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Sample records for lennard-jones model glass

  1. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  2. Glass transitions in one-, two-, three-, and four-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Ralf; St-Onge, Denis A; Patterson, Steve [Physics Department, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB, E4L 1E6 (Canada); Kob, Walter [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II and CNRS, 34095 Montpellier Cedex (France)], E-mail: rbruening@mta.ca

    2009-01-21

    We investigate the calorimetric liquid-glass transition by performing simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture in one through four dimensions. Starting at a high temperature, the systems are cooled to T = 0 and heated back to the ergodic liquid state at constant rates. Glass transitions are observed in two, three and four dimensions as a hysteresis between the cooling and heating curves. This hysteresis appears in the energy and pressure diagrams, and the scanning rate dependence of the area and height of the hysteresis can be described using power laws. The one-dimensional system does not experience a glass transition but its specific heat curve resembles the shape of the D{>=}2 results in the supercooled liquid regime above the glass transition. As D increases, the radial distribution functions reflect reduced geometric constraints. Nearest neighbor distances become smaller with increasing D due to interactions between nearest and next-nearest neighbors. Simulation data for the glasses are compared with crystal and melting data obtained with a Lennard-Jones system with only one type of particle and we find that with increasing D crystallization becomes increasingly more difficult.

  3. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbante, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano - Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32 - 20133 Milano (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano - Via La Masa 34 - 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  4. Viscous Growth in Spinodal Decomposition of the Two-component Lennard-Jones Model in Two Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, M.; Toxvaerd, S.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of phase separation of a two-component Lennard-Jones model in three dimensions is investigated by means of large scale molecular dynamics simulation. A systematic study over a wide range of quench temperatures within the coexistence region shows that the binary system reaches...

  5. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-06-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH4, N2, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO2 and C2 H6.

  6. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  7. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing ...

  8. Phase Diagram of Kob-Andersen-Type Binary Lennard-Jones Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-04-01

    The binary Kob-Andersen (KA) Lennard-Jones mixture is the standard model for computational studies of viscous liquids and the glass transition. For very long simulations, the viscous KA system crystallizes, however, by phase separating into a pure A particle phase forming a fcc crystal. We present the thermodynamic phase diagram for KA-type mixtures consisting of up to 50% small (B ) particles showing, in particular, that the melting temperature of the standard KA system at liquid density 1.2 is 1.028(3) in A particle Lennard-Jones units. At large B particle concentrations, the system crystallizes into the CsCl crystal structure. The eutectic corresponding to the fcc and CsCl structures is cutoff in a narrow interval of B particle concentrations around 26% at which the bipyramidal orthorhombic PuBr3 structure is the thermodynamically stable phase. The melting temperature's variation with B particle concentration at two constant pressures, as well as at the constant density 1.2, is estimated from simulations at pressure 10.19 using isomorph theory. Our data demonstrate approximate identity between the melting temperature and the onset temperature below which viscous dynamics appears. Finally, the nature of the solid-liquid interface is briefly discussed.

  9. Chemical Potential of a Lennard Jones Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebonovic, V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present results of analytical calculation of chemical potential of a Lennard Jones (LJ fluid performed in two ways: by using the thermodynamical formalism and the formalism of statistical mechanics. The integration range is divided into two regions. In the small distance region, which is $rleqsigma$ in the usual notation, the integration range had to be cut off in order to avoid the occurence of divergences. In the large distance region, the calculation is technically simpler. The calculation reported here will be useful in all kinds of studies concerning phase equilibrium in a LJ fluid. Interesting kinds of such systems are the giant planets and the icy satellites in various planetary systems, but also the (so far hypothetical quark stars.

  10. Chemical potential of a Lennard Jones fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čelebonović V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present results of analytical calculation of chemical potential of a Lennard Jones (LJ fluid performed in two ways: by using the thermodynamical formalism and the formalism of statistical mechanics. The integration range is divided into two regions. In the small distance region, which is r ≤ σ in the usual notation, the integration range had to be cut off in order to avoid the occurrence of divergences. In the large distance region, the calculation is technically simpler. The calculation reported here will be useful in all kinds of studies concerning phase equilibrium in a LJ fluid. Interesting kinds of such systems are the giant planets and the icy satellites in various planetary systems, but also the (so far hypothetical quark stars.

  11. More on the melting of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Avalos-Borja, M.; Blaisten-Barojas, E.

    1989-01-01

    The melting of 13-atom clusters interacting via Lennard-Jones potentials has been revisited using molecular dynamics coupled to steepest descent quenches. A procedure was devised to account for the fraction of times the global and local minima of the potential energy surface are accessed during a long trajectory. This quantity presents a sigmoid shape. A phenomenological model of melting is given in terms of a correlated walk that maps the short time excursions among the global and local minima in configuration space. Comparison between the simulation results and the theoretical model shows that the melting transition is well described in terms of the temperature changes of the fraction of high energy minima accessed during the cluster trajectory. Cooperativity is clear from the S shape of this quantity, i.e., the access to a local minimum favours the access to other local minima. (orig.)

  12. Mapping the magic numbers in binary Lennard-Jones clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doye, Jonathan P K; Meyer, Lars

    2005-08-05

    Using a global optimization approach that directly searches for the composition of greatest stability, we have been able to find the particularly stable structures for binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms for a range of Lennard-Jones parameters. In particular, we have shown that just having atoms of different sizes leads to a remarkable stabilization of polytetrahedral structures, including both polyicosahedral clusters and at larger sizes structures with disclination lines.

  13. Localized fluidity modes and the topology of the constant-potential-energy hypersurfaces of Lennard-Jones matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, Rodney M J; Madsen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Sections of configuration space for Lennard-Jones matter were obtained by probing all the normal-mode energy profiles, following diagonalization of the dynamical matrix for a 240-particle system. For the crystal and sufficiently cold glass, these are single welled, whereas increasing numbers...... of double wells occur as the glass is warmed toward the fluid. This indicates that there might be a fundamental difference between the topologies of the constant-potential-energy hypersurfaces of crystalline and noncrystalline Lennard-Jones matter....

  14. Collision kernels in the eikonal approximation for Lennard-Jones interaction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, S.

    1985-03-01

    The velocity changing collisions are conveniently described by collisional kernels. These kernels depend on an interaction potential and there is a necessity for evaluating them for realistic interatomic potentials. Using the collision kernels, we are able to investigate the redistribution of atomic population's caused by the laser light and velocity changing collisions. In this paper we present the method of evaluating the collision kernels in the eikonal approximation. We discuss the influence of the potential parameters Rsub(o)sup(i), epsilonsub(o)sup(i) on kernel width for a given atomic state. It turns out that unlike the collision kernel for the hard sphere model of scattering the Lennard-Jones kernel is not so sensitive to changes of Rsub(o)sup(i) as the previous one. Contrary to the general tendency of approximating collisional kernels by the Gaussian curve, kernels for the Lennard-Jones potential do not exhibit such a behaviour. (author)

  15. Origin of line tension for a Lennard-Jones nanodroplet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, Joost; Weijs, Joost H.; Marchand, Antonin; Andreotti, Bruno; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2011-01-01

    The existence and origin of line tension has remained controversial in literature. To address this issue, we compute the shape of Lennard-Jones nanodrops using molecular dynamics and compare them to density functional theory in the approximation of the sharp kink interface. We show that the

  16. Free energy of the Lennard-Jones solid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoef, Martin Anton

    2000-01-01

    We have determined a simple expression for the absolute Helmholtz free energy of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid from molecular dynamics simulations. The pressure and energy data from these simulations have been fitted to a simple functional form (18 parameters) for densities ranging from around

  17. Gas-solid coexistence of the Lennard-Jones system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoef, Martin Anton

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the absolute free energies of the Lennard-Jones system at solid–liquid and solid–gas coexistence were computed from Monte Carlo simulations [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7145 (2002)]. In this note, we show that the values along the sublimation line are in good agreement with the results from an

  18. Analytical tools for solitons and periodic waves corresponding to phonons on Lennard-Jones lattices in helical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ovidio, Francesco; Bohr, Henrik; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-01-01

    We study the propagation of solitons along the hydrogen bonds of an alpha helix. Modeling the hydrogen and peptide bonds with Lennard-Jones potentials, we show that the solitons can appear spontaneously and have long lifetimes. Remarkably, even if no explicit solution is known for the Lennard-Jon...

  19. Solitons in a One-Dimensional Lennard-Jones Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, ISHIMORI; Department of Applied Mathematics and Physics Kyoto University

    1982-01-01

    Nonlinear waves in a one-dimensional lattice with (2n, n) Lennard-Jones potential are studied in small-amplitude and long-wavelength approximations. Equations derived are classified into three types according to the value of the force-range parameter n. For n=2 and ≧4, we get the Benjamin-Ono equation and the Korteweg-de Vries equation, respectively.

  20. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2013-09-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Origin of line tension for a Lennard-Jones nanodroplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Joost H.; Marchand, Antonin; Andreotti, Bruno; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2011-02-01

    The existence and origin of line tension has remained controversial in literature. To address this issue, we compute the shape of Lennard-Jones nanodrops using molecular dynamics and compare them to density functional theory in the approximation of the sharp kink interface. We show that the deviation from Young's law is very small and would correspond to a typical line tension length scale (defined as line tension divided by surface tension) similar to the molecular size and decreasing with Young's angle. We propose an alternative interpretation based on the geometry of the interface at the molecular scale.

  2. Melting of 2D monatomic solids: Lennard-Jones system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Y.M.; Guo, Z.C.

    1987-09-01

    The Lennard-Jones interaction has been introduced into the Collins mix lattice of 2D liquids. By means of rigorous calculation of the total potential and the free area, the Gibbs functions for 2D liquid and solid have been derived. The melting line obtained from the phase transition equation agrees quite well with the result of recent computer simulation experiments. The obtained reduced temperature of the triple point T* t =0.438 agrees with the data measured in experiments of some inert gas monolayers adsorbed on graphite as well as in computer simulation experiments. (author). 11 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arno; Dyre, J. C.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    S/T , where ρ is density, T is temperature, and γ S is a material specific scaling exponent) is an approximation to a more general scaling predicted by the isomorph theory. Furthermore, the isomorph theory provides an explanation for Rosenfeld scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being...... functions of excess entropy) which has been observed in simulations of both molecular and polymeric systems. Doing molecular dynamics simulations of flexible Lennard-Jones chains (LJC) with rigid bonds, we here provide the first detailed test of the isomorph theory applied to flexible chain molecules. We...... confirm the existence of isomorphs, which are curves in the phase diagram along which the dynamics is invariant in the appropriate reduced units. This holds not only for the relaxation times but also for the full time dependence of the dynamics, including chain specific dynamics such as the end...

  4. Insight into induced charges at metal surfaces and biointerfaces using a polarizable Lennard-Jones potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geada, Isidro Lorenzo; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Jamil, Tariq; Sulpizi, Marialore; Heinz, Hendrik

    2018-02-19

    Metallic nanostructures have become popular for applications in therapeutics, catalysts, imaging, and gene delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations are gaining influence to predict nanostructure assembly and performance; however, instantaneous polarization effects due to induced charges in the free electron gas are not routinely included. Here we present a simple, compatible, and accurate polarizable potential for gold that consists of a Lennard-Jones potential and a harmonically coupled core-shell charge pair for every metal atom. The model reproduces the classical image potential of adsorbed ions as well as surface, bulk, and aqueous interfacial properties in excellent agreement with experiment. Induced charges affect the adsorption of ions onto gold surfaces in the gas phase at a strength similar to chemical bonds while ions and charged peptides in solution are influenced at a strength similar to intermolecular bonds. The proposed model can be applied to complex gold interfaces, electrode processes, and extended to other metals.

  5. An equation of state for two-center Lennard-Jones fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecke, M.; Müller, A.; Winkelmann, J.; Fischer, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new equation of state (EOS) is proposed for the Helmholzt energy F of two-center Lennard-Jones fluids. The EOS is written in the form of a generalized van der Waals equation, F=F H + F A , where F H accounts for the hard-body interaction and F A for the attractive dispersion forces. The equation is constructed on the basis of previously published data sets and results from new extensive computer simulation studies. It correlates pressures and internal energies over a wide fluid range for two-center model fluids with elongations up to 0.67 in reduced units with a high accuracy and shows an excellent description of the vapor-liquid coexistence properties. Comparisons of results from the new EOS with other data sets and recently published VLE from the NpT plus test particle method show very good agreement.

  6. Viscoelastic crack propagation and closing with Lennard-Jones surface forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J A

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the opening and closing of a crack in a viscoelastic solid has been made assuming a Lennard-Jones law of force acting between the crack faces. The results are compared with those of an earlier analysis in which a simple Dugdale model of the surface forces was assumed. The approximate 'reciprocal rule' between the apparent surface energies for opening and closing cracks is confirmed. At low speeds a linear relation between the apparent surface energy and the crack speed is found. The lengths of the process zone for opening and closing cracks are found to be very similar and so presumably are not responsible for the very different values of the apparent surface energy

  7. Viscoelastic crack propagation and closing with Lennard-Jones surface forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, J A [Department of Engineering, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-21

    An analysis of the opening and closing of a crack in a viscoelastic solid has been made assuming a Lennard-Jones law of force acting between the crack faces. The results are compared with those of an earlier analysis in which a simple Dugdale model of the surface forces was assumed. The approximate 'reciprocal rule' between the apparent surface energies for opening and closing cracks is confirmed. At low speeds a linear relation between the apparent surface energy and the crack speed is found. The lengths of the process zone for opening and closing cracks are found to be very similar and so presumably are not responsible for the very different values of the apparent surface energy.

  8. Spray flow-network flow transition of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2010-07-01

    We simulate gas-liquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model. The model consists of two types of Lennard-Jones particles, which we call liquid particles and gas particles. These two types of particles are distinguished by their mass and strength of interaction: a liquid particle has heavier mass and stronger interaction than a gas particle. By simulations with various initial number densities of these particles, we found that there is a transition from a spray flow to a network flow with an increase of the number density of the liquid particles. At the transition point, the size of the liquid droplets follows a power-law distribution, while it follows an exponential distribution when the number density of the liquid particles is lower than the critical value. The comparison between the transition of the model and that of models of percolation is discussed. The change of the average droplet size with the initial number density of the gas particles is also presented. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Numerical computations of the Lennard-Jones resonances and ''relative displacements'' of the scattered atomic beams from the system He/LiF(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of the attractive part of the interaction potential on the scattering of He atoms from a LiF(001) surface. We calculate, in particular, the Lennard-Jones resonances on the intensities and the phases of the scattered amplitudes, using a square well in the front of a hard corrugated surface model. We show that the amplitudes for incident energies smaller than the depth of the well are dominated by the resonances

  10. Non-equilibrium surface tension of the vapour-liquid interface of active Lennard-Jones particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paliwal, Siddharth; Prymidis, Vasileios; Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    We study a three-dimensional system of self-propelled Brownian particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones potential. Using Brownian dynamics simulations in an elongated simulation box, we investigate the steady states of vapour-liquid phase coexistence of active Lennard-Jones particles with planar

  11. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-14

    The vapor–liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  12. Premelting, solid-fluid equilibria, and thermodynamic properties in the high density region based on the Lennard-Jones potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Andreas; Mausbach, Peter; Vrabec, Jadran

    2017-10-01

    The Lennard-Jones potential is used to study the high density fluid and face centered cubic solid state region, including solid-fluid equilibria. Numerous thermodynamic properties are considered, elucidating the behavior of matter in this poorly studied region. The present molecular simulation results are extensively compared to the latest and most accurate equation of state models for fluid and solid phases. It is shown that current models do not cover the thermodynamics of the system adequately near the solid-fluid phase transition. Furthermore, thermodynamic stability is analyzed, indicating that published solid-fluid coexistence data may not be correct at high temperatures. Particular attention is paid to the premelting zone, a range of states close to the melting line, which is characterized by strong variations of several thermodynamic properties. Because the underlying microscopic mechanisms are not yet fully understood, it is hoped that these data may contribute to the development of a theoretical framework for describing premelting effects.

  13. Selection and Validation of Charge and Lennard-Jones Parameters for QM/MM Simulations of Hydrocarbon Interactions with Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Paul M; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T

    2011-06-14

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models are an appealing method for performing zeolite simulations. In QM/MM, a small cluster chosen to encompass the active center is described by QM, while the rest of the zeolite is described by MM. In the present study, we demonstrate that the charges and Lennard-Jones parameters on Si and O must be chosen properly for QM/MM calculations of adsorption energies and activation energies to agree closely with full QM calculations. The selection of parameters for Si and O is based on using the ωB97X-D functional for DFT calculations of the QM region, which is effective in capturing the effects of van der Waals interactions. A comparison of the heats of adsorption for a variety of adsorbates and activation energies for the cracking of propane and butane reveals that energies derived from QM/MM calculation carried out with appropriately selected MM parameters agree to within an rms error of ∼1.5 kcal/mol with QM calculations. To avoid reparametrization for new substrates, Lennard-Jones zeolite parameters are chosen to be compatible with existing CHARMM parameters. Transferability of these parameters is demonstrated by tests utilizing the B3LYP density functional and simulations of MFI and FAU zeolites. Moreover, the computational time for QM/MM calculations is considerably lower than that for QM calculations, and the ratio of computational times decreases rapidly with increasing size of the cluster used to represent the zeolite.

  14. Effect of Energy Polydispersity on the Nature of Lennard-Jones Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In the companion paper [T. S. Ingebrigtsen and H. Tanaka, J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11052 (2015)] the effect of size polydispersity on the nature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids, which represent most molecular liquids without hydrogen bonds, was studied. More specifically, it was shown that even highly size polydisperse LJ liquids are Roskilde-simple (RS) liquids. RS liquids are liquids with strong correlation between constant volume equilibrium fluctuations of virial and potential energy and are s...

  15. Fluctuations and thermodynamic response functions in a Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Johnson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic response functions of a nearest-neighbor Lennard-Jones solid--heat capacity, thermal-expansion coefficient, compressibility, and elastic constants--are calculated directly from fluctuations using molecular-dynamics simulations. The algorithm used is the earlier Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics modified to take into account symmetry and rotation invariance of the system under investigation. The convergence is very fast and results are in good agreement with existing Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics results

  16. Melting in Two-Dimensional Lennard-Jones Systems: Observation of a Metastable Hexatic Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Kaplan, T.; Mostoller, M.

    1995-01-01

    Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of two-dimensional melting have been carried out using a recently revised Parrinello-Rahman scheme on massively parallel supercomputers. A metastable state is observed between the solid and liquid phases in Lennard-Jones systems of 36 864 and 102 400 atoms. This intermediate state shows the characteristics of the hexatic phase predicted by the theory of Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young

  17. Metastability, spectrum, and eigencurrents of the Lennard-Jones-38 network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Maria K.

    2014-01-01

    We develop computational tools for spectral analysis of stochastic networks representing energy landscapes of atomic and molecular clusters. Physical meaning and some properties of eigenvalues, left and right eigenvectors, and eigencurrents are discussed. We propose an approach to compute a collection of eigenpairs and corresponding eigencurrents describing the most important relaxation processes taking place in the system on its way to the equilibrium. It is suitable for large and complex stochastic networks where pairwise transition rates, given by the Arrhenius law, vary by orders of magnitude. The proposed methodology is applied to the network representing the Lennard-Jones-38 cluster created by Wales's group. Its energy landscape has a double funnel structure with a deep and narrow face-centered cubic funnel and a shallower and wider icosahedral funnel. However, the complete spectrum of the generator matrix of the Lennard-Jones-38 network has no appreciable spectral gap separating the eigenvalue corresponding to the escape from the icosahedral funnel. We provide a detailed description of the escape process from the icosahedral funnel using the eigencurrent and demonstrate a superexponential growth of the corresponding eigenvalue. The proposed spectral approach is compared to the methodology of the Transition Path Theory. Finally, we discuss whether the Lennard-Jones-38 cluster is metastable from the points of view of a mathematician and a chemical physicist, and make a connection with experimental works

  18. Formation of global energy minimim structures in the growth process of Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Koshelev, Andrey; Shutovich, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic numbers sequence for the clusters of noble gases atoms and compare...... for the clusters of noble gases atoms. Our method serves an efficient alternative to the global optimization techniques based on the Monte-Carlo simulations and it can be applied for the solution of a broad variety of problems in which atomic cluster structure is important....

  19. Evidence of hexatic phase formation in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones binary arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Johnson, W.L.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1996-01-01

    We report evidence of the hexatic phase formation in Lennard-Jones binary substitutional random arrays from isothermal-isobaric molecular-dynamics simulations. The hexatic phase is analogous to those predicted in Kosterlitz-Thouless theory of melting that is characterized by short-range translational order and quasi-long-range orientational order. At the crystal to hexatic phase transition, dislocation pairs are observed to unbind into isolated dislocations. Further disordering of the hexatic phase, however, does not lead to dissociation of dislocations into disclinations. Instead, the dislocations become clustered and form dislocation networks which results in formation of amorphous phases. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Replica exchange molecular simulation of Lennard-Jones particles in a two-dimensional confined system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideo; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2017-05-01

    Confined systems exhibit interesting properties that are applied to the fields of lubrication, adhesion and nanotechnology. The replica exchange molecular simulation method was applied to calculate the phase equilibrium points of Lennard-Jones particles in a two-dimensional confined system. The liquid-solid phase equilibrium points and the solid structure with a dependency of the slit width were determined and the order parameter of the solid structure was analyzed. Such confined systems are shown to be favorable for manipulation of the phase equilibrium points.

  1. Nonlinear transport processes and fluid dynamics: Cylindrical Couette flow of Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, R.E.; Eu, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we report on calculations of flow profiles for cylindrical Couette flow of a Lennard-Jones fluid. The flow is subjected to a temperature gradient and thermoviscous effects are taken into consideration. We apply the generalized fluid dynamic equations which are provided by the modified moment method for the Boltzmann equation reported previously. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo direct simulation method by K. Nanbu [Phys. Fluids 27, 2632 (1984)] for most of Knudsen numbers for which the simulation data are available

  2. Self-diffusion coefficients of the metastable Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Chu; Zhou Youhua [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Marlow, W H; Hassan, Y A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: yhzhou@jhun.edu.cn

    2008-10-15

    Self-diffusion coefficients of a metastable Lennard-Jones vapor were obtained using the memory function formalism and the frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function at reduced temperatures from 0.75 to 1.0. The radial density distribution functions used to evaluate the second, fourth and sixth frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function were obtained from the restricted canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation (Corti and Debenedetti 1994 Chem. Eng. Sci. 49 2717). The self-diffusion coefficients at reduced temperature 0.75 do not vary monotonically as the density increases, and for the other three temperatures the self-diffusion coefficients vary normally.

  3. Stability limits for the supercooled liquid and superheated crystal of Lennard-Jones particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscar, Ernesto S; Martin, Daniel A; Grigera, Tomás S

    2017-07-21

    We have studied the limits of stability in the first order liquid-solid phase transition in a Lennard-Jones system by means of the short-time relaxation method and using the bond-orientational order parameter Q 6 . These limits are compared with the melting line. We have paid special attention to the supercooled liquid, comparing our results with the point where the free energy cost of forming a nucleating droplet goes to zero. We also indirectly estimate the dimension associated to the critical nucleus at the spinodal, expected to be fractal according to mean field theories of nucleation.

  4. Effect of gold nanoparticles on structure and dynamics of binary Lennard-Jones liquid: Wave-vector space analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Separdar, L.; Davatolhagh, S.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations at constant (N , V , T) are used to study the mutual effects of gold nanoparticles on the structure and dynamics of Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones (BLJ) liquid within the framework of mode coupling theory of dynamic glass transition in the reciprocal space. The results show the 'softening' effect of the gold nanoparticles on the liquid dynamics in terms of (i) reducing the mode coupling crossover temperature Tc with respect to that of the bulk BLJ (i.e. BLJ without nanoparticles), (ii) decreasing the time interval of β-relaxation, and (iii) decreasing the exponent γ characterizing the power-law behavior of the α-relaxation time. This softening effect is explained in terms of the van der Waals attraction between the gold atoms comprising the nanoparticle and the BLJ host atoms, such that adsorption of host atoms onto the nanoparticle surface creates more space or free-volume for the other atoms to diffuse. By the same token interactions of purely excluded-volume-type are expected to result in the opposite effect. It is also noted that, much unlike BLJ host particles, the dynamics of gold nanoparticles is much less dependent on the wave-vector and that it exhibits a nearly exponential behavior in the α-relaxation regime.

  5. Equation of state and Helmholtz free energy for the atomic system of the repulsive Lennard-Jones particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeinia, Ali; Feyzi, Farzaneh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2017-12-07

    Simple and accurate expressions are presented for the equation of state (EOS) and absolute Helmholtz free energy of a system composed of simple atomic particles interacting through the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential model in the fluid and solid phases. The introduced EOS has 17 and 22 coefficients for fluid and solid phases, respectively, which are regressed to the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation data over the reduced temperature range of 0.6≤T * ≤6.0 and the packing fraction range of 0.1 ≤ η ≤ 0.72. The average absolute relative percent deviation in fitting the EOS parameters to the MC data is 0.06 and 0.14 for the fluid and solid phases, respectively. The thermodynamic integration method is used to calculate the free energy using the MC simulation results. The Helmholtz free energy of the ideal gas is employed as the reference state for the fluid phase. For the solid phase, the values of the free energy at the reduced density equivalent to the close-packed of a hard sphere are used as the reference state. To check the validity of the predicted values of the Helmholtz free energy, the Widom particle insertion method and the Einstein crystal technique of Frenkel and Ladd are employed. The results obtained from the MC simulation approaches are well agreed to the EOS results, which show that the proposed model can reliably be utilized in the framework of thermodynamic theories.

  6. Influence of DC electric field on the Lennard-Jones potential and phonon vibrations of carbon nanotube on catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidi, Mohammadreza; Vaezzadeh, Majid; Badakhshan, Farzaneh

    2011-01-01

    Influence of DC electric field on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth in chemical vapor deposition is studied. Investigation of electric field effect in van der Waals interaction shows that increase in DC electric field raises the magnitude of attractive term of the Lennard-Jones potential. By using a theoretical model based on phonon vibrations of CNT on catalyst, it is shown that there is an optimum field for growth. Also it is observed that CNT under optimum electric field is longer than CNT in the absence of field. Finally, the relation between optimum DC electric field and type of catalyst is investigated and for some intervals of electric field, the best catalyst is introduced, which is very useful for experimental researches. -- Research highlights: → Influence of DC electric field on CNT growth in CVD. → Effect of electric field on van der Waals interaction between CNT and its catalyst. → Applying DC electric field increases attractive term of Lennard-Jonespotential. → There is an optimum DC field for CNT growth. → For catalyst with stronger van der Waals interaction, optimum field is smaller.

  7. Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase transition of the three-dimensional Lennard-Jones particles system is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The gas and liquid densities in the coexisting state are determined with high accuracy. The critical point is determined by the block density analysis of the Binder parameter with the aid of the law of rectilinear diameter. From the critical behavior of the gas-liquid coexisting density, the critical exponent of the order parameter is estimated to be β = 0.3285(7). Surface tension is estimated from interface broadening behavior due to capillary waves. From the critical behavior of the surface tension, the critical exponent of the correlation length is estimated to be ν = 0.63(4). The obtained values of β and ν are consistent with those of the Ising universality class. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Vacancies represent an important class of crystallographic defects, and their behaviors can be strongly coupled with relevant material properties. We report the rich dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals in several thermodynamic states. Specifically, we numerically observe significantly faster diffusion of the 2-point vacancy with two missing particles in comparison with other types of vacancies; it opens the possibility of doping 2-point vacancies into atomic materials to enhance atomic migration. In addition, the resulting dislocations in the healing of a long vacancy suggest the intimate connection between vacancies and topological defects that may provide an extra dimension in the engineering of defects in extensive crystalline materials for desired properties. We thank the financial support from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of some thermophysical properties of two-centre Lennard-Jones fluids along the vapour-liquid equilibrium curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronome, Gergely; Liszi, Janos; Szalai, Istvan

    The vapour pressures, saturated liquid and vapour densities, enthalpies of vaporization, isobaric, and saturation heat capacities are calculated for ethane and ethylene along their vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE) curves from Monte Carlo simulations using the extended NpT plus test particle (XNpT + TP) method (Boda, D., Liszi, J., and Szalai, I., 1995, Chem. Phys. Lett. , 235, 140). The substances are modelled by two-centre Lennard-Jones molecules of elongations L * = 0.67 for ethane and L * = 0.74 for ethylene. Simulation results are compared with correlated experimental data. In the case of ethylene new values are required for the model parameters to obtain a good agreement with experimental data along the VLE curve. Our results show that the XNpT + TP method is appropriate for the simulation of caloric properties of molecular fluids along the VLE curve.

  10. Scaling relation and regime map of explosive gas–liquid flow of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2012-02-01

    We study explosive gasliquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model of Lennard-Jones particle systems. A unique feature of our model is that it consists of two types of particles: liquid particles, which tend to form liquid droplets, and gas particles, which remain supercritical gaseous states under the depressurization realized by simulations. The system has a pipe-like structure similar to the model of a shock tube. We observed physical quantities and flow regimes in systems with various combinations of initial particle number densities and initial temperatures. It is observed that a physical quantity Q, such as pressure, at position z measured along a pipe-like system at time t follows a scaling relation Q(z,t)=Q(zt) with a scaling function Q(ζ). A similar scaling relation holds for time evolution of flow regimes in a system. These scaling relations lead to a regime map of explosive flows in parameter spaces of local physical quantities. The validity of the scaling relations of physical quantities means that physics of equilibrium systems, such as an equation of state, is applicable to explosive flows in our simulations, though the explosive flows involve highly nonequilibrium processes. In other words, if the breaking of the scaling relations is observed, it means that the explosive flows cannot be fully described by physics of equilibrium systems. We show the possibility of breaking of the scaling relations and discuss its implications in the last section. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-equilibrium surface tension of the vapour-liquid interface of active Lennard-Jones particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Siddharth; Prymidis, Vasileios; Filion, Laura; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-08-01

    We study a three-dimensional system of self-propelled Brownian particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones potential. Using Brownian dynamics simulations in an elongated simulation box, we investigate the steady states of vapour-liquid phase coexistence of active Lennard-Jones particles with planar interfaces. We measure the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the direction perpendicular to the interface and verify mechanical equilibrium of the two coexisting phases. In addition, we determine the non-equilibrium interfacial tension by integrating the difference of the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor and show that the surface tension as a function of strength of particle attractions is well fitted by simple power laws. Finally, we measure the interfacial stiffness using capillary wave theory and the equipartition theorem and find a simple linear relation between surface tension and interfacial stiffness with a proportionality constant characterized by an effective temperature.

  12. Efficient Implementations of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Lennard-Jones Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, H.

    2011-08-01

    Efficient implementations of the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method for Lennard-Jones particle systems are considered. Not only general algorithms but also techniques that are efficient for some specific CPU architectures are also explained. A simple spatialdecomposition-based strategy is adopted for parallelization. By utilizing the developed code, benchmark simulations are performed on a HITACHI SR16000/J2 system consisting of IBM POWER6 processors which are 4.7 GHz at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) and an SGI Altix ICE 8400EX system consisting of Intel Xeon processors which are 2.93 GHz at the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), the University of Tokyo. The parallelization efficiency of the largest run, consisting of 4.1 billion particles with 8192 MPI processes, is about 73% relative to that of the smallest run with 128 MPI processes at NIFS, and it is about 66% relative to that of the smallest run with 4 MPI processes at ISSP. The factors causing the parallel overhead are investigated. It is found that fluctuations of the execution time of each process degrade the parallel efficiency. These fluctuations may be due to the interference of the operating system, which is known as OS Jitter.

  13. Thermodynamic equivalence between the Lennard-Jones and hard-core attractive Yukawa systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, Y.; Albaki, R.; Bretonnet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the thermodynamic properties of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid is made by means of a system of particles interacting with a potential of hard-core plus attractive Yukawa tail (HCY). Due to the similarity between the LJ potential and the HCY potential in its overall form, it is worthwhile seeking to approximate the LJ potential in much the same way that the hard-sphere reference potential has been so used. The study consists in describing the thermodynamics of the LJ fluid in terms of the equivalent HCY system, whose the properties are known accurately, by means of mapping the thermodynamic quantities for the HCY potential parameters. The method is feasible owing to a convenient analytical expression of the Helmholtz free energy from the mean-spherical approximation expanded in power of the inverse temperature. Two different procedures are used to determine the parameters of the HCY potential as a function of the thermodynamic states: one is based on the simultaneous fits of pressure and internal energy of the LJ system and the other uses the concept of collision frequency. The reasonable homogeneity of the results in both procedures of mapping makes that the HCY potential is a very good reference system, whose the proposed theoretical expressions can be used confidently to predict the thermodynamic properties of more realistic potentials

  14. Modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin Equation of State for the Modified Lennard-Jones Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuta; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed a modified Lennard-Jones (mLJ) potential to deal with problems, such as the accurate determination of the melting condition, in which an attractive interaction plays an essential role, but its range need not necessarily extend to infinity. An accurate phase diagram, including the triple and the critical points of the system characterized by the mLJ potential, has been investigated using mainly thermodynamic integration. To predict the thermodynamic behavior of the system, it is further desired to construct the equation of state (EOS) as accurately as possible. The modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin EOS was employed to this end. The 33 parameters involved in the equation were carefully determined in order for the EOS to be compatible with the temperature dependences of the virial coefficients as well as with an extremely large set of thermodynamic data obtained from our own molecular dynamics simulation performed over a wide fluid region. The resultant EOS was found to be not only sufficiently accurate at temperatures up to twenty times as high as the critical-point temperature but also effective in practical use.

  15. Comprehensive representation of the Lennard-Jones equation of state based on molecular dynamics simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieprzyk, S.; Brańka, A. C.; Maćkowiak, Sz.; Heyes, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is calculated using a new set of molecular dynamics data which extends to higher temperature than in previous studies. The modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) equation, which goes up to ca. T ˜ 6, is reparametrized with new simulation data. A new analytic form for the EoS, which breaks the fluid range into two regions with different analytic forms and goes up to ca. T ≃ 35, is also proposed. The accuracy of the new formulas is at least as good as the MBWR fit and goes to much higher temperature allowing it to now encompass the Amagat line. The fitted formula extends into the high temperature range where the system can be well represented by inverse power potential scaling, which means that our specification of the equation of state covers the entire (ρ, T) plane. Accurate analytic fit formulas for the Boyle, Amagat, and inversion curves are presented. Parametrizations of the extrema loci of the isochoric, CV, and isobaric, CP, heat capacities are given. As found by others, a line maxima of CP terminates in the critical point region, and a line of minima of CP terminates on the freezing line. The line of maxima of CV terminates close to or at the critical point, and a line of minima of CV terminates to the right of the critical point. No evidence for a divergence in CV in the critical region is found.

  16. Ab initio study of the atomic motion in liquid metal surfaces: comparison with Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Luis E; Gonzalez, David J

    2006-01-01

    It is established that liquid metals exhibit surface layering at the liquid-vapour interface, while dielectric simple systems, like those interacting through Lennard-Jones potentials, show a monotonic decay from the liquid density to that of the vapour. First principles molecular dynamics simulations of the free liquid surface of several liquid metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ba, Al, Tl and Si), and the Na 3 K 7 alloy near their triple points have been performed in order to study the atomic motion at the interface, mainly at the outer layer. Comparison with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system shows interesting differences and similarities. The probability distribution function of the time of residence in a layer shows a peak at very short times and a long-lasting tail. The mean residence time in a layer increases when approaching the interfacial region, slightly in the Lennard-Jones system but strongly in the metallic systems. The motion within the layers, parallel to the interface, can be described as diffusion enhanced (strongly in the case of the outermost layer) with respect to the bulk, for both types of systems, despite its reduced dimensionality in metals

  17. Drying and wetting transitions of a Lennard-Jones fluid: Simulations and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert; Stewart, Maria C.; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2017-07-01

    We report a theoretical and simulation study of the drying and wetting phase transitions of a truncated Lennard-Jones fluid at a flat structureless wall. Binding potential calculations predict that the nature of these transitions depends on whether the wall-fluid attraction has a long ranged (LR) power law decay or is instead truncated, rendering it short ranged (SR). Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation and classical density functional theory, we examine both cases in detail. We find that for the LR case wetting is first order, while drying is continuous (critical) and occurs exactly at zero attractive wall strength, i.e., in the limit of a hard wall. In the SR case, drying is also critical but the order of the wetting transition depends on the truncation range of the wall-fluid potential. We characterize the approach to critical drying and wetting in terms of the density and local compressibility profiles and via the finite-size scaling properties of the probability distribution of the overall density. For the LR case, where the drying point is known exactly, this analysis allows us to estimate the exponent ν∥, which controls the parallel correlation length, i.e., the extent of vapor bubbles at the wall. Surprisingly, the value we obtain is over twice that predicted by mean field and renormalization group calculations, despite the fact that our three dimensional system is at the upper critical dimension where mean field theory for critical exponents is expected to hold. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in the light of fresh insights into the nature of near critical finite-size effects.

  18. Chemical potential and solid-solid equilibrium of near-spherical Lennard-Jones dumbbell crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangwon; Kim, Minkyu; Chang, Jaeeon

    2016-01-01

    We studied the orientational order-disorder transition of crystals made up of near-spherical Lennard-Jones dumbbells, of which reduced bond lengths are 0.225, 0.250 and 0.275. Various techniques of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to calculate the chemical potentials of ordered and disordered crystals, and thereby to predict order disorder phase transition. First, we performed NPT MC simulations to determine crystal structure, equilibrium positions and orientations of the molecules. We then calculated the free energies of the crystals using the expanded ensemble MC simulations combined with the Einstein-molecule method and the thermodynamic integration method. The solid-solid phase equilibrium is determined from the free energy profiles of the individual phases by equating the chemical potential. The predictions of phase transition obtained from the conventional NPT MC simulation and the free energy simulation were in excellent agreement with each other, which confirms the validity of the present method of calculating the chemical potential of crystal. In addition, the Gibbs-Duhem integration was performed to obtain a complete coexistence curve between the two crystal phases. Orientational probability distributions of molecular axes were analyzed to find the characteristic behavior of rotational motion of molecule in the crystal. At sufficiently low temperature, flipping rotation of molecule in the ordered crystal is suppressed. In contrast, the flipping rotation occurs at higher temperature close to the transition while orientationally ordered structure is still maintained. In the free energy calculation, such a unique rotational behavior requires to use a suitable form of external rotational potential with proper symmetry number. The present study demonstrates how one can judiciously choose a correct simulation scheme for the calculation of chemical potentials of molecular crystals.

  19. Drying and wetting transitions of a Lennard-Jones fluid: Simulations and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert; Stewart, Maria C; Wilding, Nigel B

    2017-07-28

    We report a theoretical and simulation study of the drying and wetting phase transitions of a truncated Lennard-Jones fluid at a flat structureless wall. Binding potential calculations predict that the nature of these transitions depends on whether the wall-fluid attraction has a long ranged (LR) power law decay or is instead truncated, rendering it short ranged (SR). Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation and classical density functional theory, we examine both cases in detail. We find that for the LR case wetting is first order, while drying is continuous (critical) and occurs exactly at zero attractive wall strength, i.e., in the limit of a hard wall. In the SR case, drying is also critical but the order of the wetting transition depends on the truncation range of the wall-fluid potential. We characterize the approach to critical drying and wetting in terms of the density and local compressibility profiles and via the finite-size scaling properties of the probability distribution of the overall density. For the LR case, where the drying point is known exactly, this analysis allows us to estimate the exponent ν ∥ , which controls the parallel correlation length, i.e., the extent of vapor bubbles at the wall. Surprisingly, the value we obtain is over twice that predicted by mean field and renormalization group calculations, despite the fact that our three dimensional system is at the upper critical dimension where mean field theory for critical exponents is expected to hold. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in the light of fresh insights into the nature of near critical finite-size effects.

  20. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Geología, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain)

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ{sub 11} = σ{sub 22}, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ{sub 11} = ϵ{sub 22}, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janecek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances r{sub c} and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance r{sub c} is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related

  1. Size-effects on the surface tension near the critical point: Monte Carlo simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Florent; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    We report Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid at the liquid-vapor interface in the critical region. A slab-based tail method is associated with the MC simulations to approach as close as possible the critical point (T∗ = 0.98 TC∗) . We investigate then the impact of system-sizes on the surface tension and coexisting densities by considering very large box dimensions for which the surface tension is independent of system-sizes at low temperatures.

  2. The self-referential method for linear rigid bodies: application to hard and Lennard-Jones dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatman, Martin B; Atamas, Alexander; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-14

    The self-referential (SR) method incorporating thermodynamic integration (TI) [Sweatman et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 064102 (2008)] is extended to treat systems of rigid linear bodies. The method is then applied to obtain the canonical ensemble Helmholtz free energy of the alpha-N(2) and plastic face centered cubic phases of systems of hard and Lennard-Jones dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. Generally good agreement with reference literature data is obtained, which indicates that the SR-TI method is potentially very general and robust.

  3. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation coefficients for the (2n, n) Lennard-Jones system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friisberg, Ida Marie; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potentialenergy coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system...... in two, three, and four dimensions. The state points studied include many low-density states at which the virial potentialenergy correlations are not strong. For these state points we find the roughly linear relation γ ∼= 3n R/d in d dimensions. This result is discussed in light of the approximate...... → 1, a limit that is approached at high densities and/or high temperatures at which the repulsive r−2n term dominates the physics....

  4. Phase separation of a Lennard-Jones fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain: implications for the nuclear body formation near chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Inrok; Choi, Saehyun; Jung, YounJoon; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-08-28

    Phase separation in a biological cell nucleus occurs in a heterogeneous environment filled with a high density of chromatins and thus it is inevitably influenced by interactions with chromatins. As a model system of nuclear body formation in a cell nucleus filled with chromatins, we simulate the phase separation of a low-density Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain. The influence of the density variation of LJ particles above and below the phase boundary and the role of attractive interactions between LJ particles and polymer segments are investigated at a fixed value of strong self-interaction between LJ particles. For a density of LJ particles above the phase boundary, phase separation occurs and a dense domain of LJ particles forms irrespective of interactions with the condensed polymer chain whereas its localization relative to the polymer chain is determined by the LJ-polymer attraction strength. Especially, in the case of moderately weak attractions, the domain forms separately from the polymer chain and subsequently associates with the polymer chain. When the density is below the phase boundary, however, the formation of a dense domain is possible only when the LJ-polymer attraction is strong enough, for which the domain grows in direct contact with the interacting polymer chain. In this work, different growth behaviors of LJ particles result from the differences in the density of LJ particles and in the LJ-polymer interaction, and this work suggests that the distinct formation of activity-dependent and activity-independent nuclear bodies (NBs) in a cell nucleus may originate from the differences in the concentrations of body-specific NB components and in their interaction with chromatins.

  5. Icosahedron-fcc transition size by molecular dynamics simulation of Lennard-Jones clusters at a finite temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshoji, T; Torchet, G; de Feraudy, M F; Koga, K

    2001-03-01

    We studied finite-temperature ensembles of solid clusters produced by cooling liquid droplets either by evaporation or by a thermostat through a molecular dynamics calculation using the Lennard-Jones potential. The ensembles consist of either single or binary component clusters with 25% of the atoms 8% smaller in diameter than the other 75%. These clusters (380 clusters in total) exhibit various structures in the size range of n=160-2200, where n is the number of atoms in a cluster. For increasing size, the clusters show a gradual transition from icosahedral to a variety of structures: decahedral, face centered cubic, a small amount of hexagonal, and some icosahedral structures. They are asymmetrical or faulted. Electron diffraction patterns calculated with average structure factors of clusters after grouping them into several size regions are very similar to those experimentally observed. The size transition is around n=450 for single component clusters whatever the cooling process, evaporation or thermostat. This size is smaller than the experimental transition size estimated for argon clusters formed in a supersonic expansion. The transition size for binary component clusters is around n=600 for evaporative cooling, and larger for thermostatic cooling. The larger transition size found for the binary component clusters is consistent with the large icosahedral Au-Fe and Au-Cu alloy clusters observed experimentally.

