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Sample records for lennard-jones lj potential

  1. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation coefficients for the (2n, n) Lennard-Jones system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friisberg, Ida Marie; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potentialenergy coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ syste...

  2. Collision kernels in the eikonal approximation for Lennard-Jones interaction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, S.

    1985-03-01

    The velocity changing collisions are conveniently described by collisional kernels. These kernels depend on an interaction potential and there is a necessity for evaluating them for realistic interatomic potentials. Using the collision kernels, we are able to investigate the redistribution of atomic population's caused by the laser light and velocity changing collisions. In this paper we present the method of evaluating the collision kernels in the eikonal approximation. We discuss the influence of the potential parameters Rsub(o)sup(i), epsilonsub(o)sup(i) on kernel width for a given atomic state. It turns out that unlike the collision kernel for the hard sphere model of scattering the Lennard-Jones kernel is not so sensitive to changes of Rsub(o)sup(i) as the previous one. Contrary to the general tendency of approximating collisional kernels by the Gaussian curve, kernels for the Lennard-Jones potential do not exhibit such a behaviour. (author)

  3. Interaction forces between nanoparticles in Lennard-Jones (L-J) solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Indrajit; Mukherjee, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Molecular simulations, such as Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) have been recently used for understanding the forces between colloidal nanoparticles that determine the dispersion and stability of nanoparticle suspensions. Herein we review the current status of research in the area of nanoparticles immersed in L-J solvents. The first study by Shinto et al. used large smooth spheres to depict nanoparticles in L-J and soft sphere solvents. The nanoparticles were held fixed at a particular interparticle distance and only the solvents were allowed to equilibrate. Both Van-der-waals and solvation forces were computed at different but fixed interparticle separation. Later Qin and Fitchthorn improved on this model by considering the nanoparticles as collection of molecules, thus taking into the account the effect of surface roughness of nanoparticles. Although the inter particle distance was fixed, the rotation of such nanoparticles with respect to each other was also investigated. Recently, in keeping with the experimental situation, we modified this model by allowing the nanoparticles to move and rotate freely. Solvophilic, neutral and solvophobic interactions between the solvent atoms and those that make up the nanoparticles were modelled. While neutral and solvophobic nanoparticles coalesce even at intermediate distances, solvophilic nanoparticles are more stable in solution due to the formation of a solvent shield

  4. Third-order WKBJ eigenvalues for Lennard-Jones and Varshni V potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesarwani, R.N.; Varshni, Y.P.

    1978-01-01

    The WKBJ method is applied to the third order for obtaining the eigenvalues for the fifth potential of Varshni, and the relevant integrals are analytically evaluated. Numerical results are obtained for the Lennard-Jones Potential, which is a special case of the Varshni V potential, and are compared to the results of Harrison and Bernstein obtained by a numerical integration of the wave equation. Error estimates are made. It is shown that for diatomic potentials, the Langer correction is not needed if the WKBJ approximation is carried to second and higher orders. (author)

  5. The potential energy landscape in the Lennard-Jones binary mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampoli, M; Benassi, P; Eramo, R; Angelani, L; Ruocco, G

    2003-01-01

    The potential energy landscape in the Kob-Andersen Lennard-Jones binary mixture model has been studied carefully from the liquid down to the supercooled regime, from T = 2 down to 0.46. One thousand independent configurations along the time evolution locus have been examined at each temperature investigated. From the starting configuration, we searched for the nearest saddle (or quasi-saddle) and minimum of the potential energy. The vibrational densities of states for the starting and the two derived configurations have been evaluated. Besides the number of negative eigenvalues of the saddles other quantities show some signature of the approach of the dynamical arrest temperature

  6. Localized fluidity modes and the topology of the constant-potential-energy hypersurfaces of Lennard-Jones matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, Rodney M J; Madsen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Sections of configuration space for Lennard-Jones matter were obtained by probing all the normal-mode energy profiles, following diagonalization of the dynamical matrix for a 240-particle system. For the crystal and sufficiently cold glass, these are single welled, whereas increasing numbers...... of double wells occur as the glass is warmed toward the fluid. This indicates that there might be a fundamental difference between the topologies of the constant-potential-energy hypersurfaces of crystalline and noncrystalline Lennard-Jones matter....

