WorldWideScience

Sample records for lens coupled fiber-optic

  1. Low-loss fiber optic rotary joint using C-lens collimators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Da-gong; JING Wen-cai; ZHANG Yi-mo; ZHOU Ge; ZHANG Jin; TANG Feng

    2005-01-01

    A low-loss fiber optic rotary joint (FORJ) has been designed by using two kinds of C-lens collimators. Its insertion loss and insertion loss variation due to rotation with single-mode fiber collimator is less than 1.76 dB and 0.43 dB respectively.The maximum insertion loss and coupling variation due to rotation with multi-mode fiber collimator is 1.71 dB and 0.29 dB, respectively. This kind of FORJ features low insertion loss, small coupling variation due to rotation and low cost.

  2. Coherent fiber optic sensor for early detection of cataractogenesis in a human eye lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Dellavecchia, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    A lensless backscatter fiber optic probe is used to measure the size distribution of protein molecules inside an excised, but intact, human eye lens. The fiber optic probe, about 5 mm in diameter, can be positioned arbitrarily close to the anterior surface of the eye; it is a trans-receiver, which delivers a Gaussian laser beam into a small region inside the lens and provides a coherent detection of the laser light scattered by the protein molecules in the backward direction. Protein sizes determined from the fast and slow diffusion coefficients show good correlation with the age of the lens and cataractogenesis.

  3. Portable fiber-optic taper coupled optical microscopy platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Yu, Yan; Huang, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    The optical fiber taper coupled with CMOS has advantages of high sensitivity, compact structure and low distortion in the imaging platform. So it is widely used in low light, high speed and X-ray imaging systems. In the meanwhile, the peculiarity of the coupled structure can meet the needs of the demand in microscopy imaging. Toward this end, we developed a microscopic imaging platform based on the coupling of cellphone camera module and fiber optic taper for the measurement of the human blood samples and ascaris lumbricoides. The platform, weighing 70 grams, is based on the existing camera module of the smartphone and a fiber-optic array which providing a magnification factor of 6x.The top facet of the taper, on which samples are placed, serves as an irregular sampling grid for contact imaging. The magnified images of the sample, located on the bottom facet of the fiber, are then projected onto the CMOS sensor. This paper introduces the portable medical imaging system based on the optical fiber coupling with CMOS, and theoretically analyzes the feasibility of the system. The image data and process results either can be stored on the memory or transmitted to the remote medical institutions for the telemedicine. We validate the performance of this cell-phone based microscopy platform using human blood samples and test target, achieving comparable results to a standard bench-top microscope.

  4. Test Port for Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Rinis, Haris; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-01-01

    A test port designed as part of a fiber optic coupled laser altimeter receiver optical system allows for the back-illumination of the optical system for alignment verification, as well as illumination of the detector(s) for testing the receiver electronics and signal-processing algorithms. Measuring the optical alignment of a laser altimeter instrument is difficult after the instrument is fully assembled. The addition of a test port in the receiver aft-optics allows for the back-illumination of the receiver system such that its focal setting and boresight alignment can be easily verified. For a multiple-detector receiver system, the addition of the aft-optics test port offers the added advantage of being able to simultaneously test all the detectors with different signals that simulate the expected operational conditions. On a laser altimeter instrument (see figure), the aft-optics couple the light from the receiver telescope to the receiver detector(s). Incorporating a beam splitter in the aft-optics design allows for the addition of a test port to back-illuminate the receiver telescope and/or detectors. The aft-optics layout resembles a T with the detector on one leg, the receiver telescope input port on the second leg, and the test port on the third leg. The use of a custom beam splitter with 99-percent reflection, 1-percent transmission, and a mirrored roof can send the test port light to the receiver telescope leg as well as the detector leg, without unduly sacrificing the signal from the receiver telescope to the detector. The ability to test the receiver system alignment, as well as multiple detectors with different signals without the need to disassemble the instrument or connect and reconnect components, is a great advantage to the aft-optics test port. Another benefit is that the receiver telescope aperture is fully back-illuminated by the test port so the receiver telescope focal setting vs. pressure and or temperature can be accurately measured (as

  5. Improved Fiber-Optic-Coupled Pressure And Vibration Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved fiber-optic coupler enables use of single optical fiber to carry light to and from sensor head. Eliminates problem of alignment of multiple fibers in sensor head and simplifies calibration by making performance both more predictable and more stable. Sensitivities increased, sizes reduced. Provides increased margin for design of compact sensor heads not required to contain amplifier circuits and withstand high operating temperatures.

  6. Mathematical simulation of the optical system of a fiber-optic measuring micro motion converter with a cylindrical lens modulation element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashkina, T. I.; Motin, A. V.; Badeeva, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of mathematical modeling to determine the physical, structural and technological parameters of differential fiber-optic micro motion converters with a cylindrical lens, which are basic elements of the technical solutions for fiber-optic sensors of various physical quantities used in the industry in automated control systems.

  7. Optical Coupling Structures of Fiber-Optic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers Using CO2 Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI can be used to test changes in the refractive index of sucrose solutions at different concentrations. However, the popularity of this measurement tool is limited by its substantial size and portability. Therefore, the MZI was integrated with a small fiber-optic waveguide component to develop an interferometer with fiber-optic characteristics, specifically a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FO-MZI. Optical fiber must be processed to fabricate two optical coupling structures. The two optical coupling structures are a duplicate of the beam splitter, an optical component of the interferometer. Therefore, when the sensor length and the two optical coupling structures vary, the time or path for optical transmission in the sensor changes, thereby influencing the back-end interference signals. The researchers successfully developed an asymmetrical FO-MZI with sensing abilities. The spacing value between the troughs of the sensor length and interference signal exhibited an inverse relationship. In addition, image analysis was employed to examine the size-matching relationship between various sensor lengths and the coupling and decoupling structure. Furthermore, the spectral wavelength shift results measured using a refractive index sensor indicate that FO-MZIs with a sensor length of 38 mm exhibited excellent sensitivity, measuring 59.7 nm/RIU.

  8. Fiber Optic Coupling of CW Linear Laser Diode Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaowei; XIAO Jianwei; MA Xiaoyu; WANG Zhongming; FANG Gaozhan

    2002-01-01

    Based on a set of microoptics the output radiation from a continuous wave (CW) linear laser diode array is coupled into a multi-mode optical fiber of 400 μm diameter.The CW linear laser diode array is a 1 cm laser diode bar with 19 stripes with 100 μm aperture spaced on 500 μm centers.The coupling system contains packaged laser diode bar,fast axis collimator,slow axis collimation array,beam transformation system and focusing system.The high brightness,high power density and single fiber output of a laser diode bar is achieved.The coupling efficiency is 65% and the power density is up to 1.03×104 W/cm2.

  9. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustooptic Coupling in Fiber Optics Based on Refractive Index Variation due to Local Bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Hurtado Castano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed procedure is presented to compute analytically the acoustooptic coupling coefficient between copropagating core and lowest-order cladding modes in tapered fiber optics. Based on the effect of the local bending, the linear and nonlinear variations in the refractive index are modeled. A set of equations and parameters are presented in order to calculate the influence of acoustooptic effect in nonlinear pulse propagation. We will show that as the tapered fiber diameter decreases more energy can be transferred to the cladding and the nonlinear phenomena can compensate the coupling coefficients effects.

  10. Nonreciprocal phase shift caused by magnetic-thermal coupling of a polarization maintaining fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengwei; Zhao, Yuxiang; Fu, Wenlan; Zhou, Wenqing; Liu, Cheng; Shu, Xiaowu; Che, Shuangliang

    2014-03-15

    A theory for nonreciprocal phase shift caused by cross coupling generated in a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) under the combined action of magnetic and temperature fields is proposed. The magnetic-thermal coupling in the FOG originates from the interaction of the magnetic field, fiber twist, birefringence caused by thermal stress, and the intrinsic and bending birefringence of the fiber. The cross coupling changes with temperature. When the PM fiber has a diameter of 250 μm, beat length of 3 mm, length of 500 m, twist rate of 1  rad/m, and optical source wavelength of 1310 nm, the maximum degree of magnetic-thermal coupling generated by a 1 mT radial magnetic field within the temperature range of -20°C  to 60°C is -5.47%.

  11. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Ramírez-Cedeño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been widely proposed as a technique to nondestructively and noninvasively interrogate the contents of glass and plastic bottles. In this work, Raman spectroscopy is used in a concealed threat scenario where hazardous liquids have been intentionally mixed with common consumer products to mask its appearance or spectra. The hazardous liquids under consideration included the chemical warfare agent (CWA simulant triethyl phosphate (TEP, hydrogen peroxide, and acetone as representative of toxic industrial compounds (TICs. Fiber optic coupled Raman spectroscopy (FOCRS and partial least squares (PLS algorithm analysis were used to quantify hydrogen peroxide in whiskey, acetone in perfume, and TEP in colored beverages. Spectral data was used to evaluate if the hazardous liquids can be successfully concealed in consumer products. Results demonstrated that FOC-RS systems were able to discriminate between nonhazardous consumer products and mixtures with hazardous materials at concentrations lower than 5%.

  12. Characterization of a water-equivalent fiber-optic coupled dosimeter for use in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Daniel E; Fisher, Ryan F; Hintenlang, David E

    2009-05-01

    This work reports on the characterization of a new fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimeter for use in the diagnostic radiology energy range. The FOC dosimeter was constructed by coupling a small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 microm in diameter and 2 mm in length, to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photo-multiplier tube (PMT). A serial port interface on the PMT permits real-time monitoring of light output from the dosimeter via a custom computer program. The FOC dosimeter offered excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, allowing doses as low as 0.16 mGy to be measured with a coefficient of variation of only 3.64%. Dose linearity was also excellent with a correlation coefficient of 1.000 over exposures ranging from 0.16 to 57.29 mGy. The FOC dosimeter exhibited little angular dependence from axial irradiation, varying by less than 5% over an entire revolution. A positive energy dependence was observed and measurements performed within a scatter medium yielded a 10% variation in sensitivity as beam quality changed due to hardening and scatter across a 16 cm depth range. The current dosimetry system features an array of five PMTs to allow multiple FOC dosimeters to be monitored simultaneously. Overall, the system allows for rapid and accurate dose measurements relevant to a range of diagnostic imaging applications.

  13. Fiber Optic Microcantilever Sensor Coupled with Reactive Polymers for Vapor Phase Detection of Ammonia Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to adapt its current aqueous-based, fiber-optic microcantilever sensor technology for real-time, monitoring of ammonia in air. Phase I...

  14. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Internalin A (InlA) and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass) was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM) was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL) tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P Listeria antibody (9 %). Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g), enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food. PMID:23176167

  15. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  16. Highly specific fiber optic immunosensor coupled with immunomagnetic separation for detection of low levels of Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça Marcelo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunomagnetic separation (IMS and immunoassays are widely used for pathogen detection. However, novel technology platforms with highly selective antibodies are essential to improve detection sensitivity, specificity and performance. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against Internalin A (InlA and p30 were generated and used on paramagnetic beads of varying diameters for concentration, as well as on fiber-optic sensor for detection. Results Anti-InlA MAb-2D12 (IgG2a subclass was specific for Listeria monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, and p30-specific MAb-3F8 (IgM was specific for the genus Listeria. At all bacterial concentrations (103–108 CFU/mL tested in the IMS assay; the 1-μm diameter MyOne beads had significantly higher capture efficiency (P 5 CFU/mL was significantly higher (P Listeria antibody (9 %. Furthermore, capture efficiency for MyOne-2D12 was highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii. Subsequently, we captured L. monocytogenes by MyOne-2D12 and MyOne-3F8 from hotdogs inoculated with mono- or co-cultures of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua (10–40 CFU/g, enriched for 18 h and detected by fiber-optic sensor and confirmed by plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays. The detection limit for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii by the fiber-optic immunosensor was 3 × 102 CFU/mL using MAb-2D12 as capture and reporter antibody. Selective media plating, light-scattering, and qPCR assays confirmed the IMS and fiber-optic results. Conclusions IMS coupled with a fiber-optic sensor using anti-InlA MAb is highly specific for L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii and enabled detection of these pathogens at low levels from buffer or food.

  17. Nd:YAG laser bloodless tonsillectomy by fiber optic doppler coupled handpiece beam delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Beniamino; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser ablation of palatine tonsils is a relatively new technique recently performed in head and neck surgery departments, in order to treat recurrent tonsillar infections or obstructions from enlarged tonsils. In our study, we have investigated a new procedure using the fiber optic laser beam Nd:YAG to remove up to the 89% of tonsillar tissue, and leaving in place the capsule avoiding any hemorrhagic complication and limiting the pain.

  18. Spectral light measurements in microbenthic phototrophic communities with a fiber-optic microprobe coupled to a sensitive diode array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, M. (Univ. of Aarhus (Denmark)); Joergensen, B.B. (Max-Planck-Inst. for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    A diode array detector system for microscale light measurements with fiber-optic microprobes was developed; it measures intensities of 400-900-nm light over >6 orders of magnitude with a spectral resolution of 2-5 nm. Fiber-optic microprobes to measure field radiance or scalar irradiance were coupled to the detector system and used for spectral light measurements in hypersaline microbial mats and in laminated phototrophic communities of coastal sediments. The vertical distribution of major photopigments of microalgae, cyanobacteria, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria could be identified from extinction maxima in measured radiance spectra at 430-550 nm (Chl a and carotenoids), 620-625 nm (phycocyanin), 675 nm (Chl a), 745-750 nm (BChl c), 800-810 nm, and 860-880 nm (BChl a). Scalar irradiance spectra exhibited a different spectral composition and a higher light intensity at the sediment surface as compared to incident light. IR light thus reached 200% of incident at the sediment surface. Maximal light penetration was found for IR light, whereas visible light was strongly attenuated in the upper 0-2 mm of the sediment. Measurements of photon scalar irradiance (400-700 nm) were combined with microelectrode measurements of oxygenic photosynthesis in the coastal sediment. With an incident light intensity of 200 [mu]Einst m[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1], photon scalar irradiance reached a maximum of 283 [mu]Einst m[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1] at the sediment surface. The lower boundary of the euphotic zone was 2.2 mm below the surface at a light intensity of 12 [mu]Einst m[sup [minus]2]s[sup [minus]1]. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Terminated and Tailbiting Spatially Coupled Codes with Optimized Bit Mappings for Spectrally Efficient Fiber-Optical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Häger, Christian; Brännström, Fredrik; Alvarado, Alex; Agrell, Erik

    2014-01-01

    We study the design of spectrally efficient fiber-optical communication systems based on different spatially coupled (SC) forward error correction (FEC) schemes. In particular, we optimize the allocation of the coded bits from the FEC encoder to the modulation bits of the signal constellation. Two SC code classes are considered. The codes in the first class are protograph-based low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes which are decoded using iterative soft-decision decoding. The codes in the second class are generalized LDPC codes which are decoded using iterative hard-decision decoding. For both code classes, the bit allocation is optimized for the terminated and tailbiting SC cases based on a density evolution analysis. An optimized bit allocation can significantly improve the performance of tailbiting SC codes codes over the baseline sequential allocation, up to the point where they have a comparable gap to capacity as their terminated counterparts, at a lower FEC overhead. For the considered terminated SC co...

  20. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  1. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  2. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  3. Python fiber optic seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  4. Fiber optic spanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-10-01

    Rotation is a fundamental function in nano/biotechnology and is being useful in a host of applications such as pumping of fluid flow in microfluidic channels for transport of micro/nano samples. Further, controlled rotation of single cell or microscopic object is useful for tomographic imaging. Though conventional microscope objective based laser spanners (based on transfer of spin or orbital angular momentum) have been used in the past, they are limited by the short working distance of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate development of a fiber optic spanner for rotation of microscopic objects using single-mode fiber optics. Fiber-optic trapping and simultaneous rotation of pin-wheel structure around axis perpendicular to fiber-optic axis was achieved using the fiber optic spanner. By adjusting the laser beam power, rotation speed of the trapped object and thus the microfluidic flow could be controlled. Since this method does not require special optical or structural properties of the sample to be rotated, three-dimensional rotation of a spherical cell could also be controlled. Further, using the fiber optic spanner, array of red blood cells could be assembled and actuated to generate vortex motion. Fiber optical trapping and spinning will enable physical and spectroscopic analysis of microscopic objects in solution and also find potential applications in lab- on-a-chip devices.

  5. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  6. Fiber optics engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Azadeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Covering fiber optics from an engineering perspective, this text emphasizes data conversion between electrical and optical domains. Techniques to improve the fidelity of this conversion (from electrical to optical domain, and vice versa) are also covered.

  7. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  8. Effects of Coupling Lens on Optical Refrigeration of Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Kai; ZENG Yi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Optical refrigeration of semiconductors is encountering efficiency difficulties caused by nonradiative recombination and luminescence trapping.A commonly used approach for enhancing luminescence efficiency of a semiconductor device is coupling a lens with the device. We quantitatively study the effects of a coupling lens on optical refrigeration based on rate equations and photon recycling,and calculated cooling efficiencies of different coupling mechanisms and of different lens materials.A GaAs/GaInP heterostructure coupled with a homo-epitaxial GaInP hemispherical lens is recommended.

  9. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2001-01-01

    The Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering have awarded Govind Agrawal with an honorable mention for the Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award for his work on Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd edition.Nonlinear Fiber Optics, 3rd Edition, provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers. It retains most of the material that appeared in the first edition, with the exception of Chapter 6, which is now devoted to the polarization effects relevant for light propagation in optical

  10. Fiber Optic Microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  11. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  12. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  13. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  14. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  15. Fiber optics welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  16. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  17. Fiber optic sensing and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book is designed to highlight the basic principles of fiber optic imaging and sensing devices. The editor has organized the book to provide the reader with a solid foundation in fiber optic imaging and sensing devices. It begins with an introductory chapter that starts from Maxwell’s equations and ends with the derivation of the basic optical fiber characteristic equations and solutions (i.e. fiber modes). Chapter 2 reviews most common fiber optic interferometric devices and Chapter 3 discusses the basics of fiber optic imagers with emphasis on fiber optic confocal microscope. The fiber optic interferometric sensors are discussed in detail in chapter 4 and 5. Chapter 6 covers optical coherence tomography and goes into the details of signal processing and systems level approach of the real-time OCT implementation. Also useful forms of device characteristic equations are provided so that this book can be used as a reference for scientists and engineers in the optics and related fields.

  18. Fiber-Optic Sensor Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Constructs and evaluates fiber-optic sensors for a variety of measurands. These measurands include acoustic, pressure, magnetic, and electric field as well...

  19. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  20. Geometrical parameter analysis of the high sensitivity fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, João M S; Kitano, Cláudio; Tittmann, Bernhard R

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of the influence of the geometrical parameters on the sensitivity and linear range of the fiber optic angular displacement sensor, through computational simulations and experiments. The geometrical parameters analyzed were the lens focal length, the gap between fibers, the fibers cladding radii, the emitting fiber critical angle (or, equivalently, the emitting fiber numerical aperture), and the standoff distance (distance between the lens and the reflective surface). Besides, we analyzed the sensor sensitivity regarding any spurious linear displacement. The simulation and experimental results showed that the parameters which play the most important roles are the emitting fiber core radius, the lens focal length, and the light coupling efficiency, while the remaining parameters have little influence on sensor characteristics. This paper was published in Applied Optics and is made available as an electronic reprint with the permission of OSA. The paper can be found at the fo...

  1. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  2. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  3. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  4. Compact fiber optic accelerometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Peng; Jun Yang; Bing Wu; Yonggui Yuan; Xingliang Li; Ai Zhou; Libo Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A compact fiber optic accelerometer based on a Michelson interferometer is proposed and demonstrated.In the proposed system,the sensing element consists of two single-mode fibers glued together by epoxy,which then act as a simple supported beam.By demodulating the optical phase shift,the acceleration is determined as proportional to the force applied on the central position of the two single-mode fibers.This simple model is able to calculate the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the compact accelerometer.The experimental results show that the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the accelerometer are 0.42 rad/g and 600 Hz,respectively.

  5. Multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic tissue Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-12-03

    We report a novel method making use of multivariate reference signals of fused silica and sapphire Raman signals generated from a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of in vivo tissue Raman measurements in real time. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression modeling is applied to extract the characteristic internal reference Raman signals (e.g., shoulder of the prominent fused silica boson peak (~130 cm(-1)); distinct sapphire ball-lens peaks (380, 417, 646, and 751 cm(-1))) from the ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe for quantitative analysis of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy. To evaluate the analytical value of this novel multivariate reference technique, a rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe is used for in vivo oral tissue Raman measurements (n = 25 subjects) under 785 nm laser excitation powers ranging from 5 to 65 mW. An accurate linear relationship (R(2) = 0.981) with a root-mean-square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 2.5 mW can be obtained for predicting the laser excitation power changes based on a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, which is superior to the normal univariate reference method (RMSE = 6.2 mW). A root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.4 mW (R(2) = 0.985) can also be achieved for laser power prediction in real time when we applied the multivariate method independently on the five new subjects (n = 166 spectra). We further apply the multivariate reference technique for quantitative analysis of gelatin tissue phantoms that gives rise to an RMSEP of ~2.0% (R(2) = 0.998) independent of laser excitation power variations. This work demonstrates that multivariate reference technique can be advantageously used to monitor and correct the variations of laser excitation power and fiber coupling efficiency in situ for standardizing the tissue Raman intensity to realize quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo, which is particularly appealing in

  6. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  7. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  8. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  9. Interferometric fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong Ha; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Kwan Seob; Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Myoung Jin; Rho, Byung Sup; Choi, Hae Young

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG) is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  10. Fiber optics that fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Michael J.; Thelen, Donald C., Jr.

    1996-11-01

    analog integrated circuit using photodiodes and fiber optic waveguides as the nonlinear light sensing devices, current mirrors and opamp circuits for the processing. The outputs of this circuit will go to other artificial neural networks for further processing.

  11. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  12. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    CERN Document Server

    Stoykov, A; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the "lens light guide" is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3K is demonstrated.

  13. A lens-coupled scintillation counter in cryogenic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoykov, A; Scheuermann, R; Amato, A; Bartkowiak, M; Konter, J A; Rodriguez, J; Sedlak, K, E-mail: alexey.stoykov@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present an elegant solution for a scintillation counter to be integrated into a cryogenic system. Its distinguishing feature is the absence of a continuous light guide coupling the scintillation and the photodetector parts, operating at cryogenic and room temperatures respectively. The prototype detector consists of a plastic scintillator with glued-in wavelength-shifting fiber located inside a cryostat, a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) outside the cryostat, and a lens system guiding the scintillation light re-emitted by the fiber to the G-APD through optical windows in the cryostat shields. With a 0.8 mm diameter multiclad fiber and a 1 mm active area G-APD the coupling efficiency of the 'lens light guide' is about 50%. A reliable performance of the detector down to 3 K is demonstrated.

  14. Fiber optics principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Azzawi, Abdul

    2007-01-01

    Since the invention of the laser, our fascination with the photon has led to one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of technology. New advances in fiber optic devices, components, and materials make it more important than ever to stay current. Comprising chapters drawn from the author's highly anticipated book Photonics: Principles and Practices, Fiber Optics: Principles and Practices offers a detailed and focused treatment for anyone in need of authoritative information on this critical area underlying photonics.Using a consistent approach, the author leads you step-by-step throug

  15. Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab develops, tests and evaluates high speed fiber optic network components as well as network protocols. In addition, this...

  16. Catching Attention in Fiber Optics Class

    OpenAIRE

    Kezerashvili, R. Ya.; Leng, L

    2004-01-01

    Following a brief review on the history and the current development of fiber optics, the significance of teaching fiber optics for science and non-science major college students is addressed. Several experimental demonstrations designed to aid the teaching and learning process in fiber optics lectures are presented. Sample laboratory projects are also proposed to help the students to understand the physical principles of fiber optics.

  17. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  18. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  19. Fiber Optic Magnetic Sensor Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-28

    Michelson inter- ferometric fiber optical point temperature sensor (Appendix B). The sensor has potential applicntion to non-invnsive and high...3roeniheaingUsing similar techniques, to for monolithic circuits. Lange couplers have been fabricated on alumina substrates. The: re- Fig 3 illustrates

  20. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  1. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  2. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  3. Development of fiber optic data bus for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komouchi, Yutaka; Sueoka, Akira

    1988-02-01

    An account is given of the design, construction, and both ground and flight testing of a star-coupled fiber-optic data bus consisting of an optic coupler, fibers, a connector, and a transmitter/receiver. This system precludes spark/fire hazards and crosstalk problems, while offering very small size and weight for a given capability. The communication protocol for the data bus is of 1 Mbit/sec command response type, and its design attempted to minimize the effect on electronic interfaces as a result of conversion from electrical to fiber-optic buses.

  4. Superiority of zoom lens coupling in designing a novel X-ray image detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We design a novel X-ray image detector by lens coupling a Gd2O2S:Tb intensifying screen with a high performance low-light-level (L3,which often means luminescence less than 10-3 Lux) image intensifier.Different coupling effects on imaging performance between zoom lens and fix-focus lens are analyzed theoretically.In experiment,for designing a detector of 15-inch visual field,the system coupled by zoom lens is of 12.25-1p/cm resolution,while the one with fix-focus lens is 10 lp/cm.The superiority of zoom lens is validated.It is concluded that zoom lens preserves the image information better than fix-focus lens and improves the imaging system's performance in this design,which is referential to the design of other optical imaging systems.

  5. Precision-analog fiber-optic transmission system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stover, G.

    1981-06-01

    This article describes the design, experimental development, and construction of a DC-coupled precision analog fiber optic link. Topics to be covered include overall electrical and mechanical system parameters, basic circuit organization, modulation format, optical system design, optical receiver circuit analysis, and the experimental verification of the major design parameters.

  6. Packaging considerations of fiber-optic laser sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Veli; Tukkiniemi, Kari; Vaehaekangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio

    1991-12-01

    The continuous progress in material and component technology has generated new laser-based applications that require special packaging techniques. Hybrid integration offers a flexible method to accomplish custom design needs. This paper discusses several aspects in fiber optic packaging including optical, thermal, and mechanical issues. Special emphasis is on optical coupling between a laser diode and a single-mode fiber.

  7. Fiber optic Adaline neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anjan K.; Trepka, Jim; Paparao, Palacharla

    1993-02-01

    Optoelectronic realization of adaptive filters and equalizers using fiber optic tapped delay lines and spatial light modulators has been discussed recently. We describe the design of a single layer fiber optic Adaline neural network which can be used as a bit pattern classifier. In our realization we employ as few electronic devices as possible and use optical computation to utilize the advantages of optics in processing speed, parallelism, and interconnection. The new optical neural network described in this paper is designed for optical processing of guided lightwave signals, not electronic signals. We analyzed the convergence or learning characteristics of the optically implemented Adaline in the presence of errors in the hardware, and we studied methods for improving the convergence rate of the Adaline.

  8. "Reliability Of Fiber Optic Lans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Code n, Michael; Scholl, Frederick; Hatfield, W. Bryan

    1987-02-01

    Fiber optic Local Area Network Systems are being used to interconnect increasing numbers of nodes. These nodes may include office computer peripherals and terminals, PBX switches, process control equipment and sensors, automated machine tools and robots, and military telemetry and communications equipment. The extensive shared base of capital resources in each system requires that the fiber optic LAN meet stringent reliability and maintainability requirements. These requirements are met by proper system design and by suitable manufacturing and quality procedures at all levels of a vertically integrated manufacturing operation. We will describe the reliability and maintainability of Codenoll's passive star based systems. These include LAN systems compatible with Ethernet (IEEE 802.3) and MAP (IEEE 802.4), and software compatible with IBM Token Ring (IEEE 802.5). No single point of failure exists in this system architecture.

  9. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  10. The power of fiber optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, C.

    1999-03-01

    The latest technology in optical groundwire (OPGW), involving a single cable serving as a communications network, providing high-speed data and voice transmission, and as a conventional groundwire, part of a power transmission grid, is described. The first-ever symposium devoted to OPGW was held at Hydro-Quebec`s IREQ facility in Montreal, a fitting venue, considering that Hydro-Quebec has installed an extensive network of some 3,500 km of OPGW cables since 1992. The international symposium was attended by over 130 interested experts mainly from North America, but with delegates as far away as Australia, Japan, Libya, Brazil and the UK. The three-day event showcased a number of presentations and demonstrations concerning OPGW splicing requirements, the live-line installation process, the merits of using fiber optics in a power situation, comparison of international standards in OPGW and fiber optics applications, and future developments in fiber optics technology. Demonstration of IREQ`s OPGW type-testing and manufacturer`s exhibits provided an opportunity for hands-on experience.

  11. Laboratory Equipment Type Fiber Optic Refractometer

    OpenAIRE

    E. F. Carome; M. Benca; L. Ovsenik; J. Turan

    2002-01-01

    Using fiber optics and micro optics technologies we designed an innovative fiber optic index of refraction transducer that has unique properties. On the base of this transducer a laboratory equipment type fiber optic refractometer was developed for liquid index of refraction measurements. Such refractometer may be used for medical, pharmaceutical, industrial fluid, petrochemical, plastic, food, and beverage industry applications. For example, it may be used for measuring the concentrations of...

  12. Nonlinear fiber optics formerly quantum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    1995-01-01

    The field of nonlinear fiber optics has grown substantially since the First Edition of Nonlinear Fiber Optics, published in 1989. Like the First Edition, this Second Edition is a comprehensive, tutorial, and up-to-date account of nonlinear optical phenomena in fiber optics. It synthesizes widely scattered research material and presents it in an accessible manner for students and researchers already engaged in or wishing to enter the field of nonlinear fiber optics. Particular attention is paid to the importance of nonlinear effects in the design of optical fiber communication systems. This is

  13. Fiber-optic technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    A history of fiber technology is presented. The advantages of fiber optics are discussed (bandwidth, cost, weight and size, nonmetallic construction and isolation). Some aspects of the disadvantages of fiber systems briefly discussed are fiber and cable availability, fiber components, radiation effects, receivers and transmitters, and material dispersion. Particular emphasis over the next several years will involve development of fibers and systems optimized for use at wavelengths near 1.3 ..mu..m and development of wavelengths multiplexers for simultaneous system operation at several wavelengths.

  14. Fiber-optic communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive account of fiber-optic communication systems. The 3rd edition of this book is used worldwide as a textbook in many universities. This 4th edition incorporates recent advances that have occurred, in particular two new chapters. One deals with the advanced modulation formats (such as DPSK, QPSK, and QAM) that are increasingly being used for improving spectral efficiency of WDM lightwave systems. The second chapter focuses on new techniques such as all-optical regeneration that are under development and likely to be used in future communication systems. All othe

  15. Fiber Optic Geophysics Sensor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochowski, Lucjan

    1989-01-01

    The distributed optical sensor arrays are analysed in view of specific needs of 3-D seismic explorations methods. There are compared advantages and disadventages of arrays supported by the sensors which are modulated in intensity and phase. In these systems all-fiber optic structures and their compabilities with digital geophysic formats are discussed. It was shown that the arrays based on TDM systems with the intensity modulated sensors are economically and technically the best matched for geophysic systems supported by a large number of the sensors.

  16. Campus fiber optic enterprise networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard A.

    1991-02-01

    The proliferation of departmental LANs in campus environments has driven network technology to the point where construction of token ring fiber-optic backbone systems is now a cost-effective alternative. This article will discuss several successful real life case history applications of token ring fiber in a campus setting each with unique distance and load factor requirements. It is hoped that these examples will aid in the understanding planning and implementation of similar installations. It will also attempt to provide important information on the emerging Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) standard.

  17. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  18. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  19. Fabrication of an InP/GaInAsP based integrated gain-coupled DFB laser/M-Z phase modulator for 10Gb/sec fiber optic transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puetz, N.; Adams, D.M.; Rolland, C.; Moore, R.; Mallard, R. [Bell-Northern Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The monolithic integration of lasers and modulators is an attractive approach for the manufacture of compact, low-chirp light sources with low packaging costs for high bit rate (10Gb/s) long haul fiber optic transmission systems. In this presentation the authors describe the fabrication of an InGaAsP/InP-based Mach/Zehnder phase modulator with a gain-coupled DFB laser which achieves 10Gb/s transmission at 1.55 {micro}m over 100km of non-dispersion shifted fiber. The use of an interferometric modulator provides greater freedom for the control of chirp when compared to modulation by electroabsorption. A strained layer multi quantum well gain-coupled DFB laser was employed for the cw-source because of its potential for very high yield of devices which laser in a single mode and for its greater immunity to external reflection. The integration of a phase modulator with a laser requires the deposition of InGaAsP-based quantum wells with different thicknesses over different, but adjacent areas of the InP substrate. Previous efforts of this kind employed Selective Area Epitaxy. Although SAE is an elegant method of locally varying thicknesses of epitaxial films it does not allow the independent growth of different numbers of quantum wells. Therefore, it reduces the designer`s flexibility in choosing the optimum parameters for wells and barriers as well as confinement layers (thickness, number, composition, doping) independently for both the laser and the modulator. For exactly that reason the authors have decided to pursue the butt-coupled approach and deposit the layer sequences for laser and modulator in 2 separate growth runs.

  20. Experiments on the Coupling Properties of the Spherical and Wedgeshaped of Fiber Optics%球形和楔形光纤探针耦合特性实

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨修文

    2011-01-01

    The coupling efficiency of spherical fibre optics and wedge-shaped fibre optics is measured by the experimental method.The curve reflecting that the coupling efficiency of fibre optics changes with the wedge angle of wedge-shaped fibre optics and the sagita of spherical fibre optics is given.By the experiments, the coupling properties had been analyzed and compared.It had been shown that coupling efficiency between a spherical fibre optics and a wedge-shaped fibre optics increases with the increase of wedge angle, the curve of the coupling efficiency assumes a quick uptrend by varying the wedge angle from 20.6° to 30,3° and from 40.6° to 55.2°, The curve of the coupling efficiency assumes a mitigative uptrend by varying the wedge angle from 30.3° to 40.6° and from 55.2°to 76.5°;coupling efficiency between the spherical and wedge-shaped fibre optics linearly increases with the increase of sagila of spherical fibre optics; coupling efficiency increases with the decrease of the distance between wedge-shaped and spherical fibre optics.The curve of the coupling efficiency assumes a quicker uptrend by varying the distance from 0.09mm to 0.05mm.the curve of the coupling efficiency assumes a downtrend by varying the distance from 0.04mm to 0.01 mm.%采用实验方法测量了球形光纤与楔形光纤的耦合效率,得出耦合效率随楔形光纤的楔角及球形光纤弓形高变化曲线.通过实验可得,楔形与球形光纤的耦合效率随楔角增加而增大,当楔角由20.6°增大到30.3°以及楔角由40.6°增大到55.2°时,耦合效率曲线呈较快速上升趋势,由30.3°增大到40.6°以及楔角由55.2°增大到76.5°时,耦合效率曲线上升趋势较缓;随着球形光纤弓形高的增加,球形与楔形光纤的耦合效率基本上线性上升;耦合效率随着楔形与球形光纤的间距的减小而增大,当间距由0.09mm减小到0.05mm时,耦合效率曲线呈较快速上升趋势,由0.04mm减小到0.01mm时,耦合效率曲线呈下降趋势.

  1. Gold island fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Wig, A. G.; Passian, A.; Downey, Todd R.; Buncick, Milan; Ferrell, Trinidad L.

    1999-12-01

    A fiber optic chemical sensor based on gold-island surface plasmon excitation is presented. The sensing part of the fiber is the end of the fiber onto which a thin layer of gold has been deposited to form a particulate surface. Annealing the gold reshapes the particles and produces an optical absorbance near 535 nm with the fiber in air. The optical absorption resonance of the gold particles is shifted if the fiber is immersed in a medium other than air. These resonance shifts are examined by transmission spectroscopy through the fiber. Experimental results for the sensitivity and dynamic range in the measurement of liquid solutions are in agreement with a basic theoretical model which characterizes the surface plasmon using nonretarded electrodynamics.

  2. Sensitive fiber-optic immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Irene M.; Love, Walter F.; Slovacek, Rudolf E.

    1991-07-01

    The principles of evanescent wave theory were applied to an immunological sensor for detecting the cardiac-specific isoenzyme creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB). The detection of the CK-MB isoenzyme is used in conjunction with the total CK measurement in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The clinical range for CK-MB is from 2-100 ng/ml. Previous work which utilized the fluorophor, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was able to discriminate between 0 and 3 ng/ml CK-MB. Use of the fluorophor B-phycoerythrin (BPE) increased the assay sensitivity to 0.1 ng/ml CK-MB. The data was collected for 15 minutes using an optical launch and collection angle of 25 degree(s). This fiber optic based system is homogeneous and requires no subsequent washing, handling, or processing steps after exposure to the sample.