  6. Fusion process of Lennard-Jones clusters: global minima and magic numbers formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    measured for the clusters of noble gas atoms. Our method serves as an efficient alternative to the global optimization techniques based on the Monte-Carlo simulations and it can be applied for the solutions of a broad variety of problems in which atomic cluster structure is important.......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the fusion process of Lennard–Jones (LJ) clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms....... We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the (LJ)-clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare...

  7. Vapour-liquid equilibria of two-centre Lennard-Jones fluids from the NpT plus test particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, Christian; Müller, Andreas; Winkelmann, Jochen; Fischer, Johann

    Vapour-liquid phase equilibria (VLE) are determined from the NpT plus test particle method for two-centre Lennard-Jones fluids of elongations L* = 0·22, 0·3292, 0·505, and 0·67. The resulting vapour pressures as well as the saturated vapour and liquid densities are correlated by simple equations. The thermodynamic consistency of the VLE data is confirmed on the basis of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Comparison is made with results from previous simulations, and from perturbation theory.

  8. Lennard-Jones parameters for small diameter carbon nanotubes and water for molecular mechanics simulations from van der Waals density functional calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, M; Gulans, A; Havu, P; Kauppinen, E

    2012-03-05

    Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters are derived for classical nonpolarizable force fields for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and for CNT-water interaction from van der Waals (vdW) enhanced density functional calculations. The new LJ parameters for carbon-carbon interactions are of the same order as those previously used in the literature but differ significantly for CNT-water interactions. This may partially originate from the fact that in addition to pure vdW interactions the polarization and other quantum mechanics effects are embedded into the LJ-potential. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Thermodynamical modeling of nuclear glasses: coexistence of amorphous phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjanor, G.

    2007-11-01

    Investigating the stability of borosilicate glasses used in the nuclear industry with respect to phase separation requires to estimate the Gibbs free energies of the various phases appearing in the material. In simulation, using current computational resources, a direct state-sampling of a glassy system with respect to its ensemble statistics is not ergodic and the estimated ensemble averages are not reliable. Our approach consists in generating, at a given cooling rate, a series of quenches, or paths connecting states of the liquid to states of the glass, and then in taking into account the probability to generate the paths leading to the different glassy states in ensembles averages. In this way, we introduce a path ensemble formalism and calculate a Landau free energy associated to a glassy meta-basin. This method was validated by accurately mapping the free energy landscape of a 38-atom glassy cluster. We then applied this approach to the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of binary amorphous Lennard-Jones alloys, and checked the correlation between the observed tendencies to order or to phase separate and the computed Gibbs free energies. We finally computed the driving force to phase separation in a simplified three-oxide nuclear glass modeled by a Born-Mayer-Huggins potential that includes a three-body term, and we compared the estimated quantities to the available experimental data. (author)

  10. Explicit expressions of self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and the Stokes-Einstein relation for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Norikazu; Ishii, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Explicit expressions of the self-diffusion coefficient, D i , and shear viscosity, η sv , are presented for Lennard-Jones (LJ) binary mixtures in the liquid states along the saturated vapor line. The variables necessary for the expressions were derived from dimensional analysis of the properties: atomic mass, number density, packing fraction, temperature, and the size and energy parameters used in the LJ potential. The unknown dependence of the properties on each variable was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for an equimolar mixture of Ar and Kr at the temperature of 140 K and density of 1676 kg m −3 . The scaling equations obtained by multiplying all the single-variable dependences can well express D i and η sv evaluated by the MD simulation for a whole range of compositions and temperatures without any significant coupling between the variables. The equation for D i can also explain the dual atomic-mass dependence, i.e., the average-mass and the individual-mass dependence; the latter accounts for the “isotope effect” on D i . The Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation obtained from these equations is fully consistent with the SE relation for pure LJ liquids and that for infinitely dilute solutions. The main differences from the original SE relation are the presence of dependence on the individual mass and on the individual energy parameter. In addition, the packing-fraction dependence turned out to bridge another gap between the present and original SE relations as well as unifying the SE relation between pure liquids and infinitely dilute solutions

  11. A reference-modified density functional theory: An application to solvation free-energy calculations for a Lennard-Jones solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Tomonari; Maruyama, Yutaka; Mitsutake, Ayori; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-06-14

    In the conventional classical density functional theory (DFT) for simple fluids, an ideal gas is usually chosen as the reference system because there is a one-to-one correspondence between the external field and the density distribution function, and the exact intrinsic free-energy functional is available for the ideal gas. In this case, the second-order density functional Taylor series expansion of the excess intrinsic free-energy functional provides the hypernetted-chain (HNC) approximation. Recently, it has been shown that the HNC approximation significantly overestimates the solvation free energy (SFE) for an infinitely dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) solution, especially when the solute particles are several times larger than the solvent particles [T. Miyata and J. Thapa, Chem. Phys. Lett. 604, 122 (2014)]. In the present study, we propose a reference-modified density functional theory as a systematic approach to improve the SFE functional as well as the pair distribution functions. The second-order density functional Taylor series expansion for the excess part of the intrinsic free-energy functional in which a hard-sphere fluid is introduced as the reference system instead of an ideal gas is applied to the LJ pure and infinitely dilute solution systems and is proved to remarkably improve the drawbacks of the HNC approximation. Furthermore, the third-order density functional expansion approximation in which a factorization approximation is applied to the triplet direct correlation function is examined for the LJ systems. We also show that the third-order contribution can yield further refinements for both the pair distribution function and the excess chemical potential for the pure LJ liquids.

  12. Explicit expressions of self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and the Stokes-Einstein relation for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtori, Norikazu, E-mail: ohtori@chem.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ishii, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    Explicit expressions of the self-diffusion coefficient, D{sub i}, and shear viscosity, η{sub sv}, are presented for Lennard-Jones (LJ) binary mixtures in the liquid states along the saturated vapor line. The variables necessary for the expressions were derived from dimensional analysis of the properties: atomic mass, number density, packing fraction, temperature, and the size and energy parameters used in the LJ potential. The unknown dependence of the properties on each variable was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for an equimolar mixture of Ar and Kr at the temperature of 140 K and density of 1676 kg m{sup −3}. The scaling equations obtained by multiplying all the single-variable dependences can well express D{sub i} and η{sub sv} evaluated by the MD simulation for a whole range of compositions and temperatures without any significant coupling between the variables. The equation for D{sub i} can also explain the dual atomic-mass dependence, i.e., the average-mass and the individual-mass dependence; the latter accounts for the “isotope effect” on D{sub i}. The Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation obtained from these equations is fully consistent with the SE relation for pure LJ liquids and that for infinitely dilute solutions. The main differences from the original SE relation are the presence of dependence on the individual mass and on the individual energy parameter. In addition, the packing-fraction dependence turned out to bridge another gap between the present and original SE relations as well as unifying the SE relation between pure liquids and infinitely dilute solutions.

  13. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. IV. Optimized Lennard-Jones interaction parameter sets for the alkali and halide ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2011-04-01

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions used during these simulations. However, as shown recently [M. A. Kastenholz and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006), 10.1529/biophysj.106.083667; M. M. Reif and P. H. Hünenberger, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144103 (2010)], the application of appropriate correction terms permits to obtain methodology-independent results. The corrected values are then exclusively characteristic of the underlying molecular model including in particular the ion-solvent van der Waals interaction parameters, determining the effective ion size and the magnitude of its dispersion interactions. In the present study, the comparison of calculated (corrected) hydration free energies with experimental data (along with the consideration of ionic polarizabilities) is used to calibrate new sets of ion-solvent van der Waals (Lennard-Jones) interaction parameters for the alkali (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+) and halide (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-) ions along with either the SPC or the SPC/E water models. The experimental dataset is defined by conventional single-ion hydration free energies [Tissandier et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998), 10.1021/jp982638r; Fawcett, J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 11181] along with three plausible choices for the (experimentally elusive) value of the absolute (intrinsic) hydration free energy of the proton, namely, Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] = -1100, -1075 or -1050 kJ mol-1, resulting in three sets L, M, and H for the SPC water model and three sets LE, ME, and HE for the SPC/E water model (alternative sets can easily be interpolated to intermediate Δ G_hyd^{ominus }[H+] values). The residual sensitivity of the calculated (corrected) hydration free energies on the volume-pressure boundary conditions and on the effective ionic radius entering into the calculation of the correction terms is

  14. Effect of surface tension on the behavior of adhesive contact based on Lennard-Jones potential law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyao; Xu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    The present study explores the effect of surface tension on adhesive contact behavior where the adhesion is interpreted by long-range intermolecular forces. The adhesive contact is analyzed using the equivalent system of a rigid sphere and an elastic half space covered by a membrane with surface tension. The long-range intermolecular forces are modeled with the Lennard‒Jones (L‒J) potential law. The current adhesive contact issue can be represented by a nonlinear integral equation, which can be solved by Newton‒Raphson method. In contrast to previous studies which consider intermolecular forces as short-range, the present study reveals more details of the features of adhesive contact with surface tension, in terms of jump instabilities, pull-off forces, pressure distribution within the contact area, etc. The transition of the pull-off force is not only consistent with previous studies, but also presents some new interesting characteristics in the current situation.

  15. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: The vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Mendiboure, B. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et leurs Réservoirs, UMR5150, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, B. P. 1155, Pau Cedex 64014 (France); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Departamento de Geología, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-14

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264–6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r{sub c} = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r{sub c} = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial

  16. Thermodynamical modeling of nuclear glasses: coexistence of amorphous phases; Modelisation thermodynamique des verres nucleaires: coexistence entre phases amorphes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjanor, G

    2007-11-15

    Investigating the stability of borosilicate glasses used in the nuclear industry with respect to phase separation requires to estimate the Gibbs free energies of the various phases appearing in the material. In simulation, using current computational resources, a direct state-sampling of a glassy system with respect to its ensemble statistics is not ergodic and the estimated ensemble averages are not reliable. Our approach consists in generating, at a given cooling rate, a series of quenches, or paths connecting states of the liquid to states of the glass, and then in taking into account the probability to generate the paths leading to the different glassy states in ensembles averages. In this way, we introduce a path ensemble formalism and calculate a Landau free energy associated to a glassy meta-basin. This method was validated by accurately mapping the free energy landscape of a 38-atom glassy cluster. We then applied this approach to the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of binary amorphous Lennard-Jones alloys, and checked the correlation between the observed tendencies to order or to phase separate and the computed Gibbs free energies. We finally computed the driving force to phase separation in a simplified three-oxide nuclear glass modeled by a Born-Mayer-Huggins potential that includes a three-body term, and we compared the estimated quantities to the available experimental data. (author)

  17. Probing heterogeneous dynamics from spatial density correlation in glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2016-12-01

    We numerically investigate the connection between spatial density correlation and dynamical heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. We demonstrate that the cluster size defined by the spatial aggregation of densely packed particles (DPPs) can better capture the difference between the dynamics of the Lennard-Jones glass model and the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen truncation model than the commonly used pair correlation functions. More interestingly, we compare the mobility of DPPs and loosely packed particles, and we find that high local density correlates well with slow dynamics in systems with relatively hard repulsive interactions but links to mobile ones in the system with soft repulsive interactions at one relaxation time scale. Our results show clear evidence that the above model dependence behavior stems from the hopping motion of DPPs at the end of the caging stage due to the compressive nature of soft repulsive spheres, which activates the dynamics of DPPs in the α relaxation stage.

  18. Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method in Fluoride glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kotbi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. On the other hand, the so-called Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a Fluoride glass system BaMnMF7 (M = Fe,V using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions (PDFs. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

  19. Isoviscosity lines and the liquid-glass transition in simple liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D; Brazhkin, V V; Ryzhov, V N

    2012-07-01

    This article presents the study of the generic behavior of viscosity of liquids based on some simple theoretical models, the soft-spheres and Lennard-Jones systems. The use of these simple models allows us to investigate in detail the viscosity behavior in a wide range of temperatures and pressures including the high-temperature-high-pressure limits. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the shape of isoviscosity lines and analyze the glass transition at high temperatures and high pressures. Despite the fact that the viscosity drastically increases in the limit of high temperatures and high pressures along the melting line, the relaxation time rapidly decreases in this region, and the system becomes further from the glass transition.

  20. Growing correlation length on cooling below the onset of caging in a simulated glass-forming liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lačević, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We present a calculation of a fourth-order, time-dependent density correlation function that measures higher-order spatiotemporal correlations of the density of a liquid. From molecular dynamics simulations of a glass-forming Lennard-Jones liquid, we find that the characteristic length scale...... of the dynamics of the liquid in the alpha-relaxation regime....

  1. Yield point of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  2. A study of the diffusion mechanism in glasses: a theoretical and experimental study of tracers diffusion in amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loirat, Yanick

    1999-01-01

    The principal aims of this work are a better understanding of the experimental situation in amorphous metallic alloys and a tentative explanation of the role of collective mechanisms in matter transport. Self- and solute-diffusion of Hf, Au and Cu tracers in amorphous Ni Zr alloy have been studied. We study by SIMS analysis the broadening of the concentration profile with temperature and pressure, in thin amorphous layers which were prepared by sputtering and properly relaxed. The diffusion coefficient variation with temperature shows an Arrhenius behaviour for all of our tracers. The activation energy amount to 1.55 eV for Cu, 1.65 eV for Au and 1.78 eV for Hf and corresponds to nearly one half of the corresponding energy in crystalline zirconium. The diffusion coefficients variation with hydrostatic pressure yields an activation volume equal to one half of an average atomic volume of our matrix for medium and large sized tracers Au, Hf and a smaller activation volume for Cu. The second part of our work consists of numerical simulations of atomic displacements in a generic glass by two complementary methods. In a Lennard-Jones alloy with size effect, we observe by molecular dynamics (MD) some correlated displacements which consist of substitution cycles or chains. The associated energy of these collective events represents nearly 15 pc of that found in crystalline Lennard- Jones. The systematic exploration of energy surface in space configuration made with activation-relaxation technique ART yields energy distributions of stable and saddles positions and opens the way to an evaluation of diffusion coefficients. The events found by ART are qualitatively close to MD ones, but the averaged activation energy associated with these events represents only 10 pc of the crystalline one. This clearly points towards the limit of Lennard-Jones potential, which is not enough representative of actual glasses. This is the reason why an interaction model closer to amorphous

  3. Lennard-Jones fluids in a nanochannel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartkamp, Remco; Luding, Stefan; Nuernberg Messe GmbH,

    2010-01-01

    During the past few decades molecular dynamics has been a widely applied tool to simulate fluid confined in micro/nano geometries. What makes interfacial fluids fundamentally different from the bulk fluid is the fact that their density varies considerably over microscopic distances. A class of such

  4. Vibrations and thermal conductivity in inorganic and polymeric glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenogin, Sergei; Bodapati, Arun; Keblinski, Pawel

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism of thermal transport in amorphous materials was studied by means of vibrational mode analysis and classical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We studied four different model systems of (a) Lennard-Jones glass, (b) bead-spring model of an amorphous polymer, (c) amorphous silicon with Stillinger-Weber potential; and (d) all-atom model of glassy polystyrene with PCFF-type force field. For all structures we evaluated thermal conductivity from the harmonic theory of disordered solids [P.B.Allen, and J.L.Feldman, Phys.Rev.B 48, 12581 (1993)] and from direct MD simulations. We found that for all models but polystyrene, the harmonic theory accurately predicts thermal conductivity. By contrast, in the case of polystyrene, only ˜1/2 of thermal conductivity can be explained within the harmonic approximation. Consequently, a major part of the transport has to be attributed to anharmonic coupling between vibrational modes. The reasons for the failure of harmonic theory of disordered solids to model amorphous glassy polymers will be discussed.

  5. Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing on the Basis of the Particle Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Gabsalikova, N. F.; Izotov, V. G.; Miheev, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    A technique of calculating the deformation of the soil environment when it interacts with a liquid on the basis of the particle method a is realized. To describe the behavior of the solid and liquid phases of the soil, a classical two-parameter Lennard-Jones interaction potential and its modified version proposed by the authors were chosen. The model problem of deformation and partial destruction of a soil massif under strong pressure from the liquid pumped into it is solved. Analysis of the results shows that the use of the modified Lennard-Jones potential for describing the solid phase of the soil environment makes it possible to describe the process of formation of cracks in the soil during hydraulic fracturing of the formation.

  6. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function...

  7. Hopping in a supercooled binary Lennard-Jones liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    1998-01-01

    A binary Lennard–Jones liquid has been investigated by molecular dynamics at equilibrium supercooled conditions. At the lowest temperature investigated, hopping is present in the system as indicated by a secondary peak in 4r2Gs(r,t), where Gs(r,t) is the van Hove self correlation function......", as often argued, and that the system has a single-peaked distribution of hopping-distances centered around the characteristic intermolecular distance....

  8. Equilibrium fluctuations of the Lennard-Jones cluster surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I.

    2008-11-01

    Spectra of the cluster surface equilibrium fluctuations are treated by decomposition into the bulk and net capillary ones. The bulk fluctuations without capillary ones are simulated by the surface of a cluster truncated by a sphere. The bulk fluctuation spectrum is shown to be generated primarily by the discontinuity in the spatial distribution of cluster internal particles. The net capillary fluctuation slice spectrum is obtained in molecular dynamics simulation by subtraction of the bulk fluctuation spectrum from the total one. This net spectrum is in the best agreement with a theoretical estimation if we assume the intrinsic surface tension to be independent of the wave number. The wave number cutoff is brought in balance with the intrinsic surface tension and excess surface area induced by the capillary fluctuations. It is shown that the ratio of the ordinary surface tension to the intrinsic one can be considered as a universal constant independent of the temperature and cluster size.

  9. Molecular simulation of adsorption and transport diffusion of model fluids in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düren, Tina; Keil, Frerich J.; Seaton, Nigel A.

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and dual-control-volume grand canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulations were carried out with Lennard-Jones model fluids in carbon nanotubes, with the objective of investigating the effect of varying molecular properties on adsorption and diffusion. The influence of the molecular weight, and the Lennard Jones parameters σ (a measure of the molecule size) and ɛ (a measure of the interaction strength) on adsorption isotherms, fluxes, and transport diffusivities was studied. For these simulations, the properties of component 1 in the mixture were held constant and one of the properties of component 2 was changed systematically. Furthermore, the validity of Graham's law, which relates the fluxes of two counter diffusing species to their molecular weight, was investigated on a molecular level. Graham's law is fulfilled for the whole range of molecular weights and Lennard-Jones parameters σ investigated. However, large deviations were observed for large values of ɛ2. Here, the interaction of the two components in the mixture becomes so strong that component 1 is dragged along by component 2.

  10. Computer simulations of nanoindentation in Mg-Cu and Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paduraru, Anca; Andersen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Thyssen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The formation of shear bands during plastic deformation of Cu0.50Zr0.50 and Mg0.85Cu0.15 metallic glasses is studied using atomic-scale computer simulations. The atomic interactions are described using realistic many-body potentials within the effective medium theory, and are compared with similar...... simulations using a Lennard-Jones description of the material. The metallic glasses are deformed both in simple shear and in a simulated nanoindentation experiment. Plastic shear localizes into shear bands with a width of approximately 5 nm in CuZr and 8 nm in MgCu. In simple shear, the shear band formation...... is very clear, whereas only incipient shear bands are seen in nanoindentation. The shear band formation during nanoindentation is sensitive to the indentation velocity, indenter radius and the cooling rate during the formation of the metallic glass. For comparison, a similar nanoindentation simulation...

  11. High-Level Waste Glass Formulation Model Sensitivity Study 2009 Glass Formulation Model Versus 1996 Glass Formulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsher, J.D.; Meinert, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  12. Local yield stress statistics in model amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Armand; Lerbinger, Matthias; Hernandez-Garcia, Anier; García-García, Reinaldo; Falk, Michael L.; Vandembroucq, Damien; Patinet, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    We develop and extend a method presented by Patinet, Vandembroucq, and Falk [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 045501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.045501] to compute the local yield stresses at the atomic scale in model two-dimensional Lennard-Jones glasses produced via differing quench protocols. This technique allows us to sample the plastic rearrangements in a nonperturbative manner for different loading directions on a well-controlled length scale. Plastic activity upon shearing correlates strongly with the locations of low yield stresses in the quenched states. This correlation is higher in more structurally relaxed systems. The distribution of local yield stresses is also shown to strongly depend on the quench protocol: the more relaxed the glass, the higher the local plastic thresholds. Analysis of the magnitude of local plastic relaxations reveals that stress drops follow exponential distributions, justifying the hypothesis of an average characteristic amplitude often conjectured in mesoscopic or continuum models. The amplitude of the local plastic rearrangements increases on average with the yield stress, regardless of the system preparation. The local yield stress varies with the shear orientation tested and strongly correlates with the plastic rearrangement locations when the system is sheared correspondingly. It is thus argued that plastic rearrangements are the consequence of shear transformation zones encoded in the glass structure that possess weak slip planes along different orientations. Finally, we justify the length scale employed in this work and extract the yield threshold statistics as a function of the size of the probing zones. This method makes it possible to derive physically grounded models of plasticity for amorphous materials by directly revealing the relevant details of the shear transformation zones that mediate this process.

  13. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel R; Piepel, Gregory F; Vienna, John D; Cooley, Scott K; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region

  14. Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

    2001-07-24

    The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

  15. Granular packing as model glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories. (paper)

  16. Glass Durability Modeling, Activated Complex Theory (ACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAROL, JANTZEN

    2005-01-01

    The most important requirement for high-level waste glass acceptance for disposal in a geological repository is the chemical durability, expressed as a glass dissolution rate. During the early stages of glass dissolution in near static conditions that represent a repository disposal environment, a gel layer resembling a membrane forms on the glass surface through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer has been found to age into either clay mineral assemblages or zeolite mineral assemblages. The formation of one phase preferentially over the other has been experimentally related to changes in the pH of the leachant and related to the relative amounts of Al +3 and Fe +3 in a glass. The formation of clay mineral assemblages on the leached glass surface layers ,lower pH and Fe +3 rich glasses, causes the dissolution rate to slow to a long-term steady state rate. The formation of zeolite mineral assemblages ,higher pH and Al +3 rich glasses, on leached glass surface layers causes the dissolution rate to increase and return to the initial high forward rate. The return to the forward dissolution rate is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in a disposal environment. An investigation into the role of glass stoichiometry, in terms of the quasi-crystalline mineral species in a glass, has shown that the chemistry and structure in the parent glass appear to control the activated surface complexes that form in the leached layers, and these mineral complexes ,some Fe +3 rich and some Al +3 rich, play a role in whether or not clays or zeolites are the dominant species formed on the leached glass surface. The chemistry and structure, in terms of Q distributions of the parent glass, are well represented by the atomic ratios of the glass forming components. Thus, glass dissolution modeling using simple

  17. Modeling New Adsorbents for Ethylene/Ethane Separations by Adsorption via {Pi}-Complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blas, F. J.; Vega, L. F.; Gubbins, K. E.

    1998-01-01

    The adsorption of olefins and paraffins in a novel model porous adsorbent is studied by means of molecular simulations. The adsorbents are synthesized by effective dispersion of CuCI on substrates with hydrocarbon-phobic surfaces, such as {gamma}-A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Cu(I) cations are able to undergo {pi}-complexation with olefin molecules. Ethane and ethylene are studied as adsorbents, and the molecules are modeled as having two Lennard-Jones sites. Ethylene molecules have two additional associating square-well sites placed in the line perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the molecules in order to reproduce the {pi}-complexation.

  18. Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An exactly solvable model for glass to spin-glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, A.; Leuzzi, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present the full phase diagram of the spherical 2+p spin-glass model with p≥4. The main outcome is the presence of a phase with both properties of full replica symmetry breaking phases of discrete models, e.g., the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and those of one replica symmetry breaking. This phase has a finite complexity which leads to different dynamic and static properties. The phase diagram is rich enough to allow the study of different kinds of glass to spin glass and spin glass to spin glass phase transitions

  19. Isomorphs in the phase diagram of a model liquid without inverse power law repulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arnold Adriaan; Bøhling, Lasse; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    scattering function are calculated. The results are shown to reflect a hidden scale invariance; despite its exponential repulsion the Buckingham potential is well approximated by an inverse power-law plus a linear term in the region of the first peak of the radial distribution function. As a consequence...... the dynamics of the viscous Buckingham liquid is mimicked by a corresponding model with purely repulsive inverse-power-law interactions. The results presented here closely resemble earlier results for Lennard-Jones type liquids, demonstrating that the existence of strong correlations and isomorphs does...... not depend critically on the mathematical form of the repulsion being an inverse power law....

  20. Comparison of Hard-Core and Soft-Core Potentials for Modelling Flocking in Free Space

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J. A; Martin, A. M

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the properties of a two dimensional (2D+1) system of self propelled particles (known as boids) in free space is conducted using a Lagrangian Individual-Based Model. A potential, associated with each boid is specified and a Lagrangian is subsequently derived in order to obtain the equations of motion for each particle in the flock. The Morse potential and the Lennard-Jones potential, both well understood in atomic and molecular physics, are specified. In contrast to the o...

  1. Critical review of glass performance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process

  2. Critical review of glass performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

  3. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  4. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  5. Biomembrane modeling: molecular dynamics simulation of phospholipid monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    As a first step toward a computer model of a biomembrane-like bilayer, a dynamic, deterministric model of a phospholipid monolayer has been constructed. The model moves phospholipid-like centers of force according to an integrated law of motion in finite difference form. Forces on each phospholipid analogue are derived from the gradient of the local potential, itself the sum of Coulombic and short-range terms. The Coulombic term is approximated by use of a finite-difference form of Poisson's equation, while the short-range term results from finite-radius, pairwise summation of a Lennard-Jones potential. Boundary potentials are treated in such a way that the model is effectively infinite in extent in the plane of the monolayer. The two-dimensional virial theorem is used to find the surface pressure of the monolayer as a function of molecular area. Pressure-versus-area curves for simulated monolayers are compared to those of real monolayers. Dependence of the simulator's behavior on Lennard-Jones parameters and the specific geometry of the molecular analogue is discussed. Implications for the physical theory of phospholipid monolayers and bilayers are developed.

  6. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  7. Lattice model theory of the equation of state covering the gas, liquid, and solid phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Tanaka, T.; Chan, E. M.; Horiguchi, T.; Foreman, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The three stable states of matter and the corresponding phase transitions were obtained with a single model. Patterned after Lennard-Jones and Devonshires's theory, a simple cubic lattice model containing two fcc sublattices (alpha and beta) is adopted. The interatomic potential is taken to be the Lennard-Jones (6-12) potential. Employing the cluster variation method, the Weiss and the pair approximations on the lattice gas failed to give the correct phase diagrams. Hybrid approximations were devised to describe the lattice term in the free energy. A lattice vibration term corresponding to a free volume correction is included semi-phenomenologically. The combinations of the lattice part and the free volume part yield the three states and the proper phase diagrams. To determine the coexistence regions, the equalities of the pressure and Gibbs free energy per molecule of the coexisting phases were utilized. The ordered branch of the free energy gives rise to the solid phase while the disordered branch yields the gas and liquid phases. It is observed that the triple point and the critical point quantities, the phase diagrams and the coexistence regions plotted are in good agreement with the experimental values and graphs for argon.

  8. Simple Numerical Model of Laminated Glass Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zemanová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple Finite Element model aimed at efficient simulation of layered glass units. The approach is based on considering the independent kinematics of each layer, tied together via Lagrange multipliers. Validation and verification of the resulting model against independent data demonstrate its accuracy, showing its potential for generalization towards more complex problems. 

  9. Comment on 'Spherical 2+p spin-glass model: An analytically solvable model with a glass-to-glass transition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakoviack, V.

    2007-01-01

    Guided by old results on simple mode-coupling models displaying glass-glass transitions, we demonstrate, through a crude analysis of the solution with one step of replica symmetry breaking (1RSB) derived by Crisanti and Leuzzi for the spherical s+p mean-field spin glass [Phys. Rev. B 73, 014412 (2006)], that the phase behavior of these systems is not yet fully understood when s and p are well separated. First, there seems to be a possibility of glass-glass transition scenarios in these systems. Second, we find clear indications that the 1RSB solution cannot be correct in the full glassy phase. Therefore, while the proposed analysis is clearly naive and probably inexact, it definitely calls for a reassessment of the physics of these systems, with the promise of potentially interesting developments in the theory of disordered and complex systems

  10. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  11. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  12. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  13. Models of agglomeration and glass transition

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This book is for any physicist interested in new vistas in the domain of non-crystalline condensed matter, aperiodic and quasi-crystalline networks and especially glass physics and chemistry. Students with an elementary background in thermodynamics and statistical physics will find the book accessible. The physics of glasses is extensively covered, focusing on their thermal and mechanical properties, as well as various models leading to the formation of the glassy states of matter from overcooled liquids. The models of agglomeration and growth are also applied to describe the formation of quasicrystals, fullerenes and, in biology, to describe virus assembly pathways.

  14. Beyond Born-Mayer: Improved Models for Short-Range Repulsion in ab Initio Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vleet, Mary J; Misquitta, Alston J; Stone, Anthony J; Schmidt, J R

    2016-08-09

    Short-range repulsion within intermolecular force fields is conventionally described by either Lennard-Jones (A/r(12)) or Born-Mayer (A exp(-Br)) forms. Despite their widespread use, these simple functional forms are often unable to describe the interaction energy accurately over a broad range of intermolecular distances, thus creating challenges in the development of ab initio force fields and potentially leading to decreased accuracy and transferability. Herein, we derive a novel short-range functional form based on a simple Slater-like model of overlapping atomic densities and an iterated stockholder atom (ISA) partitioning of the molecular electron density. We demonstrate that this Slater-ISA methodology yields a more accurate, transferable, and robust description of the short-range interactions at minimal additional computational cost compared to standard Lennard-Jones or Born-Mayer approaches. Finally, we show how this methodology can be adapted to yield the standard Born-Mayer functional form while still retaining many of the advantages of the Slater-ISA approach.

  15. Evaporation experiments and modelling for glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been developed to measure evaporation rates of different volatile components from commercial and model glass compositions. In the set-up the furnace atmosphere, temperature level, gas velocity and batch composition are controlled. Evaporation rates have been measured

  16. Mean field models for spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Talagrand, Michel

    2011-01-01

    This is a new, completely revised, updated and enlarged edition of the author's Ergebnisse vol. 46: "Spin Glasses: A Challenge for Mathematicians". This new edition will appear in two volumes, the present first volume presents the basic results and methods, the second volume is expected to appear in 2011. In the eighties, a group of theoretical physicists introduced several models for certain disordered systems, called "spin glasses". These models are simple and rather canonical random structures, of considerable interest for several branches of science (statistical physics, neural networks and computer science). The physicists studied them by non-rigorous methods and predicted spectacular behaviors. This book introduces in a rigorous manner this exciting new area to the mathematically minded reader. It requires no knowledge whatsoever of any physics. The first volume of this new and completely rewritten edition presents six fundamental models and the basic techniques to study them.

  17. Thermodynamic model of natural, medieval and nuclear waste glass durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability based on hydration of structural units has been applied to natural glass, medieval window glasses, and glasses containing nuclear waste. The relative durability predicted from the calculated thermodynamics correlates directly with the experimentally observed release of structural silicon in the leaching solution in short-term laboratory tests. By choosing natural glasses and ancient glasses whose long-term performance is known, and which bracket the durability of waste glasses, the long-term stability of nuclear waste glasses can be interpolated among these materials. The current Savannah River defense waste glass formulation is as durable as natural basalt from the Hanford Reservation (10 6 years old). The thermodynamic hydration energy is shown to be related to the bond energetics of the glass. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  18. Microscopic model of the glass transition and the glassy state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.

    1982-07-01

    A microscopic model of the glass transition and the glassy state is presented. It is exactly solvable, and offers a unified view of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium aspects of the glass transition. It also provides a statistical-mechanical justification of the irreversible thermodynamic models of the glass transition proposed earlier. (author)

  19. Memory versus irreversibility in the thermal densification of amorphous glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2017-06-01

    We report on dynamic effects associated with thermally annealing amorphous indium-oxide films. In this process, the resistance of a given sample may decrease by several orders of magnitude at room temperatures, while its amorphous structure is preserved. The main effect of the process is densification, i.e., increased system density. The study includes the evolution of the system resistivity during and after the thermal treatment, the changes in the conductance noise, and the accompanying changes in the optical properties. The sample resistance is used to monitor the system dynamics during the annealing period as well as the relaxation that ensues after its termination. These reveal slow processes that fit well with a stretched-exponential law, a behavior that is commonly observed in structural glasses. There is an intriguing similarity between these effects and those obtained in high-pressure densification experiments. Both protocols exhibit the "slow spring-back" effect, a familiar response of memory foams. A heuristic picture based on a modified Lennard-Jones potential for the effective interparticle interaction is argued to qualitatively account for these densification-rarefaction phenomena in amorphous materials, whether affected by thermal treatment or by application of high pressure.

  20. Model based process control for glass furnace operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, P.J. van; Huisman, L.; Deelen, S. van

    2011-01-01

    Since the eighties of the 20th century supervisory control systems have been used in the glass industry. Model Predictive Control (MPC) technology, which was developed in the chemical industry, was introduced in the glass industry for control of forehearths and crown temperatures in glass melting

  1. Spin glass model for cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments show that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells. The possible cell fates can be modeled as attractors in a dynamical system, the ``epigenetic landscape.'' Both cellular differentiation and reprogramming can be described in the landscape picture as motion from one attractor state to another attractor state. We use a simple model based on spin glass theory that can construct a simulated epigenetic landscape starting from the experimental genomic data. We modify the model to incorporate experimental reprogramming protocols. Our simulations successfully reproduce several reprogramming experiments. We probe the robustness of the results against random changes in the model, explore the importance of asymmetric interactions between transcription factors and study the importance of histone modification errors in reprogramming.

  2. A New Simplified Local Density Model for Adsorption of Pure Gases and Binary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, M.; Dehghani, M. R.; Feyzi, F.; Behzadi, B.

    2010-12-01

    Adsorption modeling is an important tool for process simulation and design. Many theoretical models have been developed to describe adsorption data for pure and multicomponent gases. The simplified local density (SLD) approach is a thermodynamic model that can be used with any equation of state and offers some predictive capability with adjustable parameters for modeling of slit-shaped pores. In previous studies, the SLD model has been utilized with the Lennard-Jones potential function for modeling of fluid-solid interactions. In this article, we have focused on application of the Sutherland potential function in an SLD-Peng-Robinson model. The advantages and disadvantages of using the new potential function for adsorption of methane, ethane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and three binary mixtures on two types of activated carbon are illustrated. The results have been compared with previous models. It is shown that the new SLD model can correlate adsorption data for different pressures and temperatures with minimum error.

  3. Critical properties of a simple spin glass model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharony, A.; Imry, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The Mattis spin glass model is described as following from a particular quenched random solid solution picture, and its zero-field properties are discussed. The random field model is reviewed. The application to the spin glass problem is made and the more general scaling theory presented, and the limitations of the model are discussed

  4. Modeling of Viscosity and Thermal Expansion of Bioactive Glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Farid, Saad B. H.

    2012-01-01

    The behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion for different compositions of bioactive glasses have been studied. The effect of phosphorous pentoxide as a second glass former in addition to silica was investigated. Consequently, the nonlinear behaviors of viscosity and thermal expansion with respect to the oxide composition have been modeled. The modeling uses published data on bioactive glass compositions with viscosity and thermal expansion. -regression optimization technique has been uti...

  5. The impact range for smooth wall–liquid interactions in nanoconfined liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Dyre, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    decade. Inspired by these observations, we present results from molecular dynamics computer simulations of four nanoconfined liquids (the single-component Lennard-Jones liquid, the Kob–Andersen binary Lennard-Jones mixture, an asymmetric dumbbell model, and the Dzugutov liquid) demonstrating also...

  6. Modeling a novel glass immobilization waste treatment process using flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Welch, T.D.; Giardina, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    One option for control and disposal of surplus fissile materials is the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), a process developed at ORNL for directly converting Pu-bearing material into a durable high-quality glass waste form. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of the GMODS process flowsheet using FLOW, a chemical process simulator. The simulation showed that the glass chemistry postulated ion the models has acceptable levels of risks

  7. Diffusion of actinides in glasses containing model radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I.A.; Sedov, V.M.; Gulin, A.N.; Shatkov, V.M.; Shashukov, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of 237 Np, 239 Pu and 241 Am radionuclides in two model alumophosphate and alumoborosilicate glasses at the temperatures, somewhat lower than their transformation temperature, were determined. It is ascertained that actinides are one of the least mobile elements. It is shown that the glass crystallization results in the increase of 237 Np diffusion mobility. Low enough amount of water absorbed by crystallized alumophosphate glass intensifies low-temperature migration of 237 Np

  8. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the potential use of a thermochemical software package (FactSage 6.2), in the design of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics, experimental and modelled results on four glass ceramics were compared. Initially large discrepancies were found. These are described and related...... for the topology of multicomponent melts, before accurate prediction of phase relations within boron-containing glass ceramics can be obtained....

  9. An empirical modeling tool and glass property database in development of US-DOE radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, I.; Gan, H.

    1997-01-01

    An integrated glass database has been developed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of Catholic University of America. The major objective of this tool was to support glass formulation using the MAWS approach (Minimum Additives Waste Stabilization). An empirical modeling capability, based on the properties of over 1000 glasses in the database, was also developed to help formulate glasses from waste streams under multiple user-imposed constraints. The use of this modeling capability, the performance of resulting models in predicting properties of waste glasses, and the correlation of simple structural theories to glass properties are the subjects of this paper. (authors)

  10. Coarse graining from variationally enhanced sampling applied to the Ginzburg-Landau model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Michele; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-03-01

    A powerful way to deal with a complex system is to build a coarse-grained model capable of catching its main physical features, while being computationally affordable. Inevitably, such coarse-grained models introduce a set of phenomenological parameters, which are often not easily deducible from the underlying atomistic system. We present a unique approach to the calculation of these parameters, based on the recently introduced variationally enhanced sampling method. It allows us to obtain the parameters from atomistic simulations, providing thus a direct connection between the microscopic and the mesoscopic scale. The coarse-grained model we consider is that of Ginzburg-Landau, valid around a second-order critical point. In particular, we use it to describe a Lennard-Jones fluid in the region close to the liquid-vapor critical point. The procedure is general and can be adapted to other coarse-grained models.

  11. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Glass Lens Molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2015-01-01

    The required accuracy for the final dimensions of the molded lenses in wafer-based precision glass molding as well as the need for elimination of costly experimental trial and error calls for numerical simulations. This study deals with 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based precision...... glass lens molding process. First, a comprehensive 3D thermo-mechanical model of glass is implemented into a FORTRAN user subroutine (UMAT) in the FE program ABAQUS, and the developed FE model is validated with both a well-known sandwich seal test and experimental results of precision molding of several...... glass rings. Afterward, 3D thermo-mechanical modeling of the wafer-based glass lens manufacturing is performed to suggest a proper molding program (i.e., the proper set of process parameters including preset force-time and temperature-time histories) for molding a wafer to a desired dimension...

  12. A structural bond strength model for glass durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Metzger, T.B.

    1996-01-01

    A glass durability model, structural bond strength (SBS) model was developed to correlate glass durability with its composition. This model assumes that the strengths of the bonds between cations and oxygens and the structural roles of the individual elements in the glass arc the predominant factors controlling the composition dependence of the chemical durability of glasses. The structural roles of oxides in glass are classified as network formers, network breakers, and intermediates. The structural roles of the oxides depend upon glass composition and the redox state of oxides. Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , and B 2 O 3 are assigned as network formers only when there are sufficient alkalis to bind with these oxides. CaO can also improve durability by sharing non-bridging oxygen with alkalis, relieving SiO 2 from alkalis. The percolation phenomenon in glass is also taken into account. The SBS model is applied to correlate the 7-day product consistency test durability of 42 low-level waste glasses with their composition with an R 2 of 0.87, which is better than 0.81 obtained with an eight-coefficient empirical first-order mixture model on the same data set

  13. Understanding the structural drivers governing glass-water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone-Weiss, Nicholas; Pierce, Eric M; Youngman, Randall E; Gulbiten, Ozgur; Smith, Nicholas J; Du, Jincheng; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-01-01

    borosilicate based model melt-quenched bioactive glass system has been studied to depict the impact of thermal history on its molecular structure and dissolution behavior in water. It has been shown that the methodology of quenching of the glass melt impacts the dissolution rate of the studied glasses by 1.5×-3× depending on the changes induced in their molecular structure due to variation in thermal history. Further, a recommendation has been made to study dissolution behavior of bioactive glasses using surface area of the sample - to - volume of solution (SA/V) approach instead of the currently followed mass of sample - to - volume of solution approach. The structural and chemical dissolution data obtained from bioactive glasses following the approach presented in this paper can be used to develop the structural descriptors and potential energy functions over a broad range of bioactive glass compositions. Realizing the goal of designing third generation bioactive glasses requires a thorough understanding of the complex sequence of reactions that control their rate of degradation (in physiological fluids) and the structural drivers that control them. In this article, we have highlighted some major experimental challenges and choices that need to be carefully navigated in order to unearth the mechanisms governing the chemical dissolution behavior of borosilicate based bioactive glasses. The proposed experimental approach allows us to gain a new level of conceptual understanding about the composition-structure-property relationships in these glass systems, which can be applied to attain a significant leap in designing borosilicate based bioactive glasses with controlled dissolution rates tailored for specific patient and disease states. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  15. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    composed of VO5 pyramids. The vanadates-based glasses show semiconducting ..... the composition 1 mol% of CeO2. The AC conductivity obeys a power law. The glass samples exhibit typical inor- ganic semiconducting behaviour. The activation energy and conductivity at room temperature were found to be 0.09 eV ...

  16. Secondary Structure Analysis of Native Cellulose by Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Coarse Grained Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuai; Zhan, Hai-yi; Wang, Hong-ming; Ju, Yan

    2012-04-01

    The secondary structure of different Iβ cellulose was analyzed by a molecular dynamics simulation with MARTINI coarse-grained force field, where each chain of the cellulose includes 40 D-glucoses units. Calculation gives a satisfied description about the secondary structure of the cellulose. As the chain number increasing, the cellulose becomes the form of a helix, with the diameter of screw growing and spiral rising. Interestingly, the celluloses with chain number N 4 of 6, 24 and 36 do show right-hand twisting. On the contrast, the celluloses with N 8 of 12, 16 chains are left-hand twisting. These simulations indicate that the cellulose with chain number larger than 36 will break down to two parts. Besides, the result indicates that 36-chains cellulose model is the most stable among all models. Furthermore, the Lennard-Jones potential determines the secondary structure. In addition, an equation was set up to analyze the twisting structure.

  17. Integrated thermomechanical model for forming of glass containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work an integrated model for all the process of glass forming of glass containers is presented. The model addresses press-and-blow and blow-and-blow procedures from the gob forming to the final product. Glass forming involves coupled thermal-mechanical physical phenomena, in which the material viscous flow is highly dependent on heat transfer which, in turn, is dependent changes of shape due to material flow. Numerical aspects associated with the model implementation and its validation with real formed products are discussed.