  7. Freezing of Lennard-Jones-type fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrapak, Sergey A.; Chaudhuri, Manis; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2011-01-01

    We put forward an approximate method to locate the fluid-solid (freezing) phase transition in systems of classical particles interacting via a wide range of Lennard-Jones-type potentials. This method is based on the constancy of the properly normalized second derivative of the interaction potential (freezing indicator) along the freezing curve. As demonstrated recently it yields remarkably good agreement with previous numerical simulation studies of the conventional 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid [S.A.Khrapak, M.Chaudhuri, G.E.Morfill, Phys. Rev. B 134, 052101 (2010)]. In this paper, we test this approach using a wide range of the LJ-type potentials, including LJ n-6 and exp-6 models, and find that it remains sufficiently accurate and reliable in reproducing the corresponding freezing curves, down to the triple-point temperatures. One of the possible application of the method--estimation of the freezing conditions in complex (dusty) plasmas with ''tunable'' interactions--is briefly discussed.

  8. Transport coefficients of dense fluids composed of globular molecules. Equilibrium molecular dynamics investigations using more-center Lennard-Jones potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, C.

    1988-09-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations with constraints have been performed for model liquids SF6 and CF4. The computations were carried out with four- and six-center Lennard-Jones potentials and up to 2×105 integration steps. Shear, bulk viscosity and the thermal conductivity have been calculated with use of Green-Kubo relations in the formulation of ``molecule variables.'' Various thermodynamic states were investigated. For SF6, a detailed comparison with experimental data was possible. For CF4, the MD results could only be compared with experiment for one liquid state. For the latter liquid, a complementary comparison was performed using MD results obtained with a one-center Lennard-Jones potential. A limited test of the particle number dependence of the results is presented. Partial and total correlations functions are shown and discussed with respect to findings obtained for the one-center Lennard-Jones liquid.

  9. Relation between calculated Lennard-Jones potential and thermal stability of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.; Bian, X.F.; Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Two metallic bulk glasses, Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 and Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 , with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared by copper mold casting method. Dilatometric measurement was carried out on the two glassy alloys to obtain information about the average nearest-neighbour distance r 0 and the effective depth of pair potential V 0 . By assuming a Lennard-Jones potential, r 0 and V 0 were calculated to be 0.28 nm and 0.16 eV for Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 and 0.27 nm and 0.13 eV for Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 , respectively. It was found that the glassy alloy Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 was more stable than Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 against heating from both experiment and calculation

  10. Transport coefficients of liquid CF4 and SF6 computed by molecular dynamics using polycenter Lennard-Jones potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoheisel, C.

    1989-01-01

    For several liquid states of CF4 and SF4, the shear and the bulk viscosity as well as the thermal conductivity were determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Lennard-Jones four- and six-center pair potentials were applied, and the method of constraints was chosen for the MD. The computed Green-Kubo integrands show a steep time decay, and no particular longtime behavior occurs. The molecule number dependence of the results is found to be small, and 3×105 integration steps allow an accuracy of about 10% for the shear viscosity and the thermal conductivity coefficient. Comparison with experimental data shows a fair agreement for CF4, while for SF6 the transport coefficients fall below the experimental ones by about 30%.

  11. Transport coefficients of liquid CF4 and SF6 computed by molecular dynamics using polycenter Lennard-Jones potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoheisel, C.

    1989-01-01

    For several liquid states of CF 4 and SF 6 , the shear and the bulk viscosity as well as the thermal conductivity were determined by equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Lennard-Jones four- and six-center pair potentials were applied, and the method of constraints were chosen for the MD. The computed Green-Kubo integrands show a steep time decay, and no particular longtime behavior occurs. The molecule number dependence of the results is found to be small, and 3 x 10 5 integration steps allow an accuracy of about 10% for the shear viscosity and the thermal conductivity coefficient. Comparison with experimental data shows a fair agreement for CF 4 , while for SF 6 the transport coefficients fall below the experimental ones by about 30%

  12. Effect of Energy Polydispersity on the Nature of Lennard-Jones Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    In the companion paper [T. S. Ingebrigtsen and H. Tanaka, J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11052 (2015)] the effect of size polydispersity on the nature of Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids, which represent most molecular liquids without hydrogen bonds, was studied. More specifically, it was shown that even highly size polydisperse LJ liquids are Roskilde-simple (RS) liquids. RS liquids are liquids with strong correlation between constant volume equilibrium fluctuations of virial and potential energy and are s...