  3. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  4. Coupling between angled-facet amplifiers and tapered lens-ended fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zheng; Mikkelsen, Benny; Pedersen, Bo

    1991-01-01

    The coupling between angled facet amplifiers and tapered lens-ended fibers is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical investigation is based on a three-dimensional plane wave model which accounts for the phase differences introduced by the angled facets. The coupling...... is investigated with respect to the beam parameters of the amplifier waveguide and the tapered lens-ended fiber, and with respect to the fiber position. The excess coupling losses due to the facet angle and to the variation of the fiber lens radius are investigated theoretically and found to be in good agreement...

  5. Architectures of fiber optic network in telecommunications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Irina B.; Vasile, Alexandru; Filip, Luminita E.

    2005-08-01

    The operators of telecommunications have targeted their efforts towards realizing applications using broad band fiber optics systems in the access network. Thus, a new concept related to the implementation of fiber optic transmission systems, named FITL (Fiber In The Loop) has appeared. The fiber optic transmission systems have been extensively used for realizing the transport and intercommunication of the public telecommunication network, as well as for assuring the access to the telecommunication systems of the great corporations. Still, the segment of the residential users and small corporations did not benefit on large scale of this technology implementation. For the purpose of defining fiber optic applications, more types of architectures were conceived, like: bus, ring, star, tree. In the case of tree-like networks passive splitters (that"s where the name of PON comes from - Passive Optical Network-), which reduce significantly the costs of the fiber optic access, by separating the costs of the optical electronic components. That's why the passive fiber optics architectures (PON represent a viable solution for realizing the access at the user's loop. The main types of fiber optics architectures included in this work are: FTTC (Fiber To The Curb); FTTB (Fiber To The Building); FTTH (Fiber To The Home).

  6. Industrial applications of fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Francois X.; Blocksidge, Robert

    1996-08-01

    Thanks to the growth of the fiber optics telecommunication industry, fiber optic components have become less expensive, more reliable and well known by potential fiber optic sensor users. LEDs, optical fibers, couplers and connectors are now widely distributed and are the building blocks for the fiber optic sensor manufacturer. Additionally, the huge demand in consumer electronics of the past 10 years has provided the manufacturer with cheap and powerful programmable logic components which reduce the development time as well as the cost of the associated instrumentation. This market trend has allowed Photonetics to develop, manufacture and sell fiber optic sensors for the last 10 years. The company contribution in the fields of fiber optic gyros (4 licenses sold world wide), white light interferometry and fiber optic sensor networks is widely recognized. Moreover, its 1992 acquisition of some of the assets of Metricor Inc., greatly reinforced its position and allowed it to pursue new markets. Over the past four years, Photonetics has done an important marketing effort to better understand the need of its customers. The result of this research has fed R&D efforts towards a new generation instrument, the Metricor 2000, better adapted to the expectations of fiber optic sensors users, thanks to its unique features: (1) universality -- the system can accept more than 20 different sensors (T, P, RI, . . .). (2) scalability -- depending on the customer needs, the system can be used with 1 to 64 sensors. (3) performance -- because of its improved design, overall accuracies of 0.01% FS can be reached. (4) versatility -- its modular design enables a fast and easy custom design for specific applications. This paper presents briefly the Metricor 2000 and its family of FO probes. Then, it describes two fiber optic sensing (FOS) applications/markets where FOS have proven to be very useful.

  7. Fiber optic communications fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication systems have advanced dramatically over the last four decades, since the era of copper cables, resulting in low-cost and high-bandwidth transmission. Fiber optics is now the backbone of the internet and long-distance telecommunication. Without it we would not enjoy the benefits of high-speed internet, or low-rate international telephone calls. This book introduces the basic concepts of fiber-optic communication in a pedagogical way. The important mathematical results are derived by first principles rather than citing research articles. In addition, physical interpre

  8. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  9. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  10. Laboratory Equipment Type Fiber Optic Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Carome

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Using fiber optics and micro optics technologies we designed aninnovative fiber optic index of refraction transducer that has uniqueproperties. On the base of this transducer a laboratory equipment typefiber optic refractometer was developed for liquid index of refractionmeasurements. Such refractometer may be used for medical,pharmaceutical, industrial fluid, petrochemical, plastic, food, andbeverage industry applications. For example, it may be used formeasuring the concentrations of aqueous solutions: as the concentrationor density of a solute increase, the refractive index increasesproportionately. The paper describes development work related to designof laboratory type fiber optic refractometer and describes experimentsto evaluation of its basic properties.

  11. Broadband excitation and collection in fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Ghimire, Navin; Bao, Hongchun; Gu, Min

    2013-08-01

    Broadband excitation and collection in a fiber-optic nonlinear endomicroscope are realized by using a single hollow-core double-clad photonic crystal fiber and a gradient index lens. Femtosecond pulses with central wavelengths in the range of 750-850 nm can be directly delivered through the core of the fiber for nonlinear excitation without pre-chirping. A gradient index lens with numerical aperture 0.8 designed to operate over the near-infrared wavelength range is used for focusing the laser beam from the fiber for nonlinear excitation and for collecting the fluorescent signal from the sample. This compact system is suitable to perform nonlinear imaging of multiple fluorophors in the wavelength range of 750-850 nm.

  12. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight Load Test...

  13. Advanced Components For Fiber-Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon; Stowe, David W.

    1989-01-01

    Paper reviews statuses of some advanced passive and active optical components for use with optical fibers. Emphasis on highly birefringent components controling polarization, because control of polarization critical in applications as fiber-optical gyroscopes, interferometric sensors, and coherent communications.

  14. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIP Sensors proposes to develop a Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor Array System for measuring air flow pressure at multiple points on the skin of aircrafts for Flight...

  15. Characterization of silver halide fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides for use in the construction of a mid-infrared attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damin, Craig A; Sommer, André J

    2013-11-01

    Advances in fiber optic materials have allowed for the construction of fibers and waveguides capable of transmitting infrared radiation. An investigation of the transmission characteristics associated with two commonly used types of infrared-transmitting fibers/waveguides for prospective use in a fiber/waveguide-coupled attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) probe was performed. Characterization of silver halide polycrystalline fiber optics and hollow silica waveguides was done on the basis of the transmission of infrared light using a conventional fiber optic coupling accessory and an infrared microscope. Using the fiber optic coupling accessory, the average percent transmission for three silver halide fibers was 18.1 ± 6.1% relative to a benchtop reflection accessory. The average transmission for two hollow waveguides (HWGs) using the coupling accessory was 8.0 ± 0.3%. (Uncertainties in the relative percent transmission represent the standard deviations.) Reduced transmission observed for the HWGs was attributed to the high numerical aperture of the coupling accessory. Characterization of the fibers/waveguides using a zinc selenide lens objective on an infrared microscope indicated 24.1 ± 7.2% of the initial light input into the silver halide fibers was transmitted. Percent transmission obtained for the HWGs was 98.7 ± 0.1%. Increased transmission using the HWGs resulted from the absence or minimization of insertion and scattering losses due to the hollow air core and a better-matched numerical aperture. The effect of bending on the transmission characteristics of the fibers/waveguides was also investigated. Significant deviations in the transmission of infrared light by the solid-core silver halide fibers were observed for various bending angles. Percent transmission greater than 98% was consistently observed for the HWGs at the bending angles. The combined benefits of high percent transmission, reproducible instrument responses, and increased bending

  16. Adjustable Fiber Optic Microwave Transversal Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadaram, Mehdi; Lutes, George F.; Logan, Ronald T.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Microwave transversal filters implemented as adjustable tapped fiber optic delay lines developed. Main advantages of these filters (in comparison with conventional microwave transversal filters) are small size, light weight, no need for matching of radio-frequency impedances, no need for shielding against electromagnetic radiation at suboptical frequencies, no need for mechanical tuning, high stability of amplitude and phase, and active control of transfer functions. Weights of taps in fiber optic delay lines adjusted.

  17. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  18. Research for Electronic Fiber Optics Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ellis E.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of this project was to provide research experiences for socially and economically disadvantaged students in networking via fiber optics. The objectives of this project were: 1) To provide knowledge and skills needed by students to use the tools and equipment essential to networking NASA's and the university's topologies; 2) To provide the student researchers with needed mathematical skills and concepts to progress in fiber optic technology; 3) To afford the principal investigator an opportunity to become certified in fiber optics; 4) To build a transmitter and receiver circuit that will be linked by fiber-optic cable to demonstrate mastery of concepts; and 5) To conduct research for NASA and the University in the fiber-optic system. The research will attempt to develop applications for THUNDER (Thin-layer Composite Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver and Sensor) and LARC-SI (Langley Research Center- Soluble Polyimide), (inventions at NASA/LaRC) and fiber-optic technology that will be beneficial to NASA, the university and the consumer. This research has the potential of improving the nation's manpower in the area of fiberoptic technology. It will allow students the opportunity to participate in visible research at NASA and in industry.

  19. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh, E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazd.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasi, Amir [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza [Laser and Optics Research School, 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-28

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4–60.0 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.21 μg L{sup −1}, an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05–300 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.016 μg L{sup −1} and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples. - Graphical abstract: A novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient mixed hemimicelles

  20. Hot Springs-Garrison Fiber Optic Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to upgrade its operational telecommunications system between the Hot Springs Substation and the Garrison Substation using a fiber optic system. The project would primarily involve installing 190 kilometers (120 miles) of fiber optic cable on existing transmission structures and installing new fiber optic equipment in BPA`s substation yards and control houses. BPA prepared an environmental assessment (EA) evaluating the proposed action. This EA was published in October 1994. The EA identifies a number of minor impacts that might occur as a result of the proposed action, as well as some recommended mitigation measures. This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) identifies specific measures to avoid, minimize, or compensate for impacts identified in the EA.

  1. Microfabrication of fiber optic scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauver, Mark; Crossman-Bosworth, Janet L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2002-06-01

    A cantilevered optical fiber is micromachined to function as a miniature resonant opto-mechanical scanner. By driving the base of the cantilevered fiber at a resonance frequency using a piezoelectric actuator, the free end of the cantilever beam becomes a scanned light source. The fiber scanners are designed to achieve wide field-of-view (FOV) and high scan frequency. We employ a non-linearly tapered profile fiber to achieve scan amplitudes of 1 mm at scan frequencies above 20 KHz. Scan angles of over 120 degree(s) (full angle) have been achieved. Higher order modes are also employed for scanning applications that require compactness while maintaining large angular FOV. Etching techniques are used to create the non-linearly tapered sections in single mode optical fiber. Additionally, micro-lenses are fabricated on the tips of the etched fibers, with lens diameters as small as 15 microns. Such lenses are capable of reducing the divergence angle of the emitted light to 5 degree(s) (full angle), with greater reduction expected by employing novel lens shaping techniques. Microfabricated optical fiber scanners have display applications ranging from micro-optical displays to larger panoramic displays. Applications for micro-image acquisition include small barcode readers to medical endoscopes.

  2. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging.

  3. Handbook of fiber optics theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Chai

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yeh supplies a firm theoretical foundation in such topics as propagation of light through fibers, fiber fabrication, loss mechanisms, and dispersion properties. He then expands from this into such practical areas as fiber splicing, measuring loss in fibers, fiber-based communications networks, remote fiber sensors, and integrated optics. Whether involved in fiber optics research, design, or practical implementation of systems, this handbook will be extremely useful.Key Features* Here is a comprehensive, ""one-stop"" reference with state-of-the-art information on fiber optics Included is da

  4. Mobile fiber-optic laser Doppler anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglmeier, M; Tropea, C

    1992-07-20

    A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been developed that combines the compactness and low power consumption of laser diodes and avalanche photodiodes with the flexibility and possibility of miniaturization by using fiber-optic probes. The system has been named DFLDA for laser diode fiber LDA and is especially suited for mobile applications, for example, in trains, airplanes, or automobiles. Optimization considerations of fiber-optic probes are put forward and several probe examples are described in detail. Measurement results from three typical applications are given to illustrate the use of the DFLDA. Finally, a number of future configurations of the DFLDA concept are discussed.

  5. Fiber optic sensors for military, industrial and commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K. A.; Quick, W. H.; Strahan, V. H.

    1978-01-01

    Four examples of specific fiber optic sensor system designs, each of which demonstrates a different optical modulation format, are described. The birefrigent temperature transducer illustrates direct digital signal modulation. The temperature/pressure dependent semiconductor filter illustrates high-pass optical wavelength signal encoding. The coupled polarized-mode transducer shows how a solid-state sensor can produce narrow-bandpass optical wavelength signal encoding. The luminescent temperature sensor illustrates a way to construct a solid state sensor in order to produce pulse width modulation of an optical signal.

  6. Efficient Fiber Optic Detection of Trapped Ion Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    VanDevender, A P; Amini, J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2010-01-01

    Integration of fiber optics may play a critical role in the development of quantum information processors based on trapped ions and atoms by enabling scalable collection and delivery of light and coupling trapped ions to optical microcavities. We trap 24Mg+ ions in a surface-electrode Paul trap that includes an integrated optical fiber for detecting 280-nm fluorescence photons. The collection numerical aperture is 0.37 and total collection efficiency is 2.1 %. The ion can be positioned between 80 \\mum and 100 \\mum from the tip of the fiber by use of an adjustable rf-pseudopotential.

  7. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  8. Fiber Optics: A New World of Possibilities in Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John

    1990-01-01

    The background and history of light and fiber optics are discussed. Applications for light passed either directly or indirectly through optical fibers are described. Suggestions for science activities that use fiber optics are provided. (KR)

  9. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  10. Achromatic optical diode in fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berent, Michal; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    We propose a broadband optical diode, which is composed of one achromatic reciprocal quarter-wave plate and one non-reciprocal quarter-wave plate, both placed between two crossed polarizers. The presented design of achromatic wave plates relies on an adiabatic evolution of the Stokes vector, thus, the scheme is robust and efficient. The possible simple implementation using fiber optics is suggested.

  11. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  12. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  13. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  14. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  15. Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Bogert, Gail A.; Minford, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated three-waveguide directional coupler functions as polarizer and splitter. Designed with transverse electric (TE) polarization in bar state (two coupling lengths) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarization in cross state (one coupling length). Intended for eventual fabrication as in mass-producible integrated optical circuit that provides advantages including low drive voltage, large-bandwidth phase modulation, preservation of polarization in transmission between devices on same substrate, and low cost.

  16. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass or...

  17. 46 CFR 111.60-6 - Fiber optic cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fiber optic cable. 111.60-6 Section 111.60-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-6 Fiber optic cable. Each fiber optic cable must— (a)...

  18. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2

  19. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  20. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    system parameters on the trapping performance has been carefully investigated through both experimental and numerical studies. ii) Multiple traps have been created and carefully studied with the inclined DFOTs for the first time. Three traps, one 3D trap and two 2D traps, have been experimentally created at different vertical levels with adjustable separations and positions. iii) Multiple functionalities have been achieved and studied for the first time with the inclined DFOTs. Particle separation, grouping, stacking, rod alignment, rod rotation, and optical binding have been experimentally demonstrated. The multiple functionalities allow the inclined DFOTs to find applications in the study of interaction forces in colloidal systems as well as parallel particle manipulation in drug delivery systems. iv) Far-field superfocusing effect has been investigated and successfully demonstrated with a fiber-based surface plasmonic (SP) lens for the first time. A planar SP lens with a set of concentric nanoscale rings on a fiber endface has been developed. For the first time, a focus size that is comparable to the smallest achievable focus size of high NA objective lenses has been achieved with the fiber-based SP lens. The fiber-based SP lens can bridge the nanoscale particles/systems and the macroscale power sources/detectors, which has been a long standing challenge for nanophotonics. In addition to optical trapping, the fiber-based SP lens will impact many applications including high-resolution lithography, high-resolution fluorescence detection, and sub-wavelength imaging. v) Trapping ability enhanced with the fiber-based SP lens has been successfully demonstrated. With the help of the fiber-based SP lens, the trapping efficiency of fiber optical tweezers has been significantly enhanced, which is comparable with that of objective-based optical tweezers. A submicron-sized bacterium has been successfully trapped in three dimensions for the first time with optical tweezers based

  1. Design of fiber optic adaline neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anjan K.; Trepka, Jim

    1997-03-01

    Based on possible optoelectronic realization of adaptive filters and equalizers using fiber optic tapped delay lines and spatial light modulators we describe the design of a single-layer fiber optic Adaline neural network that can be used as a bit pattern classifier. In our design, we employ as few electronic devices as possible and use optical computation to utilize the advantages of optics in processing speed, parallelism, and interconnection. The described new optical neural network design is for optical processing of guided light wave signals, not electronic signals. We analyze the convergence or learning characteristics of the optoelectronic Adaline in the presence of errors in the hardware. We show that with such an optoelectronic Adaline it is possible to detect a desired code word/token/header with good accuracy.

  2. Impact of nonlinearities on fiber optic communications

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This book covers the recent progress in fiber-optic communication systems with a main focus on the impact of fiber nonlinearities on system performance. There has been significant progress in coherent communication systems in the past few years due to the advances in digital signal processing techniques. This has led to renewed interest in fiber linear and nonlinear impairments as well as techniques to mitigate them in the electrical domain. In this book, the reader will find all the important topics of fiber optic communication systems in one place, with in-depth coverage by the experts of each sub-topic. Pioneers from each of the sub-topics have been invited to contribute. Each chapter will have a section on fundamentals as well as reviews of literature and of recent developments. Readers will benefit from this approach since many of the conference proceedings and journal articles mainly focus on the authors’ research, without spending space on preliminaries.

  3. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, V; Santbergen, R; Tijssen, M; Zeman, M

    2011-10-10

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder and Michelson-Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac interferometer. However, the Sagnac interferometer is much harder to study because of the fact that one input port and output port coincide. Further, the Mach-Zehnder interferometer has the advantage that the output ports are symmetric, reducing the systematic effects. Examples of standing wave light absorption in several simple objects are given. Attention is drawn to the influence of standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers with weak-absorbing layers incorporated. A method is described for how these can be theoretically analyzed and experimentally measured. Further experiments are needed for a thorough comparison between theory and experiment.

  4. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  5. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  6. Fiber optic biofluorometer for physiological research on muscle slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Mathias; Dendorfer, Andreas; Werner, Jan; Lambertz, Daniel; Klein, Karl-Friedrich

    2016-03-01

    A focus of research in cell physiology is the detection of Ca2+, NADH, FAD, ATPase activity or membrane potential, only to name a few, in muscle tissues. In this work, we report on a biofluorometer using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), optical fibers and two photomultipliers (PMTs) using synchronized fluorescence detection with integrated background correction to detect free calcium, Ca2+, in cardiac muscle tissue placed in a horizontal tissue bath and a microscope setup. Fiber optic probes with imaging optics have been designed to transport excitation light from the biofluorometer's light output to a horizontal tissue bath and to collect emission light from a tissue sample of interest to two PMTs allowing either single excitation / single emission or ratiometric, dual excitation / single emission or single excitation / dual emission fluorescence detection of indicator dyes or natural fluorophores. The efficient transport of light from the excitation LEDs to the tissue sample, bleaching effects of the excitation light in both, polymer and fused silica-based fibers will be discussed. Furthermore, a new approach to maximize light collection of the emission light using high NA fibers and high NA coupling optics will be shown. Finally, first results on Ca2+ measurements in cardiac muscle slices in a traditional microscope setup and a horizontal tissue bath using fiber optic probes will be introduced and discussed.

  7. Study of fiber optic sugar sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jayanth Kumar; N M Gowri; R Venkateswara Raju; G Nirmala; B S Bellubbi; T Radha Krishna

    2006-08-01

    Over the last two decades, the fiber optic technology has passed through many analytical stages. Some commercially available fiber optic sensors, though in a small way, are being used for automation in mechanical and industrial environments. They are also used for instrumentation and controls. In the present work, an intensity-modulated intrinsic fiber optic sugar sensor is presented. This type of sensor, with slight modification, can be used for on-line determination of the concentration of sugar content in sugarcane juice in sugar industry. In the present set-up, a plastic fiber made of polymethylmethacrylate is used. A portion of the cladding (1 cm, 2 cm, 3 cm) at the mid-point along the length of the fiber is removed. This portion is immersed in sugar solution of known concentration and refractive index. At one end of the fiber an 850 nm source is used and at the other end a power meter is connected. By varying the concentration of sugar solution, the output power is noted. These studies are made due to the change in refractive index of the fluid. The device was found to be very sensitive which is free from EMI and shock hazards, stable and repeatable and they can be remotely interfaced with a computer to give on-line measurements and thus become useful for application in sugar industries.

  8. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  9. Aircraft fiber optic structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrad, Nezih

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a sought after concept that is expected to advance military maintenance programs, increase platform operational safety and reduce its life cycle cost. Such concept is further considered to constitute a major building block of any Integrated Health Management (IHM) capability. Since 65% to 80% of military assets' Life Cycle Cost (LCC) is devoted to operations and support (O&S), the aerospace industry and military sectors continue to look for opportunities to exploit SHM systems, capability and tools. Over the past several years, countless SHM concepts and technologies have emerged. Among those, fiber optic based systems were identified of significant potential. This paper introduces the elements of an SHM system and investigates key issues impeding the commercial implementation of fiber optic based SHM capability. In particular, this paper presents an experimental study of short gauge, intrinsic, spectrometric-based in-fiber Bragg grating sensors, for potential use as a component of an SHM system. Fiber optic Bragg grating sensors are evaluated against resistance strain gauges for strain monitoring, sensitivity, accuracy, reliability, and fatigue durability. Strain field disturbance is also investigated by "embedding" the sensors under a photoelastic coating in order to illustrate sensor intrusiveness in an embedded configuration.

  10. Imaging of sub-surface nanostructures by dielectric planer cavity coupled microsphere lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Minglei; Ye, Yong-Hong; Hou, Jinglei; Du, Bintao; Wang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a dielectric planar cavity between an object and a microsphere lens is fabricated and its effects on the imaging of sub-surface nanostructures have been studied. Using the dielectric planar cavity combined (DPCC) silica microsphere lens, our experimental results illustrate that the nanostructures of data-recorded Blu-ray disc can be clearly resolved. Optical images of the object with higher contrast and larger field of view (FOV) can be obtained, compared to the case when only a microsphere lens is used. For the 3.4 μm diameter microsphere lens combing a planar cavity with a thickness about 2.2 μm, the FOV is about 2.4 μm and the magnification is about 1.6. With the 3.4 μm diameter microsphere lens only, the FOV and magnification is 1.5 μm and 1.4 respectively. Theoretical analysis of the imaging properties is carried out by the characteristics of electric field distribution of microsphere lenses. The simulated results indicate that the dielectric planar cavity working as a Fabry-Pérot cavity can effectively enhance the coupling of optical information.

  11. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pospíšilová

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS and biosensors (FOBS. Fiber optic sensor (FOS systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV (180 nm up to middle infrared (IR (10 μm and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  12. Investigation of residual core ellipticity induced nonreciprocity in air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zuchen; Zhang, Zhihao; Jin, Jing; Song, Ningfang

    2014-11-01

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is an excellent choice for fiber optic gyroscope owing to its incomparable adaptability of environment. Strong and continuous polarization mode coupling is found in PBFs with an average intensity of ~-30 dB, but the coupling arrives at the limit when the maximum optical path difference between the primary waves and the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves reaches ~10mm, which is corresponding to the PBF length of ~110 m according to the birefringence in the PBF. Incident light with the low extinction ratio (ER) can suppress the birth of the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves, but the low-ER light obtained by the conventional Lyot depolarizers does not work here. Consequently, a large nonreciprocity and a bias error of ~13°/h are caused in the air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope (PBFOG) with a PBF coil of ~268 m.

  13. Miniaturized fiber-optic Michelson-type interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kent A.; Miller, William V., III; Tran, Tuan A.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    A novel, miniaturized Michelson-type fiber-optic interferometric sensor that is relatively insensitive to temperature drifts is presented. A fused-biconical tapered coupler is cleaved immediately after the coupled length and polished down to the region of the fused cladding, but short of the interaction region. The end of one core is selectively coated with a reflective surface and is used as the reference arm; the other core serves as the sensing arm. The detection of surface acoustic waves, microdisplacements, and magnetic fields is reported. The sensor is shown to be highly stable in comparison to a classic homodyne, uncompensated Michelson interferometer, and signal-to-noise ratios of 65 dB have been obtained.

  14. Compact Fiber Optic Strain Sensors (cFOSS) Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong researchers are reducing the Fiber Optic Sensing Sysme (FOSS) technology’s size, power requirement, weight, and cost to effectively extend...

  15. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase 1, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS), in collaboration with North Carolina State University, successfully demonstrated a Fiber Bragg...

  16. Fiber optic dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-08-01

    A small dimension, real-time readout dosimeter is desirable for specific applications in medical physics as for example, dose measurement in prostate brachytherapy. This particular radiotherapy procedure consists in the permanent deposition of low energy, low-dose and low-dose rate small sized radioactive seeds. We developed a scintillating fiber optic based dosimeter suitable for in-vivo, real-time low dose and low dose rate measurements. Due to the low scintillation light produced in the scintillating fiber, a high sensitive and high gain light detector is required. The Silicon Photomultipliers are an interesting option that allowed us to obtain good results in our studies.

  17. Fiber optic gyroscopes for vehicle navigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kajioka, Hiroshi; Oho, Shigeru; Sonobe, Hisao

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) have been developed for vehicle navigation systems and are used in Toyota Motor Corporation models Mark II, Chaser and Cresta in Japan. Use of FOGs in these systems requires high reliability under a wide range of conditions, especially in a temperature range between -40 and 85 degree(s)C. In addition, a high cost-performance ratio is needed. We have developed optical and electrical systems that are inexpensive and can perform well. They are ready to be mass-produced. FOGs have already been installed in luxury automobiles, and will soon be included in more basic vehicles. We have developed more inexpensive FOGs for this purpose.

  18. Multicomponent glass fiber optic integrated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Szarniak, Przemyslaw; Franczyk, Marcin; Stepien, Ryszard; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A range of integrated fiber optic structures - lightguides, image guides, multicapillary arrays, microstructured (photonic) fibers - manufactured in the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) is described. All these structures are made of multicomponent glasses (a part of them melted in ITME). They can be manufactured in similar multistep process that involves drawing glass or lightguide rods and tubes preparing glass performs, stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes, drawing multifiber or multicapillary performs. Structure formation, technological process, characterization and applications of different integrated structures are presented.

  19. Adaptive Holographic Fiber-Optic Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.; Lipovskaya, Margarita J.

    1990-04-01

    Interaction of phase-modulated light beams in photorefractive local inertial responce media was analysed. Interaction of this type allows to registrate phase-modulated signals adaptively under low frequency phase disturbtion. The experiments on multimode fiber-optic interferometer with demodulation element based on photorefractive bacteriorhodopsin-doped polimer film are described. As the writing of dynamic phase hologram is an inertial process the signal fluctuations with the frequencies up to 100 Hz can be canceled. The hologram efficiencies are enough to registrate high frequency phase shifts ~10-4 radn.

  20. New glass developments for fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higby, Paige L.; Holst, Karen; Tabor, Kevin; James, William; Chase, Elizabeth; Pucilowski, Sally; Gober-Mangan, Elizabeth; Klimek, Ronald; Karetta, Frank; Schreder, Bianca

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic components for lighting and imaging applications have been in use for decades. Recent requirements such as a need for RoHS compliance, attractive market pricing, or particular optical properties, such as numerical aperture (NA) or transmission, have required SCHOTT to develop and implement new glasses for these applications. From Puravis™ lead-free fibers for lighting applications, to new glasses for digital X-ray imaging and sensor applications, the challenges for SCHOTT scientists are considerable. Pertinent properties of these glasses and methods of determination for suitability will be discussed.

  1. Fiber optic gyro development at Fibernetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Ralph A.; Arnesen, Leif; Herdman, Craig

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic gyroscope based inertial sensors are being used within increasingly severe environments, enabling unmanned systems to sense and navigate in areas where GPS satellite navigation is unavailable or jammed. A need exists for smaller, lighter, lower power inertial sensors for the most demanding land, sea, air, and space applications. Fibernetics is developing a family of inertial sensor systems based on our closed-loop navigation-grade fiber optic gyroscope (FOG). We are making use of the packaging flexibility of the fiber to create a navigation grade inertial measurement unit (IMU) (3 gyroscopes and 3 accelerometers) that has a volume of 102 cubic inches. We are also planning a gyrocompass and an inertial navigation system (INS) having roughly the same size. In this paper we provide an update on our development progress and describe our modulation scheme for the Sagnac interferometers. We also present a novel multiplexed design that efficiently delivers source light to each of the three detectors. In our future development section we discuss our work to improve FOG performance per unit volume, specifically detailing our focus in utilizing a multicore optical fiber.

  2. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  3. Grizzly Substation Fiber Optics : Environmental Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-02-01

    This notice announces BPA`s decision to construct, operate, and maintain the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project (Project). This Project is part of a continuing effort by BPA to complete a regionwide upgrade of its existing telecommunications system. The US Forest Service and BPA jointly prepared the Grizzly Substation Fiber Optic Project Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1241) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action, the Underground Installation Alternative, and the No Action Alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, the US Forest Service and BPA have determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI. The US Forest Service has separately issued a FONSI and Decision Notice authorizing BPA to construct, operate, and maintain the Project within the Crooked River National Grassland (Grassland).

  4. All fiber optics circular-state swept source polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hermann; Kao, Meng-Chun; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Jyun-Cin; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    A swept source (SS)-based circular-state (CS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) constructed entirely with polarization-maintaining fiber optics components is proposed with the experimental verification. By means of the proposed calibration scheme, bulk quarter-wave plates can be replaced by fiber optics polarization controllers to, therefore, realize an all-fiber optics CS SSPS-OCT. We also present a numerical dispersion compensation method, which can not only enhance the axial resolution, but also improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. We demonstrate that this compact and portable CS SSPS-OCT system with an accuracy comparable to bulk optics systems requires less stringent lens alignment and can possibly serve as a technology to realize PS-OCT instrument for clinical applications (e.g., endoscopy). The largest deviations in the phase retardation (PR) and fast-axis (FA) angle due to sample probe in the linear scanning and a rotation angle smaller than 65 deg were of the same order as those in stationary probe setups. The influence of fiber bending on the measured PR and FA is also investigated. The largest deviations of the PR were 3.5 deg and the measured FA change by ~12 to 21 deg. Finally, in vivo imaging of the human fingertip and nail was successfully demonstrated with a linear scanning probe.

  5. Combined electromechanical impedance and fiber optic diagnosis of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlavin, Jon; Zagrai, Andrei; Clemens, Rebecca; Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joey; Moslehi, Behzad; Patel, Ronak; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Faridian, Fereydoun

    2014-03-01

    Electromechanical impedance is a popular diagnostic method for assessing structural conditions at high frequencies. It has been utilized, and shown utility, in aeronautic, space, naval, civil, mechanical, and other types of structures. By contrast, fiber optic sensing initially found its niche in static strain measurement and low frequency structural dynamic testing. Any low frequency limitations of the fiber optic sensing, however, are mainly governed by its hardware elements. As hardware improves, so does the bandwidth (frequency range * number of sensors) provided by the appropriate enabling fiber optic sensor interrogation system. In this contribution we demonstrate simultaneous high frequency measurements using fiber optic and electromechanical impedance structural health monitoring technologies. A laboratory specimen imitating an aircraft wing structure, incorporating surfaces with adjustable boundary conditions, was instrumented with piezoelectric and fiber optic sensors. Experiments were conducted at different structural boundary conditions associated with deterioration of structural health. High frequency dynamic responses were collected at multiple locations on a laboratory wing specimen and conclusions were drawn about correspondence between structural damage and dynamic signatures as well as correlation between electromechanical impedance and fiber optic sensors spectra. Theoretical investigation of the effect of boundary conditions on electromechanical impedance spectra is presented and connection to low frequency structural dynamics is suggested. It is envisioned that acquisition of high frequency structural dynamic responses with multiple fiber optic sensors may open new diagnostic capabilities for fiber optic sensing technologies.

  6. Algorithm for predictive control implementation on fiber optic transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Voronkov, Andrey A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the algorithm for predictive control implementation on fiber-optic transmission lines. In order to improve the maintenance of fiber optic communication lines, the algorithm prediction uptime optic communication cables have been worked out. It considers the results of scheduled preventive maintenance and database of various works on the track cable line during maintenance.

  7. Fiber-optic Michelson interferometer using an optical power divider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, M; Ohashi, T; Ohtsuka, Y

    1980-10-01

    A fiber-optic interferometer consisting of a multimode fiber-optical power divider was constructed in the Michelson arrangement and applied to measure a micrometer-order displacement of the vibrating object based on an optical homodyne technique. Improvement in the sensitivity of the apparatus is discussed from the viewpoint of increasing the minimum detectable beat signal.

  8. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  9. Fiber Optics Technician. Curriculum Research Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Herschel K.

    A study examined the role of technicians in the fiber optics industry and determined those elements that should be included in a comprehensive curriculum to prepare fiber optics technicians for employment in the Texas labor market. First the current literature, including the ERIC database and equipment manufacturers' journals were reviewed. After…

  10. Fiber Optics Deliver Real-Time Structural Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To alter the shape of aircraft wings during flight, researchers at Dryden Flight Research Center worked on a fiber optic sensor system with Austin-based 4DSP LLC. The company has since commercialized a new fiber optic system for monitoring applications in health and medicine, oil and gas, and transportation, increasing company revenues by 60 percent.

  11. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  12. Development of a graded index microlens based fiber optical trap and its characterization using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylk, J; Kristensen, M V G; Mazilu, M; Thayil, A K; Mitchell, C A; Campbell, E C; Powis, S J; Gunn-Moore, F J; Dholakia, K

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a miniaturized single beam fiber optical trapping probe based on a high numerical aperture graded index (GRIN) micro-objective lens. This enables optical trapping at a distance of 200μm from the probe tip. The fiber trapping probe is characterized experimentally using power spectral density analysis and an original approach based on principal component analysis for accurate particle tracking. Its use for biomedical microscopy is demonstrated through optically mediated immunological synapse formation.

  13. DIRECTIVITY PATTERN INVESTIGATION OF DUAL FIBER OPTIC HYDROPHONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Efimov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper provides comparison of theoretical and experimental research results of directivity pattern of dual fiber optic hydrophone at various acoustic frequencies. Application of multiple fiber optic transducers in fiber optic hydrophone design placed in sensitive arm of the interferometer gives the possibility for increasing the sensitivity of a fiber optic hydrophone without changing the fiber-optic transducers. In the simplest case, such fiber optic hydrophone can be built on the basis of two spatially separated acoustic transducers. However, this diversity inevitably leads to the directivity pattern unevenness of the fiber optic hydrophone at acoustic frequencies which wavelengths are commensurate with the size of the transducers system. Method. Mathematical model has been created and it became the base material for a theoretical study of two acoustic transducers system in Mathcad environment. Directivity pattern was described by a mathematical formula, depending on the frequency of the acoustic impact and the distance between sensors. To confirm the correctness of theoretical research of the directivity pattern, dual fiber optic hydrophone on Bragg gratings was produced and investigated experimentally. It consists of two consequently welded sensitive elements with a 9 cm distance between them. In trials carried out in open water conditions, fiber-optic hydrophone was placed on the rotator and rotated relative to the piezoceramic emitter for 360 degrees. During investigation, the signal from a fiber optic hydrophone has been recorded simultaneously with the rotation. Further, after the data processing in MATLAB, amplitude of the measured phase signal and the directivity pattern of the test sample were estimated. Amplitude estimation of the measured phase signal and directivity pattern creation of the sample was performed at frequencies equal to 1000, 3000 and 8000 Hz. Main Results. Sensitivity of the dual fiber optic

  14. Ultra-high Frequency Linear Fiber Optic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Kam

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth treatment of both linear fiber-optic systems and their key enabling devices. It presents a concise but rigorous treatment of the theory and practice of analog (linear) fiber-optics links and systems that constitute the foundation of Hybrid Fiber Coax infrastructure in present-day CATV distribution and cable modem Internet access. Emerging applications in remote fiber-optic feed for free-space millimeter wave enterprise campus networks are also described. Issues such as dispersion and interferometric noise are treated quantitatively, and means for mitigating them are explained. This broad but concise text will thus be invaluable not only to students of fiber-optics communication but also to practicing engineers. To the second edition of this book important new aspects of linear fiber-optic transmission technologies are added, such as high level system architectural issues, algorithms for deriving the optimal frequency assignment, directly modulated or externally modulated laser t...