  18. Evaluating Force-Field London Dispersion Coefficients Using the Exchange-Hole Dipole Moment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebifar, Mohamad; Johnson, Erin R; Rowley, Christopher N

    2017-12-12

    London dispersion interactions play an integral role in materials science and biophysics. Force fields for atomistic molecular simulations typically represent dispersion interactions by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential using empirically determined parameters. These parameters are generally underdetermined, and there is no straightforward way to test if they are physically realistic. Alternatively, the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model from density-functional theory predicts atomic and molecular London dispersion coefficients from first principles, providing an innovative strategy to validate the dispersion terms of molecular-mechanical force fields. In this work, the XDM model was used to obtain the London dispersion coefficients of 88 organic molecules relevant to biochemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry and the values compared with those derived from the Lennard-Jones parameters of the CGenFF, GAFF, OPLS, and Drude polarizable force fields. The molecular dispersion coefficients for the CGenFF, GAFF, and OPLS models are systematically higher than the XDM-calculated values by a factor of roughly 1.5, likely due to neglect of higher order dispersion terms and premature truncation of the dispersion-energy summation. The XDM dispersion coefficients span a large range for some molecular-mechanical atom types, suggesting an unrecognized source of error in force-field models, which assume that atoms of the same type have the same dispersion interactions. Agreement with the XDM dispersion coefficients is even poorer for the Drude polarizable force field. Popular water models were also examined, and TIP3P was found to have dispersion coefficients similar to the experimental and XDM references, although other models employ anomalously high values. Finally, XDM-derived dispersion coefficients were used to parametrize molecular-mechanical force fields for five liquids-benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, n-pentane, and n-hexane-which resulted in improved accuracy in the

  19. An extended topological model for binary phosphate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Rodrigues, B.P.; Wondraczek, L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a topological model for binary phosphate glasses that builds on the previously introduced concepts of the modifying ion sub-network and the strength of modifier constraints. The validity of the model is confirmed by the correct prediction of Tg(x) for covalent polyphosphoric acids where......, but for larger ions a significant fraction is broken. By accounting for the fraction of intact modifying ion related constraints, qγ, the Tg(x) of alkali phosphate glasses is predicted. By examining alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metaphosphate glasses we find that the effective number of intact...

  20. Weak temperature dependence of ageing of structural properties in atomistic model glassformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Thomas; Crowther, Peter; Turci, Francesco; Royall, C. Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Ageing phenomena are investigated from a structural perspective in two binary Lennard-Jones glassformers, the Kob-Andersen and Wahnström mixtures. In both, the geometric motif assumed by the glassformer upon supercooling, the locally favoured structure (LFS), has been established. The Kob-Andersen mixture forms bicapped square antiprisms; the Wahnström model forms icosahedra. Upon ageing, we find that the structural relaxation time has a time-dependence consistent with a power law. However, the LFS population and potential energy increase and decrease, respectively, in a logarithmic fashion. Remarkably, over the time scales investigated, which correspond to a factor of 104 change in relaxation times, the rate at which these quantities age appears almost independent of temperature. Only at temperatures far below the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman temperature do the ageing dynamics slow.

  1. Mechanistic interpretation of glass reaction: Input to kinetic model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Bradley, J.P.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-05-01

    Actinide-doped SRL 165 type glass was reacted in J-13 groundwater at 90 degree C for times up to 278 days. The reaction was characterized by both solution and solid analyses. The glass was seen to react nonstoichiometrically with preferred leaching of alkali metals and boron. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the formation of a complex layer structure which became separated from the underlying glass as the reaction progressed. The formation of the layer and its effect on continued glass reaction are discussed with respect to the current model for glass reaction used in the EQ3/6 computer simulation. It is concluded that the layer formed after 278 days is not protective and may eventually become fractured and generate particulates that may be transported by liquid water. 5 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs

  2. Density-Dependent Formulation of Dispersion-Repulsion Interactions in Hybrid Multiscale Quantum/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curutchet, Carles; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Kongsted, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    embedding approaches, respectively, nonelectrostatic dispersion and repulsion interactions are instead commonly described through classical potentials despite their quantum mechanical origin. Here we present an extension of the Tkatchenko-Scheffler semiempirical van der Waals (vdWTS) scheme aimed......Mixed multiscale quantum/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models are widely used to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of complex chemical systems. Whereas such models typically include electrostatics and potentially polarization in so-called electrostatic and polarizable...... at describing dispersion and repulsion interactions between quantum and classical regions within a QM/MM polarizable embedding framework. Starting from the vdWTSexpression, we define a dispersion and a repulsion term, both of them density-dependent and consistently based on a Lennard-Jones-like potential. We...

  3. Properties of a soft-core model of methanol: An integral equation theory and computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huš, Matej; Munaò, Gianmarco; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a coarse-grained model of methanol are examined by Monte Carlo simulations and reference interaction site model (RISM) integral equation theory. Methanol particles are described as dimers formed from an apolar Lennard-Jones sphere, mimicking the methyl group, and a sphere with a core-softened potential as the hydroxyl group. Different closure approximations of the RISM theory are compared and discussed. The liquid structure of methanol is investigated by calculating site-site radial distribution functions and static structure factors for a wide range of temperatures and densities. Results obtained show a good agreement between RISM and Monte Carlo simulations. The phase behavior of methanol is investigated by employing different thermodynamic routes for the calculation of the RISM free energy, drawing gas-liquid coexistence curves that match the simulation data. Preliminary indications for a putative second critical point between two different liquid phases of methanol are also discussed. PMID:25362323

  4. Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas P. Seward III

    2003-03-31

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

  5. Surface tension of different sized single-component droplets, according to macroscopic data obtained using the lattice gas model and the critical droplet size during phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependences of the surface tension of spherical single-component droplets are calculated using equations of the lattice gas model for 19 compounds. Parameters of the model are found from experimental data on the surface tension of these compounds for a macroscopic planar surface. The chosen low-molecular compounds satisfy the law of corresponding states. To improve agreement with the experimental data, Lennard-Jones potential parameters are varied within 10% deviations. The surface tensions of different sized equilibrium droplets are calculated at elevated and lowered temperatures. It is found that the surface tension of droplets grows monotonically as the droplet size increases from zero to its bulk value. The droplet size R 0 corresponding to zero surface tension corresponds to the critical size of the emergence of a new phase. The critical droplet sizes in the new phase of the considered compounds are estimated for the first time.

  6. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  7. Cyclical Mackey Glass Model for Oil Bull Seasonal

    OpenAIRE

    Sadek MELHEM; Michel TERRAZA; Mohamed CHIKHI

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we propose an innovative way for modelling oil bull seasonals taking into account seasonal speculations in oil markets. Since oil prices behave very seasonally during two periods of the year (summer and winter), we propose a modification of Mackey Glass equation by taking into account the rhythm of seasonal frequencies. Using monthly data for WTI oil prices, Seasonal Cyclical Mackey Glass estimates indicate that seasonal interactions between heterogeneous speculators...

  8. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    materials and electrochemical batteries.8 Rare earth metal ions when added to borate act as network modifiers and change the properties of glasses. In rare earth ... room temperature to 600◦C. For electrical measurements, samples were polished and conducting silver paste was deposited on both sides. The sample area ...

  9. Atomistic modeling of interfacial interaction between polyvinyl chloride and polypropylene with Boron-Nitride monolayer sheet: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Mashhadzadeh, A.; Fereidoon, A.; Ghorbanzadeh Ahangari, M.

    2017-11-01

    In present work, we performed Density Functional Theory calculation (DFT) to prepare polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nanocomposite. For mentioned purpose, we chose Boron-Nitride graphene (BN-graphene) sheet as nano reinforcement. Next, we calculated adsorbed energy between these two polymeric matrixes with BN-monolayer sheet. Our DFT results demonstrated that interaction energy between PP/BN-graphene and PVC/BN-graphene are equal, approximately, because in mentioned two nanocomposite systems, polymer matrix approached to nano reinforcement from hydrogen atom in optimized structure. Then, the adsorbed energy and equilibrium distance between mentioned polymeric matrixes and BN-graphene sheet in nanocomposite with increasing the number of polymer monomers onto surface of BN-graphene were calculated. Finally, we modeled van der Waals interfacial interaction between polymer matrixes and nano reinforcement with linear classical spring by using lennard-jones parameters.

  10. Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, K

    2010-01-01

    Audio recording of the sea from the breakwater in Plymouth Sound, by Stuart Moore. Presentations and exhibitions of the film Glass include: Finding Place exhibition, Plymouth (3 > 26 February 2010); University of the West of England's Radical British Screens symposium (3 September 2010); Plymouth University Festival of Research: Materiality and Technology film programme presented by the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr), Jill Craigie Cinema, Plymouth University (14 March 2011); ...

  11. The energy barrier to reorientational motion of the trifluoromethyl group in lithium trifluoromethanesulphonate and its complex with poly(ethylene oxide): a comparison between modelling and NMR relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Elaine A.; Mortimer, Michael; Wigglesworth, Christopher; Williams, Martin A. K.

    1999-07-01

    Molecular modelling is used to calculate the barrier heights to reorientation for the trifluoromethyl group, CF 3, in both lithium trifluoromethanesulphonate, LiCF 3SO 3, and the crystalline complex of this salt with poly(ethylene oxide), PEO. The calculated barrier heights are compared with those determined from 19F spin-lattice relaxation studies. In the case of LiCF 3SO 3, fluorine-fluorine non-bonded interactions are shown to play a dominant role in determining the barrier height to CF 3 group reorientation and optimised Lennard-Jones parameters for this interaction are determined. In the crystalline complex, PEO 3·LiCF 3SO 3, it is suggested that CF 3 group reorientation is strongly influenced by segmental motions of the PEO chain.

  12. A Kondo cluster-glass model for spin glass Cerium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, F M; Magalhaes, S G; Coqblin, B

    2011-01-01

    There are clear indications that the presence of disorder in Ce alloys, such as Ce(Ni,Cu) or Ce(Pd,Rh), is responsible for the existence of a cluster spin glass state which changes continuously into inhomogeneous ferromagnetism at low temperatures. We present a study of the competition between magnetism and Kondo effect in a cluster-glass model composed by a random inter-cluster interaction term and an intra-cluster one, which contains an intra-site Kondo interaction J k and an inter-site ferromagnetic one J 0 . The random interaction is given by the van Hemmen type of randomness which allows to solve the problem without the use of the replica method. The inter-cluster term is solved within the cluster mean-field theory and the remaining intra-cluster interactions can be treated by exact diagonalization. Results show the behavior of the cluster glass order parameter and the Kondo correlation function for several sizes of the clusters, J k , J 0 and values of the ferromagnetic inter-cluster average interaction I 0 . Particularly, for small J k , the magnetic solution is strongly dependent on I 0 and J 0 and a Kondo cluster-glass or a mixed phase can be obtained, while, for large J k , the Kondo effect is still dominant, both in good agreement with experiment in Ce(Ni,Cu) or Ce(Pd,Rh) alloys.

  13. Glass Property Models and Constraints for Estimating the Glass to be Produced at Hanford by Implementing Current Advanced Glass Formulation Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skorski, Daniel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent glass formulation and melter testing data have suggested that significant increases in waste loading in HLW and LAW glasses are possible over current system planning estimates. The data (although limited in some cases) were evaluated to determine a set of constraints and models that could be used to estimate the maximum loading of specific waste compositions in glass. It is recommended that these models and constraints be used to estimate the likely HLW and LAW glass volumes that would result if the current glass formulation studies are successfully completed. It is recognized that some of the models are preliminary in nature and will change in the coming years. Plus the models do not currently address the prediction uncertainties that would be needed before they could be used in plant operations. The models and constraints are only meant to give an indication of rough glass volumes and are not intended to be used in plant operation or waste form qualification activities. A current research program is in place to develop the data, models, and uncertainty descriptions for that purpose. A fundamental tenet underlying the research reported in this document is to try to be less conservative than previous studies when developing constraints for estimating the glass to be produced by implementing current advanced glass formulation efforts. The less conservative approach documented herein should allow for the estimate of glass masses that may be realized if the current efforts in advanced glass formulations are completed over the coming years and are as successful as early indications suggest they may be. Because of this approach there is an unquantifiable uncertainty in the ultimate glass volume projections due to model prediction uncertainties that has to be considered along with other system uncertainties such as waste compositions and amounts to be immobilized, split factors between LAW and HLW, etc.

  14. A new viscosity model for waste glass formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, A.L.K.

    1996-01-01

    Waste glass formulation requires prediction, with reasonable accuracy, of properties over much wider ranges of composition than are typically encountered in any single industrial application. Melt viscosity is one such property whose behavior must be predicted in formulating new waste glasses. A model was developed for silicate glasses which relates the Arrhenius activation energy for flow to an open-quotes effectiveclose quotes measure of non-bridging oxygen content in the melt, NBO eff . The NBO eff parameter incorporates the differing effects of modifying cations on the depolymerization of the silicate network. The activation energy-composition relationship implied by the model is in accordance with experimental behavior. The model was validated against two different databases, with satisfactory results

  15. Consolidation process model for film stacking glass/PPS laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko

    2010-01-01

    A model is proposed to optimise the processing parameters for the consolidation of glass/polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) laminates using a film stacking procedure. In a split approach, the heating and consolidation phase are treated separately. The heating phase is modelled using the one-dimensional

  16. An acceptance model for smart glasses based tourism augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidy, Waqas Khalid; Arshad, Haslina; Huang, Jiung Yao

    2017-10-01

    Recent mobile technologies have revolutionized the way people experience their environment. Although, there is only limited research on users' acceptance of AR in the cultural tourism context, previous researchers have explored the opportunities of using augmented reality (AR) in order to enhance user experience. Recent AR research lack works that integrates dimensions which are specific to cultural tourism and smart glass specific context. Hence, this work proposes an AR acceptance model in the context of cultural heritage tourism and smart glasses capable of performing augmented reality. Therefore, in this paper we aim to present an AR acceptance model to understand the AR usage behavior and visiting intention for tourists who use Smart Glass based AR at UNESCO cultural heritage destinations in Malaysia. Furthermore, this paper identifies information quality, technology readiness, visual appeal, and facilitating conditions as external variables and key factors influencing visitors' beliefs, attitudes and usage intention.

  17. Modelling of the glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution in the compounding of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloke, P.; Herken, T.; Schöppner, V.; Rudloff, J.; Kretschmer, K.; Heidemeyer, P.; Bastian, M.; Walther, Dridger, A.

    2014-05-01

    The use of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics for the production of highly stressed parts in the plastics processing industry has experienced an enormous boom in the last few years. The reasons for this are primarily the improvements to the stiffness and strength properties brought about by fiber reinforcement. These positive characteristics of glass fiber-reinforced polymers are governed predominantly by the mean glass fiber length and the glass fiber length distribution. It is not enough to describe the properties of a plastics component solely as a function of the mean glass fiber length [1]. For this reason, a mathematical-physical model has been developed for describing the glass fiber length distribution in compounding. With this model, it is possible on the one hand to optimize processes for the production of short glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics, and, on the other, to obtain information on the final distribution, on the basis of which much more detailed statements can be made about the subsequent properties of the molded part. Based on experimental tests, it was shown that this model is able to accurately describe the change in glass fiber length distribution in compounding.

  18. Integrated modelling of the glass-iron-clay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bildstein, O

    2007-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of integrated calculations on the near-field evolution in the VHLW/steel/bentonite/clay system. The calculations of the near-field evolution include different components: the vitrified waste packages, the steel container, the bentonite-based EBS (optional), the EDZ and the geological medium. Coupled reaction-transport (X-T) is used to simulate the corrosion of the steel canister and the glass alteration phase in presence of corrosion products (CPs), looking at mass transfer for chemical elements, especially iron and silica, pH, and porosity change. Calculations as performed give actual parameters for PA calculations: rate of glass alteration (through the calculated pH) as a function of time, extension of altered zone for iron-clay interactions with their own transport parameters, nature of CPs, effect on porosity distribution. According to the operational model currently used at the CEA and the calculations performed on the glass-iron-clay system, the alteration rate of glass and the evolution of the system strongly depend on the timing of CPs saturation with respect to silica sorption. The fate of silica which can be sorbed or precipitate is crucial to the lifetime of glass and to the overall evolution of the system. The other process that might influence the glass is the porosity decrease due to the precipitation of CPs and silica rich phases. However, it is difficult to assign a safety functions to clogging. It is scarcely observed in experiments, either because the conditions are not met for clogging or because the timescale of experiments does not allow for observable clogging. Moreover, the effect of mechanical stress in the NF has to be accounted for in the assessment of the effect of porosity changes. (author)

  19. Integrated modelling of the glass-iron-clay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, O.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of integrated calculations on the near-field evolution in the VHLW/steel/bentonite/clay system. The calculations of the near-field evolution include different components: the vitrified waste packages, the steel container, the bentonite-based EBS (optional), the EDZ and the geological medium. Coupled reaction-transport (X-T) is used to simulate the corrosion of the steel canister and the glass alteration phase in presence of corrosion products (CPs), looking at mass transfer for chemical elements, especially iron and silica, pH, and porosity change. Calculations as performed give actual parameters for PA calculations: rate of glass alteration (through the calculated pH) as a function of time, extension of altered zone for iron-clay interactions with their own transport parameters, nature of CPs, effect on porosity distribution. According to the operational model currently used at the CEA and the calculations performed on the glass-iron-clay system, the alteration rate of glass and the evolution of the system strongly depend on the timing of CPs saturation with respect to silica sorption. The fate of silica which can be sorbed or precipitate is crucial to the lifetime of glass and to the overall evolution of the system. The other process that might influence the glass is the porosity decrease due to the precipitation of CPs and silica rich phases. However, it is difficult to assign a safety functions to clogging. It is scarcely observed in experiments, either because the conditions are not met for clogging or because the timescale of experiments does not allow for observable clogging. Moreover, the effect of mechanical stress in the NF has to be accounted for in the assessment of the effect of porosity changes. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic Development of Corrosion Rate Modeling in Iron Phosphate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, Mark [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Brow, Richard [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States)

    2011-10-31

    A two-year research program investigated links between the thermodynamic properties of phosphate glasses and their corrosion rates in different solutions. Glasses in the Na2O-CaO-P2O5 and Na2O-Fe2O3-PO5 systems were prepared and characterized. These glasses were then exposed in bulk and powder form to acid (0.1M HCl), basic (0.1M KOH) and neutral (deionized water) solutions at varying exposure times and temperatures. Analysis of the solution and the glass after exposure determined the rate and type of corrosion that occurred. Simultaneously, efforts were made to determine the thermodynamic properties of solid iron phosphate compounds. This included measurement of low temperature (5-300 K) heat capacities, measured at Brigham Young University; the attempted use of a Parr calorimeter to measure ambient temperature enthalpies of formation; and attempted measurement of temperature heat capacities. Only the first of the three tasks was successfully accomplished. In lieu of experimental measurement of enthalpies of formation, first-principles calculation of enthalpies of formation was performed at Missouri S&T; these results will be used in subsequent modeling efforts.

  1. Assessing the Validity of the Simplified Potential Energy Clock Model for Modeling Glass-Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Glass-ceramic seals may be the future of hermetic connectors at Sandia National Laboratories. They have been shown capable of surviving higher temperatures and pressures than amorphous glass seals. More advanced finite-element material models are required to enable model-based design and provide evidence that the hermetic connectors can meet design requirements. Glass-ceramics are composite materials with both crystalline and amorphous phases. The latter gives rise to (non-linearly) viscoelastic behavior. Given their complex microstructures, glass-ceramics may be thermorheologically complex, a behavior outside the scope of currently implemented constitutive models at Sandia. However, it was desired to assess if the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model is capable of capturing the material response. Available data for SL 16.8 glass-ceramic was used to calibrate the SPEC model. Model accuracy was assessed by comparing model predictions with shear moduli temperature dependence and high temperature 3-point bend creep data. It is shown that the model can predict the temperature dependence of the shear moduli and 3- point bend creep data. Analysis of the results is presented. Suggestions for future experiments and model development are presented. Though further calibration is likely necessary, SPEC has been shown capable of modeling glass-ceramic behavior in the glass transition region but requires further analysis below the transition region.

  2. Models and optimization of solar-control automotive glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Russell Dale

    Efforts to develop automotive glasses with enhanced solar control characteristics have been motivated by the desire for increased consumer comfort, reduced air-conditioning loads, and improved fuel-economy associated with a reduction in the total solar energy transmitted into the automotive interior. In the current investigation, the base soda-lime-silicate glass (72.7 wt.% SiO 2, 14.2% Na2O, 10.0% CaO, 2.5% MgO, 0.6% Al2O 3 with 0.3 Na2SO4 added to the batch as a fining agent) was modified with Fe2O3 (0.0 to 0.8%), NiO (0.0 to 0.15%), CoO (0.0 to 0.15%), V2O5 (0.0 to 0.225%), TiO2 (0.0 to 1.5%), SnO (0.0 to 3.0%), ZnS (0.0 to 0.09%), ZnO (0.0 to 2.0%), CaF2 (0.0 to 2.0%), and P2O5 (0.0 to 2.0%) to exploit reported non-linear mechanistic interactions among the dopants by which the solar-control characteristics of the base glass can be modified. Due to the large number of experimental variables under consideration, a D-optimal experimental design methodology was utilized to model the solar-optical properties as a function of batch composition. The independent variables were defined as the calculated batch concentrations of the primary (Fe2O 3, NiO, CoO, V2O5) and interactive (CaF2 , P2O5, SnO, ZnS, ZnO, TiO2) dopants in the glass. The dependent variable was defined as the apparent optical density over a wavelength range of 300--2700 nm at 10 nm intervals. The model form relating the batch composition to the apparent optical density was a modified Lambert-Beer absorption law; which, in addition to the linear terms, contained quadratic terms of the primary dopants, and a series of binary and ternary non-linear interactions amongst the primary and interactive dopants. Utilizing the developed model, exceptional fit in terms of both the discrete response (the transmission curves) and the integrated response (visible and solar transmittance) were realized. Glasses utilizing Fe2O 3, CoO, NiO, V2O5, ZnO and P2O 5 have generated innovative glasses with substantially improved

  3. A free energy study of the liquid-liquid phase transition of the Jagla ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Appendix” preliminary free energy surface calculations for select parameterizations of the generalized family of Jagla potentials spanning from the original (anomalous,water-like) Jagla model to the Lennard-Jones model. These calculations ...

  4. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [Energy Solutions, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  5. MODELING OF TEMPERATURE FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF THE FOAM GLASS BATCH IN TERMS OF THERMAL TREATMENT OF FOAM GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Fedosov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Applications of foam glass is currently quite wide. This material is applied directly to construction and other human activities. Recent years the attention of scientists aimed at modeling the thermal processes in the production of foamed glass. Appear works in which the developed mathematical model allows to predict the distribution of temperature fields in the foam glass material at various stages of heat treatment of the material. The emergence of these models reveals a number of promising directions in the improvement of technology of producing foamed glass. Within the phenomenological formulation of the problem it is necessary to consider three-dimensional temperature field in the charge of foam-glass and inside the metal mold for foaming. It is necessary to consider the nonstationarity of the process and dynamics of change in macrovisiontm values. It is also worth noting that in the conditions of heat treatment of charge materials occurs difficult the heat transfer. The distribution of temperature fields in the foam glass material is from near-surface regions of the charge to the center. The first objective of the study is to find and describe the distribution of temperature fields in the volume of the foam glass of the charge to reflect changes in microphysically parameters in foam glass batch due to the gradual formation of porosity of the material of the charge from the periphery to the center. The second task is to find conditions for the uniform formation of the pore volume of the material. The paper presents a boundaryvalue problem of heat transfer in foam glass material for the metal mold on the x coordinate. This illustration of temperature field distribution inside the metal mold for foaming.

  6. Symmetry, Landau theory and polytope models of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.R.; Widom, M.

    1984-01-01

    Order in supercooled liquids and metallic glasses is related to a regular icosahedral ''crystal'' consisting of 120 particles inscribed on the surface of a sphere in four dimensions. Hyperspherical harmonics and the discrete symmetry group of this four-dimensional platonic solid can be used to construct an order parameter for glasses in three-dimensional flat space. A uniformly frustrated Landau expansion in this order parameter suggests a ground state with a regular array of wedge disclination lines. Homotopy theory is used to classify all topologically stable defects. A generalization of Bloch's theorem for electronic states in flat space solids allows explicit diagonalization of tight binding models defined on the curved-space icosahedral crystal. (orig.)

  7. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimensional spatial inhomogeneity is parallel to the direction of propagation. pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  8. Spin glass model for dynamics of cell reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments show that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells. The possible cell fates can be modeled as attractors in a dynamical system, the ``epigenetic landscape.'' Both cellular differentiation and reprogramming can be described in the landscape picture as motion from one attractor to another attractor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in a simple model of the landscape. This model is based on spin glass theory and it can be used to construct a simulated epigenetic landscape starting from the experimental genomic data. We re-analyse data from several cell reprogramming experiments and compare with our simulation results. We find that the model can reproduce some of the main features of the dynamics of cell reprogramming.

  9. Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Pokorný, R.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Dixon, D.R.; Cutforth, D.A.; Lee, S.; McCarthy, B.P.; Schweiger, M. J.; Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 11 (2017), s. 5096-5106 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : foams * glassmelting * modelling/model * thermal conductivity Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  10. Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

  11. Physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion with particular consideration of simulated radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.

    1985-01-01

    A physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion is described. This model can be used for predicting, interpreting, and extrapolating experimental results. In static leaching tests the rate of corrosion generally decreases with time. Some authors assume that the surface layer, which grows during the course of the reaction, protects the underlying glass from further attack by the aqueous phase. Other authors assume that the saturation effects in solution are responsible for reducing the rate of the reaction. It is demonstrated within the scope of this work that examples can be found for both concepts; however, transport processes in the surface layer and/or in solution can be excluded as rate-determining processes within a majority of the examined cases. The location of the corrosion reaction is the boundary surface between the surface layer and the not yet attacked glass (transition zone)

  12. Particle rearrangement and softening contributions to the nonlinear mechanical response of glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2017-09-01

    Amorphous materials such as metallic, polymeric, and colloidal glasses exhibit complex preparation-dependent mechanical response to applied shear. In particular, glassy solids yield, with a mechanical response that transitions from elastic to plastic, with increasing shear strain. We perform numerical simulations to investigate the mechanical response of binary Lennard-Jones glasses undergoing athermal, quasistatic pure shear as a function of the cooling rate R used to prepare them. The ensemble-averaged stress versus strain curve 〈σ (γ )〉 resembles the spatial average in the large size limit, which appears smooth and displays a putative elastic regime at small strains, a yielding-related peak in stress at intermediate strain, and a plastic flow regime at large strains. In contrast, for each glass configuration in the ensemble, the stress-strain curve σ (γ ) consists of many short nearly linear segments that are punctuated by particle-rearrangement-induced rapid stress drops. To explain the nonlinearity of 〈σ (γ )〉 , we quantify the shape of the small stress-strain segments and the frequency and size of the stress drops in each glass configuration. We decompose the stress loss [i.e., the deviation in the slope of 〈σ (γ )〉 from that at 〈σ (0 )〉 ] into the loss from particle rearrangements and the loss from softening [i.e., the reduction of the slopes of the linear segments in σ (γ ) ], and then compare the two contributions as a function of R and γ . For the current studies, the rearrangement-induced stress loss is larger than the softening-induced stress loss, however, softening stress losses increase with decreasing cooling rate. We also characterize the structure of the potential energy landscape along the strain direction for glasses prepared with different R , and observe a dramatic change of the properties of the landscape near the yielding transition. We then show that the rearrangement-induced energy loss per strain can serve as

  13. A comparison of the performance of nuclear waste glasses by modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Strachan, D.M.

    1988-12-01

    Through a combination of data collection and computer modeling, the dissolution mechanism of nuclear waste glasses has been investigated and more clearly defined. Glass dissolution can be described as a dissolution/precipitation process in which glass dissolves in aqueous solution and solids precipitate as the solubility products are exceeded. The dissolution process is controlled by activity of the rate-limiting specie H 4 SiO 4 . As a concentration of H 4 SiO 4 increases, the rate of dissolution decreases until a final reaction rate is reached. Between the forward reaction rate (early time) and final reaction rate (very long time), glasses may exhibit an intermediate root time dependence caused by a transport resistance for the diffusion of H 4 SiO 4 within the gel layer on the glass surface. In this report, three glasses are studied: JSS-A, PNL 76-68, and SRL-131. Data from static and dynamic leach tests are assembled, plotted, and successfully modeled. The kinetic parameters for these glasses are reported. With four parameters derived from experiments for each glass, the model can be used to calculate the effects of changes in the initial composition of the water contacting the glass. The effects of convective flow can also be modeled. Furthermore, glasses of different compositions can be readily compared. 49 refs., 27 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Validation Assessment of a Glass-to-Metal Seal Finite-Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emery, John M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Arthur [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sealing glasses are ubiquitous in high pressure and temperature engineering applications, such as hermetic feed-through electrical connectors. A common connector technology are glass-to-metal seals where a metal shell compresses a sealing glass to create a hermetic seal. Though finite-element analysis has been used to understand and design glass-to-metal seals for many years, there has been little validation of these models. An indentation technique was employed to measure the residual stress on the surface of a simple glass-to-metal seal. Recently developed rate- dependent material models of both Schott 8061 and 304L VAR stainless steel have been applied to a finite-element model of the simple glass-to-metal seal. Model predictions of residual stress based on the evolution of material models are shown. These model predictions are compared to measured data. Validity of the finite- element predictions is discussed. It will be shown that the finite-element model of the glass-to-metal seal accurately predicts the mean residual stress in the glass near the glass-to-metal interface and is valid for this quantity of interest.

  15. Incorporation of defects into the central atoms model of a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lass, Eric A.; Zhu Aiwu; Shiflet, G.J.; Joseph Poon, S.

    2011-01-01

    The central atoms model (CAM) of a metallic glass is extended to incorporate thermodynamically stable defects, similar to vacancies in a crystalline solid, within the amorphous structure. A bond deficiency (BD), which is the proposed defect present in all metallic glasses, is introduced into the CAM equations. Like vacancies in a crystalline solid, BDs are thermodynamically stable entities because of the increase in entropy associated with their creation, and there is an equilibrium concentration present in the glassy phase. When applied to Cu-Zr and Ni-Zr binary metallic glasses, the concentration of thermally induced BDs surrounding Zr atoms reaches a relatively constant value at the glass transition temperature, regardless of composition within a given glass system. Using this 'critical' defect concentration, the predicted temperatures at which the glass transition is expected to occur are in good agreement with the experimentally determined glass transition temperatures for both alloy systems.

  16. Liquid-liquid phase transition and glass transition in a monoatomic model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses.

  17. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of HLW vitrification is limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layer, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~53.8 ± 3.7 µm/h determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  18. The effects of composition on glass dissolution rates: The application of four models to a data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geldart, R.W.; Kindle, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Four models have been applied to a data base to relate glass dissolution in distilled water to composition. The data base is used to compare the precisions obtained from the models in fitting actual data. The usefulness of the data base in formulating a model is also demonstrated. Two related models in which the composite or pH-adjusted free energy of hydration of the glass is the correlating parameter are compared with experimental data. In a structural model, the nonbridging oxygen content of the glasses is used to correlate glass dissolution rate to composition. In a model formulated for this report, the cation valence and the oxygen content of the glass are compared with observed dissolution rates. The models were applied to the 28-day normalized silica release at 90/sup 0/C for over 285 glass compositions with surface area to volume ratios of 10 m/sup -1/ (Materials Characterization Center MCC-1 glass durability test using distilled water). These glasses included the nonradioactive analogs of WV205 and SRL-165, as well as SRL-131, PNL 76-68, and a European glass, UK209. Predicted glass dissolution rates show similar fits to the data for all four models. The predictions of the models were also plotted for two subsets of the glasses: waste glasses and Savannah River Laboratory glasses. The model predictions fit the data for these groups much better than they fit the data for the entire set of glasses. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. A comparison of the performance of nuclear waste glasses by modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Strachan, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A model selected for the licensing process must be based on a physical and chemical understanding of the glass corrosion mechanism. The purpose of this paper is to show that a dissolution/precipitation model can be used to better understand the effects of various system variables on glass dissolution. The application and validation of this model are also discussed. A dissolution/precipitation model developed appears applicable to experiments with a wide range of solution compositions as well as to more complex systems, such as the bentonite/glass/water system the steel corrosion product/glass/water system, or the dissolution of natural basalt glass in a geologic environment. This model is based on solution chemistry and transition state theory. The theoretical background of this model is discussed elsewhere and is used to describe the dissolution behavior of three nuclear waste glasses. These glasses were selected because they represent a wide range of behavior and, therefore, could be used to illustrate the capabilities of the dissolution/precipitation model. The effects of parameters, such as temperature and starting solution composition, on the dissolution behavior of glass are also discussed. 27 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  20. Angiogenic effects of borate glass microfibers in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yinan; Brown, Roger F; Jung, Steven B; Day, Delbert E

    2014-12-01

    The primary objective of this research was to evaluate the use of bioactive borate-based glass microfibers for angiogenesis in soft tissue repair applications. The effect of these fibers on growth of capillaries and small blood vessels was compared to that of 45S5 silica glass microfibers and sham implant controls. Compressed mats of three types of glass microfibers were implanted subcutaneously in rats and tissues surrounding the implant sites histologically evaluated 2-4 weeks post surgery. Bioactive borate glass 13-93B3 supplemented with 0.4 wt % copper promoted extensive angiogenesis as compared to silica glass microfibers and sham control tissues. The angiogenic responses suggest the copper-containing 13-93B3 microfibers may be effective for treating chronic soft tissue wounds. A second objective was to assess the possible systemic cytotoxicity of dissolved borate ions and other materials released from implanted borate glass microfibers. Cytotoxicity was assessed via histological evaluation of kidney tissue collected from animals 4 weeks after subcutaneously implanting high amounts of the borate glass microfibers. The evaluation of the kidney tissue from these animals showed no evidence of chronic histopathological changes in the kidney. The overall results indicate the borate glass microfibers are safe and effective for soft tissue applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Correlation between acoustical and structural properties of glasses: Extension of Abd El-Moneim model for bioactive silica based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El-Moneim, Amin, E-mail: aminabdelmoneim@hotmail.com

    2016-04-15

    Correlation between room temperature ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the most significant structural parameters has been studied in the bioactive silica based glasses, for the first time. The correlation has been carried out in the quaternary SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass system using the two semi-empirical formulas, which have been presented recently by the author. Changes in the elastic properties, related to the substitution of SiO{sub 2} by alkali Na{sub 2}O and alkaline earth CaO oxides, have also been deduced by evaluating the mean atomic volume, packing density, fractal bond connectivity and density of the analogous crystalline structure. Furthermore, values of the theoretical elastic moduli have been calculated on the basis of Makishima-Mackenzie theory and compared with the corresponding observed values. Results show that the correlation between ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the oxygen density, average atomic ring size, first-order stretching force constant and experimental bulk modulus was achieved at 5 MHz frequency. Values of the theoretically calculated shear modulus are in excellent correlation (C. R. ≻95%) with the corresponding experimental ones. The divergence between the theoretical and experimental values of bulk modulus has been discussed. - Highlights: • Abd El-Moneim model was extended for bioactive glasses. • Ultrasonic attenuation was correlated with structural parameters. • Correlation was carried out in Si–Na–Ca–P glasses. • The model is valid for all investigated glass samples. • Agreement between theoretical and experimental elastic moduli was studied.

  2. Study of archaeological analogs for the validation of nuclear glass long-term behavior models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verney-Carron, A.

    2008-10-01

    Fractured archaeological glass blocks collected from a shipwreck discovered in the Mediterranean Sea near Embiez Island (Var) were investigated because of their morphological analogy with vitrified nuclear waste and of a known and stable environment. These glasses are fractured due to a fast cooling after they were melted (like nuclear glass) and have been altered for 1800 years in seawater. This work results in the development and the validation of a geochemical model able to simulate the alteration of a fractured archaeological glass block over 1800 years. The kinetics associated with the different mechanisms (interdiffusion and dissolution) and the thermodynamic parameters of the model were determined by leaching experiments. The model implemented in HYTEC software was used to simulate crack alteration over 1800 years. The consistency between simulated alteration thicknesses and measured data on glass blocks validate the capacity of the model to predict long-term alteration. This model is able to account for the results from the characterization of crack network and its state of alteration. The cracks in the border zone are the most altered due to a fast renewal of the leaching solution, whereas internal cracks are thin because of complex interactions between glass alteration and transport of elements in solution (influence of initial crack aperture and of the crack sealing). The lowest alteration thicknesses, as well as their variability, can be explained. The analog behavior of archaeological and nuclear glasses from leaching experiments makes possible the transposition of the model to nuclear glass in geological repository. (author)

  3. Composition models for the viscosity and chemical durability of West Valley related nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Saad, E.E.; Freeborn, W.P.; Macedo, P.B.; Pegg, I.L.; Sassoon, R.E.; Barkatt, A.; Finger, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    There are two important criteria that must be satisfied by a nuclear waste glass durability and processability. The chemical composition of the glass must be such that it does not dissolve or erode appreciably faster than the decay of the radioactive materials embedded in it. The second criterion, processability, means that the glass must melt with ease, must be easily pourable, and must not crystallize appreciably. This paper summarizes the development of simple models for predicting the durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses from their composition

  4. Modeling the Structural Response of Reinforced Glass Beams using an SLA Scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, P.C.; Graaf, van de Anne; Rots, J.G.; Bos, Freek; Louter, Pieter Christiaan; Veer, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates whether a novel computational sequentially linear analysis (SLA) technique, which is especially developed for modeling brittle material response, is applicable for modeling the structural response of metal reinforced glass beams. To do so, computational SLA results are

  5. Drilling in tempered glassmodelling and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    The present paper reports experimentally and numerically obtained results for the process of drilling in tempered glass. The experimental results are drilling depths on the edge in 19mm tempered glass with a known residual stress state measured by a scattered light polariscope. The experiments have...... of applying forces in such holes and thereby being able to mechanically assemble tempered glass without the need of drilling holes before the tempering process. The paper is the result of currently ongoing research and the results should be treated as so....

  6. Development of Models to Predict the Redox State of Nuclear Waste Containment Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O.; Guirat, R.; Advocat, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Departement de Traitement et de Conditionnement des Dechets, Marcoule, BP 71171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Phalippou, J. [Universite de Montpellier II, Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Vitrification is one of the recommended immobilization routes for nuclear waste, and is currently implemented at industrial scale in several countries, notably for high-level waste. To optimize nuclear waste vitrification, research is conducted to specify suitable glass formulations and develop more effective processes. This research is based not only on experiments at laboratory or technological scale, but also on computer models. Vitrified nuclear waste often contains several multi-valent species whose oxidation state can impact the properties of the melt and of the final glass; these include iron, cerium, ruthenium, manganese, chromium and nickel. Cea is therefore also developing models to predict the final glass redox state. Given the raw materials and production conditions, the model predicts the oxygen fugacity at equilibrium in the melt. It can also estimate the ratios between the oxidation states of the multi-valent species contained in the molten glass. The oxidizing or reductive nature of the atmosphere above the glass melt is also taken into account. Unlike the models used in the conventional glass industry based on empirical methods with a limited range of application, the models proposed are based on the thermodynamic properties of the redox species contained in the waste vitrification feed stream. The thermodynamic data on which the model is based concern the relationship between the glass redox state and the oxygen fugacity in the molten glass. The model predictions were compared with oxygen fugacity measurements for some fifty glasses. The experiments carried out at laboratory and industrial scale with a cold crucible melter. The oxygen fugacity of the glass samples was measured by electrochemical methods and compared with the predicted value. The differences between the predicted and measured oxygen fugacity values were generally less than 0.5 Log unit. (authors)

  7. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L.; Morris, C.E.

    1995-12-01

    A set of ''templates'' was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ''affinity effect'' cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity

  8. A model for foam formation, stability, and breakdown in glass-melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, J. van der; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic model for describing the build-up and breakdown of a glass-melt foam is presented. The foam height is determined by the gas flux to the glass-melt surface and the drainage rate of the liquid lamellae between the gas bubbles. The drainage rate is determined by the average gas bubble radius

  9. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  10. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  11. Progress toward bridging from atomistic to continuum modeling to predict nuclear waste glass dissolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapol, Peter (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Bourg, Ian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Steefel, Carl I. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research performed for the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Subcontinuum and Upscaling Task. The work conducted focused on developing a roadmap to include molecular scale, mechanistic information in continuum-scale models of nuclear waste glass dissolution. This information is derived from molecular-scale modeling efforts that are validated through comparison with experimental data. In addition to developing a master plan to incorporate a subcontinuum mechanistic understanding of glass dissolution into continuum models, methods were developed to generate constitutive dissolution rate expressions from quantum calculations, force field models were selected to generate multicomponent glass structures and gel layers, classical molecular modeling was used to study diffusion through nanopores analogous to those in the interfacial gel layer, and a micro-continuum model (K{mu}C) was developed to study coupled diffusion and reaction at the glass-gel-solution interface.

  12. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Rani, Pooja

    2016-05-01

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO2 (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO2 has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=-21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  13. Study of interaction in silica glass via model potential approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Sarita, E-mail: saritaiitr2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Rani, Pooja [D.A.V. College, Sec-10, Chandigarh-160010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Silica is one of the most commonly encountered substances in daily life and in electronics industry. Crystalline SiO{sub 2} (in several forms: quartz, cristobalite, tridymite) is an important constituent of many minerals and gemstones, both in pure form and mixed with related oxides. Cohesive energy of amorphous SiO{sub 2} has been investigated via intermolecular potentials i.e weak Van der Waals interaction and Morse type short-range interaction. We suggest a simple atom-atom based Van der Waals as well as Morse potential to find cohesive energy of glass. It has been found that the study of silica structure using two different model potentials is significantly different. Van der Waals potential is too weak (P.E =0.142eV/molecule) to describe the interaction between silica molecules. Morse potential is a strong potential, earlier given for intramolecular bonding, but if applied for intermolecular bonding, it gives a value of P.E (=−21.92eV/molecule) to appropriately describe the structure of silica.

  14. Modeling the Deformation-Failure Mechanisms of Thin Hollow Glass Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Cruz, Tryana V.; Nakagawa, Masami

    2009-06-01

    Thin Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGMs) are a potential candidate to insulate cryogenic tanks due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and thermal properties. In this study, HGMs were modeled using a Discrete Element Method (DEM) to simulate their deformation and fracture behavior. Due to lack of actual data, a chemical composition-based methodology was introduced to synthesize material properties that reproduce the mechanical properties of soda-lime-borosilicate glass. The modeled microsphere was subjected to a uniaxial compression test and failed due to buckling. This model captures some essential aspect of deformation-failure characteristics of a thin hollow glass microsphere.

  15. Linking rigidity transitions with enthalpic changes at the glass transition and fragility: insight from a simple oscillator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2010-07-21

    A low temperature Monte Carlo dynamics of a Keating-like oscillator model is used to study the relationship between the nature of network glasses from the viewpoint of rigidity, the thermal reversibility during the glass transition and the strong-fragile behaviour of glass-forming liquids. The model shows that a Phillips optimal glass formation with minimal enthalpic changes is obtained under a cooling/annealing cycle when the system is optimally constrained by the harmonic interactions, i.e. when it is isostatically rigid. For these peculiar systems with a nearly reversible glass transition, the computed activation energy for relaxation time shows also a minimum, which demonstrates that isostatically rigid glasses are strong (Arrhenius-like) glass-forming liquids. Experiments on chalcogenide and oxide glass-forming liquids are discussed under this new perspective and confirm the theoretical prediction for chalcogenide network glasses whereas limitations of the approach appear for weakly interacting (non-covalent, ionic) systems.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Coarse-Grain Model of Silicon Functionalized Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic transport, the storage capacity and the service life of the anode material for lithium ion batteries will be reduced seriously in the event of the material layering or cracking, so the anode material must have strong mechanical reliability. Firstly, in view of the traditional molecular dynamics (MD limited by the geometric scales of the model of Silicon functionalized graphenen (SFG as lithium ion batteries anode material, some full atomic models of SFG were established using Tersoff potential and Lennard-Jones potential, and used to calculate the modulus and the adhesion properties. What’s more, the assertion of mechanical equilibrium condition and energy conservation between full atomic and coarse-grain models through elastic strain energy were enforced to arrive at model parameters. The model of SFG coarse-grain bead-spring elements and its system energy function were obtained via full atomic simulations. Finally, the validity of the SFG coarse-grain model was verified by comparing the tensile property of coarse-grain model with full atoms model.