  13. Influence of DC electric field on the Lennard-Jones potential and phonon vibrations of carbon nanotube on catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidi, Mohammadreza; Vaezzadeh, Majid; Badakhshan, Farzaneh

    2011-01-01

    Influence of DC electric field on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth in chemical vapor deposition is studied. Investigation of electric field effect in van der Waals interaction shows that increase in DC electric field raises the magnitude of attractive term of the Lennard-Jones potential. By using a theoretical model based on phonon vibrations of CNT on catalyst, it is shown that there is an optimum field for growth. Also it is observed that CNT under optimum electric field is longer than CNT in the absence of field. Finally, the relation between optimum DC electric field and type of catalyst is investigated and for some intervals of electric field, the best catalyst is introduced, which is very useful for experimental researches. -- Research highlights: → Influence of DC electric field on CNT growth in CVD. → Effect of electric field on van der Waals interaction between CNT and its catalyst. → Applying DC electric field increases attractive term of Lennard-Jonespotential. → There is an optimum DC field for CNT growth. → For catalyst with stronger van der Waals interaction, optimum field is smaller.

  14. Thermal decay of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Avalos-Borja, M.

    1989-01-01

    The decay mechanisms of argon clusters have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations and Lennard-Jones potentials. Heating up processes were applied to Ar 13 up to temperatures in the melting region. In this range of temperatures large fluctuations in the mean kinetic energy of the system are present and a sequential evaporation is observed. The thermal decay of these aggregates occurs in a time scale of nanoseconds. (orig.)

  15. Phase diagram of a modified Lennard-Jones system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakagami, Takahiro; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The well-known Lennard-Jones potential is modified in such a way that it smoothly vanishes at a certain distance. A system whose interparticle interaction is given by such a potential is referred to as a modified Lennard-Jones system, and is served as a standard system describing simple solids and fluids. A phase diagram is determined based on the free energies obtained through thermodynamic integration.

  16. An efficient method for the determination of fourth virial coefficient with Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar A. [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpaşa University, 60250, Tokat (Turkey); Somuncu, Elif; Askerov, Iskender M. [Department of Physics, Giresun University, Giresun (Turkey)

    2016-08-10

    In this work, a new theoretical approach is proposed for calculating fourth virial coefficient with Lennard-Jones potential. The established algorithm can be used to evaluate the thermodynamics properties and the intermolecular interaction potentials of liquids and gases with an improved accuracy. Note that the evaluation of the high-order virial coefficients is very valuable for accurate calculation of thermodynamic parameters. By using the suggested method, the fourth virial coefficient of CH{sub 4}, Ar, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and SF{sub 6} molecules are evaluated. The calculation results are useful for accurate interpretation of the experimental data and of the determination of related physical properties.

  17. Evaporation of Lennard-Jones fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Lechman, Jeremy B; Plimpton, Steven J; Grest, Gary S

    2011-06-14

    Evaporation and condensation at a liquid/vapor interface are ubiquitous interphase mass and energy transfer phenomena that are still not well understood. We have carried out large scale molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids composed of monomers, dimers, or trimers to investigate these processes with molecular detail. For LJ monomers in contact with a vacuum, the evaporation rate is found to be very high with significant evaporative cooling and an accompanying density gradient in the liquid domain near the liquid/vapor interface. Increasing the chain length to just dimers significantly reduces the evaporation rate. We confirm that mechanical equilibrium plays a key role in determining the evaporation rate and the density and temperature profiles across the liquid/vapor interface. The velocity distributions of evaporated molecules and the evaporation and condensation coefficients are measured and compared to the predictions of an existing model based on kinetic theory of gases. Our results indicate that for both monatomic and polyatomic molecules, the evaporation and condensation coefficients are equal when systems are not far from equilibrium and smaller than one, and decrease with increasing temperature. For the same reduced temperature T/T(c), where T(c) is the critical temperature, these two coefficients are higher for LJ dimers and trimers than for monomers, in contrast to the traditional viewpoint that they are close to unity for monatomic molecules and decrease for polyatomic molecules. Furthermore, data for the two coefficients collapse onto a master curve when plotted against a translational length ratio between the liquid and vapor phase.

