing vitrectomy using the appropriate technique may provide very good anatomical and visual outcomes.

  1. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Fuller

    Full Text Available Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3P embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  2. Model studies of lipid flip-flop in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parisio, Giulia; Ferrarini, Alberta; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    , and growth heavily depend. Such transverse motion—commonly called flip-flop—has been studied both experimentally and computationally. Experimental investigations face difficulties related to time-scales and probe-induced membrane perturbation issues. Molecular dynamics simulations play an important role...... for the molecular-level understanding of flip-flop. In this review we present a summary of the state of the art of computational studies of spontaneous flip-flop of phospholipids, sterols and fatty acids. Also, we highlight critical issues and strategies that have been developed to solve them, and what remains...

  3. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, T.M.; Boyer, M.J.; Keith, J.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 [ 35 S]methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of [ 3 H]palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from 125 I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of [ 3 H]palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins

  4. Snake cytotoxins bind to membranes via interactions with phosphatidylserine head groups of lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia G Konshina

    Full Text Available The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs, share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS, and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against

  5. Lipid raft proteome reveals that oxidative phosphorylation system is associated with the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Woo; Lee, Chang Seok; Yi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Joo-Hyung; Lee, Joong-Won; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Jung, Soon-Young; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Myung-Shik; Yoon, Gyesoon; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2010-12-01

    Although accumulating proteomic analyses have supported the fact that mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes are localized in lipid rafts, which mediate cell signaling, immune response and host-pathogen interactions, there has been no in-depth study of the physiological functions of lipid-raft OXPHOS complexes. Here, we show that many subunits of OXPHOS complexes were identified from the lipid rafts of human adipocytes, C2C12 myotubes, Jurkat cells and surface biotin-labeled Jurkat cells via shotgun proteomic analysis. We discuss the findings of OXPHOS complexes in lipid rafts, the role of the surface ATP synthase complex as a receptor for various ligands and extracellular superoxide generation by plasma membrane oxidative phosphorylation complexes.

  6. 3D pressure field in lipid membranes and membrane-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Risselada, H Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also...... a protein-membrane complex. We show that the 3D pressure field is distinctly different for curved and planar bilayers, the pressure field depends strongly on the phase of the membrane, and that an integral protein modulates the tension and elastic properties of the membrane....

  7. Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis

    2007-01-01

    scanning calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and two-photon excitation and laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Here we show that hydrated bilayers of human skin stratum corneum lipids express a giant sponge-like morphology with dimensions corresponding to the global three......-dimensional morphology of the stratum corneum extracellular space. These structures can be directly visualized using the aforementioned fluorescence microscopy techniques. At skin physiological temperatures (28 degrees C-32 degrees C), the phase state of these hydrated bilayers correspond microscopically (radial...

  8. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Timothy A; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E; Prinz, William A

    2009-12-14

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Using Osh4p/Kes1p as a representative ORP, we show that ORPs have at least two membrane-binding surfaces; one near the mouth of the sterol-binding pocket and a distal site that can bind a second membrane. The distal site is required for the protein to function in cells and, remarkably, regulates the rate at which Osh4p extracts and delivers sterols in a phosphoinositide-dependent manner. Together, these findings suggest a new model of how ORPs could sense and regulate the lipid composition of adjacent membranes.

  9. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field on Membrane Lipids and Oxidative Injury of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ou; Zeng, Xin-An; Brennan, Charles S; Han, Zhong

    2016-08-22

    Salmonella typhimurium cells were subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at 25 kV/cm for 0-4 ms to investigate the effect of PEF on the cytoplasmic membrane lipids and oxidative injury of cells. Results indicated that PEF treatment induced a decrease of membrane fluidity of Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimuriumi), possibly due to the alterations of fatty acid biosynthesis-associated gene expressions (down-regulation of cfa and fabA gene expressions and the up-regulation of fabD gene expression), which, in turn, modified the composition of membrane lipid (decrease in the content ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids). In addition, oxidative injury induced by PEF treatment was associated with an increase in the content of malondialdehyde. The up-regulation of cytochrome bo oxidase gene expressions (cyoA, cyoB, and cyoC) indicated that membrane damage was induced by PEF treatment, which was related to the repairing mechanism of alleviating the oxidative injury caused by PEF treatment. Based on these results, we achieved better understanding of microbial injury induced by PEF, suggesting that micro-organisms tend to decrease membrane fluidity in response to PEF treatment and, thus, a greater membrane fluidity might improve the efficiency of PEF treatment to inactivate micro-organisms.

  10. Length and sequence dependence in the association of Huntingtin protein with lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawahery, Sudi; Nagarajan, Anu; Matysiak, Silvina

    2013-03-01

    There is a fundamental gap in our understanding of how aggregates of mutant Huntingtin protein (htt) with overextended polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences gain the toxic properties that cause Huntington's disease (HD). Experimental studies have shown that the most important step associated with toxicity is the binding of mutant htt aggregates to lipid membranes. Studies have also shown that flanking amino acid sequences around the polyQ sequence directly affect interactions with the lipid bilayer, and that polyQ sequences of greater than 35 glutamine repeats in htt are a characteristic of HD. The key steps that determine how flanking sequences and polyQ length affect the structure of lipid bilayers remain unknown. In this study, we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between lipid membranes of varying compositions and polyQ peptides of varying lengths and flanking sequences. We find that overextended polyQ interactions do cause deformation in model membranes, and that the flanking sequences do play a role in intensifying this deformation by altering the shape of the affected regions.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  12. Segregated phases in pulmonary surfactant membranes do not show coexistence of lipid populations with differentiated dynamic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Orädd, Greger; Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    surfactant membranes and membranes reconstituted from two surfactant hydrophobic fractions (i.e., all the lipids plus the hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C, or only the total lipid fraction). These preparations show micrometer-sized fluid ordered/disordered phase coexistence, associated with a broad...... endothermic transition ending close to 37°C. However, both types of membrane exhibit uniform lipid mobility when analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance with different spin-labeled phospholipids. A similar feature is observed with pulse-field gradient NMR experiments on oriented membranes reconstituted...... from the two types of surfactant hydrophobic extract. These latter results suggest that lipid dynamics are similar in the coexisting fluid phases observed by fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, it is found that surfactant proteins significantly reduce the average intramolecular lipid mobility...

  13. Correlated lateral phase separations in stacks of lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Takuma, E-mail: hoshino-takuma@ed.tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Komura, Shigeyuki, E-mail: komura@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Andelman, David, E-mail: andelman@post.tau.ac.il [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-12-28

    Motivated by the experimental study of Tayebi et al. [Nat. Mater. 11, 1074 (2012)] on phase separation of stacked multi-component lipid bilayers, we propose a model composed of stacked two-dimensional Ising spins. We study both its static and dynamical features using Monte Carlo simulations with Kawasaki spin exchange dynamics that conserves the order parameter. We show that at thermodynamical equilibrium, due to strong inter-layer correlations, the system forms a continuous columnar structure for any finite interaction across adjacent layers. Furthermore, the phase separation shows a faster dynamics as the inter-layer interaction is increased. This temporal behavior is mainly due to an effective deeper temperature quench because of the larger value of the critical temperature, T{sub c}, for larger inter-layer interaction. When the temperature ratio, T/T{sub c}, is kept fixed, the temporal growth exponent does not increase and even slightly decreases as a function of the increased inter-layer interaction.

  14. Effect of piroxicam on lipid membranes: Drug encapsulation and gastric toxicity aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkosz, Natalia; Rissanen, Sami; Cyza, Małgorzata; Szybka, Renata; Nowakowska, Maria; Bunker, Alex; Róg, Tomasz; Kepczynski, Mariusz

    2017-03-30

    Uptake of piroxicam, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, from the intestines after oral intake is limited due to its low solubility and its wide use is associated with several side effects related to the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and fluorescent spectroscopy were employed to investigate the interaction of piroxicam in neutral, zwitterionic, and cationic forms with lipid bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and PEGylated lipids. Our study was aimed to assess the potential for encapsulation of piroxicam in liposomal carriers and to shed more light on the process of gastrointestinal tract injury by the drug. Through both the MD simulations and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we have demonstrated that all forms of piroxicam can associate with the lipid bilayers and locate close to the water-membrane interface. Conventional liposomes used in drug delivery are usually stabilized by the addition of cholesterol and have their bloodstream lifetime extended through the inclusion of PEGylated lipids in the formulation to create a protective polymer corona. For this reason, we tested the effect of these two modifications on the behavior of piroxicam in the membrane. When the bilayer was PEGylated, piroxicam localize to the PEG layer and within the lipid headgroup region. This suggests that PEGylated liposomes are capable of carrying a larger quantity of piroxicam than the conventional ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Silicon-on-insulator based nanopore cavity arrays for lipid membrane investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, K; Tinazli, A; Kleefen, A; Dorfner, D; Pedone, D; Rant, U; Tampé, R; Abstreiter, G; Tornow, M

    2008-11-05

    We present the fabrication and characterization of nanopore microcavities for the investigation of transport processes in suspended lipid membranes. The cavities are situated below the surface of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. Single cavities and large area arrays were prepared using high resolution electron-beam lithography in combination with reactive ion etching (RIE) and wet chemical sacrificial underetching. The locally separated compartments have a circular shape and allow the enclosure of picoliter volume aqueous solutions. They are sealed at their top by a 250 nm thin Si membrane featuring pores with diameters from 2 µm down to 220 nm. The Si surface exhibits excellent smoothness and homogeneity as verified by AFM analysis. As biophysical test system we deposited lipid membranes by vesicle fusion, and demonstrated their fluid-like properties by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. As clearly indicated by AFM measurements in aqueous buffer solution, intact lipid membranes successfully spanned the pores. The nanopore cavity arrays have potential applications in diagnostics and pharmaceutical research on transmembrane proteins.

  16. Membrane lipid alterations in the metabolic syndrome and the role of dietary oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, Javier S

    2017-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of pathological conditions, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and low HDL levels that is of great concern worldwide, as individuals with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance, the key feature of the metabolic syndrome, might be at the same time cause and consequence of impaired lipid composition in plasma membranes of insulin-sensitive tissues like liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Diet intervention has been proposed as a powerful tool to prevent the development of the metabolic syndrome, since healthy diets have been shown to have a protective role against the components of the metabolic syndrome. Particularly, dietary fatty acids are capable of modulating the deleterious effects of these conditions, among other mechanisms, by modifications of the lipid composition of the membranes in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, there is still scarce data based of high-level evidence on the effects of dietary oils on the effects of the metabolic syndrome and its components. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the effects of dietary oils on improving alterations of the components of the metabolic syndrome. It also examines their influence in the modulation of plasma membrane lipid composition and in the functionality of membrane proteins involved in insulin activity, like the insulin receptor, GLUT-4, CD36/FAT and ABCA-1, and their effect in the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and cholesterol, and, in turn, the key features of the metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Acid sphingomyelinase activity is regulated by membrane lipids and facilitates cholesterol transfer by NPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oninla, Vincent O; Breiden, Bernadette; Babalola, Jonathan O; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2014-12-01

    During endocytosis, membrane components move to intraluminal vesicles of the endolysosomal compartment for digestion. At the late endosomes, cholesterol is sorted out mainly by two sterol-binding proteins, Niemann-Pick protein type C (NPC)1 and NPC2. To study the NPC2-mediated intervesicular cholesterol transfer, we developed a liposomal assay system. (Abdul-Hammed, M., B. Breiden, M. A. Adebayo, J. O. Babalola, G. Schwarzmann, and K. Sandhoff. 2010. Role of endosomal membrane lipids and NPC2 in cholesterol transfer and membrane fusion. J. Lipid Res. 51: 1747-1760.) Anionic lipids stimulate cholesterol transfer between liposomes while SM inhibits it, even in the presence of anionic bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP). Preincubation of vesicles containing SM with acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) (SM phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12) results in hydrolysis of SM to ceramide (Cer), which enhances cholesterol transfer. Besides SM, ASM also cleaves liposomal phosphatidylcholine. Anionic phospholipids derived from the plasma membrane (phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid) stimulate SM and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by ASM more effectively than BMP, which is generated during endocytosis. ASM-mediated hydrolysis of liposomal SM was also stimulated by incorporation of diacylglycerol (DAG), Cer, and free fatty acids into the liposomal membranes. Conversely, phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis was inhibited by incorporation of cholesterol, Cer, DAG, monoacylglycerol, and fatty acids. Our data suggest that SM degradation by ASM is required for physiological secretion of cholesterol from the late endosomal compartment, and is a key regulator of endolysosomal lipid digestion. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Defense related decadienal elicits membrane lipid remodeling in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Sabharwal

    Full Text Available Diatoms rapidly release extracellular oxylipins (oxygenated lipids including polyunsaturated aldehydes in response to herbivory and other stresses. Oxylipins have several defense-related activities including inhibition of reproduction in herbivores and signaling to distant diatoms. Physiological changes in diatoms exposed to varying levels of oxylipins are only beginning to be understood. In this study, Phaeodactylum tricornutum cultures were treated with sublethal concentrations of the polyunsaturated aldehyde trans,trans-2,4-decadienal (DD to assess effects on lipid composition and membrane permeability. In cells treated with DD for 3 hr, all measured saturated and unsaturated fatty acids significantly decreased (0.46-0.69 fold of levels in solvent control cells except for 18:2 (decreased but not significantly. The decrease was greater in the polyunsaturated fatty acid pool than the saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid pool. Analysis of lipid classes revealed increased abundances of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine at 3 and 6 hr. Concomitantly, these and other membrane lipids exhibited increased saturated and monounsaturated acyl chains content relative to polyunsaturated acyl chains compared to control cells. Evidence of decreased plasma membrane permeability in DD treated cells was obtained, based on reduced uptake of two of three dyes relative to control cells. Additionally, cells pre-conditioned with a sublethal DD dose for 3 hr then treated with a lethal DD dose for 2 hr exhibited greater membrane integrity than solvent pre-conditioned control cells that were similarly treated. Taken together, the data are supportive of the hypothesis that membrane remodeling induced by sublethal DD is a key element in the development of cellular resistance in diatoms to varying and potentially toxic levels of polyunsaturated aldehydes in environments impacted by herbivory or other stresses.

  19. Permeabilization assay for antimicrobial peptides based on pore-spanning lipid membranes on nanoporous alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubacher, Henrik; Mey, Ingo; Carnarius, Christian; Lazzara, Thomas D; Steinem, Claudia

    2014-04-29

    Screening tools to study antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with the aim to optimize therapeutic delivery vectors require automated and parallelized sampling based on chip technology. Here, we present the development of a chip-based assay that allows for the investigation of the action of AMPs on planar lipid membranes in a time-resolved manner by fluorescence readout. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) composed of cylindrical pores with a diameter of 70 nm and a thickness of up to 10 μm was used as a support to generate pore-spanning lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicle spreading, which resulted in large continuous membrane patches sealing the pores. Because AAO is optically transparent, fluid single lipid bilayers and the underlying pore cavities can be readily observed by three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To assay the membrane permeabilizing activity of the AMPs, the translocation of the water-soluble dyes into the AAO cavities and the fluorescence of the sulforhodamine 101 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanol-l-amine triethylammonium salt (Texas Red DHPE)-labeled lipid membrane were observed by CLSM in a time-resolved manner as a function of the AMP concentration. The effect of two different AMPs, magainin-2 and melittin, was investigated, showing that the concentrations required for membrane permeabilization and the kinetics of the dye entrance differ significantly. Our results are discussed in light of the proposed permeabilization models of the two AMPs. The presented data demonstrate the potential of this setup for the development of an on-chip screening platform for AMPs.

  20. The in vivo structure of biological membranes and evidence for lipid domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, Jonathan D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Chatterjee, Sneha [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stanley, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qian, Shuo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Myles, Dean A. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Standaert, Robert F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Elkins, James G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Katsaras, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Lopez, Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-05-23

    Examining the fundamental structure and processes of living cells at the nanoscale poses a unique analytical challenge, as cells are dynamic, chemically diverse, and fragile. A case in point is the cell membrane, which is too small to be seen directly with optical microscopy and provides little observational contrast for other methods. As a consequence, nanoscale characterization of the membrane has been performed ex vivo or in the presence of exogenous labels used to enhance contrast and impart specificity. Here, we introduce an isotopic labeling strategy in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis to investigate the nanoscale structure and organization of its plasma membrane in vivo. Through genetic and chemical manipulation of the organism, we labeled the cell and its membrane independently with specific amounts of hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D). These isotopes have different neutron scattering properties without altering the chemical composition of the cells. From neutron scattering spectra, we confirmed that the B. subtilis cell membrane is lamellar and determined that its average hydrophobic thickness is 24.3 ± 0.9 Ångstroms (Å). Furthermore, by creating neutron contrast within the plane of the membrane using a mixture of H- and D-fatty acids, we detected lateral features smaller than 40 nm that are consistent with the notion of lipid rafts. These experiments—performed under biologically relevant conditions—answer long-standing questions in membrane biology and illustrate a fundamentally new approach for systematic in vivo investigations of cell membrane structure.

  1. Crossover of two power laws in the anomalous diffusion of a two lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalis, Evangelos, E-mail: ebakalis@gmail.com, E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco, E-mail: ebakalis@gmail.com, E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Universita’ di Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Venturini, Alessandro [Institute for the Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity, National Research Council of Italy, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bi-layer membrane made by the same number of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine lipids reveal sub-diffusional motion, which presents a crossover between two different power laws. Fractional Brownian motion is the stochastic mechanism that governs the motion in both regimes. The location of the crossover point is justified with simple geometrical arguments and is due to the activation of the mechanism of circumrotation of lipids about each other.

  2. Crossover of two power laws in the anomalous diffusion of a two lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Höfinger, Siegfried; Venturini, Alessandro; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bi-layer membrane made by the same number of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine lipids reveal sub-diffusional motion, which presents a crossover between two different power laws. Fractional Brownian motion is the stochastic mechanism that governs the motion in both regimes. The location of the crossover point is justified with simple geometrical arguments and is due to the activation of the mechanism of circumrotation of lipids about each other.

  3. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Peter G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swingle, Kirstie L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paxton, Walter F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nogan, John J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stromberg, Loreen R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Firestone, Millicent A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montaño, Gabriel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.