  17. Low frequency elastic properties of glasses at low temperatures - implications on the tunneling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raychaudhuri, A.K.; Hunklinger, S.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the low frequency elastic properties of dielectric, normal conducting and superconducting metallic glasses at audio-frequencies (fapprox.=1 kHz) and temperatures down to 10 mK. Our results are discussed in the framework of the tunneling model of glasses. The major assumption of the tunneling model regarding the tunneling states with long relaxation time has been verified, but discrepancies to high frequency measurements have been found. In addition, our experiments on superconducting metallic glasses seem to indicate that the present treatment of the electron-tunneling state interaction is not sufficient. (orig.)

  18. Short range structural models of the glass transition temperatures and densities of 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] mixed glass former glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Christian; Schuller, Katherine; Martin, Steve W

    2014-04-03

    The 0.5Na2S + 0.5[xGeS2 + (1 - x)PS5/2] mixed glass former (MGF) glass system exhibits a nonlinear and nonadditive negative change in the Na(+) ion conductivity as one glass former, PS5/2, is exchanged for the other, GeS2. This behavior, known as the mixed glass former effect (MGFE), is also manifest in a negative deviation from the linear interpolation of the glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of the binary end-member glasses, x = 0 and x = 1. Interestingly, the composition dependence of the densities of these ternary MGF glasses reveals a slightly positive MGFE deviation from a linear interpolation of the densities of the binary end-member glasses, x = 0 and x = 1. From our previous studies of the structures of these glasses using IR, Raman, and NMR spectroscopies, we find that a disproportionation reaction occurs between PS7/2(4-) and GeS3(2-) units into PS4(3-) and GeS5/2(1-) units. This disproportionation combined with the formation of Ge4S10(4-) anions from GeS5/2(1-) groups leads to the negative MGFE in T(g). A best-fit model of the T(g)s of these glasses was developed to quantify the amount of GeS5/2(1-) units that form Ge4S10(4-) molecular anions in the ternary glasses (∼ 5-10%). This refined structural model was used to develop a short-range structural model of the molar volumes, which shows that the slight densification of the ternary glasses is due to the improved packing efficiency of the germanium sulfide species.

  19. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Depto. de Engenharia Termica e de Fluidos-FEM-UNICAMP CP: 6122 CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Henriquez, J.R. [Depto. de Eng. Mecanica-DEMEC, UFPE Av. Academico Helio Ramos, S/N CEP 50740-530, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance. (author)

  20. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Noemi; Kowal, Andrzej; Rincon, Jesus-Maria; Villegas, Maria-Angeles

    2010-01-01

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  1. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Noemi [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kowal, Andrzej [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAN, ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30239 Cracow (Poland); Rincon, Jesus-Maria [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion, CSIC, C. Serrano Galvache s/n, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Villegas, Maria-Angeles, E-mail: mariangeles.villegas@cchs.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C. Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  2. Towards optimization of nuclear waste glass: Constraints, property models, and waste loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, P.

    1994-04-01

    Vitrification of both low- and high-level wastes from 177 tanks at Hanford poses a great challenge to glass makers, whose task is to formulate a system of glasses that are acceptable to the federal repository for disposal. The enormous quantity of the waste requires a glass product of the lowest possible volume. The incomplete knowledge of waste composition, its variability, and lack of an appropriate vitrification technology further complicates this difficult task. A simple relationship between the waste loading and the waste glass volume is presented and applied to the predominantly refractory (usually high-activity) and predominantly alkaline (usually low-activity) waste types. Three factors that limit waste loading are discussed, namely product acceptability, melter processing, and model validity. Glass formulation and optimization problems are identified and a broader approach to uncertainties is suggested

  3. Simplified model for a ventilated glass window under forced air flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, K.A.R.; Henriquez, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study on a ventilated window composed of two glass sheets separated by a spacing through which air is forced to flow. The proposed model is one dimensional and unsteady based upon global energy balance over the glass sheets and the flowing fluid. The external glass sheet of the cavity is subjected to variable heat flow due to the solar radiation as well as variable external ambient temperature. The exchange of radiation energy (infrared radiation) between the glass sheets is also included in the formulation. Effects of the spacing between the glass sheets, variation of the forced mass flow rate on the total heat gain and the shading coefficients are investigated. The results show that the effect of the increase of the mass flow rate is found to reduce the mean solar heat gain and the shading coefficients while the increase of the fluid entry temperature is found to deteriorate the window thermal performance

  4. Precision Glass Molding: Validation of an FE Model for Thermo-Mechanical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    stress distribution inside the glass rings are calculated by the developed FE model, and the effects of some important process parameters such as interface friction and mold temperature on the FE results are assessed. The developed FE model can be employed to predict the deformation behavior, final size......In precision glass molding process, the required accuracy for the final size and shape of the molded lenses as well as the complexity of this technology calls for a numerical simulation. The current paper addresses the development of an FE model for thermo-mechanical simulation of the precision...... glass molding process including heating, pressing, and cooling stages. Temperature- dependent viscoelastic and structural relaxation behavior of the glass material are implemented through a FORTRAN material subroutine (UMAT) into the commercial FEM program ABAQUS, and the FE model is validated...

  5. Accident Rates in Glass Cockpit Model U.S. Army Rotary-Wing Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rash, Clarence E

    2001-01-01

    ...). These MFD-based crewstations are known as "glass cockpits". In addition, the U.S. Army fields two aircraft models using a hybrid design which has a mix of dedicated instruments and MFDs. The U.S...

  6. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  7. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  8. Set of molecular models based on quantum mechanical ab initio calculations and thermodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckl, Bernhard; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2008-10-09

    A parametrization strategy for molecular models on the basis of force fields is proposed, which allows a rapid development of models for small molecules by using results from quantum mechanical (QM) ab initio calculations and thermodynamic data. The geometry of the molecular models is specified according to the atom positions determined by QM energy minimization. The electrostatic interactions are modeled by reducing the electron density distribution to point dipoles and point quadrupoles located in the center of mass of the molecules. Dispersive and repulsive interactions are described by Lennard-Jones sites, for which the parameters are iteratively optimized to experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data, i.e., vapor pressure, saturated liquid density, and enthalpy of vaporization of the considered substance. The proposed modeling strategy was applied to a sample set of ten molecules from different substance classes. New molecular models are presented for iso-butane, cyclohexane, formaldehyde, dimethyl ether, sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, thiophene, hydrogen cyanide, acetonitrile, and nitromethane. Most of the models are able to describe the experimental VLE data with deviations of a few percent.

  9. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledieu, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  10. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledieu, A.

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  11. Thermokinetic model of borosilicate glass dissolution: contextual affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.; Fritz, B.

    1989-01-01

    Short and long-term geochemical interactions of R7T7 nuclear glass with water at 100 0 C were simulated with the DISSOL thermokinetic computer code. Both the dissolved glass quantity and the resulting water composition, saturation states and mineral quantities produced were calculated as a function of time. The rate equation used in the simulation was first proposed by Aagaard and Helgeson. It simulates a gradually diminishing dissolution rate as the reaction affinity diminishes. The best agreement with 1-year experimental data was obtained with a reaction affinity calculated from silica activity (Grambow's hypothesis) rather than taking into account the activity of all the glass components as proposed by Jantzen and Plodinec. The concept of residual affinity was introduced by Grambow to express the fact that the glass dissolution rate does not cease. We prefer to replace the term residual affinity by contextual affinity, which expresses the influence on the dissolution rate of three factors: the solution chemistry, the metastability of SiO 2 (m), and the possible precipitation of certain aluminosilicates such as zeolites. 19 refs

  12. A phenomenological particle-based platelet model for simulating filopodia formation during early activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothapragada, Seetha; Zhang, Peng; Sheriff, Jawaad; Livelli, Mark; Slepian, Marvin J; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a phenomenological three-dimensional platelet model to characterize the filopodia formation observed during early stage platelet activation. Departing from continuum mechanics based approaches, this coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) particle-based model can deform to emulate the complex shape change and filopodia formation that platelets undergo during activation. The platelet peripheral zone is modeled with a two-layer homogeneous elastic structure represented by spring-connected particles. The structural zone is represented by a cytoskeletal assembly comprising of a filamentous core and filament bundles supporting the platelet's discoid shape, also modeled by spring-connected particles. The interior organelle zone is modeled by homogeneous cytoplasm particles that facilitate the platelet deformation. Nonbonded interactions among the discrete particles of the membrane, the cytoskeletal assembly, and the cytoplasm are described using the Lennard-Jones potential with empirical constants. By exploring the parameter space of this CGMD model, we have successfully simulated the dynamics of varied filopodia formations. Comparative analyses of length and thickness of filopodia show that our numerical simulations are in agreement with experimental measurements of flow-induced activated platelets. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Comprehension and modelling of chromia-forming alloys corrosion mechanisms in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmucker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear wastes management consists in the confinement of the radioactive wastes in a glass matrix. This is made by inductive melting in a hot crucible at an operating temperature around 1150 C. These crucibles are constituted of nickel based superalloys with high chromium content. They are submitted to a harsh corrosion by the molten glass, eventually leading to their replacement. The protection of the crucible against corrosion is best provided by the establishment of a protective chromium oxide layer at the surface of the alloy. A binary chromia-forming alloy (Ni-30Cr) is studied in this work. Three different binary and ternary glass compositions are chosen in order to understand the influence of the glass basicity and glass viscosity on the corrosion kinetics. Besides, the de-correlation of the formation and dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer allows the modelling of the overall oxide growth in the molten glass. For that purpose, the oxide formation kinetics in molten glass media is assimilated to the oxidation kinetics of the alloy in gaseous media with oxygen partial pressure that are representative of the redox properties of the glasses. Studies of the oxidation kinetics and of the diffusion mechanisms have shown that the oxidation kinetics is independent on the oxygen pressure in the range of 10 -13 up to 10 -3 atm O 2 at 1150 C. The present work has shown that the dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer is governed by the diffusion of Cr(III) in the glass melt. This dissolution kinetics has been evaluated from the diffusion coefficient and the solubility limit of Cr(III) in the glass. Finally, the overall growth kinetics of the Cr 2 O 3 layer in the glass has been successfully modelled for each glass, thanks to the knowledge of (i) the solubility limit of Cr(III), (ii) its diffusion coefficient in the glasses and (iii) the oxidation kinetics of the alloy. The presented model also allows quantifying the influence of each of these parameters on the

  14. Heat Transfer Model of a Small-Scale Waste Glass Melter with Cold Cap Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander; Guillen, Donna Post; Pokorny, Richard

    2016-09-01

    At the Hanford site in the state of Washington, more than 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground tanks. The cleanup plan for this waste is vitrification at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), currently under construction. At the WTP, the waste will be blended with glass-forming materials and heated to 1423K, then poured into stainless steel canisters to cool and solidify. A fundamental understanding of the glass batch melting process is needed to optimize the process to reduce cost and decrease the life cycle of the cleanup effort. The cold cap layer that floats on the surface of the glass melt is the primary reaction zone for the feed-to-glass conversion. The conversion reactions include water release, melting of salts, evolution of batch gases, dissolution of quartz and the formation of molten glass. Obtaining efficient heat transfer to this region is crucial to achieving high rates of glass conversion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being used to understand the heat transfer dynamics of the system and provide insight to optimize the process. A CFD model was developed to simulate the DM1200, a pilot-scale melter that has been extensively tested by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Electrodes are built into the melter to provide Joule heating to the molten glass. To promote heat transfer from the molten glass into the reactive cold cap layer, bubbling of the molten glass is used to stimulate forced convection within the melt pool. A three-phase volume of fluid approach is utilized to model the system, wherein the molten glass and cold cap regions are modeled as separate liquid phases, and the bubbling gas and plenum regions are modeled as one lumped gas phase. The modeling of the entire system with a volume of fluid model allows for the prescription of physical properties on a per-phase basis. The molten glass phase and the gas phase physical properties are obtained from previous experimental work. Finding representative

  15. 77 FR 28533 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...-0499; Notice No. 25-12-01-SC] Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in... associated with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of an executive... non-structural glass items in the cabin area of the executive interior occupied by passengers and crew...

  16. Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozza, R.; Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical charging of parallel plates confining a model ionic liquid down to nanoscale distances yields a variety of charge-induced changes in the structural features of the confined film. That includes even-odd switching of the structural layering and charging-induced solidification and melting, with important changes of local ordering between and within layers, and of squeezout behavior. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, we explore this variety of phenomena in the simplest charged Lennard-Jones coarse-grained model including or excluding the effect a neutral tail giving an anisotropic shape to one of the model ions. Using these models and open conditions permitting the flow of ions in and out of the interplate gap, we simulate the liquid squeezout to obtain the distance dependent structure and forces between the plates during their adiabatic approach under load. Simulations at fixed applied force illustrate an effective electrical pumping of the ionic liquid, from a thick nearly solid film that withstands the interplate pressure for high plate charge to complete squeezout following melting near zero charge. Effective enthalpy curves obtained by integration of interplate forces versus distance show the local minima that correspond to layering and predict the switching between one minimum and another under squeezing and charging.

  17. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Glass Transition in a Monoatomic Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Giovambattista

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent study on the polyamorphism of the liquid and glass states in a monatomic system, a two-scale spherical-symmetric Jagla model with both attractive and repulsive interactions. This potential with a parametrization for which crystallization can be avoided and both the glass transition and the liquid-liquid phase transition are clearly separated, displays water-like anomalies as well as polyamorphism in both liquid and glassy states, providing a unique opportunity to study the interplay between the liquid-liquid phase transition and the glass transition. Our study on a simple model may be useful in understanding recent studies of polyamorphism in metallic glasses.

  18. Micro-alloying and the Toughness of Glasses: Modeling with Pinned Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Mishra, Pankaj; Procaccia, Itamar; Samwer, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of glasses, and particularly of metallic glasses, in technological applications is often limited by their toughness, which is defined as the area under the stress vs. strain curve before plastic yielding. Recently toughness was found to increase significantly by the addition of small concentrations of foreign atoms that act as pinning centers. We model this phenomenon at zero temperature and quasi-static straining with randomly positioned particles that participate in the elast...

  19. Studi Perubahan Fase Spin Glass Model Ising pada Kisi Kuasi Dua Dimensi

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhtar Otton, Muhammad Juang

    2016-01-01

    Critical nature of Ising model Spin Glass on two dimension quasi-lattices had been studied through the Monte-Carlo simulation. Because of its metastability characteristic, consequently, it used Replica-Exchange Algorithm. Physical quantities which was calculated include heat capacity and overlapping parameter. Critical temperature estimation was obtained through the heat capacity analysis, whereas the presence of Spin Glass phase was obtained through the overlapping parameter value. Two previ...

  20. Evaluation of borate bioactive glass scaffolds with different pore sizes in a rat subcutaneous implantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliormanli, Aylin M; Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Borate bioactive glass has been shown to convert faster and more completely to hydroxyapatite and enhance new bone formation in vivo when compared to silicate bioactive glass (such as 45S5 and 13-93 bioactive glass). In this work, the effects of the borate glass microstructure on its conversion to hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro and its ability to support tissue ingrowth in a rat subcutaneous implantation model were investigated. Bioactive borate glass scaffolds, designated 13-93B3, with a grid-like microstructure and pore widths of 300, 600, and 900 µm were prepared by a robocasting technique. The scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously for 4 weeks in Sprague Dawley rats. Silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds with the same microstructure were used as the control. The conversion of the scaffolds to HA was studied as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. Histology and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate conversion of the bioactive glass implants to hydroxyapatite, as well as tissue ingrowth and blood vessel formation in the implants. The pore size of the scaffolds was found to have little effect on tissue infiltration and angiogenesis after the 4-week implantation.

  1. Modeling principles applied to the simulation of a joule-heated glass melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routt, K.R.

    1980-05-01

    Three-dimensional conservation equations applicable to the operation of a joule-heated glass melter were rigorously examined and used to develop scaling relationships for modeling purposes. By rigorous application of the conservation equations governing transfer of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge in three-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, scaling relationships were derived between a glass melter and a physical model for the following independent and dependent variables: geometrical size (scale), velocity, temperature, pressure, mass input rate, energy input rate, voltage, electrode current, electrode current flux, total power, and electrical resistance. The scaling relationships were then applied to the design and construction of a physical model of the semiworks glass melter for the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The design and construction of such a model using glycerine plus LiCl as a model fluid in a one-half-scale Plexiglas tank is described

  2. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-09

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available.

  3. Assessment of numerical optimization algorithms for the development of molecular models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsmann, Marco; Vrabec, Jadran; Maaß, Astrid; Reith, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    In the pursuit to study the parameterization problem of molecular models with a broad perspective, this paper is focused on an isolated aspect: It is investigated, by which algorithms parameters can be best optimized simultaneously to different types of target data (experimental or theoretical) over a range of temperatures with the lowest number of iteration steps. As an example, nitrogen is regarded, where the intermolecular interactions are well described by the quadrupolar two-center Lennard-Jones model that has four state-independent parameters. The target data comprise experimental values for saturated liquid density, enthalpy of vaporization, and vapor pressure. For the purpose of testing algorithms, molecular simulations are entirely replaced by fit functions of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) properties from the literature to assess efficiently the diverse numerical optimization algorithms investigated, being state-of-the-art gradient-based methods with very good convergency qualities. Additionally, artificial noise was superimposed onto the VLE fit results to evaluate the numerical optimization algorithms so that the calculation of molecular simulation data was mimicked. Large differences in the behavior of the individual optimization algorithms are found and some are identified to be capable to handle noisy function values.

  4. Towards the modeling of nanoindentation of virus shells: Do substrate adhesion and geometry matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Arthur; Dragnea, Bogdan; Tayachi, Manel; Temam, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Soft nanoparticles adsorbing at surfaces undergo deformation and buildup of elastic strain as a consequence of interfacial adhesion of similar magnitude with constitutive interactions. An example is the adsorption of virus particles at surfaces, a phenomenon of central importance for experiments in virus nanoindentation and for understanding of virus entry. The influence of adhesion forces and substrate corrugation on the mechanical response to indentation has not been studied. This is somewhat surprising considering that many single-stranded RNA icosahedral viruses are organized by soft intermolecular interactions while relatively strong adhesion forces are required for virus immobilization for nanoindentation. This article presents numerical simulations via finite elements discretization investigating the deformation of a thick shell in the context of slow evolution linear elasticity and in presence of adhesion interactions with the substrate. We study the influence of the adhesion forces in the deformation of the virus model under axial compression on a flat substrate by comparing the force-displacement curves for a shell having elastic constants relevant to virus capsids with and without adhesion forces derived from the Lennard-Jones potential. Finally, we study the influence of the geometry of the substrate in two-dimensions by comparing deformation of the virus model adsorbed at the cusp between two cylinders with that on a flat surface.

  5. Enthalpy-based equation of state for highly porous materials employing modified soft sphere fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Bishnupriya; Menon, S. V. G.

    2018-01-01

    Enthalpy-based equation of state based on a modified soft sphere model for the fluid phase, which includes vaporization and ionization effects, is formulated for highly porous materials. Earlier developments and applications of enthalpy-based approach had not accounted for the fact that shocked states of materials with high porosity (e.g., porosity more than two for Cu) are in the expanded fluid region. We supplement the well known soft sphere model with a generalized Lennard-Jones formula for the zero temperature isotherm, with parameters determined from cohesive energy, specific volume and bulk modulus of the solid at normal condition. Specific heats at constant pressure, ionic and electronic enthalpy parameters and thermal excitation effects are calculated using the modified approach and used in the enthalpy-based equation of state. We also incorporate energy loss from the shock due to expansion of shocked material in calculating porous Hugoniot. Results obtained for Cu, even up to initial porosities ten, show good agreement with experimental data.

  6. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  7. On the potential energy landscape of supercooled liquids and glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodney, D.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The activation-relaxation technique (ART), a saddle-point search method, is applied to determine the potential energy landscape around supercooled and glassy configurations of a three-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones system. We show a strong relation between the distribution of activation energies...... of transitions undergone by the same supercooled liquid during a time trajectory simulated by molecular dynamics. We find that ART is biased towards more heterogeneous transitions with higher activation energies and more broken bonds than the MD simulation....

  8. A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent with availa......In the present paper we establish a temperature dependent constraint model of alkali phosphate glasses considering the structural and topological role of the modifying ion sub-network constituted by alkali ions and their non-bonding oxygen coordination spheres. The model is consistent...... with available structural data by NMR and molecular dynamics simulation and dynamic data such glass transition temperature (Tg) and liquid fragility (m). Alkali phosphate glasses are exemplary systems for developing constraint model since the modifying cation network plays an important role besides the primary...... of the modifying ion sub-network, as the alkali ions must share non-bonding oxygen to satisfy their coordination requirements at higher alkali oxide contents. We argue that the systematically decreasing the Tg values of alkali phosphate glasses from Li2O to Na2O to Cs2O could be caused by a weakening...

  9. Dynamical Response of Quantum Spin-Glass Models at T = 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, L.; Rozenberg, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    We study the behavior of two archetypal quantum spin glasses at T = 0 by exact diagonalization techniques: the random Ising model in a transverse field and the random Heisenberg model. The behavior of the dynamical spin response is obtained in the spin-glass ordered phase. In both models it is gapless and has the general form χ''\\(ω\\) = qδ\\(ω\\)+χ''reg\\(ω\\), with χ''reg\\(ω\\)~ω for the Ising and χ''reg\\(ω\\)~const for the Heisenberg, at low frequencies. The method provides new insight to the physical nature of the low-lying excitations.

  10. Pressure effects on martensitic transformation under quenching process in a molecular dynamics model of NiAl alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanc, S.; Ozgen, S.; Adiguzel, O.

    2003-01-01

    The solid-solid phase transitions in NiAl alloys occur by the temperature changes and application of a pressure on the system. Both types of transitions are called martensitic transformation and have displacive and thermoelastic characters. Pressure effects on thermoelastic transformation in Ni 62.5 Al 37.5 alloy model have been studied by means of molecular dynamics method proposed by Parrinello-Rahman. Interaction forces between atoms in the model system were calculated by Lennard-Jones potential energy function. Thermodynamics and structural analysis of the martensitic transformations under hydrostatic pressure during the quenching processes have been performed. The simulation runs have been carried out in different hydrostatic pressures changing from zero to 40.65 GPa during the quenching process of the model alloy. At the zero and nonzero pressures, the system with B2-type ordered structure undergoes the product phase with L1 0 -type ordered structure by Bain distortion in the first step of martensitic transformation under the quenching process. The increase in hydrostatic pressure causes decrease in the formation time of the product phase, and twin-like lattice distortion is observed in low temperature L1 0 phase

  11. Density-Dependent Formulation of Dispersion-Repulsion Interactions in Hybrid Multiscale Quantum/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curutchet, Carles; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Kongsted, Jacob; Corni, Stefano; Frediani, Luca; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Guido, Ciro A; Scalmani, Giovanni; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2018-03-13

    Mixed multiscale quantum/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models are widely used to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of complex chemical systems. Whereas such models typically include electrostatics and potentially polarization in so-called electrostatic and polarizable embedding approaches, respectively, nonelectrostatic dispersion and repulsion interactions are instead commonly described through classical potentials despite their quantum mechanical origin. Here we present an extension of the Tkatchenko-Scheffler semiempirical van der Waals (vdW TS ) scheme aimed at describing dispersion and repulsion interactions between quantum and classical regions within a QM/MM polarizable embedding framework. Starting from the vdW TS expression, we define a dispersion and a repulsion term, both of them density-dependent and consistently based on a Lennard-Jones-like potential. We explore transferable atom type-based parametrization strategies for the MM parameters, based on either vdW TS calculations performed on isolated fragments or on a direct estimation of the parameters from atomic polarizabilities taken from a polarizable force field. We investigate the performance of the implementation by computing self-consistent interaction energies for the S22 benchmark set, designed to represent typical noncovalent interactions in biological systems, in both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. Overall, our results suggest that the present implementation is a promising strategy to include dispersion and repulsion in multiscale QM/MM models incorporating their explicit dependence on the electronic density.

  12. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  13. Simple solvable energy-landscape model that shows a thermodynamic phase transition and a glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G

    2012-06-01

    When a liquid melt is cooled, a glass or phase transition can be obtained depending on the cooling rate. Yet, this behavior has not been clearly captured in energy-landscape models. Here, a model is provided in which two key ingredients are considered in the landscape, metastable states and their multiplicity. Metastable states are considered as in two level system models. However, their multiplicity and topology allows a phase transition in the thermodynamic limit for slow cooling, while a transition to the glass is obtained for fast cooling. By solving the corresponding master equation, the minimal speed of cooling required to produce the glass is obtained as a function of the distribution of metastable states.

  14. Quasi-realistic distribution of interaction fields leading to a variant of Ising spin glass model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasa, Radu; Enachescu, Cristian; Stancu, Alexandru; Linares, Jorge; Varret, Francois

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of interaction fields of an Ising-like system, obtained by Monte Carlo entropic sampling is used for modeling the hysteretic behavior of patterned media made of magnetic particles with a common anisotropy axis; a variant of the canonical Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass model is introduced

  15. CORRELATION OF THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE OF PLASTICIZED PVC USING A LATTICE FLUID MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model has been developed to describe the composition dependence of the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) + plasticizer mixtures. The model is based on Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state and the Gibbs-Di Marzio criterion, which states that th...

  16. Mathematical Modeling and Optimal Blank Generation in Glass Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Phillips

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the stock size selection problem (Chambers and Dyson, 1976, which is of relevance in the float glass industry. Given a fixed integer N, generally between 2 and 6 (but potentially larger, we find the N best sizes for intermediate stock from which to cut a roster of orders. An objective function is formulated with the purpose of minimizing wastage, and the problem is phrased as a combinatorial optimization problem involving the selection of columns of a cost matrix. Some bounds and heuristics are developed, and two exact algorithms (depth-first search and branch-and-bound are applied to the problem, as well as one approximate algorithm (NOMAD. It is found that wastage reduces dramatically as N increases, but this trend becomes less pronounced for larger values of N (beyond 6 or 7. For typical values of N, branch-and-bound is able to find the exact solution within a reasonable amount of time.

  17. Conversion of Nuclear Waste into Nuclear Waste Glass: Experimental Investigation and Mathematical Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    The melter feed, slurry, or calcine charged on the top of a pool of molten glass forms a floating layer of reacting material called the cold cap. Between the cold-cap top, which is covered with boiling slurry, and its bottom, where bubbles separate it from molten glass, the temperature changes by up to 1000 K. The processes that occur over this temperature interval within the cold cap include liberation of gases, conduction and consumption of heat, dissolution of quartz particles, formation and dissolution of intermediate crystalline phases, and generation of foam and gas cavities. These processes have been investigated using thermal analyses, optical and electronic microscopies, x-ray diffraction, as well as other techniques. Properties of the reacting feed, such as heat conductivity and density, were measured as functions of temperature. Investigating the structure of quenched cold caps produced in a laboratory-scale melter complemented the crucible studies. The cold cap consists of two main layers. The top layer contains solid particles dissolving in the glass-forming melt and open pores through which gases are escaping. The bottom layer contains bubbly melt or foam where bubbles coalesce into larger cavities that move sideways and release the gas to the atmosphere. The feed-to-glass conversion became sufficiently understood for representing the cold-cap processes via mathematical models. These models, which comprise heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction kinetics models, have been developed with the final goal to relate feed parameters to the rate of glass melting

  18. Finite element model based on refined plate theories for laminated glass units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Zemanová

    Full Text Available AbstractLaminated glass units exhibit complex response as a result of different mechanical behavior and properties of glass and polymer foil. We aim to develop a finite element model for elastic laminated glass plates based on the refined plate theory by Mau. For a geometrically nonlinear description of the behavior of units, each layer behaves according to the Reissner-Mindlin kinematics, complemented with membrane effects and the von Kármán assumptions. Nodal Lagrange multipliers enforce the compatibility of independent layers in this approach. We have derived the discretized model by the energy-minimization arguments, assuming that the unknown fields are approximated by bi-linear functions at the element level, and solved the resulting system by the Newton method with consistent linearization. We have demonstrated through verification and validation examples that the proposed formulation is reliable and accurately reproduces the behavior of laminated glass units. This study represents a first step to the development of a comprehensive, mechanics-based model for laminated glass systems that is suitable for implementation in common engineering finite element solvers.

  19. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yi Je; Lee, Wookjin; Park, Yong Ho

    2017-10-19

    The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE) approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Je Cho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  1. Characterization & Modeling of Materials in Glass-To-Metal Seals: Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Robert S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computer Science and Mechanics; Emery, John M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solid Mechanics; Tandon, Rajan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Reliability; Antoun, Bonnie R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Science; Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Reliability

    2014-01-01

    To support higher fidelity modeling of residual stresses in glass-to-metal (GTM) seals and to demonstrate the accuracy of finite element analysis predictions, characterization and validation data have been collected for Sandia’s commonly used compression seal materials. The temperature dependence of the storage moduli, the shear relaxation modulus master curve and structural relaxation of the Schott 8061 glass were measured and stress-strain curves were generated for SS304L VAR in small strain regimes typical of GTM seal applications spanning temperatures from 20 to 500 C. Material models were calibrated and finite element predictions are being compared to measured data to assess the accuracy of predictions.

  2. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  3. Exploration and Modeling of Structural changes in Waste Glass Under Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Carlos; Ryan, Joseph; Strachan, Denis

    2013-11-10

    Vitrification is currently the world-wide treatment of choice for the disposition of high-level nuclear wastes. In glasses, radionuclides are atomistically bonded into the solid, resulting in a highly durable product, with borosilicate glasses exhibiting particularly excellent durability in water. Considering that waste glass is designed to retain the radionuclides within the waste form for long periods, it is important to understand the long-term stability of these materials when they react in the environment, especially in the presence of water. Based on a number of previous studies, there is general consensus regarding the mechanisms controlling the initial rate of nuclear waste glass dissolution. Agreement regarding the cause of the observed decrease in dissolution rate at extended times, however, has been elusive. Two general models have been proposed to explain this behavior, and it has been concluded that both concepts are valid and must be taken into account when considering the decrease in dissolution rate. Furthermore, other processes such as water diffusion, ion exchange, and precipitation of mineral phases onto the glass surface may occur in parallel with dissolution of the glass and can influence long-term performance. Our proposed research will address these issues through a combination of aqueous-phase dissolution/reaction experiments and probing of the resulting surface layers with state-of-the-art analytical methods. These methods include solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The resulting datasets will then be coupled with computational chemistry and reaction-rate modeling to address the most persistent uncertainties in the understanding of glass corrosion, which indeed have limited the performance of the best corrosion models to date. With an improved understanding of corrosion mechanisms, models can be developed and improved that, while still conservative, take advantage of

  4. Numerical modeling of the mechanical agitation inside a molten glass bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoutot, L.; Gagnoud, A.; Fautrelle, Y.; Jacoutot, L.; Brun, P.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new process for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes is under study at the CEA-Marcoule since about twenty years: the cold crucible direct induction vitrification process. This process is characterized by a cooling of the crucible walls using water flow and by a direct induction of electrical currents inside the molten glass load. A mechanical agitation system allows the homogenization of the molten glass bath. The aim of this study is the implementation of a numerical modeling of the thermal, hydrodynamical and electromagnetic phenomena which take place inside the glass bath in order to support the dimensioning of the cold crucible vitrification process. This article focusses on the modeling of the mechanical agitation and on the development of the coupling between the three phenomena. (J.S.)

  5. Preparation and characterization of physically modified glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnitz, Sarah; Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob Dominik; Kappl, Michael; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Urbanetz, Nora Anne

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work is the physical modification and characterization of the surface topography of glass beads used as model carriers in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). By surface modification the contact area between drug and carrier and thereby interparticle forces may be modified. Thus the performance of DPIs that relies on interparticle interactions may be improved. Glass beads were chosen as model carriers because various prospects of physical surface modification may be applied without affecting other factors also impacting interparticle interactions like particle size and shape. To generate rough surfaces glass beads were processed mechanically by friction and impaction in a ball mill with different grinding materials that were smaller and harder with respect to the glass beads. By varying the grinding time (4 h, 8 h) and by using different grinding media (tungsten carbide, quartz) surfaces with different shades of roughness were generated. Depending on the hardness of the grinding material and the grinding time the surface roughness was more or less pronounced. Surface roughness parameters and specific surface area were determined via several complementary techniques in order to get an enhanced understanding of the impact of the modifying procedure on the surface properties of the glass beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. From lime to silica and alumina: systematic modeling of cement clinkers using a general force-field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A A; Santos, R L; Colaço, R; Bayão Horta, R; Canongia Lopes, J N

    2015-07-28

    Thirteen different cement-clinker crystalline phases present in the lime-silica-alumina system have been systematically modeled using a simple and general force field. This constitutes a new type of approach towards the study of lime-silica-alumina systems, where the simpler and more transferable Lennard-Jones potential was used instead of the more traditional Buckingham potential. The results were validated using experimental density and structural data. The elastic properties were also considered. Six amorphous phases (corresponding to calcium/silicon ratios corresponding to belite, rankinite, wollastonite and alumina-doped amorphous wollastonite with 5%, 10% and 15% alumina content) were also studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The obtained MD trajectories were used to characterize the different crystalline and amorphous phases in terms of the corresponding radial distribution functions, aggregate analyses and connectivity among silica groups. These studies allowed a direct comparison between the crystalline and amorphous phases and revealed how the structure of the silica network was modified in the amorphous materials or by the inclusion of other structural units such as alumina. The knowledge at an atomistic level of such modifications is paramount for the formulation of new cement-clinker phases.

  7. Thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass - long term behavior modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlhac, X.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass was investigated experimentally and by modeling to predict its long-term evolution at low temperature. The crystallization mechanisms were analyzed by studying devitrification in the supercooled liquid. Three main crystalline phases were characterized (CaMoO 4 , CeCO 2 , ZnCr 2 O 4 ). Their crystallisation was TO 4.24 wt%, due to the low concentration of the constituent elements. The nucleation and growth curves showed that platinoid elements catalysed nucleation but did not affect growth, which was governed by volume diffusion. The criteria of classic nucleation theory were applied to determine the thermodynamic and diffusional activation energies. Viscosity measurements illustrate the analogy between the activation energy of viscous flow and diffusion, indicating control of crystallization by viscous flow phenomena. The combined action of nucleation and growth was assessed by TTT plots, revealing a crystallization equilibrium line that enables the crystallized fractions to be predicted over the long term. The authors show that hetero-genetics catalyze the transformation without modifying the maximum crystallized fraction. A kinetic model was developed to describe devitrification in the glass based on the nucleation and growth curves alone. The authors show that the low-temperature growth exhibits scale behavior (between time and temperature) similar to thermo-rheological simplicity. The analogy between the resulting activation energy and that of the viscosity was used to model growth on the basis of viscosity. After validation with a simplified (BaO 2 SiO 2 ) glass, the model was applied to the containment glass. The result indicated that the glass remained completely vitreous after a cooling scenario with the one measured at the glass core. Under isothermal conditions, several million years would be required to reach the maximum theoretical crystallization fraction. (author)

  8. THE SEMIEMPIRICAL MODEL OF THE MULTICOMPONENT BUBBLE BEHAVIOUR IN GLASS MELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUBOMÍR NĚMEC

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical model of the bubble growth and dissolution in glasses with a fining agent has been derived. This model applies the experimental data from bubble observation at melting and fining temperatures. The experimental data needed for the model involved the temperature dependences of the average growth rate of the bubble radius and the average concentration of the fining gas in the bubbles. Both sets of values were measured in the laboratory in the glass of the float type and applied in the model. The measurements of the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the gases present in the glass – needed for the analytical model of multicomponent bubbles – were thus avoided. The course of the partial bubble absorption with the temperature decreasing was simulated by means of two factors modifying the experimental values of the bubble growth rates at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of the resulting bubble growth rate qualitatively corresponded to the experimental observations in the soda-lime-silica glass, but a more detailed experimental and comparative study has yet to be performed. Such a study is being prepared.

  9. Glass Composition Constraint Recommendations for Use in Life-Cycle Mission Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-05-03

    The component concentration limits that most influence the predicted Hanford life-cycle HLW glass volume by HTWOS were re-evaluated. It was assumed that additional research and development work in glass formulation and melter testing would be performed to improve the understanding of component effects on the processability and product quality of these HLW glasses. Recommendations were made to better estimate the potential component concentration limits that could be applied today while technology development is underway to best estimate the volume of HLW glass that will eventually be produced at Hanford. The limits for concentrations of P2O5, Bi2O3, and SO3 were evaluated along with the constraint used to avoid nepheline formation in glass. Recommended concentration limits were made based on the current HLW glass property models being used by HTWOS (Vienna et al. 2009). These revised limits are: 1) The current ND should be augmented by the OB limit of OB ≤ 0.575 so that either the normalized silica (NSi) is less that the 62% limit or the OB is below the 0.575 limit. 2) The mass fraction of P2O5 limit should be revised to allow for up to 4.5 wt%, depending on CaO concentrations. 3) A Bi2O3 concentration limit of 7 wt% should be used. 4) The salt accumulation limit of 0.5 wt% SO3 may be increased to 0.6 wt%. Again, these revised limits do not obviate the need for further testing, but make it possible to more accurately predict the impact of that testing on ultimate HLW glass volumes.

  10. A fully tetrahedral and highly corner-sharing network model of ZnCl2 glass and its comparison to SiO2 glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swansbury, Laura A; Mountjoy, Gavin

    2017-07-28

    Zinc chloride, ZnCl 2 , is intermediate between a strong and a fragile glass former. During computational simulations, it is therefore important to account for ion polarizability. This, together with the lack of suitable interatomic potential parameters, is the likely cause for the lack of modeling studies on ZnCl 2 glass which contain a high degree of ZnCl 4 tetrahedral units. Through using accurate interatomic potential parameters and applying the adiabatic core-shell model, the first fully tetrahedral model of ZnCl 2 glass was obtained. The Cl-Zn-Cl bond angle of 109° reproduced the ideal tetrahedral bond angle, and the calculated total neutron and x-ray structure factors closely replicated experimental findings. While 86% of the ZnCl 4 tetrahedral units were corner-sharing, 14% were found to be edge-sharing. This led to two distinct contributions in both the Zn-Cl-Zn bond angle distribution and in the Zn⋯Zn nearest neighbour peaks being seen. These are not apparent in studies based on neutron diffraction. By comparing the intermediate glass former ZnCl 2 to the strong glass former SiO 2 , marked differences in ring statistics became apparent. The Zn-Cl-Zn bond angle of around 110° enabled 3-membered rings to form in significant proportions. In contrast, 3-membered rings were only present in SiO 2 glass as defects. By calculating the ZnCl 2 and SiO 2 partial structure factors, strong similarities became visible after scaling according to nearest neighbour distances. Although it was apparent that the main contributions to the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) came from cation-anion correlations, the relative scaling of the FSDP positions in ZnCl 2 and SiO 2 glass was not understood.

  11. Understanding the effects of alpha self-irradiation on the glass structure by coupling spectroscopic studies and atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, G.

    2008-12-01

    Our objective was to assess irradiation effects on nuclear containment glass in order to guarantee glass performance when subjected to high alpha decay doses. Experimental studies and molecular dynamics modeling provided a better understanding of the impact of cumulative alpha decay on the structural behavior of complex nuclear glass formulations and of simplified glass models. A mechanism typical of sodium borosilicate glass was identified in response to nuclear interactions or ballistic collisions. The glass local order is slightly modified by the conversion of a fraction of the boron atoms from coordination number IV to III, releasing charge-compensating alkali ions that become available as network modifiers, and resulting in a slight increase in the number of non bridging oxygen atoms. The medium-range order shifts toward increasing disorder in the glass as indicated by broadening of the angular, radial, and size distributions. A model of accumulated quasi-thermal quenching is proposed to account for these changes, based on the two steps describing the reaction of the glass to the alpha decay recoil nucleus: a cascade generates a ballistic phase that completely destabilizes the glass structure with no short and medium-range order, resulting in the loss of the initial structure; glass reconstruction is controlled only by the 'quenching rate' in the displacement cascade, i.e. by its thermal history and the corresponding relaxation options. From this standpoint the final glass structure is the consequence of the ballistic changes and the regenerative capacity of the glass structure, resulting in a higher fictive-temperature glass corresponding to the structural changes identified in this study. (author)

  12. Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hujova, Miroslava [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Joint Workplace of the University of Chemistry and Technology Prague and the Institute, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics of the ASCR, Prague Czech Republic; Pokorny, Richard [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Joint Workplace of the University of Chemistry and Technology Prague and the Institute, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics of the ASCR, Prague Czech Republic; Klouzek, Jaroslav [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Joint Workplace of the University of Chemistry and Technology Prague and the Institute, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics of the ASCR, Prague Czech Republic; Dixon, Derek R. [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Cutforth, Derek A. [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Lee, Seungmin [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; McCarthy, Benjamin P. [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Schweiger, Michael J. [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington; Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington; Hrma, Pavel [Radiological Materials & Detection Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington

    2017-07-10

    The heat conductivity of reacting melter feed affects the heat transfer and conversion process in the cold cap (the reacting feed floating on molten glass). To investigate it, we simulated the feed conditions and morphology in the cold-cap by preparing “fast-dried slurry blocks”, formed by rapidly evaporating water from feed slurry poured onto a 200°C surface. A heat conductivity meter was used to measure heat conductivity of samples cut from the fast-dried slurry blocks, samples of a cold cap retrieved from a laboratory-scale melter, and loose dry powder feed samples. Our study indicates that the heat conductivity of the feed in the cold cap is significantly higher than that of loose dry powder feed, resulting from the feed solidification during the water evaporation from the feed slurry. To assess the heat transfer at higher temperatures when feed turns into foam, we developed a theoretical model that predicts the foam heat conductivity based on morphology data from in-situ X-ray computed tomography. The implications for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap are discussed.

  13. On-site Raman analysis of ancient glasses and stained-glass windows: modeling, procedure, lixiviation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournie, Aurelie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the possibilities of Raman spectrometry to identify on site old glasses (objects, stained-glass windows...) whatever been their preserving state. The efficiency of Raman analysis depends strongly of the structural organization of glasses and then of their technological history. In order to differentiate the great silicate family compounds from their Raman analysis, a methodology has been developed: data acquisition and spectrum processing, Raman parameters extraction and classification of these glasses. This approach has then been extended to crystalline phosphates and silicates. Beforehand, correlations between crystallo-chemical parameters and vibrational signatures have been considered. The old glasses are often recovered by a corrosion layer which induces important changes on the Raman signature. Four layers have been identified and characterized by a multi-scale study: leached porous layer, transition zone, cracked zone and sound glass. The results show that only an analytical chemistry approach (databases of Raman signatures) is not sufficient and that a solid chemistry and physics approach is required to explain the spectral answers and extract the relevant parameters from glasses preserving [fr

  14. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV......, and simulates the transient development of an oxidation zone. Simulations are in good agreement with experimental data for a fast degrading epoxy-amine coating with a glass transition temperature of −50°C. It was found that the degradation rate of the non-stabilized coating was influenced significantly...

  15. Modeling of the fringe shift in multiple beam interference for glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A quadratic model is suggested to describe the fringe shift occurred due to the phase variations of uncladded glass fiber introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer. The fringe shift of the phase object is represented in the harmonic term which appears in the denominator of the Airy ...

  16. Dynamic model describing response of glass-fiber extrusion process to external perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpashchikov, V. L.; Martynenko, O. G.; Shnip, A. I.

    1984-11-01

    A model is proposed for describing the dynamics of glass-fiber extrusion, and on its basis are determined the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the produced fiber cross-section, depending on technological perturbations. The effect of viscous relaxation on the magnitude of residual stresses in a multilayer optical fiber is also evaluated on this basis.

  17. Modeling of the fringe shift in multiple beam interference for glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A quadratic model is suggested to describe the fringe shift occurred due to the phase variations of uncladded glass fiber introduced between the two plates of the liquid wedge interferometer. The fringe shift of the phase object is represented in the harmonic term which appears in the denominator of the Airy distribution ...

  18. Modeling interfacial glass-water reactions: recent advances and current limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-01-01

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries-pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and timescales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the mesoscale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations (i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer simulations), Monte Carlo simulations, and molecular dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers. New results are presented as examples of each approach. (authors)

  19. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study

  20. Physical modeling of joule heated ceramic glass melters for high level waste immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, M.S.; Kreid, D.K.