  15. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  16. Gain Characteristics of Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明义; 姜淳; 胡卫生

    2004-01-01

    The theory model of fiber optical parametric amplifier (FOPA) was introduced, which is based on optical nonlinear effect. And then numerical simulation was done to analyze and discuss the gain spectral characteristics of one-pump and two-pump FOPA. The results show that for one-pump FOPA, when pump wavelength is near to fiber zero-dispersion wavelength(ZDW), the gain flatness is better, and with the increase of the pump power, fiber length and its nonlinear coefficient, the gain value will increase while the gain bandwidth will become narrow. For two-pump FOPA, when the pump central wavelength is near to fiber ZDW, the gain flatness is better. Moreover, by decreasing the space of two pumps wavelength, the gain flatness can be improved. Finally, some problems existing in FOPA were addressed.

  17. Fiber optic liquid refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Vanita; Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    In this present work we report fabrication of fiber optic liquid refractive index (RI) measurement sensor based on Michelson Interferometer method. This sensor was assembled by using graded index multimode (MM) fiber with core diameter 50 µm and the cladding of fiber was removed by simple chemical method. To perform this experiment a 2×2 3dB coupler is used. The fiber ends are then immersed in solvent and solution to provide reference and refractive index measurements, respectively. This method was successfully used to measure refractive index of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)-Water solution at different concentrations. The fringe contrast sensitivity of device is 92.90 dB/RIU measured in the RI range from 1.34 to 1.42 which is better than Mach-Zehnder Interferometer sensor [1] and Fabry perot based sensor [2]. The fabrication of sensor is simple, low cost and highly sensitive.

  18. Normal dispersion femtosecond fiber optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T N; Kieu, K; Maslov, A V; Miyawaki, M; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate a synchronously pumped fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) operating in the normal dispersion regime. The FOPO generates chirped pulses at the output, allowing significant pulse energy scaling potential without pulse breaking. The output average power of the FOPO at 1600 nm was ∼60  mW (corresponding to 1.45 nJ pulse energy and ∼55% slope power conversion efficiency). The output pulses directly from the FOPO were highly chirped (∼3  ps duration), and they could be compressed outside of the cavity to 180 fs by using a standard optical fiber compressor. Detailed numerical simulation was also performed to understand the pulse evolution dynamics around the laser cavity. We believe that the proposed design concept is useful for scaling up the pulse energy in the FOPO using different pumping wavelengths.

  19. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  20. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Moore, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in composite materials by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of composites with subsurface defects. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Methods and limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  1. Enzyme-Based Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Camins, Irene; Angel, Stanley M.

    1988-06-01

    Fiber optic chemical sensors capable of detecting glucose and penicillin were developed. Each consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein). A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the analyte (glucose or penicillin) into a product (gluconic or penicilloic acid, respectively) that lowers the microenvironmental pH of the membrane and, consequently, lowers the fluorescence intensity of the dye. Each sensor is capable of responding to analyte concentrations in the range of ~0.1 to 100 mM. The penicillin optrode response time is 40 to 60 s while that for glucose is ~5 to 12 min.

  2. Fiber optic biosensor of immobilized firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡谨; 吉鑫松; 等

    2002-01-01

    Luciferase from firefly lantern extract was immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B,The kinetic properties of immobilized luciferase were extensively studied.The Km' for D-luciferin is 11.9umol/L,the optimum pH and temperature for Sepharose-bound enzyme were 7.8 and 25℃ respectively.A luminescence fiber optic biosensor,making use of immobilized crude luciferase was developed for assay of ATP.The peak light intensity was linear with respect to ATP concentration in range of 10-9-10-5mol/L.A biological application was also demonstrated with the determination of serum ATP from rats bred in low versus normal oxygen environments.

  3. Fiber optic biosensor of immobilized firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡谨; 孟文芳; 吉鑫松

    2002-01-01

    Luciferase from firefly lantern extract was immobilized on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The kinetic properties of immobilized luciferase were extensively studied. The Km′ for D-luciferin is 11.9 μmol/L, the optimum pH and temperature for Sepharose-bound enzyme were 7.8 and 25℃ respectively. A luminescence fiber optic biosensor, making use of immobilized crude luciferase, was developed for assay of ATP. The peak light intensity was linear with respect to ATP concentration in range of 10-9-10-5 mol/L. A biological application was also demonstrated with the determination of serum ATP from rats bred in low versus normal oxygen environments.

  4. Excess Loss of the Coupling System to Double-Function Optical Circulators Utilizing Lens Twice and Two-Fiber Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yan-ning; FANG Qiang; WANG Yong-chang; SUN Ai-jing; BAI Ju-rong; YANG Yi-fei

    2005-01-01

    A new type of double function optical circulator for double fibers is proposed in this paper. Two fiber tips and lens twice are employed in this kind of device as the coupling system for what is believed to be the first time. Because two fiber tips and lens twice are used, the function of optical circulator is duplicated in comparison with conventional optical circulator with single fiber tip. Thus the optical circulator has a low cost and a small volume comparatively. Excess loss of the coupling system and the misalignment of the lens twice in angular error and the position error to the developed circulator are analyzed and discussed by using Gauss wave and double integral in theory. The analysis results show that the excess loss is zero when each distance is equal to f between every adjacent fraction and without misalignment error in the coupling system. In addition, the excess loss is increasing with increment of the distance error and the angular error. The errors of the angular of the optical axis to lens and the distance between the SL to lens are the main source of the excess loss. The higher the errors are, the higher the excess loss is. It's very important for reducing the misalignment errors in the coupling system with high ratio of coupling to achieve low excess loss. Details of design and excess loss in the coupling system of this circulator are presented.

  5. Development Of Porous Glass Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, P. B.; Barkatt, Aa.; Feng, X.; Finger, S. M.; Hojaji, H.; Laberge, N.; Mohr, R.; Penafiel, M.; Saad, E.

    A method for producing rugged, continuous porous glass fiber optic sensors was developed. pH and temperature sensors based on this technology have been successfully produced. The sensor portion of the fiber is made porous by selective leaching of a specially formulated borosilicate glass fiber. This results in a strong, monolithic structure where the sensor portion of the fiber remains integrally attached to the rest of the fiber (which acts as a light pipe), essentially eliminating losses at the sensor-light pipe interface. Pore size in the sensor can be controllably varied by modifying heat treatment conditions, making these sensors suitable for chemical concentration measurements in liquids and gases. Appropriate dyes were chemically bonded by silanization to the large interior surface area of the porous sensors to produce the pH and temperature sensors. Cresol red and phenol red were used for pH and pinacyanol chloride was used for temperature sensing. The sensitivity of these devices can be controlled by varying the concentration of the chemically bonded dye and the length of the porous region. Optical absorbance measurements were made in the visible range. The tip of the sensors was coated with a thin, porous layer of gold to reflect the incident light, resulting in a double pass across the porous sensor. Experimental measurements were made over a pH range of 3 to 8 and a temperature range of 28-70 C. These porous glass fiber optic sensors were found to be rugged and reliable due to their monolithic structure and large interior surface area for attachment of active species. A broad range of sensors based on this technology could be developed by using different active species, such as enzymes and other biochemicals, which could be bonded to the interior surface of the porous glass sensor.

  6. Virtual-reality-based educational laboratories in fiber optic engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Dana; Turczynski, Craig; Rice, Jonny; Kozhevnikov, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Researchers and educators have observed great potential in virtual reality (VR) technology as an educational tool due to its ability to engage and spark interest in students, thus providing them with a deeper form of knowledge about a subject. The focus of this project is to develop an interactive VR educational module, Laser Diode Characteristics and Coupling to Fibers, to integrate into a fiber optics laboratory course. The developed module features a virtual laboratory populated with realistic models of optical devices in which students can set up and perform an optical experiment dealing with laser diode characteristics and fiber coupling. The module contains three increasingly complex levels for students to navigate through, with a short built-in quiz after each level to measure the student's understanding of the subject. Seventeen undergraduate students learned fiber coupling concepts using the designed computer simulation in a non-immersive desktop virtual environment (VE) condition. The analysis of students' responses on the updated pre- and post tests show statistically significant improvement of the scores for the post-test as compared to the pre-test. In addition, the students' survey responses suggest that they found the module very useful and engaging. The conducted study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed instructional technology for engineering education, where both the model of instruction and the enabling technology are equally important, in providing a better learning environment to improve students' conceptual understanding as compared to other instructional approaches.

  7. Development and Testing of a Post-Installable Deepwater Monitoring System Using Fiber-Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Calvin H.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Tang, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the design and development of a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing deepwater risers and flowlines; and provides a summary of test article fabrication and the subsequent laboratory testing performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC). A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the riser or flowline of interest. This work investigates the sensor coupling for pipelines that are suspended in a water column (from topside platform to seabed) using a fiber-optic sensor clamp and subsea bonding adhesive. The study involved the design, fabrication, and test of several prototype clamps that contained fiber-optic sensors. A mold was produced by NASA using 3-D printing methods that allowed the casting of polyurethane clamp test articles to accommodate 4-inch and 8-inch diameter pipes. The prototype clamps were installed with a subsea adhesive in a "wet" environment and then tested in the NASA Structures Test Laboratory (STL). The tension, compression, and bending test data showed that the prototype sensor clamps achieved good structural coupling, and could provide high quality strain measurement for active monitoring.

  8. Performance evaluation of fiber optic components in nuclear plant environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, M.C.; Miller, D.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); James, R.W. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Over the past several years, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded several projects to evaluate the performance of commercially available fiber optic cables, connective devices, light sources, and light detectors under environmental conditions representative of normal and abnormal nuclear power plant operating conditions. Future projects are planned to evaluate commercially available fiber optic sensors and to install and evaluate performance of instrument loops comprised of fiber optic components in operating nuclear power plant applications. The objective of this research is to assess the viability of fiber optic components for replacement and upgrade of nuclear power plant instrument systems. Fiber optic instrument channels offer many potential advantages: commercial availability of parts and technical support, small physical size and weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, relatively low power requirements, and high bandwidth capabilities. As existing nuclear power plants continue to replace and upgrade I&C systems, fiber optics will offer a low-cost alternative technology which also provides additional information processing capabilities. Results to date indicate that fiber optics are a viable technology for many nuclear applications, both inside and outside of containments. This work is funded and manage& under the Operations & Maintenance Cost Control research target of EPRI`s Nuclear Power Group. The work is being performed by faculty and students in the Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Departments and the staff of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of the Ohio State University.

  9. Measurements of High Energy X-Ray Dose Distributions Using Multi-Dimensional Fiber-Optic Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Dong Hyun; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Bongsoo; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Tack, Gye-Rae; Yi, Jeong Han; Kim, Sin; Cho, Hyosung

    In this study, we have fabricated multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation detectors with organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and photo-detectors such as photodiode array and a charge-coupled device. To measure the X-ray dose distributions of the clinical linear accelerator in the tissue-equivalent medium, we have fabricated polymethylmethacrylate phantoms which have one-dimensional and two-dimensional fiber-optic detector arrays inside. The one-dimensional and two-dimensional detector arrays can be used to measure percent depth doses and surface dose distributions of high energy X-ray in the phantom respectively.

  10. Design and implementation of a fiber optic RS232 link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James W.

    1987-09-01

    This thesis investigates the feasibility of using a bi-directional fiber optic link to implement a RS232 data link. The results showed that a fiber optic link is a viable replacement. It offers a bandwidth up to 5 MHz, 250 times that of a RS232 data link. This fiber optic link was tested over a distance of 1.5 kilometers, nearly 100 times that of the present RS232 link. It also offers the benefits of space and weight savings and is comparable to devices produced commercially but at a substantial cost savings.

  11. Static sensitivity calculation of a novel fiber optic biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongchen Bai; Shuijie Qin; Jing Li; Dashun Huang; Xin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    A novel structure of fiber optic biosensor and its principle are introduced. The sample is detected in microchannels of several microns diameter in fiber optic biosensors. The relation between the optic fiber tapered angle and the fluorescence incident angle is calculated in signal receiving part. As the sensor is a zero-order system, calculating formula of the static sensitivity is derived. When ZnSe nano-crystalline cluster is used for marking the molecules, the static sensitivity for fiber optic biosensors is calculated. At the same time, the relation between the static sensitivity and the ratio of exciting wavelength to fluorescence wavelength is presented.

  12. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  13. Microflow1, a sheathless fiber-optic flow cytometry biomedical platform: demonstration onboard the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubeau-Laramée, Geneviève; Rivière, Christophe; Jean, Isabelle; Mermut, Ozzy; Cohen, Luchino Y

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic based flow cytometry platform was designed to build a portable and robust instrument for space applications. At the core of the Microflow1 is a unique fiber-optic flow cell fitted to a fluidic system and fiber coupled to the source and detection channels. A Microflow1 engineering unit was first tested and benchmarked against a commercial flow cytometer as a reference in a standard laboratory environment. Testing in parabolic flight campaigns was performed to establish Microflow1's performance in weightlessness, before operating the new platform on the International Space Station. Microflow1 had comparable performances to commercial systems, and operated remarkably and robustly in weightlessness (microgravity). Microflow1 supported immunophenotyping as well as microbead-based multiplexed cytokine assays in the space environment and independently of gravity levels. Results presented here provide evidence that this fiber-optic cytometer technology is inherently compatible with the space environment with negligible compromise to analytical performance.

  14. Fiber-optical sensor with miniaturized probe head and nanometer accuracy based on spatially modulated low-coherence interferogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiereux, Frank; Lehmann, Peter; Pfeifer, Tilo; Schmitt, Robert

    2007-06-10

    Fiber-optical sensors have some crucial advantages compared with rigid optical systems. They allow miniaturization and flexibility of system setups. Nevertheless, optical principles such as low-coherence interferometry can be realized by use of fiber optics. We developed and realized an approach for a fiber-optical sensor, which is based on the analysis of spatially modulated low-coherence interferograms. The system presented consists of three units, a miniaturized sensing probe, a broadband fiber-coupled light source, and an adapted Michelson interferometer, which is used as an optical receiver. Furthermore, the signal processing procedure, which was developed for the interferogram analysis in order to achieve nanometer measurement accuracy, is discussed. A system prototype has been validated thoroughly in different experiments. The results approve the accuracy of the sensor.

  15. Tri-Axial MRI Compatible Fiber-optic Force Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, U-Xuan; Yang, Bo; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been gaining popularity over standard imaging modalities like ultrasound and CT because of its ability to provide excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, due to the working principle of MRI, a number of conventional force sensors are not compatible. One popular solution is to develop a fiber-optic force sensor. However, the measurements along the principal axes of a number of these force sensors are highly cross-coupled. One of the objectives of this paper is to minimize this coupling effect. In addition, this paper describes the design of elastic frame structures that are obtained systematically using topology optimization techniques for maximizing sensor resolution and sensor bandwidth. Through the topology optimization approach, we ensure that the frames are linked from the input to output. The elastic frame structures are then fabricated using polymers materials, such as ABS and Delrin®, as they are ideal materials for use in MRI environment. However, the hysteresis effect seen in the displacement-load graph of plastic materials is known to affect the accuracy. Hence, this paper also proposes modeling and addressing this hysteretic effect using Prandtl-Ishlinskii play operators. Finally, experiments are conducted to evaluate the sensor’s performance, as well as its compatibility in MRI under continuous imaging. PMID:21666783

  16. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  17. Landslide Monitoring Based on High-Resolution Distributed Fiber Optic Stress Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong Dai; Yong Liu; Li-Xun Zhang; Zhong-Hua Ou; Ce Zhou; Yong-Zhi Liu

    2008-01-01

    A landslide monitoring application is presented by using a high-resolution distributed fiber optic stress sensor. The sensor is used to monitor the intra-stress distribution and variations in landslide bodies, and can be used for the early warning of the occurrence of the landslides. The principle of distributed fiber optic stress sensing and the intra-stress monitoring method for landslides are described in detail. By measuring the distributed polarization mode coupling in the polarization-maintaining fiber, the distributed fiber stress sensor with stress measuring range 0 to 15 Mpa, spatial resolution 10 em and measuring range 0.5 km, is designed. The warning system is also investigated experimentally in the field trial.

  18. High Speed and High Spatial Density Parameter Measurement Using Fiber Optic Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Allen R. Jr. (Inventor); Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Richards, William Lance (Inventor); Piazza, Anthony (Inventor); Hamory, Philip J (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an improved fiber optic sensing system (FOSS) having the ability to provide both high spatial resolution and high frequency strain measurements. The inventive hybrid FOSS fiber combines sensors from high acquisition speed and low spatial resolution Wavelength-Division Multiplexing (WDM) systems and from low acquisition speed and high spatial resolution Optical Frequency Domain Reflection (OFDR) systems. Two unique light sources utilizing different wavelengths are coupled with the hybrid FOSS fiber to generate reflected data from both the WDM sensors and OFDR sensors operating on a single fiber optic cable without incurring interference from one another. The two data sets are then de-multiplexed for analysis, optionally with conventionally-available WDM and OFDR system analyzers.

  19. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  20. Fiber Optic Wing Shape Sensing on NASA's Ikhana UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This document discusses the development of fiber optic wing shape sensing on NASA's Ikhana vehicle. The Dryden Flight Research Center's Aerostructures Branch initiated fiber-optic instrumentation development efforts in the mid-1990s. Motivated by a failure to control wing dihedral resulting in a mishap with the Helios aircraft, new wing displacement techniques were developed. Research objectives for Ikhana included validating fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions; the validation of fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; assessing technical viability and, if applicable, developing methodology and approaches to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system; and, developing and flight validating approaches to perform active wing shape control using conventional control surfaces and active material concepts.

  1. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  2. Manipulating time-bin qubits with fiber optics components

    OpenAIRE

    Bussieres, Felix; Soudagar, Yasaman; Berlin, Guido; Lacroix, Suzanne; Godbout, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    We propose two experimental schemes to implement arbitrary unitary single qubit operations on single photons encoded in time-bin qubits. Both schemes require fiber optics components that are available with current technology.

  3. Ultra-high Frequency Linear Fiber Optic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, Kam Y

    2009-01-01

    Designed for a one-semester course on fiber-optics systems and communication links, this book provides a concise but rigorous treatment of the theory and practice of analog (linear) fiber-optics links and systems that constitute the foundation of Hybrid Fiber Coax infrastructure in present-day CATV distribution and cable modem Internet access. Emerging applications in remote fiber-optic feed for free-space millimeter wave enterprise campus networks are also described. Issues such as dispersion and interferometric noise are treated quantitatively, and means for mitigating them are explained. This broad but concise text will thus be invaluable not only to students of fiber-optics communication but also to practicing engineers.

  4. Fiber-diffraction Interferometer using Coherent Fiber Optic Taper

    CERN Document Server

    Kihm, Hagyong

    2010-01-01

    We present a fiber-diffraction interferometer using a coherent fiber optic taper for optical testing in an uncontrolled environment. We use a coherent fiber optic taper and a single-mode fiber having thermally-expanded core. Part of the measurement wave coming from a test target is condensed through a fiber optic taper and spatially filtered from a single-mode fiber to be reference wave. Vibration of the cavity between the target and the interferometer probe is common to both reference and measurement waves, thus the interference fringe is stabilized in an optical way. Generation of the reference wave is stable even with the target movement. Focus shift of the input measurement wave is desensitized by a coherent fiber optic taper.

  5. Fiber Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Incorporated proposes to develop a patent-pending fiber optic continuous liquid sensor for low-thrust level settled mass gauging with measurement...

  6. Fiber-Optic Sensing for In-Space Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Francisco; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides examples of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Armstrong. Examples of current and previous work that support in-space inspection techniques and methodologies are highlighted.

  7. Recent progresses in scintillating doped silica fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattia, Cristina; Mones, Eleonora; Veronese, Ivan; Fasoli, Mauro; Chiodini, Norberto; Cantone, Marie Claire; Vedda, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The recent progresses in the development and characterization of doped silica fiber optics for dosimetry applications in the modern radiation therapy, and for high energy physics experiments, are presented and discussed. In particular, the main purpose was the production of scintillating fiber optics with an emission spectrum which can be easily and efficiently distinguished from that of other spurious luminescent signals originated in the fiber optic material as consequence of the exposition to ionizing radiations (e.g. Cerenkov light and intrinsic fluorescence phenomena). In addition to the previously investigated dopant (Ce), other rare earth elements (Eu and Yb) were considered for the scintillating fiber optic development. The study of the luminescent and dosimetric properties of these new systems was carried out by using X and gamma rays of different energies and field sizes.

  8. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensor Suite for Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for microspacecraft is a rapidly growing technology area for the use of fiber optics and MEMS. Morgan Research Corporation...

  9. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection of...

  10. Enabling technologies for fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Selwan K.; Farnan, Martin; Karabacak, Devrez M.; Singer, Johannes M.

    2016-04-01

    In order for fiber optic sensors to compete with electrical sensors, several critical parameters need to be addressed such as performance, cost, size, reliability, etc. Relying on technologies developed in different industrial sectors helps to achieve this goal in a more efficient and cost effective way. FAZ Technology has developed a tunable laser based optical interrogator based on technologies developed in the telecommunication sector and optical transducer/sensors based on components sourced from the automotive market. Combining Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing technology with the above, high speed, high precision, reliable quasi distributed optical sensing systems for temperature, pressure, acoustics, acceleration, etc. has been developed. Careful design needs to be considered to filter out any sources of measurement drifts/errors due to different effects e.g. polarization and birefringence, coating imperfections, sensor packaging etc. Also to achieve high speed and high performance optical sensing systems, combining and synchronizing multiple optical interrogators similar to what has been used with computer/processors to deliver super computing power is an attractive solution. This path can be achieved by using photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology which opens the doors to scaling up and delivering powerful optical sensing systems in an efficient and cost effective way.

  11. Pulse Distortion in Saturated Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation.......Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation....

  12. Modal Frequency Detection in Composite Beams Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    interference have been developed. These include the Fabry-Perot interferometer , the Mach-Zehner interferometer , and the Michelson interferometer [8]. The...widely studied. A Fabry-Perot interferometer as a fiber optic sensor was first introduced in 1982 [10]. In a later study intrinsic Fabry-Perot...Yoshino, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Katsuji Itoh, and Teruzi Ose, " Fiber -Optic Fabry-Perot Interferometer and its Sensor Applications," IEEE Journal of Quantum

  13. Overview of fiber optics technology :industrial and military

    OpenAIRE

    Derrington, Dolores Cormack

    1989-01-01

    Fiber optics technology is being used in many applications, both in the military world and in the industrial world. A broad overview of this technology is provided, including a discussion of the fundamentals of fiber operation and component characteristics. Applications of fiber optics in both military and industrial communities is addressed, identifying specific examples in both cases. In addition, market projections and technology trends are discussed for both the milit...

  14. Intruder localization and identification in fiber optic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.

    2008-10-01

    The ultimate goal in all fiber optic systems is to extract information about the mechanical perturbations. For example, this information may be the frequency dependent index of perturbation. For security systems we desire to detect and differentiate between different intruders based on the mechanical response. This article shows experimental investigation of ideal intruder classifier. We considered demodulation, denoising, deconvolution and normalisation. We present additionally possible configuration of fiber optic sensor to localizing perturbation place.

  15. Advances in fiber optic sensors for in-vivo monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco; Mignani, Anna G.

    1995-09-01

    Biomedical fiber-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of both physical and chemical parameters as well as for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fiber-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different fields of application such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology, and dentistry.

  16. Fast frame rate rodent cardiac x-ray imaging using scintillator lens coupled to CMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi Lakshmi, B.; Sai Varsha, M. K. N.; Kumar, N. Ashwin; Dixit, Madhulika; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2017-03-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (MCT) systems for small animal imaging plays a critical role for monitoring disease progression and therapy evaluation. In this work, an in-house built micro-CT system equipped with a X-ray scintillator lens coupled to a commercial CMOS camera was used to test the feasibility of its application to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). Literature has reported such studies being done with clinical X-ray tubes that can be pulsed rapidly or with rotating gantry systems, thus increasing the cost and infrastructural requirements.The feasibility of DSA was evaluated by injected Iodinated contrast agent (ICA) through the tail vein of a mouse. Projection images of the heart were acquired pre and post contrast using the high frame rate X-ray detector and processing done to visualize transit of ICA through the heart.

  17. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  18. Demonstration of a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to provide localized, real-time monitoring of material regression rates in various applications has the potential to provide a new stream of data for development testing of various components and systems, as well as serving as a monitoring tool in flight applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the regression of a combusting solid fuel surface, the ablation of the throat in a chemical rocket or the heat shield of an aeroshell, and the monitoring of erosion in long-life plasma thrusters. The rate of regression in the first application is very fast, while the second and third are increasingly slower. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor is optical, using two different, co-located fiber-optics to perform the regression measurement. The disparate optical transmission properties of the two fiber-optics makes it possible to measure the regression rate by monitoring the relative light attenuation through the fibers. As the fibers regress along with the parent material in which they are embedded, the relative light intensities through the two fibers changes, providing a measure of the regression rate. The optical nature of the system makes it relatively easy to use in a variety of harsh, high temperature environments, and it is also unaffected by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. In addition, the sensor could be used to perform optical spectroscopy on the light emitted by a process and collected by fibers, giving localized measurements of various properties. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of material regression rates is useful in addressing a variety of physical issues in various applications. An in-situ measurement allows for real-time data regarding the erosion rates, providing a quick method for

  19. Fresh and cultured human lens epithelial cells: an electrophysiological study of cell coupling and membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, T J

    1988-09-01

    Microelectrode studies of fresh human and rabbit lens epithelia revealed stable membrane potentials [VR (human) = -36 mV; VR (rabbit) = -45 mV] and low input resistances [Ri (human) = 10 M omega; Ri (rabbit) = 20 M omega]. Coupling studies, using two voltage microelectrodes, demonstrated that the low input resistance of the fresh epithelial tissue was due to electrotonic coupling, which was found to be extremely labile and sensitive to perfusion of the apical (fibrefacing) surface of the epithelium. The intercellular coupling could be stabilized by raising the calcium concentration of the perfusate. Studies performed on confluent monolayers of cultured human lens epithelial (HLE) cells demonstrated a membrane potential (VR = -33 mV) and input resistance (Ri = 29 M omega) similar to their fresh counterparts. The intercellular coupling of these cells was found to be much more robust. Ultrastructural studies revealed that the apical junction of cultured HLE cells was less complex than that found in fresh tissue, the latter exhibiting multiple interdigitations and folds. The cultured monolayer was dissociated into single cells by a variety of methods and the membrane properties of individual cells were studied. Single cells were found to have a lower membrane potential (-20 to -25 mV) and an input resistance in the range 110-170 M omega, depending on the method of dissociation. Channel blocking and ion replacement studies revealed significant conductance pathways for potassium, sodium and chloride and a cell-attached patch clamp investigation revealed three distinct channel types. Of the two channels with inward currents at the resting potential, one, with a conductance of 25 pS, is identified as a non-selective cation channel, and the other, with a conductance of 14 pS and reversal potential of - 14 mV, is a possible candidate for a chloride channel but has yet to be characterized. A third channel with an outward current at the resting potential is identified as a

  20. Integral window hermetic fiber optic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

  1. Optical system components for navigation grade fiber optic gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, Marcus; Liesegang, Maximilian; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Interferometric fiber optic gyroscopes belong to the class of inertial sensors. Due to their high accuracy they are used for absolute position and rotation measurement in manned/unmanned vehicles, e.g. submarines, ground vehicles, aircraft or satellites. The important system components are the light source, the electro optical phase modulator, the optical fiber coil and the photodetector. This paper is focused on approaches to realize a stable light source and fiber coil. Superluminescent diode and erbium doped fiber laser were studied to realize an accurate and stable light source. Therefor the influence of the polarization grade of the source and the effects due to back reflections to the source were studied. During operation thermal working conditions severely affect accuracy and stability of the optical fiber coil, which is the sensor element. Thermal gradients that are applied to the fiber coil have large negative effects on the achievable system accuracy of the optic gyroscope. Therefore a way of calculating and compensating the rotation rate error of a fiber coil due to thermal change is introduced. A simplified 3 dimensional FEM of a quadrupole wound fiber coil is used to determine the build-up of thermal fields in the polarization maintaining fiber due to outside heating sources. The rotation rate error due to these sources is then calculated and compared to measurement data. A simple regression model is used to compensate the rotation rate error with temperature measurement at the outside of the fiber coil. To realize a compact and robust optical package for some of the relevant optical system components an approach based on ion exchanged waveguides in thin glass was developed. This waveguides are used to realize 1x2 and 1x4 splitter with fiber coupling interface or direct photodiode coupling.

  2. Qualification of Fiber Optic Cables for Martian Extreme Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Lindensmith, Christian A.; Roberts, William T.; Rainen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Means have been developed for enabling fiber optic cables of the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometer instrument to survive ground operations plus the nominal 670 Martian conditions that include Martian summer and winter seasons. The purpose of this development was to validate the use of the rover external fiber optic cabling of ChemCam for space applications under the extreme thermal environments to be encountered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Flight-representative fiber optic cables were subjected to extreme temperature thermal cycling of the same diurnal depth (or delta T) as expected in flight, but for three times the expected number of in-flight thermal cycles. The survivability of fiber optic cables was tested for 600 cumulative thermal cycles from -130 to +15 C to cover the winter season, and another 1,410 cumulative cycles from -105 to +40 C to cover the summer season. This test satisfies the required 3 times the design margin that is a total of 2,010 thermal cycles (670 x 3). This development test included functional optical transmission tests during the course of the test. Transmission of the fiber optic cables was performed prior to and after 1,288 thermal cycles and 2,010 thermal cycles. No significant changes in transmission were observed on either of the two representative fiber cables subject through the 3X MSL mission life that is 2,010 thermal cycles.

  3. Design and performance optimization of fiber optic adaptive filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparao, P; Ghosh, A; Allen, S D

    1991-05-10

    There is a great need for easy-to-fabricate and versatile fiber optic signal processing systems in which optical fibers are used for the delay and storage of wideband guided lightwave signals. We describe the design of the least-mean-square algorithm-based fiber optic adaptive filters for processing guided lightwave signals in real time. Fiber optic adaptive filters can learn to change their parameters or to process a set of characteristics of the input signal. In our realization we employ as few electronic devices as possible and use optical computation to utilize the advantages of optics in the processing speed, parallelism, and interconnection. Many schemes for optical adaptive filtering of electronic signals are available in the literature. The new optical adaptive filters described in this paper are for optical processing of guided lightwave signals, not electronic signals. We analyzed the convergence or learning characteristics of the adaptive filtering process as a function of the filter parameters and the fiber optic hardware errors. From this analysis we found that the effects of the optical round-off errors and noise can be reduced, and the learning speed can be comparatively increased in our design through an optimal selection of the filter parameters. A general knowledge of the fiber optic hardware, the statistics of the lightwave signal, and the desired goal of the adaptive processing are enough for this optimum selection of the parameters. Detailed computer simulations validate the theoretical results of performance optimization.

  4. Reducing Systematic Centroid Errors Induced by Fiber Optic Faceplates in Intensified High-Accuracy Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Jiang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Compared with traditional star trackers, intensified high-accuracy star trackers equipped with an image intensifier exhibit overwhelmingly superior dynamic performance. However, the multiple-fiber-optic faceplate structure in the image intensifier complicates the optoelectronic detecting system of star trackers and may cause considerable systematic centroid errors and poor attitude accuracy. All the sources of systematic centroid errors related to fiber optic faceplates (FOFPs) throughout the detection process of the optoelectronic system were analyzed. Based on the general expression of the systematic centroid error deduced in the frequency domain and the FOFP modulation transfer function, an accurate expression that described the systematic centroid error of FOFPs was obtained. Furthermore, reduction of the systematic error between the optical lens and the input FOFP of the intensifier, the one among multiple FOFPs and the one between the output FOFP of the intensifier and the imaging chip of the detecting system were discussed. Two important parametric constraints were acquired from the analysis. The correctness of the analysis on the optoelectronic detecting system was demonstrated through simulation and experiment. PMID:26016920

  5. Fiber Optic Component Tests In High Speed Data Bus Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, R.; Drake, M. D.; Husbands, C. R.

    1982-12-01

    A series of tests was performed to evaluate off-the-shelf components for the design of a fiber optic channel for the Nascom System Improvements Project in support of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This paper describes the results of this series of tests, establishing operational performance of active and passive fiber optic components at data rates up to 150 Mb/s. These tests determine the transmission characteristics of the fiber optic transmitters and receivers and the effects of data rate, bit pattern sensitivity, and vestigial optical energy on the performance of these devices. Tests were also performed to evaluate the capability of fused biconical couplers to Function properly at these high data rates.

  6. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  7. Fiber-optic raster scanning two-photon endomicroscope using a tubular piezoelectric actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Dukho; Yoo, Hongki; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2014-06-01

    A nonresonant, fiber-optic raster scanning endomicroscope was developed using a quarter-tubular piezoelectric (PZT) actuator. A fiber lever mechanism was utilized to enhance the small actuation range of the tubular PZT actuator and to increase its field-of-view. Finite element method simulation of the endoscopic probe was conducted for various conditions to maximize its scanning range. After fabricating the probe using a double clad fiber, we obtained two-photon fluorescence images using raster beam scanning of the fiber. The outer diameter of the probe was 3.5 mm and its rigid distal length was 30 mm including a high numerical aperture gradient index lens. These features are sufficient for input into the instrumental channel of a commercial colonoscope or gastroscope to obtain high resolution images in vivo.

  8. Fiber optical artificial nose for the food industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed

    2003-04-01

    An artificial nose has been attractive for scientific research and the food industry. This paper proposes that the detection and recognition of odours or chemicals concentrate can be achieved by means of passive and compact size fiber optic sensors (Fiber Bragg Gratings Technology) that will form an olfactory sensor array and a fuzzy logic algorithm that will form the recognition artificial intelligence. The mathematical model of the fiber Bragg gratings olfactory sensor is developed and the design model of the artificial fiber optic nose is introduced.

  9. Overview of advanced components for fiber optic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Stowe, David W.

    1986-01-01

    The basic operating principles and potential performance of several state-of-the-art fiber-optic devices are illustrated with diagrams and briefly characterized. Technologies examined include high-birefringence polarization-maintaining fibers and directional couplers, single-mode fiber polarizers and cut-off polarizers, optical-fiber modulators with radially poled piezoactive polymer (PVF2) jackets, and piezoelectric-squeezer polarization modulators. The need for improved manufacturing techniques to make such fiber-optic devices cost-competitive with their thin-film integrated-optics analogs is indicated.

  10. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  11. Fiber optic sensors for environmental applications: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1992-04-01

    Understanding the flow a groundwater quality. This understanding is achieved by measurement of the appropriate chemical and physical subsurface parameters. The ideal measurement would accurately assess a parameter without affecting the parameter or its environment. Fiber optic spectroscopy offers some of the most promising techniques for accurate, non-invasive measurements of environmental parameters. Fiber optic sensors for subsurface applications are currently being developed by several Department of Energy laboratories. Some of these sensors have been successfully deployed in the field and are attaining the goals of accurate, noninvasive, real time measurements in the subsurface.

  12. Zero Length Intrastation Fiber Optics Links Test and Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    WOirCS (Continue on, ev- icb. it r .~53r’Od Idern~f b’ lock r-urmher) Fiber Optics Digital Transmissic-, Analoo Transmission 20. AtiSTRACT (Cowfou. am...typified Defcnse Communications Systems (DCS) transmission node between DCS digital multir!exers and radios. The intent being to evaluate fiber optics...1920 under the technical dircction of the US Army Comunication Electronics Engi’-Vring In*’allation h\\keN)J (USACJEIA). Supplei.,ental testing ’.ws

  13. Fiber-Optic Terahertz Data-Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Peter L.; Lambert, James L.; Morookian, John M.; Bergman, Larry A.

    1994-01-01

    Network protocols implemented in optical domain. Fiber-optic data-communication networks utilize fully available bandwidth of single-mode optical fibers. Two key features of method: use of subpicosecond laser pulses as carrier signals and spectral phase modulation of pulses for optical implementation of code-division multiple access as multiplexing network protocol. Local-area network designed according to concept offers full crossbar functionality, security of data in transit through network, and capacity about 100 times that of typical fiber-optic local-area network in current use.

  14. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  15. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran, E-mail: bitjy@bit.edu.cn [School of Optoelectronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Yuewu [Key Laboratory for Mechanics in Fluid Solid Coupling Systems, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-05-15

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  16. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran; Liu, Yuewu

    2015-05-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  17. Fiber optic to integrated optical chip coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikulski, Joseph I. (Inventor); Ramer, O. Glenn (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Optical fibers are clamped by a block onto a substrate. Thereupon, metal is plated over the fibers to hold them in place upon the substrate. The clamp block is removed and the opening, resulting from the clamp block's presence, is then plated in. The built-up metallic body is a coupling which holds the fibers in position so that the ends can be polished for coupling to an integrated optical chip upon a coupling fixture.