  4. Pharmacological aspects of release from microcapsules - from polymeric multilayers to lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuytens, Pieter; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Yashchenok, Alexey; Winterhalter, Mathias; Skirtach, Andre

    2014-10-01

    This review is devoted to pharmacological applications of principles of release from capsules to overcome the membrane barrier. Many of these principles were developed in the context of polymeric multilayer capsule membrane modulation, but they are also pertinent to liposomes, polymersomes, capsosomes, particles, emulsion-based carriers and other carriers. We look at these methods from the physical, chemical or biological driving mechanisms point of view. In addition to applicability for carriers in drug delivery, these release methods are significant for another area directly related to pharmacology - modulation of the permeability of the membranes and thus promoting the action of drugs. Emerging technologies, including ionic current monitoring through a lipid membrane on a nanopore, are also highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural role of lipids in mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes: freeze-fracture electron microscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, L; Mehard, C W; Meissner, G; Zahler, W L; Fleischer, S

    1974-01-01

    The role of phospholipid in the structure of the membranes of beef heart mitochondria and of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes from rabbit skeletal muscle has been investigated by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Progressive removal of membrane phospholipids, by phospholipase A treatment or detergent treatment, or by organic solvent extraction, results in loss of the smooth background seen in membrane fracture faces and decreased ability of membrane to undergo freeze fracture to yield fracture faces. Instead cross-sections of vesicles or particle clusters are observed. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles have a 9 to 1 asymmetry in the distribution of particles between the convex and concave fracture faces. There is also a wide range of particle size distribution in both of these fracture faces with 85-A particles in greatest number. The removal of membrane associated proteins by detergent extraction does not appreciably change the distribution in particle size. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were dissolved with detergent and reassembled to form membrane vesicles containing mainly one protein (approx. 90%), i.e., the Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein, and with a ratio of lipid to protein similar to the original membrane. The reconstituted vesicles readily underwent freeze fracture but the asymmetric particle distribution between the fracture faces was no longer observed. The size distribution of particles in the reconstituted membrane, consisting mainly of Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein, and phospholipid, was similar in heterogeneity to the original sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. Thus the heterogeneity in particle size could reflect variation in the orientation of the Ca/sup 2 +/ pump protein within the membrane.

  6. On the freezing behavior and diffusion of water in proximity to single-supported zwitterionic and anionic bilayer lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the freezing/melting behavior of water hydrating single-supported bilayers of a zwitterionic lipid DMPC with that of an anionic lipid DMPG. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the elastically scattered neutron intensity indicates distinct water types undergoing...... translational diffusion: bulk-like water probably located above the membrane and two types of confined water closer to the lipid head groups. The membranes differ in the greater width of the water freezing transition near the anionic DMPG bilayer compared to zwitterionic DMPC as well as in the abruptness...

  7. Interaction of the 106-126 prion peptide with lipid membranes and potential implication for neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupiereux, Ingrid; Zorzi, Willy; Lins, Laurence; Brasseur, Robert; Colson, Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Elmoualij, Benaissa

    2005-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation in the brain of an abnormally misfolded, protease-resistant, and β-sheet rich pathogenic isoform (PrP sc ) of the cellular prion protein (PrP c ). In the present work, we were interested to study the mode of prion protein interaction with the membrane using the 106-126 peptide and small unilamellar lipid vesicles as model. As previously demonstrated, we showed by MTS assay that PrP 106-126 induces alterations in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We demonstrated for the first time by lipid-mixing assay and by the liposome vesicle leakage test that PrP 106-126, a non-tilted peptide, induces liposome fusion thus a potential cell membrane destabilization, as supported by membrane integrity assay (LDH). By circular dichroism (CD) analysis we showed that the fusogenic property of PrP 106-126 in the presence of liposome is associated with a predominantly β-sheet structure. These data suggest that the fusogenic property associated with a predominant β-sheet structure exhibited by the prion peptides contributes to the neurotoxicity of these peptides by destabilizing cellular membranes. The latter might be attached at the membrane surface in a parallel orientation as shown by molecular modeling

  8. Microchemical device based on microscopic bilayer lipid membranes; Bisho 2 bunshimaku wo mochiiita maikuro kagaku debaisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, H. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    If an organism is regarded as a macromolecular system, the element device to construct the same is the molecular structure of nano meter scale formed by the functional protein existing in biomembranes. A lot of essential functions of organism such as the sense reception including vision, gustation, etc., photosynthesis, energy-substance production and so on are performed therein. In this paper, the structure, preparing process and the functions of the microchemical device using micro-bilipid membranes are described. The simulation of the sense receiving functions of organisms is tried by said microchemical device wherein, same as biomembranes, the base is bilayer lipid molecular membrane and the receptive protein for receiving signals from exterior and output molecules such as ion channels connected to said receptive protein and the like are incorporated in the membranes. Recently, it becomes possible to make a partial imaging of the bilayer lipid membranes fixed on porous membrane by the observation with scanning Maxwell-stress microscope. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. CCR5 internalisation and signalling have different dependence on membrane lipid raft integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaba, Clara Moyano; Kerr, Jason S; Mueller, Anja

    2008-09-01

    The chemokine receptor, CCR5, acts as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus entry into cells. CCR5 has been shown to be targeted to cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts or caveolae. Cholesterol is essential for CCL4 binding to CCR5 and for keeping the conformational integrity of the receptor. Filipin treatment leads to loss of caveolin-1 from the membrane and therefore to a collapse of the caveolae. We have found here that sequestration of membrane cholesterol with filipin did not affect receptor signalling, however a loss of ligand-induced internalisation of CCR5 was observed. Cholesterol extraction with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) reduced signalling through CCR5 as measured by release of intracellular Ca(2+) and completely abolished the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with no effect on internalisation. Pertussis toxin (PTX) treatment inhibited the intracellular release of calcium that is transduced via Galphai G-proteins. Depletion of cholesterol destroyed microdomains in the membrane and switched CCR5/G-protein coupling to a PTX-independent G-protein. We conclude that cholesterol in the membrane is essential for CCR5 signalling via the Galphai G-protein subunit, and that integrity of lipid rafts is not essential for effective CCR5 internalisation however it is crucial for proper CCR5 signal transduction via Galphai G-proteins.

  10. Detection and quantification through a lipid membrane using the molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavli, Danny; Tkachev, Maria; Piwonski, Hubert; Capua, Eyal; de Albuquerque, Ian; Bensimon, David; Haran, Gilad; Naaman, Ron

    2012-01-10

    The detection of covalent and noncovalent binding events between molecules and biomembranes is a fundamental goal of contemporary biochemistry and analytical chemistry. Currently, such studies are performed routinely using fluorescence methods, surface-plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and electrochemical methods. However, there is still a need for novel sensitive miniaturizable detection methods where the sample does not have to be transferred to the sensor, but the sensor can be brought into contact with the sample studied. We present a novel approach for detection and quantification of processes occurring on the surface of a lipid bilayer membrane, by monitoring the current change through the n-type GaAs-based molecularly controlled semiconductor resistor (MOCSER), on which the membrane is adsorbed. Since GaAs is susceptible to etching in an aqueous environment, a protective thin film of methoxysilane was deposited on the device. The system was found to be sensitive enough to allow monitoring changes in pH and in the concentration of amino acids in aqueous solution on top of the membrane. When biotinylated lipids were incorporated into the membrane, it was possible to monitor the binding of streptavidin or avidin. The device modified with biotin-streptavidin complex was capable of detecting the binding of streptavidin antibodies to immobilized streptavidin with high sensitivity and selectivity. The response depends on the charge on the analyte. These results open the way to facile electrical detection of protein-membrane interactions.

  11. Biophysical properties of membrane lipids of anammox bacteria : I. Ladderane phospholipids form highly organized fluid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumann, Henry A.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Stroeve, Pieter; Poolman, Bert; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Damste, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan

    Anammox bacteria that are capable of anaerobically oxidizing ammonium (anammox) with nitrite to nitrogen gas produce unique membrane phospholipids that comprise hydrocarbon chains with three or five linearly condensed cyclobutane rings. To gain insight into the biophysical properties of these

  12. The small molecule fenpropimorph rapidly converts chloroplast membrane lipids to triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanul eKim

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Concern about global warming has prompted an intense interest in developing economical methods of producing biofuels. Microalgae provide a promising platform for biofuel production, because they accumulate high levels of lipids, and do not compete with food or feed sources. However, current methods of producing algal oil involve subjecting the microalgae to stress conditions, such as nitrogen deprivation, and are prohibitively expensive. Here, we report that the fungicide fenpropimorph rapidly causes high levels of neutral lipids to accumulate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. When treated with fenpropimorph (10 μg mL–1 for 1 h, Chlamydomonas cells accumulated at least four-fold the amount of triacylglycerols (TAGs present in the untreated control cells. Furthermore, the quantity of TAGs present after 1 h of fenpropimorph treatment was over two-fold higher than that formed after 9 days of nitrogen starvation in medium with no acetate supplement. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that the accumulated TAGs were derived mainly from chloroplast polar membrane lipids. Such a conversion of chloroplast polar lipids to TAGs is desirable for biodiesel production, because polar lipids are usually removed during the biodiesel production process. Thus, our data exemplified that a cost and time effective method of producing TAGs is possible using fenpropimorph or similar drugs.

  13. Association of acylated cationic decapeptides with dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine-dipalmitoyl- phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, T. B.; Sabra, Mads Christian; Frokjaer, Sven

    2001-01-01

    decapeptides that are N-terminally linked with C-2, C-8, and C-14 acyl chains contain four basic histidine residues in their identical amino acid sequence. A binding model, based on changes in the intrinsic fluorescent properties of the peptides upon association with the DPPC-DPPS membranes, is used...... DPPC-DPPS lipid mixture. The extent of peptide association deduced from the heat capacity measurements suggests a strong binding and membrane insertion of the C-14 acylated peptide in accordance with the fluorescence measurements....

  14. Effect of acetone accumulation on structure and dynamics of lipid membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posokhov, Yevgen O; Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The modulation of the properties and function of cell membranes by small volatile substances is important for many biomedical applications. Despite available experimental results, molecular mechanisms of action of inhalants and organic solvents, such as acetone, on lipid membranes remain not well understood. To gain a better understanding of how acetone interacts with membranes, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a POPC bilayer in aqueous solution in the presence of acetone, whose concentration was varied from 2.8 to 11.2 mol%. The MD simulations of passive distribution of acetone between a bulk water phase and a lipid bilayer show that acetone favors partitioning into the water-free region of the bilayer, located near the carbonyl groups of the phospholipids and at the beginning of the hydrocarbon core of the lipid membrane. Using MD umbrella sampling, we found that the permeability barrier of ~0.5 kcal/mol exists for acetone partitioning into the membrane. In addition, a Gibbs free energy profile of the acetone penetration across a bilayer demonstrates a favorable potential energy well of -3.6 kcal/mol, located at 15-16Å from the bilayer center. The analysis of the structural and dynamics properties of the model membrane revealed that the POPC bilayer can tolerate the presence of acetone in the concentration range of 2.8-5.6 mol%. The accumulation of the higher acetone concentration of 11.2 mol% results, however, in drastic disordering of phospholipid packing and the increase in the membrane fluidity. The acetone molecules push the lipid heads apart and, hence, act as spacers in the headgroup region. This effect leads to the increase in the average headgroup area per molecule. In addition, the acyl tail region of the membrane also becomes less dense. We suggest, therefore, that the molecular mechanism of acetone action on the phospholipid bilayer has many common features with the effects of short chain alcohols, DMSO, and

  15. Urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiana Chen

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of urea on nitrogen metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla pinnata. Compared to controls, the application of urea to A. pinnata resulted in a 44% decrease in nitrogenase activity, no significant change in glutamine synthetase activity, 660% higher glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, 39% increase in free amino acid levels, 22% increase in malondialdehyde levels, 21% increase in Na+/K+- levels, 16% increase in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase levels, and 11% decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. In terms of H2O2 detoxifying enzymes, peroxidase activity did not change and catalase activity increased by 64% in urea-treated A. pinnata. These findings suggest that urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in A. pinnata.

  16. Plant P4-ATPases: lipid translocators with a role in membrane traficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    a large family of membrane proteins involved in pumping different physiologically-relevant substrates across biological membranes [4]. The members of the P4 subfamily (also known as flippases) catalyze the energy-driven translocation of lipids necessary for establishing transbilayer lipid asymmetry [5......], a feature necessary for correct functioning of the cells [6,7]. Deletion of one or more P4-ATPase genes causes defects in vesicle budding in various organisms [8-10] and some members of the yeast family have been shown to interact with the vesiculation machinery [11,12]. Thus, unraveling the key features...... of P4-ATPase functioning is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying the whole secretory and endocytic pathways. In the model plant Arabidopsis, 12 members of the P4-ATPase family have been described (ALA1-ALA12, for Aminophospholipid ATPase) [4]. In the past years, we have characterized several...

  17. Urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiana; Huang, Min; Cao, Fangbo; Pardha-Saradhi, P; Zou, Yingbin

    2017-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of urea on nitrogen metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla pinnata. Compared to controls, the application of urea to A. pinnata resulted in a 44% decrease in nitrogenase activity, no significant change in glutamine synthetase activity, 660% higher glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, 39% increase in free amino acid levels, 22% increase in malondialdehyde levels, 21% increase in Na+/K+- levels, 16% increase in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase levels, and 11% decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. In terms of H2O2 detoxifying enzymes, peroxidase activity did not change and catalase activity increased by 64% in urea-treated A. pinnata. These findings suggest that urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in A. pinnata.

  18. A low membrane lipid phase transition temperature is associated with a high cryotolerance of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus CFL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, J; Passot, S; Pénicaud, C; Guillemin, H; Cenard, S; Lieben, P; Fonseca, F

    2013-09-01

    The mechanisms of cellular damage that lactic acid bacteria incur during freeze-thaw processes have not been elucidated to date. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate in situ the lipid phase transition behavior of the membrane of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus CFL1 cells during the freeze-thaw process. Our objective was to relate the lipid membrane behavior to membrane integrity losses during freezing and to cell-freezing resistance. Cells were produced by using 2 different culture media: de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) broth (complex medium) or mild whey-based medium (minimal medium commonly used in the dairy industry), to obtain different membrane lipid compositions corresponding to different recovery rates of cell viability and functionality after freezing. The lipid membrane behavior studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was found to be different according to the cell lipid composition and cryotolerance. Freeze-resistant cells, exhibiting a higher content of unsaturated and cyclic fatty acids, presented a lower lipid phase transition temperature (Ts) during freezing (Ts=-8°C), occurring within the same temperature range as the ice nucleation, than freeze-sensitive cells (Ts=+22°C). A subzero value of lipid phase transition allowed the maintenance of the cell membrane in a relatively fluid state during freezing, thus facilitating water flux from the cell and the concomitant volume reduction following ice formation in the extracellular medium. In addition, the lipid phase transition of freeze-resistant cells occurred within a short temperature range, which could be ascribed to a reduced number of fatty acids, representing more than 80% of the total. This short lipid phase transition could be associated with a limited phenomenon of lateral phase separation and membrane permeabilization. This work highlights that membrane phase transitions occurring during freeze-thawing play a fundamental role in the

  19. Synthesis and characterization of tethered lipid assemblies for membrane protein reconstitution (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziano, Rémi; Rossi, Claire; Chenal, Alexandre; Brenner, Catherine; Ladant, Daniel; Chopineau, Joël

    2017-09-28

    Biological membranes and their related molecular mechanisms are essential for all living organisms. Membranes host numerous proteins and are responsible for the exchange of molecules and ions, cell signaling, and cell compartmentation. Indeed, the plasma membrane delimits the intracellular compartment from the extracellular environment and intracellular membranes. Biological membranes also play a major role in metabolism regulation and cellular physiology (e.g., mitochondrial membranes). The elaboration of membrane based biomimetic systems allows us to reconstitute and investigate, in controlled conditions, biological events occurring at the membrane interface. A whole variety of model membrane systems have been developed in the last few decades. Among these models, supported membranes were developed on various hydrophilic supports. The use of solid supports enables the direct use of surface sensitive techniques (e.g., surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy) to monitor and quantify events occurring at the membrane surface. Tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) could be considered as an achievement of the first solid supported membranes described by the McConnell group. Tethered bilayers on solid supports were designed to delimit an inside compartment from an outside one. They were used for measuring interactions with ligands or incorporating large membrane proteins or complexes without interference with the support. In this context, the authors developed an easy concept of versatile tBLMs assembled on amino coated substrates that are formed upon the vesicle fusion rupture process applicable to protein-free vesicles as well as proteoliposomes. The phospholipid bilayer (natural or synthetic lipids) incorporated 5% of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-poly ethylene glycol-N-hydroxy succinimide to ensure the anchorage of the bilayer to the amino coated surface. The conditions for the formation of tBLMs on amino

  20. Permeability Barrier and Microstructure of Skin Lipid Membrane Models of Impaired Glucosylceramide Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Sochorov?, Michaela; Sta?kov?, Kl?ra; Pullmannov?, Petra; Kov??ik, Andrej; Zbytovsk?, Jarmila; V?vrov?, Kate?ina

    2017-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) release from glucosylceramides (GlcCer) is critical for the formation of the skin permeability barrier. Changes in ?-glucocerebrosidase (GlcCer?ase) activity lead to diminished Cer, GlcCer accumulation and structural defects in SC lipid lamellae; however, the molecular basis for this impairment is not clear. We investigated impaired GlcCer-to-Cer processing in human Cer membranes to determine the physicochemical properties responsible for the barrier defects. Minor impairment (...

  1. Protein-membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-{alpha}-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  2. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin, E-mail: huangwm@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes.

  3. Cholesterol Bilayer Domains in the Eye Lens Health: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    The most unique biochemical characteristic of the eye lens fiber cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content, the need for which is still unclear. It is evident, however, that the disturbance of Chol homeostasis may result in damages associated with cataracts. Electron paramagnetic resonance methods allow discrimination of two types of lipid domains in model membranes overloaded with Chol, namely, phospholipid-cholesterol domains and pure Chol bilayer domains. These domains are also detected in human lens lipid membranes prepared from the total lipids extracted from lens cortices and nuclei of donors from different age groups. Independent of the age-related changes in phospholipid composition, the physical properties of phospholipid-Chol domains remain the same for all age groups and are practically identical for cortical and nuclear membranes. The presence of Chol bilayer domains in these membranes provides a buffering capacity for cholesterol concentration in the surrounding phospholipid-Chol domains, keeping it at a constant saturating level and thus keeping the physical properties of the membrane consistent with and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. It seems that the presence of Chol bilayer domains plays an integral role in the regulation of cholesterol-dependent processes in fiber cell plasm membranes and in the maintenance of fiber cell membrane homeostasis.