  18. Glass of monatomic Lennard-Jones system at nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Van Hoang

    2010-01-01

    Structure and stability of glass of monatomic Lennard-Jones (LJ) system at nanoscale compared with those of the bulk counterparts have been studied using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method. Models have been obtained by cooling from the melts. Structure of the systems was analyzed via radial distribution function (RDF), interatomic distances, the Honeycutt-Andersen analysis and coordination number distributions. Surface and core structures of LJ nanoparticles have been analyzed in details. Density dependence and cooling rate effects on structure of the systems have been found and discussed. In addition, size dependence of structure and properties of nanoparticles has been analyzed in detail. Indeed, we found glass formation in monatomic LJ systems; however, their stability is not high. Evolution of structure and thermodynamics of the systems upon cooling from the melts was found. We also discussed annealing-induced crystallization of LJ glass.

  19. Thermodynamic equivalence between the Lennard-Jones and hard-core attractive Yukawa systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, Y.; Albaki, R.; Bretonnet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the thermodynamic properties of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid is made by means of a system of particles interacting with a potential of hard-core plus attractive Yukawa tail (HCY). Due to the similarity between the LJ potential and the HCY potential in its overall form, it is worthwhile seeking to approximate the LJ potential in much the same way that the hard-sphere reference potential has been so used. The study consists in describing the thermodynamics of the LJ fluid in terms of the equivalent HCY system, whose the properties are known accurately, by means of mapping the thermodynamic quantities for the HCY potential parameters. The method is feasible owing to a convenient analytical expression of the Helmholtz free energy from the mean-spherical approximation expanded in power of the inverse temperature. Two different procedures are used to determine the parameters of the HCY potential as a function of the thermodynamic states: one is based on the simultaneous fits of pressure and internal energy of the LJ system and the other uses the concept of collision frequency. The reasonable homogeneity of the results in both procedures of mapping makes that the HCY potential is a very good reference system, whose the proposed theoretical expressions can be used confidently to predict the thermodynamic properties of more realistic potentials

  20. Effect of surface tension on the behavior of adhesive contact based on Lennard-Jones potential law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyao; Xu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    The present study explores the effect of surface tension on adhesive contact behavior where the adhesion is interpreted by long-range intermolecular forces. The adhesive contact is analyzed using the equivalent system of a rigid sphere and an elastic half space covered by a membrane with surface tension. The long-range intermolecular forces are modeled with the Lennard‒Jones (L‒J) potential law. The current adhesive contact issue can be represented by a nonlinear integral equation, which can be solved by Newton‒Raphson method. In contrast to previous studies which consider intermolecular forces as short-range, the present study reveals more details of the features of adhesive contact with surface tension, in terms of jump instabilities, pull-off forces, pressure distribution within the contact area, etc. The transition of the pull-off force is not only consistent with previous studies, but also presents some new interesting characteristics in the current situation.

  1. Formation of global energy minimim structures in the growth process of Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Koshelev, Andrey; Shutovich, Andrey

    2003-01-01

    that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic numbers sequence for the clusters of noble gases atoms and compare...

  2. Phase behavior of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Ray M.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Ford, David M.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a coarse-grained description of the phase behavior of the isolated 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster (LJ 38 ). The model captures both the solid-solid polymorphic transitions at low temperatures and the complex cluster breakup and melting transitions at higher temperatures. For this coarse model development, we employ the manifold learning technique of diffusion mapping. The outcome of the diffusion mapping analysis over a broad temperature range indicates that two order parameters are sufficient to describe the cluster's phase behavior; we have chosen two such appropriate order parameters that are metrics of condensation and overall crystallinity. In this well-justified coarse-variable space, we calculate the cluster's free energy landscape (FEL) as a function of temperature, employing Monte Carlo umbrella sampling. These FELs are used to quantify the phase behavior and onsets of phase transitions of the LJ 38 cluster

  3. Evaporation of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, C.E.; Garzon, I.L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive molecular dynamics simulations have been done to study the evaporation of a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. The survival probability and the evaporative lifetime are calculated as a function of the cluster total energy from a classical trajectory analysis. The results are interpreted in terms of the RRK theory of unimolecular dissociation. The calculation of the binding energy of the evaporated species from the evaporation rate and the average kinetic energy release is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Analytical tools for solitons and periodic waves corresponding to phonons on Lennard-Jones lattices in helical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'ovidio, Francesco; Bohr, Henrik; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-01-01

    We study the propagation of solitons along the hydrogen bonds of an alpha helix. Modeling the hydrogen and peptide bonds with Lennard-Jones potentials, we show that the solitons can appear spontaneously and have long lifetimes. Remarkably, even if no explicit solution is known for the Lennard-Jones...... potential, the solitons can be characterized analytically with a good quantitative agreement using formulas for a Toda potential with parameters fitted to the Lennard-Jones potential. We also discuss and show the robustness of the family of periodic solutions called cnoidal waves, corresponding to phonons...