  18. Ground Water Monitoring Using Laser Fluorescence And Fiber Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Pohlig, Kenneth; Rico, Nicola; Johnson, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    In-situ measurement of aromatic ground water contaminants, including the benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTEX) fraction of gasoline, has been demonstrated using fiber optic systems. A prototype field instrument has shown that this method has advantages over traditional sampling and analysis. Problems encountered and solved include coupling of the laser energy into to fiber, sensor design, and detector configuration to optimize instrument sensitivity. The effects of sensor length, corresponding to well depth, on limits of detection are presented. Effects of potential interferences, including external fluorescence quenchers, are discuss-ed. The resolution of complex mixtures is addressed, with modifications to the detector shown to be effective in separation of groups of contaminants. Instrument design considerations include the need for portability, ruggedness at field sites, and ease of operation. The modular instrument design used is shown to help solve these potential problems, while maintaining analytical sensitivity and reproducibility. Modular optical system design has also shown to be useful when modifications are made. Changes in the detector as well as provisions for multiple laser sources have allowed a flexible system to be configured to meet analytical demands as they arise. Sensor design considerations included high ultraviolet transmission, physical flexibility, resistance to breakage, and resistance to chemical and/or biological fouling. The approach to these problem areas is presented, as well as discussion of the methods used to minimize effects of fiber solarization. Results of testing the field portable prototype are presented for a variety of typical ground water analysis sites, illustrating the usefulness of this new technology in environmental monitoring.

  19. Fiber optic and laser sensors VIII; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Sept. 17-19, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This issue presents topics on the advances in fiber-optic sensor technology, fiber-optic gyroscope, fiber-optic position and pressure sensors, fiber-optic magnetic and temperature sensors, and generic fiber-optic sensors. Papers included are on a novel analog phase tracker for interferometric fiber-optic sensor applications, recent development status of fiber-optic sensors in China, the magnetic-field sensitivity of depolarized fiber-optic gyros, a depolarized fiber-optic gyro for future tactical applications, fiber-optic position transducers for aircraft controls, and a metal embedded optical-fiber pressure sensor. Attention is also given to a fiber-optic magnetic field sensor using spectral modulation encoding, a bare-fiber temperature sensor, an interferometric fiber-optic accelerometer, improvement of specular reflection pyrometer, a theoretical analysis of two-mode elliptical-core optical fiber sensors, and a fiber probe for ring pattern.

  20. Lens coupled tunable Young's double pinhole system for hard X-ray spatial coherence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-06-13

    We have implemented a modified Young's double slit experiment using pinholes with tunable separation distance coupled with compound refractive lens for hard X-ray spatial coherence characterization. Varying distance between the apertures provides a high sensitivity to the determination of spatial coherence across a wide range of experimental parameters. The use of refractive lenses as a Fourier transformer ensures far field registration conditions and allows the realization of a very compact experimental setup in comparison with the classical Young technique and its derivatives. The tunable double aperture interferometer was experimentally tested at the ESRF ID06 beamline in the energy range from 8 to 25 keV. The spatial coherence and the source size were measured by evaluating the visibility of the interference fringes at various separation distances between the apertures and this value agrees very well with the data obtained by other techniques. The proposed scheme can be used for comprehensive characterization of the coherence properties of the source on low emittance synchrotrons in the hard X-ray region.

  1. Fiber optic and laser sensors VII; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 5-7, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric (Editor); Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on fiber optic and laser sensors are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fiber optic photoelastic pressure sensor for high-temperature gases, fiber optic gyroscope using an eight-component LiNbO3 integrated optic circuit, design and performance of a fiber optic gyroscope using integrated optics, digital angular position sensor using wavelength division multiplexing, simple repeatable fiber optic intensity sensor for temperature measurement, compensation for effects of ambient temperature on rare-earth-doped fiber optic thermometer.

  2. A fiber-optic fluorescence microscope using a consumer-grade digital camera for in vivo cellular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsuk Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early detection is an essential component of cancer management. Unfortunately, visual examination can often be unreliable, and many settings lack the financial capital and infrastructure to operate PET, CT, and MRI systems. Moreover, the infrastructure and expense associated with surgical biopsy and microscopy are a challenge to establishing cancer screening/early detection programs in low-resource settings. Improvements in performance and declining costs have led to the availability of optoelectronic components, which can be used to develop low-cost diagnostic imaging devices for use at the point-of-care. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-optic fluorescence microscope using a consumer-grade camera for in vivo cellular imaging. METHODS: The fiber-optic fluorescence microscope includes an LED light, an objective lens, a fiber-optic bundle, and a consumer-grade digital camera. The system was used to image an oral cancer cell line labeled with 0.01% proflavine. A human tissue specimen was imaged following surgical resection, enabling dysplastic and cancerous regions to be evaluated. The oral mucosa of a healthy human subject was imaged in vivo, following topical application of 0.01% proflavine. FINDINGS: The fiber-optic microscope resolved individual nuclei in all specimens and tissues imaged. This capability allowed qualitative and quantitative differences between normal and precancerous or cancerous tissues to be identified. The optical efficiency of the system permitted imaging of the human oral mucosa in real time. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate this device as a useful tool to assist in the identification of early neoplastic changes in epithelial tissues. This portable, inexpensive unit may be particularly appropriate for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings.

  3. A fiber-optic fluorescence microscope using a consumer-grade digital camera for in vivo cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongsuk; Pierce, Mark C; Gillenwater, Ann M; Williams, Michelle D; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R

    2010-06-23

    Early detection is an essential component of cancer management. Unfortunately, visual examination can often be unreliable, and many settings lack the financial capital and infrastructure to operate PET, CT, and MRI systems. Moreover, the infrastructure and expense associated with surgical biopsy and microscopy are a challenge to establishing cancer screening/early detection programs in low-resource settings. Improvements in performance and declining costs have led to the availability of optoelectronic components, which can be used to develop low-cost diagnostic imaging devices for use at the point-of-care. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-optic fluorescence microscope using a consumer-grade camera for in vivo cellular imaging. The fiber-optic fluorescence microscope includes an LED light, an objective lens, a fiber-optic bundle, and a consumer-grade digital camera. The system was used to image an oral cancer cell line labeled with 0.01% proflavine. A human tissue specimen was imaged following surgical resection, enabling dysplastic and cancerous regions to be evaluated. The oral mucosa of a healthy human subject was imaged in vivo, following topical application of 0.01% proflavine. The fiber-optic microscope resolved individual nuclei in all specimens and tissues imaged. This capability allowed qualitative and quantitative differences between normal and precancerous or cancerous tissues to be identified. The optical efficiency of the system permitted imaging of the human oral mucosa in real time. Our results indicate this device as a useful tool to assist in the identification of early neoplastic changes in epithelial tissues. This portable, inexpensive unit may be particularly appropriate for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings.

  4. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products... Singapore; and Avago Technologies U.S. Inc. of San Jose, California. Letters supplementing the complaint... the United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic...

  5. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  6. Experiment Study of Fiber Optic Sensing in Railway Security Monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Fan; De-Sheng Jiang; Wei-Lai Li

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at some security problems in railway running and the application condition of existing technology, this paper studies some issues of using fiber optic sensing technology in railway security monitoring. Through field experiment measuring the strain of the rail and analyzing the experiment data, the method of diagnosing the health condition of rail and wheel is investigated.

  7. Bragg grating fiber optic sensing for bridges and other structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, Raymond M.; Alavie, A. Tino; Maaskant, Robert; Huang, Shang Yuan; LeBlanc, Michel

    1994-09-01

    We have demonstrated that fiber optic intracore Bragg grating sensors are able to measure the strain relief experienced over an extended period of time by both steel and carbon composite tendons within the concrete deck support girders of a recently constructed two span highway bridge. This is the first bridge in the world to test the prospects of using carbon fiber composite tendons to replace steel tendons. This unique set of measurements was accomplished with an array of 15 Bragg grating fiber optic sensors that were embedded within the precast concrete girders during their construction. We have also demonstrated that these same sensors can measure the change in the internal strain within the girders associated with both static and dynamic loading of the bridge with a truck. We are now studying the ability of Bragg grating fiber optic sensors to measure strong strain gradients and thereby provide a warning of debonding of any Bragg grating sensor from its host structure...one of the most important failure modes for any fiber optic strain sensor.

  8. Fiber Optic Wink-around Speed of Light Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which a recycling oscillator has been designed having a fiber optic data link that closes the loop. Outlines the use of this wink-around system to determine the speed of light and suggests additional application for measuring integrated circuit propagation delays to subnanosecond resolution. (GS)

  9. Novel Fiber Optic Fluorometer for the Measurement of Alga Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel fluorometer based on fiber optics is briefly introduced for the measurement of alga concentration. Both the exciting light and the fluorescence from alga chlorophyll are transmitted along a fiber cable. By this way, we can get alga concentration by measuring its chlorophyll-a fluorescence intensity. The experiment results show that this instrument is characterized by good sensitivity, linearity and accuracy.

  10. A fiber optics textile composite sensor for geotechnical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artières, Olivier; Dortland, Gerrit

    2010-09-01

    The fiber optics in structural health monitoring systems for civil engineering applications have been widely used. By integrating fiber optic sensing into a geotextile fabric, the TenCate GeoDetect® system is the first designed specifically for geotechnical applications. This monitoring solution embodies fiber optics on a geotextile fabric, e.g. a textile used into the soil, and combines the benefits of geotextile materials, such as high interface friction in contact with the soil, with the latest fiber optics sensing technologies. It aims to monitor geotechnical structure and to generate early warnings if it detects and localizes the early signs of malfunctioning, such as leaks or instability. This is a customizable solution: Fiber Bragg gratings, Brillouin and Raman scattering can be built into this system. These technologies measure both strain and temperature changes in soil structures. It can provide a leak and deformation location within accuracies resp. 1 l/min/m and 0.02%. The TenCate GeoDetect® solution provides objective, highly precise, and timely in-situ performance information, allowing the design professional and owner to understand system performance in addition to providing alerts for negative "geo-events" (subsidence) and other potentially deleterious events.

  11. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  12. Kansas Communication and Instruction System through Fiber-Optic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    Schools and communities will restructure as they move into the next decade. The success of this restructuring will be dependent upon access to and sharing of quality teaching and information through an expanded communication system. One of the major two-way interactive technologies is the fiber-optic cable: a delivery system that will provide…

  13. Fiber Optic Laser Delivery For Endarterectomy Of Experimental Atheromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, John; Pollock, Marc E.; McColgan, Stephen J.; Hammer-Wilson, Marie; Berns, Michael W.

    1986-08-01

    Fiber optic delivery of argon ion laser energy and Nd-YAG laser energy were compared by the performance of open laser endarterectomy in the rabbit arteriosclerosis model. In Group I, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with an argon ion laser (488 nm and 514.5 nm) with the laser beam directed through a 400 pm quartz fiber optic. In Group II, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with a Nd-YAG laser (1.06 pm) with the laser beam directed through a 600 pm quartz fiber optic. Gross and light microscopic examination revealed smooth endarterectomy surfaces with tapered end points in Group I. In Group II, the endarterectomy surfaces were uneven and perforation occurred at 5/6 end points. Although energy could be precisely delivered with each laser by fiber optics, satisfactory results could only be achieved with the argon ion laser because argon ion energy was well absorbed by atheromas. Successful intravascular laser use requires a strong interaction between wavelength and atheroma as well as a precise delivery system.

  14. Low-cost fiber optic weigh-in-motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaai-Jazi, A.; Ardekani, S. A.; Mehdikhani, M.

    1990-11-01

    A design for a fiber optic weigh in motion (WIM) sensor is proposed. A prototype of the proposed sensor is designed, manufactured, and tested in the laboratory for different load frequency combinations using a material testing system (MTS) machine. Statistical analysis of data are performed to assess the response of the sensor under varying load frequencies for comparison.

  15. Simple fiber optic sensor for applications in security systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Karol, M.; Markowski, P.; Napierala, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate measurement results of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor used for the monitoring of the fiber optic link integrity to protect it against unauthorized access to classified information. The presented construction is based on the detection of changes of the modes distribution in a multimode fiber. Any mechanical stress on the multimode fiber causes changes of polarization and distribution of propagating modes, hence it changes the distribution of modes at the end of the multimode fiber. Observation of these changes using a narrow core single-mode fiber allows to use the structure as an optical fiber sensor. We used several kilometers long optical links to conduct field tests of laboratory sensor. On this basis the prototype module of modalmetric fiber optic sensor wasbuilt. The modification of optoelectronic part, the variation of sensor length and the change of the method of light reflection at the end of the fiber enable the use of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor in many applications. The sensor finds wide range of applications in security systems. It can be applied to protect the museum's collection, transmission lines and to protect objects of critical infrastructure.

  16. Fiber Optic Fourier Transform White-Light Interferometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Jiang; Cai-Jie Tang

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Fourier transform white-light inter-fereometry is presented to interrogate the absolute optical path difference of an Mach-Zehnder inter-ferometer. The phase change of the interferometer caused by scanning wavelength can be calculated by a Fourier transform-based phase demodulation technique. A linear output is achieved.

  17. And They're Off! The Race to Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joan E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology and discusses its use in distance learning and educational reform. Highlights include the quality of communications transmission systems; costs; Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations; cable television; networks, including the National Research and Education Network (NREN); government versus…

  18. Application of fiber optic interferometers for Cook-off measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.; Meer, B.J. van der

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer comprising of a Sagnac interferometer and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was developed. The interferometer enabled detection of explosive subtonic expansion velocities during the Cook-off test. The system enabled a comparison between the results of the two interferometer

  19. Gain characteristics of a saturated fiber optic parametric amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2008-01-01

    In this work we discuss saturation performance of a fiber optic parametric amplifier. A simple numerical model is described and applied to specific cases. A system experiment using a saturated amplifier illustrates a 4 dB improvement in required signal to noise ratio for a fixed bit error ratio....

  20. Asymmetric gain-saturated spectrum in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rottwitt, Karsten; Galili, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and numerically an unexpected spectral asymmetry in the saturated-gain spectrum of single-pump fiber optical parametric amplifiers. The interaction between higher-order four-wave mixing products and dispersive waves radiated as an effect of third-order dispersion...

  1. Domestic Enterprise Awarded Overseas Patents On Fiber Optical Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-Electronic Technology Corp. Ltd was granted a patent for a fiber optical gyroscope using a low-polarization and polarization-maintaining hybrid light path in Ukraine. After filling an ordinary patent application for the technology domestically in 2006, the company filed a Paris Convention application in Ukraine to collaborate with a Ukrainian technical center in 2007.

  2. Fiber optical magnetic field sensor for power generator monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Villnow, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Inside of large electrical engines such as power generators and large drives, extreme electric and magnetic fields can occur which cannot be measured electrically. Novel fiber optical magnetic field sensors are being used to characterize the fields and recognize inner faults of large power generators.

  3. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  4. Analog Fiber Optic Link with DC-100 MHz Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-30

    Lohrmann Envisioneering , Inc. King George, VA May 30, 2008 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. C.a. SuLLivan Surface Electronic...October 25, 2006 * Envisioneering , Inc., King George, VA 22485 Analog fiber optic link DC Wide band CONTENTS iii Executive Summary

  5. Utilization of Infrared Fiber Optic in the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optics are finding a place in the automotive industry. Illumination is the primary application today. Soon, however, fiber optics will be used for data communications and sensing applications. Silica fiber optics and plastic fibers are sufficient for illumination and communication applications however, sensing applications involving high temperature measurement and remote gas analysis would benefit from the use of infrared fiber optics. Chalcogonide and heavy metal fluoride glass optical fibers are two good candidates for these applications. Heavy metal fluoride optical fibers are being investigated by NASA for applications requiring transmission in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Zirconium-Barium-Lanthanum-Aluminum-Sodium-Fluoride (ZBLAN) is one such material which has been investigated. This material has a theoretical attenuation coefficient 100 times lower than that of silica and transmits into the mid-IR. However, the measured attenuation coefficient is higher than silica due to impurities and crystallization. Impurities can be taken care of by utilizing cleaner experimental protocol. It has been found that crystallization can be suppressed by processing in reduced gravity. Fibers processed in reduced gravity on the KC135 reduced gravity aircraft were found to be free of crystals while those processed on the ground were found to have crystals. These results will be presented along with plans for producing continuous lengths of ZBLAN optical fiber on board the International Space Station.

  6. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  7. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  8. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No. 7,379,630...

  9. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable, nonassignable...

  10. 77 FR 73456 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a... described in U.S. Patent No. 7,020,354: Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 83...

  11. Fiber Optically Coupled Eyesafe Laser Threat Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-11

    LIGHTWEIGHT, MUST BE CONFORMAL TO AIRCRAFT SKIN, MUST HAVE A HIGH DEGREE OF RFI/EMI INMUNITY AND SHOULD BE LOW COST. PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS SIMILAR...CONTINUOUS) LARGE OPTICAL DYNAMIC RANGES (60-70 dB) DEMONSTRATED WITH LARGE TEMPORAL BANDWIDTHS RFI/EMI IMMUNITY ACHIEVED WITH 100% PASSIVE OPTICAL

  12. Automatic Alignment Fiber Optic Coupling System for Optimal Signal Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Devices Packaging,” Proc. of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics , July 10-12, Taiwan, 2005. [3] C.L. Chang, C.Y. Tseng, and J.P...Conference on Mechatronics and Automation, June 25-28, China, 2006. 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-01-0188

  13. Micromachined fiber optic Fabry-Perot underwater acoustic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuyin; Shao, Zhengzheng; Hu, Zhengliang; Luo, Hong; Xie, Jiehui; Hu, Yongming

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important branches in the development trend of the traditional fiber optic physical sensor is the miniaturization of sensor structure. Miniature fiber optic sensor can realize point measurement, and then to develop sensor networks to achieve quasi-distributed or distributed sensing as well as line measurement to area monitoring, which will greatly extend the application area of fiber optic sensors. The development of MEMS technology brings a light path to address the problems brought by the procedure of sensor miniaturization. Sensors manufactured by MEMS technology possess the advantages of small volume, light weight, easy fabricated and low cost. In this paper, a fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric underwater acoustic probe utilizing micromachined diaphragm collaborated with fiber optic technology and MEMS technology has been designed and implemented to actualize underwater acoustic sensing. Diaphragm with central embossment, where the embossment is used to anti-hydrostatic pressure which would largely deflect the diaphragm that induce interferometric fringe fading, has been made by double-sided etching of silicon on insulator. By bonding the acoustic-sensitive diaphragm as well as a cleaved fiber end in ferrule with an outer sleeve, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer has been constructed. The sensor has been interrogated by quadrature-point control method and tested in field-stable acoustic standing wave tube. Results have been shown that the recovered signal detected by the sensor coincided well with the corresponding transmitted signal and the sensitivity response was flat in frequency range from 10 Hz to 2kHz with the value about -154.6 dB re. 1/μPa. It has been manifest that the designed sensor could be used as an underwater acoustic probe.

  14. Research in Fiber Optics: Implications for Fiber Optics in Vocational-Technical Education. Final Report 1984-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen County Vocational-Technical High School, Hackensack, NJ.

    This project was conducted to determine the vocational, technical, and scientific skills and knowledge needed to work with the fiber optics applications that are in all areas of technology. A research assistant was hired by the project director to collect data and develop a research base for the project. Information was gathered through a…

  15. Comparison of lens- and fiber-coupled CCD detectors for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, K; Hoshino, M; Yagi, N

    2011-03-01

    X-ray imaging detectors with an identical phosphor and a CCD chip but employing lens- and fiber-coupling between them have been compared. These are designed for X-ray imaging experiments, especially computed tomography, at the medium-length beamline at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. It was found that the transmittance of light to the CCD is about four times higher in the fiber-coupled detector. The uniformity of response in the lens-coupled detector has a global shading of up to 40%, while pixel-to-pixel variation owing to a chicken-wire pattern was dominant in the fiber-coupled detector. Apart from the higher transmittance, the fiber-coupled detector has a few characteristics that require attention when it is used for computed tomography, which are browning of the fiber, discontinuity in the image, image distortion, and dark spots in the chicken-wire pattern. Thus, it is most suitable for high-speed tomography of samples that tend to deform, for example biological and soft materials.

  16. SU-E-T-610: Phosphor-Based Fiber Optic Probes for Proton Beam Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Soldner, A; Liu, H; Kassaee, A; Zhu, T; Finlay, J [Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution (<0.5 mm3) based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beam including profiles and range. Methods: The fiber optic probe with TbF3 phosphor tip, embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms was irradiated with double scattering proton beam with energy of 180 MeV. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. In order to measure the spatial beam profile and percentage depth dose, we used singular value decomposition method to spectrally separate the phosphors ionoluminescence signal from the background Cerenkov radiation signal. Results: The spectra of the TbF3 fiber probe showed characteristic ionoluminescence emission peaks at 489, 542, 586, and 620 nm. By using singular value decomposition we found the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to measure the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with ion chamber. We observed quenching effect at the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as under-responding of the signal, due to the high LET of the beam. However, the beam profiles were not dramatically affected by the quenching effect. Conclusion: We have evaluated the performance of a fiber optic probe with submillimeter resolution for proton beam dosimetry. We demonstrated feasibility of spectral separation of the Cerenkov radiation from the collected signal. Such fiber probes can be used for measurements of proton beams profile and range. The experimental apparatus and spectroscopy method developed in this work provide a robust platform for characterization of proton-irradiated nanophosphor particles for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy or molecular imaging applications.

  17. Experimental Analysis of Desalination Unit Coupled with Solar Water Lens Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaithanya, K. K.; Rajesh, V. R.; Suresh, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    The main problem that the world faces in this scenario is shortage of potable water. Hence this research work rivets to increase the yield of desalination system in an economical way. The integration of solar concentrator and desalination unit can project the desired yield, but the commercially available concentrated solar power technologies (CSP) are not economically viable. So this study proposes a novel method to concentrate ample amount of solar radiation in a cost effective way. Water acting as lens is a highlighted technology initiated in this work, which can be a substitute for CSP systems. And water lens can accelerate the desalination process so as to increase the yield economically. The solar irradiance passing through the water will be concentrated at a focal point, and the concentration depends on curvature of water lens. The experimental analysis of water lens makes use of transparent thin sheet, supported on a metallic structure. The Plano convex shape of water lens is developed by varying the volume of water that is being poured on the transparent thin sheet. From the experimental analysis it is inferred that, as the curvature of water lens increases, solar irradiance can be focused more accurately on to the focus and a higher water temperature is obtained inside the solar still.

  18. Fiber Optic Experience with the Smart Actuation System on the F-18 Systems Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Eddie

    1997-01-01

    High bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and potential weight savings have led to the development of fiber optic technology for future aerospace vehicle systems. This technology has been incorporated in a new smart actuator as the primary communication interface. The use of fiber optics simplified system integration and significantly reduced wire count. Flight test results showed that fiber optics could be used in aircraft systems and identified critical areas of development of fly-by-light technology. This paper documents the fiber optic experience gained as a result of this program, and identifies general design considerations that could be used in a variety of specific applications of fiber optic technology. Environmental sensitivities of fiber optic system components that significantly contribute to optical power variation are discussed. Although a calibration procedure successfully minimized the effect of fiber optic sensitivities, more standardized calibration methods are needed to ensure system operation and reliability in future aerospace vehicle systems.

  19. Neural Network-Based Multimode Fiber-Optic Information Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusarz, Ronald K.; Sayeh, Mohammad R.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for transmitting information through multimode fiber-optic cables is presented. This technique sends parallel channels through the fiber-optic cable, thereby greatly improving the data transmission rate compared with that of the current technology, which uses serial data transmission through single-mode fiber. An artificial neural network is employed to decipher the transmitted information from the received speckle pattern. Several different preprocessing algorithms are developed, tested, and evaluated. These algorithms employ average region intensity, distributed individual pixel intensity, and maximum mean-square-difference optimal group selection methods. The effect of modal dispersion on the data rate is analyzed. An increased data transmission rate by a factor of 37 over that of single-mode fibers is realized. When implementing our technique, we can increase the channel capacity of a typical multimode fiber by a factor of 6.

  20. Fiber optical Bragg grating sensors embedded in CFRP wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellen, Philipp M.; Frank, Andreas; Broennimann, Rolf; Meier, Urs; Sennhauser, Urs J.

    1999-05-01

    Based on the example application of Emmenbridge, a newly built steel-concrete-composite bridge in Switzerland with 47 m long built-in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) prestressing cables, we will present and analyze the process chain leading to a reliable surveillance of modern civil engineering structures with embedded fiber optical Bragg gratings. This consists first in the embedding of optical fibers and in-fiber Bragg gratings in long CFRP wires in an industrial environment, including fiber optical monitoring of the curing process. Then, various qualifying tests were done: annealing experiments for determining optical lifetime of the Bragg gratings used, dynamic and static tensile tests for estimating their mechanical lifetime under operation, push-out experiments to check adhesion of fiber/coating/matrix interfaces, and performance tests to determine strain and temperature sensitivity of the embedded Bragg gratings. Finally, the prestressing cables were equipped with the CFRP sensor wires and built into the bridge.

  1. Fiber optic sensors current status and future possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Ikezawa, Satoshi; Corres, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    This book describes important recent developments in fiber optic sensor technology and examines established and emerging applications in a broad range of fields and markets, including power engineering, chemical engineering, bioengineering, biomedical engineering, and environmental monitoring. Particular attention is devoted to niche applications where fiber optic sensors are or soon will be able to compete with conventional approaches. Beyond novel methods for the sensing of traditional parameters such as strain, temperature, and pressure, a variety of new ideas and concepts are proposed and explored. The significance of the advent of extended infrared sensors is discussed, and individual chapters focus on sensing at THz frequencies and optical sensing based on photonic crystal structures. Another important topic is the resonances generated when using thin films in conjunction with optical fibers, and the enormous potential of sensors based on lossy mode resonances, surface plasmon resonances, and long-range...

  2. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Yao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  3. Utilization of Faraday Mirror in Fiber Optic Current Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic sensors dispose of some advantages in the field of electrical current and magnetic field measurement, like large bandwidth, linearity, light transmission possibilities. Unfortunately, they suffer from some parasitic phenomena. The crucial issue is the presence of induced and latent linear birefringence, which is imposed by the fiber manufacture imperfections as well as mechanical stress by fiber bending. In order to the linear birefringence compensation a promising method was chosen for pulsed current sensor design. The method employs orthogonal polarization conjugation by the back direction propagation of the light wave in the fiber. The Jones calculus analysis presents its propriety. An experimental fiber optic current sensor has been designed and realized. The advantage of the proposed method was proved considering to the sensitivity improvement.

  4. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Soto, J G; Antonio-Lopez, J E; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [Photonics and Optical Physics Laboratory, Optics Department, INAOE Apdo. Postal 51 and 216, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: darrioja@uat.edu.mx

    2011-01-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on multimode interference was designed, fabricated and tested. The sensor is very simple and inexpensive since we only need to splice a section of multimode fiber between two single mode fibers. Using this device a sensing range of 25 deg. C to 375 deg. C is demonstrated. We should also highlight that due to the pass-band filter response of MMI devices, multiplexing is rather simple by just changing the length of the multimode section.

  5. Review Of Fiber-Optic Electric-Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P.; Jarzynski, Jacek

    1989-01-01

    Tutorial paper reviews state of art in fiber-optic sensors of alternating electric fields. Because such sensors are made entirely of dielectric materials, they are relatively transparent to incident electric fields; they do not distort fields significantly. Paper presents equations that express relationships among stress, strain, and electric field in piezoactive plastic and equations for phase shift in terms of photoelastic coefficients and strains in optical fiber.

  6. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Structures Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Anthony

    Structural health monitoring is the process of detecting damage to a structure, where damage can be characterized as changes to material/mechanical properties including but not limited to plastically deforming the material or the modification of connections. Fiber optic cables with fiber Bragg gratings have emerged as a reliable method of locally measuring strains within a structure. During the manufacturing of composite structures, the fiber optic cables can be embedded between lamina plies, allowing the ability to measure strain at discrete locations within the structure as opposed to electrical strain gauges, which must typically be applied to the surface only. The fiber optic sensors may be used to see if the local strain at the sensor location is beyond desired limits, or the array response may be mined to determine additional information about the loading applied to the structure. The work presented in this thesis is to present novel and potential applications of FBG sensors being used to assess the health of the structure. The first application is the dual application of the FBG sensor as a method to determine the strain around a bolt connection as well as the preload of the fastener using a single fiber optic sensor. The composite material around the bolted connections experience stress concentrations and are often the location of damage to the structure from operational cyclic loading over the lifetime of the structure. The degradation can occur more quickly if the fastener is insufficiently tight to transfer load properly. The second application is the ability to locate the impact location of a projectile with damaging and non-damaging energy. By locating and quantifying the damage, the sensor array provides the basis for a structural health monitoring system that has the potential to determine if the damage is extensive enough to replace, or if the part can be salvaged and retrofitted.

  7. HIGH-STABLE ERBIUM SUPERLUMINESCENT FIBER OPTICAL SOURCES CREATION METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Aleynik; N. E. Kikilich; V. N. Kozlov; A. A. Vlasov; NIKITENKO A.N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the overview of wideband Erbium doped superluminescent fiber sources (EDSFS) creation methods. This type of optical sources is mainly used in navigation accuracy class fiber-optical gyroscopes (FOG) production. For this application an optical source should have small coherence length to reduce FOG output signal error rate. Output signal errors are caused by different parasitic effects: reverse Rayleigh scattering, optical components mode swapping, Kerr effect. Consequently, the mos...

  8. A Large Area Fiber Optic Gyroscope on multiplexed fiber network

    OpenAIRE

    Clivati, Cecilia; Calonico, Davide; Costanzo, Giovanni A.; Mura, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Marco; Levi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fiber optical gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect realized on a multiplexed telecom fiber network. Our loop encloses an area of 20 km^2 and coexists with Internet data traffic. This Sagnac interferometer achieves a sensitivity of about 1e-8 (rad/s)/sqrt(Hz), thus approaching ring laser gyroscopes without using narrow-linewidth laser nor sophisticated optics. The proposed gyroscope is sensitive enough for seismic applications, opening new possibilities for this kind of optical f...

  9. A Large Area Fiber Optic Gyroscope on multiplexed fiber network

    CERN Document Server

    Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Mura, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Marco; Levi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fiber optical gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect realized on a multiplexed telecom fiber network. Our loop encloses an area of 20 km^2 and coexists with Internet data traffic. This Sagnac interferometer achieves a sensitivity of about 1e-8 (rad/s)/sqrt(Hz), thus approaching ring laser gyroscopes without using narrow-linewidth laser nor sophisticated optics. The proposed gyroscope is sensitive enough for seismic applications, opening new possibilities for this kind of optical fiber sensors

  10. Fiber-optic sensor applications in civil and geotechnical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, Katerina

    2011-09-01

    Different types of fiber-optic sensors based on glass or polymeric fibers are used to evaluate material behavior or to monitor the integrity and long-term stability of load-bearing structure components. Fiber-optic sensors have been established as a new and innovative measurement technology in very different fields, such as material science, civil engineering, light-weight structures, geotechnical areas as well as chemical and high-voltage substations. Very often, mechanical quantities such as deformation, strain or vibration are requested. However, measurement of chemical quantities in materials and structure components, such as pH value in steel reinforced concrete members also provides information about the integrity of concrete structures. A special fiber-optic chemical sensor for monitoring the alkaline state (pH value) of the cementitious matrix in steel-reinforced concrete structures with the purpose of early detection of corrosion-initiating factors is described. The paper presents the use of several fiber-optic sensor technologies in engineering. One example concerns the use of highly resolving concrete-embeddable fiber Fabry-Perot acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the assessment of the bearing behaviour of large concrete piles in existing foundations or during and after its installation. Another example concerns fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors attached to anchor steels (micro piles) to measure the strain distribution in loaded soil anchors. Polymer optical fibers (POF) can be — because of their high elasticity and high ultimate strain — well integrated into textiles to monitor their deformation behaviour. Such "intelligent" textiles are capable of monitoring displacement of soil or slopes, critical mechanical deformation in geotechnical structures (dikes, dams, and embankments) as well as in masonry structures during and after earthquakes.

  11. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  12. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  13. An enhanced LSPR fiber-optic nanoprobe for ultrasensitive detection of protein biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Mollye; Lin, Yongbin; Wei, Jianjun; Bono, Taylor; Lindquist, Robert G

    2014-11-15

    A miniaturized, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-coupled fiber-optic (FO) nanoprobe is reported as a biosensor that is capable of label-free, sensitive detection of a cancer protein biomarker, free prostate specific antigen (f-PSA). The biosensor is based on the LSPR at the reusable dielectric-metallic hybrid interface with a robust, gold nano-disk array at the fiber end facet that is directly fabricated using EBL and metal lift-off process. The f-PSA has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a specific receptor linked with a self-assembled monolayer at the LSPR-FO facet surfaces. Experimental investigation and data analysis found near field refractive index (RI) sensitivity at ~226 nm/RIU with current LSPR-FO nanoprobe, and demonstrated the lowest limit of detection (LOD) at 100 fg/mL (~3 fM) of f-PSA in PBS solutions. The control experimentation using 5mg/mL bovine serum albumin in PBS and nonspecific surface test shows the excellent specificity and selectivity in the detection of f-PSA in PBS. These results present important progress towards a miniaturized, multifunctional fiber-optic technology that integrates informational communication and sensing function for developing a high performance, label-free, point-of-care (POC) device.

  14. Detection of inflammatory cytokines using a fiber optic microsphere immunoassay array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2006-10-01

    A multiplexed fiber optic microsphere-based immunoassay array capable of simultaneously measuring five inflammatory cytokines has been developed. Five groups of amine-functionalized 3.1 micron microspheres were internally encoded with five distinct concentrations of a europium dye and converted to cytokine probes by covalently coupling monoclonal capture antibodies specific for human VEGF, IFN-gamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3 to the microspheres via glutaraldehyde chemistry. The microspheres were pooled and loaded into a 1 mm diameter fiber optic bundle containing ~50,000 individual etched microwells, producing the multiplexed cytokine immunoassay array. Multiple arrays can be created from a single microsphere pool for high throughput sample analysis. Sandwich fluoroimmunoassays were performed by incubating the probe array in a sample, followed by incubation in a mixture of biotin-labeled detection antibodies that are complementary to the five cytokines. Finally, universal detection of each protein was performed using a fluorescence imaging system after briefly immersing the array in a solution of fluorophore-labeled streptavidin. The multiplexed cytokine array has been shown to respond selectively to VEGF, IFNgamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3, permitting multiplexed quantitative analysis. Ultimately, the multiplexed cytokine array will be utilized to evaluate the potential of using saliva as a noninvasive diagnostic fluid for pulmonary inflammatory diseases such as asthma.

  15. Realization and characterization of fiber optic reflective sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, B.; Łakomski, M.; Słapek, B.

    2016-11-01

    In almost all of non-invasive techniques, fiber optic sensors may be the most promising ones because of their inherent advantages such as very small size and hard environment tolerance. Proximity sensors based on optical fiber are highly required especially in the impact area of electromagnetic fields. In this paper three different types of fiber optic reflective sensors are presented. In all three types of the sensor four multimode optical fibers (MMF) illuminate the movable surface. The difference is in the number of collecting the reflected light MMF. In the first one, 12 MMF collect the light, in the second one 20 MMF, while in the third one the number of MMF collecting reflected light is 32. Moreover, all three types of fiber optic reflective sensors were realized in two configurations. In the first one, the cleaved MMF were used to collect reflected light, while in the second configuration - the ball-lensed optical fibers were chosen. In this paper an analysis of each type of realized sensor is presented. In the last part of this paper the obtained results and the detailed discussion are given.

  16. High-speed digital fiber optic links for satellite traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryoush, A. S.; Ackerman, E.; Saedi, R.; Kunath, R. R.; Shalkhauser, K.

    1989-09-01

    Large aperture phased array antennas operating at millimeter wave frequencies are designed for space-based communications and imaging platforms. Array elements are comprised of active T/R modules which are linked to the central processing unit through high-speed fiber-optic networks. The system architecture satisfying system requirements at millimeter wave frequency is T/R level data mixing where data and frequency reference signals are distributed independently before mixing at the T/R modules. This paper demonstrates design procedures of a low loss high-speed fiber-optic link used for transmission of data signals over 600-900 MHz bandwidth inside satellite. The fiber-optic link is characterized for transmission of analog and digital data. A dynamic range of 79 dB/MHz was measured for analog data over the bandwidth. On the other hand, for bursted SMSK satellite traffic at 220 Mbps rates, BER of 2 x 10 to the -7th was measured for E(b)/N(o) of 14.3 dB.