  4. Regional differences in the lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speksnijder, J E; Dohmen, M R; Tertoolen, L G; de Laat, S W

    1985-07-01

    Regional and temporal differences in plasma membrane lipid mobility have been analyzed during the first three cleavage cycles of the embryo of the polar-lobe-forming mollusc Nassarius reticulatus by the fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) method, using 1,1'-ditetradecyl 3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine iodide (C14diI) as a fluorescent lipid probe. During this period of development the lateral diffusion coefficient of membrane lipids is consistently greater in the vegetal polar lobe area as compared to the animal plasma membrane area (on average 30%), demonstrating the existence of an animal-vegetal polarity in plasma membrane properties. At third cleavage, the differences between animal and vegetal plasma membrane region become even more pronounced; in the four animal micromeres the diffusion coefficient (D) and mobile fraction (MF) are 2.9 +/- 0.2 X 10(-9) cm2/sec and 51 +/- 2%, respectively, while in the four vegetal macromeres D = 5.0 +/- 0.3 X 10(-9) cm2/sec and MF = 78 +/- 2%. Superimposed upon the observed animal-vegetal polarity, the lateral diffusion in the polar lobe membrane area shows a cell-cycle-dependent modulation. The highest mean values for D are reached during the S phase (ranging from 7.0 to 7.8 X 10(-9) cm2/sec in the three cycles measured), while at the end of G2 phase and during early mitosis mean values for D have decreased significantly (ranging from 5.0 to 5.9 X 10(-9) cm2/sec). Diffusion rates in the animal membranes of the embryo are constant during the three successive cell cycles (D = 4.3-5.0 X 10(-9) cm2/sec), except for a peak at the S phase of the first cell cycle (D = 6.0 X 10(-9) cm2/sec). These results are discussed in relation with previously observed ultrastructural heterogeneities in the Nassarius egg plasma membrane. It is speculated that the observed animal-vegetal polarity in the organization of the egg membrane might play an important role in the process of cell diversification during early development.

  5. Membrane lipids protected from oxidation by red wine tannins: a proton NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Aurélien L; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Buchoux, Sébastien; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J; Géan, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Dietary polyphenols widespread in vegetables and beverages like red wine and tea have been reported to possess antioxidant properties that could have positive effects on human health. In this study, we propose a new in situ and non-invasive method based on proton liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine the antioxidant efficiency of red wine tannins on a twice-unsaturated phospholipid, 1,2-dilinoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLiPC), embedded in a membrane model. Four tannins were studied: (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The lipid degradation kinetics was determined by measuring the loss of the bis-allylic protons during oxidation induced by a radical initiator, 2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). The antioxidant efficiency, i.e. the ability of tannins to slow down the lipid oxidation rate, was shown to be higher for galloylated tannins, ECG and EGCG. Furthermore, the mixture of four tannins was more efficient than the most effective tannin, EGCG, demonstrating a synergistic effect. To better understand the antioxidant action mechanism of polyphenols on lipid membranes, the tannin location was investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics. A correlation between antioxidant action of tannins and their location at the membrane interface (inserted at the glycerol backbone level) could thus be established. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical composition fluctuations in artificial and cell-derived lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honerkamp-Smith, Aurelia

    2014-03-01

    Cell plasma membranes contain a mixture of lipid types which can segregate into coexisting liquids, a thermodynamic phenomenon which may contribute to biological functions. Simplified, artificial three-component lipid vesicles can be prepared which display a critical miscibility transition near room temperature. We found that such vesicles exhibit concentration fluctuations whose size, composition, and timescales vary consistently with critical exponents for two-dimensional conserved order parameter systems. However, the critical miscibility transition is also observed in vesicles formed directly from the membranes of living cells, despite their more complex composition and the presence of membrane proteins. I will describe our critical fluctuation measurements and also review a variety of more recent work by other researchers. Proximity to a critical point alters the spatial distribution and aggregation tendencies of proteins, and makes lipid mixtures more susceptible to domain formation by protein-mediated interactions, such as adhesion zones. Recent work suggests that critical temperature depression may also be relevant to the mechanism of anaesthetic action.

  7. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  8. The ELBA force field for coarse-grain modeling of lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orsi

    Full Text Available A new coarse-grain model for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid membranes is presented. Following a simple and conventional approach, lipid molecules are modeled by spherical sites, each representing a group of several atoms. In contrast to common coarse-grain methods, two original (interdependent features are here adopted. First, the main electrostatics are modeled explicitly by charges and dipoles, which interact realistically through a relative dielectric constant of unity (ε(r = 1. Second, water molecules are represented individually through a new parametrization of the simple Stockmayer potential for polar fluids; each water molecule is therefore described by a single spherical site embedded with a point dipole. The force field is shown to accurately reproduce the main physical properties of single-species phospholipid bilayers comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE in the liquid crystal phase, as well as distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC in the liquid crystal and gel phases. Insights are presented into fundamental properties and phenomena that can be difficult or impossible to study with alternative computational or experimental methods. For example, we investigate the internal pressure distribution, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and spontaneous self-assembly. Simulations lasting up to 1.5 microseconds were conducted for systems of different sizes (128, 512 and 1058 lipids; this also allowed us to identify size-dependent artifacts that are expected to affect membrane simulations in general. Future extensions and applications are discussed, particularly in relation to the methodology's inherent multiscale capabilities.

  9. Dose-rate and oxygen effects in models of lipid membranes: linoleic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raleigh, J A; Kremers, W; Gaboury, B [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba. Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

    1977-03-01

    Cellular membranes have been suggested as possible loci for the development of the oxygen effect in radiobiology. Unsaturated lipids from membranes are subject to very efficient radiation-induced peroxidation, and the deleterious effects generally associated with lipid autoxidation could be initiated by ionizing radiation. Oxidative damage in lipids was characterized not only by high yields but also by a profound dose-rate effect. At dose-rates of x irradiation below 100 rad/min, a very sharp rise occurred in oxidative damage. This damage has been quantified spectrophotometrically in terms of diene conjugation (O.D. 234 mm) and chromatographically in terms of specific 9- and 13-hydroperoxide formation in linoleic acid micelles. Radical scavenging experiments indicated that hydroxyl radical attack initiated the oxidative damage. Dimethyl sulphoxide is exceptional in that it did not protect, but sensitized, linoleic acid to radiation-induced peroxidation. The yields of hydroperoxides were substantial (G = 10 to 40) and could be related to biological changes known to be effected by autoxidizing lipids.

  10. Electrostatic control by lipids upon the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, M L

    1981-04-06

    In this paper, the membrane-bound (Na+ + K+)-ATPase from bovine brain is shown to be controlled by electrostatic alterations of the charged lipids surrounding the enzyme. The properties under investigation are the enzymatic activity, activation energy and the response of the enzymatic system to temperature. Arrhenius plots of the ATPase activity are biphasic with a break at temperature Ti. The temperature Ti, the activation energies at temperatures above and below Ti, and the enzymatic activity at any constant temperature have been shown to depend upon the concentrations of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions in the solution. These electrolyte dependencies are ascribed to changes of electrostatic conditions at the lipids surrounding the ATPase. If the higher electrostatic screening ability of divalent ions is taken into account, the results in the presence of mono- and divalent ions become virtually the same. As a result of this work, it is concluded that electrostatic alterations are transmitted to the ATPase from the lipids of the membrane in which the enzyme is embedded. Inhibition and activation of the enzyme by mono-and divalent metal ions may thus be explained without any auxiliary hypothesis, particularly without postulating specific binding sites for the different ionic species at the protein. In addition, the specific lipid requirement of the ATPase may be understood better in the light of this interpretation.

  11. Salt-induced effects on natural and inverse DPPC lipid membranes: Molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Sani, Seyed Mojtaba; Akhavan, Mojdeh; Jalili, Seifollah

    2018-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer and its neutral inverse-phosphocholine equivalent (DPCPe) were performed to find salt-induced effects on their surface structure and the nature of ion-lipid interactions. We found that the area per lipid is not considerably affected by the inversion, but the deuterium order parameter of carbon atoms in the region of carbonyl carbons changes dramatically. MD simulations indicate that Ca 2+ ions can bind to the surface of both DPPC and DPCPe membranes, but K + ions do not bind to them. In the case of Na + , however, the ions can bind to natural lipids but not to the inverse ones. Also, our results demonstrate that the hydration level of CPe bilayers is substantially lower than PC bilayers and the averaged orientation of water dipoles in the region of CPe headgroups is effectively inverted compared to PC lipids. This might be important in the interaction of the bilayer with its biological environment. Furthermore, it was found for the CPe bilayers that the enhanced peaks of the electrostatic potential profiles shift further away from the bilayer center relative to those of PC bilayers. This behavior makes the penetration of cations into the bilayer more difficult and possibly explains the experimentally observed enhanced release rates of anionic compounds in the CPe membrane. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 endocytosis allows lipid mixing at the plasma membrane, but not complete fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Vega Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently provided evidence that HIV-1 enters HeLa-derived TZM-bl and lymphoid CEMss cells by fusing with endosomes, whereas its fusion with the plasma membrane does not proceed beyond the lipid mixing step. The mechanism of restriction of HIV-1 fusion at the cell surface and/or the factors that aid the virus entry from endosomes remain unclear. Results We examined HIV-1 fusion with a panel of target cells lines and with primary CD4+ T cells. Kinetic measurements of fusion combined with time-resolved imaging of single viruses further reinforced the notion that HIV-1 enters the cells via endocytosis and fusion with endosomes. Furthermore, we attempted to deliberately redirect virus fusion to the plasma membrane, using two experimental strategies. First, the fusion reaction was synchronized by pre-incubating the viruses with cells at reduced temperature to allow CD4 and coreceptors engagement, but not the virus uptake or fusion. Subsequent shift to a physiological temperature triggered accelerated virus uptake followed by entry from endosomes, but did not permit fusion at the cell surface. Second, blocking HIV-1 endocytosis by a small-molecule dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, resulted in transfer of viral lipids to the plasma membrane without any detectable release of the viral content into the cytosol. We also found that a higher concentration of dynasore is required to block the HIV-endosome fusion compared to virus internalization. Conclusions Our results further support the notion that HIV-1 enters disparate cell types through fusion with endosomes. The block of HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane at a post-lipid mixing stage shows that this membrane is not conducive to fusion pore formation and/or enlargement. The ability of dynasore to interfere with the virus-endosome fusion suggests that dynamin could be involved in two distinct steps of HIV-1 entry - endocytosis and fusion within intracellular compartments.

  13. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces...... functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither...... major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present...

  14. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, G.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malínský, Jan; Weig-Meckl, I.; Tanner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2007), s. 1-8 ISSN 0261-4189 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA204/06/0009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : lipid rafts * mebrane compartmentation * susceptibility against detergents Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 8.662, year: 2007

  15. Active Gating, Molecular Pumping, and Turnover Determination in Biomimetic Lipidic Cubic Mesophases with Reconstituted Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziale, Chiara; Zabara, Alexandru Florian; Drummond, Calum John; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2017-11-28

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling molecular transport in bioinspired materials is a central topic in many branches of nanotechnology. In this work, we show that biomolecules of fundamental importance in biological processes, such as glucose, can be transported in an active, controlled, and selective manner across macroscopic lipidic cubic mesophases, by correctly reconstituting within them their corresponding membrane protein transporters, such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcP Se ). Importantly, by duly exploiting the symporter properties of GlcP Se of coupled glucose/H + transport, the diffusion of glucose can further be tuned by independent physiological stimuli, such as parallel or antiparallel pH gradients, offering an important model to study molecular exchange processes in cellular machinery. We finally show that by measuring the transport properties of the lipidic mesophases with and without the GlcP Se membrane protein reconstituted within, it becomes possible to determine its intrinsic conductance. We generalize these findings to other membrane proteins from the antiporters family, such as the bacterial ClC exchanger from Escherichia coli (EcClC), providing a robust method for evaluating the turnover rate of the membrane proteins in general.

  16. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in Xenopus eggs: Regional differences related to animal/vegetal polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Laat, S.W. de; Bluemink, J.G.; Dictus, W.J.A.G.; Zoelen, E.J.J. van; Tetteroo, P.A.T.; Tertoolen, L.G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Regional differences in the lateral mobility properties of plasma membrane lipids were studied in unfertilized and fertilized Xenopus eggs by fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) measurements. Out of a variety of commonly used lipid probes only the aminofluorescein- -1abelled fatty acids HEDAF (5-(N-hexadecanoyl)- aminofluorescein) and TEDAF (5-(N-tetradecanoyl)-aminofluorescein) appear to distribute itself in the plasma membrane. Under all experimental conditions used these molecules s...

  17. Phosphatidylserine Lateral Organization Influences the Interaction of Influenza Virus Matrix Protein 1 with Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobone, Sara; Hilsch, Malte; Storm, Julian; Dunsing, Valentin; Herrmann, Andreas; Chiantia, Salvatore

    2017-06-15

    Influenza A virus matrix protein 1 (M1) is an essential component involved in the structural stability of the virus and in the budding of new virions from infected cells. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis of virion formation and the budding process is required in order to devise new therapeutic approaches. We performed a detailed investigation of the interaction between M1 and phosphatidylserine (PS) (i.e., its main binding target at the plasma membrane [PM]), as well as the distribution of PS itself, both in model membranes and in living cells. To this end, we used a combination of techniques, including Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), confocal microscopy imaging, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and number and brightness (N&B) analysis. Our results show that PS can cluster in segregated regions in the plane of the lipid bilayer, both in model bilayers constituted of PS and phosphatidylcholine and in living cells. The viral protein M1 interacts specifically with PS-enriched domains, and such interaction in turn affects its oligomerization process. Furthermore, M1 can stabilize PS domains, as observed in model membranes. For living cells, the presence of PS clusters is suggested by N&B experiments monitoring the clustering of the PS sensor lactadherin. Also, colocalization between M1 and a fluorescent PS probe suggest that, in infected cells, the matrix protein can specifically bind to the regions of PM in which PS is clustered. Taken together, our observations provide novel evidence regarding the role of PS-rich domains in tuning M1-lipid and M1-M1 interactions at the PM of infected cells. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus particles assemble at the plasma membranes (PM) of infected cells. This process is orchestrated by the matrix protein M1, which interacts with membrane lipids while binding to the other proteins and genetic material of the virus. Despite its importance, the initial step in virus assembly (i.e., M1-lipid interaction) is still

  18. Chitosan derivatives targeting lipid bilayers: Synthesis, biological activity and interaction with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Danubia Batista; Nasário, Fábio Domingues; Silva-Gonçalves, Laiz Costa; de Oliveira Tiera, Vera Aparecida; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Tiera, Marcio José; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez

    2018-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan and derivatives to human and plant pathogens represents a high-valued prospective market. Presently, two low molecular weight derivatives, endowed with hydrophobic and cationic character at different ratios were synthesized and characterized. They exhibit antimicrobial activity and increased performance in relation to the intermediate and starting compounds. However, just the derivative with higher cationic character showed cytotoxicity towards human cervical carcinoma cells. Considering cell membranes as targets, the mode of action was investigated through the interaction with model lipid vesicles mimicking bacterial, tumoral and erythrocyte membranes. Intense lytic activity and binding are demonstrated for both derivatives in anionic bilayers. The less charged compound exhibits slightly improved selectivity towards bacterial model membranes, suggesting that balancing its hydrophobic/hydrophilic character may improve efficiency. Observing the aggregation of vesicles, we hypothesize that the "charge cluster mechanism", ascribed to some antimicrobial peptides, could be applied to these chitosan derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. El Tor hemolysin of Vibrio cholerae O1 forms channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Ono, T; Iwata, M; Nakae, T; Shimamura, T

    1997-05-15

    We investigated the channel formation by El Tor hemolysin (molecular mass, 65 kDa) of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in planar lipid bilayers. The El Tor hemolysin channel exhibited asymmetric and hyperbolic membrane current with increasing membrane potential, meaning that the channel is voltage dependent. The zero-current membrane potential measured in KCI solution showed that permeability ratio PK+/PCl- was 0.16, indicating that the channel is 6-fold more anion selective over cation. The hemolysin channel frequently flickered in the presence of divalent cations, suggesting that the channel spontaneously opens and closes. These data imply that the El Tor hemolysin damages target cells by the formation of transmembrane channels and, consequently, is the cause of osmotic cytolysis.

  20. Early and late HIV-1 membrane fusion events are impaired by sphinganine lipidated peptides that target the fusion site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Yoel A; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Viard, Mathias; Porat, Ziv; Blumenthal, Robert; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-07-15

    Lipid-conjugated peptides have advanced the understanding of membrane protein functions and the roles of lipids in the membrane milieu. These lipopeptides modulate various biological systems such as viral fusion. A single function has been suggested for the lipid, binding to the membrane and thus elevating the local concentration of the peptide at the target site. In the present paper, we challenged this argument by exploring in-depth the antiviral mechanism of lipopeptides, which comprise sphinganine, the lipid backbone of DHSM (dihydrosphingomyelin), and an HIV-1 envelope-derived peptide. Surprisingly, we discovered a partnership between the lipid and the peptide that impaired early membrane fusion events by reducing CD4 receptor lateral diffusion and HIV-1 fusion peptide-mediated lipid mixing. Moreover, only the joint function of sphinganine and its conjugate peptide disrupted HIV-1 fusion protein assembly and folding at the later fusion steps. Via imaging techniques we revealed for the first time the direct localization of these lipopeptides to the virus-cell and cell-cell contact sites. Overall, the findings of the present study may suggest lipid-protein interactions in various biological systems and may help uncover a role for elevated DHSM in HIV-1 and its target cell membranes.