  5. Melting of 2D monatomic solids: Lennard-Jones system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Y.M.; Guo, Z.C.

    1987-09-01

    The Lennard-Jones interaction has been introduced into the Collins mix lattice of 2D liquids. By means of rigorous calculation of the total potential and the free area, the Gibbs functions for 2D liquid and solid have been derived. The melting line obtained from the phase transition equation agrees quite well with the result of recent computer simulation experiments. The obtained reduced temperature of the triple point T* t =0.438 agrees with the data measured in experiments of some inert gas monolayers adsorbed on graphite as well as in computer simulation experiments. (author). 11 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Phase diagram of power law and Lennard-Jones systems: Crystal phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travesset, Alex

    2014-01-01

    An extensive characterization of the low temperature phase diagram of particles interacting with power law or Lennard-Jones potentials is provided from Lattice Dynamical Theory. For power law systems, only two lattice structures are stable for certain values of the exponent (or softness) (A15, body centered cube (bcc)) and two more (face centered cubic (fcc), hexagonal close packed (hcp)) are always stable. Among them, only the fcc and bcc are equilibrium states. For Lennard-Jones systems, the equilibrium states are either hcp or fcc, with a coexistence curve in pressure and temperature that shows reentrant behavior. The hcp solid never coexists with the liquid. In all cases analyzed, for both power law and Lennard-Jones potentials, the fcc crystal has higher entropy than the hcp. The role of anharmonic terms is thoroughly analyzed and a general thermodynamic integration to account for them is proposed

  7. Atomic size effect on the formation of ionized cluster beam epitaxy in Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh Horngming; Averback, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ionized cluster beam deposition is studied by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic size of incident cluster atoms is different from the size of substrate atoms. Lennard-Jones interatomic potentials are used for the two-component system. The results provide the morphologies of the overlayers for various atomic sizes and are compared to simulation results of molecular beam epitaxy. (orig.)

  8. Nematic-isotropic transition in some lattice models for rigid cores having semiflexible tails: segmental Lennard-Jones interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, F.

    1983-01-01

    Two average-environment simple cubic lattice models: a refined model and a simple model, both having site-site (segmental) pair Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions: for molecules composed of rigid cores having semiflexible tails are presented. The calculated values of the following properties at the nematic-isotropic transition for rigid rods of varying length are compared with relevant experimental data for PAA (p-azoxyanisole, or 4,4'-dimethoxyazoxybenzene): temperature, core orientational order parameter, nematic density and volume, relative density change, and relative entropy change. The temperature change as a function of volume change at constant order parameter is also discussed. In general, both LJ models give considerably better quantitative agreement with experiment, especially for the temperature and the relative density change, than do the earlier lattice models with hard repulsions, with or without constant segmental pair interaction energies. In most aspects, these LJ models give good quantitative agreement with experiment. These LJ models elucidate the importance of realistic intermolecular potentials, especially the role of soft repulsions, in describing an order-disorder transition between two condensed phases

  9. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arno; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The previous paper [A. A. Veldhorst et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 054904 (2014)] demonstrated that the isomorph theory explains the scaling properties of a liquid of flexible chains consisting of ten Lennard-Jones particles connected by rigid bonds. We here investigate the same model with harmonic......, dynamics, and the excess entropy are invariant. The Lennard-Jones chain liquid with harmonic bondsdoes have curves in the phase diagram along which the structure and dynamics are invariant. The excess entropy is not invariant on these curves, which we refer to as “pseudoisomorphs.” In particular......, this means that Rosenfeld’s excess-entropy scaling (the dynamics being a function of excess entropy only) does not apply for the Lennard-Jones chain with harmonic bonds...

  10. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  11. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  12. A density functional perturbative approach for simple fluids: the structure of a nonuniform Lennard-Jones fluid at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul; Lee, Song Hi

    2004-01-01

    A density functional perturbation approximation (DFPT), which is based both on the fundamental-measure theory (FMT) to the hard-sphere repulsion and on the weighted-density approximations (WDAs) to the attractive contribution, has been proposed for studying the structural properties of model fluids with an attractive part of the potential. The advantage of the present theory is the simplicity of the calculation of the weight function due to the attractive contribution. It has been applied to predict the equilibrium particle density distributions and adsorption isotherms of Lennard-Jones fluids at interfaces. The theoretical results show that the present theory describes quite well the adsorption isotherms of a Lennard-Jones ethane in a graphite slit pore as well as the equilibrium particle density distributions of a Lennard-Jones fluid near a planar slit pore

  13. Stability of relaxed Lennard-Jones models made of 500 to 6000 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoult, B.; Farges, J.; Feraudy, M.F. de; Torchet, G.