  17. Recent advances in liquid-crystal fiber optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woliński, T. R.; Siarkowska, A.; Budaszewski, D.; Chychłowski, M.; Czapla, A.; Ertman, S.; Lesiak, P.; Rutkowska, K. A.; Orzechowski, K.; Sala-Tefelska, M.; Sierakowski, M.; DÄ browski, R.; Bartosewicz, B.; Jankiewicz, B.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Mergo, P.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystals over the last two decades have been successfully used to infiltrate fiber-optic and photonic structures initially including hollow-core fibers and recently micro-structured photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). As a result photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) have been created as a new type of micro-structured fibers that benefit from a merge of "passive" PCF host structures with "active" LC guest materials and are responsible for diversity of new and uncommon spectral, propagation, and polarization properties. This combination has simultaneously boosted research activities in both fields of Liquid Crystals Photonics and Fiber Optics by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Simultaneously, photonic liquid crystal fibers create a new class of fiber-optic devices that utilize unique properties of the photonic crystal fibers and tunable properties of LCs. Compared to "classical" photonic crystal fibers, PLCFs can demonstrate greatly improved control over their optical properties. The paper discusses the latest advances in this field comprising PLCFs that are based on nanoparticles-doped LCs. Doping of LCs with nanoparticles has recently become a common method of improving their optical, magnetic, electrical, and physical properties. Such a combination of nanoparticles-based liquid crystals and photonic crystal fibers can be considered as a next milestone in developing a new class of fiber-based optofluidic systems.

  18. Sampled MTF of fused fiber optic components and bonded assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Fused fiber optic devices are bundles of glass optical fibers that have been successively bundled and drawn to smaller and smaller sizes, effectively creating a "zero optical path window". Due to the nature of fiber's clad and core design, pixelization or sampling of the resulting image occurs; this sampling fundamentally degrades the image. Degradation of a resulting image caused by an optical system can be quantified by way of its Modulation Transfer Function. However, since fused fiber optic devices first sample then effectively project the original image, they do not meet the Fourier transform's prerequisite conditions of being linear and isoplanatic. Current technologies at SCHOTT Lighting and Imaging have initiated a study to determine methodology for measuring the sampled modulation transfer function of bonded assemblies such as bonded Faceplate-to-OLED and Faceplate-tosensor assemblies. The use of randomly generated targets imaged through the bonded assemblies proved to be a useful tactic. This paper discusses the test methods developed and subsequent measurement of the sampled modulation transfer function of fused fiber optic bundles and bonded assemblies.

  19. Visual stimulus presentation using fiber optics in the MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruey-Song; Sereno, Martin I

    2008-03-30

    Imaging the neural basis of visuomotor actions using fMRI is a topic of increasing interest in the field of cognitive neuroscience. One challenge is to present realistic three-dimensional (3-D) stimuli in the subject's peripersonal space inside the MRI scanner. The stimulus generating apparatus must be compatible with strong magnetic fields and must not interfere with image acquisition. Virtual 3-D stimuli can be generated with a stereo image pair projected onto screens or via binocular goggles. Here, we describe designs and implementations for automatically presenting physical 3-D stimuli (point-light targets) in peripersonal and near-face space using fiber optics in the MRI scanner. The feasibility of fiber-optic based displays was demonstrated in two experiments. The first presented a point-light array along a slanted surface near the body, and the second presented multiple point-light targets around the face. Stimuli were presented using phase-encoded paradigms in both experiments. The results suggest that fiber-optic based displays can be a complementary approach for visual stimulus presentation in the MRI scanner.

  20. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  1. Fiber Optic Strain Sensor for Planetary Gear Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiddy, Jason S.; Lewicki, David G.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Ehinger, Ryan T.; Fetty, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new sensing approach for helicopter damage detection in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission based on a fiber optic strain sensor array. Complete helicopter transmission damage detection has proven itself a difficult task due to the complex geometry of the planetary reduction stage. The crowded and complex nature of the gearbox interior does not allow for attachment of sensors within the rotating frame. Hence, traditional vibration-based diagnostics are instead based on measurements from externally mounted sensors, typically accelerometers, fixed to the gearbox exterior. However, this type of sensor is susceptible to a number of external disturbances that can corrupt the data, leading to false positives or missed detection of potentially catastrophic faults. Fiber optic strain sensors represent an appealing alternative to the accelerometer. Their small size and multiplexibility allows for potentially greater sensing resolution and accuracy, as well as redundancy, when employed as an array of sensors. The work presented in this paper is focused on the detection of gear damage in the planetary stage of a helicopter transmission using a fiber optic strain sensor band. The sensor band includes an array of 13 strain sensors, and is mounted on the ring gear of a Bell Helicopter OH-58C transmission. Data collected from the sensor array is compared to accelerometer data, and the damage detection results are presented

  2. Fiber optic weigh in motion: looking back and ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teral, Stephane R.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the fiber optic weight- in-motion (WIM) smart sensor situation. Based on the interrelationship between technology and needs, the analysis is divided into three parts. The first part reflects WIM equipment development, such as piezo-electric sensors, and some of the pitfalls encountered in WIM measurements that led to fiber optic sensor utilization. With a chronological approach, the second part reviews the various optical principles that have been developed to measure dynamic weight. Since 1986, three techniques have been fully tested on actual highways. On the one hand, the simplest one based on light attenuation in multimode fibers as suitable for counting. On the other hand, speckle analysis at the end of a multimode fiber allowed a better strain and deformation determination. Finally, the sophisticated polarimetric configuration seemed to be more powerful and led to impressive findings such as dynamic phenomenon observation. The third and last part of this paper reviews some of the future needs for WIM systems, and the ongoing developments in the intelligent transportation system (ITS) field. Then, the factual report derived from this analysis shows that despite their tremendous potential, fiber optic sensors are almost nonexistent in current ITS worldwide developments.

  3. Fiber-Optic Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris Impact Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Tennyson, R. C.; Morison, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a reliable, lightweight micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) detection system that can be located at strategic positions of "high consequence" to provide real-time warning of a penetration, its location, and the extent of the damage to a spacecraft. The concept is to employ fiber-optic sensors to detect impact damage and penetration of spacecraft structures. The fibers are non-electrical, employ light waves, and are immune to electromagnetic interference. The fiber-optic sensor array can be made as a stand-alone product, being bonded to a flexible membrane material or a structure that is employed as a MMOD shield material. The optical sensors can also be woven into hybrid MMOD shielding fabrics. The glass fibers of the fiber-optic sensor provide a dual purpose in contributing to the breakup of MMOD projectiles. The grid arrays can be made in a modular configuration to provide coverage over any area desired. Each module can be connected to a central scanner instrument and be interrogated in a continuous or periodic mode.

  4. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  5. Fourier transform optical profilometry using fiber optic Lloyd's mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kart, Türkay; Kösoğlu, Gülşen; Yüksel, Heba; İnci, Mehmet Naci

    2014-12-10

    A fiber optic Lloyd's mirror assembly is used to obtain various optical interference patterns for the detection of 3D rigid body shapes. Two types of fiber optic Lloyd's systems are used in this work. The first consists of a single-mode optical fiber and a highly reflecting flat mirror to produce bright and dark strips. The second is constructed by locating a single-mode optical fiber in a v-groove, which is formed by two orthogonal flat mirrors to allow the generation of square-type interference patterns for the desired applications. The structured light patterns formed by these two fiber Lloyd's techniques are projected onto 3D objects. Fringe patterns are deformed due to the object's surface topography, which are captured by a digital CCD camera and processed with a Fourier transform technique to accomplish 3D surface topography of the object. It is demonstrated that the fiber-optic Lloyd's technique proposed in this work is more compact, more stable, and easier to configure than other existing surface profilometry systems, since it does not include any high-cost optical tools such as aligners, couplers, or 3D stages. The fringe patterns are observed to be more robust against environmental disturbances such as ambient temperature and vibrations.

  6. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  7. Improvement of light collection efficiency of lens-coupled YAG screen TV system for a high-voltage electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Tanji, T; Hibino, M; Schauer, P; Autrata, R

    2000-06-15

    A new lens coupling television (TV) system using a YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet: Y(3)Al(5)O(12) : Ce(3+)) single crystal screen has been developed for a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM), and its performance is examined. The system, using a combination of YAG and lenses, is less damaged by high-energy electron irradiation and reduces the influence of X-rays on the image. YAG screens have not been used for lens-coupling systems, because the high refractive index (n = 1.84) of YAG results in a low light collection efficiency for emitted light. This disadvantage is overcome by combining a thin YAG disk screen (thickness; 100 microm) with a glass hemisphere whose refractive index is 1.81. We found that the light intensity is almost the same as that obtained with a conventional P22 powder screen and lenses system. The resolution is about 55 microm on the YAG screen, and this value is 1.3 times higher than that measured by the conventional system. Shading and distortion do not affect TV observation. Detection quantum efficiency, obtained after correction of the channel mixing effect, is about 0.1.

  8. Novel Perturbation-Immune All-Fiber Optical Architecture for Current Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel all-fiber optical architecture for electric current or magnetic field sensing which is immune against temperature and vibration perturbations in a hazardous environment. The architecture is structured by employing the fiber-optic wave plates (quarter, half or full) of the patented invention of the senior author. Experimental results on prototype fiber-optic specimen and on a variety of optical fiber networks confirm the respective theoretical predictions.

  9. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fucai Li; Hideaki Murayama; Kazuro Kageyama; Takehiro Shirai

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber r...

  10. Education kits for fiber optics, optoelectronics, and optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájek, Martin; Švrček, Miroslav

    2007-04-01

    Our company MIKROKOM, s.r.o. is engaged for many years in development of education equipment and kits for fiber optics, optoelectronics and optical communications. We would like to inform competitors of conference about results of this long-time development. Requirements on education kits and equipment in a modern and dynamic area as is optical communications and fiber optics are quite difficult. The education kits should to clearly introduce students to given issue - the most important physical principles and technical approaches, but it should to introduce also to new and modern technologies, which are quickly changing and developing. On the other hand should be these tools and kits reasonable for the schools. In our paper we would like to describe possible ways of development of this education kits and equipment and present our results of long-time work, which covers very wide range. On the one hand we developed equipment and kits for clear demonstration of physical effects using plastic optical fibers POF, next we prepare kits with a glass fibers, which are the most used fibers in practice and after as much as the kits, which covers broad range of passive and active elements of the optical networks and systems and which makes possible to create complex optical transmission connection. This kind of systems with using corresponding tools and equipment introduce the students to properties, manipulation, measurement and usage of optical fibers, traces and many active and passive components. Furthermore, with using different sorts of optical sources, photodetectors, fiber optics couplers etc., students can get acquainted with all optoelectronics transmission system, which uses different sorts of signals. Special part will be devoted also to effort mentioned before - to implement modern technologies such as e.g. Wavelength Division Multiplex (WDM) into the education kits. Our presentation will inform auditors about development of mentioned education kits and

  11. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  12. Re-inventing the fiber-optic textbook: a proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jeff; Hecht, Deborah; Chowdary, Ahsan; Massa, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    It's time to reinvent the textbook to meet the needs of today's students, educators, and self-study readers. Students aren't buying them, and authors and publishers have slowed or stopped revising them keep up with new technology and new pedagogy. We want to demonstrate new possibilities by completely overhauling Understanding Fiber Optics, an introduction to fiber optics originally written by J.H. for self-study and later republished as a textbook for technician training. After five editions that sold over 100,000 copies, its page count nearly doubled and its price soared more than tenfold from its original $16.95. We envision a modular structure to meet the needs of students and instructors. Basic concepts will be covered at an introductory level in a "core book" of some 200-250 pages, suitable for self-study, STEM programs at the high school level, and technician training. Additional separate modules primarily intended for instructors will cover details, such as how to install connectors. All materials will be distributed electronically at low cost, and will include interactive demonstrations, animations, simulations, and audio and video supplements explaining key concepts. Our goal is to keep the best aspects of a well-written and well-illustrated textbook, take advantage of new tools for presenting material to students, and make the whole package readily accessible and affordable to students, instructors, and anyone else wanting a working knowledge of fiber optics. We are developing a proposal to achieve these goals, and looking for partners to help us develop, test and evaluate instructional materials.

  13. Fiber-Optic Monitoring System of Particle Counters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Titov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers development of a fiber-optic system to monitor the counters of particles. Presently, optical counters of particles, which are often arranged at considerable distance from each other, are used to study the saltation phenomenon. For monitoring the counters, can be used electric communication lines.However, it complicates and raises the price of system Therefore, we offered a fiber-optic system and the counter of particles, free from these shortcomings. The difference between the offered counter of particles and the known one is that the input of radiation to the counter and the output of radiation scattering on particles are made by the optical fibers, and direct radiation is entered the optical fiber rather than is delayed by a light trap and can be used for lighting the other counters thereby allowing to use their connection in series.The work involved a choice of the quartz multimode optical fiber for communication, defining the optical fiber and lenses parameters of the counter of particles, and a selection of the radiation source and the photo-detector.Using the theory of light diffraction on a particle, a measuring range of the particle sizes has been determined. The system speed has been estimated, and it has been shown that a range of communication can reach 200km.It should be noted that modulation noise of counters of particles connected in series have the impact on the useful signal. To assess the extent of this influence we have developed a calculation procedure to illustrate that with ten counters connected in series this influence on the signal-to-noise ratio will be insignificant.Thus, it has been shown that the offered fiber-optic system can be used for monitoring the counters of particles across the desertified territories. 

  14. Fiber-Optic Network Architectures for Onboard Avionics Applications Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Ngo, Duc H.

    2003-01-01

    This project is part of a study within the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The main focus of the program is the improvement of air transportation, with particular emphasis on air transportation safety. Current and future advances in digital data communications between an aircraft and the outside world will require high-bandwidth onboard communication networks. Radiofrequency (RF) systems, with their interconnection network based on coaxial cables and waveguides, increase the complexity of communication systems onboard modern civil and military aircraft with respect to weight, power consumption, and safety. In addition, safety and reliability concerns from electromagnetic interference between the RF components embedded in these communication systems exist. A simple, reliable, and lightweight network that is free from the effects of electromagnetic interference and capable of supporting the broadband communications needs of future onboard digital avionics systems cannot be easily implemented using existing coaxial cable-based systems. Fiber-optical communication systems can meet all these challenges of modern avionics applications in an efficient, cost-effective manner. The objective of this project is to present a number of optical network architectures for onboard RF signal distribution. Because of the emergence of a number of digital avionics devices requiring high-bandwidth connectivity, fiber-optic RF networks onboard modern aircraft will play a vital role in ensuring a low-noise, highly reliable RF communication system. Two approaches are being used for network architectures for aircraft onboard fiber-optic distribution systems: a hybrid RF-optical network and an all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) network.

  15. Double-Tubing Encapsulated Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juncheng; Pickrell, Gary; Huang, Zhengyu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Po; Duan, Yuhong; Wang, Anbo

    2003-09-01

    Increasing the efficiency of oil production operations requires improved sensors to supply critical information such as mixed-phase fluid flow, pressure and temperature measurements within the down-hole oil environment. In order to provide robust and reliable fiber optic temperature sensors capable of operating in the harsh down-hole oil environment, where temperatures might exceed 250 °C and pressures might reach 20,000 psi (140 Mpa), a novel type of fiber optic temperature sensor has been developed. This temperature sensor functions as an EFPI (extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric) sensor. One unique contribution of this work is that the glass tubing used is a borosilicate glass with a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and long gauge length, allowing a much higher sensitivity to be achieved, without hysteresis. The sensor structure utilizes a dual tubing design (tubing within a tubing) to allow pressure isolation. An LED light beam is used as the signal interrogation source to remotely interrogate the sensor which may be located tens of thousands of meters away, connected by an optical fiber. A white-light interferometer measurement system is utilized to process the returned interference signal and to precisely determine the length of the Fabry-Perot interferometric cavity. Another unique feature of this work is that the sensor has been packaged with a specially developed hermetic protection process to prevent water penetration and to improve the mechanical integrity of the sensor. This protection process has allowed the successful hydraulic deployment of fiber optic sensors through 3 mm ID stainless steel tubing into a functioning oil well. Data on the resolution, repeatability and pressure sensitivity are presented.

  16. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  17. Anomalous Fiber Optic Gyroscope Signals Observed above Spinning Rings at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Tajmar, M; Seifert, B

    2008-01-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual Earth rotation offset proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the anomalous signals is originating from the rotating helium in our facilities.

  18. Interferometric fiber-optic bending / nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, H; Skorobogatiy, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/micro-displacement sensor based on a plastic dual-core fiber with one end coated with a silver mirror. The two fiber cores are first excited with the same laser beam, the light in each core is then back-reflected at the mirror-coated fiber-end, and, finally, the light from the two cores is made to interfere at the coupling end. Bending of the fiber leads to shifting interference fringes that can be interrogated with a slit and a single photodetector. We find experimentally that the resolution of our bending sensor is ~3x10-4 m-1 for sensing of bending curvature, as well as ~70 nm for sensing of displacement of the fiber tip. We demonstrate operation of our sensor using two examples. One is weighting of the individual micro-crystals of salt, while the other one is monitoring dynamics of isopropanol evaporation.

  19. A rotating inertial navigation system with the rotating axis error compensation consisting of fiber optic gyros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHA Feng; HU Bai-qing; QIN Fang-jun; LUO Yin-bo

    2012-01-01

    An effective and flexible rotation and compensation scheme is designed to improve the accuracy of rotating inertial navigation system (RINS).The accuracy of single-axial RINS is limited by the errors on the rotating axis.A novel inertial measurement unit (IMU) scheme with error compensation for the rotating axis of fiber optic gyros (FOG) RINS is presented.In the scheme,two couples of inertial sensors with similar error characteristics are mounted oppositely on the rotating axes to compensate the sensors error.Without any change for the rotation cycle,this scheme improves the system's precision and reliability,and also offers the redundancy for the system.The results of 36 h navigation simulation prove that the accuracy of the system is improved notably compared with normal strapdown INS,besides the heading accuracy is increased by 3 times compared with single-axial RINS,and the position accuracy is improved by 1 order of magnitude.

  20. Anomalous fiber optic gyroscope signals observed above spinning rings at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajmar, M; Plesescu, F; Seifert, B [Space Propulsion and Advanced Concepts, Austrian Research Centers GmbH - ARC, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)], E-mail: martin.tajmar@arcs.ac.at

    2009-02-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual offset due to Earth's rotation. This deviation is proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the rotating low temperature helium may be the source of our anomalous signals.

  1. Nanostructured Fiber Optic Cantilever Arrays and Hybrid MEMS Sensors for Chemical and Biological Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in nano-/micro-scale sensor fabrication and molecular recognition surfaces offer promising opportunities to develop miniaturized hybrid fiber optic and...

  2. Real-time In-Flight Strain and Deflection Monitoring with Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Dryden's efforts to develop in-flight monitoring based on Fiber Optics. One of the motivating factors for this development was the breakup of the Helios aircraft. On Ikhana the use of fiber optics for wing shape sensing is being developed. They are being used to flight validate fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions on NASA's Ikhana vehicle; validate fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; Assess technical viability and, if applicable, develop methodology and approach to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system, and develop and flight validate advanced approaches to perform active wing shape control.

  3. Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelepouga, Serguei A.; Rue, David M.; Saveliev, Alexei V.

    2011-03-15

    A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

  4. Microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Hee, Hwan Ing; Ng, Soon Huat; Teo, Ju Teng; Yang, Xiufeng; Wang, Dier

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a highly sensitive microbend fiber optic sensor for perioperative pediatric vital signs monitoring that is free from direct contact with skin, cableless, electromagnetic interference free and low cost. The feasibility of our device was studied on infants undergoing surgery and 10 participants ranging from one month to 12 months were enrolled. The sensor was placed under a barrier sheet on the operating table. All patients received standard intraoperative monitoring. The results showed good agreement in heart rate and respiratory rate between our device and the standard physiological monitoring when signals are clean.

  5. Modeling of Nonlinear Signal Distortion in Fiber-Optical Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Johannisson, Pontus

    2013-01-01

    A low-complexity model for signal quality prediction in a nonlinear fiber-optical network is developed. The model, which builds on the Gaussian noise model, takes into account the signal degradation caused by a combination of chromatic dispersion, nonlinear signal distortion, and amplifier noise. The center frequencies, bandwidths, and transmit powers can be chosen independently for each channel, which makes the model suitable for analysis and optimization of resource allocation, routing, and scheduling in large-scale optical networks applying flexible-grid wavelength-division multiplexing.

  6. LFS-90 - A modular system design with fiber optic gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handrich, E.; Bueschelberger, H. J.; Kemmler, M.; Krings, M.

    The general design and the main components of the LFS-90, a fiber optic three-axis rate gyro package intended for flight control applications, are described. The LFS-90 fiber gyro system has a modular structure including a sensor module, an opto-module, a digital control module, and a data processor. With the addition of more modules, the system can be extended to a complete attitude and heading reference system for aerospace applications or a low-cost navigator for land vehicles. LFS-90 test data are presented, including the scale factor, bias, and random walk of the main parameters.

  7. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  8. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J M; Ferriera, T J; Tully, L K; Stephan, P L

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  9. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  10. Intraoral fiber-optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Gutierrez, Dora M.; Everett, Matthew J.; Brown, Steve B.; Langry, Kevin C.; Cox, Weldon R.; Johnson, Paul W.; Roe, Jeffrey N.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic senor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research too.

  11. Intraoral fiber optic-based diagnostic for periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P W; Gutierrez, D M; Everett, M J; Brown, S B; Langry, K C; Colston, B W; Roe, J N

    2000-01-21

    The purpose of this initial study was to begin development of a new, objective diagnostic instrument that will allow simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteases within a single periodontal pocket using a chemical fiber optic sensor. This approach could potentially be adapted to use specific antibodies and chemiluminescence to detect and quantitate virtually any compound and compare concentrations of different compounds within the same periodontal pocket. The device could also be used to assay secretions in salivary ducts or from a variety of wounds. The applicability is, therefore, not solely limited to dentistry and the device would be important both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool.

  12. Femtosecond nonlinear fiber optics in the ionization regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, P; Chang, W; Travers, J C; Nazarkin, A; Nold, J; Joly, N Y; Saleh, M F; Biancalana, F; Russell, P St J

    2011-11-11

    By using a gas-filled kagome-style photonic crystal fiber, nonlinear fiber optics is studied in the regime of optically induced ionization. The fiber offers low anomalous dispersion over a broad bandwidth and low loss. Sequences of blueshifted pulses are emitted when 65 fs, few-microjoule pulses, corresponding to high-order solitons, are launched into the fiber and undergo self-compression. The experimental results are confirmed by numerical simulations which suggest that free-electron densities of ∼10(17) cm(-3) are achieved at peak intensities of 10(14) W/cm(2) over length scales of several centimeters.

  13. Introduction to fiber optics: Sensors for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R Y; Agrawal, Y K

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the introduction of fiber optics, a fusion of science and engineering and describes the materials generally used for its construction along with the procedure used to design the fibers. It gives an idea of the materials used for the construction along with the pros and cons associated with them and various factors governing the emission of ultraviolet, infrared or visible radiations. The central core revolves around the applications of optical fibers in the medical and biomedical field and extending the use of the same in pharmaceutical industry as probes in quality control and dosage form analysis.

  14. Experimental results of fiber optic contrast-sensitive dislocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Palka, N.

    2005-05-01

    The dislocation sensor based on the contrast phenomenon in an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with a 3 x 3 coupler and a semiconductor multimode laser. Periodic contrast oscillations, which depend on a laser spectrum, occur if a measuring arm of the interferometer is elongated. A conception of the elongation sensor that based on linearization of contrast oscillations is shown. Next, a setup of the sensor and signal processing scheme of the sensor is presented. During measurements, for 1-m long sensor we obtained 5-mm measuring range with +/-28-μm uncertainty. Explanation of these differences and conclusion to further research are formulated.

  15. Sampling impairments influence over stealthy fiber-optic signal decryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeminy, Tomer; Sadot, Dan; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-03-01

    Recently we have proposed a method for temporal and spectral stealthy fiber-optic communications. In this technique the signal is spread in the time domain below the noise level and the power spectral density of the signal is spread beneath the noise level in the frequency domain. The power spectral density of the signal is reconstructed by means of sampling which results in coherent addition of the encrypted signal spectral replicas. Hence, the sampling quality plays a major role in the ability to successfully decrypt the received covert signal. In this paper, we mathematically and numerically analyze the effect of sampling impairments over the decryption performance.

  16. Fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-01

    We present a fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective plate. The theoretical model was derived, and simulation analysis of light intensity distribution, reflective plate width, and the distance between fiber probe and reflective plate were conducted in details. The three dimensional received light intensity distribution and the characteristic curve of light intensity were studied as functions of displacement of finite reflective plate. Experiments were carried out to verify the established model. The physical fundamentals and the effect of operating parameters on measuring system performance were revealed in the end.

  17. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  18. Starnet, a fiber optic metropolitan area network with centralized control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacilieri, P.; Caccia, B.; Cardarelli, R.; Carlucci, G. P.; Ciaffoni, O.; Coli, M.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ghiselli, A.; Martini, A.; Medici, G.; Mirabelli, G.; Pace, E.; Santonico, R.; Trasatti, L.; Valente, E.; Valentini, S.

    1989-12-01

    We present here a project involving a new long distance, high speed, fiber optic network with a passive star topology. The medium access mechanism is based on a centralized controller allowing channel reservation. This controller is connected to each station through an independent pair of optical fibers. It grants access using a deterministic scheme (DAMA/ICCC, demand assignment multiple access by independent centrally controlled channel) by means of a Round Robin algorithm allowing a simple implementation of priority levels and very high data channel efficiency. An overview of the first implementation design is given and some experimental results are presented.

  19. Physical layer secret key generation for fiber-optical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Konstantin; Wang, Zhenxing; Trappe, Wade; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-10-07

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method for generating and sharing a secret key using phase fluctuations in fiber optical links. The obtained key can be readily used to support secure communication between the parties. The security of our approach is based on a fundamental asymmetry associated with the optical physical layer: the sophistication of tools needed by an eavesdropping adversary to subvert the key establishment is significantly greater and more costly than the complexity needed by the legitimate parties to implement the scheme. In this sense, the method is similar to the classical asymmetric algorithms (Diffie-Hellman, RSA, etc.).

  20. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  1. Field trial of composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S.; Kawahira, H.; Nakajima, T.; Matsubara, I.; Saito, Y.; Kitayama, Y.

    A composite fiber-optic ground wire (OPGW), which provides additional communication capabilities for system protection and control of overhead power transmission systems has been developed. After laboratory tests, the OPGW was strung along a live power transmission line in a mountainous region and has been confirmed to have sufficient performance to establish a high-speed digital transmission network able to withstand actual conditions. The field line, constructed substantially by existing techniques, has proved that the new OPGW, accessories such as clamps and joint boxes, installation technique, and on-tower splicing method can be effectively utilized to produce a protection and control system with extremely stable characteristics.

  2. Composite cavity based fiber optic Fabry Perot strain sensors demodulated by an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with an electrical scanning mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Yang, Jun; Sun, Weimin; Jin, Wencai; Yuan, Libo; Peng, G. D.

    2008-08-01

    A composite cavity based fiber optic Fabry-Perot strain sensor system, interrogated by a white light source and demodulated by an unbalanced fiber optic Michelson interferometer with an electrical scanning mirror, is proposed and demonstrated. Comparing with the traditional extrinsic fiber optic Fabry-Perot strain sensor, the potential multiplexing capability and the dynamic measurement range are improved simultaneously. At the same time, the measurement stability of the electrical scanning mirror system is improved by the self-referenced signal of the sensor structure.

  3. Geometric calibration and correction for a lens-coupled detector in x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alex; Chen, Peter Y; Morales-Martinez, Alejandro; Panna, Alireza; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Wen, Han

    2017-01-01

    A lens-coupled x-ray camera with a tilted phosphor collects light emission from the x-ray illuminated (front) side of phosphor. Experimentally, it has been shown to double x-ray photon capture efficiency and triple the spatial resolution along the phosphor tilt direction relative to the same detector at normal phosphor incidence. These characteristics benefit grating-based phase-contrast methods, where linear interference fringes need to be clearly resolved. However, both the shallow incident angle on the phosphor and lens aberrations of the camera cause geometric distortions. When tiling multiple images of limited vertical view into a full-field image, geometric distortion causes blurring due to image misregistration. Here, we report a procedure of geometric correction based on global polynomial transformation of image coordinates. The corrected image is equivalent to one obtained with a single full-field flat panel detector placed at the sample plane. In a separate evaluation scan, the position deviations in the horizontal and vertical directions were reduced from 0.76 and 0.028 mm, respectively, to 0.006 and 0.009 mm, respectively, by the correction procedure, which were below the 0.028-mm pixel size of the imaging system. In a demonstration of a phase-contrast imaging experiment, the correction reduced blurring of small structures.

  4. [Lens platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukaszewska-Smyk, Agnieszka; Kałuzny, Józef

    2010-01-01

    The lens platform defines lens structure and lens material. Evolution of lens comprises change in their shape, angulation of haptens and transition of three-piece lens into one-piece lens. The lens fall into two categories: rigid (PMMA) and soft (siliconic, acrylic, colameric). The main lens maaterials are polymers (hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The lens platform has an effect on biocompatibility, bioadhesion, stability of lens in capsule, degree of PCO evolution and sensitiveness to laser damages.

  5. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Homa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications.

  6. Fiber-optic analog-to-NRZ binary conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahmakoun, A.; Reeves, E.

    2015-03-01

    A novel photonic analog-to-binary converter based on the first-order asynchronous delta-sigma modulation (ADSM) has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated. A fiber-optic prototype ADSM system is constructed and characterized. Delta-sigma modulation is a straightforward approach to A/D conversion because in this case an external clocking is not required and demodulation can be simply performed via a low-pass filtering process. To improve signal-to-noise ratio and thus system ENOB, a non-interferometric optical implementation has been constructed. The ADSM is comprised of three photonic devices: an inverted output photonic leaky integrator, bistable quantizer, and positive corrective feedback. The photonic integrator which is a recirculating loop performs the oversampling of an analog input using the cross-gain modulation in an SOA. We will show that the photonic ADSM produces an inverted non-return-to-zero (NRZ) pulse-density modulated output describing an input analog signal. This fiber-optic ADSM converts up to 7.6 MHz analog input at about 30 MS/s and effective ENOB of 6.

  7. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  8. Fiber optic shape sensing for monitoring of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Evan M.; Reaves, Matt; Horrell, Emily; Klute, Sandra; Froggatt, Mark E.

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in materials science have resulted in a proliferation of flexible structures for high-performance civil, mechanical, and aerospace applications. Large aspect-ratio aircraft wings, composite wind turbine blades, and suspension bridges are all designed to meet critical performance targets while adapting to dynamic loading conditions. By monitoring the distributed shape of a flexible component, fiber optic shape sensing technology has the potential to provide valuable data during design, testing, and operation of these smart structures. This work presents a demonstration of such an extended-range fiber optic shape sensing technology. Three-dimensional distributed shape and position sensing is demonstrated over a 30m length using a monolithic silica fiber with multiple optical cores. A novel, helicallywound geometry endows the fiber with the capability to convert distributed strain measurements, made using Optical Frequency-Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), to a measurement of curvature, twist, and 3D shape along its entire length. Laboratory testing of the extended-range shape sensing technology shows

  9. Low-cost fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Hishmeh, G.; Ciszek, P.; Lee, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The ability to detect hydrogen gas leaks economically and with inherent safety is an important technology that could facilitate commercial acceptance of hydrogen fuel in various applications. In particular, hydrogen fueled passenger vehicles will require hydrogen leak detectors to signal the activation of safety devices such as shutoff valves, ventilating fans, alarms, etc. Such detectors may be required in several locations within a vehicle--wherever a leak could pose a safety hazard. It is therefore important that the detectors be very economical. This paper reports progress on the development of low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detectors intended to meet the needs of a hydrogen-fueled passenger vehicle. In the design, the presence of hydrogen in air is sensed by a thin-film coating at the end of a polymer optical fiber. When the coating reacts reversibly with the hydrogen, its optical properties are changed. Light from a central electro-optic control unit is projected down the optical fiber where it is reflected from the sensor coating back to central optical detectors. A change in the reflected intensity indicates the presence of hydrogen. The fiber-optic detector offers inherent safety by removing all electrical power from the leak sites and offers reduced signal processing problems by minimizing electromagnetic interference. Critical detector performance requirements include high selectivity, response speed and durability as well as potential for low-cost production.

  10. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  11. Radioluminescence dosimetry by scintillating fiber optics: the open challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiodini, Norberto; De Mattia, Cristina; Fasoli, Mauro; Mones, Eleonora; Vedda, Anna

    2013-09-01

    In the last decade, the interest in scintillating fiber optics for ionizing radiation monitoring is constantly increasing. Among the fields of possible applications of these sensors, radiation therapy represents a driving force for the research and development of new devices. In fact, the small dimensions of fiber optics based detectors, together with their realtime response, make these systems extremely promising both in quality assurance measurements of intensity modulated radiotherapy beams, and in in-vivo dosimetry. On the other hand, two specific aspects might represent limiting factors: (i) the "stem effect", that is the spurious luminescence originating as a consequence of the irradiation of the light guide, and (ii) the "memory effect", that is the radioluminescence sensitivity increase during prolonged exposition to ionizing radiation, typical of many scintillating materials. These two issues, representing the main challenges to face for the effective use of scintillating fiber as dosimeters in radiotherapy, were studied considering amorphous silica matrices prepared by sol-gel method and doped with europium. The origin of the stem effect was investigated by means of spectral measurements of the doped fibers irradiated with Xrays and electrons of different energies, field sizes and orientations. New approaches for removing the stem effect on the basis of the radioluminescent spectral analysis are presented and discussed. Furthermore, the causes and phenomenology of the memory effect are described, considering also the effect of dose accumulation with different dose rates and energies of ionizing radiation.

  12. 1st International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Arditty, Hervé

    1982-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the application of optical meth­ ods for the measurement of absolute rotation. Active approaches, so-called ring laser gyros, have been under serious development for at least 15 years. More recently, passive approaches using ring resonators or multi turn fiber interferometers have also demonstrated much pro~ise. The only previous conference devoted exclusively to optical rotation sensors, held in 1978 in San Diego, California, was organized by the Society of Photo-optical Instru­ mentation Engineers(S.P.I.E.J. Although the main emphasis at that conference was on ring laser gyros, a number of papers were also included that described the early development of fiber gyroscopes. Since then the field of fiber optic rotation sensors has grown so rapidly that a conference devoted primarily to this subject was needed. The First International Conference on Fiber-Optic Rotation Sensors was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Nove~­ b...

  13. Performance comparison of fiber optic tips in interferrometric displacement measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Anthony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grahn, Rick [UNM; Karimi, Hussain [UCSD; Wilson, Kyle [ROSE HULMAN INSTITUTE OT TECH.

    2010-10-21

    Fiber optic displacement sensors have many potential advantages over traditional displacement measurement techniques, including small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, electrical isolation, and high resolution. In this report, we focus on an interferometric fiber optic sensor, where the gap between the fiber tip and the device under test forms a Fabry-Perot resonant cavity. An optical interrogator measures the reflected intensity at wavelengths ranging from 1510 to 1590 nm. The spacing between resonant frequencies allows us to determine the distance from the tip to the device under test. We consider ferrule connector angled physical contact (FC/APC), ferrule connector ultra physical contact (FC/UPC) and unpolished cleaved tips and compare their influence on sensor performance. A plane wave propagation model is proposed for predicting tip effects. Comparisons are made on the basis of sensor measurement range, resolution, and sensitivity to changes in test conditions. In this paper, we discuss the experimental setup, detail our analysis, and present test results with recommendations for the applications of each tip.

  14. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  15. Use of Fiber Optic Interconnects for Signal Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phal, Yamuna D.; Phal, Deovrat D.

    2016-05-01

    Signal integrity (SI) is always a concern when it comes to high-speed data transmission. Even in space, there is a need for high-speed data transmission such as in the communication systems, monitoring various sub- systems and for other on-board experiments and applications.From Electromagneticperspective, using fiber-optic interconnect is highly recommended to avoid interference issues. This field has been explored for quite some time now, but mostly limited to applications that are on earth. Using these interconnects for harsh and extreme environments i.e. in space, requires reliability and ruggedness of interconnects and the system.This study suggests methods for optical fiber based communication systems for internal unit communication, communication within various instruments, as well as inter-board communication. A conclusion in terms of what areas need to be explored for enabling high-speed data transmission for space applications would be discussed in details. This study also explores and compares the existing technologies in the fiber-optic interconnects for space applications.