  1. Effect of temperature and pH on the lipid photoperoxidation and the structural state of erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, D.I.; Pelenitsyn, A.B.; Vladimirov, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    The degree of lipid photoperoxidation in erythrocytes (the amount of TBA-active products accumulated under the given dose of ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm) increased abruptly with temperature in the interval 12 - 20 0 C, then it increased more slowly and later on passed over the maximum at about 30 - 32 0 C. Apparently, the degree of lipid photoperoxidation can serve as a sensitive index of lipid structural state. Using a method of modelling of erythrocyte membranes by liposomes of different chemical content, it was shown that under temperature changes in physiological limits the lipids of erythrocyte membranes undergo at least two structural transformations. The first might be a change in the relative position of cholesterol and phospholipids. The second is followed by the enhancement of membrane antioxidant activity. The degree of lipid photoperoxidation in erythrocytes grows with increasing pH from 6 to 8 according to S-shaped curve with middle point at pH 7.0. This effect can be attributed to structural transformation of membrane lipid zone associated with ionization of membrane protein hystidine. The swelling of erythrocytes in hypotonic medium also leads to structural transformation of lipid zone. (author)

  2. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. → Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. → This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  3. Monitoring the Orientational Changes of Alamethicin during Incorporation into Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrig, Enrico; Staffa, Jana K; Salewski, Johannes; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter; Kozuch, Jacek

    2018-02-13

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are the first line of defense after contact of an infectious invader, for example, bacterium or virus, with a host and an integral part of the innate immune system of humans. Their broad spectrum of biological functions ranges from cell membrane disruption over facilitation of chemotaxis to interaction with membrane-bound or intracellular receptors, thus providing novel strategies to overcome bacterial resistances. Especially, the clarification of the mechanisms and dynamics of AMP incorporation into bacterial membranes is of high interest, and different mechanistic models are still under discussion. In this work, we studied the incorporation of the peptaibol alamethicin (ALM) into tethered bilayer lipid membranes on electrodes in combination with surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. This approach allows monitoring the spontaneous and potential-induced ion channel formation of ALM in situ. The complex incorporation kinetics revealed a multistep mechanism that points to peptide-peptide interactions prior to penetrating the membrane and adopting the transmembrane configuration. On the basis of the anisotropy of the backbone amide I and II infrared absorptions determined by density functional theory calculations, we employed a mathematical model to evaluate ALM reorientations monitored by SEIRA spectroscopy. Accordingly, ALM was found to adopt inclination angles of ca. 69°-78° and 21° in its interfacially adsorbed and transmembrane incorporated states, respectively. These orientations can be stabilized efficiently by the dipolar interaction with lipid head groups or by the application of a potential gradient. The presented potential-controlled mechanistic study suggests an N-terminal integration of ALM into membranes as monomers or parallel oligomers to form ion channels composed of parallel-oriented helices, whereas antiparallel oligomers are barred from intrusion.

  4. Research on the Changes to the Lipid/Polymer Membrane Used in the Acidic Bitterness Sensor Caused by Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Harada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A taste sensor that uses lipid/polymer membranes can evaluate aftertastes felt by humans using Change in membrane Potential caused by Adsorption (CPA measurements. The sensor membrane for evaluating bitterness, which is caused by acidic bitter substances such as iso-alpha acid contained in beer, needs an immersion process in monosodium glutamate (MSG solution, called “MSG preconditioning”. However, what happens to the lipid/polymer membrane during MSG preconditioning is not clear. Therefore, we carried out three experiments to investigate the changes in the lipid/polymer membrane caused by the MSG preconditioning, i.e., measurements of the taste sensor, measurements of the amount of the bitterness substance adsorbed onto the membrane and measurements of the contact angle of the membrane surface. The CPA values increased as the preconditioning process progressed, and became stable after 3 d of preconditioning. The response potentials to the reference solution showed the same tendency of the CPA value change during the preconditioning period. The contact angle of the lipid/polymer membrane surface decreased after 7 d of MSG preconditioning; in short, the surface of the lipid/polymer membrane became hydrophilic during MSG preconditioning. The amount of adsorbed iso-alpha acid was increased until 5 d preconditioning, and then it decreased. In this study, we revealed that the CPA values increased with the progress of MSG preconditioning in spite of the decrease of the amount of iso-alpha acid adsorbed onto the lipid/polymer membrane, and it was indicated that the CPA values increase because the sensor sensitivity was improved by the MSG preconditioning.

  5. Differential dynamic and structural behavior of lipid-cholesterol domains in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F Aguilar

    Full Text Available Changes in the cholesterol (Chol content of biological membranes are known to alter the physicochemical properties of the lipid lamella and consequently the function of membrane-associated enzymes. To characterize these changes, we used steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and two photon-excitation microscopy techniques. The membrane systems were chosen according to the techniques that were used: large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs for cuvette and giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs for microscopy measurements; they were prepared from dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC and dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC in mixtures that are well known to form lipid domains. Two fluorescent probes, which insert into different regions of the bilayer, were selected: 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH was located at the deep hydrophobic core of the acyl chain regions and 2-dimethylamino-6-lauroylnaphthalene (Laurdan at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic membrane interface. Our spectroscopy results show that (i the changes induced by cholesterol in the deep hydrophobic phospholipid acyl chain domain are different from the ones observed in the superficial region of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface, and these changes depend on the state of the lamella and (ii the incorporation of cholesterol into the lamella induces an increase in the orientation dynamics in the deep region of the phospholipid acyl chains with a corresponding decrease in the orientation at the region close to the polar lipid headgroups. The microscopy data from DOPC/DPPC/Chol GUVs using Laurdan generalized polarization (Laurdan GP suggest that a high cholesterol content in the bilayer weakens the stability of the water hydrogen bond network and hence the stability of the liquid-ordered phase (Lo.

  6. Clinical observation on bandage type corneal contact lens applied after pterygium excision combined with fresh amniotic membrane transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the clinical effect of fresh amniotic membrane transplantation in combination with bandage type corneal contact lens in the treatment of pterygium. METHODS: This study was a prospective analysis of 600 pterygium excision patients(600 cases, 600 eyesin the He Eye Hospital from January 2016 to June 2016. The patients were randomly and evenly divided into two groups: observation group and control group, 300 cases in each group(300 eyes. Observation group wore the bandage type corneal contact lens after surgery and took it down at fifth day. The control group did not. The degree of pain after surgery were evaluated at 2h, 1, 3 and 5d after surgery. The clinical outcomes in these two groups were compared in a 12mo postoperative follow-up observation. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the observation and control group in the percentage of age and gender and size of the pterygium(P>0.05. After surgery, the degree of pain of treatment group significantly decreased compared to control group, the difference was statistically significant(PP>0.05. CONCLUSION: Bandage contact lenses could significantly release pain response after pterygium excision. But it can not reduce the recurrence rate.

  7. Dietary lipids differentially affect membranes from different areas of rooster sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongalhardo, D C; Leeson, S; Buhr, M M

    2009-05-01

    The present work aimed to compare the effect of dietary flax with other oil sources on rooster sperm membranes and on semen characteristics. White Leghorn roosters (16 per diet) were fed 1 of 4 treatments: control diet (CON), or a diet containing corn oil (CORN), fish oil (FISH), or flax seed (FLAX) as the lipid source. Semen from 4 birds (30 wk old) of each treatment was pooled, the sperm head (HM) and body membranes (BM) were isolated, and lipids were extracted and analyzed. Aspects of lipid composition tested were as follows: percentage of individual fatty acids (C14:0 to C24:1) in total fatty acids, percentage of fatty acid categories [saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated (PUFA), n-3 and n-6 PUFA, and n-6:n-3 ratio] within total fatty acids, and percentage of phospholipids [phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin] in total phospholipids. Sperm characteristics evaluated were as follows: volume, concentration, viability, percentage of motile cells, average path velocity, track speed, progressive velocity, lateral head displacement, straightness, and linearity. Diet did not affect membrane phospholipid ratios in either membrane but modified major fatty acids within certain phospholipids. Birds fed FISH and CORN showed, respectively, the highest and the lowest n-3 in sperm, causing reciprocal significant changes in n-6:n-3 ratio. Feeding FLAX caused intermediate effects in n-3, with values significantly lower than FISH but higher than CORN in HM (PC, PE, and phosphatidylinositol) and PC in BM (P < 0.05). In the PE phospholipids, FISH, followed by FLAX, increased n-3 in BM and decreased n-6 PUFA in HM. Sperm concentration was specifically correlated with the amount of 20:4n-6 in FLAX and 22:4n-6 in CON. In FLAX diets, straightness correlated with C18:0, n-3, and n-6:n-3 ratio. Diets containing distinct lipid sources differentially modify the lipid contents of HM and BM, with minor

  8. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-01-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements. (paper)

  9. Fusion of Sendai virus with vesicles of oligomerizable lipids: a microcalorimetric analysis of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoo, B J; Weringa, W D; Engberts, J B

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4- (beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head groups of DHPBNS in the bilayer vesicles. The enthalpy associated with fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles was measured by isothermal titration microcalorimetry, comparing titrations of Sendai virus into (i) solutions of DHPBNS vesicles (which fuse with the virus) and (ii) oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles (which do not fuse with the virus), respectively. The observed heat effect of fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is strongly dependent on the buffer medium, reflecting a partial charge neutralization of the Sendai F and HN proteins upon insertion into the negatively-charged vesicle membrane. No buffer effect was observed for the titration of Sendai virus into oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles, indicating that inhibition of fusion is a result of inhibition of insertion of the fusion protein into the target membrane. Fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is endothermic and entropy-driven. The positive enthalpy term is dominated by heat effects resulting from merging of the protein-rich viral envelope with the lipid vesicle bilayers rather than by the fusion of the viral with the vesicle bilayers per se. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2016-01-11

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research.

  11. Influence of cholesterol and ceramide-VI on structure of the multilamellar lipid membrane at water exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabova, N.Yu.; Kiselev, M.A.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The results of neutron diffraction investigation of structure changes in multilamellar lipid membranes DPPC/cholesterol and DPPC/ceramide-VI (DPPC - dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) during the processes of hydration and dehydration are presented. The influence of cholesterol and ceramide-VI on kinetics of water exchange in DPPC membrane is characterized

  12. Relationship between the Amount of Bitter Substances Adsorbed onto Lipid/Polymer Membrane and the Electric Response of Taste Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bitterness of bitter substances can be measured by the change in the membrane electric potential caused by adsorption (CPA using a taste sensor (electronic tongue. In this study, we examined the relationship between the CPA value due to an acidic bitter substance and the amount of the bitter substance adsorbed onto lipid/polymer membranes, which contain different lipid contents, used in the taste sensor. We used iso-α-acid which is an acidic bitter substance found in several foods and beverages. The amount of adsorbed iso-α-acid, which was determined by spectroscopy, showed a maximum at the lipid concentration 0.1 wt % of the membrane, and the same phenomenon was observed for the CPA value. At the higher lipid concentration, however, the amount adsorbed decreased and then remained constant, while the CPA value decreased monotonically to zero. This constant adsorption amount was observed when the membrane potential in the reference solution did not change with increasing lipid concentration. The decrease in CPA value in spite of the constant adsorption amount is caused by a decrease in the sensitivity of the membrane as the surface charge density increases. The reason why the peaks appeared in both the CPA value and adsorption amount is based on the contradictory adsorption properties of iso-α-acid. The increasing charged lipid concentration of the membrane causes an increasing electrostatic attractive interaction between iso-α-acid and the membrane, but simultaneously causes a decreasing hydrophobic interaction that results in decreasing adsorption of iso-α-acid, which also has hydrophobic properties, onto the membrane. Estimates of the amount of adsorption suggest that iso-α-acid molecules are adsorbed onto both the surface and interior of the membrane.

  13. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewa, Takehisa; Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes were reconstituted into lipid membranes. ► Energy transfers between light-harvesting complexes were examined. ► Atomic force microscopy indicated cluster formation of light-harvesting complexes. ► Efficient energy transfer was observed for the clustered complexes in the membranes. - Abstract: In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency

  14. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewa, Takehisa, E-mail: takedewa@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nango, Mamoru, E-mail: nango@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes were reconstituted into lipid membranes. ► Energy transfers between light-harvesting complexes were examined. ► Atomic force microscopy indicated cluster formation of light-harvesting complexes. ► Efficient energy transfer was observed for the clustered complexes in the membranes. - Abstract: In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  15. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hameed

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  16. Development of a Portable Taste Sensor with a Lipid/Polymer Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new portable taste sensor with a lipid/polymer membrane and conducted experiments to evaluate the sensor’s performance. The fabricated sensor consists of a taste sensor chip (40 mm × 26 mm × 2.2 mm with working and reference electrodes and a portable sensor device (80 mm × 25 mm × 20 mm. The working electrode consists of a taste-sensing site comprising a poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate (pHEMA hydrogel layer with KCl as the electrolyte layer and a lipid/polymer membrane as the taste sensing element. The reference electrode comprises a polyvinyl chloride (PVC membrane layer with a small hole and a pHEMA layer with KCl. The whole device is the size of a USB memory stick, making it suitable for portable use. The sensor’s response to tannic acid as the standard astringency substance showed good accuracy and reproducibility, and was comparable with the performance of a commercially available taste sensing system. Thus, it is possible for this sensor to be used for in-field evaluations and it can make a significant contribution to the food industry, as well as in various fields of research.

  17. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles from Native Membranes and Organic Lipid Mixtures for the Study of Lipid Domains under Physiological Ionic-Strength Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Ibarguren, Maitane

    2010-01-01

    Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) constitute a cell-sized model membrane system that allows direct visualization of particular membrane-related phenomena, such as domain formation, at the level of single vesicles using fluorescence microscopy-related techniques. Currently available protocols...... for the preparation of GUVs work only at very low salt concentrations, thus precluding experimentation under physiological conditions. In addition, the GUVs thus obtained lack membrane compositional asymmetry. Here we show how to prepare GUVs using a new protocol based on the electroformation method either from...... native membranes or organic lipid mixtures at physiological ionic strength. Additionally, we describe methods to test whether membrane proteins and glycosphingolipids preserve their natural orientation after electroformation of GUVs composed of native membranes...

  18. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Michael Danielsen

    Full Text Available The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs, was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs, implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  19. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  20. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  1. Cholesterol catalyses Aβ42 aggregation through a heterogeneous nucleation pathway in the presence of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habchi, Johnny; Chia, Sean; Galvagnion, Céline; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Bellaiche, Mathias M. J.; Ruggeri, Francesco Simone; Sanguanini, Michele; Idini, Ilaria; Kumita, Janet R.; Sparr, Emma; Linse, Sara; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2018-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide. Although increasing evidence implicates cholesterol in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, the detailed mechanistic link between this lipid molecule and the disease process remains to be fully established. To address this problem, we adopt a kinetics-based strategy that reveals a specific catalytic role of cholesterol in the aggregation of Aβ42 (the 42-residue form of the amyloid-β peptide). More specifically, we demonstrate that lipid membranes containing cholesterol promote Aβ42 aggregation by enhancing its primary nucleation rate by up to 20-fold through a heterogeneous nucleation pathway. We further show that this process occurs as a result of cooperativity in the interaction of multiple cholesterol molecules with Aβ42. These results identify a specific microscopic pathway by which cholesterol dramatically enhances the onset of Aβ42 aggregation, thereby helping rationalize the link between Alzheimer's disease and the impairment of cholesterol homeostasis.

  2. DHA-fluorescent probe is sensitive to membrane order and reveals molecular adaptation of DHA in ordered lipid microdomains☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Heather; Ross, Ron; Harris, Mitchel; Mitchell, Drake C.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) disrupts the size and order of plasma membrane lipid microdomains in vitro and in vivo. However, it is unknown how the highly disordered structure of DHA mechanistically adapts to increase the order of tightly packed lipid microdomains. Therefore, we studied a novel DHA-Bodipy fluorescent probe to address this issue. We first determined if the DHA-Bodipy probe localized to the plasma membrane of primary B and immortal EL4 cells. Image analysis revealed that DHA-Bodipy localized into the plasma membrane of primary B cells more efficiently than EL4 cells. We then determined if the probe detected changes in plasma membrane order. Quantitative analysis of time-lapse movies established that DHA-Bodipy was sensitive to membrane molecular order. This allowed us to investigate how DHA-Bodipy physically adapted to ordered lipid microdomains. To accomplish this, we employed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements in lipid vesicles of varying composition. Similar to cell culture studies, the probe was highly sensitive to membrane order in lipid vesicles. Moreover, these experiments revealed, relative to controls, that upon incorporation into highly ordered microdomains, DHA-Bodipy underwent an increase in its fluorescence lifetime and molecular order. In addition, the probe displayed a significant reduction in its rotational diffusion compared to controls. Altogether, DHA-Bodipy was highly sensitive to membrane order and revealed for the first time that DHA, despite its flexibility, could become ordered with less rotational motion inside ordered lipid microdomains. Mechanistically, this explains how DHA acyl chains can increase order upon formation of lipid microdomains in vivo. PMID:22841541

  3. A Moessbauer study on the interaction between biomolecular lipid membranes and ferric ferrous ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvaly, B.; Badinka, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Erdei, L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of Moessbauer experiments made on liposome systems of a large specific area are presented. In the study lecithin was used as a membrane-forming material. The measurements were carried out on frozen liposome systems, at various 57 Fe/lipid concentration ratios, pH values and temperatures. Since the presence of liposomes had no noticeable influence on the Moessbauer spectra of Fe 2+ ions, only lecithin Fe 3+ systems were considered. Moessbauer spectra in case of Fe 3+ solutions with lecithin showed marked quadrupole splitting (exhibiting an anomalous temperature dependence) which is not shown in case of pure Fe 3+ solution. (Z.S.)