    1979-03-01

    This study developed physical modeling techniques and apparatus suitable for experimental analysis of joule heated ceramic glass melters designed for immobilizing high level waste. The physical modeling experiments can give qualitative insight into the design and operation of prototype furnaces and, if properly verified with prototype data, the physical models could be used for quantitative analysis of specific furnaces. Based on evaluation of the results of this study, it is recommended that the following actions and investigations be undertaken: It was not shown that the isothermal boundary conditions imposed by this study established prototypic heat losses through the boundaries of the model. Prototype wall temperatures and heat fluxes should be measured to provide better verification of the accuracy of the physical model. The VECTRA computer code is a two-dimensional analytical model. Physical model runs which are isothermal in the Y direction should be made to provide two-dimensional data for more direct comparison to the VECTRA predictions. The ability of the physical model to accurately predict prototype operating conditions should be proven before the model can become a reliable design tool. This will require significantly more prototype operating and glass property data than were available at the time of this study. A complete set of measurements covering power input, heat balances, wall temperatures, glass temperatures, and glass properties should be attempted for at least one prototype run. The information could be used to verify both physical and analytical models. Particle settling and/or sludge buildup should be studied directly by observing the accumulation of the appropriate size and density particles during feeding in the physical model. New designs should be formulated and modeled to minimize the potential problems with melter operation identifed by this study.

  1. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander [School of Engineering and Science, Curtin University of Technology, Sarawak (Malaysia); Abou-El-Hossein, K A, E-mail: mohan.m@curtin.edu.my [Mechanical and Aeronautical Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elegebeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2011-02-15

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  2. Results from the long-term interaction and modeling of SRL-131 glass with aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Lokken, R.O.

    1985-11-01

    Leaching studies on SRL-131 simulated defense waste glass have been carried out for a duration of two years. This glass contained nonradioactive elements and depleted uranium to simulate the waste content. The leachants used in this study were deionized water, a sodium bicarbonate/silicic acid solution (silicate water), a synthetic groundwater, and a high ionic strength K-Mg-Na-Cl brine. Two temperatures were used: 40 0 C and 90 0 C. The long-term results were in fair agreement with modeling calculations performed using the PHREEQE geochemical code. The leachability of SRL-131 glass from results up to two years followed the trend: deionized water > silicate water > synthetic groundwater > salt brine at 40 0 C and deionized water approx. = synthetic groundwater > silicate water > salt brine at 90 0 C. Solid state analyses are reported along with an Appendix containing a complete data set

  3. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander; Abou-El-Hossein, K A

    2011-01-01

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  4. Rare earth-doped integrated glass components: modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Ole; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Rasmussen, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    For the integrated optic erbium-doped phosphate silica-amplifier, a comprehensive model is presented which includes high-concentration dissipative ion-ion interactions. Based on actual waveguide parameters, the model is seen to reproduce measured gains closely. A rigorous design optimization is p...

  5. Collision of the glass shards with the eye: A computational fluid-structure interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Biglari, Hasan; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2017-12-27

    The main stream of blunt trauma injuries has been reported to be related to the automobile crashes, sporting activities, and military operations. Glass shards, which can be induced due to car accident, earthquake, gunshot, etc., might collide with the eye and trigger substantial scarring and, consequently, permanently affect the vision. The complications as a result of the collision with the eye and its following injuries on each component of the eye are difficult to be diagnosed. The objective of this study was to employ a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye to assess the results of the glass shards collision with the eye. To do this, a rigid steel-based object hit a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) glass wall at the velocities of 100, 150, and 200 m/s and, subsequently, the resultant glass shards moved toward the eye. The amount of injury, then, quantified in terms of the stresses and strains. The results revealed the highest amount of stress in the cornea while the lowest one was observed in the vitreous body. It was also found that increasing the speed of the glass shards amplifies the amount of the stress in the components which are located in the central anterior zone of the eye, such as the cornea, aqueous body, and iris. However, regarding those components located in the peripheral/posterior side of the eye, especially the optic nerve, by increasing the amount of velocity a reduction in the stresses was observed and the optic nerve is hardly damaged. These findings have associations not only for understanding the amount of stresses/strains in the eye components at three different velocities, but also for providing preliminary information for the ophthalmologists to have a better diagnosis after glass shards (small objects impact) injuries to the eye. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Local elastic expansion model for viscous-flow activation energies of glass-forming molecular liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Olsen, Niels Boye; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1996-01-01

    A model for the viscosity of glass-forming molecular liquids is proposed in which a "flow event" requires a local volume increase. The activation energy for a flow event is identified with the work done in shoving aside the surrounding liquid; this work is proportional to the high-frequency shear...... modulus, which increases as the temperature decreases. The model is confirmed by experiments on a number of molecular liquids....

  7. AN ALTERNATIVE MODEL FOR OPTIMISING PAYLOADS OF BUILDING GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Taha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This article deals with the development of a multi-stage model for optimising payload placement on a hauler-trailer rig in an environment described by physical and regulatory constraints. The model which purports to be an improvement on an earlier model provides two types of solution i.e. a feasible solution which satisfies all zone loading and axle weight constraints, or an infeasible solution giving the cause and quantification of source(s of infeasibility which may be used to modify model inputs for further attempts at optimisation.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die artikel handel oor die ontwikkeling van 'n multistadiummodel vir die optimisering van vragplasing op 'n sleepwa onder fisiese en regsvoorskriftelike voorwaardes. Die model wat daarop aanspraak maak dat dit 'n verbetering is op 'n vorige model, lewer as uitset twee oplossingstipes naamlik 'n gangbare oplossing wat alle sone- en aslasrandvoorwaardes eerbiedig, of 'n ongangbare oplossing wat oorsaak en kwantifisering van ongangbaarheidsbronne uitwys vir die gebruik van gewysigde modelinsette by verdere pogings tot optimisering.

  8. Bubble removal and sand dissolution in an electrically heated glass melting channel with defined melt flow examined by mathematical modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrbek, L.; Kocourková, P.; Jebavá, Marcela; Cincibusová, P.; Němec, Lubomír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 456, JAN 15 (2017), s. 101-113 ISSN 0022-3093 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt flow * mathematical modelling * energy distribution * space utilization * melting performance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.124, year: 2016

  9. Model of electron capture in low-temperature glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartczak, W.M.; Swiatla, D.; Kroh, J.

    1983-01-01

    The new model of electron capture by a statistical variety of traps in glassy matrices is proposed. The electron capture is interpreted as the radiationless transition (assisted by multiphonon emission) of the mobile electron to the localized state in the trap. The conception of 'unfair' and 'fair' traps is introduced. The 'unfair' trap captures the mobile electron by the shallow excited state. In contrast, the 'fair' trap captures the electron by the ground state. The model calculations of the statistical distributions of the occupied electron traps are presented and discussed with respect to experimental results. (author)

  10. Modelling the crystallisation of alkaline earth boroaluminosilicate glass ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Agersted, Karsten; Holm, Paul Martin

    2014-01-01

    -empirical optimisation of boron and alkali/alkali earth oxide activities in the liquid oxide solution, significantly improved fits between modelled and experimental results were obtained. Based on these results, it is suggested that more precise descriptions of higher order interactions need to be addressed, to account...

  11. Modelling of the draining of a molten glass heated by induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima-Da-Silva, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is part of the development of a new technology of oxides melting in a furnace heated by induction. The technology studied involves strong interactions between electromagnetic, thermal and hydrodynamic phenomena in a flow with physical properties strongly dependents of the temperature. The aim of the thesis is the modelling of the process by coupling closely the Joule heating, the mechanical stirring and the draining of the furnace. The modeling of the time evolution of the interface between glass and air during the emptying of the cold crucible was performed. Regarding the methodology, we chose to combine two scientific codes: Flux for the electromagnetic calculation and Fluent for thermal-hydraulics. The evolution of the free surface was treated by the multiphasic method 'Volume-Of-Fluid - VOF' and the mechanical stirring by the 'Moving Reference Frame' and the 'Sliding Mesh'. First of all, we considered the draining of a tank filled with a silicon oil of high-viscosity without mechanical stirring. This initial model took into account studies of hydraulic similarity between the silicon oil and the glass. Then we superimposed the forced flow creates by the mechanical stirrer, the thermal and the electromagnetic phenomena in order to model the flow of the molten glass. The final model can provide various parameters, including the time needed to drain the furnace, the heat transfer flux and the time evolution of the mass flow rate and of the temperature inside de furnace. (author) [fr

  12. THE ANALYSIS OF FLAT GLASS EXPORTS FOR ROMANIA USING THE GRAVITY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draghescu Florin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The intense international competition and reduced rates of economics growth force the companies at dynamic and appropriate strategies to address internal and external market. The manufacturing industry from Romania has competitive advantages defined by tradition, qualified labour force, indigenous raw materials, and its products serve various industries – construction, automotive, food – that is expected to experience a future sustained development. With approximately 2,500 employees, the glassware sector from Romania is part of the manufacturing industry which has constantly decreased in the last 25 years. Romania has a long tradition in the glassware sector and remains a strategic player in the region being integrated in the global flows from the industry. Geographical orientation of Romanian trade of flat glass for export is analyzed using the gravity model. The purpose of this article is to determine the essential factors of flat glass export level from Romania to states with which has commercial partnerships using both a gravity static model, but also a gravity dynamic model – a common model in the literature, used to analyze the trade flows between world countries or polarization strength of cities and commercial centres. The empirical results of both models have shown that the gravity attraction of local and destination economies, transport costs – measured by the distances between capitals and lack of common border –, language interconnectivity, and also belonging to the BSEC (Organization of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation are the most important factors affecting the Romanian exports of the flat glass.

  13. A micromechanical model to predict the flow of soft particle glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Jyoti R.; Mohan, Lavanya; Locatelli-Champagne, Clémentine; Cloitre, Michel; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2011-11-01

    Soft particle glasses form a broad family of materials made of deformable particles, as diverse as microgels, emulsion droplets, star polymers, block copolymer micelles and proteins, which are jammed at volume fractions where they are in contact and interact via soft elastic repulsions. Despite a great variety of particle elasticity, soft glasses have many generic features in common. They behave like weak elastic solids at rest but flow very much like liquids above the yield stress. This unique feature is exploited to process high-performance coatings, solid inks, ceramic pastes, textured food and personal care products. Much of the understanding of these materials at volume fractions relevant in applications is empirical, and a theory connecting macroscopic flow behaviour to microstructure and particle properties remains a formidable challenge. Here we propose a micromechanical three-dimensional model that quantitatively predicts the nonlinear rheology of soft particle glasses. The shear stress and the normal stress differences depend on both the dynamic pair distribution function and the solvent-mediated EHD interactions among the deformed particles. The predictions, which have no adjustable parameters, are successfully validated with experiments on concentrated emulsions and polyelectrolyte microgel pastes, highlighting the universality of the flow properties of soft glasses. These results provide a framework for designing new soft additives with a desired rheological response.

  14. String model for the dynamics of glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmiño Betancourt, Beatriz A; Douglas, Jack F; Starr, Francis W

    2014-05-28

    We test the applicability of a living polymerization theory to describe cooperative string-like particle rearrangement clusters (strings) observed in simulations of a coarse-grained polymer melt. The theory quantitatively describes the interrelation between the average string length L, configurational entropy Sconf, and the order parameter for string assembly Φ without free parameters. Combining this theory with the Adam-Gibbs model allows us to predict the relaxation time τ in a lower temperature T range than accessible by current simulations. In particular, the combined theories suggest a return to Arrhenius behavior near Tg and a low T residual entropy, thus avoiding a Kauzmann "entropy crisis."

  15. A probabilistic model for failure design of glass plates in buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Canteli, Alfonso

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A model for the design of glass plates to failure is presented, which, based on the theory of plates with gross deformations for the calculation of the stress state as well as on the empirical flaws statistical distribution in the glass surface, applies fracture Mechanics criteria to establish a probabilistic prediction of failure. The validity of the model has been experimentally proved for plates with different thicknesses and geometric characteristics.

    Se propone un modelo para el dimensionamiento a rotura de acristalamientos de vidrio, que, partiendo del estado tensional, obtenido mediante la teoría de placas con grandes deformaciones, y de la distribución empírica de defectos superficiales en el vidrio, utiliza criterios de Mecánica de la Fractura para predecir probabilísticamente la rotura. La validez del modelo ha podido ser contrastada experimentalmente en placas de diferentes espesores y con variadas relaciones geométricas.

  16. Spin-glass-like transition in the majority-vote model with anticonformists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiecki, Andrzej

    2018-03-01

    Majority-vote model on scale-free networks and random graphs is investigated in which a randomly chosen fraction p of agents (called anticonformists) follows an antiferromagnetic update rule, i.e., they assume, with probability governed by a parameter q (0 transition from a disordered (paramagnetic) state to a spin-glass-like state, characterized by a non-zero value of the spin-glass order parameter measuring the overlap of agents' opinions in two replicas of the system, and simultaneously by the magnetization close to zero. In the case of the model on scale-free networks the critical value of the parameter q weakly depends on the details of the degree distribution. As p is decreased, the critical value of q falls quickly to zero and only the disordered phase is observed. On the other hand, for p close to zero for decreasing q the usual ferromagnetic transition is observed.

  17. On modeling of statistical properties of classical 3D spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorkyan, A.S.; Abajyan, H.G.; Ayryan, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    We study statistical properties of 3D classical spin glass layer of certain width and infinite length. The 3D spin glass is represented as an ensemble of disordered 1D spatial spin chains (SSC) where interactions are random between spin chains (nonideal ensemble of 1D SSCs). It is proved that in the limit of Birkhoff's ergodic hypothesis performance, 3D spin glasses can be generated by Hamiltonian of disordered 1D SSC with random environment. Disordered 1D SSC is defined on a regular lattice where one randomly oriented spin is put on each node of lattice. Also, it is supposed that each spin randomly interacts with six nearest-neighboring spins (two spins on lattice and four in the environment). The recurrent transcendental equations are obtained on the nodes of spin-chain lattice. These equations, combined with the Silvester conditions, allow step-by-step construction of spin chain in the ground state of energy where all spins are in the minimal energy of a classical Hamiltonian. On the basis of these equations an original high-performance parallel algorithm is developed for 3D spin glasses simulation. Distributions of different parameters of unperturbed spin glass are calculated. In particular, it is analytically proved and numerical calculations show that the distribution of spin-spin interaction constant in Heisenberg nearest-neighboring Hamiltonian model, as opposed to widely used Gauss-Edwards-Anderson distribution, satisfies the Levy alpha-stable distribution law which does not have variance. A new formula is proposed for construction of partition function in the form of a one-dimensional integral on the energy distribution of 1D SSCs

  18. Design of a day tank glass furnace using a transient model and steady-state computation fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-Ibarra, Oscar; Abad, Pablo; Molina, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    To design day tanks with energy efficiency and good operation standards, a detailed transient model that considers the melting, refining, cooling and working stages of the glass production process was developed. With the model, the required power input was determined, with glass coverage with batch (β) as parameter, for a furnace with a daily production of 1130 kg of soda-lime glass and 14 h for melting/refining. A detailed analysis of the energy balance with the model showed that during the daily cycle about 70% of the energy input is released with the flue gas. During the working stage most of the energy escapes through the doors. As the peak of energy consumption is during the refining process, the power requirement for this stage defines the global power requirement. Calculated energy efficiencies vary between 13% and 16% for β = 70% and 30% respectively. A steady state CFD simulation of the combustion chamber and glass tank shows that a side-fired burner configuration allows for lower gas velocities and temperatures close to the glass and the furnace walls while guaranteeing the same heat transfer characteristics to the glass than the more traditional end-fired (U-type) furnaces. -- Highlights: ► A transient model of a day tank glass furnace captures main process characteristics. ► Heat loss through doors during working stage impacts thermal efficiency. ► A side-fired burner configuration should be preferred to an end-fired approach

  19. Effects of alpha decays on nuclear waste glasses, simulation through atomistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaleb, D.; Delaye, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In a simplified (SiO 2 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) nuclear glass we have simulated, by Molecular Dynamics simulations, the effects of displacement cascades created by the slowing-down of the recoil nucleus. The methodology employed to construct and validate the used Molecular Dynamics model representing the basis matrix of the 'light-water' French nuclear glass (R77) and the manner which are simulated atomic displacements are described. Although the energies given to recoil nucleus were relatively low (≤ 1/10 of actual energies) the study has yielded a number of interesting results. Notably we have: - identified the main mechanisms responsible for the depolymerization of the network; - observed, at the atomic level, the kinetic of the structure evolution; - detailed the behavior and displacement mechanisms of every atomic species during the cascade sequences; - made a link with the experimentation through the calculation of some physical properties. (authors)

  20. Micro-alloying and the toughness of glasses: Modeling with pinned particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Ratul; Mishra, Pankaj; Procaccia, Itamar; Samwer, Konrad

    2013-05-01

    The usefulness of glasses, and particularly of metallic glasses, in technological applications is often limited by their toughness, (which is defined as the area under the stress vs. strain curve before plastic yielding). Recently, toughness was found to increase significantly by the addition of small concentrations of foreign atoms that act as pinning centers. We model this phenomenon at zero temperature and quasi-static straining with randomly positioned particles that participate in the elastic deformation, but are pinned in the non-affine return to mechanical equilibrium. We find a very strong effect on toughness via the increase of both the shear modulus and the yield stress as a function of the density of pinned particles. Understanding the results calls for analyzing separately the elastic, or "Born term", and the contributions of the "excess modes" that result from glassy disorder. Finally, we present a scaling theory that collapses the data on one universal curve as a function of rescaled variables.

  1. Density-temperature scaling of the fragility in a model glass-former

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    . Such a scaling, referred to as density-temperature (DT) scaling, is exact for liquids with inverse power law (IPL) interactions but has also been found to be approximately valid in many non-IPL liquids. We have analyzed the consequences of DT scaling on the density dependence of the fragility in a model glass......Dynamical quantities e.g. diffusivity and relaxation time for some glass-formers may depend on density and temperature through a specific combination, rather than independently, allowing the representation of data over ranges of density and temperature as a function of a single scaling variable......-former. We find the density dependence of kinetic fragility to be weak, and show that it can be understood in terms of DT scaling and deviations of DT scaling at low densities. We also show that the Adam-Gibbs relation exhibits DT scaling and the scaling exponent computed from the density dependence...

  2. PALS investigations of matrix Vycor glass doped with molecules of luminescent dye and silver nanoparticles. Discrepancies from the ETE model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgol Marek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A thermal stability of three materials: undoped reference Vycor glass, glass filled with ROT-305 red dye, and silver nanoparticles was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS in a broad temperature range (from 93 to 473 K. The attempt of pore size calculations from the ortho-positronium lifetime data was performed using the extended Tao-Eldrup (ETE model. Below room temperature, a significant decrease in lifetime values of the longest-lived component was found for all the samples. This effect could not be explained by thermal shrinkage of the material and is probably caused by interaction of o-Ps with a Vycor glass matrix. The greatest discrepancy from the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass. Doping the base material with dye molecules and silver nanoparticles resulted in similar small decrease in this discrepancy. After reheating the samples to the room temperature, the PALS components returned to the initial values. In the temperature range of 293–473 K, quite good agreement between PALS results and the ETE model predictions was observed for the reference glass and the glass incorporated with dye molecules. The observed small discrepancy in this range could possibly be partly explained by thermal expansion of the material. For the glass doped with silver nanoparticles, a significant change in PALS parameters was observed in the temperature range from 403 to 473 K.

  3. About a solvable mean field model of a Gaussian spin glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Adriano; Genovese, Giuseppe; Guerra, Francesco; Tantari, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    In a series of papers, we have studied a modified Hopfield model of a neural network, with learned words characterized by a Gaussian distribution. The model can be represented as a bipartite spin glass, with one party described by dichotomic Ising spins, and the other party by continuous spin variables, with an a priori Gaussian distribution. By application of standard interpolation methods, we have found it useful to compare the neural network model (bipartite) from one side, with two spin glass models, each monopartite, from the other side. Of these, the first is the usual Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the second is a spin glass model, with continuous spins and inbuilt highly nonlinear smooth cut-off interactions. This model is an invaluable laboratory for testing all techniques which have been useful in the study of spin glasses. The purpose of this paper is to give a synthetic description of the most peculiar aspects, by stressing the necessary novelties in the treatment. In particular, it will be shown that the control of the infinite volume limit, according to the well-known Guerra-Toninelli strategy, requires in addition one to consider the involvement of the cut-off interaction in the interpolation procedure. Moreover, the control of the ergodic region, the annealed case, cannot be directly achieved through the standard application of the Borel-Cantelli lemma, but requires previous modification of the interaction. This remark could find useful application in other cases. The replica symmetric expression for the free energy can be easily reached through a suitable version of the doubly stochastic interpolation technique. However, this model shares the unique property that the fully broken replica symmetry ansatz can be explicitly calculated. A very simple sum rule connects the general expression of the fully broken free energy trial function with the replica symmetric one. The definite sign of the error term shows that the replica solution is optimal. Then

  4. Composition effects on chemical durability and viscosity of nuclear waste glasses - systematic studies and structural thermodynamic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the primary criteria for the acceptability of nuclear waste glasses are their durability, i.e. chemical resistance to aqueous attack for 10 4 to 10 5 years, and processability, which requires their viscosity at the desired melt temperature to be sufficiently low. Chapter 3 presents the results of systematic composition variation studies around the preliminary reference glass composition WV205 and an atomistic interpretation of the effects of individual oxides. Chapter 4 is concerned with modifications of the Jantzen-Plodinec hydration model which takes into account formation of complex aluminosilicate compounds in the glass. Chapter 5 is devoted to the development and validation of the structural-thermodynamic model for both durability and viscosity. This model assumes the strength of bonds between atoms to be the controlling factor in the composition dependence of these glass properties. The binding strengths are derived from the known heats of formation and the structural roles of constituent oxides. Since the coordination state of various oxides in the glass is temperature dependent and cation size has opposite effects on the two properties, the correlation between melt viscosity and rate of corrosion at low temperature is not simply linear. Chapter 6 surveys the effects of aqueous phase composition on the leach behavior of glasses. These studies provide a comprehensive view of the effects of both glass composition and leachant composition on leaching. The models developed correlate both durability and viscosity with glass composition. A major implication is that these findings can be used in the systematic optimization of the properties of complex oxide glasses

  5. Effects of water contamination on the supercooled dynamics of a hydrogen-bonded model glass former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Johan; Bergman, Rikard; Wadell, Carl; Moberg, Tobias; Swenson, Jan; Mattsson, Johan

    2011-03-03

    Broad-band dielectric spectroscopy is a commonly used tool in the study of glass-forming liquids. The high sensitivity of the technique together with the wide range of probed time scales makes it a powerful method for investigating the relaxation spectra of liquids. One particularly important class of glass-forming liquids that is often studied using this technique consists of liquids dominated by hydrogen (H) bond interactions. When investigating such liquids, particular caution has to be taken during sample preparation due to their often highly hygroscopic nature. Water can easily be absorbed from the atmosphere, and dielectric spectroscopy is a very sensitive probe of such contamination due to the large dipole moment of water. Our knowledge concerning the effects of small quantities of water on the dielectric properties of these commonly investigated liquids is limited. We here demonstrate the effects due to the presence of small amounts of water on the dielectric response of a typical H-bonded model glass former, tripropylene glycol. We show how the relaxation processes present in the pure liquid are affected by addition of water, and we find that a characteristic water induced relaxation response is observed for water contents as low as 0.15 wt%. We stress the importance of careful purification of hygroscopic liquids before experiments and quantify what the effects are if such procedures are not undertaken. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Anomalous suppression of the Bose glass at commensurate fillings in the disordered Bose-Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, Frank; Wu Jiansheng; Phillips, Philip

    2009-01-01

    We study the weakly disordered Bose-Hubbard model on a cubic lattice through a one-loop renormalization-group analysis of the corresponding effective-field theory which is explicitly derived by combining a strong-coupling expansion with a replica average over the disorder. The method is applied not only to generic uncorrelated on-site disorder but also to simultaneous hopping-disorder correlated with the differences of adjacent disorder potentials. Such correlations are inherent in fine-grained optical speckle potentials used as a source of disorder in optical lattice experiments. As a result of strong coupling, the strength of the replica-mixing disorder vertex, responsible for the emergence of a Bose glass, crucially depends on the chemical potential and the Hubbard repulsion and vanishes to leading order in the disorder at commensurate boson fillings. As a consequence, at such fillings a direct transition between the Mott insulator and the superfluid in the presence of disorder cannot be excluded on the basis of a one-loop calculation. At incommensurate fillings, at a certain length scale, the Mott insulator will eventually become unstable toward the formation of a Bose glass. Phase diagrams as a function of the microscopic parameters are presented and the finite-size crossover between the Mott-insulating state and the Bose glass is analyzed.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Mechanical Properties of CNT/Polymer Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Hwa; Cho, Maeg Hyo

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain mechanical properties of CNT/Polymer nano-composites, molecular dynamics simulation is performed. Overall system was modeled as a flexible unit cell in which carbon nanotubes are embedded into a polyethylene matrix for N σ T ensemble simulation. COMPASS force field was chosen to describe inter and intra molecular potential and bulk effect was achieved via periodic boundary conditions. In CNT-polymer interface, only Lennard-Jones non-bond potential was considered. Using Parrinello-Rahman fluctuation method, mechanical properties of orthotropic nano-composites under various temperatures were successfully obtained. Also, we investigated thermal behavior of the short CNT reinforced nanocomposites system with predicting glass transition temperature

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  9. Eliminating the use of intravenous glass bottles using a FOCUS-PDCA model and providing a practical stability reference guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraiki, Fatma; Farooq, Faiyaz; Ahmed, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    To identify the intravenous (IV) medications that are prepared in glass bottles at the institution and establish which of these medications can be prepared in flexible IV bags such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or non-PVC instead of glass bottles. The cost implication of switching from glass bottles to flexible IV bags was calculated. A study using FOCUS-PDCA model to identify IV medications prepared in glass bottles and establish which of these medications could be prepared in IV bags (PVC or non-PVC). The cost impact of switching from glass bottles to IV plastic bags (including PVC or non-PVC) was calculated. The stability data obtained were used as a reference for updating pharmacy internal IV preparation charts. A total of 17 IV medications were found to be prepared in IV glass bottles. Of these 17 medications, only 8 (47%) were prepared in IV glass bottles due to incompatibility with PVC bags. For 7 (41%) of the medications, of which 6 were monoclonal antibodies (MABs), the reason for preparation in glass bottles was unclear as these medications are compatible with either PVC or non-PVC or both. The potential cost savings associated with switching all of the identified medications to IV plastic bags (either non-PVC or PVC) exceeded $200 000. The elimination of glass bottles within the institution resulted in a significant cost saving. The use of FOCUS-PDCA model can help healthcare institution achieve significant improvements in process and realize significant cost savings. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Impact of caramelization on the glass transition temperature of several caramelized sugars. Part II: Mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Liu, Yeting; Bhandari, Bhesh; Zhou, Weibiao

    2008-07-09

    Further to part I of this study, this paper discusses mathematical modeling of the relationship between caramelization of several sugars including fructose, glucose, and sucrose and their glass transition temperatures ( T g). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used for creating caramelized sugar samples and determining their glass transition temperatures ( T g). UV-vis absorbance measurement and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis were used for quantifying the extent of caramelization. Specifically, absorbances at 284 and 420 nm were obtained from UV-vis measurement, and the contents of sucrose, glucose, fructose, and 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF) in the caramelized sugars were obtained from HPLC measurements. Results from the UV and HPLC measurements were correlated with the Tg values measured by DSC. By using both linear and nonlinear regressions, two sets of mathematical models were developed for the prediction of Tg values of sugar caramels. The first set utilized information obtained from both UV-vis measurement and HPLC analysis, while the second set utilized only information from the UV-vis measurement, which is much easier to perform in practice. As a caramelization process is typically characterized by two stages, separate models were developed for each of the stages within a set. Furthermore, a third set of nonlinear equations were developed, serving as criteria to decide at which stage a caramelized sample is. The models were evaluated through a validation process.

  11. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.; Hertz, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spin glasses, simply defined by the authors as a collection of spins (i.e., magnetic moments) whose low-temperature state is a frozen disordered one, represent one of the fascinating new fields of study in condensed matter physics, and this book is the first to offer a comprehensive account of the subject. Included are discussions of the most important developments in theory, experimental work, and computer modeling of spin glasses, all of which have taken place essentially within the last two decades. The first part of the book gives a general introduction to the basic concepts and a discussion of mean field theory, while the second half concentrates on experimental results, scaling theory, and computer simulation of the structure of spin glasses

  12. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Acoustic Trapping in Glass Capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Mikkel Wennemoes Hvitfeld; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic traps are used to capture and handle suspended microparticles and cells in microfluidic applications. A particular simple and much-used acoustic trap consists of a commercially available, millimeter-sized, liquid-filled straight glass capillary actuated by a piezoelectric transducer. Here...... of localized acoustic resonance modes in such a straight acoustic waveguide without any geometrical cavities in the axial direction of the capillary. The model further predicts that some of these modes are well suited for acoustic trapping, and it provides estimates for their frequencies and quality factors...

  13. Analytic determination of dynamical and mosaic length scales in a Kac glass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, S [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, PO Box 586, I-34100 Trieste (Italy); Montanari, A [Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-16

    We consider a disordered spin model with multi-spin interactions undergoing a glass transition. We introduce dynamic and static length scales and compute them in the Kac limit (long-but-finite range interactions). They diverge at the dynamic and static phase transition with exponents -1/4 and -1 (respectively). The two length scales are approximately equal well above the mode coupling transition. Their discrepancy increases rapidly as this transition is approached. We argue that this signals a crossover from mode coupling to activated dynamics. (fast track communication)

  14. Choice of mathematical models for technological process of glass rod drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, L. B.

    2017-10-01

    The technological process of drawing glass rods (light guides) is considered. Automated control of the drawing process is reduced to the process of making decisions to ensure a given quality. The drawing process is considered as a control object, including the drawing device (control device) and the optical fiber forming zone (control object). To study the processes occurring in the formation zone, mathematical models are proposed, based on the continuum mechanics basics. To assess the influence of disturbances, a transfer function is obtained from the basis of the wave equation. Obtaining the regression equation also adequately describes the drawing process.

  15. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  16. Phase-coexistence simulations of fluid mixtures by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method using single-particle models

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2013-09-01

    We present a single-particle Lennard-Jones (L-J) model for CO2 and N2. Simplified L-J models for other small polyatomic molecules can be obtained following the methodology described herein. The phase-coexistence diagrams of single-component systems computed using the proposed single-particle models for CO2 and N2 agree well with experimental data over a wide range of temperatures. These diagrams are computed using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method based on the Gibbs-NVT ensemble. This good agreement validates the proposed simplified models. That is, with properly selected parameters, the single-particle models have similar accuracy in predicting gas-phase properties as more complex, state-of-the-art molecular models. To further test these single-particle models, three binary mixtures of CH4, CO2 and N2 are studied using a Gibbs-NPT ensemble. These results are compared against experimental data over a wide range of pressures. The single-particle model has similar accuracy in the gas phase as traditional models although its deviation in the liquid phase is greater. Since the single-particle model reduces the particle number and avoids the time-consuming Ewald summation used to evaluate Coulomb interactions, the proposed model improves the computational efficiency significantly, particularly in the case of high liquid density where the acceptance rate of the particle-swap trial move increases. We compare, at constant temperature and pressure, the Gibbs-NPT and Gibbs-NVT ensembles to analyze their performance differences and results consistency. As theoretically predicted, the agreement between the simulations implies that Gibbs-NVT can be used to validate Gibbs-NPT predictions when experimental data is not available. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  17. On the dynamics of spin-glass models of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Greetje

    1999-10-01

    In the first part of the thesis we have studied the parallel dynamics of the Q-Ising spin-glass model of an attractor neural network. The pattern retrieval is seen as a dynamical process of the spins in order to arrive at a configuration similar to one of the embedded patterns. The similarity is expressed by order parameters. Using a probabilistic signal-to-noise analysis we have calculated the time evolution of the order parameters for the asymmetrically and symmetrically diluted architectures and the fully connected architecture. For the first one we have obtained a closed-form solution. For the other architectures feedback correlations of the spins prevent such a closed-form solution, but we have developed a recursive scheme determining the complete time evolution of the order parameters, without any approximation. For these symmetric architectures we have also derived equilibrium fixed-point equations under certain conditions on the noise in the system. They are the same as those obtained in the replica-symmetric mean-field theory. In the second part of the thesis we have applied the replica-symmetric mean-field theory to the XY spin glass with coupled dynamics. In such a model both spins and couplings evolve stochastically, according to coupled equations, but on different time scales. We have defined relevant order parameters and derived a phase diagram. The system exhibits two different spin-glass phases: one describing freezing of the spins only, and one describing freezing of both spins and couplings. Finally, we have calculated the de Almeida-Thouless lines indicating replica-symmetry breaking.

  18. Relaxations in spin glasses: Similarities and differences from ordinary glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Rajagopal, A.K.; Huang, C.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Relaxation phenomena have become a major concern in the physics of spin glasses. There are certain resemblances of these relaxation properties to those of ordinary glasses. In this work, we compare the relaxation properties of spin glasses near the freezing temperature with those of glasses near the glass transition temperature. There are similarities between the two types of glasses. Moreover, the relaxation properties of many glasses and spin glasses are in conformity with two coupled ''universality'' relations predicted by a recent model of relaxations in condensed matter

  19. Analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from boron silicate glass film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurachi, Ikuo; Yoshioka, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    An analytical boron diffusivity model in silicon for thermal diffusion from a boron silicate glass (BSG) film has been proposed in terms of enhanced diffusion due to boron-silicon interstitial pair formation. The silicon interstitial generation is considered to be a result of the silicon kick-out mechanism by the diffused boron at the surface. The additional silicon interstitial generation in the bulk silicon is considered to be the dissociation of the diffused pairs. The former one causes the surface boron concentration dependent diffusion. The latter one causes the local boron concentration dependent diffusion. The calculated boron profiles based on the diffusivity model are confirmed to agree with the actual diffusion profiles measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for a wide range of the BSG boron concentration. This analytical diffusivity model is a helpful tool for p+ boron diffusion process optimization of n-type solar cell manufacturing.

  20. A model for the stabilization of atomic hydrogen centers in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontuschka, W.M.; Isotani, S.; Furtado, W.W.; Piccini, A.; Rabbani, S.R.

    1989-04-01

    A model describing the trapping site of the interstitial atomic hydrogen (H sup(0) sub(i) in borate glasses x-irradiated at 77 K is proposed. The hydrogen atom is stabilized at the centers of oxygen polygons belonging to B-O ring structures in the glass network by van der Waals forces. The previously reported H sup(0) sub(i) isothermal decay experimental data are discussed in the light of this microscopic model. A coupled differential equation system describing the possible reactions was numerically solved by means of Runge-Kutta's method. The parameter best fit was found by trial and error. The untrapping parameter provided an activation energy of 0.7 x 10 sup(-19) J, in good agreement with the calculated results for dispersion interactions between the stabilized atomic hydrogen and the neighbouring oxygen atoms at the vertices of hexagonal and heptagonal structures. The retrapping and recombination parameters were found to be correlated to (T sup1/2) - T sup(1/2) sub(0)) where t sub(0)=179 K is a cutoff temperature for the kinetics process. (author)

  1. Gentamicin-loaded borate bioactive glass eradicates osteomyelitis due to Escherichia coli in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zongping; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Cunju; Huang, Wenhai; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Changqing

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of osteomyelitis induced by Gram-negative bacilli is rarely reported in the literature. This study established a rabbit tibia model of osteomyelitis induced by the Gram-negative bacillus Escherichia coli. Using this model, pellets composed of a chitosan-bonded mixture of borate bioactive glass and gentamicin were evaluated in vitro and in vivo for the treatment of osteomyelitis induced by Escherichia coli. Our results showed that the pellets in phosphate-buffered saline released gentamicin continuously over 26 days. Without the simultaneous use of a systemic antibiotic, the implantation of the gentamicin-loaded pellets into the osteomyelitis region of the tibia resulted in the eradication of 81.82% of infections, as determined by microbiological, histological and radiographic evaluation, and supported the ingrowth of new bone into the tibia defects after 6 weeks of implantation. The results indicate that the gentamicin-loaded borate bioactive glass implant, combining sustained drug release with the ability to support new bone formation, could provide a method for treating osteomyelitis induced by Gram-negative bacilli.

  2. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH 4 H 2 O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H 2 O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH) 4 are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components

  3. Study of the mechanisms underlying resumptions of alteration. Modeling and evaluation of the impact on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    A sudden and still poorly understood phenomenon, the resumption of alteration results in a sudden acceleration of the glass alteration rate due to the destabilization of the amorphous passivating layer formed on the glass surface. Understanding the origin and the consequences of this phenomenon is a major issue for the prediction of nuclear glass long-term behavior. This study quantitatively links the alteration degree of a six-oxide reference glass and the formation mechanisms of zeolites and C-S-H that control the solution chemistry. The role played by the decrease in aluminum concentration as an indicator of resumption is highlighted. It appears that the resumption occurrence and rate are correlated to the couple (T, pH), but even in the most adverse situations the resumption rate is lower than the initial alteration rate, which remains the fastest kinetic regime. Previously limited to alkaline pH, the characterization of alteration resumptions was extended to conditions more representative of those found in a geological repository. This approach required the development of a new tool: seeding, that reduces or eliminates the latency period preceding a resumption. The results obtained demonstrate its usefulness in understanding the role of zeolites in amorphous layer destabilization and for modeling alteration resumptions. A geochemical modeling approach to alteration resumption is proposed, based on the formalism of the GRAAL glass alteration model. It is based on the calculation of zeolite thermodynamic constants, on the implementation of their nucleation and growth kinetics, and on assumptions related to the solubility of the amorphous layer. When zeolite precipitation consumes alkali, glass alteration - driven by zeolite precipitation - releases alkali. The model highlights the importance of such chemical couplings and shows that, in the stoichiometry of French nuclear reference glass, their cumulative effects are the cause of a pH decrease which limits

  4. Current-voltage characteristics of two-dimensional vortex-glass models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, R.A. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Wallin, M. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, S-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Fisher, M.P.A. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Girvin, S.M. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Young, A.P. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    We have performed Monte Carlo simulations to determine current-voltage characteristics of two vortex-glass models in two dimensions. Our results confirm earlier studies which concluded that there is a zero-temperature transition. Additionally we find that, as the temperature approaches zero, the linear resistance vanishes exponentially, and the current scale {ital J}{sub {ital n}{ital l}} where nonlinearities appear in the current-voltage characteristics, varies roughly as {ital T}{sup 3}. This result is quite different from the prediction of conventional flux creep theory in which {ital J}{sub {ital n}{ital l}}{similar_to}{ital T}. The results for the two models agree quite well with each other, and also agree fairly well with recent experiments on very thin films of Y-Ba-Cu-O.

  5. The dissolution rate of silicate glasses and minerals: an alternative model based on several activated complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, G.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the mineral reactions in natural water-rock systems progress at conditions close to the chemical equilibrium. The kinetics of these reactions, in particular the dissolution rate of the primary minerals, is a major constrain for the numerical modelling of diagenetic and hydrothermal processes. In the case of silicates, recent experimental studies have pointed out the necessity to better understand the elementary reactions which control the dissolution process. This article presents several models that have been proposed to account for the observed dissolution rate/chemical affinity relationships. The case of glasses (R7T7), feldspars and clays, in water, in near neutral pH aqueous solutions and in acid/basic media, are reviewed. (A.C.)

  6. Modeling of glass fusion furnaces; Modelisation des fours de fusion de verre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechitoua, N. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Plard, C. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-12-31

    The furnaces used for glass melting are industrial installations inside which complex and coupled physical and chemical phenomena occur. Thermal engineering plays a major role and numerical simulation is a precious tool for the analysis of the different coupling, of their interaction and of the influence of the different parameters. In order to optimize the functioning of glass furnaces and to improve the quality of the glass produced, Electricite de France (EdF) has developed a specialized version of the ESTET fluid mechanics code, called `Joule`. This paper describes the functioning principle of glass furnaces, the interactions between heat transfers and flows inside the melted glass, the interactions between heat transfers and the thermal regulation of the furnace, the interactions between heat transfers and glass quality and the heat transfer interactions between the melted glass, the furnace walls and the combustion area. (J.S.)

  7. Micro-CT based finite element models for elastic properties of glass-ceramic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabue, Stefano; Rossi, Erica; Baino, Francesco; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Gastaldi, Dario; Vena, Pasquale

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of porous glass-ceramic scaffolds are investigated by means of three-dimensional finite element models based on micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan data. In particular, the quantitative relationship between the morpho-architectural features of the obtained scaffolds, such as macroscopic porosity and strut thickness, and elastic properties, is sought. The macroscopic elastic properties of the scaffolds have been obtained through numerical homogenization approaches using the mechanical characteristics of the solid walls of the scaffolds (assessed through nanoindentation) as input parameters for the numerical simulations. Anisotropic mechanical properties of the produced scaffolds have also been investigated by defining a suitable anisotropy index. A comparison with morphological data obtained through the micro-CT scans is also presented. The proposed study shows that the produced glass-ceramic scaffolds exhibited a macroscopic porosity ranging between 29% and 97% which corresponds to an average stiffness ranging between 42.4GPa and 36MPa. A quantitative estimation of the isotropy of the macroscopic elastic properties has been performed showing that the samples with higher solid fractions were those closest to an isotropic material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Spinodal Decomposition in Three-Dimensional Binary Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Toxvaerd, Søren; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of a two-component Lennard-Jones model in three dimensions, we show that the late-time dynamics of spinodal decomposition in concentrated binary fluids reaches a viscous scaling regime with a growth exponent n = 1, in agreement with experiments...

  9. Study of structure and spectroscopy of water–hydroxide ion clusters ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experimen- talists are interested in determining the bonding,1–18 structure and spectroscopy of these systems and the- oreticians have contributed to the logical explanation of experimental findings. There are different types of systems ranging from atomic clusters, especially noble gas clusters (modelled by Lennard Jones ...

  10. Validity of the Rosenfeld relationship: A comparative study of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we explore the validity of the Rosenfeld and the Dzugutov relation for the Lennard- Jones (LJ) system, its repulsive counterpart, the WCA system and a network forming liquid, the NTW model. We find that for all the systems both the relations are valid at high temperature regime with an universalexponent close ...

  11. G A Adebayo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. G A Adebayo. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. O akinlade. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  13. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. L A Hussain. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  14. On the vapor-liquid equilibrium of attractive chain fluids with variable degree of molecular flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Westen, T.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Gross, J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the isotropic (vapor and liquid) phase behavior of attractive chain fluids. Special emphasis is placed on the role of molecular flexibility, which is studied by means of a rod-coil model. Two new equations of state (EoSs) are developed for square-well- (SW) and Lennard-Jones (LJ) chain

  15. G A Adebayo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation ... Collision frequency of Lennard–Jones fluids at high densities by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation ... Adhesion energy, surface traction and surface tension in liquid xenon.

  16. Nonpolar solvation dynamics for a nonpolar solute in room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 130; Issue 1. Nonpolar solvation ... Frank-Condon type excitation of the solute, previously in equilibrium inRTIL solvent, has been modelled by abruptly changing the Lennard-Jones(LJ) diameter of the solute atoms and thereby disrupting the equilibrium situation.

  17. Feasibility of a single-parameter description of equilibrium viscous liquid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Christensen, Tage Emil; Schrøder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    -Andersen binary Lennard-Jones mixture as well as for an asymmetric dumbbell model liquid, a single-parameter description works quite well. This is confirmed by time-domain results where it is found that energy and pressure fluctuations are strongly correlated on the alpha time scale in the constant...