    1989-01-01

    We present a study of the stability of clusters models made of a number N of atoms in the range 500 to 6000 atoms, freely interacting through the Lennard-Jones potential. The potential energy per atom, calculated for relaxed models, shows that stable models belong to an icosahedral sequence when N<1600 and to a decahedral sequence beyond. A coexistence size range of both structures is discussed in connection with experimental results on argon clusters in free jet expansions. (orig.)

  14. Contact angle of sessile drops in Lennard-Jones systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Urbassek, Herbert M; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2014-11-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used for studying the contact angle of nanoscale sessile drops on a planar solid wall in a system interacting via the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones potential. The entire range between total wetting and dewetting is investigated by varying the solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy. The temperature is varied between the triple point and the critical temperature. A correlation is obtained for the contact angle in dependence of the temperature and the dispersive interaction energy. Size effects are studied by varying the number of fluid particles at otherwise constant conditions, using up to 150,000 particles. For particle numbers below 10,000, a decrease of the contact angle is found. This is attributed to a dependence of the solid-liquid surface tension on the droplet size. A convergence to a constant contact angle is observed for larger system sizes. The influence of the wall model is studied by varying the density of the wall. The effective solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy at a contact angle of θ = 90° is found to be independent of temperature and to decrease linearly with the solid density. A correlation is developed that describes the contact angle as a function of the dispersive interaction, the temperature, and the solid density. The density profile of the sessile drop and the surrounding vapor phase is described by a correlation combining a sigmoidal function and an oscillation term.

  15. Dynamics of an assembly of finite-size Lennard-Jones spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.

    1996-01-01

    The time-averaged Fourier spectra of the number density, velocity, and force fields are obtained numerically for an assembly of spherical particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones potential. The magnitude spectra determine the dominant wave numbers, and the phase difference between the Lennard-Jones force and number density spectra determines the nature of the particle dynamics. The latter is used to show that for every wave number k there is a critical frequency ω c (k), such that when ω c (k) the phase difference is π/2 and when ω approx-gt ω c (k) the phase difference is -π/2. The ratio of the frequency and the wave number at which the phase difference changes sign is used to define an effective sound speed for the particle system. The effective sound speed is shown to be a function of the dimensionless wave number, and is locally minimum at the same dimensionless wave numbers for which the static structure factor is minimum. It is also shown that the dynamical response of the particle system for waves with speeds greater than the effective sound speed is similar to the response of the hyperbolic systems of equations, and for waves with speeds smaller than the effective sound speed the response is similar to the response of the elliptic systems. The convection effects are shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the Lennard-Jones forces, and the change of type of the equations from hyperbolic to elliptic occurs when the magnitude of the convection term is comparable to the magnitude of the Lennard-Jones force term. It is also shown that the change of type cannot occur in a theory where the convection term is neglected. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Freezing and melting line invariants of the Lennard-Jones system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    The invariance of several structural and dynamical properties of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) system along the freezing and melting lines is interpreted in terms of isomorph theory. First the freezing/melting lines of the LJ system are shown to be approximated by isomorphs. Then we show...... that the invariants observed along the freezing and melting isomorphs are also observed on other isomorphs in the liquid and crystalline phases. The structure is probed by the radial distribution function and the structure factor and dynamics are probed by the mean-square displacement, the intermediate scattering...... function, and the shear viscosity. Studying these properties with reference to isomorph theory explains why the known single-phase melting criteria hold, e.g., the Hansen–Verlet and the Lindemann criteria, and why the Andrade equation for the viscosity at freezing applies, e.g., for most liquid metals. Our...

  17. Free energy of the Lennard-Jones solid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoef, van der M.A.

    2000-01-01

    We have determined a simple expression for the absolute Helmholtz free energy of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid from molecular dynamics simulations. The pressure and energy data from these simulations have been fitted to a simple functional form (18 parameters) for densities ranging from around

  18. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arno; Dyre, J. C.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    functions of excess entropy) which has been observed in simulations of both molecular and polymeric systems. Doing molecular dynamics simulations of flexible Lennard-Jones chains (LJC) with rigid bonds, we here provide the first detailed test of the isomorph theory applied to flexible chain molecules. We...