  4. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...... channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  5. High fat diet-induced modifications in membrane lipid and mitochondrial-membrane protein signatures precede the development of hepatic insulin resistance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, M; Schäfer, A; Seelig, A; Schultheiß, J; Wu, M; Aichler, M; Leonhardt, J; Rathkolb, B; Rozman, J; Sarioglu, H; Hauck, S M; Ueffing, M; Wolf, E; Kastenmueller, G; Adamski, J; Walch, A; Hrabé de Angelis, M; Neschen, S

    2015-01-01

    Excess lipid intake has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. Lipids constitute approximately 50% of the cell membrane mass, define membrane properties, and create microenvironments for membrane-proteins. In this study we aimed to resolve temporal alterations in membrane metabolite and protein signatures during high-fat diet (HF)-mediated development of hepatic insulin resistance. We induced hepatosteatosis by feeding C3HeB/FeJ male mice an HF enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 fatty acids for 7, 14, or 21 days. Longitudinal changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed via the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, in membrane lipids via t-metabolomics- and membrane proteins via quantitative proteomics-analyses, and in hepatocyte morphology via electron microscopy. Data were compared to those of age- and litter-matched controls maintained on a low-fat diet. Excess long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 intake for 7 days did not compromise hepatic insulin sensitivity, however, induced hepatosteatosis and modified major membrane lipid constituent signatures in liver, e.g. increased total unsaturated, long-chain fatty acid-containing acyl-carnitine or membrane-associated diacylglycerol moieties and decreased total short-chain acyl-carnitines, glycerophosphocholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, or sphingolipids. Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease within 14 days HF-exposure. Overt hepatic insulin resistance developed until day 21 of HF-intervention and was accompanied by morphological mitochondrial abnormalities and indications for oxidative stress in liver. HF-feeding progressively decreased the abundance of protein-components of all mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inner and outer mitochondrial membrane substrate transporters independent from the hepatocellular mitochondrial volume in liver. We assume HF-induced modifications in membrane lipid- and protein-signatures prior to and

  6. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  7. Lipid-linked cell wall precursors regulate membrane association of bacterial actin MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirner, Kathrin; Eun, Ye-Jin; Dion, Mike; Luo, Yun; Helmann, John D; Garner, Ethan C; Walker, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial actin homolog MreB, which is crucial for rod shape determination, forms filaments that rotate around the cell width on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. What determines filament association with the membranes or with other cell wall elongation proteins is not known. Using specific chemical and genetic perturbations while following MreB filament motion, we find that MreB membrane association is an actively regulated process that depends on the presence of lipid-linked peptidoglycan precursors. When precursors are depleted, MreB filaments disassemble into the cytoplasm, and peptidoglycan synthesis becomes disorganized. In cells that lack wall teichoic acids but continue to make peptidoglycan, dynamic MreB filaments are observed, although their presence is not sufficient to establish a rod shape. We propose that the cell regulates MreB filament association with the membrane, allowing rapid and reversible inactivation of cell wall enzyme complexes in response to the inhibition of cell wall synthesis.

  8. Spectral Properties and Orientation of Voltage-Sensitive Dyes in Lipid Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Matson, Maria

    2012-07-24

    Voltage-sensitive dyes are frequently used for probing variations in the electric potential across cell membranes. The dyes respond by changing their spectral properties: measured as shifts of wavelength of absorption or emission maxima or as changes of absorption or fluorescence intensity. Although such probes have been studied and used for decades, the mechanism behind their voltage sensitivity is still obscure. We ask whether the voltage response is due to electrochromism as a result of direct field interaction on the chromophore or to solvatochromism, which is the focus of this study, as result of changed environment or molecular alignment in the membrane. The spectral properties of three styryl dyes, di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, and RH421, were investigated in solvents of varying polarity and in model membranes using spectroscopy. Using quantum mechanical calculations, the spectral dependence of monomer and dimer ANEPPS on solvent properties was modeled. Also, the kinetics of binding to lipid membranes and the binding geometry of the probe molecules were found relevant to address. The spectral properties of all three probes were found to be highly sensitive to the local environment, and the probes are oriented nearly parallel with the membrane normal. Slow binding kinetics and scattering in absorption spectra indicate, especially for di-8-ANEPPS, involvement of aggregation. On the basis of the experimental spectra and time-dependent density functional theory calculations, we find that aggregate formation may contribute to the blue-shifts seen for the dyes in decanol and when bound to membrane models. In conclusion, solvatochromic and other intermolecular interactions effects also need to be included when considering electrochromic response voltage-sensitive dyes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Accurate potentiometric determination of lipid membrane-water partition coefficients and apparent dissociation constants of ionizable drugs: electrostatic corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mustafa M A; Vierl, Ulrich; Cevc, Gregor

    2009-06-01

    Potentiometric lipid membrane-water partition coefficient studies neglect electrostatic interactions to date; this leads to incorrect results. We herein show how to account properly for such interactions in potentiometric data analysis. We conducted potentiometric titration experiments to determine lipid membrane-water partition coefficients of four illustrative drugs, bupivacaine, diclofenac, ketoprofen and terbinafine. We then analyzed the results conventionally and with an improved analytical approach that considers Coulombic electrostatic interactions. The new analytical approach delivers robust partition coefficient values. In contrast, the conventional data analysis yields apparent partition coefficients of the ionized drug forms that depend on experimental conditions (mainly the lipid-drug ratio and the bulk ionic strength). This is due to changing electrostatic effects originating either from bound drug and/or lipid charges. A membrane comprising 10 mol-% mono-charged molecules in a 150 mM (monovalent) electrolyte solution yields results that differ by a factor of 4 from uncharged membranes results. Allowance for the Coulombic electrostatic interactions is a prerequisite for accurate and reliable determination of lipid membrane-water partition coefficients of ionizable drugs from potentiometric titration data. The same conclusion applies to all analytical methods involving drug binding to a surface.

  10. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-ß: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-ß (Aß generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-ß (Aß. The purpose was to determine how Aß may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aß in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid ß was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway.

  11. Optimization of bicelle lipid composition and temperature for EPR spectroscopy of aligned membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E; James, Zachary M; Thomas, David D

    2015-01-01

    We have optimized the magnetic alignment of phospholipid bilayered micelles (bicelles) for EPR spectroscopy, by varying lipid composition and temperature. Bicelles have been extensively used in NMR spectroscopy for several decades, in order to obtain aligned samples in a near-native membrane environment and take advantage of the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance to molecular orientation. Recently, bicelles have also seen increasing use in EPR, which offers superior sensitivity and orientational resolution. However, the low magnetic field strength (less than 1 T) of most conventional EPR spectrometers results in homogeneously oriented bicelles only at a temperature well above physiological. To optimize bicelle composition for magnetic alignment at reduced temperature, we prepared bicelles containing varying ratios of saturated (DMPC) and unsaturated (POPC) phospholipids, using EPR spectra of a spin-labeled fatty acid to assess alignment as a function of lipid composition and temperature. Spectral analysis showed that bicelles containing an equimolar mixture of DMPC and POPC homogeneously align at 298 K, 20 K lower than conventional DMPC-only bicelles. It is now possible to perform EPR studies of membrane protein structure and dynamics in well-aligned bicelles at physiological temperatures and below. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gamma irradiation prolongs the sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L) storage and delays the lipids membrane degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkallah, Insaf; Mahjoub, Abdelmajid; Cheour, F.

    2005-01-01

    Sea bass have been submitted to gamma rays radiation at doses 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 KGy at 0,087KGY/min rate and stored during 21 days at 1 0 C to evaluate the effects on the development of microorganisms as well as on the conservation and the degradation of membranes lipids Microbiological analysis has revealed only the presence of mesophils germs in muscles which are totally eliminated at dose 4 KGy. The presence of psychrophiles, halophiles, coliformes, fecaux and totals, Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium sulfutoreducteurs has been noted in the visceres of sea bass. They are completely eliminated at dose 1KGy. Contents in nitrogen basic fowl (ABVT) and in trimethylamine (TMA), as well as the pH increase during storage of fish in relation with the reduction of phospholipids, the diminution of the degree of insaturation of the phospholipids and the free fat acidic fraction, and the increase of the report sterols on phospholipids. The irradiation to gamma rays allows to slow these changes and consequently reduced the deterioration of the sea bass. We conclude that the irradiation to gamma rays could have prolong the conservation of sea bass sea bass by preserving probably lipids membranes of the degradation and by inhibiting the development of microorganisms

  13. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM 14 N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments

  14. Van der Waals interactions between planar substrate and tubular lipid membranes undergoing pearling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, G. S.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Vassilev, V. M.; Dantchev, D. M.

    2017-10-01

    In the current article we study the behavior of the van der Waals force between a planar substrate and an axisymmetric bilayer lipid membrane undergoing pearling instability, caused by uniform hydrostatic pressure difference. To do so, the recently suggested "surface integration approach" is used, which can be considered a generalization of the well known and widely used Derjaguin approximation. The static equilibrium shape after the occurrence of the instability is described in the framework of Helfrich's spontaneous curvature model. Some specific classes of exact analytical solutions to the corresponding shape equation are considered, and the components of the respective position vectors given in terms of elliptic integrals and Jacobi elliptic functions. The mutual orientation between the interacting objects is chosen such that the axis of revolution of the distorted cylinder be parallel to the plane bounding the substrate. Based on the discussed models and approaches we made some estimations for the studied force in real experimentally realizable systems, thus showing the possibility of pearling as an useful technique for reduction of the adhesion in variety of industrial processes using lipid membranes as carriers.

  15. Lipid intermediates in membrane fusion: formation, structure, and decay of hemifusion diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-11-01

    Lipid bilayer fusion is thought to involve formation of a local hemifusion connection, referred to as a fusion stalk. The subsequent fusion stages leading to the opening of a fusion pore remain unknown. The earliest fusion pore could represent a bilayer connection between the membranes and could be formed directly from the stalk. Alternatively, fusion pore can form in a single bilayer, referred to as hemifusion diaphragm (HD), generated by stalk expansion. To analyze the plausibility of stalk expansion, we studied the pathway of hemifusion theoretically, using a recently developed elastic model. We show that the stalk has a tendency to expand into an HD for lipids with sufficiently negative spontaneous splay, (~)J(s)action of an external force pulling the diaphragm rim apart. We calculate the dependence of the HD radius on this force. To address the mechanism of fusion pore formation, we analyze the distribution of the lateral tension emerging in the HD due to the establishment of lateral equilibrium between the deformed and relaxed portions of lipid monolayers. We show that this tension concentrates along the HD rim and reaches high values sufficient to rupture the bilayer and form the fusion pore. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that transition from a hemifusion to a fusion pore involves radial expansion of the stalk.

  16. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, Alex M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Cheng, Chi-Yuan [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Israelachvili, Jacob N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Han, Songi [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  17. Isolation and characterization of lipid rafts in Emiliania huxleyi: a role for membrane microdomains in host-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Suzanne L; Fulton, James M; Brown, Christopher M; Natale, Frank; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Bidle, Kay D

    2014-04-01

    Coccolithoviruses employ a suite of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) to successfully infect the globally important coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Lipid rafts, chemically distinct membrane lipid microdomains that are enriched in GSLs and are involved in sensing extracellular stimuli and activating signalling cascades through protein-protein interactions, likely play a fundamental role in host-virus interactions. Using combined lipidomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, we isolated and characterized the lipid and protein content of lipid rafts from control E. huxleyi cells and those infected with EhV86, the type strain for Coccolithovirus. Lipid raft-enriched fractions were isolated and purified as buoyant, detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) in OptiPrep density gradients. Transmission electron microscopy of vesicle morphology, polymerase chain reaction amplification of the EhV major capsid protein gene and immunoreactivity to flotillin antisera served as respective physical, molecular and biochemical markers. Subsequent lipid characterization of DRMs via high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrapole mass spectrometry revealed four distinct GSL classes. Parallel proteomic analysis confirmed flotillin as a major lipid raft protein, along with a variety of proteins affiliated with host defence, programmed cell death and innate immunity pathways. The detection of an EhV86-encoded C-type lectin-containing protein confirmed that infection occurs at the interface between lipid rafts and cellular stress/death pathways via specific GSLs and raft-associated proteins. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Differentiation of human keratinocytes: changes in lipid synthesis, plasma membrane lipid composition, and 125I-EGF binding upon administration of 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponec, M.; Kempenaar, J.; Weerheim, A.; Boonstra, J.

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between differentiation capacity, plasma membrane composition, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression of normal keratinocytes in vitro. The plasma membrane composition of the cells was modulated experimentally by cholesterol depletion, using specific inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, such as 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin. Exposure of the cells towards these inhibitors resulted in a drastic decrease of cholesterol biosynthesis, as determined from 14 C-acetate incorporation into the various lipid fractions. This effect on cholesterol biosynthesis was reflected by changes in plasma membrane composition, as determined by lipid analysis of isolated plasma membrane fractions, these resulting in a decreased cholesterol-phospholipid ratio. The experimental modulation of plasma membrane composition by 25-hydroxycholesterol or mevinolin were accompanied by a decreased cornified envelope formation and by high expression of EGF binding sites. These phenomena were more pronounced in cells induced to differentiate by exposure of cells grown under low Ca2+ to normal Ca2+ concentrations, as compared to cells grown persistently under low Ca2+ concentrations. These results suggest a close correlation between plasma membrane composition, differentiation capacity, and EGF receptor expression

  19. Digging into Lipid Membrane Permeation for Cardiac Ion Channel Blocker d-Sotalol with All-Atom Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Kevin R; Bekker, Slava; Clancy, Colleen E; Noskov, Sergei Y; Vorobyov, Igor

    2018-01-01

    Interactions of drug molecules with lipid membranes play crucial role in their accessibility of cellular targets and can be an important predictor of their therapeutic and safety profiles. Very little is known about spatial localization of various drugs in the lipid bilayers, their active form (ionization state) or translocation rates and therefore potency to bind to different sites in membrane proteins. All-atom molecular simulations may help to map drug partitioning kinetics and thermodynamics, thus providing in-depth assessment of drug lipophilicity. As a proof of principle, we evaluated extensively lipid membrane partitioning of d-sotalol, well-known blocker of a cardiac potassium channel K v 11.1 encoded by the hERG gene, with reported substantial proclivity for arrhythmogenesis. We developed the positively charged (cationic) and neutral d-sotalol models, compatible with the biomolecular CHARMM force field, and subjected them to all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of drug partitioning through hydrated lipid membranes, aiming to elucidate thermodynamics and kinetics of their translocation and thus putative propensities for hydrophobic and aqueous hERG access. We found that only a neutral form of d-sotalol accumulates in the membrane interior and can move across the bilayer within millisecond time scale, and can be relevant to a lipophilic channel access. The computed water-membrane partitioning coefficient for this form is in good agreement with experiment. There is a large energetic barrier for a cationic form of the drug, dominant in water, to cross the membrane, resulting in slow membrane translocation kinetics. However, this form of the drug can be important for an aqueous access pathway through the intracellular gate of hERG. This route will likely occur after a neutral form of a drug crosses the membrane and subsequently re-protonates. Our study serves to demonstrate a first step toward a framework for multi-scale in silico safety pharmacology

  20. Digging into Lipid Membrane Permeation for Cardiac Ion Channel Blocker d-Sotalol with All-Atom Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. DeMarco

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of drug molecules with lipid membranes play crucial role in their accessibility of cellular targets and can be an important predictor of their therapeutic and safety profiles. Very little is known about spatial localization of various drugs in the lipid bilayers, their active form (ionization state or translocation rates and therefore potency to bind to different sites in membrane proteins. All-atom molecular simulations may help to map drug partitioning kinetics and thermodynamics, thus providing in-depth assessment of drug lipophilicity. As a proof of principle, we evaluated extensively lipid membrane partitioning of d-sotalol, well-known blocker of a cardiac potassium channel Kv11.1 encoded by the hERG gene, with reported substantial proclivity for arrhythmogenesis. We developed the positively charged (cationic and neutral d-sotalol models, compatible with the biomolecular CHARMM force field, and subjected them to all-atom molecular dynamics (MD simulations of drug partitioning through hydrated lipid membranes, aiming to elucidate thermodynamics and kinetics of their translocation and thus putative propensities for hydrophobic and aqueous hERG access. We found that only a neutral form of d-sotalol accumulates in the membrane interior and can move across the bilayer within millisecond time scale, and can be relevant to a lipophilic channel access. The computed water-membrane partitioning coefficient for this form is in good agreement with experiment. There is a large energetic barrier for a cationic form of the drug, dominant in water, to cross the membrane, resulting in slow membrane translocation kinetics. However, this form of the drug can be important for an aqueous access pathway through the intracellular gate of hERG. This route will likely occur after a neutral form of a drug crosses the membrane and subsequently re-protonates. Our study serves to demonstrate a first step toward a framework for multi-scale in silico safety

  1. Plant adaptation to frequent alterations between high and low temperatures: remodeling of membrane lipids and maintenance of unsaturation levels

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Guowei; Tian, Bo; Zhang, Fujuan; Tao, Faqing; Li, Weiqi

    2011-01-01

    One major strategy by which plants adapt to temperature change is to decrease the degree of unsaturation of membrane lipids under high temperature and increase it under low temperature. We hypothesize that this strategy cannot be adopted by plants in ecosystems and environments with frequent alterations between high and low temperatures, because changes in lipid unsaturation are complex and require large energy inputs. To test this hypothesis, we used a lipidomics approach to profile changes ...

  2. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar; Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Opella, Stanley J.; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with 13 C or 1 H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for 13 C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for 1 H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for 15 N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The 1 H-detected solid-state NMR 1 H/ 15 N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR 1 H/ 15 N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  3. High resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yong; Dutta, Samit Kumar [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Park, Sang Ho; Rai, Ratan [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Fujimoto, L. Miya; Bobkov, Andrey A. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States); Opella, Stanley J. [University of California San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbp.edu [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (Adhesion invasion locus) is one of the most abundant proteins on the cell surface of Yersinia pestis during human infection. Its functions are expressed through interactions with a variety of human host proteins, and are essential for microbial virulence. Structures of Ail have been determined by X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy, but those samples contained detergents that interfere with functionality, thus, precluding analysis of the structural basis for Ail’s biological activity. Here, we demonstrate that high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra can be obtained from samples of Ail in detergent-free phospholipid liposomes, prepared with a lipid to protein molar ratio of 100. The spectra, obtained with {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H detection, have very narrow line widths (0.40–0.60 ppm for {sup 13}C, 0.11–0.15 ppm for {sup 1}H, and 0.46–0.64 ppm for {sup 15}N) that are consistent with a high level of sample homogeneity. The spectra enable resonance assignments to be obtained for N, CO, CA and CB atomic sites from 75 out of 156 residues in the sequence of Ail, including 80% of the transmembrane region. The {sup 1}H-detected solid-state NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N correlation spectra obtained for Ail in liposomes compare very favorably with the solution NMR {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N TROSY spectra obtained for Ail in nanodiscs prepared with a similar lipid to protein molar ratio. These results set the stage for studies of the molecular basis of the functional interactions of Ail with its protein partners from human host cells, as well as the development of drugs targeting Ail.