  18. Some aspects of equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.L.

    1979-02-01

    Some elementary properties of the equation of state of molecules repulsing each other as point centers of force are developed briefly. An inequality for the Lennard--Jones gas is presented. The scaled particle theory equation of state of hard spheres is also reviewed briefly. Means of possibly applying these concepts to represent thermodynamic data on model detonating gases are suggested

  19. Application of the GRAAL model to leaching experiments with SON68 nuclear glass in initially pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frugier, P.; Chave, T.; Gin, S.; Lartigue, J.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the aqueous alteration of SON68 nuclear glass we have proposed a mechanistic model, GRAAL (Glass Reactivity with Allowance for the Alteration Layer) [P. Frugier, S. Gin, Y. Minet, T. Chave, B. Bonin, N. Godon, J.E. Lartigue, P. Jollivet, A. Ayral, L. De Windt, G. Santarini, J. Nucl. Mater. 380 (2008) 8]. This article describes how the GRAAL model hypotheses are solved using a calculation code coupling chemistry and transport. The geochemical solution of this model combines three major phenomena: chemical equilibria in solution, water and ion transport by convection or diffusion, and element diffusion through the passivating reactive interphase. The model results are compared with experimental data for SON68 glass leached in initially pure water both in a closed system and in renewed media. The comparison shows the model very satisfactorily accounts for variations in the pH and the element concentrations in solution as a function of time, the glass surface area in contact with solution, and the solution renewal rate. This success is due to the fact that the diffusion of elements through the alteration gel is taken into account in the model. This mechanism cannot be disregarded under most experimental conditions - if only to predict the solution pH - and must therefore be an integral part of the geochemical model.

  20. Coding coarse grained polymer model for LAMMPS and its application to polymer crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chuanfu; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2009-08-01

    We present a patch code for LAMMPS to implement a coarse grained (CG) model of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). LAMMPS is a powerful molecular dynamics (MD) simulator developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Our patch code implements tabulated angular potential and Lennard-Jones-9-6 (LJ96) style interaction for PVA. Benefited from the excellent parallel efficiency of LAMMPS, our patch code is suitable for large-scale simulations. This CG-PVA code is used to study polymer crystallization, which is a long-standing unsolved problem in polymer physics. By using parallel computing, cooling and heating processes for long chains are simulated. The results show that chain-folded structures resembling the lamellae of polymer crystals are formed during the cooling process. The evolution of the static structure factor during the crystallization transition indicates that long-range density order appears before local crystalline packing. This is consistent with some experimental observations by small/wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). During the heating process, it is found that the crystalline regions are still growing until they are fully melted, which can be confirmed by the evolution both of the static structure factor and average stem length formed by the chains. This two-stage behavior indicates that melting of polymer crystals is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Our results concur with various experiments. It is the first time that such growth/reorganization behavior is clearly observed by MD simulations. Our code can be easily used to model other type of polymers by providing a file containing the tabulated angle potential data and a set of appropriate parameters. Program summaryProgram title: lammps-cgpva Catalogue identifier: AEDE_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDE_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU's GPL No. of lines in distributed program

  1. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Peter V; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-09-21

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO 2 ) 57.5 -(B 2 O 3 ) 10 -(Na 2 O) 15 -(CaO) 15 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 and (SiO 2 ) 57.3 -(B 2 O 3 ) 20 -(Na 2 O) 6.8 -(Li 2 O) 13.4 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 , were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na 2 MoO 4 and CaMoO 4 ). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations.

  2. Modeling the liquid-liquid interface and the transfer of a solute by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1990-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics method and Lennard-Jones potential functions have been employed to model Liquid-Liquid Interfaces. The variation of the miscibilities between the two liquids is obtained by changing the interaction between the two atomic species. The resulting interfaces have a thickness of about three atomic diameters and are stable on the time scale of the simulation. They have been characterized by the density and pressure profiles. The interfacial tension has also been computed and is of the order of magnitude of experimental values. The diffusion process is anisotropic in the interfacial region: the transverse diffusion coefficient (parallelly to the interface) is higher than the normal one. A qualitative explanation of this behaviour is suggested by considering the pressure tensor. The second part of this work, performed by Molecular Dynamics in the canonical ensemble, is devoted to the kinetic study of the transfer of a solute through the interface. A model of a symmetric interface with an atomic solute has been used. The interaction potential between the solute and the solvents has been built in order to obtain an activation barrier to the transfer. We have computed the mean force exerted by the solvent on the solute as a function of its distance to the interface. The resulting mean force potential corresponds to a free energy difference. The height of the energy barrier involved is about 4 kT. The potential energy and entropy profiles have also been calculated and discussed. The diffusion coefficient of the solute has been computed by equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods. We deduced the friction coefficient of the solvent, which is essential to determine the Kramers transmission coefficient. This coefficient is compared to the one obtained by simulation. Finally, the solute transfer rate constant has been calculated. (author) [fr

  3. Simple Theory for the Dynamics of Mean-Field-Like Models of Glass-Forming Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szamel, Grzegorz

    2017-10-13

    We propose a simple theory for the dynamics of model glass-forming fluids, which should be solvable using a mean-field-like approach. The theory is based on transparent physical assumptions, which can be tested in computer simulations. The theory predicts an ergodicity-breaking transition that is identical to the so-called dynamic transition predicted within the replica approach. Thus, it can provide the missing dynamic component of the random first order transition framework. In the large-dimensional limit the theory reproduces the result of a recent exact calculation of Maimbourg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 015902 (2016)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.116.015902]. Our approach provides an alternative, physically motivated derivation of this result.

  4. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  5. Simple Theory for the Dynamics of Mean-Field-Like Models of Glass-Forming Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szamel, Grzegorz

    2017-10-01

    We propose a simple theory for the dynamics of model glass-forming fluids, which should be solvable using a mean-field-like approach. The theory is based on transparent physical assumptions, which can be tested in computer simulations. The theory predicts an ergodicity-breaking transition that is identical to the so-called dynamic transition predicted within the replica approach. Thus, it can provide the missing dynamic component of the random first order transition framework. In the large-dimensional limit the theory reproduces the result of a recent exact calculation of Maimbourg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 015902 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.015902]. Our approach provides an alternative, physically motivated derivation of this result.

  6. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  7. Chemical reactivity of precursor materials during synthesis of glasses used for conditioning high-level radioactive waste: Experiments and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    The glass used to store high-level radioactive waste is produced by reaction of a solid waste residue and a glassy precursor (glass frit). The waste residue is first dried and calcined (to lose water and nitrogen respectively), then mixed with the glass frit to enable vitrification at high temperature. In order to obtain a good quality glass of constant composition upon cooling, the chemical reactions between the solid precursors must be complete while in the liquid state, to enable incorporation of the radioactive elements into the glassy matrix. The physical and chemical conditions during glass synthesis (e.g. temperature, relative proportions of frit and calcine, amount of radioactive charge) are typically empirically adjusted to obtain a satisfactory final product. The aim of this work is to provide new insights into the chemical and physical interactions that take place during vitrification and to provide data for a mathematical model that has been developed to simulate the chemical reactions. The consequences of the different chemical reactions that involve solid, liquid and gaseous phases are described (thermal effects, changes in crystal morphology and composition, variations in melt properties and structure). In a first series of experiments, a simplified analogue of the calcine (NaNO 3 -Al 2 O 3 ± MoO 3 /Nd 2 O 3 ) has been studied. In a second series of experiments, the simplified calcines have been reacted with a simplified glass frit (SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 ) at high temperature. The results show that crystallization of the calcine may take place before interaction with the glass frit, but that the reactivity with the glass at high temperature is a function of the nature and stoichiometry of the crystalline phases which form at low temperature. The results also highlight how the mixing of the starting materials, the physical properties of the frit (viscosity, glass transition temperature) and the Na 2 O/Al 2 O 3 of the calcine but also its

  8. Dynamical arrest, percolation, gelation, and glass formation in model nanoparticle dispersions with thermoreversible adhesive interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P R; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón; Kim, Jung M; Wagner, Norman J

    2012-01-24

    We report an experimental study of the dynamical arrest transition for a model system consisting of octadecyl coated silica suspended in n-tetradecane from dilute to concentrated conditions spanning the state diagram. The dispersion's interparticle potential is tuned by temperature affecting the brush conformation leading to a thermoreversible model system. The critical temperature for dynamical arrest, T*, is determined as a function of dispersion volume fraction by small-amplitude dynamic oscillatory shear rheology. We corroborate this transition temperature by measuring a power-law decay of the autocorrelation function and a loss of ergodicity via fiber-optic quasi-elastic light scattering. The structure at T* is measured using small-angle neutron scattering. The scattering intensity is fit to extract the interparticle pair-potential using the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the Percus-Yevick closure approximation, assuming a square-well interaction potential with a short-range interaction (1% of particle diameter). (1) The strength of attraction is characterized using the Baxter temperature (2) and mapped onto the adhesive hard sphere state diagram. The experiments show a continuous dynamical arrest transition line that follows the predicted dynamical percolation line until ϕ ≈ 0.41 where it subtends the predictions toward the mode coupling theory attractive-driven glass line. An alternative analysis of the phase transition through the reduced second virial coefficient B(2)* shows a change in the functional dependence of B(2)* on particle concentration around ϕ ≈ 0.36. We propose this signifies the location of a gel-to-glass transition. The results presented herein differ from those observed for depletion flocculated dispersion of micrometer-sized particles in polymer solutions, where dynamical arrest is a consequence of multicomponent phase separation, suggesting dynamical arrest is sensitive to the physical mechanism of attraction.

  9. Constraints on the affinity term for modeling long-term glass dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.; Carroll, S.A.; Phillips, B.L.

    1993-11-01

    Predictions of long-term glass dissolution rates are highly dependent on the form of the affinity term in the rate expression. Analysis of the quantitative effect of saturation state on glass dissolution rate for CSG glass (a simple analog of SRL-165 glass), shows that a simple (1-Q/K) affinity term does not match experimental results. Our data at 100 degree C show that the data is better fit by an affinity term having the form (1 - (Q/K) 1 /σ) where σ = 10

  10. Modeling of solution renewal with the Kindis code: example of R7T7 glass dissolution at 90 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Vernaz, E.; Crovisier, J.L.; Clement, A.; Gerard, F.

    1994-01-01

    The deep underground environment that would correspond to a geological repository is a system open to fluid flow. It is therefore necessary to investigate the effects of solution renewal on the long-term behavior of glass in contact with water. These effects can now be simulated using the new version of the geochemical KINDIS model (thermodynamic and kinetic model). We tested the model at 90 deg C with an SA/V ratio of 400 m -1 at twelve renewal rates of pure water ranging from 200 to 0 vol% per day. With renewal rates between 200 and 0.065 vol% per day, steady-state conditions were obtained in the reaction system: i.e. the glass corrosion rate remained constant as did the concentrations of the dissolved species in solution (although at different values depending on the renewal rate). The ionic strength never exceeded 1 (the validity limit for the DEBYE-HUCKEL law) and long term predictions of the dissolved glass mass, the solution composition and the potential secondary mineral sequence are possible. For simulated renewal rates of less than 0.065 vol% per day (27% per year), the ionic strength rose above 1 (as in a closed system) before steady-state conditions were reached, making it critical to calculate long-term rates; A constant and empirical long-term rate, derived from laboratory measurement, have to be extrapolated. These calculations were based on a first order equation to describe the glass dissolution kinetic. The results obtained with the KINDIS code show discrepancies with some major experimental kinetic data (the long term rate must decrease with the ''glass-water'' reaction progress, under silica saturation conditions). This clearly indicates that a more refine kinetic relation is needed for the glass matrix. (authors). 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xu; Huang, Wenhai; Zhang, Yadong; Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping; Pan, Haobo; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8±2MPa to 31±2MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0gml -1 to 2.5gml -1 ). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomistic modeling to investigate the favored composition for metallic glass formation in the Ca-Mg-Ni ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S; Li, J H; An, S M; Li, S N; Liu, B X

    2017-05-17

    A realistic interatomic potential was first constructed for the Ca-Mg-Ni system and then applied to Monte Carlo simulations to predict the favored composition for metallic glass formation in the ternary system. The simulations not only predict a hexagonal composition region, within which the Ca-Mg-Ni metallic glass formation is energetically favored, but also pinpoint an optimized sub-region within which the amorphization driving force, i.e. the energy difference between the solid solution and disordered phase, is larger than that outside. The simulations further reveal that the physical origin of glass formation is the solid solution collapsing when the solute atom exceeds the critical solid solubility. Further structural analysis indicates that the pentagonal bi-pyramids dominate in the optimized sub-region. The large atomic size difference between Ca, Mg and Ni extends the short-range landscape and facilitates the development of a hybridized packing model in the medium-range, and eventually enhancing the glass formation in the system. The predictions are well supported by the experimental observations reported so far, and could be of help for designing the ternary glass formation.

  13. Teicoplanin-loaded borate bioactive glass implants for treating chronic bone infection in a rabbit tibia osteomyelitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Jia, Weitao; Gu, Yifei; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Xin; Wang, Deping; Zhang, Changqing; Huang, Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Zhou, Nai

    2010-08-01

    The treatment of chronic osteomyelitis (bone infection) remains a clinical challenge. In this work, pellets composed of a chitosan-bonded mixture of borate bioactive glass particles (glass converted to hydroxyapatite (HA) within 7 days, eventually forming a porous HA structure. Implantation of the teicoplanin-loaded pellets in a rabbit tibia osteomyelitis model resulted in the detection of teicoplanin in the blood for about 9 days. The implants converted to a bone-like HA graft, and supported the ingrowth of new bone into the tibia defects within 12 weeks of implantation. Microbiological, histological and scanning electron microscopy techniques showed that the implants provided a cure for the bone infection. The results indicate that the teicoplanin-loaded borate bioactive glass implant, combining sustained drug release with the ability to support new bone ingrowth, could provide a method for treating chronic osteomyelitis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leach testing of model glasses containing sodium or potassium ions as a flux

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohanová, D.; Hradecká, H.; Klikarová, L.; Hauková, P.; Švarcová, Silvie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2012), s. 109-117 ISSN 1753-3546 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION * SILICATE-GLASSES * MEDIEVAL GLASSES * CORROSION * DETERIORATION Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.729, year: 2012

  15. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper

  16. Numerical modeling of the conduction and radiation heating in precision glass moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    wafer, heating can be performed by either conduction or radiation. The numerical simulation of these two heating mechanisms in the wafer based glass moulding process is the topic of the present paper. First, the transient heating of the glass wafer is simulated by the FEM software ABAQUS. Temperature...

  17. Real beards and real networks: a spin-glass model for interacting individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neale, Dion

    ''I want to be different, just like all the other different people'' sang the band King Missile. Whether they are the Beatniks of the 1950s, the punks of the 1970s, or the hipsters of today, non-conformists often tend to look the same, seemingly at odds with their goal of non-conformity. The spin-glass model, originally developed to describe the interaction of magnetic spins, and since applied to situations as diverse as the electrical activity of networks of neurons, to trades on a financial market, has recently been used in social science to study populations of interacting individuals comprised of a mix of both conformists and anti-conformists - or hipsters. Including delay effects for the interactions between individuals has been shown to give a system with non-trivial dynamics with a phase transition from stable behaviour to periodic switching between two states (let's call them bushy bearded and clean shaven). Analytic solutions to such a model are possible, but only for particular assumptions about the interaction and delay matrices. In this work we will show what happens when the interactions in the model are based on real-world networks with ''small-world'' effects and clustering.

  18. Spin glass behavior of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on scale free network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surungan, Tasrief; Zen, Freddy P; Williams, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    Randomness and frustration are considered to be the key ingredients for the existence of spin glass (SG) phase. In a canonical system, these ingredients are realized by the random mixture of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) couplings. The study by Bartolozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. B73, 224419 (2006)] who observed the presence of SG phase on the AF Ising model on scale free network (SFN) is stimulating. It is a new type of SG system where randomness and frustration are not caused by the presence of FM and AF couplings. To further elaborate this type of system, here we study Heisenberg model on AF SFN and search for the SG phase. The canonical SG Heisenberg model is not observed in d-dimensional regular lattices for (d ≤ 3). We can make an analogy for the connectivity density (m) of SFN with the dimensionality of the regular lattice. It should be plausible to find the critical value of m for the existence of SG behaviour, analogous to the lower critical dimension (d l ) for the canonical SG systems. Here we study system with m = 2, 3, 4 and 5. We used Replica Exchange algorithm of Monte Carlo Method and calculated the SG order parameter. We observed SG phase for each value of m and estimated its corersponding critical temperature. (paper)

  19. Thermo-hydrodynamic and inductive modelling of a glass melt elaborated in cold inductive crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, E.

    2009-11-01

    Within the context of a search for a new vitrification process for nuclear wastes with a replacement of the presently used metallic pot by an inductive cold crucible, this research thesis deals with the numerical modelling of this technology. After having recalled the interest of nuclear waste vitrification, this report presents the new process based on the use of a cold crucible, describing principles and objectives of this method, and the characteristic physical phenomena associated with the flow and the thermodynamics of the glassy melt in such a crucible. It also recalls and comments the existing works on modelling. The main objective of this research is then to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D thermo-hydraulic and inductive simulations. He describes and analyses the glass physical properties (electrical properties, viscosity, thermal properties), the electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and thermal phenomena. He presents in detail the bubbling mixing modelling, reports 3D induction and fluid mechanical coupling calculations, and specific thermal investigations (radiating transfers, thermal limit conditions)

  20. Exact Solution of the Gauge Symmetric p-Spin Glass Model on a Complete Graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korada, Satish Babu; Macris, Nicolas

    2009-07-01

    We consider a gauge symmetric version of the p-spin glass model on a complete graph. The gauge symmetry guarantees the absence of replica symmetry breaking and allows to fully use the interpolation scheme of Guerra (Fields Inst. Commun. 30:161, 2001) to rigorously compute the free energy. In the case of pairwise interactions ( p=2), where we have a gauge symmetric version of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, we get the free energy and magnetization for all values of external parameters. Our analysis also works for even p≥4 except in a range of parameters surrounding the phase transition line, and for odd p≥3 in a more restricted region. We also obtain concentration estimates for the magnetization and overlap parameter that play a crucial role in the proofs for odd p and justify the absence of replica symmetry breaking. Our initial motivation for considering this model came from problems related to communication over a noisy channel, and is briefly explained.

  1. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  2. A novel deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) glass micro-model for two-phase flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, N K; Joekar-Niasar, V; Hassanizadeh, S M; Kleingeld, P J; Pyrak-Nolte, L J

    2012-09-21

    In the last few decades, micro-models have become popular experimental tools for two-phase flow studies. In this work, the design and fabrication of an innovative, elongated, glass-etched micro-model with dimensions of 5 × 35 mm(2) and constant depth of 43 microns is described. This is the first time that a micro-model with such depth and dimensions has been etched in glass by using a dry etching technique. The micro-model was visualized by a novel setup that allowed us to monitor and record the distribution of fluids throughout the length of the micro-model continuously. Quasi-static drainage experiments were conducted in order to obtain equilibrium data points that relate capillary pressure to phase saturation. By measuring the flow rate of water through the flow network for known pressure gradients, the intrinsic permeability of the micro-model's flow network was also calculated. The experimental results were used to calibrate a pore-network model and test its validity. Finally, we show that glass-etched micro-models can be valuable tools in single and/or multi-phase flow studies and their applications.

  3. Dynamic decoupling and local atomic order of a model multicomponent metallic glass-former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Sung, Bong June

    2015-06-17

    The dynamics of multicomponent metallic alloys is spatially heterogeneous near glass transition. The diffusion coefficient of one component of the metallic alloys may also decouple from those of other components, i.e., the diffusion coefficient of each component depends differently on the viscosity of metallic alloys. In this work we investigate the dynamic heterogeneity and decoupling of a model system for multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts by using a hard sphere model that considers the size disparity of alloys but does not take chemical effects into account. We also study how such dynamic behaviors would relate to the local atomic structure of metallic alloys. We find, from molecular dynamics simulations, that the smallest component P of multicomponent Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 melts becomes dynamically heterogeneous at a translational relaxation time scale and that the largest major component Pd forms a slow subsystem, which has been considered mainly responsible for the stabilization of amorphous state of alloys. The heterogeneous dynamics of P atoms accounts for the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation and also leads to the dynamic decoupling of P and Pd atoms. The dynamically heterogeneous P atoms decrease the lifetime of the local short-range atomic orders of both icosahedral and close-packed structures by orders of magnitude.

  4. Computational modelling of large deformations in layered-silicate/PET nanocomposites near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figiel, Łukasz; Dunne, Fionn P. E.; Buckley, C. Paul

    2010-01-01

    Layered-silicate nanoparticles offer a cost-effective reinforcement for thermoplastics. Computational modelling has been employed to study large deformations in layered-silicate/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) nanocomposites near the glass transition, as would be experienced during industrial forming processes such as thermoforming or injection stretch blow moulding. Non-linear numerical modelling was applied, to predict the macroscopic large deformation behaviour, with morphology evolution and deformation occurring at the microscopic level, using the representative volume element (RVE) approach. A physically based elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model, describing the behaviour of the PET matrix within the RVE, was numerically implemented into a finite element solver (ABAQUS) using an UMAT subroutine. The implementation was designed to be robust, for accommodating large rotations and stretches of the matrix local to, and between, the nanoparticles. The nanocomposite morphology was reconstructed at the RVE level using a Monte-Carlo-based algorithm that placed straight, high-aspect ratio particles according to the specified orientation and volume fraction, with the assumption of periodicity. Computational experiments using this methodology enabled prediction of the strain-stiffening behaviour of the nanocomposite, observed experimentally, as functions of strain, strain rate, temperature and particle volume fraction. These results revealed the probable origins of the enhanced strain stiffening observed: (a) evolution of the morphology (through particle re-orientation) and (b) early onset of stress-induced pre-crystallization (and hence lock-up of viscous flow), triggered by the presence of particles. The computational model enabled prediction of the effects of process parameters (strain rate, temperature) on evolution of the morphology, and hence on the end-use properties.

  5. Thermal modelling of the multi-stage heating system with variable boundary conditions in the wafer based precision glass moulding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarhadi, Ali; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    pressures. Finally, the three-dimensional modelling of the multi-stage heating system in the wafer based glass moulding process is simulated with the FEM software ABAQUS for a particular industrial application for mobile phone camera lenses to obtain the temperature distribution in the glass wafer...

  6. Interpreting the nonlinear dielectric response of glass-formers in terms of the coupling model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear dielectric measurements at high electric fields of glass-forming glycerol and propylene carbonate initially were carried out to elucidate the dynamic heterogeneous nature of the structural α-relaxation. Recently, the measurements were extended to sufficiently high frequencies to investigate the nonlinear dielectric response of faster processes including the so-called excess wing (EW), appearing as a second power law at high frequencies in the loss spectra of many glass formers without a resolved secondary relaxation. While a strong increase of dielectric constant and loss is found in the nonlinear dielectric response of the α-relaxation, there is a lack of significant change in the EW. A surprise to the experimentalists finding it, this difference in the nonlinear dielectric properties between the EW and the α-relaxation is explained in the framework of the coupling model by identifying the EW investigated with the nearly constant loss (NCL) of caged molecules, originating from the anharmonicity of the intermolecular potential. The NCL is terminated at longer times (lower frequencies) by the onset of the primitive relaxation, which is followed sequentially by relaxation processes involving increasing number of molecules until the terminal Kohlrausch α-relaxation is reached. These intermediate faster relaxations, combined to form the so-called Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, are spatially and dynamically heterogeneous, and hence exhibit nonlinear dielectric effects, as found in glycerol and propylene carbonate, where the JG β-relaxation is not resolved and in D-sorbitol where it is resolved. Like the linear susceptibility, χ 1 (f), the frequency dispersion of the third-order dielectric susceptibility, χ 3 (f), was found to depend primarily on the α-relaxation time, and independent of temperature T and pressure P. I show this property of the frequency dispersions of χ 1 (f) and χ 3 (f) is the characteristic of the many-body relaxation

  7. Modelling and Characterization of Effective Thermal Conductivity of Single Hollow Glass Microsphere and Its Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hui; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2018-01-14

    Tiny hollow glass microsphere (HGM) can be applied for designing new light-weighted and thermal-insulated composites as high strength core, owing to its hollow structure. However, little work has been found for studying its own overall thermal conductivity independent of any matrix, which generally cannot be measured or evaluated directly. In this study, the overall thermal conductivity of HGM is investigated experimentally and numerically. The experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of HGM powder is performed by the transient plane source (TPS) technique to provide a reference to numerical results, which are obtained by a developed three-dimensional two-step hierarchical computational method. In the present method, three heterogeneous HGM stacking elements representing different distributions of HGMs in the powder are assumed. Each stacking element and its equivalent homogeneous solid counterpart are, respectively, embedded into a fictitious matrix material as fillers to form two equivalent composite systems at different levels, and then the overall thermal conductivity of each stacking element can be numerically determined through the equivalence of the two systems. The comparison of experimental and computational results indicates the present computational modeling can be used for effectively predicting the overall thermal conductivity of single HGM and its powder in a flexible way. Besides, it is necessary to note that the influence of thermal interfacial resistance cannot be removed from the experimental results in the TPS measurement.

  8. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs

  9. Structure of AgxNa1-xPO3 glasses by neutron diffraction and reverse Monte Carlo modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Andreas; Swenson, Jan; Karlsson, Christian; Adams, Stefan; Bowron, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    We have performed structural studies of mixed mobile ion phosphate glasses Ag x Na 1-x PO 3 using diffraction experiments and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. This glass system is particularly interesting as a model system for investigations of the mixed mobile ion effect, due to its anomalously low magnitude in the system. As for previously studied mixed alkali phosphate glasses, with a much more pronounced mixed mobile ion effect, we find no substantial structural alterations of the phosphorous-oxygen network and the local coordination of the mobile cations. Furthermore, the mobile Ag + and Na + ions are randomly mixed with no detectable preference for either similar or dissimilar pairs of cations. However, in contrast to mixed mobile ion systems with a very pronounced mixed mobile ion effect, the two types of mobile ions have, in this case, very similar local environments. For all the studied glass compositions the average Ag-O and Na-O distances in the first coordination shell are determined to be 2.5 ± 0.1 and 2.5 ± 0.1 A, and the corresponding average coordination numbers are approximately 3.2 and 3.7, respectively. The similar local coordinations of the two types of mobile ions suggests that the energy mismatch for a Na + ion to occupy a site that previously has been occupied by a Ag + ion (and vice versa) is low, and that this low energy mismatch is responsible for the anomalously weak mixed mobile ion effect

  10. Low-temperature bonded glass-membrane microfluidic device for in vitro organ-on-a-chip cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Kyall J.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wang, Chenxi; Priest, Craig; Prestidge, Clive A.; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The integration of microfluidics with living biological systems has paved the way to the exciting concept of "organson- a-chip", which aims at the development of advanced in vitro models that replicate the key features of human organs. Glass based devices have long been utilised in the field of microfluidics but the integration of alternative functional elements within multi-layered glass microdevices, such as polymeric membranes, remains a challenge. To this end, we have extended a previously reported approach for the low-temperature bonding of glass devices that enables the integration of a functional polycarbonate porous membrane. The process was initially developed and optimised on specialty low-temperature bonding equipment (μTAS2001, Bondtech, Japan) and subsequently adapted to more widely accessible hot embosser units (EVG520HE Hot Embosser, EVG, Austria). The key aspect of this method is the use of low temperatures compatible with polymeric membranes. Compared to borosilicate glass bonding (650 °C) and quartz/fused silica bonding (1050 °C) processes, this method maintains the integrity and functionality of the membrane (Tg 150 °C for polycarbonate). Leak tests performed showed no damage or loss of integrity of the membrane for up to 150 hours, indicating sufficient bond strength for long term cell culture. A feasibility study confirmed the growth of dense and functional monolayers of Caco-2 cells within 5 days.

  11. Effect of bioactive borate glass microstructure on bone regeneration, angiogenesis, and hydroxyapatite conversion in a rat calvarial defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lianxiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Brown, Zackary; Samujh, Christopher; Liu, Xin; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Dusevich, Vladimir; Eick, J David; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2013-08-01

    Borate bioactive glasses are biocompatible and enhance new bone formation, but the effect of their microstructure on bone regeneration has received little attention. In this study scaffolds of borate bioactive glass (1393B3) with three different microstructures (trabecular, fibrous, and oriented) were compared for their capacity to regenerate bone in a rat calvarial defect model. 12weeks post-implantation the amount of new bone, mineralization, and blood vessel area in the scaffolds were evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The amount of new bone formed was 33%, 23%, and 15%, respectively, of the total defect area for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous microstructures. In comparison, the percent new bone formed in implants composed of silicate 45S5 bioactive glass particles (250-300μm) was 19%. Doping the borate glass with copper (0.4 wt.% CuO) had little effect on bone regeneration in the trabecular and oriented scaffolds, but significantly enhanced bone regeneration in the fibrous scaffolds (from 15 to 33%). The scaffolds were completely converted to hydroxyapatite within the 12week implantation. The amount of hydroxyapatite formed, 22%, 35%, and 48%, respectively, for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous scaffolds, increased with increasing volume fraction of glass in the as-fabricated scaffold. Blood vessels infiltrated into all the scaffolds, but the trabecular scaffolds had a higher average blood vessel area compared with the oriented and fibrous scaffolds. While all three scaffold microstructures were effective in supporting bone regeneration, the trabecular scaffolds supported more bone formation and may be more promising in bone repair. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  13. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, W

    2001-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria

  14. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  15. Low-Li2O Frits: Selecting Glasses that Support the Melt Rate Studies and Challenge the Current Durability Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-01-01

    During the progressive development of the cold cap model (as it applies to a potential melt rate predictive tool), the formation of an Al-Li-silicate phase was identified as an intermediate reaction phase that could possibly hinder melt rate for SB4. To test this theory, six glasses were designed (using Frit 320's composition as the baseline) to maintain a constant 20 wt% sum of alkali content (in frit) by varying Na 2 O to Li 2 O ratios. The Li 2 O concentration ranged from 8 wt% down to 0% in either 2% or 1% increments with the differences being accounted for by an increase in Na 2 O concentration. Although the primary objective of the ''lower Li 2 O'' frits was to evaluate the potential for melt rate improvements, assessments of durability (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) were also performed. The results suggest that durable glasses can be produced with these ''lower Li 2 O'' frits should it be necessary to pursue this option for improving melt rate. In addition to the series of glasses to support melt rate assessments, a series of frits were also developed to challenge the current durability model based on the limits proposed by Edwards et al. (2004). Although the ''new'' limits allow access into compositional regions of interest (i.e., higher alkali systems) which can improve melt rate and/or waste loading, there may still be ''additional'' conservatism. In this report, two series of glasses were developed to challenge the ''new'' durability limits for the SB4 system. In the first series, the total alkali of the Frit 320-based glasses (designed to support the melt rate program) was increased from 20 wt% to 21 wt% (in the frit), but the series also evaluated the possible impact of various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratio differences. The second series pushed the alkali limit in the frit even further with frits containing either 22 or 24 wt% total alkali as well as various Na 2 O and Li 2 O mass ratios. The results of the PCT evaluation indicated

  16. Constitutive modelling of creep in a long fiber random glass mat thermoplastic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasappa, Prasad

    The primary objective of this proposed research is to characterize and model the creep behaviour of Glass Mat Thermoplastic (GMT) composites under thermo-mechanical loads. In addition, tensile testing has been performed to study the variability in mechanical properties. The thermo-physical properties of the polypropylene matrix including crystallinity level, transitions and the variation of the stiffness with temperature have also been determined. In this work, the creep of a long fibre GMT composite has been investigated for a relatively wide range of stresses from 5 to 80 MPa and temperatures from 25 to 90°C. The higher limit for stress is approximately 90% of the nominal tensile strength of the material. A Design of Experiments (ANOVA) statistical method was applied to determine the effects of stress and temperature in the random mat material which is known for wild experimental scatter. Two sets of creep tests were conducted. First, preliminary short-term creep tests consisting of 30 minutes creep followed by recovery were carried out over a wide range of stresses and temperatures. These tests were carried out to determine the linear viscoelastic region of the material. From these tests, the material was found to be linear viscoelastic up-to 20 MPa at room temperature and considerable non-linearities were observed with both stress and temperature. Using Time-Temperature superposition (TTS) a long term master curve for creep compliance for up-to 185 years at room temperature has been obtained. Further, viscoplastic strains were developed in these tests indicating the need for a non-linear viscoelastic viscoplastic constitutive model. The second set of creep tests was performed to develop a general non-linear viscoelastic viscoplastic constitutive model. Long term creep-recovery tests consisting of 1 day creep followed by recovery has been conducted over the stress range between 20 and 70 MPa at four temperatures: 25°C, 40°C, 60°C and 80°C. Findley's model

  17. How reliable is the HMSA integral equation for the pair structure of supercooled and amorphous mixtures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaddour, F.O.; Pastore, G.

    1993-07-01

    Accurate Molecular Dynamics calculations on highly asymmetric Lennard-Jones mixtures have been performed to check in rather extreme cases the ability of the self-consistent HMSA integral equation to predict the pair correlations in supercooled and glassy mixtures. We find that, in the supercooled region, the HMSA is a reasonable approximation for the structural properties and thermodynamics properties, but systematic deviations from MD data appear when the glass transition is approached. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. A Problem For the Mush Model: Mismatch Between Trace Element Patterns Of Rhyolites And Dacite Matrix Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, A. F.; Wörner, G.

    2016-12-01

    Extraction of liquid from granodiorite mush—the "mush model" of crystal-liquid separation—is a widely accepted method for production of high-silica rhyolite. An obvious test of this hypothesis is to analyze glasses in dacite lavas and tuffs and see if they match the geochemical characteristics of rhyolites. We have done so for glass matrices of 12 dacites from 11 Pliocene-Quaternary volcanoes in the central Andes and find that their glasses, although broadly rhyolitic, fail to match the compositions of rhyolites in several key elements. The mush model thus fails this test. The sample set, analyzed by LA-ICPMS and FE-microprobe, comprises dacites and rhyodacites (avg whole-rock SiO2 67 wt%) with glassy or pumiceous textures and tens of % phenocrysts (dominantly hbl+bio+plag±qtz±san); reference dataset is 3400 silicic volcanic rocks (72-80 wt% SiO2) from circum-Pacific convergent margins. SiO2 in the glasses, calculated volatile-free, ranges up to 79 wt%, with several above the nominal igneous limit of 77.4 wt% and beyond nearly all rhyolites. Although elements that should be held by the crystal fraction (e.g., Ba, Sr, Zr, etc.) overlap with the reference dataset, Y and middle-heavy REE are uniformly lower in the glasses than in rhyolites, and REE patterns are uniformly more scoop-shaped than rhyolites. Modal titanite has only been found in 5 of the dacites; MREE depletion may reflect high modal hornblende. U and Th are significantly higher in the glasses than in rhyolites. It is unlikely that the 12 samples analyzed are all outliers, and we conclude that they contradict the hypothesis that convergent-margin rhyolites form by extraction of liquid from crystal mushes that congeal into granodiorite plutons. Our data are consistent with other failed tests of the mush hypothesis (e.g., comparisons of volcanic and plutonic rocks from the same setting; compositions of aplites) and physical reasoning (e.g., difficulty of separating sub-mm crystals from highly viscous

  19. Fluvial Transport Model from Spatial Distribution Analysis of Libyan Desert Glass Mass on the Great Sand Sea (Southwest Egypt: Clues to Primary Glass Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Jimenez-Martinez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Libyan Desert Glass (LDG is a natural silica-rich melted rock found as pieces scattered over the sand and bedrock of the Western Desert of Egypt, northeast of the Gilf Kebir. In this work, a population mixture analysis serves to relate the present spatial distribution of LDG mass density with the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene fluvial dynamics in the Western Desert of Egypt. This was verified from a spatial distribution model that was predicted from the log-normal kriging method using the LDG–mass-dependent transformed variable, Y(x. Both low- and high-density normal populations (–9.2 < Y(x < –3.5 and –3.8 < Y(x < 2.1, respectively were identified. The low-density population was the result of an ordinary fluvial LDG transport/deposition sequence that was active from the time of the melting process, and which lasted until the end of activity of the Gilf River. The surface distribution of the high-density population allowed us to restrict the source area of the melting process. We demonstrate the importance of this geostatistical study in unveiling the probable location of the point where the melting of surficial material occurred and the role of the Gilf River in the configuration of the observed strewn field.

  20. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  1. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  2. Molecular simulation and mathematical modelling of glass transition temperature depression induced by CO2 plasticization in Polysulfone membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, S. S. M.; Lau, K. K.; Lock Sow Mei, Irene; Shariff, A. M.; Yeong, Y. F.; Bustam, A. M.

    2017-08-01

    A sequence of molecular modelling procedure has been proposed to simulate experimentally validated membrane structure characterizing the effect of CO2 plasticization, whereby it can be subsequently employed to elucidate the depression in glass transition temperature (Tg ). Based on the above motivation, unswollen and swollen Polysulfone membrane structures with different CO2 loadings have been constructed, whereby the accuracy has been validated through good compliance with experimentally measured physical properties. It is found that the presence of CO2 constitutes to enhancement in polymeric chain relaxation, which consequently promotes the enlargement of molecular spacing and causes dilation in the membrane matrix. A series of glass transition temperature treatment has been conducted on the verified molecular structure to elucidate the effect of CO2 loadings to the depression in Tg induced by plasticization. Subsequently, a modified Michealis-Menten (M-M) function has been implemented to quantify the effect of CO2 loading attributed to plasticization towards Tg .

  3. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-15

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  4. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  5. Interpreting the nonlinear dielectric response of glass-formers in terms of the coupling model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngai, K. L. [CNR-IPCF, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-21

    Nonlinear dielectric measurements at high electric fields of glass-forming glycerol and propylene carbonate initially were carried out to elucidate the dynamic heterogeneous nature of the structural α-relaxation. Recently, the measurements were extended to sufficiently high frequencies to investigate the nonlinear dielectric response of faster processes including the so-called excess wing (EW), appearing as a second power law at high frequencies in the loss spectra of many glass formers without a resolved secondary relaxation. While a strong increase of dielectric constant and loss is found in the nonlinear dielectric response of the α-relaxation, there is a lack of significant change in the EW. A surprise to the experimentalists finding it, this difference in the nonlinear dielectric properties between the EW and the α-relaxation is explained in the framework of the coupling model by identifying the EW investigated with the nearly constant loss (NCL) of caged molecules, originating from the anharmonicity of the intermolecular potential. The NCL is terminated at longer times (lower frequencies) by the onset of the primitive relaxation, which is followed sequentially by relaxation processes involving increasing number of molecules until the terminal Kohlrausch α-relaxation is reached. These intermediate faster relaxations, combined to form the so-called Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation, are spatially and dynamically heterogeneous, and hence exhibit nonlinear dielectric effects, as found in glycerol and propylene carbonate, where the JG β-relaxation is not resolved and in D-sorbitol where it is resolved. Like the linear susceptibility, χ{sub 1}(f), the frequency dispersion of the third-order dielectric susceptibility, χ{sub 3}(f), was found to depend primarily on the α-relaxation time, and independent of temperature T and pressure P. I show this property of the frequency dispersions of χ{sub 1}(f) and χ{sub 3}(f) is the characteristic of the many

  6. Geochemical modelling of the long-term dissolution behaviour of the French nuclear glass R7T7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaux, L.; Mouche, E.; Petit, J.-C.; Fritz, B.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term dissolution behaviour of the French nuclear reference glass R7T7 was studied by means of the geochemical code DISSOL. New experimental data which support some of the assumptions of DISSOL are presented: namely, that the dissolution is congruent and that the altered layer can be considered as an assemblage of secondary phases. At 100 o C the main results of modelling are that the altered layer is essentially formed of a pure siliceous phase (amorphous silica or chalcedony) associated with smectites and zeolites. This sequence of secondary minerals is closely linked to the chemical composition of the glass. For high degrees of reaction, corresponding to high B concentration, the ionic strength reaches 1 and the pH varies from 9 to 10 depending on the CO 2 fugacity; B,Li and Na are essentially found in solution and their concentrations depend on the amount of dissolved glass. By contrast Fe,Al and Zn have low solution concentrations which are controlled by solubility products of secondary minerals. Silicon and Ca have an intermediate behaviour which depends on the choice of selected secondary minerals. The total volume of the secondary phases is always lower than that of the corresponding dissolved glass. The results of modelling compared to static leaching experimental results show only minor differences which can be explained by kinetic control or colloid formation. It is concluded that the altered layer is not a barrier to diffusion. The consequences of this work for actinide solubility are also discussed. (author)

  7. Free energy of mean-field spin-glass models: evolution operator and perturbation expansion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Kauch, Anna; Klíč, Antonín

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 5 (2013), "054201-1"-"054201-11" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spin glasses * continuous replica-symmetry breaking * continuous order-parameter function Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  8. 77 FR 40255 - Special Conditions: Boeing, Model 737-800; Large Non-Structural Glass in the Passenger Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... with the installation of large non-structural glass items in the cabin area of an executive interior...: The installation of large non-structural glass items, typically in the form of glass sheets in the... novel and unusual design features for the use of large non-structural glass in the passenger cabin...

  9. SELF-CLEANING GLASS BASED ON ACID-TREATED TiO2 FILMS WITH PALMITIC ACID AS MODEL POLLUTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hidayat Aprilita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and characterization of self-cleaning glass based on acid-treated TiO2 films as well as evaluation on their self-cleaning properties have been carried out. Palmitic acid photodegradation was used as model pollutant. Acid-treated TiO2 powders were deposited on glass surface by using spraying technique. The XRD results showed that acid-treated TiO2 film exhibited decreased anatase crystalline size. The corresponding SEM images showed porous surface morphology. Layer densification was observed as the film thickness increased. TiO2 photocatalytic activity increased as the length of UV radiation increased. Best results were obtained at experimental condition of 35 hours UV radiation time. It is also observed that the thickness of TiO2 layers influenced the efficiency of palmitic acid photodegradation. The film with 1.661 µm thick TiO2 layers and 6.933 mg weight (0.7164 mg/cm2 could degrade 97.54 % mg palmitic acid/cm2 thin film.   Keywords: TiO2 films, acid treatment, self-cleaning glass

  10. A phenomenological molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Lin, Panpan; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2014-09-07

    This work formulates, at a molecular level, a phenomenological theoretical description of the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in tensile extension, exhibited by all polymeric glasses of high molecular weight (MW). The starting point is our perception of a polymer glass (under large deformation) as a structural hybrid, consisting of a primary structure due to the van der Waals bonding and a chain network whose junctions are made of pairs of hairpins and function like chemical crosslinks due to the intermolecular uncrossability. During extension, load-bearing strands (LBSs) emerge between the junctions in the affinely strained chain network. Above the BDT, i.e., at "warmer" temperatures where the glass is less vitreous, the influence of the chain network reaches out everywhere by activating all segments populated transversely between LBSs, starting from those adjacent to LBSs. It is the chain network that drives the primary structure to undergo yielding and plastic flow. Below the BDT, the glassy state is too vitreous to yield before the chain network suffers a structural breakdown. Thus, brittle failure becomes inevitable. For any given polymer glass of high MW, there is one temperature TBD or a very narrow range of temperature where the yielding of the glass barely takes place as the chain network also reaches the point of a structural failure. This is the point of the BDT. A theoretical analysis of the available experimental data reveals that (a) chain pullout occurs at the BDT when the chain tension builds up to reach a critical value f(cp) during tensile extension; (b) the limiting value of f(cp), extrapolated to far below the glass transition temperature T(g), is of a universal magnitude around 0.2-0.3 nN, for all eight polymers examined in this work; (c) pressurization, which is known [K. Matsushige, S. V. Radcliffe, and E. Baer, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1853 (1976)] to make brittle polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) ductile at room

  11. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Solidification of liquid is a very rich and complicated field, although there is always a famous homogeneous nucleation theory in a standard physics or materials science text book. Depending on the material and processing condition, liquid may solidify to single crystalline, polycrystalline with different texture, quasi-crystalline, amorphous solid or glass (Glass is a kind of amorphous solid in general, which has short-range and medium-range order). Traditional oxide glass may easily be formed since the covalent directional bonded network is apt to be disturbed. In other words, the energy landcape of the oxide glass is so complicated that system need extremely long time to explore the whole configuration space. On the other hand, metallic liquid usually crystalize upon cooling because of the metallic bonding nature. However, Klement et.al., (1960) reported that Au-Si liquid underwent an amorphous or “glassy” phase transformation with rapid quenching. In recent two decades, bulk metallic glasses have also been found in several multicomponent alloys[Inoue et al., (2002)]. Both thermodynamic factors (e.g., free energy of various competitive phase, interfacial free energy, free energy of local clusters, etc.) and kinetic factors (e.g., long range mass transport, local atomic position rearrangement, etc.) play important roles in the metallic glass formation process. Metallic glass is fundamentally different from nanocrystalline alloys. Metallic glasses have to undergo a nucleation process upon heating in order to crystallize. Thus the short-range and medium-range order of metallic glasses have to be completely different from crystal. Hence a method to calculate the energetics of different local clusters in the undercooled liquid or glasses become important to set up a statistic model to describe metalllic glass formation. Scattering techniques like x-ray and neutron have widely been used to study the structues of metallic glasses. Meanwhile, computer simulation

  12. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  13. Study of archaeological analogs for the validation of nuclear glass long-term behavior models; Etude d'analogues archeologiques pour la validation des modeles de comportement a long terme des verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verney-Carron, A

    2008-10-15

    Fractured archaeological glass blocks collected from a shipwreck discovered in the Mediterranean Sea near Embiez Island (Var) were investigated because of their morphological analogy with vitrified nuclear waste and of a known and stable environment. These glasses are fractured due to a fast cooling after they were melted (like nuclear glass) and have been altered for 1800 years in seawater. This work results in the development and the validation of a geochemical model able to simulate the alteration of a fractured archaeological glass block over 1800 years. The kinetics associated with the different mechanisms (interdiffusion and dissolution) and the thermodynamic parameters of the model were determined by leaching experiments. The model implemented in HYTEC software was used to simulate crack alteration over 1800 years. The consistency between simulated alteration thicknesses and measured data on glass blocks validate the capacity of the model to predict long-term alteration. This model is able to account for the results from the characterization of crack network and its state of alteration. The cracks in the border zone are the most altered due to a fast renewal of the leaching solution, whereas internal cracks are thin because of complex interactions between glass alteration and transport of elements in solution (influence of initial crack aperture and of the crack sealing). The lowest alteration thicknesses, as well as their variability, can be explained. The analog behavior of archaeological and nuclear glasses from leaching experiments makes possible the transposition of the model to nuclear glass in geological repository. (author00.