  16. Fiber optic temperature profiling for thermal protection heat shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Moslehi, Behzad; Zarnescu, Livia; Hackney, Drew; Peters, Kara

    2014-04-01

    Reliable Thermal Protection System (TPS) sensors are needed to achieve better designs for spacecraft (probe) heatshields for missions requiring atmospheric aero-capture or entry/reentry. In particular, they will allow both reduced risk and heat-shield mass minimization, which will facilitate more missions and allow increased payloads and returns. For thermal measurements, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) is providing a temperature monitoring system involving innovative lightweight, EMI-immune, high-temperature resistant Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors with a thermal mass near that of TPS materials together with fast FBG sensor interrogation. The IFOS fiber optic sensing technology is highly sensitive and accurate. It is also low-cost and lends itself to high-volume production. Multiple sensing FBGs can be fabricated as arrays on a single fiber for simplified design and reduced cost. In this paper, we provide experimental results to demonstrate the temperature monitoring system using multi-sensor FBG arrays embedded in small-size Super-Light Ablator (SLA) coupon, which was thermally loaded to temperatures in the vicinity of the SLA charring temperature. In addition, a high temperature FBG array was fabricated and tested for 1000°C operation.

  17. A fiber optic hybrid multifunctional AC voltage sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovsky, A.; Zadvornov, S. [IRE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryabko, M. [UFD, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Hybrid sensors have the advantages of both electronic and optical technologies. Their sensing element is based on conventional transducers and the optical fiber is used as a transmission media for the optical signal encoded with information between the local module and the remote module. The power supply for the remote module is usually provided by a built-in photoelectric converter illuminated by the optical radiation going through the same or another optical fiber. Electro-optic hybrid sensors have been widely used because of the electrical isolation provided by optical fiber. In the conventional fiber optic voltage sensor, piezoelectric or electro-optic transducers are implemented. Processing and conditioning measurement information is a complex task in these sensors. Moreover, the considerable drawback of most of these systems is that only one parameter, usually voltage value, is measured. This paper presented a novel fiber optic hybrid sensor for alternating current voltage measurements. This instrument provides the simultaneous measurement of four parameters, notably voltage value, frequency, phase angle and the external temperature. The paper described the measurement technology of the instrument including the remote module and optical powering as well as the unique modulation algorithm. The results and conclusions were also presented. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. DNA origami nanorobot fiber optic genosensor to TMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Manzano, Marisa; Srivastava, Sachin K; Marks, Robert S

    2018-01-15

    In the quest of greater sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic systems, one continually searches for alternative DNA hybridization methods, enabling greater versatility and where possible field-enabled detection of target analytes. We present, herein, a hybrid molecular self-assembled scaffolded DNA origami entity, intimately immobilized via capture probes linked to aminopropyltriethoxysilane, onto a glass optical fiber end-face transducer, thus producing a novel biosensor. Immobilized DNA nanorobots with a switchable flap can then be actuated by a specific target DNA present in a sample, by exposing a hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme, which then catalyzes the generation of chemiluminescence, once the specific fiber probes are immersed in a luminol-based solution. Integrating organic nanorobots to inorganic fiber optics creates a hybrid system that we demonstrate as a proof-of-principle can be utilized in specific DNA sequence detection. This system has potential applications in a wide range of fields, including point-of-care diagnostics or cellular in vivo biosensing when using ultrathin fiber optic probes for research purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  20. A fiber optic biosensor for the detection of TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriver-Lake, L.C.; Breslin, K.A.; Golden, J.P.; Choi, J.; Ligler, F.S. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering; Judd, L. [Geo-Centers Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Explosives are one of many hazardous waste problems of concern to the Department of Defense. Defective storage facilities or byproducts of weapons manufacture have led to contamination of soil and water with explosives. Most explosives are toxic, thus posing an ecological and human health hazard. The ability to do on-site or down-stream detection of explosives will be invaluable for site characterization and remediation by saving both time and money. The evanescent wave fiber optic biosensor that was developed at NRL has been modified for the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), by developing a competitive immunoassay on the surface of an optical probe. A fluorescently-labeled analog of TNT, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB), was used as the competitor. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine the best fluorescently-labeled competitor available to be able to achieve high sensitivity in the fiber optic assay. For the competition assay, 7.5 ng/ml Cyanine 5-ethylenediamine-labeled TNB (Cy5-EDA-TNB) was exposed to an antibody-coated optical fiber generating specific signal above background that corresponds to the 100% or reference signal. Inhibition of this signal was observed in the presence of TNT with the percent inhibition proportional to the TNT concentration in the sample. Detection sensitivities in aqueous solutions containing 10 ng/ml TNT (8 ppb) have been achieved using this system.

  1. Fiber optic biosensor for the detection of TNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Breslin, Kristen A.; Golden, Joel P.; Judd, Linda L.; Choi, John; Ligler, Frances S.

    1995-01-01

    Explosives are one of many hazardous waste problems of concern to the Department of Defense. Defective storage facilities or byproducts of weapons manufacture have led to contamination of soil and water with explosives. Most explosives are toxic, thus posing an ecological and human health hazard. The ability to do on-site or down-stream detection of explosives will be invaluable for site characterization and remediation by saving both time and money. The evanescent wave fiber optic biosensor that was developed at NRL has been modified for the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), by developing a competitive immunoassay on the surface of an optical probe. A fluorescently labelled analog of TNT, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB), was used as the competitor. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to determine the best fluorescently labeled competitor available to be able to achieve high sensitivity in the fiber optic assay. For the competition assay, 7.5 ng/ml Cyanine 5-ethylenediamine-labelled TNB (Cy5-EDA-TNB) was exposed to an antibody-coated optical fiber generating specific signal above background that corresponds to the 100% or reference signal. Inhibition of this signal was observed in the presence of TNT with the percent inhibition proportional to the TNT concentration in the sample. Detection sensitivities in aqueous solutions containing 10 ng/ml TNT (8 ppb) have been achieved using this system.

  2. Fiber-Optic Current Sensor Validation with Triggered Lightning Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed that is highly suitable for aircraft installation and can measure total current enclosed in a fiber loop down to DC. Other attributes include being small, light-weight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate when exposed to a magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the induced light polarization rotation in fiber loops yields the total current enclosed. Two sensor systems were constructed and installed at Camp Blanding, Florida, measuring rocket-triggered lightning. The systems were similar in design but with different laser wavelengths, sensitivities and ranges. Results are compared to a shunt resistor as reference. The 850nm wavelength system tested in summer 2011 showed good result comparison early. However, later results showed gradual amplitude increase with time, attributed to corroded connections affecting the 50-ohm output termination. The 1550nm system also yielded good results in the summer 2012. The successful measurements demonstrate the fiber optic sensor's accuracies in capturing real lightning currents, and represent an important step toward future aircraft installation.

  3. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  4. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhic, Michel E.; Andrekson, Peter A.; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time-...... in excess of 14,000 Tb/s x km in realistic wavelength-division multiplexed long-haul networks. Technical challenges remaining to be addressed in order for fiber OPAs to become useful for long-haul communication networks are discussed.......The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time......-modulated signals. A PSA with 1.1-dB noise figure has been demonstrated, and preliminary wavelength-division multiplexing experiments have been performed with PSAs. 512Gb/s have been transmitted over 6,000km by periodic phase conjugation. Simulations indicate that PIAs could reach data rate x reach products...

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor using bifurcated plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M.; Bidin, N.; Yasin, M.

    2016-11-01

    An extrinsic fiber optic vibration sensor is demonstrated for a fiber optic displacement sensor based on a bundled multimode fiber to measure a vibration frequency ranging from 100 until 3000 Hz. The front slope has a sensitivity of 0.1938mV/mm and linearity of 99.7% within a measurement range between 0.15-3.00 mm. By placing the diaphragm of the concave load-speaker within the linear range from the probe, the frequency of the vibration can be measured with error percentage of less than 1.54%. The graph of input against output frequency for low, medium and high frequency range show very high linearity up to 99%. Slope for low, medium, and high frequency range are calculated as 1.0026, 0.9934, and 1.0007 respectively. Simplicity, long term stability, low power consumption, wide dynamic and frequency ranges, noise reduction, ruggedness, linearity and light weight make it promising alternative to other well-establish methods for vibration frequency measurement.

  6. Fiber-Optic Imaging Probe Developed for Space Used to Detect Diabetes Through the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Chenault, Michelle V.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; Sebag, J.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, which can severely impair eyesight by causing cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Cataracts are 1.6 times more common in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, and cataract extraction is the only surgical treatment. In many cases, diabetes-related ocular pathologies go undiagnosed until visual function is compromised. This ongoing pilot project seeks to study the progression of diabetes in a unique animal model by monitoring changes in the lens with a safe, sensitive, dynamic light-scattering probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), has the potential to diagnose cataracts at the molecular level. Recently, a new DLS fiber-optic probe was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for noncontact, accurate, and extremely sensitive particle-sizing measurements in fluid dispersions and suspensions (ref. 1). This compact, portable, and rugged probe is free of optical alignment, offers point-and-shoot operation for various online field applications and challenging environments, and yet is extremely flexible in regards to sample container sizes, materials, and shapes. No external vibration isolation and no index matching are required. It can measure particles as small as 1 nm and as large as few micrometers in a wide concentration range from very dilute (waterlike) dispersions to very turbid (milklike) suspensions. It is safe and fast to use, since it only requires very low laser power (10 nW to 3 mW) with very short data acquisition times (2 to 10 sec).

  7. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  8. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  9. Fiber optic low-coherence Michelson interferometer for silicon growth measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Robert R., Jr.; Lawson, Christopher M.

    1994-02-01

    We report on the use of optical low coherence reflectometry for silicon characterization. The measurement system uses a low coherence light source (edge-emitting LED) in conjunction with a fiber optic Michelson interferometer. This non-contact fiber optic measurement system has been used to measure silicon thickness and flatness to an accuracy of +/- 1.5 micrometers in the laboratory.

  10. Laser Communications and Fiber Optics Lab Manual. High-Technology Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddick, Robert

    This laboratory training manual on laser communications and fiber optics may be used in a general technology-communications course for ninth graders. Upon completion of this exercise, students achieve the following goals: match concepts with laser communication system parts; explain advantages of fiber optic cable over conventional copper wire;…

  11. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  12. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Over the past two decades, fiber optics has emerged as a highly practical and cost-efficient communications technology. Its competitiveness vis-a-vis other transmission media, especially satellite, has become a critical question. This report studies the likely evolution and application of fiber optic networks in the United States to the end of the century. The outlook for the technology of fiber systems is assessed and forecast, scenarios of the evolution of fiber optic network development are constructed, and costs to provide service are determined and examined parametrically as a function of network size and traffic carried. Volume 1 consists of the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic technology and long distance fiber optic networks. Volume 3 develops a traffic and financial model of a nationwide long distance transmission network. Among the study's most important conclusions are: revenue requirements per circuit for LATA-to-LATA fiber optic links are less than one cent per call minute; multiplex equipment, which is likely to be required in any competing system, is the largest contributor to circuit costs; the potential capacity of fiber optic cable is very large and as yet undefined; and fiber optic transmission combined with other network optimization schemes can lead to even lower costs than those identified in this study.

  13. Sensing system with Michelson-type fiber optical interferometer based on single FBG reflector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueliang Zhang; Zhou Meng; Zhengliang Hu

    2011-01-01

    A sensing system, with Michelson-type fiber optical interferometer based on single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as the reflector, is demonstrated. The system used a frequency-matched ring fiber optical laser as the source. The closed Michelson-type fiber optical interferometer system will be helpful in simplifying the developed interferometric sensor by replacing the double reflectors with only one FBG reflecting the double-side light. The basic sensing properties of the system are demonstrated, with a fiber optic piezoelectric ceramic transducer embedded in the arm of the interferometer simulating the sensing signal.%As a simple fiber optic component,fiber Bragg grating (FBG) has been used frequently as a sensor,filter or reflector[1-4],etc.Meanwhile,the Michelson-type fiber optical interferometric sensor has achieved a high level of development in the acoustic,electric,and magnetic field sensors because of its simple and low-cost structure as well as multiplexing advantages.The Michelsontype interferometer has been widely applied with Faraday rotating mirrors (FRMs) or polarization maintaining fiber reflectors particularly in the fiber optic hydrophone system[5,6].At present,further research is aimed at simplifying fiber optical interferometric sensors.

  14. Toward the next fiber optic revolution and decision making in the oil and gas industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Boering, M.; Braal, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber optic data transmission has caused revolutionary developments in the current information society. It was also an eye opener for the Oil & Gas industry when fiber optic-based Distributed Temperature Sensing was introduced in the nineties. Temperature profiles over the entire length of the wellb

  15. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  16. 7 CFR 1755.404 - Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiber optic cable telecommunications plant...) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.404 Fiber optic cable telecommunications...

  17. Analyzing Fourier Transforms for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechtner, Kaitlyn Leann

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a basic overview of the fiber optic technology used for sensing stress, strain, and temperature. Also, the document summarizes the research concerning speed and accuracy of the possible mathematical algorithms that can be used for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system.

  18. Analysis of dead zone sources in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kyoung-Ho; Choi, Woo-Seok; Chong, Kil-To

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the dead zone is among the intensive studies in a closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope. In a dead zone, a gyroscope cannot detect any rotation and produces a zero bias. In this study, an analysis of dead zone sources is performed in simulation and experiments. In general, the problem is mainly due to electrical cross coupling and phase modulation drift. Electrical cross coupling is caused by interference between modulation voltage and the photodetector. The cross-coupled signal produces spurious gyro bias and leads to a dead zone if it is larger than the input rate. Phase modulation drift as another dead zone source is due to the electrode contamination, the piezoelectric effect of the LiNbO3 substrate, or to organic fouling. This modulation drift lasts for a short or long period of time like a lead-lag filter response and produces gyro bias error, noise spikes, or dead zone. For a more detailed analysis, the cross-coupling effect and modulation phase drift are modeled as a filter and are simulated in both the open-loop and closed-loop modes. The sources of dead zone are more clearly analyzed in the simulation and experimental results.

  19. In-Line Fiber Optic Interferometric Sensors in Single-Mode Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Wen Duan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It’s known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, we review two kinds of typical in-line fiber optic interferometers formed in single-mode fibers fabricated with different post-processing techniques. Also, some recently reported specific technologies for fabricating such fiber optic interferometers are presented.

  20. Feasibility of Ultra-Thin Fiber-Optic Dosimeters for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongsoo Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, prototype ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters were fabricated using organic scintillators, wavelength shifting fibers, and plastic optical fibers. The sensor probes of the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters consisted of very thin organic scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 150 and 200 μm. These types of sensors cannot only be used to measure skin or surface doses but also provide depth dose measurements with high spatial resolution. With the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, surface doses for gamma rays generated from a Co-60 therapy machine were measured. Additionally, percentage depth doses in the build-up regions were obtained by using the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, and the results were compared with those of external beam therapy films and a conventional fiber-optic dosimeter.

  1. Multisensor transducer based on a parallel fiber optic digital-to-analog converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grechishnikov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered possibility of creating a multisensory information converter (MSPI based on new fiber-optic functional element-digital-to-analog (DAC fiber optic converter. The use of DAC fiber-optic provides jamming immunity combined with low weight and cost of indicators .Because of that MSPI scheme was developed based on parallel DAC fiber-optic (Russian Federation Patent 157416. We came up with an equation for parallel DAC fiber-optic. An eleborate general mathematical model of the proposed converter. Developed a method for reducing conversion errors by placing the DAC transfer function between i and i + 1 ADC quantization levels. By using this model it allows you to obtain reliable information about the technical capabilities of a converter without the need for costly experiments.

  2. Feasibility study on fiber-optic goniometer for measuring knee joint angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic goniometer using a plastic optical fiber, a light-emitting diode, and a photodiode. The cladding of the plastic optical fiber was removed at 0.5-3mm intervals regularly to increase the bending loss of the plastic optical fiber. Also, the output voltages of the photodiode based on light intensity that measured using the fiber-optic goniometer were measured light intensities using the fiber-optic goniometer were measured to evaluate the linearity of the fiber-optic goniometer. Finally, we measured the responses of the fiber-optic goniometer for gait speeds of 3, 5, and 10 km/h using a data acquisition board and a LabVIEW program.

  3. Design of high-capacity fiber-optic transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhi Ming

    2001-08-01

    We study the design of fiber-optic transport systems and the behavior of fiber amplifiers/lasers with the aim of achieving higher capacities with larger amplifier spacing. Solitons are natural candidates for transmitting short pulses for high-capacity fiber-optic networks because of its innate ability to use two of fiber's main defects, fiber dispersion and fiber nonlinearity to balance each other. In order for solitons to retain its dynamic nature, amplifiers must be placed periodically to restore powers to compensate for fiber loss. Variational analysis is used to study the long-term stability of a periodical- amplifier system. A new regime of operation is identified which allows the use of a much longer amplifier spacing. If optical fibers are the blood vessels of an optical communication system, then the optical amplifier based on erbium-doped fiber is the heart. Optical communication systems can avoid the use of costly electrical regenerators to maintain system performance by being able to optically amplify the weakened signals. The length of amplifier spacing is largely determined by the gain excursion experienced by the solitons. We propose, model, and demonstrate a distributed erbium-doped fiber amplifier which can drastically reduce the amount of gain excursion experienced by the solitons, therefore allowing a much longer amplifier spacing and superior stability. Dispersion management techniques have become extremely valuable tools in the design of fiber-optic communication systems. We have studied in depth the advantage of different arnplification schemes (lumped and distributed) for various dispersion compensation techniques. We measure the system performance through the Q factor to evaluate the added advantage of effective noise figure and smaller gain excursion. An erbium-doped fiber laser has been constructed and characterized in an effort to develop a test bed to study transmission systems. The presence of mode-partition noise in an erbium

  4. Dual permeability FEM models for distributed fiber optic sensors development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-López, Juan Pablo; Bogaard, Thom

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic cables are commonly known for being robust and reliable mediums for transferring information at the speed of light in glass. Billions of kilometers of cable have been installed around the world for internet connection and real time information sharing. Yet, fiber optic cable is not only a mean for information transfer but also a way to sense and measure physical properties of the medium in which is installed. For dike monitoring, it has been used in the past for detecting inner core and foundation temperature changes which allow to estimate water infiltration during high water events. The DOMINO research project, aims to develop a fiber optic based dike monitoring system which allows to directly sense and measure any pore pressure change inside the dike structure. For this purpose, questions like which location, how many sensors, which measuring frequency and which accuracy are required for the sensor development. All these questions may be initially answered with a finite element model which allows to estimate the effects of pore pressure change in different locations along the cross section while having a time dependent estimation of a stability factor. The sensor aims to monitor two main failure mechanisms at the same time; The piping erosion failure mechanism and the macro-stability failure mechanism. Both mechanisms are going to be modeled and assessed in detail with a finite element based dual permeability Darcy-Richards numerical solution. In that manner, it is possible to assess different sensing configurations with different loading scenarios (e.g. High water levels, rainfall events and initial soil moisture and permeability conditions). The results obtained for the different configurations are later evaluated based on an entropy based performance evaluation. The added value of this kind of modelling approach for the sensor development is that it allows to simultaneously model the piping erosion and macro-stability failure mechanisms in a time

  5. Compensation of chromatic and polarization mode dispersion in fiber-optic communication lines in microwave signals transmittion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaev, A. N.; Krishpents, G. P.; Davydov, V. V.; Vysoczkiy, M. G.

    2016-08-01

    Methods of dispersion compensation in fiber-optic communication lines. A new proposed method of electronic dispersion compensation in the transmission of microwave signals through fiber-optic lines. Represents is proposed the results of experimental studies of this method.

  6. Fiber Optic Thermo-Hygrometers for Soil Moisture Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Marco; Principe, Sofia; Consales, Marco; Parente, Roberto; Laudati, Armando; Caliro, Stefano; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2017-06-20

    This work deals with the fabrication, prototyping, and experimental validation of a fiber optic thermo-hygrometer-based soil moisture sensor, useful for rainfall-induced landslide prevention applications. In particular, we recently proposed a new generation of fiber Bragg grating (FBGs)-based soil moisture sensors for irrigation purposes. This device was realized by integrating, inside a customized aluminum protection package, a FBG thermo-hygrometer with a polymer micro-porous membrane. Here, we first verify the limitations, in terms of the volumetric water content (VWC) measuring range, of this first version of the soil moisture sensor for its exploitation in landslide prevention applications. Successively, we present the development, prototyping, and experimental validation of a novel, optimized version of a soil VWC sensor, still based on a FBG thermo-hygrometer, but able to reliably monitor, continuously and in real-time, VWC values up to 37% when buried in the soil.

  7. Fiber Optic Thermo-Hygrometers for Soil Moisture Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Leone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the fabrication, prototyping, and experimental validation of a fiber optic thermo-hygrometer-based soil moisture sensor, useful for rainfall-induced landslide prevention applications. In particular, we recently proposed a new generation of fiber Bragg grating (FBGs-based soil moisture sensors for irrigation purposes. This device was realized by integrating, inside a customized aluminum protection package, a FBG thermo-hygrometer with a polymer micro-porous membrane. Here, we first verify the limitations, in terms of the volumetric water content (VWC measuring range, of this first version of the soil moisture sensor for its exploitation in landslide prevention applications. Successively, we present the development, prototyping, and experimental validation of a novel, optimized version of a soil VWC sensor, still based on a FBG thermo-hygrometer, but able to reliably monitor, continuously and in real-time, VWC values up to 37% when buried in the soil.

  8. Infrared fiber optic probes for evaluation of musculoskeletal tissue pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalkar, Mugdha; McGoverin, Cushla; Onigbanjo, Quam; Spencer, Richard; Barbash, Scott; Kropf, Eric; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pathology of the knee commonly occurs with aging and as a result of injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries continues to increase annually, and may precede the eventual onset of osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating and prevalent disease characterized by cartilage degeneration. Early detection of OA remains elusive, with current imaging methods lacking adequate sensitivity to detect early pathologic cartilage changes. We used mid- and near- infrared (IR) spectroscopy through arthroscopic-based fiber-optic devices to assess cartilage damage and differentiate tendon from ligament. Mid-IR spectroscopy is characterized by distinct bands and low penetration depth (ligaments and tendons. We discuss here basic science studies and the potential for translation to clinical research with novel arthroscopic probes.

  9. Thin film technologies for optoelectronic components in fiber optic communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinati, Agostino

    1998-02-01

    'The Asian Routes Towards the Global Information Society' and 'Towards a Strategic Planning for the Global Information Society' will be the forum themes of 'Asia Telecom 97' and 'Telecom Interactice 97' events respectively, to be held by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in order to further telecommunication development around the world. International telecommunications network affects our life by keeping us in touch, bringing us world news and underpinning the global economy. Global tele-economy, global information infrastructure, global information society terms are more and more used to indicate the evolution towards an information- driven world where the access to information, communication and technologies is essential to the economic and social development in every country. Telecommunication industry can strongly contribute to this evolution together with broadcasting and computer industry, and fiber optic communications are expected to continue to grow up and share a relevant part of the total telecom market. In 1995 telecom market shown a 3.8 percent worldwide investment growth reaching a 545 billion value. According to 'Kessler Marketing Intelligence (KMI) Corp.' analysis of fiberoptics and multimedia market the amount of cabled fiber installed in U.S. will be around 11 million fiber-km in 1997 and 15 million fiber-km are predicted in the year 2000. Between 1995 and 1998 the undersea industry is estimated to deal with 13.9 billion as additional undersea cable systems investment in the global telecom network. In China beside satellite telecom stations and digital microwave systems 22 fiber optic backbones have been realized and another 23 systems are expected to be built in the Ninth Five-Year National Plan (1996 to approximately 2000) with a total length of nearly 30,000 sheat-km. The study, Fiber and Fiberoptic Cable Markets in China, recently released by KMI Corp. shows that fiber optic cable installation by MPT and other network operators

  10. Fiber-optic gyro location of dome azimuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, John W.

    2016-07-01

    The 2.1-m Otto Struve Telescope, world's second largest in 1939, today has modern motion control and superb tracking, yet the 19-m-diameter Art Deco dome has resisted many attempts to record its azimuth electronically. Demonstrated in January 2016, a small tactical-grade fiber-optic gyro located anywhere on the rotating structure, aided by a few fiducial points to zero gyro drift, adequately locates the azimuth. The cost of a gyro is practically independent of dome size, offering an economical solution for large domes that cannot be easily encoded with conventional systems. The 100-Hz sampling is capable of revealing anomalies in the rotation rate, valuable for preventive maintenance on any dome. I describe software methods and time series analysis to integrate angular velocity to dome azimuth; transformation of telescope hour angle and declination into required dome azimuth, using a formula that accounts for a cross-axis mount inside an offset dome; and test results.

  11. Signal processing for all fiber optical current transducer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴焕斗; 祖静; 陈鸿

    2008-01-01

    The work principle of all fiber optical current transducer (AFOCT) was introduced. By analyzing the characteristic of photo-detector’s output, a measurement and signal processing scheme based on sine wave modulation and demodulation was put forward for eliminating the influence of light intensity change and modulation degree change. A digital signal processing system and a calibration scheme were also advanced. The experimental data show that the mean ratio error is 0.016 74% for direct current and 0.035% for alternating current, and the correlation coefficient of linearity is up to 0.999 982 4, meeting the precision requirement of 0.2 grade. Stability experiments and temperature drift experiments show the AFOCT has a better stable capability.

  12. Crack detection using multimode fiber optical time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanser, Keith H.; Voss, Karl F.

    1994-09-01

    Results of measurements of longitudinal and transverse crack growth using multimode fiber optical time domain reflectometry are presented. Crack detection thresholds less than 0.1 millimeter are readily achieved with OTDR. A sensor package design has been developed to provide controllable directional response characteristics. In particular, a method to eliminate the orientation angle problem and yield omnidirectional sensor response characteristics has been discovered. Results are reported on a novel all-fiber sensor capable of sensing 10 micrometers crack displacements while surviving and sensing 150% strains and displacements of 6 mm. Transmission measurements of the sensor using white light are also reported. The method is suitable for distributed sensing applications covering large areas of structures and adaptable to response enhancements required for real time structural monitoring at rates on the order of hundreds of Hertz. Applications include bridges, buildings, main-steam pipelines, and offshore platforms.

  13. Adaptive fiber optics collimator based on flexible hinges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Pengfei; Si, Lei; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2014-08-20

    In this manuscript, we present a new design for an adaptive fiber optics collimator (AFOC) based on flexible hinges by using piezoelectric stacks actuators for X-Y displacement. Different from traditional AFOC, the new structure is based on flexible hinges to drive the fiber end cap instead of naked fiber. We fabricated a real AFOC based on flexible hinges, and the end cap's deviation and resonance frequency of the device were measured. Experimental results show that this new AFOC can provide fast control of tip-tilt deviation of the laser beam emitting from the end cap. As a result, the fiber end cap can support much higher power than naked fiber, which makes the new structure ideal for tip-tilt controlling in a high-power fiber laser system.

  14. Two-interferometer fiber optic sensor with disturbance localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. This sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer do not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is also presented. During research of the laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 40m along the 6-km long sensor.

  15. Probing the ultimate limit of fiber-optic strain sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, G; Salza, M; Avino, S; Ferraro, P; De Natale, P

    2010-11-19

    The measurement of relative displacements and deformations is important in many fields such as structural engineering, aerospace, geophysics, and nanotechnology. Optical-fiber sensors have become key tools for strain measurements, with sensitivity limits ranging between 10(-9) and 10(-6)ε hertz (Hz)(-1/2) (where ε is the fractional length change). We report on strain measurements at the 10(-13)ε-Hz(-1/2) level using a fiber Bragg-grating resonator with a diode-laser source that is stabilized against a quartz-disciplined optical frequency comb, thus approaching detection limits set by thermodynamic phase fluctuations in the fiber. This scheme may provide a route to a new generation of strain sensors that is entirely based on fiber-optic systems, which are aimed at measuring fundamental physical quantities; for example, in gyroscopes, accelerometers, and gravity experiments.

  16. Digitalization optical open loop test system for fiber optic gyroscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deng-wei; SHU Xiao-wu; MU Xu-dong; LIU Cheng

    2006-01-01

    In order to receive and process the open loop signal from fiber optic gyroscopes speedily,stably and expediently,and to realize the amity interface between human and machine,a digital system that can convert GPIB (general purpose interface bus ) parallel bus into Universal Serial Bus is developed.All the interface functions of GP1B and the hardware system are realized through FPGA.With a digital sampling and processing system designed with VC++ in Windows platform,the real-time controlling procedure,high-speed receiving and sending data can be carried out,and the results can be displayed too.So the design of the system is flexible,the reliability and the stability are improved,error rate is no more than 10-11,the highest bit rate is 8 MB/s and the open loop detection system for optic fiber gyros achieves standardization and complete digitalization simultaneously.

  17. Short-pulse propagation in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina

    and can operate with a potentially low noise figure with respect to erbium-doped fiber amplifiers and Raman amplifiers, when working in phase-sensitive configurations. A characterization of the signal distortion mechanisms introduced by FOPAs is relevant for investigating the applicability of FOPAs......Fiber optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) are attractive because they can provide large gain over a broad range of central wavelengths, depending only on the availability of a suitable pump laser. In addition, FOPAs are suitable for the realization of all-optical signal processing functionalities...... transfer can be reduced in saturated F OPAs. In order to characterize propagation impairments such as dispersion and Kerr effect, affecting signals reaching multi-terabit per second per channel, short pulses on the order of 500 fs need to be considered. Therefore, a short pulses fiber laser source...

  18. Design and properties study of fiber optic glucose biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Jiang(姜德生); Er Liu(刘尔); Xin Chen(陈兴); Jun Huang(黄俊)

    2003-01-01

    A new type of fiber optic glucose biosensor based on fluorescence quenching has been designed and itsproperties have been studied. Glucose can be oxidized by oxygen when glucose oxidase are used as thecatalyst, therefore, the concentration of glucose can be measured by detecting the consumption of oxygen.For the detection of oxygen concentration, the ruthenium(Ⅱ) complex, Ru(bpy)3Cl2, were used as thefluorescence indicator and its fluorescence lifetime were detected by lock-in technology. The detectingrange of the sensor is 50 - 500 mg/dl and its response time is 30 seconds, showing that this kind of sensorsis possible to be used in clinical diagnosis and detection.

  19. Imaging port wine stains by fiber optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiyong; Gu, Ying; Xue, Ping; Guo, Jin; Shen, Tingmei; Wang, Tianshi; Huang, Naiyan; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Haixia; Yu, Xin; Wei, Xunbin

    2010-05-01

    We develop a fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in the clinical utility of imaging port wine stains (PWS). We use our OCT system on 41 patients with PWS to document the difference between PWS skin and contralateral normal skin. The system, which operates at 4 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 10 and 9 μm, respectively, in the skin tissue, can clearly distinguish the dilated dermal blood vessels from normal tissue. We present OCT images of patients with PWS and normal human skin. We obtain the structural parameters, including epidermal thickness and diameter and depth of dilated blood vessels. We demonstrate that OCT may be a useful tool for the noninvasive imaging of PWS. It may help determine the photosensitizer dose and laser parameters in photodynamic therapy for treating port wine stains.

  20. Thin film metal coated fiber optic hydrophone probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath Minasamudram, Rupa; Arora, Piyush; Gandhi, Gaurav; Daryoush, Afshin S; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A; Lewin, Peter A

    2009-11-01

    Our purpose is to improve the performance sensitivity of a fiber sensor used as a fiber optic hydrophone probe (FOHP) by the addition of nanoscale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of approximately 9 mum. The performance sensitivity of straight cleaved (i.e., full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated, and tapered thin film gold-coated fiber sensors was compared in the frequency range from 1.5 to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic amplitude pressure levels as high as 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of -245 dB relative to 1 V/muPa (560 mV/MPa) was measured for a thin film gold-coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness.

  1. New composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, S.; Kitayama, Y.; Ona, A.; Shimada, S.; Kikuta, T.

    1986-11-01

    A composite fiber-optic overhead ground wire (OPGW) has already been used commercially. Most of the electric power companies have the plans to establish new telecommunication networks by means of OPGW, and it is greatly needed to develop OPGW which has a maximum number of fibers for specific ground wire size with low transmission loss, easy handling and higher reliability. We have developed New OPGW, which satisfies these demands. It has the following features: (1) 18 fibers within 75 sq mm ground wire. (2) The fiber is a pure silica core and a fluorine-doped cladding single mode fiber with the average transmission loss of 0.4 dB/km at 1.3 micron. (3) Six fibers are stranded into a compact bunch and three bunches are housed in the spiral grooves of an aluminum spacer.

  2. Fiber Coupled Laser Diodes with Even Illumination Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical fiber for evenly illuminating a target. The optical fiber is coupled to a laser emitting diode and receives laser light. The la ser light travels through the fiber optic and exits at an exit end. T he exit end has a diffractive optical pattern formed thereon via etch ing, molding or cutting, to reduce the Gaussian profile present in co nventional fiber optic cables The reduction of the Gaussian provides an even illumination from the fiber optic cable.

  3. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing of Recharge Basin Percolation Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Allen, E. M.; Hutchinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Infiltration (spreading) basins are a central component of managed aquifer and recovery operations around the world. The concept is simple. Water is percolated into an aquifer where it can be withdrawn at a later date. However, managing infiltration basins can be complicated by entrapped air in sediments, strata of low permeability, clogging of the recharge surface, and biological growth, among other factors. Understanding the dynamics of percolation in light of these complicating factors provides a basis for making management decisions that increase recharge efficiency. As an aid to understanding percolation dynamics, fiber optic distribute temperature sensing (DTS) was used to track heat as a tracer of water movement in an infiltration basin. The diurnal variation of temperature in the basin was sensed at depth. The time lag between the oscillating temperature signal at the surface and at depth indicated the velocity of water percolation. DTS fiber optic cables were installed horizontally along the basin and vertically in boreholes to measure percolation behavior. The horizontal cable was installed in trenches at 0.3 and 1 m depth, and the vertical cable was installed using direct push technology. The vertical cable was tightly wound to produce a factor of 10 increase in spatial resolution of temperature measurements. Temperature was thus measured every meter across the basin and every 10 cm to a depth of 10 m. Data from the trenched cable suggested homogeneous percolation across the basin, but infiltration rates were a function of stage indicating non-ideal percolation. Vertical temperature monitoring showed significant lateral flow in sediments underlying the basin both during saturation and operation of the basin. Deflections in the vertical temperature profile corresponded with fine grained layers identified in core samples indicating a transient perched water table condition. The three-dimensional flow in this relatively homogenous surficial geology calls

  4. A novel fiber optic spectrophotometric determination of nitrite using Safranin O and cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Hayati; Giray, Derya; Ceylan, Burak; Apak, Reşat

    2011-09-30

    A novel fiber optic spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in different samples is suggested, based on the reaction of nitrite with Safranin O in acidic medium to form a diazo-safranin, which is subsequently coupled with pyrogallol in alkaline medium to form a highly stable, red azo dye, followed by cloud point extraction (CPE) using a mixed micelle of a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-114, with an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The reaction and extraction conditions (e.g., acidity for diazotization and alkalinity for pyrogallol coupling, and other reagent concentrations, time, and tolerance to other ions) were optimized. Linearity was obeyed in a concentration range up to 230 μg L(-1), and the detection limit of the method is 0.5 μg L(-1) of nitrite ion. The molar absorptivity for nitrite of the Safranin-diazonium salt (ɛ(610 nm) =4 × 10(3) L mol(-1)cm(-1)) existing in literature was greatly enhanced by pyrogallol coupling and CPE enrichment (ɛ(592 nm)=1.39 × 10(5) L mol(-1)cm(-1)). The method was applied to the determination of nitrite in tap water, lake water and milk samples with an optimal preconcentration factor of 20.

  5. Fiber optic temperature sensor using a Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu thermographic phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.V. [Bethel Coll., St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Smith, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report details the development and testing of a thermographic-phosphor-based fiber-optic temperature sensor. The sensor is constructed by removing a region of the fiber jacket and cladding, then coating the exposed core with yttrium oxysulfide doped with a europium activator (Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu). When photoexcited, the europium in the host lattice emits a sharp-line fluorescence spectrum that is characteristic of the temperature of the host crystal lattice. By measuring fluorescence lifetimes, we can deduce the temperature of an optical fiber that is in thermal contact with the fiber. Two different distributions of Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu in the cladding region were evaluated with regard to light coupling efficiency. Theoretical waveguide calculations indicate that a thin core/cladding boundary distribution of Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu couples light more efficiently into the cores guided modes than does a bulk distribution of phosphor in the cladding. The sensor tests showed reproducible response from 20 to 180 degrees Celsius. This technique has several advantages over other fiber optic temperature sensing techniques: the temperature measurement is independent of the strain applied to the fiber; the measurements are potentially accurate to within half a degree centigrade; the sensor allows temperature to be measured at precise locations; and the method doesn`t preclude the use of the fiber for the simultaneous measurement of other parameters.