  4. Pex11mediates peroxisomal proliferation by promoting deformation of the lipid membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Yoshida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pex11p family proteins are key players in peroxisomal fission, but their molecular mechanisms remains mostly unknown. In the present study, overexpression of Pex11pβ caused substantial vesiculation of peroxisomes in mammalian cells. This vesicle formation was dependent on dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1 and mitochondrial fission factor (Mff, as knockdown of these proteins diminished peroxisomal fission after Pex11pβ overexpression. The fission-deficient peroxisomes exhibited an elongated morphology, and peroxisomal marker proteins, such as Pex14p or matrix proteins harboring peroxisomal targeting signal 1, were discernible in a segmented staining pattern, like beads on a string. Endogenous Pex11pβ was also distributed a striped pattern, but which was not coincide with Pex14p and PTS1 matrix proteins. Altered morphology of the lipid membrane was observed when recombinant Pex11p proteins were introduced into proteo-liposomes. Constriction of proteo-liposomes was observed under confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and the reconstituted Pex11pβ protein localized to the membrane constriction site. Introducing point mutations into the N-terminal amphiphathic helix of Pex11pβ strongly reduced peroxisomal fission, and decreased the oligomer formation. These results suggest that Pex11p contributes to the morphogenesis of the peroxisomal membrane, which is required for subsequent fission by DLP1.

  5. Pex11mediates peroxisomal proliferation by promoting deformation of the lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yumi; Niwa, Hajime; Honsho, Masanori; Itoyama, Akinori; Fujiki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Pex11p family proteins are key players in peroxisomal fission, but their molecular mechanisms remains mostly unknown. In the present study, overexpression of Pex11pβ caused substantial vesiculation of peroxisomes in mammalian cells. This vesicle formation was dependent on dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) and mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), as knockdown of these proteins diminished peroxisomal fission after Pex11pβ overexpression. The fission-deficient peroxisomes exhibited an elongated morphology, and peroxisomal marker proteins, such as Pex14p or matrix proteins harboring peroxisomal targeting signal 1, were discernible in a segmented staining pattern, like beads on a string. Endogenous Pex11pβ was also distributed a striped pattern, but which was not coincide with Pex14p and PTS1 matrix proteins. Altered morphology of the lipid membrane was observed when recombinant Pex11p proteins were introduced into proteo-liposomes. Constriction of proteo-liposomes was observed under confocal microscopy and electron microscopy, and the reconstituted Pex11pβ protein localized to the membrane constriction site. Introducing point mutations into the N-terminal amphiphathic helix of Pex11pβ strongly reduced peroxisomal fission, and decreased the oligomer formation. These results suggest that Pex11p contributes to the morphogenesis of the peroxisomal membrane, which is required for subsequent fission by DLP1. PMID:25910939

  6. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Barrett, M [McMaster University; Toppozini, L [McMaster University; Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  7. Interactions between lipids and proteins are critical for organization of plasma membrane-ordered domains in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, Kevin; Der, Christophe; Robert, Franck; Thomas, Dominique; Mongrand, Sébastien; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia

    2018-06-27

    The laterally heterogeneous plant plasma membrane (PM) is organized into finely controlled specialized areas that include membrane-ordered domains. Recently, the spatial distribution of such domains within the PM has been identified as playing a key role in cell responses to environmental challenges. To examine membrane order at a local level, BY-2 tobacco suspension cell PMs were labelled with an environment-sensitive probe (di-4-ANEPPDHQ). Four experimental models were compared to identify mechanisms and cell components involved in short-term (1 h) maintenance of the ordered domain organization in steady-state cell PMs: modulation of the cytoskeleton or the cell wall integrity of tobacco BY-2 cells; and formation of giant vesicles using either a lipid mixture of tobacco BY-2 cell PMs or the original lipid and protein combinations of the tobacco BY-2 cell PM. Whilst inhibiting phosphorylation or disrupting either the cytoskeleton or the cell wall had no observable effects, we found that lipids and proteins significantly modified both the abundance and spatial distribution of ordered domains. This indicates the involvement of intrinsic membrane components in the local physical state of the plant PM. Our findings support a major role for the 'lipid raft' model, defined as the sterol-dependent ordered assemblies of specific lipids and proteins in plant PM organization.

  8. Measuring the strength of interaction between the Ebola fusion peptide and lipid rafts: implications for membrane fusion and virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica S Freitas

    Full Text Available The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO₁₆ is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO₁₆ and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM, a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO₁₆ to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO₁₆ was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs, but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO₁₆. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO₁₆ and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases.

  9. Measuring the strength of interaction between the Ebola fusion peptide and lipid rafts: implications for membrane fusion and virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mônica S; Follmer, Cristian; Costa, Lilian T; Vilani, Cecília; Bianconi, M Lucia; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Jerson L

    2011-01-13

    The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO₁₆) is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO₁₆ and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM), a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO₁₆ to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO₁₆ was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs), but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO₁₆. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO₁₆ and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases.

  10. Structure-function insights into direct lipid transfer between membranes by Mmm1-Mdm12 of ERMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Shin; Tamura, Yasushi; Kojima, Rieko; Bala, Siqin; Asai, Eri; Michel, Agnès H; Kornmann, Benoît; Riezman, Isabelle; Riezman, Howard; Sakae, Yoshitake; Okamoto, Yuko; Endo, Toshiya

    2018-03-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES) physically links the membranes of the ER and mitochondria in yeast. Although the ER and mitochondria cooperate to synthesize glycerophospholipids, whether ERMES directly facilitates the lipid exchange between the two organelles remains controversial. Here, we compared the x-ray structures of an ERMES subunit Mdm12 from Kluyveromyces lactis with that of Mdm12 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and found that both Mdm12 proteins possess a hydrophobic pocket for phospholipid binding. However in vitro lipid transfer assays showed that Mdm12 alone or an Mmm1 (another ERMES subunit) fusion protein exhibited only a weak lipid transfer activity between liposomes. In contrast, Mdm12 in a complex with Mmm1 mediated efficient lipid transfer between liposomes. Mutations in Mmm1 or Mdm12 impaired the lipid transfer activities of the Mdm12-Mmm1 complex and furthermore caused defective phosphatidylserine transport from the ER to mitochondrial membranes via ERMES in vitro. Therefore, the Mmm1-Mdm12 complex functions as a minimal unit that mediates lipid transfer between membranes. © 2018 Kawano et al.

  11. Steady-state oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase in lipid bilayer membranes on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Devadoss, Anando; Palencsar, Mariela S.; Burgess, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase is immobilized in electrode-supported lipid bilayer membranes. Platinum electrodes are initially modified with a self-assembled monolayer of thiolipid. A vesicle fusion method is used to deposit an outer leaflet of phospholipids onto the thiolipid monolayer forming a thiolipid/lipid bilayer membrane on the electrode surface. Cholesterol oxidase spontaneously inserts into the electrode-supported lipid bilayer membrane from solution and is consequently immobilized to the electrode surface. Cholesterol partitions into the membrane from buffer solutions containing cyclodextrin. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol by molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide as a product. Amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide for continuous solution flow experiments are presented, where flow was alternated between cholesterol solution and buffer containing no cholesterol. Steady-state anodic currents were observed during exposures of cholesterol solutions ranging in concentration from 10 to 1000 μM. These data are consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for oxidation of cholesterol as catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase immobilized in the lipid bilayer membrane. The cholesterol detection limit is below 1 μM for cholesterol solution prepared in buffered cyclodextrin. The response of the electrodes to low density lipoprotein solutions is increased upon addition of cyclodextrin. Evidence for adsorption of low density lipoprotein to the electrode surface is presented

  12. Maximally asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic lipids alters the structure and interaction with lipids of an amyloidogenic protein dimer bound to the membrane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sara Y; Chou, George; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark W; Compton, Campbell; Cheng, Kwan H

    2016-03-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to explore the effects of asymmetric transbilayer distribution of anionic phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids on the structure of a protein on the membrane surface and subsequent protein-lipid interactions. Our simulation systems consisted of an amyloidogenic, beta-sheet rich dimeric protein (D42) absorbed to the phosphatidylcholine (PC) leaflet, or protein-contact PC leaflet, of two membrane systems: a single-component PC bilayer and double PC/PS bilayers. The latter comprised of a stable but asymmetric transbilayer distribution of PS in the presence of counterions, with a 1-component PC leaflet coupled to a 1-component PS leaflet in each bilayer. The maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer had a non-zero transmembrane potential (TMP) difference and higher lipid order packing, whereas the symmetric PC bilayer had a zero TMP difference and lower lipid order packing under physiologically relevant conditions. Analysis of the adsorbed protein structures revealed weaker protein binding, more folding in the N-terminal domain, more aggregation of the N- and C-terminal domains and larger tilt angle of D42 on the PC leaflet surface of the PC/PS bilayer versus the PC bilayer. Also, analysis of protein-induced membrane structural disruption revealed more localized bilayer thinning in the PC/PS versus PC bilayer. Although the electric field profile in the non-protein-contact PS leaflet of the PC/PS bilayer differed significantly from that in the non-protein-contact PC leaflet of the PC bilayer, no significant difference in the electric field profile in the protein-contact PC leaflet of either bilayer was evident. We speculate that lipid packing has a larger effect on the surface adsorbed protein structure than the electric field for a maximally asymmetric PC/PS bilayer. Our results support the mechanism that the higher lipid packing in a lipid leaflet promotes stronger protein-protein but weaker protein-lipid interactions for a dimeric protein on

  13. Protein sorting by lipid phase-like domains supports emergent signaling function in B lymphocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Núñez, Marcos F; Wisser, Kathleen; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Diverse cellular signaling events, including B cell receptor (BCR) activation, are hypothesized to be facilitated by domains enriched in specific plasma membrane lipids and proteins that resemble liquid-ordered phase-separated domains in model membranes. This concept remains controversial and lacks direct experimental support in intact cells. Here, we visualize ordered and disordered domains in mouse B lymphoma cell membranes using super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy, demonstrate that clustered BCR resides within ordered phase-like domains capable of sorting key regulators of BCR activation, and present a minimal, predictive model where clustering receptors leads to their collective activation by stabilizing an extended ordered domain. These results provide evidence for the role of membrane domains in BCR signaling and a plausible mechanism of BCR activation via receptor clustering that could be generalized to other signaling pathways. Overall, these studies demonstrate that lipid mediated forces can bias biochemical networks in ways that broadly impact signal transduction.

  14. Lipid, membrane, and mitochondrial characteristics of Ustilago maydis following exposure to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterfield, W.F. III

    1986-01-01

    Pencoazole at 0.5 ..mu..g/ml inhibited ergosterol biosynthesis in U. maydis. Polar lipids of sporidia grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 7.5 or 22 hr or 1.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol for 7.5 hr contained more 18:2 than 18:1 fatty acids. There was usually more 18:1 than 18:2 fatty acids in polar lipids of untreated sporidia but this ratio was influenced by culture cell density. The high 18:2 to 18:1 ratio in the polar lipids from penconazole grown cells was unaffected by cell density. There was an increase in free fatty acids and these were enriched with 18:2 members in cells grown with 0.5 ..mu..g/ml penconazole for 22 hr. Unsaturation of triglycerides fatty acids did not differ appreciably from that of untreated sporidia. Untreated WT U. maydis protoplasts lysed more slowly in 0.3 M sorbitol than those prepared from WT sporidia grown for 16 hr with 1.0 ..mu..g/ml penconazole or 2.0 ..mu..g/ml fenarimol or from untreated erg-40 sporidia. Protoplasts were more permeable to crystal violet than were those from untreated WT sporidia. Mitochondria from untreated WT sporidia oxidizing pyruvate plus malate or succinate yielded higher ADP/O rations than mitochondria from erg-40 or penconazole grown WT sporidia. The mitochondrial ATPase of control cells had a Km of 0.8 mM ATP whereas the mitochondrial ATPase of penconazole grown WT and erg-40 had a Km value of 3.7 and 3.2 mM ATP, respectively. When the mitochondrial catalytic subunit of the ATPase from these mitochondria were solubilized, the Km did not differ. These studies suggest that changes in sterols and membrane fatty acids resulting from treatments with EBI fungicides cause increased membrane fluidity which affects membrane stability, permeability and activity of the mitochondrial ATPase.

  15. Membranes linked by trans-SNARE complexes require lipids prone to non-bilayer structure for progression to fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Michael; Stroupe, Christopher; Orr, Amy; Douville, Deborah; Wickner, William T

    2014-01-01

    Like other intracellular fusion events, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles requires a Rab GTPase, a large Rab effector complex, SNARE proteins which can form a 4-helical bundle, and the SNARE disassembly chaperones Sec17p and Sec18p. In addition to these proteins, specific vacuole lipids are required for efficient fusion in vivo and with the purified organelle. Reconstitution of vacuole fusion with all purified components reveals that high SNARE levels can mask the requirement for a complex mixture of vacuole lipids. At lower, more physiological SNARE levels, neutral lipids with small headgroups that tend to form non-bilayer structures (phosphatidylethanolamine, diacylglycerol, and ergosterol) are essential. Membranes without these three lipids can dock and complete trans-SNARE pairing but cannot rearrange their lipids for fusion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01879.001.

  16. [Change in the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membranes in rat organs during adaptation to heat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubareva, E V; Seferova, R I; Denisova, N A

    1991-01-01

    Under conditions of adaptation to heating lipid composition in mitochondrial membranes of rat inner tissues was altered as follows: an increase in relative concentration of plasmalogenous forms of phospholipids (kidney, heart) and in content of saturated fatty acids (liver tissue), a decrease in the index of fatty acids unsaturation and in the ratio of fatty acids omega-3/omega-6. The alterations observed enabled the membranes to keep sufficient amount of liquidity essential for functional activity of mitochondria in heating.

  17. Integrative Analysis of Subcellular Quantitative Proteomics Studies Reveals Functional Cytoskeleton Membrane-Lipid Raft Interactions in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anup D; Inder, Kerry L; Shah, Alok K; Cristino, Alexandre S; McKie, Arthur B; Gabra, Hani; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2016-10-07

    Lipid rafts are dynamic membrane microdomains that orchestrate molecular interactions and are implicated in cancer development. To understand the functions of lipid rafts in cancer, we performed an integrated analysis of quantitative lipid raft proteomics data sets modeling progression in breast cancer, melanoma, and renal cell carcinoma. This analysis revealed that cancer development is associated with increased membrane raft-cytoskeleton interactions, with ∼40% of elevated lipid raft proteins being cytoskeletal components. Previous studies suggest a potential functional role for the raft-cytoskeleton in the action of the putative tumor suppressors PTRF/Cavin-1 and Merlin. To extend the observation, we examined lipid raft proteome modulation by an unrelated tumor suppressor opioid binding protein cell-adhesion molecule (OPCML) in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. In agreement with the other model systems, quantitative proteomics revealed that 39% of OPCML-depleted lipid raft proteins are cytoskeletal components, with microfilaments and intermediate filaments specifically down-regulated. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction network and simulation analysis showed significantly higher interactions among cancer raft proteins compared with general human raft proteins. Collectively, these results suggest increased cytoskeleton-mediated stabilization of lipid raft domains with greater molecular interactions as a common, functional, and reversible feature of cancer cells.

  18. Stratification of archaeal membrane lipids in the ocean and implications for adaptation and chemotaxonomy of planktonic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun; Wakeham, Stuart G; Elling, Felix J; Basse, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Versteegh, Gerard J M; Könneke, Martin; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-12-01

    Membrane lipids of marine planktonic archaea have provided unique insights into archaeal ecology and paleoceanography. However, past studies of archaeal lipids in suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments mainly focused on a small class of fully saturated glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) homologues identified decades ago. The apparent low structural diversity of GDGTs is in strong contrast to the high diversity of metabolism and taxonomy among planktonic archaea. Furthermore, adaptation of archaeal lipids in the deep ocean remains poorly constrained. We report the archaeal lipidome in SPM from diverse oceanic regimes. We extend the known inventory of planktonic archaeal lipids to include numerous unsaturated archaeal ether lipids (uns-AELs). We further reveal (i) different thermal regulations and polar headgroup compositions of membrane lipids between the epipelagic (≤ 100 m) and deep (>100 m) populations of archaea, (ii) stratification of unsaturated GDGTs with varying redox conditions, and (iii) enrichment of tetra-unsaturated archaeol and fully saturated GDGTs in epipelagic and deep oxygenated waters, respectively. Such stratified lipid patterns are consistent with the typical distribution of archaeal phylotypes in marine environments. We, thus, provide an ecological context for GDGT-based paleoclimatology and bring about the potential use of uns-AELs as biomarkers for planktonic Euryarchaeota. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco; Mourokh, Lev G

    2011-01-01

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  20. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  1. Spontaneous Lipid Flip-Flop in Membranes: A Still Unsettled Picture from Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Ferrarini, Alberta

    2017-01-01

    or assisted by protein transporters. It can be accelerated or inhibited by various factors, e.g., it can be induced by mechanical stresses. It was also found that flip-flop rate and mechanism strongly depend on the molecular structure of the flipping lipid and on the composition and physical state...... studies is presented, together with a summary of the state of the art of computer simulation studies, which enable a direct insight at the molecular level. The achievements and limitations of experimental and computational approaches are pointed out, as well as the challenges that remain to be addressed....... of the membrane. Yet, large discrepancies exist among the data available in the literature, and a quantitative and comprehensive understanding of this process is still missing. This chapter reviews our current knowledge of the molecular aspects of spontaneous (or passive) flip-flop. An overview of experimental...