  19. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  20. Equilibrium spherically curved two-dimensional Lennard-Jones systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogd, J.M.; Sloot, P.M.A.; van Dantzig, R.

    2005-01-01

    To learn about basic aspects of nano-scale spherical molecular shells during their formation, spherically curved two-dimensional N-particle Lennard-Jones systems are simulated, studying curvature evolution paths at zero-temperature. For many N-values (N < 800) equilibrium configu- rations are traced

  1. Phase diagram of a Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.; Ree, T.; Ree, F.H.

    1993-01-01

    A phase diagram of a Lennard-Jones solid at kT/ε≥0.8 is constructed by our recent perturbation theory. It shows the stability of the face-centered-cubic phase except within a small pressure and temperature domain, where the hexagonal-close packed phase may occur. The theory predicts anharmonic contributions to the Helmholtz free energy (important to the crystal stability) in good agreement with Monte Carlo data

  2. Theoretical prediction of crystallization kinetics of a supercooled Lennard-Jones fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, K. G. S. H.; Song, Xueyu

    2018-05-01

    The first order curvature correction to the crystal-liquid interfacial free energy is calculated using a theoretical model based on the interfacial excess thermodynamic properties. The correction parameter (δ), which is analogous to the Tolman length at a liquid-vapor interface, is found to be 0.48 ± 0.05 for a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid. We show that this curvature correction is crucial in predicting the nucleation barrier when the size of the crystal nucleus is small. The thermodynamic driving force (Δμ) corresponding to available simulated nucleation conditions is also calculated by combining the simulated data with a classical density functional theory. In this paper, we show that the classical nucleation theory is capable of predicting the nucleation barrier with excellent agreement to the simulated results when the curvature correction to the interfacial free energy is accounted for.

  3. Density-scaling exponents and virial potential-energy correlation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates the relation between the density-scaling exponent γ and the virial potential energy correlation coefficient R at several thermodynamic state points in three dimensions for the generalized (2n, n) Lennard-Jones (LJ) system for n = 4, 9, 12, 18, as well as for the standard n = 6 LJ system in two,three, and ...

  4. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoura, Ahmad, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa; Sun, Shuyu, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa [Computational Transport Phenomena Laboratory, The Earth Sciences and Engineering Department, The Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Siripatana, Adil, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa; Hoteit, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.hoteit@kaust.edu.sa [Earth Fluid Modeling and Predicting Group, The Earth Sciences and Engineering Department, The Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Knio, Omar, E-mail: ahmad.kadoura@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: adil.siripatana@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa, E-mail: omar.knio@kaust.edu.sa [Uncertainty Quantification Center, The Applied Mathematics and Computational Science Department, The Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-07

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO{sub 2} and C{sub 2} H{sub 6}.

  5. A model-adaptivity method for the solution of Lennard-Jones based adhesive contact problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Dhia, Hachmi; Du, Shuimiao

    2018-05-01

    The surface micro-interaction model of Lennard-Jones (LJ) is used for adhesive contact problems (ACP). To address theoretical and numerical pitfalls of this model, a sequence of partitions of contact models is adaptively constructed to both extend and approximate the LJ model. It is formed by a combination of the LJ model with a sequence of shifted-Signorini (or, alternatively, -Linearized-LJ) models, indexed by a shift parameter field. For each model of this sequence, a weak formulation of the associated local ACP is developed. To track critical localized adhesive areas, a two-step strategy is developed: firstly, a macroscopic frictionless (as first approach) linear-elastic contact problem is solved once to detect contact separation zones. Secondly, at each shift-adaptive iteration, a micro-macro ACP is re-formulated and solved within the multiscale Arlequin framework, with significant reduction of computational costs. Comparison of our results with available analytical and numerical solutions shows the effectiveness of our global strategy.

  6. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-06-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. The main advantage of such surrogates, once generated, is the capability of accurately computing the needed thermodynamic quantities in a few seconds, thus efficiently replacing the computationally expensive MC molecular simulations. Benefiting from the tremendous computational time reduction, the PC surrogates were used to conduct large-scale optimization in order to propose single-site LJ models for several simple molecules. Experimental data, a set of supercritical isotherms, and part of the two-phase envelope, of several pure components were used for tuning the LJ parameters (ε, σ). Based on the conducted optimization, excellent fit was obtained for different noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) and other small molecules (CH4, N2, and CO). On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the LJ model used, dramatic deviations between simulation and experimental data were observed, especially in the two-phase region, for more complex molecules such as CO2 and C2 H6.