  6. Bit error rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-06-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  7. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  8. Design of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Cholesterol Detection in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Permata, A. N.; Eka, D.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A fiber optic sensor is to detect the cholesterol content in blood serum-based biosensor using plastic optical fiber that has been designed. The fiber optic sensor designed with sensing area was a fiber optic grated by 5 scratches then given bending treatment by 5 cm. The first test was by UV-Vis spectrometer with linearity of 0.96. The second test was by light spectrometer with linearity in white LED of 0.94. Optical fiber sensors were made to work well on a range of blood serum concentration of 140 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL.

  9. Cost-effective add-drop fiber optic microcell system for CDMA cellular network evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jong M.; Ham, David; Song, Myoung H.; Son, Yong S.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a cost effective add-drop fiber-optic microcell system for CDMA cellular network. The add-drop microcell is compatible with the existing PCS or digital cellular services (DCS) systems & networks. The proposed fiber-optic add-drop access network is independent of the different channels and gives flexibility in evolution scenarios. This add-drop network provides the optimum solution to cut-down the additional rental fees by sharing the existing fiber-optic cable for cellular/PCS service providers who want to provide third generation services.

  10. Quantitative cognitive-test characterization of reconnectable implantable fiber-optic neurointerfaces for optogenetic neurostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, I V; Ivashkina, O I; Pochechuev, M S; Roshchina, M A; Toropova, K A; Fedotov, A B; Anokhin, K V; Zheltikov, A M

    2017-02-23

    Cognitive tests on representative groups of freely behaving transgenic mice are shown to enable a quantitative characterization of reconnectable implantable fiber-optic neurointerfaces for optogenetic neurostimulation. A systematic analysis of such tests provides a robust quantitative measure for the cognitive effects induced by fiber-optic neurostimulation, validating the performance of fiber-optic neurointerfaces for long-term optogenetic brain stimulations and showing no statistically significant artifacts in the behavior of transgenic mice due to interface implantation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Scintillating balloon-enabled fiber-optic system for radionuclide imaging of atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Raiyan T; Kosuge, Hisanori; Carpenter, Colin; Sun, Conroy; McConnell, Michael V; Xing, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies coronary artery disease, the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Detection of coronary plaque inflammation remains challenging. In this study, we developed a scintillating balloon-enabled fiber-optic radionuclide imaging (SBRI) system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of plaque imaging using (18)F-FDG, a marker of vascular inflammation, and tested it in a murine model. The fiber-optic system uses a Complementary Metal-Oxide Silicon (CMOS) camera with a distal ferrule terminated with a wide-angle lens. The novelty of this system is a scintillating balloon in the front of the wide-angle lens to image light from the decay of (18)F-FDG emission signal. To identify the optimal scintillating materials with respect to resolution, we calculated the modulation transfer function of yttrium-aluminum-garnet doped with cerium, anthracene, and calcium fluoride doped with europium (CaF2:Eu) phosphors using an edge pattern and a thin-line optical phantom. The scintillating balloon was then fabricated from 10 mL of silicone RTV catalyst mixed with 1 mL of base and 50 mg of CaF2:Eu per mL. The addition of a lutetium oxyorthosilicate scintillating crystal (500 μm thick) to the balloon was also investigated. The SBRI system was tested in a murine atherosclerosis model: carotid-ligated mice (n = 5) were injected with (18)F-FDG, followed by ex vivo imaging of the macrophage-rich carotid plaques and nonligated controls. Confirmatory imaging of carotid plaques and controls was also performed by an external optical imaging system and autoradiography. Analyses of the different phosphors showed that CaF2:Eu enabled the best resolution of 1.2 μm. The SBRI system detected almost a 4-fold-higher radioluminescence signal from the ligated left carotid artery than the nonligated right carotid: 1.63 × 10(2) ± 4.01 × 10(1) vs. 4.21 × 10(1) ± 2.09 × 10(0) (photon counts), P = 0.006. We found no significant benefit to adding a

  12. Measurement of imaging properties of scintillating fiber optic plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentai, George; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Star-Lack, Josh; Virshup, Gary; Hirsh, Hayley; Shedlock, Daniel; Humber, David

    2014-03-01

    Scintillating Fiber Optic Plates (SFOP) or Fiber Optic Scintillator (FOS) made with scintillating fiber-glass, were investigated for x-ray imaging. Two different samples (T x W x L = 2cm x 5cm x 5cm) were used; Sample A: 10μm fibers, Sample B: 50μm fibers both with statistically randomized light absorbing fibers placed in the matrix. A customized holder was used to place the samples in close contact with photodiodes in an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (AS1000, Varian), typically used for portal imaging. The detector has a 392μm pixel pitch and in the standard configuration uses a gadolinium oxy-sulphide (GOS) screen behind a copper plate. X-ray measurements were performed at 120kV (RQA 9 spectrum), 1MeV (5mm Al filtration) and 6MeV (Flattening Filter Free) for Sample A and the latter 2 spectra for Sample B. A machined edge was used for MTF measurements. The measurements showed the MTF degraded with increased X-ray energies because of the increase in Compton scattering. However, at the Nyquist frequency of 1.3lp/mm, the MTF is still high (FOS value vs. Cu+GOS): (a) 37% and 21% at 120kVp for the 10μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays, (b) 31%, 20% and 20% at 1MeV and (c) 17%, 11% and 14% at 6MeV for the 10μm FOS, 50μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays. The DQE(0) value comparison were (a) at 120kV ~24% and ~13 % for the 10μm FOS and the Cu+GOS arrays (b) at 1MV 10%, 10% and 7% and (c) at 6MV 12%, ~19% and 1.6% for the 10μm FOS , 50μm FOS and Cu+GOS arrays.

  13. High-Speed Fiber Optic Micromultiplexer for Space and Airborne Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA Earth Science Division need for high-speed fiber optic multiplexers for next generation lidar systems, Luminit proposes to develop a new Fiber...

  14. Radiation Hardened High Speed Fiber Optic Transceivers for Extreme Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program develops fiber optic transceivers that offer wide bandwidth (1 Mbps to 10 Gbps) and operate in space environments targeted by NASA for robotic...

  15. Monolithic, High-Speed Fiber-Optic Switching Array for Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II effort will develop a 1 x 10 prototype non-mechanical fiber optic switch for use with high power lasers. The proposed optical device is a...

  16. Fiber Optic Mass Flow Gauge for Liquid Cryogenic Fuel Facilities Monitoring and Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal describes a fiber optic mass flow gauge that will aid in managing liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel storage and transport. The increasing...

  17. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  18. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations has teamed with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  19. High-Frequency Flush Mounted Miniature LOX Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations is teaming with the University of Alabama, Huntsville, to develop a miniature flush-mounted fiber-optic pressure sensor that will allow accurate,...

  20. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerveagents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolaseimmobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiberbundle....

  1. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  2. A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its array for gene detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its arrayfor the simultaneous detection of multiple genes is described. The optical fibers were first treated with poly-l-lysine, and then were made into fiber-optic DNA biosensors by adsorbing and immobilizing the oligonucleotide probe on its end. By assembling the fiber-optic DNA biosensors in a bundle in which each fiber carried a different DNA probe, the fiber-optic DNA biosensor array was well prepared. Hybridization of fluorescent- labeled cDNA of p53 gene, N-ras gene and Rb1 gene to the DNA array was monitored by CCD camera. A good result was achieved.

  3. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI. This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented.

  4. Advanced Modular, Multi-Channel, High Speed Fiber Optic Sensing System for Acoustic Emissions Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations based on ultra-light-weight, ultra-high-speed, multi-channel,...

  5. Fiber optic sensor solutions for increase of efficiency and availability of electric power generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Villnow, M.

    2010-09-01

    Multiple fiber optic sensors have been developed for strain, vibration, temperature, magnetic field and air flow measurement in electric power generators. This paper describes the recent state of development and reports about todays field experience.

  6. Monitoring applications of power generators for the increase of energy efficiency using novel fiber optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villnow, Michael; Willsch, Michael; Bosselmann, Thomas; Schmauss, Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    To verify optimization measures of power generators to improve the energy efficiency and to monitor critical parameters, fiber optical sensors have been developed and investigated. A fiber optical hot wire anemometer based on the thermooptic effect of Fiber Bragg Gratings was investigated to measure the flow distribution along the stator core. Fiber optical magnetic field sensors, based on the strain-optic effect of FBGs, were used to measure the magnetic field distribution on the end windings of a power generator. A novel fiber-optical accelerometer was used to measure the end winding vibrations. In this paper the functionality of each sensor is described and results of field test under real conditions are shown and discussed.

  7. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  8. McCullough to Liberty fiber optics project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to replace an existing overhead static wire with a shield wire that contains optical fibers (OPGW) on transmission lines from McCullough Substation, south of Las Vegas, Nevada, to Liberty Substation near Phoenix, Arizona. The replacement will occur on the McCullough-Davis, Davis-Parker No. 2, and Parker-Liberty No. 1 230-kV transmission lines. Western is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the lines. Western prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) entitled ``McCullough to Liberty Fiber Optics Project`` (DOE/EA-1202). The EA contains the analysis of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the OPGW. Based on the analysis in the EA, Western finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. The preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and therefore, Western is issuing this Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. Fiber optic immunosensor for cross-linked fibrin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Samuel E.

    2000-08-01

    Working with calcium ions in the blood, platelets produce thromboplastin which transforms prothrombin into thrombin. Removing peptides, thrombin changes fibrinogen into fibrin. Cross-linked insoluble fibrin polymers are solubilized by enzyme plasmin found in blood plasma. Resulting D-dimers are elevated in patients with intravascular coagulation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, multiple trauma, cancer, impaired renal and liver functions, and sepsis. Consisting principally of a NIR 780 nm GaAlAs laser diode and a 800 nm avalanche photodiode (APD), the fiber-optic immunosensor can determined D-dimer concentration to levels detected by a second antibody which is labeled with NN 382 fluorescent dye. An evanescent wave traveling on an excitation optical fiber excites the antibody-antigen fluorophore complex. Concentration of cross-linked fibrin is directly proportional to the APD measured intensity of fluorescence. NIR fluorescence has advantages of low background interference, short fluorescence lifetime, and large difference between excitation and emission peaks. Competitive ELISA test for D-dimer concentration requires trained personnel performing a time consuming operation.

  10. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrmann Gregory P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The metal housings were fabricated by several methods including laser micromachining, swaging, and hydroforming. Designs are presented that allow for simultaneous temperature and force measurements as well as for simultaneous resolution of multi-axis forces. The sensor was experimentally evaluated by hydrostatic loading and in vitro testing. A commercial hydraulic burst tester was used to provide uniform pressures on the sensor in order to establish the linearity, repeatability, and accuracy characteristics of the sensor. The in vitro experiments were performed in excised tendon and in a dynamic gait simulator to simulate biological conditions. In both experimental conditions, the sensor was found to be a sensitive and reliable method for acquiring minimally invasive measurements of soft tissue forces. Our results suggest that this sensor will prove useful in a variety of biomechanical measurements.

  11. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhiyong; Xu, Dingjie; He, Kunpeng; Pang, Shuwan; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-01

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of "state of health" for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  12. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  13. Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

    2009-08-01

    A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a strength closely associated to a specified structure damage state is used for bonding zigzagged configured optic fibers on the surfaces of the structure. Sensing the local deformation of the structure, the epoxy modulates the signal change within the optic fiber in response to the damage state of the structure. A monotonic loading test is conducted on a steel specimen installed with the proposed sensing system using selected epoxy that will crack at the designated strain level, which indicates the damage of the steel structure. Then, using the selected epoxy, a varying degree of cyclic loading amplitudes, which is associated with different damage states, is applied on a second specimen. The test results show that the specimen's damage can be identified by the optic sensors, and its maximum local deformation can be recorded by the sensing system; moreover, the damage evolution can also be identified.

  14. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  15. Microbial forensics: fiber optic microarray subtyping of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jason R. E.

    2009-05-01

    The past decade has seen increased development and subsequent adoption of rapid molecular techniques involving DNA analysis for detection of pathogenic microorganisms, also termed microbial forensics. The continued accumulation of microbial sequence information in genomic databases now better positions the field of high-throughput DNA analysis to proceed in a more manageable fashion. The potential to build off of these databases exists as technology continues to develop, which will enable more rapid, cost effective analyses. This wealth of genetic information, along with new technologies, has the potential to better address some of the current problems and solve the key issues involved in DNA analysis of pathogenic microorganisms. To this end, a high density fiber optic microarray has been employed, housing numerous DNA sequences simultaneously for detection of various pathogenic microorganisms, including Bacillus anthracis, among others. Each organism is analyzed with multiple sequences and can be sub-typed against other closely related organisms. For public health labs, real-time PCR methods have been developed as an initial preliminary screen, but culture and growth are still considered the gold standard. Technologies employing higher throughput than these standard methods are better suited to capitalize on the limitless potential garnered from the sequence information. Microarray analyses are one such format positioned to exploit this potential, and our array platform is reusable, allowing repetitive tests on a single array, providing an increase in throughput and decrease in cost, along with a certainty of detection, down to the individual strain level.

  16. HIGH-STABLE ERBIUM SUPERLUMINESCENT FIBER OPTICAL SOURCES CREATION METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Aleynik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the overview of wideband Erbium doped superluminescent fiber sources (EDSFS creation methods. This type of optical sources is mainly used in navigation accuracy class fiber-optical gyroscopes (FOG production. For this application an optical source should have small coherence length to reduce FOG output signal error rate. Output signal errors are caused by different parasitic effects: reverse Rayleigh scattering, optical components mode swapping, Kerr effect. Consequently, the most important characteristics of EDSFS are central wavelength time and wide temperature range stability and optical spectrum width and shape. The spectrum shape is needed to be close to the Gaussian distribution to minimize time coherence function. The paper deals with major EDSFS instability reasons and their most effective spectral parameters stabilization and optimization methods. We consider various methods of output optical radiation spectrum correction, and problems connected with output radiation residual polarization, the EDSFS principle of operation, structure and their basic construction schemes, the overview of Erbium-doped active fibers for EDSFS creation. The conclusions on most effective output optical radiation stabilization methods are drawn.

  17. The fiber optic gyroscope - a portable rotational ground motion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, J. M.; Bernauer, F.; Guattari, F.; Igel, H.

    2016-12-01

    It was already shown that a portable broadband rotational ground motion sensor will have large impact on several fields of seismological research such as volcanology, marine geophysics, seismic tomography and planetary seismology. Here, we present results of tests and experiments with one of the first broadband rotational motion sensors available. BlueSeis-3A, is a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) especially designed for the needs of seismology, developed by iXBlue, France, in close collaboration with researchers financed by the European Research council project ROMY (Rotational motions - a new observable for seismology). We first present the instrument characteristics which were estimated by different standard laboratory tests, e.g. self noise using operational range diagrams or Allan deviation. Next we present the results of a field experiment which was designed to demonstrate the value of a 6C measurement (3 components of translation and 3 components of rotation). This field test took place at Mt. Stromboli volcano, Italy, and is accompanied by seismic array installation to proof the FOG output against more commonly known array derived rotation. As already shown with synthetic data an additional direct measurement of three components of rotation can reduce the ambiguity in source mechanism estimation and can be taken to correct for dynamic tilt of the translational sensors (i.e. seismometers). We can therefore demonstrate that the deployment of a weak motion broadband rotational motion sensor is in fact producing superior results by a reduction of the number of deployed instruments.

  18. MANUFACTURE OF FIBER OPTIC SENSORS TO MEASURE THE PH WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra R. Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic pH sensor based on evanescent wave penetration is presented. Evanescent wave penetration is generated by removing the clad and contact the core with the solution. Testing samples were perpetrated by add a strong acid (HCL or a strong base (NaOH at distilled water to produce different value of pH (from 4 to 13. To determine the absorption or transmission of the evanescent waves, that generate after where obtained on appropriate calibration curve to determine a wide range of pH, by using pH indicators. Where using methyl red, by add fixed amounts of this dyes to the water samples were obtained on samples with colors vary with pH values. Calculate the transmission and absorption with draw a relationship between the transmissions or absorption with the pH values, to obtain on suitable curves, considered as calibration curves. Calibration curve for methyl red is best, where extends (from 4 to 12 for pH value. Can calculate the pH value for any water sample to tested, by the add the same ratios of the organic dyes it used.

  19. Online Estimation of ARW Coefficient of Fiber Optic Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a standard method for noise analysis of fiber optic gyro (FOG, Allan variance has too large offline computational burden and data storages to be applied to online estimation. To overcome the barriers, the state space model is firstly established for FOG. Then the Sage-husa adaptive Kalman filter (SHAKF is introduced in this field. Through recursive calculation of measurement noise covariance matrix, SHAKF can avoid the storage of large amounts of history data. However, the precision and stability of this method are still the primary matters that needed to be addressed. Based on this point, a new online method for estimation of the coefficient of angular random walk is proposed. In the method, estimator of measurement noise is constructed by the recursive form of Allan variance at the shortest sampling time. Then the estimator is embedded into the SHAKF framework resulting in a new adaptive filter. The estimations of measurement noise variance and Kalman filter are independent of each other in this method. Therefore, it can address the problem of filtering divergence and precision degrading effectively. Test results of both digital simulation and experimental data of FOG verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  20. Development of smart textiles with embedded fiber optic chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Saif E.; Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    2004-03-01

    Smart textiles are defined as textiles capable of monitoring their own health conditions or structural behavior, as well as sensing external environmental conditions. Smart textiles appear to be a future focus of the textile industry. As technology accelerates, textiles are found to be more useful and practical for potential advanced technologies. The majority of textiles are used in the clothing industry, which set up the idea of inventing smart clothes for various applications. Examples of such applications are medical trauma assessment and medical patients monitoring (heart and respiration rates), and environmental monitoring for public safety officials. Fiber optics have played a major role in the development of smart textiles as they have in smart structures in general. Optical fiber integration into textile structures (knitted, woven, and non-woven) is presented, and defines the proper methodology for the manufacturing of smart textiles. Samples of fabrics with integrated optical fibers were processed and tested for optical signal transmission. This was done in order to investigate the effect of textile production procedures on optical fiber performance. The tests proved the effectiveness of the developed methodology for integration of optical fibers without changing their optical performance or structural integrity.

  1. Development of fiber optic gyroscopes for industrial and consumer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Kajioka, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present the current status of the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG), a ring interferometric rotation sensor for commercial applications by industries and consumers. An open-loop FOG with all polarization-maintaining fiber components is being used in these applications. One primary application is in vehicle navigation systems for automobiles, and a mass-produced has already been installed in luxury automobiles in Japan. Another application is in sweeper robots, Other applications such as a route-measuring system for boreholes, an attitude-controlling system for industrial helicopters, and an optocompass or north-seeking instrument will also be described. These FOGs are compact and reliable and need only a +12 V or a +24 V DC power source. This bias error is determined by the electrical system rather than the optical system and varies between 0.01 and 36 deg/h depending on the design of the signal-processing unit. The scale factor error varies between 0.1% and 1% also depending on the design, however, it is stable over the temperature range from -30 to 85 degree(s)C.

  2. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  3. A Fiber-Optic Aircraft Lightning Current Measurement Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2013-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor based on the Faraday Effect is developed for aircraft installations. It can measure total lightning current amplitudes and waveforms, including continuing current. Additional benefits include being small, lightweight, non-conducting, safe from electromagnetic interference, and free of hysteresis and saturation. The Faraday Effect causes light polarization to rotate in presence of magnetic field in the direction of light propagation. Measuring the total induced light polarization change yields the total current enclosed. The system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and can measure approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. A reflective polarimetric scheme is used, where the light polarization change is measured after a round-trip propagation through the fiber. A two-detector setup measures the two orthogonal polarizations for noise subtraction and improved dynamic range. The current response curve is non-linear and requires a simple spline-fit correction. Effects of high current were achieved in laboratory using combinations of multiple fiber and wire loops. Good result comparisons against reference sensors were achieved up to 300 kA. Accurate measurements on a simulated aircraft fuselage and an internal structure illustrate capabilities that maybe difficult with traditional sensors. Also tested at a commercial lightning test facility from 20 kA to 200 kA, accuracy within 3-10% was achieved even with non-optimum setups.

  4. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng, E-mail: pengkhe@126.com; Pang, Shuwan [Department of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Xu, Dingjie [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Tian, Chunmiao [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  5. Interferometric and localized surface plasmon based fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Bano, Andon; Hjelme, Dag Roar

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a novel single point, multi-parameter, fiber optic sensor concept based on a combination of interferometric and plasmonic sensor modalities on an optical fiber end face. The sensor consists of a micro-Fabry-Perot interferometer in the form of a hemispherical stimuli-responsive hydrogel with immobilized gold nanoparticles. We present results of proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing of refractive index (RI) in the visible range and interferometric measurements of volumetric changes of the pH stimuli-responsive hydrogel in near infrared range. The response of LSPR to RI (Δλr/ΔRI 877nm/RI) and the free spectral range (FSR) to pH (ΔpH/ΔFSR = 0.09624/nm) were measured with LSPR relatively constant for hydrogel swelling degree and FSR relatively constant for RI. We expect this novel sensor concept to be of great value for biosensors for medical applications.

  6. VARIANCE OF NONLINEAR PHASE NOISE IN FIBER-OPTIC SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANJU KANWAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In communication system, the noise process must be known, in order to compute the system performance. The nonlinear effects act as strong perturbation in long- haul system. This perturbation effects the signal, when interact with amplitude noise, and results in random motion of the phase of the signal. Based on the perturbation theory, the variance of nonlinear phase noise contaminated by both self- and cross-phase modulation, is derived analytically for phase-shift- keying system. Through this work, it is investigated that for longer transmission distance, 40-Gb/s systems are more sensitive to nonlinear phase noise as compared to 50-Gb/s systems. Also, when transmitting the data through the fiber optic link, bit errors are produced due to various effects such as noise from optical amplifiers and nonlinearity occurring in fiber. On the basis of the simulation results , we have compared the bit error rate based on 8-PSK with theoretical results, and result shows that in real time approach, the bit error rate is high for the same signal to noise ratio. MATLAB software is used to validate the analytical expressions for the variance of nonlinear phase noise.

  7. Corrosion monitoring along infrastructures using distributed fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhandawi, Khalil B.; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2016-04-01

    Pipeline Inspection Gauges (PIGs) are used for internal corrosion inspection of oil pipelines every 3-5 years. However, between inspection intervals, rapid corrosion may occur, potentially resulting in major accidents. The motivation behind this research project was to develop a safe distributed corrosion sensor placed inside oil pipelines continuously monitoring corrosion. The intrinsically safe nature of light provided motivation for researching fiber optic sensors as a solution. The sensing fiber's cladding features polymer plastic that is chemically sensitive to hydrocarbons within crude oil mixtures. A layer of metal, used in the oil pipeline's construction, is deposited on the polymer cladding, which upon corrosion, exposes the cladding to surrounding hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon's interaction with the cladding locally increases the cladding's refractive index in the radial direction. Light intensity of a traveling pulse is reduced due to local reduction in the modal capacity which is interrogated by Optical Time Domain Reflectometery. Backscattered light is captured in real-time while using time delay to resolve location, allowing real-time spatial monitoring of environmental internal corrosion within pipelines spanning large distances. Step index theoretical solutions were used to calculate the power loss due changes in the intensity profile. The power loss is translated into an attenuation coefficient characterizing the expected OTDR trace which was verified against similar experimental results from the literature. A laboratory scale experiment is being developed to assess the validity of the model and the practicality of the solution.

  8. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhic, Michel E; Andrekson, Peter A; Petropoulos, Periklis; Radic, Stojan; Peucheret, Christophe; Jazayerifar, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time-division multiplexed formats. High-quality mid-span spectral inversion has been demonstrated at 0.64 Tb/s, avoiding electronic dispersion compensation. All-optical amplitude regeneration of amplitude-modulated signals has been performed, while PSAs have been used to demonstrate phase regeneration of phase-modulated signals. A PSA with 1.1-dB noise figure has been demonstrated, and preliminary wavelength-division multiplexing experiments have been performed with PSAs. 512 Gb/s have been transmitted over 6,000 km by periodic phase conjugation. Simulations indicate that PIAs could reach data rate x reach products in excess of 14,000 Tb/s × km in realistic wavelength-division multiplexed long-haul networks. Technical challenges remaining to be addressed in order for fiber OPAs to become useful for long-haul communication networks are discussed. [Formula: see text].

  9. A simple and robust fiber optics system for measuring the lead-acid battery state-of-charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortazar, O.D.; Feliu, V. [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha - Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13071 (Spain)

    2006-09-13

    A simple, robust and low-cost fiber optics system for monitoring the state-of-charge (SOC) in a lead-acid battery is presented. The device is based on measuring light ray trajectory variations produced by the electrolyte media when its density changes. The changes in the electrolyte refraction index are produced due to changes in density, and the system measures such changes by means of an optical sensor coupled with a fiber optics bundle. SOC is indirectly measured on the base of such optical specific gravity measuring. A set of equations based on a paraxial ray model perform the optical sensor design, describing its behavior for different design parameters thereby allowing for the optimization of signal response. The system is applied to an SLI battery discharge-charge cycle obtaining excellent agreement with direct measuring of electrolyte density and estimation of SOC by integration of current. Simplicity, low cost, robustness and the unnecessary use of any signal processing are the main improvements with respect to previous works. (author)

  10. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-03-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber- optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the straininduced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection will be discussed.

  11. Design of a fiber-optic transmitter for microwave analog transmission with high phase stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, R. T., Jr.; Lutes, G. F.; Primas, L. E.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    The principal considerations in the design of fiber-optic transmitters for highly phase-stable radio frequency and microwave analog transmission are discussed. Criteria for a fiber-optic transmitter design with improved amplitude and phase-noise performance are developed through consideration of factors affecting the phase noise, including low-frequency laser-bias supply noise, the magnitude and proximity of external reflections into the laser, and temperature excursions of the laser-transmitter package.

  12. Development of a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei-Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen-Jong; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2010-01-01

    The purpose this paper is the development a novel polymeric fiber-optic magnetostrictive metal detector, using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer and polymeric magnetostrictive material. Metal detection is based on the strain-induced optical path length change steming from the ferromagnetic material introduced in the magnetic field. Varied optical phase shifts resulted largely from different metal objects. In this paper, the preliminary results on the different metal material detection will be discussed.

  13. Distributed fiber optic strain sensor based on the Sagnac and Michelson interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric

    1996-04-01

    By placing fiber optic gratings in a Sagnac loop a distributed strain sensor may be formed by using the light reflected from the fiber gratings as sources for balanced Michelson and Mach- Zehnder interferometers. In this manner the resulting fiber optic sensor is capable of measuring integrated strain over lengths determined by the fiber grating position, point strain and temperature at the fiber grating locations and localizing and measuring the position of a time varying signal such as an acoustic wave.

  14. Fiber-optic fluorometer for microscale mapping of photosynthetic pigments in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael; Holst, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls, and bacteri......Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls...

  15. A Fiber-Optical Intrusion Alarm System Based on Quasi-Distributed Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Jiang; Yun-Jiang Rao; De-Hong Zeng

    2008-01-01

    A fiber-optical intrusion alarm system based on quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is demonstrated in this paper. The algorithms of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet packet characteristic entropy are adopted to determine the intrusion location. The intrusion alarm software based on the Labview is developed, and it is also proved by the experiments. The results show that such a fiber-optical intrusion alarm system can offer the automatic intrusion alarm in real-time.

  16. DSP based coherent receiver for phase-modulated radio-over-fiber optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Peucheret, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    A novel DSP based coherent receiver for phase modulated radio-over-fiber optical links is reported. Using the proposed digital receiver, signal demodulation of 1.25 Gb/s ASK-modulated 10 GHz RF carrier is experimentally demonstrated.......A novel DSP based coherent receiver for phase modulated radio-over-fiber optical links is reported. Using the proposed digital receiver, signal demodulation of 1.25 Gb/s ASK-modulated 10 GHz RF carrier is experimentally demonstrated....

  17. Fiber-optic fluorometer for microscale mapping of photosynthetic pigments in microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland Matthias; Kühl, Michael; Holst, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls, and bacteri......Microscale fluorescence measurements were performed in photosynthetic biofilms at a spatial resolution of 100 to 200 µm with a new fiber-optic fluorometer which allowed four different excitation and emission wavelengths and was configured for measuring phycobiliproteins, chlorophylls...

  18. Fiber optic line for RoF systems with remote and local pump EDFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Irina L.; Sultanov, Albert K.; Meshkov, Ivan K.; Andrianova, Anna V.; Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Ishmiyarov, Arsen A.; Zainullin, Airat R.

    2015-03-01

    The article is devoted to the research of a method providing positive chirp of a signal on a long-haul fiber optic line. The modeling of an optical pulse duration and its chirp functions on an offered segment has allowed to estimate the parameters of a segment - distance between regeneration points and capacity level of additional radiation. The method is interesting for high-speed transmission when there is no availability to use the electronic or fiber optic chromatic dispersion compensation modules.

  19. Mathematical Model of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Optic Absorption and Experiment Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of analysis on the temperature monitoring methods for high voltage devices, a new type of fiber optic sensor structure with reference channel is given. And the operation principle of fiber optic sensor is analysed at large based on the absorption of semiconductor chip. The mathematical model of both devices and the whole system are also given. It is proved by the experiment that this mathematical model is reliable.

  20. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  1. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  2. Wavelength Conversion by Cascaded FWM in a Fiber Optical Parametric Oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2011-01-01

    We report on a continuous-wave fiber optical parametric oscillator utilizing selective filtering on cascade four wave mixing (CFWM). Oscillations of distinct CFWM terms are obtained, extending wavelength conversion outside the parametric gain region.......We report on a continuous-wave fiber optical parametric oscillator utilizing selective filtering on cascade four wave mixing (CFWM). Oscillations of distinct CFWM terms are obtained, extending wavelength conversion outside the parametric gain region....

  3. Dynamic Characterization of Fiber Optical Chirped Pulse Amplification for Sub-ps Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation.......We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation....

  4. Asymmetric Gain-Saturated Spectrum in One-pump Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rottwitt, Karsten; Galili, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The effect of third-order dispersion on the saturated-gain in fiber optical parametric amplifiers is experimentally demonstrated. A possible interpretation in terms of dispersive waves, which change the power transfer to the signal, is presented.......The effect of third-order dispersion on the saturated-gain in fiber optical parametric amplifiers is experimentally demonstrated. A possible interpretation in terms of dispersive waves, which change the power transfer to the signal, is presented....

  5. Nonlinear optical rectification in a vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots with wetting layers under hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Mahrsia, R.; Choubani, M., E-mail: mohsenchoubani3@yahoo.fr; Bouzaiene, L.; Maaref, H.

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we explore the structure parameters, hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on Nonlinear optical rectification (NOR) in an asymmetric vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots. During epitaxial growth, lens-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). Many theoretical works have neglected WL and its effect on nonlinear optical properties of QD-based systems for sake of simplicity. However, in this work the WL has been shown to be so influential in the intersubband energy and nonlinear optical rectification magnitude. Also, a detailed and comprehensive study of the nonlinear optical rectification is theoretical investigated within the framework of the compact density-matrix approach and finite difference method (FDM). It's found that nonlinear optical rectification coefficient is strongly affected not only by the WL, but also by the pressure, temperature and the coupled width between the QDs. Obtained results revealed that a red or a blue shift cane be observed. This behavior in the NOR gives a new degree of freedom in regions of interest for device applications. - Highlights: • Vertically coupled lens-shaped InAs/GaAs quantum dots is investigated. • Photon energy shifts towards the red with increasing pressure. • Photon energy shifts towards the blue with increasing temperature. • Intersubband energy decreases with increasing the wetting layer width. • Nonlinear optical rectification magnitude is controlled and adjusted.

  6. Transmission stabilization and destabilization involving Kerr and Raman effects in broadband soliton-based fiber optics systems

    CERN Document Server

    Peleg, Avner; Tran, Thinh P

    2015-01-01

    We study stabilization and destabilization of propagating soliton sequences in broadband fiber optics systems with $N$ frequency channels, taking into account second-order dispersion, Kerr nonlinearity, delayed Raman response, and linear gain-loss. We employ a propagation model consisting of a system of $N$ coupled nonlinear Schr\\"odinger (NLS) equations and a reduced $N$-dimensional predator-prey model for amplitude dynamics. Numerical simulations with the coupled-NLS model with $2 \\le N \\le 4$ show stable oscillatory dynamics of soliton amplitudes at short-to-intermediate distances, in agreement with predictions of the predator-prey model. Furthermore, the main destabilizing mechanism at long distances is due to generation of radiative sidebands, where the sidebands for a given channel form at the frequencies of solitons in the neighboring channels. This destabilizing process can be partially mitigated by employing frequency dependent linear gain-loss. Moreover, significant enhancement of transmission stabi...

  7. Comprehensive validation scheme for in situ fiber optics dissolution method for pharmaceutical drug product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Tahseen; Liu, Qian Julie; Vivilecchia, Richard; Joshi, Yatindra

    2009-03-01

    There has been a growing interest during the past decade in the use of fiber optics dissolution testing. Use of this novel technology is mainly confined to research and development laboratories. It has not yet emerged as a tool for end product release testing despite its ability to generate in situ results and efficiency improvement. One potential reason may be the lack of clear validation guidelines that can be applied for the assessment of suitability of fiber optics. This article describes a comprehensive validation scheme and development of a reliable, robust, reproducible and cost-effective dissolution test using fiber optics technology. The test was successfully applied for characterizing the dissolution behavior of a 40-mg immediate-release tablet dosage form that is under development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey. The method was validated for the following parameters: linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness. In particular, robustness was evaluated in terms of probe sampling depth and probe orientation. The in situ fiber optic method was found to be comparable to the existing manual sampling dissolution method. Finally, the fiber optic dissolution test was successfully performed by different operators on different days, to further enhance the validity of the method. The results demonstrate that the fiber optics technology can be successfully validated for end product dissolution/release testing.

  8. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  9. Design of Integrated Fiber-Optic Receivers Using Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Aaron Wayne

    Recent demands for increased information transfer through communication networks are stretching channel capacities to the limit. Telecommunication trunking, local-area data networks, video on demand, integrated multi-media applications, etc. require ever increasing bandwidths. Optical fibers are the best known medium for point-to-point communication because of their high bandwidth (1400 GHz-km) and low losses (0.15 dB/km). Electronic circuits are not fast enough to fully exploit the broadhand fiber-optic channel, and cause a bottleneck in the throughput of optical communication systems. This dissertation focuses on the theory and practice of the design of integrated circuits for multi-gigabit -per-second fiber-optic receivers. Realizing a 10 Gb/s system consistent with the SONET hierarchy is the ultimate goal of the research, and test circuits were developed to this end. Difficulty in implementing clock recovery circuits at rates greater than 3 Gb/s have limited the capacity of integrated receivers. Therefore, considerable attention is paid to clock extraction techniques. Architectures applicable to high-speed systems and insensitive to parasitic effects are presented. Among the test circuits developed was a 12 GHz InP-based HBT preamplifier. The circuit contains a PIN photodetector and can achieve an rms input noise of approximately 1.25muA at a data rate of 10 Gb/s. Two VCOs were designed in an AIGaAs/GaAs HBT process. A ring oscillator and emitter-coupled multivibrator, both operating at 2.75 GHz were fabricated. A patented 7 GHz ring VCO with frequency doubling was also designed. The new VCO was used to implement a 6 GHz phase-lock loop. The test circuits demonstrate functionality of key building blocks of a high-speed clock recovery circuit. Simulations based on models extracted from the test circuit predict that the architectures presented are applicable for clock recovery at a data rate of 10 Gb/s. Further research is needed to implement a complete

  10. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  11. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Embedded Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2003-01-01

    coupled into the optical fiber sensor, a reflection peak will be obtained centered around a wavelength called Bragg-wavelength. The Bragg-wavelength depends on the refractive index and the period of the grating, which both change due to mechanical and thermal strain applied to the sensor. The shift in the Bragg-wavelength is directly proportional to the strain. Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of advanced structural materials expected to become the mainstay of the current and future generation space structures. Since carbon-epoxy composites are the materials of choice for the current space structures, the initial study is concentrated on this type of composite. The goals of this activity are to use embedded FBG sensors for measuring strain and temperature of composite structures, and to investigate the effects of various parameters such as composite fiber orientation with respect to the optical sensor, unidirectional fiber composite, fabrication process etc., on the optical performance of the sensor. This paper describes an experiment to demonstrate the use of an embedded FBG for measuring strain in a composite material. The performance of the fiber optic sensor is determined by direct comparison with results from more conventional instrumentation.