  14. Cosmos & Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    1996-01-01

    The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne.......The article unfolds the architectural visions of glass by Bruno Taut. It refers to inspirations by Paul Sheerbart and litterature and the Crystal Chain, also it analyses the tectonic univers that can be found in the glass pavillion for the Werkbund exposition in Cologne....

  15. First-order dynamical phase transition in models of glasses: an approach based on ensembles of histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrahan, Juan P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Jack, Robert L [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lecomte, Vivien; Duijvendijk, Kristina van; Wijland, Frederic van [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes (CNRS UMR 7057), Universite Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Pitard, Estelle [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (CNRS UMR 5587), Universite de Montpellier II, place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-02-20

    We investigate the dynamics of kinetically constrained models of glass formers by analysing the statistics of trajectories of the dynamics, or histories, using large deviation function methods. We show that, in general, these models exhibit a first-order dynamical transition between active and inactive dynamical phases. We argue that the dynamical heterogeneities displayed by these systems are a manifestation of dynamical first-order phase coexistence. In particular, we calculate dynamical large deviation functions, both analytically and numerically, for the Fredrickson-Andersen model, the East model, and constrained lattice gas models. We also show how large deviation functions can be obtained from a Landau-like theory for dynamical fluctuations. We discuss possibilities for similar dynamical phase-coexistence behaviour in other systems with heterogeneous dynamics.

  16. Effect of inclusion matrix model on temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass damaged by long-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Wang, Bin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-04-01

    A model containing an inclusion matrix heated by a millisecond laser is proposed to calculate temperature and thermal stress fields of K9-glass using a finite element method. First, the evolution of temperature and thermal stress fields is analyzed. Results show that both the upper and lower surfaces are damaged. K9-glass is primarily damaged by the combination of radial and axial stresses. Calculated damage morphology is mainly determined by radial stress. Then damage morphology evolution with the increase of the incident laser energy is investigated, which shows that damage area spreads inward from both the front and rear surfaces. Finally, experimental results of long-pulse laser damage of K9-glass are analyzed. The comparison of numerical results with experimental observations shows a good correlation in damage morphology, which indicates that the built inclusion matrix model is applicable to long-pulse laser damage in K9-glass.

  17. Molecular Force Field Development for Aqueous Electrolytes: 1. Incorporating Appropriate Experimental Data and the Inadequacy of Simple Electrolyte Force Fields Based on Lennard-Jones and Point Charge Interactions with Lorentz-Berthelot Rules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moučka, F.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2013), s. 5076-5085 ISSN 1549-9618 Grant - others:GA MŠMT(CZ) LH12019; NSERCC(CA) OGP1041; UJEP(CZ) GAP208/12/0105 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : sodium-chloride * ionic hydration * free-energy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  18. Processing, characterization and modeling of recycled polypropylene/glass fibre/wood flour composites

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Maadeed, M.A.; Shabana, Yasser M.; Khanam, P. Noorunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is one of the most common thermoplastic materials in the world. There is a need to recycle the large amount of this used material. To overcome the environmental problems, related to the polymer waste, PP was recycled and used as a matrix material in different composites that can be used in high value applications. In this paper, composites made of recycled polypropylene (RPP) reinforced by glass fibres and/or wood flour of the palm tree were prepared, characterized and mode...

  19. Glass leaching performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chick, L.A.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1983-05-01

    Current understanding of the leaching performance of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is summarized. The empirical model of waste glass leaching behavior developed shows that at high water flow rates the glass leach rate is kinetically limited to a maximum value. At intermediate water flow rates, leaching is limited by the solution concentration of silica and decreases with decreasing water flow rates. Release of soluble elements is controlled by silica dissolution because silica forms the binding network of the glass. At low water flow rates, mass loss rates reach values controlled by formation rates of alteration minerals, or by diffusion of dissolution products through essentially stagnant water. The parameters reviewed with respect to their quantifiable influence on leaching behavior include temperature, pH, leachant composition, glass composition, thermal history, and radiation. Of these, temperature is most important since the rate of mass loss approximately doubles with each 10 0 C increase in dilute solutions. The pH has small effects within the 4 to 10 range. The chemical composition of the leachant is most important with regard to its influence on alteration product formation. Glass composition exhibits the largest effects at high flow rates where improved glasses leach from ten to thirty times slower than glass 76 to 68. The effects of the thermal history (devitrification) of the glass are not likely to be significant. Radiation effects are important primarily in that radiolysis can potentially drive pH values to less than 4. Radiation damage to the glass causes insignificant changes in leaching performance

  20. Mathematical modelling of bubble removal from a glass melting channel with defined melt flow and the relation between the optimal flow conditions of bubble removal and sand dissolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cincibusová, Petra; Němec, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2015), s. 52-62 ISSN 1753-3546 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010844 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : glass melt * mathematical modelling * controlled flow * space utilization * temperature gradients Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.362, year: 2015 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/sgt/gta/2015/00000056/00000002/art00003

  1. Negative effect of rapidly resorbing properties of bioactive glass-ceramics as bone graft substitute in a rabbit lumbar fusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Ryu, Hyun-Seung; Seo, Jun-Hyuk; Lee, Do-Yoon; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2014-03-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramics have the ability to directly bind to bones and have been widely used as bone graft substitutes due to their high osteoconductivity and biocompatibility. CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics are known to have good osteoconductivity and are used as bone graft extenders. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the resorbing properties of glass-ceramics in bone fusion after producing and analyzing three types of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics with high osteoconductivity that had enhanced resorption by having an increased B2O3 content. The three types of CaO-SiO2-P2O5-B2O3 glass-ceramics with B2O3 contents of 8.0, 9.0, and 9.5 weight % were designated and grouped as P20B80, P10B90, and P5B95, respectively. Glass-ceramic types were tested for fusion rates and bone formation by employing the lumbar 5-6 intertransverse process fusion model in 51 New Zealand male rabbits. Bioactivity was assessed by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro study results showed sufficient hydroxycarbonate apatite layer formation occurred for P20B80 in1 day, for P10B90 in 3 days, and for P5B95 in 5 days after soaking in SBF. For the rabbit lumbar spine posterolateral fusion model, the autograft group recorded a 100% fusion rate with levels significantly higher than those of P20B80 (29.4%), P10B90 (0%), and P5B95 (14.3%), with high resorbing properties. Resorbing property differences among the three glass-ceramic groups were not significant. Histological results showed new bone formation confirming osteoconductivity in all three types of glass-ceramics. Radiomorphometric results also confirmed the resorbing properties of the three glass-ceramic types. The high resorbing properties and osteoconductivity of porous glass-ceramics can be advantageous as no glass-ceramics remain in the body. However, their relatively fast rate of resorption in the body negatively affects their role as an osteoconductive scaffold as glass-ceramics are resorbed before bony fusion.

  2. Mechanically reinforced glass beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes

    2007-01-01

    The use of glass as a load carrying material in structural elements is rarely seen even though glass is a popular material for many architects. This is owed to the unreliable and low tensile strength, which is due to surface flaws and high brittleness of the material. These properties lead...... to breakage without any warning or ductility, which can be catastrophic if no precautions are taken. One aspect of this issue is treated here by looking at the possibility of mechanically reinforcing glass beams in order to obtain ductile failure for such a structural component. A mechanically reinforced...... presented. The experiments show that it is possible to obtain a very ductile structural behavior using the right amount of reinforcement. A Finite Element Model including - in a simple manner - the effects of cracking of glass is presented. Based on a comparison between experimental and model results...

  3. Glass Glimpsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology.......Glass in poetry as it reflects the viewer and as its power of reflection are both reduced and enhanced by technology....

  4. Atomic structure of Mg-based metallic glass investigated with neutron diffraction, reverse Monte Carlo modeling and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, Rafał; Łukowiec, Dariusz; Temleitner, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The structure of a multicomponent metallic glass, Mg 65 Cu 20 Y 10 Ni 5 , was investigated by the combined methods of neutron diffraction (ND), reverse Monte Carlo modeling (RMC) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The RMC method, based on the results of ND measurements, was used to develop a realistic structure model of a quaternary alloy in a glassy state. The calculated model consists of a random packing structure of atoms in which some ordered regions can be indicated. The amorphous structure was also described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers, which illustrated some types of cluster packing. The N = 9 clusters correspond to the tri-capped trigonal prisms, which are one of Bernal's canonical clusters, and atomic clusters with N = 6 and N = 12 are suitable for octahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations. The nanocrystalline character of the alloy after annealing was also studied by HRTEM. The selected HRTEM images of the nanocrystalline regions were also processed by inverse Fourier transform analysis. The high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) technique was used to determine phase separation in the studied glass after heat treatment. The HAADF mode allows for the observation of randomly distributed, dark contrast regions of about 4-6 nm. The interplanar spacing identified for the orthorhombic Mg 2 Cu crystalline phase is similar to the value of the first coordination shell radius from the short-range order.

  5. Understanding Complex Tribofilms by Means of H3BO3-B2O3Model Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, F; Rossi, A; Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Lainé, E; Woodward, P; Spencer, N D

    2018-02-13

    The discovery of the spontaneous reaction of boric oxides with moisture in the air to form lubricious H 3 BO 3 films has led to great interest in the tribology of boron compounds in general. Despite this, a study of the growth kinetics of H 3 BO 3 on a B 2 O 3 substrate under controlled relative humidity (RH) has not yet been reported in the literature. Here, we describe the tribological properties of H 3 BO 3 -B 2 O 3 glass systems after aging under controlled RH over different lengths of time. A series of tribological tests has been performed applying a normal load of 15 N, at both room temperature and 100 °C in YUBASE 4 oil. In addition, the cause of H 3 BO 3 film failure under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions has been studied to find out whether the temperature, the tribostress, or both influence the removal of the lubricious film from the contact points. The following techniques were exploited: confocal Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure and chemical nature of the glass systems, environmental scanning electron microscopy to examine the morphology of the H 3 BO 3 films developed, atomic force microscopy to monitor changes in roughness as a consequence of the air exposure, focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscopy to measure the average thickness of the H 3 BO 3 films grown over various times on B 2 O 3 glass substrates and to reveal the morphology of the sample in the vertical section, tribological tests to shed light on the system's lubricating properties, and finally small-area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the composition of the transfer film formed on the steel ball while tribotesting.

  6. Model-based control of glass melting furnaces and forehearths: first principles-based model of predictive control system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backx, T.C.; Huisman, L.; Astrid, P.; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2003-01-01

    The volume of the Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceeding (CESP) series, in which this paper is incorporated, contains a collection of papers dealing with issues in both traditional ceramics (i.e., glass, whitewares, refractories, and porcelain enamel) and advanced ceramics. Topics covered in the

  7. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  8. Physical and mathematical modelling of gas-fired glass melting furnaces with regard to NO-formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, F.; Stuchlik, O.; Kremer, H.

    1999-01-01

    The increasing demand in quality, efficiency, energy conservation and the environmental issues drive the operators of high temperature processes to optimize their furnaces. Especially the glass manufacturing industry with their high working temperatures from about 1850 K to more than 1950 K and high air preheating temperatures of above 1480 K will produce high NOx-concentrations in the flue gas if no primary measures are taken. Considering the three different paths for NO-formation it is obvious that increased thermal NO is responsible for higher emissions. The German environmental regulations on air ''TA Luft'' requires a maximum value of 500 mg/mN3 in the flue gas for most of the combustion processes but for glass melting furnaces a temporary regulation of 1200 mg/mN3 and further on to 800 mg/mN3 is valid. Due to economical reasons the level of secondary measures is to be minimized thus the main objective of research is to reduce the NOx-emissions via primary measures. The design of the furnace is very important due to its strong influence on the distribution of velocity and species. That consequently affects the temperature field and the heat transfer to the load and further on the emissions. For the understanding of the processes within these furnaces numerical simulations, which are successfully validated with experiments, can give valuable indications to optimize furnace design for the reduction of NOx-emissions. The glass melting furnace modelled here is a regenerative horseshoe furnace fired with natural gas. Combustion air is preheated within the regenerator onto a level of temperature of 1650 K. (author)

  9. Dissolution of subglacial volcanic glasses from Iceland: laboratory study and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.-L.; Honnorez, J.; Fritz, B.; Petit, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Subglacial hyaloclastites from Iceland with ages ranging from 2 ka to 2.2 Ma have been studied from a mineralogical and geochemical standpoint. The chemical composition of palagonite (alteration crust formed on the surface of the glass) is almost identical with that of the clayey material filling the intergranular spaces of the rock. The clayey material is made up of two particle populations: the first is Si-, Mg-and Ca-rich with a smectite structure, while the second is amorphous, Fe-, Ti- and Al-rich, and has a smectite-like morphology. It is suggested that these two types of particles can be formed simultaneously, in the same solution, such that it is not necessary to explain their existence by local or temporary equilibria. The mineralogical sequences observed in natural samples were reproduced using the geochemical computer code DISSOL. The geochemical mass balances calculated with DISSOL also fit quite well with those calculated from Icelandic samples, illustrating the predictive capability of such a calculation code and give us confidence in applying a similar approach to nuclear waste-form glass problems. (author)

  10. Glass science tutorial: Lecture number-sign 1, Chemistry and properties of oxide glasses. Professor William C. LaCourse, Lecturer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1994-10-01

    The tutorial covers the following topics: Definitions and terminology; Introduction to glass structure and properties; The glass transition; Structure/property relationships in oxide glasses; Generalized models for predicting structure/properties; Glass surfaces; Chemical durability; and Mechanical properties

  11. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  12. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  13. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  14. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  15. Constructive interference between disordered couplings enhances multiparty entanglement in quantum Heisenberg spin glass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R; Sen, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-01-01

    Disordered systems form one of the centrestages of research in many body sciences and lead to a plethora of interesting phenomena and applications. A paradigmatic disordered system consists of a one-dimensional array of quantum spin-1/2 particles, governed by the Heisenberg spin glass Hamiltonian with natural or engineered quenched disordered couplings in an external magnetic field. These systems allow disorder-induced enhancement for bipartite and multipartite observables. Here we show that simultaneous application of independent quenched disorders results in disorder-induced enhancement, while the same is absent with individual application of the same disorders. We term the phenomenon as constructive interference and the corresponding parameter stretches as the Venus regions. Interestingly, it has only been observed for multiparty entanglement and is absent for the single- and two-party physical quantities. (paper)

  16. Modeling Pair Distribution Functions of Rare-Earth Phosphate Glasses Using Principal Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jacqueline M; Cheng, Xie; Payne, Michael C

    2016-11-07

    The use of principal component analysis (PCA) to statistically infer features of local structure from experimental pair distribution function (PDF) data is assessed on a case study of rare-earth phosphate glasses (REPGs). Such glasses, codoped with two rare-earth ions (R and R') of different sizes and optical properties, are of interest to the laser industry. The determination of structure-property relationships in these materials is an important aspect of their technological development. Yet, realizing the local structure of codoped REPGs presents significant challenges relative to their singly doped counterparts; specifically, R and R' are difficult to distinguish in terms of establishing relative material compositions, identifying atomic pairwise correlation profiles in a PDF that are associated with each ion, and resolving peak overlap of such profiles in PDFs. This study demonstrates that PCA can be employed to help overcome these structural complications, by statistically inferring trends in PDFs that exist for a restricted set of experimental data on REPGs, and using these as training data to predict material compositions and PDF profiles in unknown codoped REPGs. The application of these PCA methods to resolve individual atomic pairwise correlations in t(r) signatures is also presented. The training methods developed for these structural predictions are prevalidated by testing their ability to reproduce known physical phenomena, such as the lanthanide contraction, on PDF signatures of the structurally simpler singly doped REPGs. The intrinsic limitations of applying PCA to analyze PDFs relative to the quality control of source data, data processing, and sample definition, are also considered. While this case study is limited to lanthanide-doped REPGs, this type of statistical inference may easily be extended to other inorganic solid-state materials and be exploited in large-scale data-mining efforts that probe many t(r) functions.

  17. in glass transition region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    compositions of arsenic. An effort has also been made to develop an empirical model for the composition dependence of ∆H. A good agreement has been observed between the experimental values and the results of model calculation. Keywords. Glass transition temperature; activation energy; heat absorbed; composition ...

  18. Structural color from colloidal glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magkiriadou, Sofia

    When a material has inhomogeneities at a lengthscale comparable to the wavelength of light, interference can give rise to structural colors: colors that originate from the interaction of the material's microstructure with light and do not require absorbing dyes. In this thesis we study a class of these materials, called photonic glasses, where the inhomogeneities form a dense and random arrangement. Photonic glasses have angle-independent structural colors that look like those of conventional dyes. However, when this work started, there was only a handful of colors accessible with photonic glasses, mostly hues of blue. We use various types of colloidal particles to make photonic glasses, and we study, both theoretically and experimentally, how the optical properties of these glasses relate to their structure and constituent particles. Based on our observations from glasses of conventional particles, we construct a theoretical model that explains the scarcity of yellow, orange, and red photonic glasses. Guided by this model, we develop novel colloidal systems that allow a higher degree of control over structural color. We assemble glasses of soft, core-shell particles with scattering cores and transparent shells, where the resonant wavelength can be tuned independently of the reflectivity. We then encapsulate glasses of these core-shell particles into emulsion droplets of tunable size; in this system, we observe, for the first time, angle-independent structural colors that cover the entire visible spectrum. To enhance color saturation, we begin experimenting with inverse glasses, where the refractive index of the particles is lower than the refractive index of the medium, with promising results. Finally, based on our theoretical model for scattering from colloidal glasses, we begin an exploration of the color gamut that could be achieved with this technique, and we find that photonic glasses are a promising approach to a new type of long-lasting, non-toxic, and

  19. A Note on the Guerra and Talagrand Theorems for Mean Field Spin Glasses: The Simple Case of Spherical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Silvio; Tria, Francesca

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the main ideas of the Talagrand proof of the Parisi Ansatz for the free-energy of Mean Field Spin Glasses with a physicist's approach. We consider the case of the spherical p-spin model, which has the following advantages: (1) the Parisi Ansatz takes the simple "one step replica symmetry breaking form," (2) the replica free-energy as a function of the order parameters is simple enough to allow for numerical maximization with arbitrary precision. We present the essential ideas of the proof, we stress its connections with the theory of effective potentials for glassy systems, and we reduce the technically more difficult part of the Talagrand's analysis to an explicit evaluation of the solution of a variational problem.

  20. Thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass - long term behavior modeling; Etude de la stabilite thermique du verre nucleaire. Modelisation de son evolution a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlhac, X

    2000-07-01

    The thermal stability of the French nuclear waste glass was investigated experimentally and by modeling to predict its long-term evolution at low temperature. The crystallization mechanisms were analyzed by studying devitrification in the supercooled liquid. Three main crystalline phases were characterized (CaMoO{sub 4}, CeCO{sub 2}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}). Their crystallisation was TO 4.24 wt%, due to the low concentration of the constituent elements. The nucleation and growth curves showed that platinoid elements catalysed nucleation but did not affect growth, which was governed by volume diffusion. The criteria of classic nucleation theory were applied to determine the thermodynamic and diffusional activation energies. Viscosity measurements illustrate the analogy between the activation energy of viscous flow and diffusion, indicating control of crystallization by viscous flow phenomena. The combined action of nucleation and growth was assessed by TTT plots, revealing a crystallization equilibrium line that enables the crystallized fractions to be predicted over the long term. The authors show that hetero-genetics catalyze the transformation without modifying the maximum crystallized fraction. A kinetic model was developed to describe devitrification in the glass based on the nucleation and growth curves alone. The authors show that the low-temperature growth exhibits scale behavior (between time and temperature) similar to thermo-rheological simplicity. The analogy between the resulting activation energy and that of the viscosity was used to model growth on the basis of viscosity. After validation with a simplified (BaO{sub 2}SiO{sub 2}) glass, the model was applied to the containment glass. The result indicated that the glass remained completely vitreous after a cooling scenario with the one measured at the glass core. Under isothermal conditions, several million years would be required to reach the maximum theoretical crystallization fraction. (author)

  1. Influence of chain topology and bond potential on the glass transition of polymer chains simulated with the bond fluctuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, J J [Departamento de Ciencias y Tecnicas FisicoquImicas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jfreire@invi.uned.es

    2008-07-16

    The bond fluctuation model with a bond potential has been applied to investigation of the glass transition of linear chains and chains with a regular disposition of small branches. Cooling and subsequent heating curves are obtained for the chain energies and also for the mean acceptance probability of a bead jump. In order to mimic different trends to vitrification, a factor B gauging the strength of the bond potential with respect to the long-range potential (i.e. the intramolecular or intermolecular potential between indirectly bonded beads) has been introduced. (A higher value of B leads to a preference for the highest bond lengths and a higher total energy, implying a greater tendency to vitrify.) Different cases have been considered for linear chains: no long-range potential, no bond potential and several choices for B. Furthermore, two distinct values of B have been considered for alternate bonds in linear chains. In the case of the branched chains, mixed models with different values of B for bonds in the main chain and in the branches have also been investigated. The possible presence of ordering or crystallization has been characterized by calculating the collective light scattering function of the different samples after annealing at a convenient temperature below the onset of the abrupt change in the curves associated with a thermodynamic transition. It is concluded that ordering is inherited more efficiently in the systems with branched chains and also for higher values of B. The branched molecules with the highest B values in the main chain bonds exhibit two distinct transitions in the heating curves, which may be associated with two glass transitions. This behavior has been detected experimentally for chains with relatively long flexible branches.

  2. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  3. Who will buy smart glasses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauschnabel, Philipp; Brem, Alexander; Ivens, Bjørn S.

    2015-01-01

    of research that investigates the role of personality in predicting media usage by analyzing smart glasses, particularly Google Glass. First, we integrate AR devices into the current evolution of media and technologies. Then, we draw on the Big Five Model of human personality and present the results from two...... studies that investigate the direct and moderating effects of human personality on the awareness and innovation adoption of smart glasses. Our results show that open and emotionally stable consumers tend to be more aware of Google Glass. Consumers who perceive the potential for high functional benefits...

  4. New Erbium Doped Antimony Glasses for Laser and Glass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of the special spectroscopic properties of the rare earth ions, rare earth doped glasses are widely used in bulk and fiber lasers or amplifiers. The modelling of lasers and searching for new laser transitions require a precise knowledge of the spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in different host glasses.

  5. Modeling the Effect of Glass Microballoon (GMB) Volume Fraction on Behavior of Sylgard/GMB Composites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Judith Alice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This work was done to support customer questions about whether a Sylgard/Glass Microballoon (GMB) potting material in current use could be replaced with pure Sylgard and if this would significantly change stresses imparted to internal components under thermal cycling conditions. To address these questions, we provide micromechanics analysis of Sylgard/GMB materials using both analytic composite theory and finite element simulations to better understand the role of the GMB volume fraction in determining thermal expansion coefficient, elastic constants, and behavior in both confined and unconfined compression boundary value problems. A key finding is that damage accumulation in the material from breakage of GMBs significantly limits the global stress magnitude and results in a plateau stress behavior over large ranges of compressive strain. The magnitude of this plateau stress is reduced with higher volume fractions of GMBs. This effect is particularly pronounced in confined compression, which we estimate bears the most similarity to the application of interest. This stress-limiting damage mechanism is not present in pure Sylgard, however, and the result is much higher stresses under confined compression. Thus, we recommend that some volume fraction greater than 10% GMBs be used for confined deformation applications.

  6. An Estimation of Longitudinal Strength Reduction of Unidirectional E-glass/Epoxy Composite Exposed to Sulfuric Acid Using a Micromechanics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Mehrdad Shokrieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new model is proposed in this research to calculate the longitudinal strengthof unidirectional E-glass reinforced polymer composites exposed to sulfuricacid environment, using a micromechanics model. In the proposed method,it is assumed that the residual strength of the degraded composites under acidic environment can be calculated by knowing the degraded strength properties of the constituent materials. In order to measure the properties of the degraded epoxy resins and E-glass fibers, corrosion tests are performed on them when exposed to 5% sulfuric acid for different immersion times. Acid penetration in composites is a time consuming phenomenon. Thus, before the acid reaches to inside region of composites, the degraded composites cross-section can be divided to two regions, namely intact and degraded regions. In this stage, a simple model is suggested to estimate the acid penetration depth in the degraded composites. Based on the corrosion mechanisms of glass fibers, the energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX results of different points of composites cross-section are used to estimate the acid penetration depth in composites. Both the acid penetration depth model and micromechanics model are used to calculate the longitudinal strength of intact and degraded regions for different immersion times. Thus, the longitudinal strength of degraded composites can be calculated. Moreover, some similar unidirectional E-glass/ epoxy composites exposed to sulfuric acid for different immersion times are tested to measure the longitudinal strength of them. The theoretical results are in good agreements with those experimentally measured.

  7. Thermomechanical Modeling of Laser-Induced Structural Relaxation and Deformation of Glass: Volume Changes in Fused Silica at High Temperatures [Thermo-mechanical modeling of laser-induced structural relaxation and deformation of SiO2 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignes, Ryan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Soules, Thomas F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Stolken, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Settgast, Randolph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Elhadj, Selim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Matthews, Manyalibo J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). National Ignition Facility and Photon Sciences; Mauro, J.

    2012-12-17

    In a fully coupled thermomechanical model of the nanoscale deformation in amorphous SiO2 due to laser heating is presented. Direct measurement of the transient, nonuniform temperature profiles was used to first validate a nonlinear thermal transport model. Densification due to structural relaxation above the glass transition point was modeled using the Tool-Narayanaswamy (TN) formulation for the evolution of structural relaxation times and fictive temperature. TN relaxation parameters were derived from spatially resolved confocal Raman scattering measurements of Si–O–Si stretching mode frequencies. These thermal and microstructural data were used to simulate fictive temperatures which are shown to scale nearly linearly with density, consistent with previous measurements from Shelby et al. Volumetric relaxation coupled with thermal expansion occurring in the liquid-like and solid-like glassy states lead to residual stresses and permanent deformation which could be quantified. But, experimental surface deformation profiles between 1700 and 2000 K could only be reconciled with our simulation by assuming a roughly 2 × larger liquid thermal expansion for a-SiO2 with a temperature of maximum density ~150 K higher than previously estimated by Bruckner et al. Calculated stress fields agreed well with recent laser-induced critical fracture measurements, demonstrating accurate material response prediction under processing conditions of practical interest.

  8. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, Agílio A. H.

    2017-05-01

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  9. Scaling of viscous dynamics in simple liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøhling, Lasse; Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Grzybowski, A.

    2012-01-01

    Supercooled liquids are characterized by relaxation times that increase dramatically by cooling or compression. From a single assumption follows a scaling law according to which the relaxation time is a function of h(ρ) over temperature, where ρ is the density and the function h(ρ) depends...... on the liquid in question. This scaling is demonstrated to work well for simulations of the Kob–Andersen binary Lennard-Jones mixture and two molecular models, as well as for the experimental results for two van der Waals liquids, dibutyl phthalate and decahydroisoquinoline. The often used power-law density...... scaling, h(ρ)∝ργ, is an approximation to the more general form of scaling discussed here. A thermodynamic derivation was previously given for an explicit expression for h(ρ) for liquids of particles interacting via the generalized Lennard-Jones potential. Here a statistical mechanics derivation is given...

  10. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  11. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Dan; Olsen, Andreas Elmerdahl; Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework......, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics...... of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles...

  12. Graphene on Cu(111) at the nonzero temperatures: Molecular dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenkov, A. V.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Saletsky, A. M.

    2017-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamic simulation of continuous graphene monolayer on Cu(111). In this paper, we investigate the dependencies of the average binding energy and the average binding distance on the temperature. The interaction between carbon and copper atoms was described by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the binding energy practically remains constant in a wide range of temperatures 0-800 K. However, in the same temperature range, the binding distance of graphene on Cu(111) surface has a linear dependence on temperature. The dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the binding distance on Lennard-Jones parameters has been calculated. We suggest a simple theoretical model to explain this dependence qualitatively.

  13. Contribution to the improved ultrasonic testing of glass fiber-reinforced polymers based on analytic modeling; Beitrag zur Verbesserung der Ultraschallpruefung glasfaserverstaerkter Polymere auf der Grundlage analytischer Modellierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripp, S.

    2001-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of acoustic anisotropic materials like fiber composites has been evaluated. Modelling enabled predictions about wave deflection, direction of wave propagation, and refractive angle of ultrasonic waves in these media. Thus, measurements could be carried out using unidirectional glass-fiber composites.

  14. Influence of Glass Property Restrictions on Hanford HLW Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic evaluation of Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) loading in alkali-alumino-borosilicate glasses was performed. The waste feed compositions used were obtained from current tank waste composition estimates, Hanford's baseline retrieval sequence, and pretreatment processes. The waste feeds were sorted into groups of like composition by cluster analysis. Glass composition optimization was performed on each cluster to meet property and composition constraints while maximizing waste loading. Glass properties were estimated using property models developed for Hanford HLW glasses. The impacts of many constraints on the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford were evaluated. The liquidus temperature, melting temperature, chromium concentration, formation of multiple phases on cooling, and product consistency test response requirements for the glass were varied one- or many-at-a-time and the resultant glass volume was calculated. This study shows clearly that the allowance of crystalline phases in the glass melter can significantly decrease the volume of HLW glass to be produced at Hanford.

  15. Compositional Dependence of Solubility/Retention of Molybdenum Oxides in Aluminoborosilicate-Based Model Nuclear Waste Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehault, Antoine; Patil, Deepak; Kamat, Hrishikesh; Youngman, Randall E; Thirion, Lynn M; Mauro, John C; Corkhill, Claire L; McCloy, John S; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-02-08

    Molybdenum oxides are an integral component of the high-level waste streams being generated from the nuclear reactors in several countries. Although borosilicate glass has been chosen as the baseline waste form by most of the countries to immobilize these waste streams, molybdate oxyanions (MoO 4 2- ) exhibit very low solubility (∼1 mol %) in these glass matrices. In the past three to four decades, several studies describing the compositional and structural dependence of molybdate anions in borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses have been reported in the literature, providing a basis for our understanding of fundamental science that governs the solubility and retention of these species in the nuclear waste glasses. However, there are still several open questions that need to be answered to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that control the solubility and retention of these oxyanions in glassy waste forms. This article is focused on finding answers to two such questions: (1) What are the solubility and retention limits of MoO 3 in aluminoborosilicate glasses as a function of chemical composition? (2) Why is there a considerable increase in the solubility of MoO 3 with incorporation of rare-earth oxides (for example, Nd 2 O 3 ) in aluminoborosilicate glasses? Accordingly, three different series of aluminoborosilicate glasses (compositional complexity being added in a tiered approach) with varying MoO 3 concentrations have been synthesized and characterized for their ability to accommodate molybdate ions in their structure (solubility) and as a glass-ceramic (retention). The contradictory viewpoints (between different research groups) pertaining to the impact of rare-earth cations on the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses are discussed, and their implications on the solubility of MoO 3 in these glasses are evaluated. A novel hypothesis explaining the mechanism governing the solubility of MoO 3 in rare-earth containing aluminoborosilicate

  16. Modeling, Characterization and Analysis of the dynamic behavior of heat transfers through polyethylene and glass walls of Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi-Triki, N.; Bendimerad, S.; Chermiti, A.; Mahdjoub, T.; Draoui, B.; Abène, A.

    The conventional agricultural tunnel greenhouse is highly widespread in Mediterranean countries, despite the shortcomings it presents, specifically the overheating during the day and the intense cooling at night. This can sometimes lead to an internal thermal inversion. The chapel-shaped glass greenhouse is relatively more efficient, but its evolution remains slow because of its investment cost and amortization. The objectives of the agricultural greenhouse are to create a microclimate that is favorable to the requirements and growth of plants from the surrounding climatic conditions and produce cheap off-season fruits, vegetables and flowers which must be highly available all along the year. The agricultural greenhouse is defined by its structural and functional architecture as well as by the optical, thermal and mechanical qualities of its wall and the accompanying technical support. The greenhouse is supposed to be a confined environment where there is an exchange of several components. The main intervening factors are: light, temperature and relative humidity. When protected, the culture heats up more than when in free air because of the wall that acts as a barrier to harmful influences of the wind and the surrounding climatic variations as well as to the reduction in internal air convection. This thermal evolution state depends on the air-tightness degree of the cover and its physical characteristics. It has to be transparent to solar rays, and must as well absorb and reflect infrared rays emitted by the soil. This leads to trapped solar rays, called the "greenhouse effect". In this article, we propose the dynamic modeling of the greenhouse system, the characterization and analysis of the thermal behavior of the wall for both experimental greenhouses, where the first one is made of polyethylene (tunnel greenhouse) and the second of glass (chapel-shaped greenhouse), throughout experimentation and simulation which finally lead to identifying the evolution in the

  17. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  18. Final Report - Enhanced LAW Glass Property - Composition Models - Phase 1 VSL-13R2940-1, Rev. 0, dated 9/27/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Muller, I.; Gilbo, K.; Joseph, I.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-11-13

    The objectives of this work are aimed at the development of enhanced LAW propertycomposition models that expand the composition region covered by the models. The models of interest include PCT, VHT, viscosity and electrical conductivity. This is planned as a multi-year effort that will be performed in phases with the objectives listed below for the current phase.  Incorporate property- composition data from the new glasses into the database.  Assess the database and identify composition spaces in the database that need augmentation.  Develop statistically-designed composition matrices to cover the composition regions identified in the above analysis.  Prepare crucible melts of glass compositions from the statistically-designed composition matrix and measure the properties of interest.  Incorporate the above property-composition data into the database.  Assess existing models against the complete dataset and, as necessary, start development of new models.

  19. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  20. Effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on surface morphology, water sorption, and glass transition temperature of a model infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Grace M; O'Mahony, James A; Kelly, Alan L; O'Callaghan, Donal J

    2016-09-01

    Physical properties of spray-dried dairy powders depend on their composition and physical characteristics. This study investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein on the microstructure and physical stability of dried model infant formula. Model infant formulas were produced containing either intact (DH 0) or hydrolyzed (DH 12) whey protein, where DH=degree of hydrolysis (%). Before spray drying, apparent viscosities of liquid feeds (at 55°C) at a shear rate of 500 s(-1) were 3.02 and 3.85 mPa·s for intact and hydrolyzed infant formulas, respectively. On reconstitution, powders with hydrolyzed whey protein had a significantly higher fat globule size and lower emulsion stability than intact whey protein powder. Lactose crystallization in powders occurred at higher relative humidity for hydrolyzed formula. The Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer equation, fitted to sorption isotherms, showed increased monolayer moisture when intact protein was present. As expected, glass transition decreased significantly with increasing water content. Partial hydrolysis of whey protein in model infant formula resulted in altered powder particle surface morphology, lactose crystallization properties, and storage stability. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER IN AN INSULATED GLASS UNIT (IGU WITH ACCOUNT FOR ITS DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubev Stanislav Sergeevich

    2012-12-01

    The effects of different climatic impacts lead to the deformation of glasses within an IGU (and its vertical cavity, respectively. Deformation of glasses and vertical cavities reduces the thermal resistance of an IGU. A numerical simulation of conjugate heat transfer within an IGU was implemented as part of the research into this phenomenon. Calculations were performed in ANSYS FLUENT CFD package. Basic equations describing the conservation of mass, conservation of momentum (in the Boussinesq approximation, conservation of energy were solved. Also, the radiation of the cavity wall was taken into account. Vertical walls were considered as non-isothermal, while horizontal walls were adiabatic. Calculations were made for several patterns of glass deformations. Calculation results demonstrate that the heat flow over vertical walls intensifies as the distance between centres of IGU glasses is reduced. The temperature in the central area of the hot glass drops.

  2. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius relaxation time of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    -time elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion.......We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short...

  3. Elastic models for the Non-Arrhenius Relaxation Time of Glass-Forming Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    -time elastic properties are all determined by just one effective, temperature-dependent force constant). We finally discuss the connection between the elastic models and two well-established research fields of condensed-matter physics: point defects in crystals and solid-state diffusion.......We first review the phenomenology of viscous liquids and the standard models used for explaining the non-Arrhenius average relaxation time. Then the focus is turned to the so-called elastic models, arguing that these models are all equivalent in the Einstein approximation (where the short...

  4. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length of the ...

  5. Some recent developments in spin glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I give some experimental and theoretical background to spin glasses, and then discuss the nature of the phase transition in spin glasses with vector spins. Results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Heisenberg spin glass model in three dimensions are presented. A finite-size scaling analysis of the correlation length ...

  6. Elastic models for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of glass-forming liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil; Olsen, Niels Boye

    2006-01-01

    This paper first reviews the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of viscous liquids. According to this model the main contribution to the activation energy of a flow event is the energy needed for molecules to shove aside the surrounding, an energy which is proportional to the instantan......This paper first reviews the shoving model for the non-Arrhenius viscosity of viscous liquids. According to this model the main contribution to the activation energy of a flow event is the energy needed for molecules to shove aside the surrounding, an energy which is proportional...... on to review several related explanations for the non-Arrhenius viscosity. Most of these are also ‘elastic models’, i.e., they express the viscosity activation energy in terms of short-time elastic properties of the liquid. Finally, two alternative arguments for elastic models are given, a general solid...

  7. Break-glass handling exceptional situations in access control

    CERN Document Server

    Petritsch, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Helmut Petritsch describes the first holistic approach to Break-Glass which covers the whole life-cycle: from access control modeling (pre-access), to logging the security-relevant system state during Break-Glass accesses (at-access), and the automated analysis of Break-Glass accesses (post-access). Break-Glass allows users to override security restrictions in exceptional situations. While several Break-Glass models specific to given access control models have already been discussed in research (e.g., extending RBAC with Break-Glass), the author introduces a generic Break-Glass model. The pres

  8. Highly optimized simulations on single- and multi-GPU systems of the 3D Ising spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, M.; Bernaschi, M.; Parisi, G.

    2015-11-01

    We present a highly optimized implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulator for the three-dimensional Ising spin-glass model with bimodal disorder, i.e., the 3D Edwards-Anderson model running on CUDA enabled GPUs. Multi-GPU systems exchange data by means of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The chosen MC dynamics is the classic Metropolis one, which is purely dissipative, since the aim was the study of the critical off-equilibrium relaxation of the system. We focused on the following issues: (i) the implementation of efficient memory access patterns for nearest neighbours in a cubic stencil and for lagged-Fibonacci-like pseudo-Random Numbers Generators (PRNGs); (ii) a novel implementation of the asynchronous multispin-coding Metropolis MC step allowing to store one spin per bit and (iii) a multi-GPU version based on a combination of MPI and CUDA streams. Cubic stencils and PRNGs are two subjects of very general interest because of their widespread use in many simulation codes.

  9. A consolidation process model for film-stacking glass/PPS laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko

    2009-01-01

    The applied pressure, processing temperature and holding time influence the consolidation of thermoplastic laminates. A model to optimise the processing parameters is proposed. The influence of heating rate, processing temperature and pressure is investigated. Short textile impregnation times, in

  10. Impact of Redox on Glass Durability: The Glass Selection Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEELER, DAVID

    2004-01-01

    Recent glass formulation activities have focused on developing alternative frit compositions for use with specific sludge batches to maximize melt rate and/or waste throughput. The general trend has been to increase the total alkali content in the glass through the use of a high alkali based frit, a less washed sludge, or a combination of the two. As a result, predictions of durability have become a limiting factor in defining the projected operating windows for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for certain systems. An additional issue for these high alkali glasses has been the effect of REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) on the durability of the glass. Recent analyses have indicated that the application of the durability model's value without consideration of the overall glass composition may lead to a more significant shift (larger magnitude) than needed. Therefore, activation of the REDOX term in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) may have a significant impact on the predicted operational windows based on model predictions, but may not represent the realistic impact on the measured durability. In this report, two specific issues are addressed. First, a review of the data used to develop PCCS (in particular the durability model) showed the potential for a REDOX interaction that is not accounted for. More specifically, three terms were added to the current model and were found to be statistically significant at a confidence level of 95 per cent. These results suggest a possible interaction between REDOX and glass composition that is not accurately captured leading to potentially conservative decisions regarding the durability of reduced glasses. The second issue addressed in this report is the development of a 45 glass test matrix to assess the effect of REDOX on durability as well as to provide insight into specific interactive compositional effects on durability. The glasses were selected to support the assessment of the following specific

  11. On the Mechanical Response of Chopped Glass/Urethane Resin Composite: Data and Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elahi, M.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1999-11-01

    This report presents data on the creep response of a polymeric composite that is a candidate material for automotive applications. The above data were used to establish the basis for the mechanical characterization of the material's response over a wide range of stresses and temperatures, as well as under cyclic loading and due to exposure to distilled water. A constitutive model based upon fundamental principles of irreversible thermodynamics and continuum mechanics was employed to encompass the above mentioned database and to predict the response under more complex inputs. These latter tests verified the validity of the model.

  12. Effect of the initial stage of annealing on modeling of enthalpy relaxation in a hyperquenched glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Guo, Xiaoju; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2013-01-01

    relaxation in both HQG and AHQG during the initial stage of both the sub-Tg and above-Tg annealing cannot be captured by the existing models. In this Letter we show that the combination of a modified stretched exponential equation [M. Peyron, et al., J. Magn. Reson, Series A 118 (1996) 214] and the recently...

  13. An energy landscape model for glass-forming liquids in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Hecksher, Tina; Dyre, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    different densities at several temperatures. At high densities and low temperatures the model captures the important characteristics of viscous liquid dynamics. We thus observe non-exponential relaxation in the self part of the density auto-correlation function, and fragility plots of the self...