  2. Structure and stability of the spinach aquaporin SoPIP2;1 in detergent micelles and lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Plasencia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SoPIP2;1 constitutes one of the major integral proteins in spinach leaf plasma membranes and belongs to the aquaporin family. SoPIP2;1 is a highly permeable and selective water channel that has been successfully overexpressed and purified with high yields. In order to optimize reconstitution of the purified protein into biomimetic systems, we have here for the first time characterized the structural stability of SoPIP2;1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We have characterized the protein structural stability after purification and after reconstitution into detergent micelles and proteoliposomes using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The structure of SoPIP2;1 was analyzed either with the protein solubilized with octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OG or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed by E. coli lipids, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC, or reconstituted into lipid membranes formed from mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPE, 1-palmitoyl-2oleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylserine (POPS, and ergosterol. Generally, SoPIP2;1 secondary structure was found to be predominantly α-helical in accordance with crystallographic data. The protein has a high thermal structural stability in detergent solutions, with an irreversible thermal unfolding occurring at a melting temperature of 58°C. Incorporation of the protein into lipid membranes increases the structural stability as evidenced by an increased melting temperature of up to 70°C. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study provide insights into SoPIP2;1 stability in various host membranes and suggest suitable choices of detergent and lipid composition for reconstitution of SoPIP2;1 into biomimetic membranes for biotechnological applications.

  3. Occurrence and distribution of tetraether membrane lipids in soils: implications for the use of the TEX86 proxy and the BIT index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, J.W.H.; Schouten, S.; Spaargaren, O.C.; Sinnige Damsté, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    A diverse collection of globally distributed soil samples was analyzed for its glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipid content. Branched GDGTs, derived from anaerobic soil bacteria, were the most dominant and were found in all soils. Isoprenoid GDGTs, membrane lipids of Archaea,

  4. Methods of staining and visualization of sphingolipid enriched and non-enriched plasma membrane regions of Arabidopsis thaliana with fluorescent dyes and lipid analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blachutzik Jörg O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sterols and Sphingolipids form lipid clusters in the plasma membranes of cell types throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. These lipid domains provide a medium for protein signaling complexes at the plasma membrane and are also observed to be principal regions of membrane contact at the inception of infection. We visualized different specific fluorescent lipophilic stains of the both sphingolipid enriched and non-sphingolipid enriched regions in the plasma membranes of live protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Lipid staining protocols for several fluorescent lipid analogues in plants are presented. The most emphasis was placed on successful protocols for the single and dual staining of sphingolipid enriched regions and exclusion of sphingolipid enriched regions on the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts. A secondary focus was placed to ensure that these staining protocols presented still maintain cell viability. Furthermore, the protocols were successfully tested with the spectrally sensitive dye Laurdan. Conclusion Almost all existing staining procedures of the plasma membrane with fluorescent lipid analogues are specified for animal cells and tissues. In order to develop lipid staining protocols for plants, procedures were established with critical steps for the plasma membrane staining of Arabidopsis leaf tissue and protoplasts. The success of the plasma membrane staining protocols was additionally verified by measurements of lipid dynamics by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique and by the observation of new phenomena such as time dependent lipid polarization events in living protoplasts, for which a putative physiological relevance is suggested.

  5. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin induces heterogeneity in lipid membranes: potential implication for its diverse biological action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, indomethacin (Indo, has a large number of divergent biological effects, the molecular mechanism(s for which have yet to be fully elucidated. Interestingly, Indo is highly amphiphilic and associates strongly with lipid membranes, which influence localization, structure and function of membrane-associating proteins and actively regulate cell signaling events. Thus, it is possible that Indo regulates diverse cell functions by altering micro-environments within the membrane. Here we explored the effect of Indo on the nature of the segregated domains in a mixed model membrane composed of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di16:0 PC, or DPPC and dioleoyl phosphatidyl-choline (di18:1 PC or DOPC and cholesterol that mimics biomembranes.Using a series of fluorescent probes in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET study, we found that Indo induced separation between gel domains and fluid domains in the mixed model membrane, possibly by enhancing the formation of gel-phase domains. This effect originated from the ability of Indo to specifically target the ordered domains in the mixed membrane. These findings were further confirmed by measuring the ability of Indo to affect the fluidity-dependent fluorescence quenching and the level of detergent resistance of membranes.Because the tested lipids are the main lipid constituents in cell membranes, the observed formation of gel phase domains induced by Indo potentially occurs in biomembranes. This marked Indo-induced change in phase behavior potentially alters membrane protein functions, which contribute to the wide variety of biological activities of Indo and other NSAIDs.

  6. Molecular, dynamic, and structural origin of inhomogeneous magnetization transfer in lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Scott D; Malyarenko, Dariya I; Fabiilli, Mario L; Welsh, Robert C; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    To elucidate the dynamic, structural, and molecular properties that create inhomogeneous magnetization transfer (ihMT) contrast. Amphiphilic lipids, lamellar phospholipids with cholesterol, and bovine spinal cord (BSC) specimens were examined along with nonlipid systems. Magnetization transfer (MT), enhanced MT (eMT, obtained with double-sided radiofrequency saturation), ihMT (MT - eMT), and dipolar relaxation, T 1D , were measured at 2.0 and 11.7 T. The amplitude of ihMT ratio (ihMTR) is positively correlated with T 1D values. Both ihMTR and T 1D increase with increasing temperature in BSC white matter and in phospholipids and decrease with temperature in other lipids. Changes in ihMTR with temperature arise primarily from alterations in MT rather than eMT. Spectral width of MT, eMT, and ihMT increases with increasing carbon chain length. Concerted motions of phospholipids in white matter decrease proton spin diffusion leading to increased proton T 1D times and increased ihMT amplitudes, consistent with decoupling of Zeeman and dipolar spin reservoirs. Molecular specificity and dynamic sensitivity of ihMT contrast make it a suitable candidate for probing myelin membrane disorders. Magn Reson Med 77:1318-1328, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V.; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM 14 N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments

  8. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Anna J.; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R.; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required

  9. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Oxford e-Research Centre, 7 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Horrell, Sam [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  10. Vibrational, calorimetric, and molecular conformational study on calcein interaction with model lipid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maherani, Behnoush; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Rogalska, Ewa; Korchowiec, Beata; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Linder, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Nanoliposomes are commonly used as a carrier in controlled release drug delivery systems. Controlled release formulations can be used to reduce the amount of drug necessary to cause the same therapeutic effect in patients. One of the most noticeable factors in release profiles is the strength of the drug-carrier interaction. To adjust the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of therapeutic agents, it is necessary to optimize the drug-carrier interaction. To get a better understanding of this interaction, large unilamellar liposomes containing calcein were prepared using 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and a mixture of them; calcein was chosen as a model polar molecule of biological interest. The thermodynamic changes induced by calcein and its location in lipid bilayers were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results reveal that calcein has no significant influence on thermotropic properties of the lipid membrane, but causing the abolition of pre-transition. The decreasing of the pre-transition can be ascribed to the presence of calcein near the hydrophilic cooperative zone of the bilayer. The change in intensity of the Raman peaks represents the interaction of calcein with choline head groups. Moreover, the impact of calcein on phosphoglyceride Langmuir layers spread at the air–water interface was studied using surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms, as well as polarization-modulation infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy and Brewster angle microscopy. The results obtained indicate that calcein introduce no major modification on the systems prepared with pure lipids

  11. Soluble products of Escherichia coli induce mitochondrial dysfunction-related sperm membrane lipid peroxidation which is prevented by lactobacilli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangelo Barbonetti

    Full Text Available Unidentified soluble factors secreted by E. coli, a frequently isolated microorganism in genitourinary infections, have been reported to inhibit mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, motility and vitality of human spermatozoa. Here we explore the mechanisms involved in the adverse impact of E. coli on sperm motility, focusing mainly on sperm mitochondrial function and possible membrane damage induced by mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, as lactobacilli, which dominate the vaginal ecosystem of healthy women, have been shown to exert anti-oxidant protective effects on spermatozoa, we also evaluated whether soluble products from these microorganisms could protect spermatozoa against the effects of E. coli. We assessed motility (by computer-aided semen analysis, ΔΨm (with JC-1 dye by flow cytometry, mitochondrial ROS generation (with MitoSOX red dye by flow cytometry and membrane lipid-peroxidation (with the fluorophore BODIPY C11 by flow cytometry of sperm suspensions exposed to E. coli in the presence and in the absence of a combination of 3 selected strains of lactobacilli (L. brevis, L. salivarius, L. plantarum. A Transwell system was used to avoid direct contact between spermatozoa and microorganisms. Soluble products of E. coli induced ΔΨm loss, mitochondrial generation of ROS and membrane lipid-peroxidation, resulting in motility loss. Soluble factors of lactobacilli prevented membrane lipid-peroxidation of E. coli-exposed spermatozoa, thus preserving their motility. In conclusion, sperm motility loss by soluble products of E. coli reflects a mitochondrial dysfunction-related membrane lipid-peroxidation. Lactobacilli could protect spermatozoa in the presence of vaginal disorders, by preventing ROS-induced membrane damage.

  12. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... a system that can be considered a paradigm for interactions of soluble proteins with membrane receptors. In this work, we have investigated different technologies for capturing nanodiscs containing the glycolipid receptor G(M1) in lipid bilayers, enabling measurements of binding of its soluble interaction...

  13. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan egg: Evidence for an animal/vegetal polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Laat, S.W. de; Speksnijder, J.E.; Dohmen, M.R.; Zoelen, E. van; Tertoolen, L.G.J.; Bluemink, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of the lipid analog C₁₄-diI (3', 3'-dihexadecylindocarbocyanine iodide) was measured in the plasma membrane of early embryos of the mollusc Nassarius reticulatus using the FPR-(Fluorescence Photobleaching Recovery) method. At almost all stages measured (from fertilized egg up to 8-cell stage) the diffusion coefficient (D) of the mobile fraction (MF) of C₁₄-diI is significantly higher in the plasma membrane of the polar lobe as compared to the plasma membrane of the anima...

  14. Biomechanics and Thermodynamics of Nanoparticle Interactions with Plasma and Endosomal Membrane Lipids in Cellular Uptake and Endosomal Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  15. Cholesterol Induced Changes in the Characteristics of the Time Series From Planar Lipid Bilayer Membrane during Electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulska, M.; Koronkiewicz, S.; Kalinowski, S.

    2002-01-01

    The electroporation can be used as a non-toxic method for introducing exogenous macromolecules, especially DNA and drugs, into various types of cells. Research in to new therapeutic methods based on Long Duration Electroporation (LDE) is of special interest. A new current-clamp method makes possible the electroporation of very long duration with no damage to bio-membranes. In this paper we compare responses of lipid planar bilayer membranes at physiological concentration of KCl, with lipid membranes formed at higher ionic strength, and membranes containing cholesterol. A longer lifespan of the membranes with cholesterol and membranes with increased ionic strength could be observed. Sensitivity of the power spectrum response to the presence of cholesterol, ionic strength, current intensity, and membrane ageing was examined. The membrane memory was analyzed by means of autocorrelation function and rescaled range analysis. We showed that the memory of the system decreases for higher current intensities and this relation is pronounced better at higher ionic strength. At low current intensities all membranes showed slightly persistent type of noise behavior with crossover to Brownian type of noise for higher current value. The transition w as much faster for higher ionic strength, where the next transition to anti-persistent response was observed for relatively low currents. Very interesting results were obtained from power spectrum analysis. At low current intensity, all membranes exhibited 1/f noise, which disappeared for higher currents, maintaining f β type with rising value of β. Membranes formed at lower ionic strength and with cholesterol showed a pronounced tendency to lose flicker noise while ageing, also with rising β value. (author)

  16. Probing plasma membrane microdomains in cowpea protoplasts using lipidated GFP-fusion proteins and multimode FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, J.E.M.; van Munster, E.B.; Vischer, N.O.; Gadella, T.

    2004-01-01

    Multimode fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was applied to study the plasma membrane organization using different lipidated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins co-expressed in cowpea protoplasts. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to the hyper variable region

  17. Elucidation and identification of amino acid containing membrane lipids using liquid chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moore, E.K.; Hopmans, E.C.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Villanueva, L.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Intact polar lipids (IPLs) are the building blocks of cell membranes, and amino acid containing IPLs havebeen observed to be involved in response to changing environmental conditions in various species of bacteri a. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) has

  18. Analysis by Mass Spectrometry of the Polar Lipids from the Cellular Membrane of Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Seldes

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast atom bombardment (FAB technique was employed to determine the structure of polar lipids from the cellular membrane of Lactobacillus delbruekii ssp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus. Analysis of spectra provided useful information about the molecular species and aminoacids constituents of the samples.

  19. Convenient synthesis and application of versatile nucleic acid lipid membrane anchors in the assembly and fusion of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Oliver; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    or the construction of DNA origami structures. We herein present the synthesis and applications of versatile lipid membrane anchor building blocks suitable for solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis. These are readily synthesized in bulk in five to seven steps from commercially available precursors and can...

  20. Lateral mobility of plasma membrane lipids in a molluscan egg: Evidence for an animal/vegetal polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, S.W. de; Speksnijder, J.E.; Dohmen, M.R.; Zoelen, E. van; Tertoolen, L.G.J.; Bluemink, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The lateral diffusion of the lipid analog C₁₄-diI (3', 3'-dihexadecylindocarbocyanine iodide) was measured in the plasma membrane of early embryos of the mollusc Nassarius reticulatus using the FPR-(Fluorescence Photobleaching Recovery) method. At almost all stages measured (from

  1. Environmental controls on the distribution of bacterial tetraether membrane lipids: Constraints on the MBT-CBT paleothermometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterse, F.

    2011-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are membrane lipids of soil bacteria that occur ubiquitously in soils, peats, and marine sediments. The structures of the branched GDGTs vary in the number of methyl groups (4 to 6) attached to the alkyl chains and can contain up to two

  2. Cell-Free and Cell-Based Approaches to Explore the Roles of Host Membranes and Lipids in the Formation of Viral Replication Compartment Induced by Tombusviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter D; Pogany, Judit; Xu, Kai

    2016-03-03

    Plant positive strand RNA viruses are intracellular infectious agents that take advantage of cellular lipids and membranes to support replication and protect viral RNA from degradation by host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss how Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts lipid transfer proteins and modulates lipid metabolism and transport to facilitate the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase complexes within intricate replication compartments. Identification and characterization of the proviral roles of specific lipids and proteins involved in lipid metabolism based on results from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host and cell-free approaches are discussed. The review also highlights the advantage of using liposomes with chemically defined composition to identify specific lipids required for TBSV replication. Remarkably, all the known steps in TBSV replication are dependent on cellular lipids and co-opted membranes.

  3. Porous Materials to Support Bilayer Lipid Membranes for Ion Channel Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Phung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify materials suitable as membrane supports for ion channel biosensors, six filter materials of varying hydrophobicity, tortuosity, and thickness were examined for their ability to support bilayer lipid membranes as determined by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Bilayers supported by hydrophobic materials (PTFE, polycarbonate, nylon, and silanised silver had optimal resistance (14–19 GΩ and capacitance (0.8–1.6 μF values whereas those with low hydrophobicity did not form BLMs (PVDF or were short-lived (unsilanised silver. The ability of ion channels to function in BLMs was assessed using a method recently reported to improve the efficiency of proteoliposome incorporation into PTFE-supported bilayers. Voltage-gated sodium channel activation by veratridine and inhibition by saxitoxin showed activity for PTFE, nylon, and silanised silver, but not polycarbonate. Bilayers on thicker, more tortuous, and hydrophobic materials produced higher current levels. Bilayers that self-assembled on PTFE filters were the longest lived and produced the most channel activity using this method.

  4. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  5. Micro- and nanofabrication methods for ion channel reconstitution in bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Daisuke; Yamaura, Daichi; Arata, Kohei; Ohori, Takeshi; Ma, Teng; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2018-03-01

    The self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) forms the basic structure of the cell membrane and serves as a major barrier against ion movement. Ion channel proteins function as gated pores that permit ion permeation across the BLM. The reconstitution of ion channel proteins in artificially formed BLMs represents a well-defined system for investigating channel functions and screening drug effects on ion channels. In this review, we will discuss our recent microfabrication approaches to the formation of stable BLMs containing ion channel proteins as a potential platform for next-generation drug screening systems. BLMs formed in a microaperture having a tapered edge exhibited highly stable properties, such as a lifetime of ∼65 h and tolerance to solution changes even after the incorporation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. We also explore a new method of efficiently incorporating human ion channels into BLMs by centrifugation. Our approaches to the formation of stable BLMs and efficient channel incorporation markedly improve the experimental efficiency of BLM reconstitution systems, leading to the realization of a BLM-based high-throughput platform for functional assays of various ion channels.

  6. Aromatic Side Chain Water-to-Lipid Transfer Free Energies Show a Depth Dependence across the Membrane Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sarah K; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-06-29

    Quantitating and understanding the physical forces responsible for the interactions of biomolecules are fundamental to the biological sciences. This is especially challenging for membrane proteins because they are embedded within cellular bilayers that provide a unique medium in which hydrophobic sequences must fold. Knowledge of the energetics of protein-lipid interactions is thus vital to understand cellular processes involving membrane proteins. Here we used a host-guest mutational strategy to calculate the Gibbs free energy changes of water-to-lipid transfer for the aromatic side chains Trp, Tyr, and Phe as a function of depth in the membrane. This work reveals an energetic gradient in the transfer free energies for Trp and Tyr, where transfer was most favorable to the membrane interfacial region and comparatively less favorable into the bilayer center. The transfer energetics follows the concentration gradient of polar atoms across the bilayer normal that naturally occurs in biological membranes. Additional measurements revealed nearest-neighbor coupling in the data set are influenced by a network of aromatic side chains in the host protein. Taken together, these results show that aromatic side chains contribute significantly to membrane protein stability through either aromatic-aromatic interactions or placement at the membrane interface.

  7. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide in Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Membranes: A Comparative Study of Experiments In Silico and with Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ménorval, Marie-Amélie; Mir, Lluis M.; Fernández, M. Laura; Reigada, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been known to enhance cell membrane permeability of drugs or DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single-component lipid bilayers predicted the existence of three regimes of action of DMSO: membrane loosening, pore formation and bilayer collapse. We show here that these modes of action are also reproduced in the presence of cholesterol in the bilayer, and we provide a description at the atomic detail of the DMSO-mediated process of pore formation in cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. We also successfully explore the applicability of DMSO to promote plasma membrane permeability to water, calcium ions (Ca2+) and Yo-Pro-1 iodide (Yo-Pro-1) in living cell membranes. The experimental results on cells in culture can be easily explained according to the three expected regimes: in the presence of low doses of DMSO, the membrane of the cells exhibits undulations but no permeability increase can be detected, while at intermediate DMSO concentrations cells are permeabilized to water and calcium but not to larger molecules as Yo-Pro-1. These two behaviors can be associated to the MD-predicted consequences of the effects of the DMSO at low and intermediate DMSO concentrations. At larger DMSO concentrations, permeabilization is larger, as even Yo-Pro-1 can enter the cells as predicted by the DMSO-induced membrane-destructuring effects described in the MD simulations. PMID:22848583

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo.