  12. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Leak Detection in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.; Korman, Valentin; Hendrickson, Adam; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic, laser-based, interferometric leak detector is presented for application as a means to detect on-orbit gas leaks. The sensor employs a fiber-coupled modified Michelson interferometer to detect gas leaks by measuring an increase in gas density in the sensing region. Monitoring changes in the fringe pattern output by the interferometer allows for direct measurement of the gas density in the sensing region and, under the assumption of an equation of state, this can be used to obtain a pressure measurement. Measurements obtained over a pressure range from 20 mtorr to 760 torr using a prototypical interferometer on working gases of air, nitrogen, argon, and helium generally exhibit agreement with a theoretical prediction of the pressure increase required before an interference fringe completely moves over the detector. Additional measurements performed on various gases demonstrate the range of detectable species, measuring sub-torr pressure changes in the process. A high-fidelity measurement places the ultimate pressure resolution for this particular sensor configuration in the 10 mtorr range. Time-resolved data prove the capability of this sensor to detect fast gas flow phenomena associated with transients and pressure waves.

  13. Orientation-dependent fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Qiao, Xueguang; Guo, Tuan; Bao, Weijia; Su, Dan; Yang, Hangzhou

    2014-12-01

    An orientation-sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer based on grating inscription over fiber cladding has been demonstrated. The sensor probe comprises a compact structure in which a short section of thin-core fiber (TCF) stub containing a "cladding" fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is spliced to another single-mode fiber (SMF) without any lateral offset. A femtosecond laser side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure that the grating inscription remains close to the core-cladding interface of the TCF. The core mode and the cladding mode of the TCF are coupled at the core-mismatch junction, and two well-defined resonances in reflection appear from the downstream FBG, in which the cladding resonance exhibits a strong polarization and bending dependence due to the asymmetrical distribution of the cladding FBG along the fiber cross section. Strong orientation dependence of the vibration (acceleration) measurement has been achieved by power detection of the cladding resonance. Meanwhile, the unwanted power fluctuations and temperature perturbations can be referenced out by monitoring the fundamental core resonance.

  14. Detection of wavelengths in the visible range using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Leonardo; Morales, Yailteh; Mattos, Lorenzo; Torres, Cesar O.

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows the design and implementation of a fiber optic sensor for detecting and identifying wavelengths in the visible range. The system consists of a diffuse optical fiber, a conventional laser diode 650nm, 2.5mW of power, an ambient light sensor LX1972, a PIC 18F2550 and LCD screen for viewing. The principle used in the detection of the lambda is based on specular reflection and absorption. The optoelectronic device designed and built used the absorption and reflection properties of the material under study, having as active optical medium a bifurcated optical fiber, which is optically coupled to an ambient light sensor, which makes the conversion of light signals to electricas, procedure performed by a microcontroller, which acquires and processes the signal. To verify correct operation of the assembly were utilized the color cards of sewing thread and nail polish as samples for analysis. This optoelectronic device can be used in many applications such as quality control of industrial processes, classification of corks or bottle caps, color quality of textiles, sugar solutions, polymers and food among others.

  15. Rockslide deformation monitoring with fiber optic strain sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available With micro-strain resolution and the capability to sample at rates of 100 Hz and higher, fiber optic (FO strain sensors offer exciting new possibilities for in-situ landslide monitoring. Here we describe a new FO monitoring system based on long-gauge fiber Bragg grating sensors installed at the Randa Rockslide Laboratory in southern Switzerland. The new FO monitoring system can detect sub-micrometer scale deformations in both triggered-dynamic and continuous measurements. Two types of sensors have been installed: (1 fully embedded borehole sensors and (2 surface extensometers. Dynamic measurements are triggered by sensor deformation and recorded at 100 Hz, while continuous data are logged every 5 min. Deformation time series for all sensors show displacements consistent with previous monitoring. Accelerated shortening following installation of the borehole sensors is likely related to long-term shrinkage of the grout. A number of transient signals have been observed, which in some cases were large enough to trigger rapid sampling. The combination of short- and long-term observation offers new insight into the deformation process. Accelerated surface crack opening in spring is shown to have a diurnal trend, which we attribute to the effect of snowmelt seeping into the crack void space and freezing at night to generate pressure on the crack walls. Controlled-source tests investigated the sensor response to dynamic inputs, which compared an independent measure of ground motion against the strain measured across a surface crack. Low frequency signals were comparable but the FO record suffered from aliasing, where undersampling of higher frequency signals generated spectral peaks not related to ground motion.

  16. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  17. Fiber optic system design for vehicle detection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoma, Jan; Zboril, Ondrej; Fajkus, Marcel; Zavodny, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Bednarek, Lukas; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Fiber optic interferometers belong to a group of highly sensitive and precise devices enabling to measure small changes in the deformation shapes, changes in pressure, temperature, vibration and so on. The basis of their activity is to evaluate the number of fringes over time, not changes in the intensity of the optical signal. The methodology described in the article is based on using the interferometer to monitor traffic density. The base of the solution is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating with single-mode G.652 optical fiber at the wavelength of 1550 nm excited by a DFB laser. The power distribution of the laser light into the individual arms of the interferometer is in the ratio 1:1. Realized measuring scheme was terminated by an optical receiver including InGaAs PIN photodiode. Registered signal from the photodetector was through 8 Hz high pass filter fed to the measuring card that captures the analog input voltage using an application written in LabView development environment. The interferometer was stored in a waterproof box and placed at the side of the road. Here panned individual transit of cars in his environs. Vertically across the road was placed in contact removable belt simulating a retarder, which was used when passing cars to create sufficient vibration response detecting interferometer. The results demonstrated that the individual vehicles passing around boxing showed characteristic amplitude spectra, which was unique for each object, and had sufficient value signal to noise ratio (SNR). The signal was processed by applications developed for the amplitude-frequency spectrum. Evaluated was the maximum amplitude of the signal and compared to the noise. The results were verified by repeated transit of the different types of cars.

  18. Multiparameter fiber optic sensing system for monitoring enhanced geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William A

    2014-12-04

    The goal of this project was to design, fabricate and test an optical fiber cable which supports multiple sensing modalities for measurements in the harsh environment of enhanced geothermal systems. To accomplish this task, optical fiber was tested at both high temperatures and strains for mechanical integrity, and in the presence of hydrogen for resistance to darkening. Both single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) commercially available optical fiber were identified and selected for the cable based on the results of these tests. The cable was designed and fabricated using a tube-within-tube construction containing two MM fibers and one SM fiber, and without supporting gel that is not suitable for high temperature environments. Commercial fiber optic sensing instruments using Raman DTS (distributed temperature sensing), Brillouin DTSS (distributed temperature and strain sensing), and Raleigh COTDR (coherent optical time domain reflectometry) were selected for field testing. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, packaged, and calibrated for high pressure measurements at high temperatures and spliced to the cable. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor was also spliced to the cable. A geothermal well was selected and its temperature and pressure were logged. The cable was then deployed in the well in two separate field tests and measurements were made on these different sensing modalities. Raman DTS measurements were found to be accurate to ±5°C, even with some residual hydrogen darkening. Brillouin DTSS measurements were in good agreement with the Raman results. The Rayleigh COTDR instrument was able to detect some acoustic signatures, but was generally disappointing. The FBG sensor was used to determine the effects of hydrogen darkening, but drift over time made it unreliable as a temperature or pressure sensor. The MEMS sensor was found to be highly stable and accurate to better than its 0.1% calibration.

  19. Establishing a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamantidis, Antoine R; Zhang, Feng; de Lecea, Luis; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-08-01

    Selective expression of opsins in genetically defined neurons makes it possible to control a subset of neurons without affecting nearby cells and processes in the intact brain, but light must still be delivered to the target brain structure. Light scattering limits the delivery of light from the surface of the brain. For this reason, we have developed a fiber-optic-based optical neural interface (ONI), which allows optical access to any brain structure in freely moving mammals. The ONI system is constructed by modifying the small animal cannula system from PlasticsOne. The system for bilateral stimulation consists of a bilateral cannula guide that has been stereotactically implanted over the target brain region, a screw cap for securing the optical fiber to the animal's head, a fiber guard modified from the internal cannula adapter, and a bare fiber whose length is customized based on the depth of the target region. For unilateral stimulation, a single-fiber system can be constructed using unilateral cannula parts from PlasticsOne. We describe here the preparation of the bilateral ONI system and its use in optical stimulation of the mouse or rat brain. Delivery of opsin-expressing virus and implantation of the ONI may be conducted in the same surgical session; alternatively, with a transgenic animal no opsin virus is delivered during the surgery. Similar procedures are useful for deep or superficial injections (even for neocortical targets, although in some cases surface light-emitting diodes or cortex-apposed fibers can be used for the most superficial cortical targets).

  20. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  1. A training-aided MIMO equalization based on matrix transformation in the space division multiplexed fiber-optic transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoning; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Tian, Qinghua; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Feng; Li, Dengao; Zhao, Jumin; Wang, Renfan

    2016-10-01

    A novel training sequence is designed for the space division multiplexed fiber-optic transmission system in this paper. The training block is consisting of segmented sequence, which can be used to compensate time offset and distortion (such as dispersion) in the transmission link. The channel function can be obtained by one tap equalization in the receiver side. This paper designs the training sequence by adjusting the length of the training signals and implementing matrix transformation, to obtain the coefficient of equalizer for channel detect and equalization. This new training sequence reduces system complexity and improves transmission efficiency at the same time. Compared with blind equalization, the matrix transformation based training sequence can reduce system complexity, and perform targeted equalization to the mechanism of mode coupling in the space division optical fiber system. As a result, it can effectively improve signal transmission quality and reduce bit error rate.

  2. GlideScope versus flexible fiber optic for awake upright laryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverton, Natalie A; Youngquist, Scott T; Mallin, Michael P; Bledsoe, Joseph R; Barton, Erik D; Schroeder, Erika D; Bledsoe, Amber D; Axelrod, Deborah A

    2012-03-01

    We compare laryngoscopic quality and time to highest-grade view between a face-to-face approach with the GlideScope and traditional flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in awake, upright volunteers. This was a prospective, randomized, crossover study in which we performed awake laryngoscopy under local anesthesia on 23 healthy volunteers, using both a GlideScope video laryngoscopy face-to-face technique with the blade held upside down and flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. Operator reports of Cormack-Lehane laryngoscopic views and video-reviewed time to highest-grade view, as well as number of attempts, were recorded. Ten women and 13 men participated. A grade II or better view was obtained with GlideScope video laryngoscopy in 22 of 23 (95.6%) participants and in 23 of 23 (100%) participants with flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy (relative risk GlideScope video laryngoscopy versus flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.04). Median time to highest-grade view for GlideScope video laryngoscopy was 16 seconds (interquartile range 9 to 34) versus 51 seconds (interquartile range 35 to 96) for flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. A distribution of interindividual differences demonstrated that GlideScope video laryngoscopy was, on average, 39 seconds faster than flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 76.9 seconds). GlideScope video laryngoscopy can be used to obtain a Cormack-Lehane grade II or better view in the majority of awake, healthy volunteers when an upright face-to-face approach is used and was slightly faster than traditional flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. However, flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy may be more reliable at obtaining high-grade views of the larynx. Awake, face-to-face GlideScope use may offer an alternative approach to the difficulty airway, particularly among providers uncomfortable with flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. Copyright © 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians

  3. Computational Model Of Fiber Optic, Arc Fusion Splicing; Experimental Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Paul; Frost, Walter; Long, Wayne

    1989-02-01

    Acknowledgement: The assistance and support of the MICOM Army Missile Command is gratefully appreciated. An analytical tool to investigate the arc fusion splicing of optical fibers is developed. The physical model incorporates heat transfer and thermal, visco elastic strain. The heat transfer equations governing radiation, conduction and convection during arc heating are formulated. The radiation heat flux impinging on the fiber optics is modeled based on reported experimental analysis of a generic type arc discharge. The fusion process considers deformation of the fiber due to thermal, viscous and elastic strain. A Maxwell stress-strain relationship is assumed. The model assumes an initial gap at the beginning of the arc which is closed by a press-stroke during the heating cycle. All physical properties of the fused silica glass fibers are considered as functions of temperature based on available experimental data. A computer algorithm has been developed to solve the system of governing equations and parametric studies carried out. An experiment using a FSM-20 arc fusion splicer manufactured by Fujikura Ltd. was carried out to provide experimental verification of the analytical model. In the experiment a continuous fiber was positioned in the arc and cyclic heating and cooling was carried out. One end of the fiber was clamped and the other was free to move. The fiber was heated for 6 seconds and cooled for 3 minutes for several cycles. At the end of each cooling process, photographs of the deformation of the fiber were taken. The results showed that the fiber necked down on the free end and buldged up on the fixed end. With repeated heating and cooling cycles, the optical fiber eventually necked down to the point that it melted in two. The analytical model was run for the conditions of the experiment. Comparisons of the predicted deformation of the optical fiber with those measured is given. The analytical model displays all of the physical phenomenon of fiber

  4. Fiber-optic parametric amplifiers: Their advantages and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Fatih

    Fiber-optic parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) can be used in lightwave systems for several signal-processing applications including optical amplification, phase conjugation, and wavelength conversion. In principle, FOPAs can provide high gain uniform over a wide wavelength range (> 100 nm). What is more, FOPAs add little noise to the amplified signal. FOPAs can have noise figure as low as 0 dB when operated in the phase-sensitive mode and 3 dB in the phase insensitive mode. However, in practice, these advantages of FOPAs are compromised. In this work, I investigate several factors that limit the performance of FOPAs, and propose practical schemes to minimize those limitations. FOPAs can provide a relatively large gain bandwidth because the gain spectrum of FOPAs is not determined by material resonances but by the phase-matching condition. For the same reason, FOPAs are very sensitive to perturbations stemming from fiber irregularities. One such irregularity is that fiber dispersion varies randomly along the fiber length. My numerical modeling showed that, because of such variations, FOPA gain spectrum cannot maintain its flatness and also that FOPA gain profile changes from one fiber to the other. Using stochastic methods, an analytic theory is developed that can predict an "average gain spectrum." This analytic theory can be used to show that flatness of FOPA gain is recovered at the expense of reducing the gain bandwidth. Another fiber irregularity that affects FOPA gain spectrum is the residual birefringence. During the fiber-drawing process, the cross section of fiber core inevitably deviates from perfect circular symmetry. As a result, all non-polarization maintaining fibers exhibit residual birefringence. Both the magnitude of birefringence and the direction of its principal axis vary along the fiber length as well as in time. Because of residual birefringence, state of polarizations of the propagating fields change randomly also. Since the underlying four

  5. Preliminary photovoltaic arc-fault prognostic tests using sacrificial fiber optic cabling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Blemel, Kenneth D.; Peter, Francis

    2013-02-01

    Through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program, Sandia National Laboratories worked with Sentient Business Systems, Inc. to develop and test a novel photovoltaic (PV) arc-fault detection system. The system operates by pairing translucent polymeric fiber optic sensors with electrical circuitry so that any external abrasion to the system or internal heating causes the fiber optic connection to fail or detectably degrade. A periodic pulse of light is sent through the optical path using a transmitter-receiver pair. If the receiver does not detect the pulse, an alarm is sounded and the PV system can be de-energized. This technology has the unique ability to prognostically determine impending failures to the electrical system in two ways: (a) the optical connection is severed prior to physical abrasion or cutting of PV DC electrical conductors, and (b) the polymeric fiber optic cable melts via Joule heating before an arc-fault is established through corrosion. Three arc-faults were created in different configurations found in PV systems with the integrated fiber optic system to determine the feasibility of the technology. In each case, the fiber optic cable was broken and the system annunciated the fault.

  6. Cryogenic Fiber Optic Assemblies for Spaceflight Environments: Design, Manufacturing, Testing, and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. Joe; Ott, Melanie N.; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Onuma, Eleanya; Blair, Diana; Frese, Erich; Matyseck, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic assemblies have been used on spaceflight missions for many years as an enabling technology for routing, transmitting, and detecting optical signals. Due to the overwhelming success of NASA in implementing fiber optic assemblies on spaceflight science-based instruments, system scientists increasingly request fibers that perform in extreme environments while still maintaining very high optical transmission, stability, and reliability. Many new applications require fiber optic assemblies that will operate down to cryogenic temperatures as low as 20 Kelvin. In order for the fiber assemblies to operate with little loss in optical throughput at these extreme temperatures requires a system level approach all the way from how the fiber assembly is manufactured to how it is held, routed, and integrated. The NASA Goddard Code 562 Photonics Group has been designing, manufacturing, testing, and integrating fiber optics for spaceflight and other high reliability applications for nearly 20 years. Design techniques and lessons learned over the years are consistently applied to developing new fiber optic assemblies that meet these demanding environments. System level trades, fiber assembly design methods, manufacturing, testing, and integration will be discussed. Specific recent examples of ground support equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST); the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2); and others will be included.

  7. Two Sorts of Fiber Optic Sensor Monitoring the Cure Process of Composite Laminate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two new sorts of fiber optic sensor are designed.Firstly, the variation of refractive index of resin surrounding the embedded fiber optic was mean to observed by measuring the speckle spatial spectrum at the end-face of the fiber optic.Secondly, it is proposed to measuring the change of thickness of the laminate by using fiber optic microbend attenuation.The experiment results measured by the fiber optic sensors are given.The first sort of sensor was found to be able to detect the viscosity process of the resin matrix during cure process includeing the minimum point of viscosity, the gelation point and the end point of cure process; the second sort of sensor could detect the course of change of the thickness of composite laminate pressed by operation pressure.It is benefit for us to optimize the operation technology and to establish the intelligent monitoring system about curing process of composites for the reason that the viscosity process and the change course of the thickness of laminate can be monitored.

  8. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations.

  9. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  10. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0 guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  11. Total radiated power, infrared output, and heat generation by cold light sources at the distal end of endoscopes and fiber optic bundle of light cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensman, C; Hanna, G B; Drew, T; Moseley, H; Cuschieri, A

    1998-04-01

    Skin burns and ignition of drapes have been reported with the use of cold light sources. The aim of the study was to document the temperature generated by cold light sources and to correlate this with the total radiated power and infrared output. The temperature, total radiated power, and infrared output were measured as a function of time at the end of the endoscope (which is inserted into the operative field) and the end of the fiber optic bundle of the light cable (which connects the cable to the light port of the endoscope) using halogen and xenon light sources. The highest temperature recorded at the end of the endoscope was 95 degrees C. The temperature measured at the optical fiber location of the endoscope was higher than at its lens surface (p cables, the temperature reached 225 degrees C within 15 s. The temperature recorded at the optical fiber location of all endoscopes and light cables studied rose significantly over a period of 10 min to reach its maximum (p power. High temperatures are reached by 10 min at the end of fiber optic bundle of light cables and endoscopes with both halogen and xenon light sources. This heat generation is largely due to the radiated power in the visible light spectrum.

  12. Alcohol sensor based on u-bent hetero-structured fiber optic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrialova, Sefi N.; Hatta, Agus M.; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo

    2016-11-01

    A sensor based on a fiber optic hetero-structure to determine the concentration of alcohol has been proposed. The structure of the sensing probe in this research is a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) which bent into Ushaped and soon called as SMS u-bent. The SMS structure was chosen to get a higher sensitivity. This research utilizes the principle of multimode interference and evanescent field by modifying the cladding with various alcohol concentration. Testing of the sensor's performance has been done by measuring the sensor's power output response to the length of the SMS fiber optic, bending diameter, and alcohol concentration. Based on the experiment result, the ubent SMS fiber optic with 50 mm bending diameter and 63 mm MMF lenght has the highest sensitivity, 3.87 dB/% and the minimum resolution, 0.26 x 10-3 %.

  13. Pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zefeng Wang; Yongming Hu; Zhou Meng; Ming Ni

    2008-01-01

    A novel pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for the acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones is described and demonstrated.The measurement principle is introduced in detail.An experimental system,which interrogates an interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with this method,is designed.The acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of the fiber-optic hydrophone is measured over the frequency range of 20-2500Hz.The measured acoustic sensitivity is about-156.5dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation lower than ±1.2dB,which is in good agreement with the results obtained by the method of phase generated carrier.The experimental results testify the validity of this new method which has the advantages of no electric elements in the sensing head,the simplicity of signal processing,and wide working bandwidth.

  14. Average modulation transfer function of line-array fiber-optic image bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang(王慧); Yang Xiang(向阳); Bingxi Yu(禹秉熙)

    2004-01-01

    The image quality evaluation in fiber-optic image bundles was addressed by the modulation transfer function(MTF).With the definition of the contrast transfer function(CTF),the MTF model of line-array fiber-optic image bundles was established and analyzed numerically.The average MTF was carefully evaluated by considering the influence of phase match on the MTF between input pattern and fiber-optic image bundles.In this paper,the average MTF is mean arithmetical value on the MTFs of eight different phases.The results show that,for certain fiber diameter and spatial frequency,the relationship between the core diameter and the average MTF is inverse proportion; for certain fiber cladding thickness,the relationship between the core diameter and the average MTF is also inverse proportion.And at Nyquist frequency,the MTF value is near 0.5.

  15. Active vibration control using a modal-domain fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David E.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-loop control experiment is described in which vibrations of a cantilevered beam are suppressed using measurements from a modal-domain fiber optic sensor. Modal-domain sensors are interference between the modes of a few-mode optical waveguide to detect strain. The fiber is bonded along the length of the beam and provides a measurement related to the strain distribution on the surface of the beam. A model for the fiber optic sensor is derived, and this model is integrated with the dynamic model of the beam. A piezoelectric actuator is also bonded to the beam and used to provide control forces. Control forces are obtained through dynamic compensation of the signal from the fiber optic sensor. The compensator is implemented with a real-time digital controller. Analytical models are verified by comparing simulations to experimental results for both open-loop and closed-loop configurations.

  16. Development and Application of Fiber-Optic Sensors in Environmental and Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickelt, Lars Fledelius

    The light guiding properties of optical fibers are the fundament for fiber-optic sensors. The composition of the fiber materials as well as the fabrication methods for both glass optical fibers and plastic optical fibers (POF) are useful knowledge for improvements of the sensor design. A majority...... of sensing materials includes imbedded luminescent dyes and all O2 fiber-optic sensors are based on O2 quenching of a luminophore. The mechanisms of luminescence and O2 quenching are described. A new procedure for etching a recess in the tip of multimode graded index optical glass fibers was used to improve...... inside vials with polymorphonuclear leukocytes revealed strong O2 consumption. The O2 level was measured from outside the vials with a POF. A new method for producing fiber-optic microprobes for measuring scalar irradiance is presented along with an experimental setup for measuring the isotropic response...

  17. Distributed fiber optic sensors embedded in technical textiles for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, Katerina; Lenke, Philipp; Liehr, Sascha; Noether, Nils; Wendt, Mario; Wosniok, Aleksander

    2010-09-01

    Technical textiles with embedded distributed fiber optic sensors have been developed for the purposes of structural health monitoring in geotechnical and civil engineering. The distributed fiber optic sensors are based on Brillouin scattering in silica optical fibers and OTDR in polymer optical fibers. Such "smart" technical textiles can be used for reinforcement of geotechnical and masonry structures and the embedded fiber optic sensors can provide information about the condition of the structures and detect the presence of any damages and destructions in real time. Thus, structural health monitoring of critical geotechnical and civil infrastructures can be realized. The paper highlights the results achieved in this innovative field in the framework of several German and European projects.

  18. Active vibration control using a modal-domain fiber optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David E.

    1992-01-01

    A closed-loop control experiment is described in which vibrations of a cantilevered beam are suppressed using measurements from a modal-domain fiber optic sensor. Modal-domain sensors are interference between the modes of a few-mode optical waveguide to detect strain. The fiber is bonded along the length of the beam and provides a measurement related to the strain distribution on the surface of the beam. A model for the fiber optic sensor is derived, and this model is integrated with the dynamic model of the beam. A piezoelectric actuator is also bonded to the beam and used to provide control forces. Control forces are obtained through dynamic compensation of the signal from the fiber optic sensor. The compensator is implemented with a real-time digital controller. Analytical models are verified by comparing simulations to experimental results for both open-loop and closed-loop configurations.

  19. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Lv

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  20. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  1. Fiber-Optic Sensors for Measurements of Torsion, Twist and Rotation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Budinski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical measurement of mechanical parameters is gaining significant commercial interest in different industry sectors. Torsion, twist and rotation are among the very frequently measured mechanical parameters. Recently, twist/torsion/rotation sensors have become a topic of intense fiber-optic sensor research. Various sensing concepts have been reported. Many of those have different properties and performances, and many of them still need to be proven in out-of-the laboratory use. This paper provides an overview of basic approaches and a review of current state-of-the-art in fiber optic sensors for measurements of torsion, twist and/or rotation.Invited Paper

  2. Huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Bai, Wei; Guo, Huiyong; Wen, Hongqiao; Yu, Haihu; Jiang, Desheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the work on huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Fiber Optic Sensing Technology (NEL-FOST), Wuhan University of Technology, China. A versatile drawing tower grating sensor network based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is firstly proposed and demonstrated. The sensing network is interrogated with time- and wavelength-division multiplexing method, which is very promising for the large-scale sensing network.

  3. Fiber optic magnetic field sensor based on the TbDyFe rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Jiang, Yi

    2014-08-01

    We present, and experimentally demonstrate, a fiber optic magnetic field sensor for the measurement of a weak alternating magnetic field, based on a TbDyFe rod. The fiber optic magnetic field sensor is constructed in a Michelson interferometer configuration, and the phase-generated carrier demodulation is used to obtain the time-varying phase shift induced by the applied magnetic field. A high sensitivity of up to 3.6 × 10-2 V μT - 1 (rms) with a resolution of 23 pT/√Hz (rms) at 50 Hz is achieved. Experimental results show that the sensor exhibits excellent linearity and reversibility.

  4. Unbalanced Michelson's interferometer as a fiber optic distributed sensor of external signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, M.; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek

    2001-08-01

    The subject of this work is a novel fiber optic distributed sensor system. The system uses a technique called multiplexed reflectometric interferometry to measure dynamic strain in a network of single mode optical fiber sensors. The sensor is constructed on unbalanced fiber optic Michelson's interferometer is activated by series of double pulse. The time interval between those pulses depends on the length of the section of sensor. Acousto-optical modulator acts as an optical frequency shifter. A change in a frequency of electrical pulses exciting the modulator result in a frequency shift in each generated wave packet.

  5. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  6. Dual random phase encoding: a temporal approach for fiber optic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Duchowicz, Ricardo; Torroba, Roberto; Sicre, Enrique E

    2008-04-10

    We analyze the dual random phase encoding technique in the temporal domain to evaluate its potential application for secure data transmission in fiber optic links. To take into account the optical fiber multiplexing capabilities, the noise content of the signal is restricted when multiple channels are transmitted over a single fiber optic link. We also discuss some mechanisms for producing encoded time-limited as well as bandwidth-limited signals and a comparison with another recently proposed technique is made. Numerical simulations have been carried out to analyze the system performance. The results indicate that this multiplexing encryption method could be a good alternative compared with other well-established methods.

  7. Development and Ground-Test Validation of Fiber Optic Sensor Attachment Techniques for Hot Structures Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony; Hudson, Larry D.; Richards, W. Lance

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Optic Strain Measurements: a) Successfully attached silica fiber optic sensors to both metallics and composites; b) Accomplished valid EFPI strain measurements to 1850 F; c) Successfully attached EFPI sensors to large scale hot-structures; and d) Attached and thermally validated FBG bond and epsilon(sub app). Future Development a) Improve characterization of sensors on C-C and C-SiC substrates; b) Apply application to other composites such as SiC-SiC; c) Assist development of interferometer based Sapphire sensor currently being conducted under a Phase II SBIR; and d) Complete combined thermal/mechanical testing of FBG on composite substrates in controlled laboratory environment.

  8. Results of a portable fiber-optic weigh-in-motion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhs, J.D.; Jordan, J.K.; Scudiere, M.B.; Tobin, K.W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on a portable, low speed fiber-optic weigh-in motion system are described that demonstrate the applicability of fiber-optic-based sensors in transportation, defense, and law enforcement applications where accurate weight determination of moving vehicles is necessary. Results are given on the systems' dynamic range (0.1--30 metric tons), velocity range (up to 5 km/h), accuracy error (0.5--3.0%), and repeatability. Also included in the paper is a discussion of the sources of error associated with low-speed weigh-in-motion systems and methods of minimizing these errors for practical deployment.

  9. Results of a portable fiber optic weigh-in-motion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Jordan, John K.; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental results on a portable, low-speed fiber-optic weigh-in-motion system are described that demonstrate the applicability of fiber-optic-based sensors in transportation, defense, and law enforcement applications where accurate weight determination of moving vehicles is necessary. Results are given on the systems' dynamic range (0.1 - 30 metric tons), velocity range (up to 5 km/h), accuracy error (0.5 - 3.0%), and repeatability. Also included in the paper is a discussion of the sources of error associated with low speed weigh-in-motion systems and methods of minimizing these errors for practical deployment.

  10. Results of a portable fiber-optic weigh-in-motion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhs, J.D.; Jordan, J.K.; Scudiere, M.B.; Tobin, K.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Experimental results on a portable, low speed fiber-optic weigh-in motion system are described that demonstrate the applicability of fiber-optic-based sensors in transportation, defense, and law enforcement applications where accurate weight determination of moving vehicles is necessary. Results are given on the systems` dynamic range (0.1--30 metric tons), velocity range (up to 5 km/h), accuracy error (0.5--3.0%), and repeatability. Also included in the paper is a discussion of the sources of error associated with low-speed weigh-in-motion systems and methods of minimizing these errors for practical deployment.

  11. A bridge-style fiber-optic weigh-in-motion sensor for military vehicle monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wei, Zhanxiong; Chen, Bingquan; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2005-05-01

    This paper introduces a novel design of "bridge style" fiber-optic weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensor using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. Compared with other designs of fiber-optic WIM sensors, the bridge-style design is reliable, sensitive and can bear more loads. With these advantages, the bridge-style WIM sensor is specifically suitable for heavy vehicle dynamic weighing, especially for military vehicles, cargos and equipments. Experiment is conducted and the results show good repeatability and sensitivity under large loads. The minimum achieved resolvable weight is 7.1 kilograms. Finally, WIM sensor on-site installation method is suggested.

  12. A Monotonically Increasing Lower Bound on the Capacity of the Fiber-Optical Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Keykhosravi, Kamran; Durisi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An achievable rate is derived for the fiber-optical channel, described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation and discretized in time and space. The model takes into account the effects of nonlinearity, dispersion, and noise. The obtained achievable rate goes to infinity with a pre-log factor of one half as the power grows large. Since any achievable rate is a lower bound on the capacity of the same channel, the result proves that the capacity of the discretized fiber-optical channel grows unboundedly.

  13. Specifics of short-wavelength generation in a continuous wave fiber optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobina, E. A.; Mishra, V.; Kablukov, S. I.; Singh, S. P.; Varshney, S. K.; Babin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate factors limiting short-wavelength generation and therefore tuning range of the continuous wave all-fiber optical parametric oscillator based on birefringent photonic crystal fiber pumped by a tunable linearly polarized ytterbium-doped fiber laser. Influence of the longitudinal dispersion fluctuations in the fiber on the threshold of the fiber optical parametric oscillators is numerically studied. It is shown that even low fluctuations (<0.5 nm) of the zero dispersion wavelength in 18 m-long fiber result in a significant increase of the threshold at large parametric shifts.

  14. An analog modulation and demodulation method employing LVDT signal conditioner for fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejiang; Rao, Qi; Zhang, Minjie; Hu, Keke; Ruan, Yefeng

    2017-09-01

    An analog method to modulate and demodulate fiber-optic interferometric sensors employing a linear variable differential transformer signal conditioner to generate sine modulation wave and demodulate phase-modulated signal from the photodetector’s output is presented in this letter. No external lock-in amplifiers or digital components are used in this design. All the necessary components for signal processing are integrated in a single analog electronic microchip AD698, which reduces the system’s complexity significantly. After implementation on an interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope as an example, this method demonstrates a bias stability of 0.063 deg h-1 (i.e. 0.220 µrad).

  15. Light Path Model of Fiber Optic Liquid Level Sensor Considering Residual Liquid Film on the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The working principle of the refractive-type fiber optic liquid level sensor is analyzed in detail based on the light refraction principle. The optic path models are developed in consideration of common simplification and the residual liquid film on the glass tube wall. The calculating formulae for the model are derived, constraint conditions are obtained, influencing factors are discussed, and the scopes and skills of application are analyzed through instance simulations. The research results are useful in directing the correct usage of the fiber optic liquid level sensor, especially in special cases, such as those involving viscous liquid in the glass tube monitoring.

  16. Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    The development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems is described. LWIR fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of trace chemical detection systems based in the 8 to 12 micron region. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow waveguide technology geared specifically for LWIR spectroscopy, including a reduction in both the length dependent loss and the bending loss while maintaining relatively high beam quality. Results will be presented from tests conducted with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

  17. Theoretical model of the modulation transfer function for fiber optic taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoxiang; Tian, Weijian; Bin, XiangLi

    2005-02-01

    Fiber optic taper has been used more and more widely as a relay optical component in the integrated taper assembly image intensified sensors for military and medical imaging application. In this paper, the transmission characteristic of energy in the taper is analyzed, and following the generalized definition of the modulation transfer function for sampled imaging system, a spatial averaged impulse response and a corresponding MTF component that are inherent in the sampling process of taper are deduced, and the mathematical model for evaluating the modulation transfer function of fiber optic taper is built. Finally, the dynamic and static modulation transfer function curves simulated by computer have been exhibited.

  18. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Sensor for Subsea Fiber-Optic Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole; Brower, David; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin; Tang, Henry

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. This paper provides a summary of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and design refinements of the device. The results of the laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are included in this paper. Limitations of the initial design were identified and future design improvements were proposed. These new features will enhance the coupling of the device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based coupling devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on subsea structures, flowlines or risers. The work described in this paper investigates the design of a friction-based coupling device (friction clamp), which is applicable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column and those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiber-optic sensors that are bonded to a metal clamshell with a high-friction coating. The friction clamp has a single hinge design to facilitate the operation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force on the structure. The friction clamp can be installed by divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating, and in the design and testing of the prototype clamp device. Four-inch diameter and eight-inch diameter sub-scale friction clamp prototypes were built and tested to evaluate the strain

  19. Development and Testing of a Friction-Based Post-Installable Sensor for Subsea Fiber-Optic Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Nicole L.; Brower, David V.; Le, Suy Q.; Seaman, Calvin H.; Tang, Henry H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a friction-based coupling device for a fiber-optic monitoring system that can be deployed on existing subsea structures. This paper provides a summary of the design concept, prototype development, prototype performance testing, and design refinements of the device. The results of the laboratory testing of the first prototype performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are included in this paper. Limitations of the initial design were identified and future design improvements were proposed. These new features will enhance the coupling of the device and improve the monitoring system measurement capabilities. A major challenge of a post-installed instrumentation monitoring system is to ensure adequate coupling between the instruments and the structure of interest for reliable measurements. Friction-based coupling devices have the potential to overcome coupling limitations caused by marine growth and soil contamination on subsea structures, flowlines or risers. The work described in this paper investigates the design of a friction-based coupling device (friction clamp), which is applicable for pipelines and structures that are suspended in the water column and those that are resting on the seabed. The monitoring elements consist of fiber-optic sensors that are bonded to a metal clamshell with a high-friction coating. The friction clamp has a single hinge design to facilitate the operation of the clamp and dual rows of opposing fasteners to distribute the clamping force on the structure. The friction clamp can be installed by divers in shallow depths or by remotely operated vehicles in deep-water applications. NASA-JSC was involved in the selection and testing of the friction coating, and in the design and testing of the prototype clamp device. Four-inch diameter and eight-inch diameter sub-scale friction clamp prototypes were built and tested to evaluate the strain

  20. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe with integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile imaging technique and has great potential in tissue characterization for breast cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance. In addition to structural difference, cancerous breast tissue is usually stiffer compared to normal adipose breast tissue. However, previous studies on compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) are qualitative rather than quantitative. It is challenging to identify the cancerous status of tissue based on qualitative OCE results obtained from different measurement sessions or from different patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop technique that integrates structural imaging and force sensing, for quantitative elasticity characterization of breast tissue. In this work, we demonstrate a quantitative OCE (qOCE) microsurgery device which simultaneously quantifies force exerted to tissue and measures the resultant tissue deformation. The qOCE system is based on a spectral domain OCT engine operated at 1300 nm and a probe with an integrated Febry-Perot (FP) interferometric cavity at its distal end. The FP cavity is formed by the cleaved end of the lead-in fiber and the end surface of a GRIN lens which allows light to incident into tissue for structural imaging. The force exerted to tissue is quantified by the change of FP cavity length which is interrogated by a fiber-optic common-paths phase resolved OCT system with sub-nanometer sensitivity. Simultaneously, image of the tissue structure is acquired from photons returned from tissue through the GRIN lens. Tissue deformation is obtained through Doppler analysis. Tissue elasticity can be quantified by comparing the force exerted and tissue deformation.