  14. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Faure, Florence

    2016-01-01

    The immune system (IS) and the central nervous system (CNS) are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self) of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit) memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e., danger-fear) memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e., the taste of the Proust's madeleine cake) by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model's approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  15. From the Collages and Glass Models of Oteiza to the Concrete of Sáenz de Oíza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma López-Bahut

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Jorge Oteiza Foundation Museum in Alzuza (Navarra, Spain was designed by the architect Francisco Javier Sáenz de Oíza, with the sculptor Jorge Oteiza intervening in the architectural decisions at particular moments. The building marked the conclusion of a series of collaborations between them, beginning in the early 1950s, marked by an intense convergence between art and architecture. The building contains and interacts with the artistic works in a powerful way, but at the same time with great care and awareness, demonstrating the extent to which Sáenz de Oíza understood the sculptural work of Oteiza. This article explores the connection between the museum (2003 and the artistic experiments of the sculptor in pieces called “Light Wall” (1956, made using glass models and collages whose main references are the Suprematist paintings of Malevich. Sáenz de Oíza made use of Oteiza’s artistic concept, which took shape in the fabric of the architecture. Le Corbusier’s chapel in Ronchamp serves as a bridge between their ideas, a reference found in Oteiza’s sculptural experiments and in his text Experimental Proposal (1957 and in the architecture proposed by Sáenz de Oíza for the museum.

  16. Tissue adhesion to bioactive glass-coated silicone tubing in a rat model of peritoneal dialysis catheters and catheter tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Edward A; Batich, Christopher D; Clapp, William L; Sallustio, Judith E; Lee, Nadeen C

    2003-02-01

    Silicone peritoneal dialysis catheters do not develop tissue ingrowth, lack a mechanical barrier to periluminal bacterial migration and need cuffs for anchorage. We hypothesized that a bioactive glass coating composed of silicon, calcium, sodium and phosphorous oxides would cause a beneficial tissue reaction causing catheter adhesion, and tested this in a rat model. A hexane solvent-based method of coating silicone tubes with Bioglass powder was used, which maintained flexibility, and then the ultrastructure was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy (EM). Segments 2.5 cm were implanted subcutaneously in 8 Sprague-Dawley rats, with uncoated tubes as a contralateral control, and histology was done at 2, 4 and 6 weeks, including special stains and EM. The uncoated segments grossly had no adherence to surrounding tissue, and were physically separate from a thin fibrous capsule of approximately 50 micro width. Trichrome stains demonstrated the capsule was rich in collagen. There was minimal adjacent tissue reaction. In contrast, the coated tubes were palpably fixed to the soft tissues, and sections demonstrated an adjacent prominent layer of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Small numbers of lymphocytes were noted. This cellular reaction increased over the 6-week implant duration, and was also associated with neovascularization of the tissue adjacent to the segments (33 vessels in coated vs. 20 in controls per x 200 field, P tubing by promoting adhesion by collagen and cell proliferation, and are promising for future studies of peritoneal dialysis catheters.

  17. A Four-Site Molecular Model for Simulations of Liquid Methanol and Water-Methanol Mixtures: MeOH-4P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jiménez, Manuel; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2018-04-17

    In this work, we present a new four-site potential for methanol, MeOH-4P, fitted to reproduce the dielectric constant ε, the surface tension γ s , and the liquid density ρ of the pure liquid at T = 298.15 K and p = 1 bar. The partial charges on each site were taken from the OPLS/2016 model with the only difference of putting the negative charge on the fourth site ( M) instead of on the O atom, as done in four-site water models. The original Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of OPLS/2016 for the methyl moiety (Me) were modified for the fitting of ρ and γ s , whereas the parameters of the TIP4P-FB water model were used for the O atom without change. Taking into account the energetic cost of the enhanced dipole relative to the isolated molecule, the results from simulations with this model showed good agreement with experiments for ρ, α p , κ T , C p , and Δ H v- l . Also, the temperature dependence of γ s and ε is satisfactory in the interval between 260 and 360 K, and the critical point description is similar to that of OPLS/2016. It is shown that orientational correlations, described by the Kirkwood factor G k , play a prominent role in the appropriate description of dielectric constants in existing models; unfortunately, the enhancement of the dipole moment produced a low diffusion coefficient D MeOH ; thus, a compromise was required between a good reproduction of ε and an acceptable D MeOH . The use of a fourth site resulted in a significant improvement for water-methanol mixtures described with TIP4P-FB and MeOH-4P, respectively, but required the modification of the LJ geometric combination rule to allow a good description of the methanol molar-fraction dependence of ρ, ε, and methanol (water) diffusion coefficients D MeOH ( D H 2 O ) and excess volume of mixing Δ V mix in the entire range of composition. The resulting free energy of hydration Δ G hyd shows excellent agreement with experiments in the interval between 280 and 360 K.

  18. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  19. INORGANIC PHOSPHORS IN GLASS BASED ON LEAD SILICATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Aseev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We created and synthesized luminescent composite of the "phosphor in glass" type, based on the lead-silicate matrix and fine-dispersed powder of cerium-activated yttrium-aluminum garnet crystal. Lead-silicate system (40SiO2- 20PbO-(40-x PbF2-xAlF3, x = 0-25 was chosen as the glassy matrix. Initial glass was reduced to powder (frit for "phosphor in glass" composite with a particle size about 50 µm. Glass frit and powder of commercial YAG:Ce3+ phosphor were mixed in a ratio of 30 to 70 (wt %. Then this composite was pressed in a tablet and sintered on a quartz substrate at 823 К for 30 minutes. Thus, the plane parallel sheet for composite of the "phosphor in glass" was obtained with a diameter equal to 10 mm. For the purpose to reduce the loss of light in the presence of dispersion at a glass-phosphor boundary, optimization of glass mixture was done by adjusting the refractive index. X-ray phase and spectral-luminescent analysis of the derived composite were done. The results of these studies showed that there was no degradation of YAG: Ce powder during sintering. Dependence of luminescence intensity from temperature in the range from room temperature to 473 К was studied. It was shown, that with the phosphor in glass usage thermal quenching of luminescence was reduced in comparison with the silicone. The model of white LED was created with the "phosphor in glass" composite based on lead-silicate glasses with low temperature of vitrifying. The derived LED emits white light with a color temperature of 4370 K, and the luminous efficiency is equal to 58 lm/W. The developed luminescent composite based on the lead-silicate matrix can be used for the production of high-power white light LED.

  20. Mold-filling experiments for validation of modeling encapsulation. Part 1, "wine glass" mold.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Altobelli, Stephen A. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2005-06-01

    The C6 project 'Encapsulation Processes' has been designed to obtain experimental measurements for discovery of phenomena critical to improving these processes, as well as data required in the verification and validation plan (Rao et al. 2001) for model validation of flow in progressively complex geometries. We have observed and recorded the flow of clear, Newtonian liquids and opaque, rheologically complex suspensions in two mold geometries. The first geometry is a simple wineglass geometry in a cylinder and is reported here in Part 1. The results in a more realistic encapsulation geometry are reported in Part 2.

  1. Joints in Tempered Glass Using Glass Dowel Discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    One of the major reasons for using glass in structures is its transparency; however, traditional mechanical joints such as friction joints and steel dowel pinned connections are compromising the transparency. The present paper describes a novel joint which is practically maintaining the complete...... transparency of the glass. This is achieved by using a dowel disc made entirely of tempered glass. The concept of the joint is proved by pilot tests and numerical models. From the work it is seen that the load-carrying capacity of such a connection is similar to what is found for traditionally in-plane loaded...

  2. Analysis of the Glass-Forming Ability of Fe-Er Alloys, Based on Thermodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunyan, N. A.; Zaitsev, A. I.; Dunaev, S. F.; Kalmykov, K. B.; El'nyakov, D. D.; Shaposhnikov, N. G.

    2018-05-01

    The Fe-Er phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of all its phases are assessed by means of self-consistent analysis. To refine the data on phase equilibria in the Fe-Er system, an investigation is performed in the 10-40 at % range of Er concentrations. The temperature-concentration dependences of the thermodynamic properties of a melt are presented using the model of ideal associated solutions. Thermodynamic parameters of each phase are obtained, and the calculated results are in agreement with available experimental data. The correlation between the thermodynamic properties of liquid Fe-Er alloys and their tendency toward amorphization are studied. It is shown that compositions of amorphous alloys prepared by melt quenching coincide with the ranges of concentration with the predominance of Fe3Er and FeEr2 associative groups that have large negative entropies of formation.

  3. Negative differential mobility of weakly driven particles in models of glass formers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack, Robert L.; Kelsey, David; Garrahan, Juan P.; Chandler, David

    2008-04-01

    We study the response of probe particles to weak constant driving in kinetically constrained models of glassy systems, and show that the probe's response can be non-monotonic and give rise to negative differential mobility: increasing the applied force can reduce the probe's drift velocity in the force direction. Other significant non-linear effects are also demonstrated, such as the enhancement with increasing force of the probe's fluctuations away from the average path, a phenomenon known in other contexts as giant diffusivity. We show that these results can be explained analytically by a continuous-time random walk approximation where there is decoupling between persistence and exchange times for local displacements of the probe. This decoupling is due to dynamic heterogeneity in the glassy system, which also leads to bimodal distributions of probe particle displacements. We discuss the relevance of our results to experiments.

  4. The Predictive Power of Electronic Polarizability for Tailoring the Refractivity of High Index Glasses Optical Basicity Versus the Single Oscillator Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Carlie, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    Four compositions of high density (~8 g/cm3) heavy metal oxide glasses composed of PbO, Bi2O3, and Ga2O3 were produced and refractivity parameters (refractive index and density) were computed and measured. Optical basicity was computed using three different models – average electronegativity, ionic-covalent parameter, and energy gap – and the basicity results were used to compute oxygen polarizability and subsequently refractive index. Refractive indices were measured in the visible and infrared at 0.633 μm, 1.55 μm, 3.39 μm, 5.35 μm, 9.29 μm, and 10.59 μm using a unique prism coupler setup, and data were fitted to the Sellmeier expression to obtain an equation of the dispersion of refractive index with wavelength. Using this dispersion relation, single oscillator energy, dispersion energy, and lattice energy were determined. Oscillator parameters were also calculated for the various glasses from their oxide values as an additional means of predicting index. Calculated dispersion parameters from oxides underestimate the index by 3 to 4%. Predicted glass index from optical basicity, based on component oxide energy gaps, underpredicts the index at 0.633 μm by only 2%, while other basicity scales are less accurate. The predicted energy gap of the glasses based on this optical basicity overpredicts the Tauc optical gap as determined by transmission measurements by 6 to 10%. These results show that for this system, density, refractive index in the visible, and energy gap can be reasonably predicted using only composition, optical basicity values for the constituent oxides, and partial molar volume coefficients. Calculations such as these are useful for a priori prediction of optical properties of glasses.

  5. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy With Yttrium-90 Glass Microspheres: Biases and Uncertainties in Absorbed Dose Calculations Between Clinical Dosimetry Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Justin K; Mahvash, Armeen; Siman, Wendy; Baladandayuthapani, Veera; Mourtada, Firas; Kappadath, S Cheenu

    2016-11-15

    To quantify differences that exist between dosimetry models used for 90 Y selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). Retrospectively, 37 tumors were delineated on 19 post-therapy quantitative 90 Y single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography scans. Using matched volumes of interest (VOIs), absorbed doses were reported using 3 dosimetry models: glass microsphere package insert standard model (SM), partition model (PM), and Monte Carlo (MC). Univariate linear regressions were performed to predict mean MC from SM and PM. Analysis was performed for 2 subsets: cases with a single tumor delineated (best case for PM), and cases with multiple tumors delineated (typical clinical scenario). Variability in PM from the ad hoc placement of a single spherical VOI to estimate the entire normal liver activity concentration for tumor (T) to nontumoral liver (NL) ratios (TNR) was investigated. We interpreted the slope of the resulting regression as bias and the 95% prediction interval (95%PI) as uncertainty. MC NL single represents MC absorbed doses to the NL for the single tumor patient subset; other combinations of calculations follow a similar naming convention. SM was unable to predict MC T single or MC T multiple (p>.12, 95%PI >±177 Gy). However, SM single was able to predict (p<.012) MC NL single , albeit with large uncertainties; SM single and SM multiple yielded biases of 0.62 and 0.71, and 95%PI of ±40 and ± 32 Gy, respectively. PM T single and PM T multiple predicted (p<2E-6) MC T single and MC T multiple with biases of 0.52 and 0.54, and 95%PI of ±38 and ± 111 Gy, respectively. The TNR variability in PM T single increased the 95%PI for predicting MC T single (bias = 0.46 and 95%PI = ±103 Gy). The TNR variability in PM T multiple modified the bias when predicting MC T multiple (bias = 0.32 and 95%PI = ±110 Gy). The SM is unable to predict mean MC tumor absorbed dose. The PM is statistically correlated with mean MC, but the

  6. Glass packages in interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  7. Retrieving infinite numbers of patterns in a spin-glass model of immune networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, E.; Annibale, A.; Barra, A.; Coolen, A. C. C.; Tantari, D.

    2017-01-01

    The similarity between neural and (adaptive) immune networks has been known for decades, but so far we did not understand the mechanism that allows the immune system, unlike associative neural networks, to recall and execute a large number of memorized defense strategies in parallel. The explanation turns out to lie in the network topology. Neurons interact typically with a large number of other neurons, whereas interactions among lymphocytes in immune networks are very specific, and described by graphs with finite connectivity. In this paper we use replica techniques to solve a statistical mechanical immune network model with “coordinator branches” (T-cells) and “effector branches” (B-cells), and show how the finite connectivity enables the coordinators to manage an extensive number of effectors simultaneously, even above the percolation threshold (where clonal cross-talk is not negligible). A consequence of its underlying topological sparsity is that the adaptive immune system exhibits only weak ergodicity breaking, so that also spontaneous switch-like effects as bi-stabilities are present: the latter may play a significant role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis.

  8. The molten glass sewing machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, P.-T.; Inamura, Chikara; Lizardo, Daniel; Franchin, Giorgia; Stern, Michael; Houk, Peter; Oxman, Neri

    2017-04-01

    We present a fluid-instability-based approach for digitally fabricating geometrically complex uniformly sized structures in molten glass. Formed by mathematically defined and physically characterized instability patterns, such structures are produced via the additive manufacturing of optically transparent glass, and result from the coiling of an extruded glass thread. We propose a minimal geometrical model-and a methodology-to reliably control the morphology of patterns, so that these building blocks can be assembled into larger structures with tailored functionally and optically tunable properties. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications'.

  9. Markov state modeling and dynamical coarse-graining via discrete relaxation path sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fačkovec, B; Vanden-Eijnden, E; Wales, D J

    2015-07-28

    A method is derived to coarse-grain the dynamics of complex molecular systems to a Markov jump process (MJP) describing how the system jumps between cells that fully partition its state space. The main inputs are relaxation times for each pair of cells, which are shown to be robust with respect to positioning of the cell boundaries. These relaxation times can be calculated via molecular dynamics simulations performed in each cell separately and are used in an efficient estimator for the rate matrix of the MJP. The method is illustrated through applications to Sinai billiards and a cluster of Lennard-Jones discs.

  10. Amorphous gauge glass theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Bennett, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    Assuming that a lattice gauge theory describes a fundamental attribute of Nature, it should be pointed out that such a theory in the form of a gauge glass is a weaker assumption than a regular lattice model in as much as it is not constrained by the imposition of translational invariance; translational invariance is, however, recovered approximately in the long wavelength or continuum limit. (orig./WL)

  11. Modeling study on the thermal performance of a modified cavity receiver with glass window and secondary reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Huawei; Duan, Chen; Wen, Ke; Liu, Yuting; Xiang, Can; Wan, Zhongmin; He, Sinian; Jing, Changwei; Shu, Shuiming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A modified cavity receiver with glass window and secondary reflector is presented. • Optical and thermal performance of the modified cavity receiver is investigated. • Effects of glass window and secondary reflector are analyzed with comparison study. - Abstract: The development of a cavity receiver for a 1 kW beta type solar Stirling engine is presented in this work. The proposed receiver is composed of an additional quartz glass window and a secondary reflector aiming at improving the thermal performance. Monte-Carlo ray-tracing method is adopted to study the optical property and calculate radiative exchange factors of the solar collector system. The results show that the radiation flux sent to the proposed cavity receiver is 5003 W, and the optical efficiency of this receiver is 70.8%. Numerical simulation is conducted to investigate the thermal performance of this modified receiver. The proposed receiver is also compared with other three simulated receivers combining the presence and absence of the quartz glass window and the secondary reflector. The numerical simulation results show that the modified receiver with both quartz glass window and secondary trumpet reflector outperformed other designs, and its heat loss is reduced about 56% compared to the initial receiver without both quartz glass window and secondary reflector. Hence, the impact factors on the modified receiver radiation and convection heat transfer are well analyzed including temperature, the inner surface orientation and emissivity. The research indicates that the proposed cavity receiver can efficiently reduce the heat loss from cavity and is suitable for Stirling engine applications.

  12. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul (Monofrax Inc., Falconer, NY); Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward (ANH Refractories, Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Marin, Ovidiu () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL)

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  13. Atomic-scale models of early-stage alkali depletion and SiO2-rich gel formation in bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2015-01-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Na(+)/H(+)-exchanged 45S5 Bioglass® models reveal that a large fraction of the hydroxyl groups introduced into the proton-exchanged, hydrated glass structure do not initially form covalent bonds with Si and P network formers but remain free and stabilised by the modifier metal cations, whereas substantial Si-OH and P-OH bonding is observed only at higher Na(+)/H(+) exchange levels. The strong affinity between free OH groups and modifier cations in the highly fragmented 45S5 glass structure appears to represent the main driving force for this effect. This suggests an alternative direct route for the formation of a repolymerised silica-rich gel in the early stages of the bioactive mechanism, not considered before, which does not require sequential repeated breakings of Si-O-Si bonds and silanol condensations.

  14. Local order and crystallization of dense polydisperse hard spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ozawa, Misaki; Berthier, Ludovic

    2018-04-01

    Computer simulations give precious insight into the microscopic behavior of supercooled liquids and glasses, but their typical time scales are orders of magnitude shorter than the experimentally relevant ones. We recently closed this gap for a class of models of size polydisperse fluids, which we successfully equilibrate beyond laboratory time scales by means of the swap Monte Carlo algorithm. In this contribution, we study the interplay between compositional and geometric local orders in a model of polydisperse hard spheres equilibrated with this algorithm. Local compositional order has a weak state dependence, while local geometric order associated to icosahedral arrangements grows more markedly but only at very high density. We quantify the correlation lengths and the degree of sphericity associated to icosahedral structures and compare these results to those for the Wahnström Lennard-Jones mixture. Finally, we analyze the structure of very dense samples that partially crystallized following a pattern incompatible with conventional fractionation scenarios. The crystal structure has the symmetry of aluminum diboride and involves a subset of small and large particles with size ratio approximately equal to 0.5.

  15. Crystallization In Multicomponent Glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  16. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  17. Impact Strength of Glass and Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, S.; Tolman, J.

    2009-12-01

    Strength of glass and glass ceramic was measured with a bar impact technique. High-speed movies show regions of tensile and compressive failure. The borosilicate glass had a compressive strength of at least 2.2 GPa, and the glass ceramic at least 4 GPa. However, the BSG was much stronger in tension than GC. In ballistic tests, the BSG was the superior armor.

  18. High-temperature mass spectrometric study and modeling of thermodynamic properties of binary glass-forming systems containing Bi2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarova, V L; Shilov, A L; Lopatin, S I; Shugurov, S M

    2014-04-15

    Binary glass-forming systems containing bismuth(III) oxide, especially the Bi2O3-SiO2 system, are of great importance in modern materials science: preparation of thin films, fiber optics, potential solar converters, and radiation shields in nuclear physics. Information on vaporization processes and thermodynamic properties obtained in the present study and the results of modeling of this system will be useful for optimization of the synthesis and applications of Bi2O3-containing materials at high temperatures. High-temperature Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry was used to study the vaporization processes and to determine the partial pressures of components of the Bi2O3-SiO2 system. Measurements were performed with a MS-1301 mass spectrometer. Vaporization was carried out using two iridium-plated molybdenum effusion cells containing the sample under study and pure bismuth(III) oxide (reference substance). Modeling of the thermodynamic properties and structure of glasses and melts in the Bi2O3-SiO2 and Bi2O3-B2O3 systems was performed using a modified approach based on the generalized lattice theory of associated solutions (GLTAS). At a temperature of 1000 K, Bi and O2 were found to be the main vapor species over the samples studied. The Bi2O3 activity as a function of composition of the Bi2O3-SiO2 system was obtained from the measured partial pressures of the vapor species. The thermodynamic properties of mixing from oxides in this system were calculated. The advantages of GLTAS for modeling of glasses and melts in the binary systems containing Bi2O3 were demonstrated. The thermodynamic functions of mixing in glasses and melts of the Bi2O3-SiO2 system determined at 1000 K in the present study, as well as in the Bi2O3-B2O3 system, demonstrated negative deviations from ideality. Modeling of the obtained experimental data using GLTAS allowed a correlation to be found between the thermodynamic properties and the relative number of bonds of various types formed in

  19. A Decision-Making Model for Analysing How the Glass Ceiling Is Maintained: Unblocking Equal Promotion Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Martin; Saunders, Mark N. K.

    1995-01-01

    Widespread structural gender inequality and job segregation still exist. The glass ceiling is maintained by a combination of both organizational barriers and individual choices. Individual decisions about working toward promotion are colored by their perceptions of the value of the rewards and the climate of the organization. (SK)

  20. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  1. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DEFENSE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS DEGRADATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the analyses that were done to develop models for radionuclide release from high-level waste (HLW) glass dissolution that can be integrated into performance assessment (PA) calculations conducted to support site recommendation and license application for the Yucca Mountain site. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M andO 2000a). It specifically addresses the item, ''Defense High Level Waste Glass Degradation'', of the product technical work plan. The AP-3.15Q Attachment 1 screening criteria determines the importance for its intended use of the HLW glass model derived herein to be in the category ''Other Factors for the Postclosure Safety Case-Waste Form Performance'', and thus indicates that this factor does not contribute significantly to the postclosure safety strategy. Because the release of radionuclides from the glass will depend on the prior dissolution of the glass, the dissolution rate of the glass imposes an upper bound on the radionuclide release rate. The approach taken to provide a bound for the radionuclide release is to develop models that can be used to calculate the dissolution rate of waste glass when contacted by water in the disposal site. The release rate of a particular radionuclide can then be calculated by multiplying the glass dissolution rate by the mass fraction of that radionuclide in the glass and by the surface area of glass contacted by water. The scope includes consideration of the three modes by which water may contact waste glass in the disposal system: contact by humid air, dripping water, and immersion. The models for glass dissolution under these contact modes are all based on the rate expression for aqueous dissolution of borosilicate glasses. The mechanism and rate expression for aqueous dissolution are adequately understood; the analyses in this AMR were conducted to

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  4. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of the insoluble phases in the nuclear waste glasses. Application to the vitrification of molybdenum and of platinoid fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    After the dissolution of the used fuel and the separation of several elements by the Purex process, the high level nuclear wastes composed of fission products and minor actinides are reprocessed and vitrified in nuclear glasses at AREVA La Hague plant. Some of the fission products precipitate: they are not solubilized in the glass matrix. On the one hand, depending on the oxygen potential of the glass melt, the platinoid elements Pd-Ru-Rh form complex solid oxide phases or intermetallic compounds containing chalcogen elements such as selenium and tellurium. On the other hand, the molybdenum forms only oxide phases. It reacts strongly with the oxide phases present in the glass melt to form molybdate phases able to solubilise other elements like lanthanides. These phases can locally precipitate for a high load in molybdenum. Nevertheless, the formation of the molybdate phases has to remain transient. In this thesis, the thermodynamics of the chemical Systems containing the platinoid elements Pd-Rh-Ru and the chalcogen elements Se and Te were experimentally investigated. The Systems containing the platinoids were studied by DTA, DSC, Tian-Calvet drop calorimetry and by annealing. For the Systems containing the molybdenum, the interactions between MoO 3 and the main oxides composing the glass (Na 2 O, SiO 2 , MoO 3 and CaO) were studied by high temperature XRD. In the meantime, the thermodynamics of these chemical Systems was modeled with the Calphad method so as to be able to predict the crystallization phenomena of molybdenum and of the platinoids. The ternary Systems Ru-Rh-O and Pd-Se-Te were optimized to understand the platinoids thermochemistry. The Systems CaO-MoO 3 , Na 2 O-MoO 3 and Na 2 MoO 4 -CaMoO 4 were modeled to assess the thermodynamics of the molybdate phases. Moreover, the Systems Na 2 0 - SiO 2 and Na 2 O-SiO 2 -MoO 3 were optimized to describe the interaction between the molybdate phases and the glass melt. These modelling allow to perform

  6. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  7. Are the dynamics of silicate glasses and glass-forming liquids embedded in their elastic properties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    According to the elastic theory of the glass transition, the dynamics of glasses and glass-forming liquids are controlled by the evolution of shear modulus. In particular, the elastic shoving model expresses dynamics in terms of an activation energy required to shove aside the surrounding atoms......, which is determined by the shear modulus. First, we here present an in situ high-temperature Brillouin spectroscopy test of the shoving model near the glass transition of eight aluminosilicate glass-forming systems. We find that the measured viscosity data agree qualitatively with the measured...... temperature dependence of shear moduli, as predicted by the shoving model. However, the model systematically underpredicts the values of fragility. Second, we also present a thorough test of the shoving model for predicting the low temperature dynamics of an aluminosilicate glass system. This is done...

  8. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels; Etude du gel d`alteration des verres nucleaires et synthese de gels modeles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-10-05

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Static corrosion of radioactive glass at 400C and corrosion of radioactive glass under dynamic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The goals of the project were to establish to what extent results obtained on non-radioactive glass are applicable to real waste glasses and also to develop a basis for understanding the effects of the components in the waste package on the glass dissolution behaviour as well as to obtain basic data on the temperature dependence of dissolution and the glass behaviour under flow conditions. Based on the results from these initial three phases, a model for predicting the dissolution behaviour of highly radioactive glass under realistic conditions in a granitic repository is being developed and refined. (orig./PW)

  10. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model

  11. Material Removal Rate for Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) of Optical Glasses with Nanodiamond MR Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; Wilson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-07-13

    We present a material removal rate model for MRF of optical glasses using nanodiamond MR fluid. The new model incorporates terms for drag force, polishing particle properties, chemical durability and glass composition into an existing model that contains only terms for the glass mechanical properties. Experimental results for six optical glasses are given that support this model.

  12. Characterization and modeling of 2D-glass micro-machining by spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) with constant velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Dolatabadi, Ali; Wüthrich, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) is an unconventional micro-machining technology based on electrochemical discharge used for micro-machining nonconductive materials. SACE 2D micro-machining with constant speed was used to machine micro-channels in glass. Parameters affecting the quality and geometry of the micro-channels machined by SACE technology with constant velocity were presented and the effect of each of the parameters was assessed. The effect of chemical etching on the geometry of micro-channels under different machining conditions has been studied, and a model is proposed for characterization of the micro-channels as a function of machining voltage and applied speed

  13. Reference document on the long life behavior of nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.

    2004-01-01

    This document exposes the scientific analysis of the operational modelizations concerning the behavior of glasses (C wastes) for the long time storage and for the retrieval or ultimate underground disposal. The scientific approach adopted to establish the behavior of glasses uses a methodology, a strategy and defined approaches, described in this document. The containment glasses specifications, the glass behavior dry or in non saturated open environment, the glass behavior in aqueous environment, predictions models of glasses alteration and elements of validation are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  14. Comment on “A model for phosphate glass topology considering the modifying ion sub-network” [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidebottom, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper, Hermansen, Mauro, and Yue [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154501 (2014)] applied the temperature-dependent constraint theory to model both the glass transition temperature, T g , and fragility, m, of a series of binary alkali phosphate glasses of the form (R 2 O) x (P 2 O 5 ) 1−x , where R represents an alkali species. Key to their success seems to be the retention of linear constraints between the alkali ion (R + ) and the non-bridging oxygens near T g , which allows the model to mimic a supposed minimum for both T g (x) and m(x) located near x = 0.2. However, the authors have overlooked several recent studies that clearly show there is no minimum in m(x). We argue that the retention of the alkali ion constraints at these temperatures is unjustified and question whether the model calculations can be revised to meet the actual experimental data. We also discuss alternative interpretations for the fragility based on two-state thermodynamics that can accurately account for its compositional dependence

  15. Strong pressure-energy correlations in van der Waals liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    in the crystal and glass phases reflect an effective inverse power-law repulsive potential dominating fluctuations, even at zero and slightly negative pressure. In experimental data for supercritical argon, the correlations are found to be approximately 96%. Consequences for viscous liquid dynamics are discussed.......Strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of the configurational parts of pressure and energy are found in computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid and other simple liquids, but not for hydrogen-bonding liquids such as methanol and water. The correlations that are present also...

  16. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  17. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  18. Modelling of nuclear glasses by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics; Modelisation de verres intervenant dans le conditionnement des dechets radioactifs par dynamiques moleculaires classique et ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganster, P

    2004-10-15

    A calcium aluminosilicate glass of molar composition 67 % SiO{sub 2} - 12 % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 21 % CaO was modelled by classical and ab initio molecular dynamics. The size effect study in classical MD shows that the systems of 100 atoms are more ordered than the larger ones. These effects are mainly due to the 3-body terms in the empirical potentials. Nevertheless, these effects are small and the structures generated are in agreement with experimental data. In such kind of glass, we denote an aluminium avoidance and an excess of non bridging oxygens which can be compensated by tri coordinated oxygens. When the dynamics of systems of 100 and 200 atoms is followed by ab initio MD, some local arrangements occurs (bond length, angular distributions). Thus, more realistic vibrational properties are obtained in ab initio MD. The modelling of thin films shows that aluminium atoms extend to the most external part of the surface and they are all tri-coordinated. Calcium atoms are set in the sub layer part of the surface and they produce a depolymerization of the network. In classical MD, tri-coordinated aluminium atoms produce an important electric field above the surface. With non bridging oxygens, they constitute attractive sites for single water molecules. (author)

  19. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  20. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  1. Microstructuring of glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Hülsenberg, Dagmar; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    As microstructured glass becomes increasingly important for microsystems technology, the main application fields include micro-fluidic systems, micro-analysis systems, sensors, micro-actuators and implants. And, because glass has quite distinct properties from silicon, PMMA and metals, applications exist where only glass devices meet the requirements. The main advantages of glass derive from its amorphous nature, the precondition for its - theoretically - direction-independent geometric structurability. Microstructuring of Glasses deals with the amorphous state, various glass compositions and their properties, the interactions between glasses and the electromagnetic waves used to modify it. Also treated in detail are methods for influencing the geometrical microstructure of glasses by mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and electrical treatment, and the methods and equipment required to produce actual microdevices.

  2. Measurement of optical glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau-Rebigan, S.

    1978-11-01

    The possibilities of measurement of the optical glasses parameters needed in building optical devices especially in lasers devices are presented. In the first chapter the general features of the main optical glasses as well as the modalities of obtaining them are given. Chapter two defines the optical glass parameters, and the third chapter describes the measuring methods of the optical glass parameters. Finally, the conclusions which point out the utilization of this paper are presented. (author)

  3. Technique for Machining Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Process for machining glass with conventional carbide tools requires a small quantity of a lubricant for aluminum applied to area of glass to be machined. A carbide tool is then placed against workpiece with light pressure. Tool is raised periodically to clear work of glass dust and particles. Additional lubricant is applied as it is displaced.

  4. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  5. Experimental study and modeling of gas diffusion through partially water saturated porous media. Application to Vycor glasses, geo-polymers and CEM V cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boher, C.

    2012-01-01

    This work documents the relationship that exists between the transfer properties of a material (pore size distribution, total porosity accessible to water, water saturation degree), and its diffusion coefficient. For this sake, materials having a quasi mono modal porosity are used: Vycor glasses and geo-polymers. We also use materials having a complex porosity: CEM V cement pastes. The use of Vycor glasses and geo-polymers allows quantifying the gas diffusion coefficient through materials having known pores size, as a function of their water saturation degree. The use of cement pastes allows checking if it is possible to decompose the diffusion coefficient of a complex porosity material, in an assembling of diffusion coefficients of quasi mono modal porosity materials. For this sake, the impact of pore network arrangement on the diffusion coefficient is studied in great details. This study is divided into three parts:1)Measurement of the geometric characteristics of materials porous network by means of the mercury intrusion porosimetry, water porosimetry, isotherms of nitrogen sorption / desorption, and water desorption tests. 2) Measurement of the materials diffusion coefficient, as a function of their relative humidity storage, and their water saturation degree. 3) Modeling the diffusion coefficient of the materials, and study the impact of the pore network (tortuosity, pores connection). (author) [fr

  6. Laboratory-scale vitrification and leaching of Hanford high-level waste for the purpose of simulant and glass property models validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Elliott, M.L.; Tingey, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being built to process the high-level and TRU waste into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Testing programs have been established within the Project to verify process technology using simulated waste. A parallel testing program with actual radioactive waste is being performed to confirm the validity of using simulates and glass property models for waste form qualification and process testing. The first feed type to be processed by and the first to be tested on a laboratory-scale is pretreated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). The NCAW is a neutralized high-level waste stream generated from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant at Hanford. As part of the fuel reprocessing, the high-level waste generated in PUREX was denitrated with sugar to form current acid waste (CAW). Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite were added to the CAW to minimize corrosion in the tanks, thus yielding neutralized CAW. The NCAW contains small amounts of plutonium, fission products from the irradiated fuel, stainless steel corrosion products, and iron and sulfate from the ferrous sulfamate reductant used in the PUREX process. This paper will discuss the results and status of the laboratory-scale radioactive testing

  7. Ab initio molecular dynamics model for density, elastic properties and short range order of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glass thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostert, C; Music, D; Schneider, J M; Bednarcik, J; Keckes, J; Kapaklis, V; Hjörvarsson, B

    2011-01-01

    Density, elastic modulus and the pair distribution function of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glasses were obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and measured for sputtered thin films using x-ray reflectivity, nanoindentation and x-ray diffraction using high energy photons. The computationally obtained density of 8.19 g cm -3 for Co 43 Fe 20 Ta 5.5 B 31.5 and 8.42 g cm -3 for Co 45.5 Fe 24 Ta 6 B 24.5 , as well as the Young’s moduli of 273 and 251 GPa, respectively, are consistent with our experiments and literature data. These data, together with the good agreement between the theoretical and the experimental pair distribution functions, indicate that the model established here is useful to describe the density, elasticity and short range order of Co-Fe-Ta-B metallic glass thin films. Irrespective of the investigated variation in chemical composition, (Co, Fe)-B cluster formation and Co-Fe interactions are identified by density-of-states analysis. Strong bonds within the structural units and between the metallic species may give rise to the comparatively large stiffness. (paper)

  8. Diaplectic quartz glass and SiO2 melt experimentally generated at only 5 GPa shock pressure in porous sandstone: Laboratory observations and meso-scale numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitz, A.; Güldemeister, N.; Reimold, W. U.; Schmitt, R. T.; Wünnemann, K.

    2013-12-01

    A combination of shock recovery experiments and numerical modeling of shock deformation in the low pressure range from 2.5 to 17.5 GPa in dry, porous Seeberger sandstone provides new, significant insights with respect to the heterogeneous nature of shock distribution in such important, upper crustal material, for which to date no pressure-calibrated scheme for shock metamorphism exists. We found that pores are already completely closed at 2.5 GPa shock pressure. Whole quartz grains or parts of them are transformed to diaplectic quartz glass and/or SiO2 melt starting already at 5 GPa, whereas these effects are not observed below shock pressures of 30-35 and ˜45 GPa, respectively, in shock experiments with quartz single crystals. The appearance of diaplectic glass or melt is not restricted to the zone directly below the impacted surface but is related to the occurrence of pores in a much broader zone. The combined amount of these phases increases distinctly with increasing shock pressure from 0.03 vol.% at 5 GPa to ˜80 vol.% at 17.5 GPa. In accordance with a previous shock classification for silica phases in naturally shocked Coconino sandstone from Meteor Crater that was based on varied slopes of the Coconino sandstone Hugoniot curve, our observations allow us to construct a shock pressure classification for porous sandstone consistent with shock stages 1b-4 of the progressive shock metamorphism classification of Kieffer (1971).

  9. A new approach for understanding ion transport in glasses; example ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanism of ion transport in glasses continues to be incompletely understood. Several of the theoretical ... All important observations in d.c. and a.c. transport in glasses are found consistent with this model. Keywords. Diborate glass ...... In the process it is su- pposed to move through the crowded environment by mecha- ...

  10. The stress distribution in tempered glass due to a crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    A model describing the failure in tempered glass is proposed and a method of solution is presented. An infinite elastic strip is assumed to represent the glass and the loads vanish everywhere on the boundary as well as at infinity. The problem is solved using the integral equations technique where the input is the residual stresses in the glass.

  11. Multiple Glass Ceilings

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Giovanni; Hassink, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    Both vertical (between job levels) and horizontal (within job levels) mobility can be sources of wage growth. We find that the glass ceiling operates at both margins. The unexplained part of the wage gap grows across job levels (glass ceiling at the vertical margin) and across the deciles of the intra-job-level wage distribution (glass ceiling at the horizontal margin). This implies that women face many glass ceilings, one for each job level above the second, and that the glass ceiling is a p...

  12. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  13. Modeling a calixarene-crown-6 and its alkali complexes by means of a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamare, V.; Golebiowski, J.; Ruiz-Lopez, M.F.; Martins-Costa, M.; Millot, C.

    2000-01-01

    Calixarene-crown-6s in 1,3-alternate conformation are compounds currently investigated for their ability to selectively extract traces of cesium from acidic or strong salinity aqueous solutions. Studies based on molecular modeling were undertaken on these systems to understand their behavior regarding cesium and other alkali cations, in particular sodium. In this work, a recently developed molecular modeling approach was used to investigate calixarene BC6 and its alkali complexes. The whole calixarene ligand is treated by the semiempirical AM1 quantum method (QM) whereas the cation and solvent are treated by a conventional force field (MM). The total energy of the system is the sum of the QM and MM sub-system contributions plus the QM/MM interaction energy. The latter includes the electrostatic interaction between QM charges (nuclei + electrons) and MM sites, and the non-electrostatic QM/MM van der Weals term, usually expressed by a Lennard-Jones potential. In the QM/MM method, van der Waals interactions between the QM and MM sub-systems are described by empirical Lennard-Jones parameters which must be adapted to the hybrid potential considered. Parameters on oxygen atoms were optimized. For the cations, two sets of Parameters were tested: Aqvist empirical parameters, derived to represent cation/water interactions in classical dynamics (set 2), and a new set of parameters which we calculated from dispersion coefficients available in the literature (set 1). The latter gave better results for the interactions with the crown. In the sodium complex, the cation interacts with only four oxygen atoms of the crown, whereas in the complex with cesium, the interaction involves six oxygen atoms. Distortion of the BC6 is therefore less with sodium and favors the corresponding complex by 4 kcal/mol. The cation/BC6 van der Waals energy is very weak for the two complexes. Hence the interaction between the cation and BC6 is primarily electrostatic. The BC6 polarization energy due

  14. STRESS RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chocholoušek J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a quantitative method of stress relaxation measurement in prismatic glass samples during two different time-temperature regimes using the Sénarmont compensator. Four types of glass (Barium crystal glass, Eutal, Simax, and Container glass were subjected to observation in an assembled measuring device. Results will be used for parameterization of the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin model and consequently implemented in a finite element method code.

  15. Acoustics of glass harmonicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.

    2004-05-01

    Glass musical instruments are probably as old as glassmaking. At least as early as the 17th century it was discovered that wine glasses, when rubbed with a wet finger, produced a musical tone. A collection of glasses played in this manner is called a glass harp. Another type of glass harmonica, called the armonica by its inventor Benjamin Franklin, employs glass bowls or cups turned by a horizontal axle, so the performer need only touch the rim of the bowls as they rotate to set them into vibration. We discuss the modes of vibration of both types of glass harmonica, and describe the different sounds that are emitted by rubbing, tapping, or bowing them. Rubbing with a wet finger tends to excite only the (2,0) mode and its harmonics through a ``stick-slip'' process, while tapping excites the other modes as well.

  16. Leaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hench, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding surface compositional profiles of glasses over a range of 0-2000 A with a variety of analytical instruments shows that five general types of glass surfaces exist. The surface character of a glass article depends upon bulk composition and environmental history during which surface dealkalization, film formation, and network dissolution can occur. Environmental-surface interactions generally result in complex compositional profiles of all the constituents in a glass. Durable glasses almost always develop a stable surface film which has a higher concentration of network formers than the bulk composition. Compositional effects that are used to improve glass durability usually improve the stability of the surface films. Durability tests or service conditions that lead to film destruction are especially severe for the most silicate glasses. 43 references

  17. Theories of glass formation and the glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J S

    2014-04-01

    This key-issues review is a plea for a new focus on simpler and more realistic models of glass-forming fluids. It seems to me that we have too often been led astray by sophisticated mathematical models that beautifully capture some of the most intriguing features of glassy behavior, but are too unrealistic to provide bases for predictive theories. As illustrations of what I mean, the first part of this article is devoted to brief summaries of imaginative, sensible, but disparate and often contradictory ideas for solving glass problems. Almost all of these ideas remain alive today, with their own enthusiastic advocates. I then describe numerical simulations, mostly by H Tanaka and coworkers, in which it appears that very simple, polydisperse systems of hard disks and spheres develop long range, Ising-like, bond-orientational order as they approach glass transitions. Finally, I summarize my recent proposal that topologically ordered clusters of particles, in disordered environments, tend to become aligned with each other as if they were two-state systems, and thus produce the observed Ising-like behavior. Neither Tanaka's results nor my proposed interpretation of them fit comfortably within any of the currently popular glass theories.

  18. Modified mathematical model for evaluating the performance of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar collector considering tube shading effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabeel, A.E.; Khalil, A.; Elsayed, S.S.; Alatyar, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a procedure for simulating the absorbed solar radiation and heat transfer process in water-in-glass evacuated tube solar collectors. The procedure is developed to calculate the daily utilized solar energy and outlet collector temperature for different tilt angles, collector azimuth angles and geometric parameters without requirement for any experimental factor determination. Total absorbed solar radiation is evaluated by integrating the flat-plate solar collector performance equations over the tube circumference taking into account the shading of the adjacent tubes and variance of transmissivity–absorptivity product with the incidence angle of radiation. The heat transfer into the collector fluid is evaluated by subtracting the heat loss from the total absorbed solar radiation. Comparison between calculated and measured tank temperature shows a good agreement between them under different heating loads. Performance of solar collector at different tilt angles, collector Azimuth angles, tubes spacing and collector mass flow rate is investigated theoretically. In Egypt (30° Latitude angle), the results show that 10°, 30° and 45° are the optimum solar collector tilt angles during the summer, vernal and autumnal equinox and winter operation respectively. Also, the utilized solar energy increases about 2.8% when the mass flow rate increases 100%, and the solar collector with south-facing has the best performance except for vertical tube solar collector. The simulation results also show that solar collector with wide tube spacing reduce the shading effect and hence increase the absorbed radiation. The final tank temperature as a function of collector's mass flow rate for three different days; 21 March, 21 June and 21 December is also investigated. The total incidence radiation, absorbed solar radiation and utilized heat per tube are presented for the three optimum tilt angles 10°, 30° and 45°. Efficiency curve of water-in-glass

  19. Experimental design of a waste glass study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Redgate, P.E.; Hrma, P.

    1995-04-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed to support a future high-level waste glass plant at Hanford. A total of 147 glasses, covering a broad region of compositions melting at approximately 1150 degrees C, were tested in five statistically designed experimental phases. This paper focuses on the goals, strategies, and techniques used in designing the five phases. The overall strategy was to investigate glass compositions on the boundary and interior of an experimental region defined by single- component, multiple-component, and property constraints. Statistical optimal experimental design techniques were used to cover various subregions of the experimental region in each phase. Empirical mixture models for glass properties (as functions of glass composition) from previous phases wee used in designing subsequent CVS phases

  20. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.