  9. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  10. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilismara Sousa

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1, iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5% than in women and was associated with an increase (446% in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and an increase (327% in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132% in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  11. Age-related changes in the lateral lipid distribution in a human lens described by mass spectrometry imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pól, Jaroslav; Faltýsková, Helena; Krásný, Lukáš; Volný, Michael; Vláčil, O.; Hajdúch, M.; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2015), s. 297-303 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13038; GA MŠk LO1509 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : lens * eye * imaging Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.011, year: 2015

  12. Osmolality, temperature, and membrane lipid composition modulate the activity of betaine transporter BetP in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozcan, Nuran; Ejsing, Christer S.; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    The gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum, a major amino acid-producing microorganism in biotechnology, is equipped with several osmoregulated uptake systems for compatible solutes, which is relevant for the physiological response to osmotic stress. The most significant carrier......P activity. We further correlated the change in BetP regulation properties in cells grown at different temperatures to changes in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane. For this purpose, the glycerophospholipidome of C. glutamicum grown at different temperatures was analyzed by mass spectrometry using...... quantitative multiple precursor ion scanning. The molecular composition of glycerophospholipids was strongly affected by the growth temperature. The modulating influence of membrane lipid composition on BetP function was further corroborated by studying the influence of artificial modulation of membrane...

  13. MP20, the second most abundant lens membrane protein and member of the tetraspanin superfamily, joins the list of ligands of galectin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Paul J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although MP20 is the second most highly expressed membrane protein in the lens its function remains an enigma. Putative functions for MP20 have recently been inferred from its assignment to the tetraspanin superfamily of integral membrane proteins. Members of this family have been shown to be involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. In this study, we show that MP20 associates with galectin-3, a known adhesion modulator. Results MP20 and galectin-3 co-localized in selected areas of the lens fiber cell plasma membrane. Individually, these proteins purified with apparent molecular masses of 60 kDa and 22 kDa, respectively. A 104 kDa complex was formed in vitro upon mixing the purified proteins. A 102 kDa complex of MP20 and galectin-3 could also be isolated from detergent-solubilized native fiber cell membranes. Binding between MP20 and galectin-3 was disrupted by lactose suggesting the lectin site was involved in the interaction. Conclusions MP20 adds to a growing list of ligands of galectin-3 and appears to be the first representative of the tetraspanin superfamily identified to possess this specificity.

  14. How To Tackle the Issues in Free Energy Simulations of Long Amphiphiles Interacting with Lipid Membranes: Convergence and Local Membrane Deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filipe, H. A. L.; Moreno, M. J.; Rog, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the great challenges in membrane biophysics is to find a means to foster the transport of drugs across complex membrane structures. In this spirit, we elucidate methodological challenges associated with free energy computations of complex chainlike molecules across lipid membranes....... As an appropriate standard molecule to this end, we consider 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-labeled fatty amine, NBD-C-n, which is here dealt with as a homologous series with varying chain lengths. We found the membrane-water interface region to be highly sensitive to details in free energy computations. Despite...... of radius 1.7 nm from the amphiphile. Importantly, the free energy results given by PGC were found to be qualitatively consistent with experimental data, while the PGD results were not. We conclude that with long amphiphiles there is reason for concern with regard to computations of their free energy...

  15. The Impact of Lens Opacity on SD-OCT Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer and Bruch's Membrane Opening Measurements Using the Anatomical Positioning System (APS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauschitz, Matthias M; Roth, Felix; Holz, Frank G; Breteler, Monique M B; Finger, Robert P

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of lens opacity on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) and Bruch's membrane opening (BMO) measurements. Fifty-nine randomly selected patients without any other relevant ocular pathology undergoing elective routine cataract surgery in two specialized eye clinics were enrolled. RNFLT, BMO area, and BMO minimum rim width (BMO-MRW) were assessed with the Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis OCT using the anatomical positioning system (APS) prior to and 1 day after cataract surgery using a ring scan at different eccentricities of the disc (3.5, 4.1 and 4.7 mm). Lens opacity was quantified using densitometry based on Scheimpflug images (Oculus Pentacam AXL). RNFLT, BMO area, and BMO-MRW were virtually identical before and following removal of the cataractous lens. This held when assessed overall, within the six sectors for the 3.5-mm scan, or at any other eccentricity. Baseline RNFLT was not associated with lens opacity. Using the APS, RNFLT remained unchanged following cataract surgery, contrary to results reported by previous studies. Our results imply that the APS may have contributed to more precise spectral-domain optical coherence measurements, minimizing the influence of cataract on RNFLT and BMO assessments in our cohort.

  16. FCS diffusion laws in two-phase lipid membranes: determination of domain mean size by experiments and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favard, Cyril; Wenger, Jérôme; Lenne, Pierre-François; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the last few decades to characterize the diffusion process in model and cellular lipid membranes. One of the techniques developed for this purpose, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), has proved to be a very efficient approach, especially if the analysis is extended to measurements on different spatial scales (referred to as FCS diffusion laws). In this work, we examine the relevance of FCS diffusion laws for probing the behavior of a pure lipid and a lipid mixture at temperatures below, within and above the phase transitions, both experimentally and numerically. The accuracy of the microscopic description of the lipid mixtures found here extends previous work to a more complex model in which the geometry is unknown and the molecular motion is driven only by the thermodynamic parameters of the system itself. For multilamellar vesicles of both pure lipid and lipid mixtures, the FCS diffusion laws recorded at different temperatures exhibit large deviations from pure Brownian motion and reveal the existence of nanodomains. The variation of the mean size of these domains with temperature is in perfect correlation with the enthalpy fluctuation. This study highlights the advantages of using FCS diffusion laws in complex lipid systems to describe their temporal and spatial structure. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Membrane morphology is actively transformed by covalent binding of the protein Atg8 to PE-lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland L Knorr

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway involving the shape transformation of lipid bilayers. During the onset of autophagy, the water-soluble protein Atg8 binds covalently to phosphatdylethanolamines (PEs in the membrane in an ubiquitin-like reaction coupled to ATP hydrolysis. We reconstituted the Atg8 conjugation system in giant and nm-sized vesicles with a minimal set of enzymes and observed that formation of Atg8-PE on giant vesicles can cause substantial tubulation of membranes even in the absence of Atg12-Atg5-Atg16. Our findings show that ubiquitin-like processes can actively change properties of lipid membranes and that membrane crowding by proteins can be dynamically regulated in cells. Furthermore we provide evidence for curvature sorting of Atg8-PE. Curvature generation and sorting are directly linked to organelle shapes and, thus, to biological function. Our results suggest that a positive feedback exists between the ubiquitin-like reaction and the membrane curvature, which is important for dynamic shape changes of cell membranes, such as those involved in the formation of autophagosomes.

  18. Lipid chain saturation and the cholesterol in the phospholipid membrane affect the spectroscopic properties of lipophilic dye nile red

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Animesh; Saha, Baishakhi; Maity, Pabitra; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Karmakar, Sanat

    2018-02-01

    We have studied the effect of composition and the phase state of phospholipid membranes on the emission spectrum, anisotropy and lifetime of a lipophilic fluorescence probe nile red. Fluorescence spectrum of nile red in membranes containing cholesterol has also been investigated in order to get insights into the influence of cholesterol on the phospholipid membranes. Maximum emission wavelength (λem) of nile red in the fluid phase of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids was found to differ by 10 nm. The λem was also found to be independent of chain length and charge of the membrane. However, the λem is strongly dependent on the temperature in the gel phase. The λem and rotational diffusion rate decrease, whereas the anisotropy and lifetime increase markedly with increasing cholesterol concentration for saturated phosoholipids, such as, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in the liquid ordered phase. However, these spectroscopic properties do not alter significantly in case of unsaturated phospholipids, such as, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) in liquid disordered phase. Interestingly, red edge excitation shift (REES) in the presence of lipid-cholesterol membranes is the direct consequences of change in rotational diffusion due to motional restriction of lipids in the presence of cholesterol. This study provides correlations between the membrane compositions and fluorescence spectral features which can be utilized in a wide range of biophysical fields as well the cell biology.

  19. Compartmentalized cAMP Signaling Associated With Lipid Raft and Non-raft Membrane Domains in Adult Ventricular Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shailesh R; Gratwohl, Jackson; Cozad, Mia; Yang, Pei-Chi; Clancy, Colleen E; Harvey, Robert D

    2018-01-01

    Aim: Confining cAMP production to discrete subcellular locations makes it possible for this ubiquitous second messenger to elicit unique functional responses. Yet, factors that determine how and where the production of this diffusible signaling molecule occurs are incompletely understood. The fluid mosaic model originally proposed that signal transduction occurs through random interactions between proteins diffusing freely throughout the plasma membrane. However, it is now known that the movement of membrane proteins is restricted, suggesting that the plasma membrane is segregated into distinct microdomains where different signaling proteins can be concentrated. In this study, we examined what role lipid raft and non-raft membrane domains play in compartmentation of cAMP signaling in adult ventricular myocytes. Methods and Results: The freely diffusible fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor Epac2-camps was used to measure global cytosolic cAMP responses, while versions of the probe targeted to lipid raft (Epac2-MyrPalm) and non-raft (Epac2-CAAX) domains were used to monitor local cAMP production near the plasma membrane. We found that β-adrenergic receptors, which are expressed in lipid raft and non-raft domains, produce cAMP responses near the plasma membrane that are distinctly different from those produced by E-type prostaglandin receptors, which are expressed exclusively in non-raft domains. We also found that there are differences in basal cAMP levels associated with lipid raft and non-raft domains, and that this can be explained by differences in basal adenylyl cyclase activity associated with each of these membrane environments. In addition, we found evidence that phosphodiesterases 2, 3, and 4 work together in regulating cAMP activity associated with both lipid raft and non-raft domains, while phosphodiesterase 3 plays a more prominent role in the bulk cytoplasmic compartment. Conclusion: These results suggest that different membrane

  20. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support diverse...... aspects of cellular life. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which rapid flip-flop occurs, and what role lipid flipping plays in membrane homeostasis and cell growth. We focus on conceptual aspects, highlighting mechanistic insights from biochemical and in silico experiments, and the recent, ground......-breaking identification of a number of lipid scramblases....

  1. αA-crystallin R49Cneo mutation influences the architecture of lens fiber cell membranes and causes posterior and nuclear cataracts in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andley Usha P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background αA-crystallin (CRYAA/HSPB4, a major component of all vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein responsible for maintaining lens transparency. The R49C mutation in the αA-crystallin protein is linked with non-syndromic, hereditary human cataracts in a four-generation Caucasian family. Methods This study describes a mouse cataract model generated by insertion of a neomycin-resistant (neor gene into an intron of the gene encoding mutant R49C αA-crystallin. Mice carrying the neor gene and wild-type Cryaa were also generated as controls. Heterozygous knock-in mice containing one wild type gene and one mutated gene for αA-crystallin (WT/R49Cneo and homozygous knock-in mice containing two mutated genes (R49Cneo/R49Cneo were compared. Results By 3 weeks, WT/R49Cneo mice exhibited large vacuoles in the cortical region 100 μm from the lens surface, and by 3 months posterior and nuclear cataracts had developed. WT/R49Cneo mice demonstrated severe posterior cataracts at 9 months of age, with considerable posterior nuclear migration evident in histological sections. R49Cneo/R49Cneo mice demonstrated nearly complete lens opacities by 5 months of age. In contrast, R49C mice in which the neor gene was deleted by breeding with CreEIIa mice developed lens abnormalities at birth, suggesting that the neor gene may suppress expression of mutant R49C αA-crystallin protein. Conclusion It is apparent that modification of membrane and cell-cell interactions occurs in the presence of the αA-crystallin mutation and rapidly leads to lens cell pathology in vivo.

  2. Alteration in lipid composition of plasma membranes of sensitive and resistant Guerin carcinoma cells due to the action of free and liposomal form of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naleskina, L A; Todor, I N; Nosko, M M; Lukianova, N Y; Pivnyuk, V M; Chekhun, V F

    2013-09-01

    To study in vivo changes of lipid composition of plasma membranes of sensitive and resistant to cisplatin Guerin carcinoma cells under influence of free and liposomal cisplatin forms. The isolation of plasma membranes from parental (sensitive) and resistant to cisplatin Guerin carcinoma cells was by differential ultracentrifugation in sucrose density gradient. Lipids were detected by method of thin-layer chromatography. It was determined that more effective action of cisplatin liposomal form on resistant cells is associated with essential abnormalities of conformation of plasma membrane due to change of lipid components and architectonics of rafts. It results in the increase of membrane fluidity. Reconstructions in lipid composition of plasma membranes of cisplatin-resistant Guerin carcinoma cells provide more intensive delivery of drug into the cells, increase of its concentration and more effective interaction with cellular structural elements.

  3. The Position of Aβ22-40 and Aβ1-42 in Anionic Lipid Membranes Containing Cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Matthew A; Alsop, Richard J; Hauß, Thomas; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-11-30

    Amyloid-β peptides interact with cell membranes in the human brain and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. An emerging explanation of the molecular mechanism, which results in neurodegeneration, places the cause of neurotoxicity of the amyloid- peptides on their potentially negative interaction with neuronal membranes. It is known that amyloid-β peptides interact with the membrane, modifying the membrane's structural and dynamic properties. We present a series of X-ray diffraction experiments on anionic model lipid membranes containing various amounts of cholesterol. These experiments provide experimental evidence for an interaction of both the full length amyloid-β1-42 peptide, and the peptide fragment amyloid-β22-40 with anionic bilayer containing cholesterol. The location of the amyloid-β peptides was determined from these experiments, with the full length peptide embedding into the membrane, and the peptide fragment occupying 2 positions-on the membrane surface and embedded into the membrane core.

  4. Reorganization of Azospirillum brasilense cell membrane is mediated by lipid composition adjustment to maintain optimal fluidity during water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, A B; Paulucci, N S; Biasutti, M A; Reguera, Y B; Gallarato, L A; Kilmurray, C; Dardanelli, M S

    2016-01-01

    We study the Azospirillum brasilense tolerance to water deficit and the dynamics of adaptive process at the level of the membrane. Azospirillum brasilense was exposed to polyethylene glycol (PEG) growth and PEG shock. Tolerance, phospholipids and fatty acid (FA) composition and membrane fluidity were determined. Azospirillum brasilense was able to grow in the presence of PEG; however, its viability was reduced. Cells grown with PEG showed membrane fluidity similar to those grown without, the lipid composition was modified, increasing phosphatidylcholine and decreasing phosphatidylethanolamine amounts. The unsaturation FAs degree was reduced. The dynamics of the adaptive response revealed a decrease in fluidity 20 min after the addition of PEG, indicating that the PEG has a fluidizing effect on the hydrophobic region of the cell membrane. Fluidity returned to initial values after 60 min of PEG exposure. Azospirillum brasilense is able to perceive osmotic changes by changing the membrane fluidity. This effect is offset by changes in the composition of membrane phospholipid and FA, contributing to the homeostasis of membrane fluidity under water deficit. This knowledge can be used to develop new Azospirillum brasilense formulations showing an adapted membrane to water deficit. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Microvillar membrane microdomains exist at physiological temperature. Role of galectin-4 as lipid raft stabilizer revealed by "superrafts"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braccia, Anita; Villani, Maristella; Immerdal, Lissi

    2003-01-01

    rafts prepared by the two protocols were morphologically different but had essentially similar profiles of protein- and lipid components, showing that raft microdomains do exist at 37 degrees C and are not "low temperature artifacts." We also employed a novel method of sequential detergent extraction...... and the transmembrane aminopeptidase N, whereas the peripheral lipid raft protein annexin 2 was essentially absent. In conclusion, in the microvillar membrane, galectin-4, functions as a core raft stabilizer/organizer for other, more loosely raft-associated proteins. The superraft analysis might be applicable to other...

  6. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. pH sensing by lipids in membranes: The fundamentals of pH-driven migration, polarization and deformations of lipid bilayer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Miglena I; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Seigneuret, Michel; Staneva, Galya; Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Imai, Masayuki; Puff, Nicolas

    2018-03-06

    Most biological molecules contain acido-basic groups that modulate their structure and interactions. A consequence is that pH gradients, local heterogeneities and dynamic variations are used by cells and organisms to drive or regulate specific biological functions including energetic metabolism, vesicular traffic, migration and spatial patterning of tissues in development. While the direct or regulatory role of pH in protein function is well documented, the role of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions in modulating the properties of lipid assemblies such as bilayer membranes is only beginning to be understood. Here, we review approaches using artificial lipid vesicles that have been instrumental in providing an understanding of the influence of pH gradients and local variations on membrane vectorial motional processes: migration, membrane curvature effects promoting global or local deformations, crowding generation by segregative polarization processes. In the case of pH induced local deformations, an extensive theoretical framework is given and an application to a specific biological issue, namely the structure and stability of mitochondrial cristae, is described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emergence of Complex Behavior in Biomembranes edited by Marjorie Longo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffusion of lipids and GPI-anchored proteins in actin-free plasma membrane vesicles measured by STED-FCS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Falk; Waithe, Dominic; Clausen, Mathias P

    2017-01-01

    (STED-FCS) to access and compare the diffusion characteristics of fluorescent lipid analogues and GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in the live cell plasma membrane and in actin cytoskeleton-free cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). Hindered diffusion of phospholipids and sphingolipids......Diffusion and interaction dynamics of molecules at the plasma membrane play an important role in cellular signalling, and they are suggested to be strongly associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we utilise super-resolution STED microscopy combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...... forming immobile clusters, both of which disappear in GPMVs. Our data underline the crucial role of the actin cortex in maintaining hindered diffusion modes of many but not all of the membrane molecules, and highlight a powerful experimental approach to decipher specific influences on molecular plasma...

  9. Solubilization of lipids and membrane proteins into nanodiscs : Mode of action and applications of SMA copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheidelaar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes separate the inside and outside of cells. Membrane proteins in the cell membrane control the traffic of molecules across the membrane and are therefore targets for a lot of drugs: about 50 % of all approved drugs target a