  7. Crystallisation of a Lennard-Jones fluid by large scale molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snook, I.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The evolution of the structure of a large system of atoms interacting via a Lennard-Jones pair potential was simulated by the use of the Molecular Dynamics computer simulation technique. The system was initially equilibrated in the one phase region of the phase diagram at a temperature above critical then a temperature quench was performed which placed the system in a region were the single fluid phase was unstable. Quenches to below the triple point temperature gave rise to crystallisation The mechanism and final morphology is shown to depend strongly on the starting conditions e.g. the starting density

  8. Radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    A molecular-dynamics simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous Lennard-Jones solid has been undertaken. A three-dimensional structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions was used. An atom was injected inward from the middle of one surface, and as it lost its energy its velocity and position were recorded. The temperature profile around the injection direction was also calculated. The amorphous structure was examined before and after irradiation by calculating the volume distribution of the Voronoi polyhedra and its time evolution. The production of vacancies and interstitials was observed. The interstitials were found to disappear rapidly, and the vacancies slowly. (author)

  9. Binding energy of large icosahedral and cuboctahedral Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northby, J.A.; Xie, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is widely believed that the lowest energy configurations for small rare gas clusters have icosahedral symmetry. This contrasts with the bulk crystal structures which have cuboctahedral fcc symmetry. It is of interest to understand the transition between this finite and bulk behavior. To model this transition in rare gas clusters we have undertaken optimization studies within the Lennard-Jones pair potential model. Using a combination of Monte Carlo and Partan Search optimization methods, the lowest energy relaxed structures of Lennard-Jones clusters having icosahedral and cuboctahedral symmetry were found. Studies were performed for complete shell clusters ranging in size from one shell having 13 atoms to 14 shells having 10,179 atoms. It was found that the icosahedral structures are lower in energy than the cuboctahedral structures for cluster sizes having 13 shells or fewer. Additional studies were performed using the more accurate Aziz-Chen [HFD-C] pair potential parameterized for argon. The conclusions appear to be relatively insensitive to the form of the potential. (orig.)

  10. Icosahedral binary clusters of glass-forming Lennard-Jones binary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2007-01-01

    It is widely believed that the local icosahedral structure is related to the formation of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Specifically the existence of 13-atom icosahedral cluster in undercooled liquid is imagined to play a key role to initiate the glass formation as the seed of amorphous structure or to block the nucleation of regular crystal as the impurity. The existence of 13-atom icosahedral clusters in one-component liquids was predicted more than half a century ago by Frank from his total energy calculation for isolated clusters. In BMG alloys, however, the situation is less clear. In this report, we present the lowest-energy structures of 13-atom Lennard-Jones binary cluster calculated from the modified space-fixed genetic algorithm. We study, in particular, the artificial Lennard-Jones potential designed by Kob and Andersen [W. Kob, H.C. Andersen, Phys. Rev. E 51 (1995) 4626] that is known to form BMG. Curiously, the lowest-energy structures of 13-atom cluster are non-icosahedral for almost all compositions. Our result suggests that the existence of the icosahedral cluster is not a necessary condition but only a sufficient condition for glass formation

  11. A Lennard-Jones-like perspective on first order transitions in biological helices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskolkov, Nikolay N.; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Helical structures with Lennard-Jones self-interactions are studied for optimal conformations. For this purpose, their self-energy is analyzed for extrema with respect to the geometric parameters of the helices. It is found that Lennard-Jones helices exhibit a first order phase transition from...

  12. KAJIAN METODE ANALISA DATA GOAL SEEK (MICROSOFT EXCEL UNTUK PENYELESAIAN PERSAMAAN SCHRÖDINGER DALAM MENENTUKAN KUANTISASI ENERGI DIBAWAH PENGARUH POTENSIAL LENNARD-JONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kurniawan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penyelesaian persamaan Schrödinger dengan berbagai model potensial sangat penting dilakukan untuk memberikan gambaran perilaku zarah di bawah pengaruh potensial tersebut. Solusinya berupa fungsi gelombang yang memuat informasi penting tentang perilaku gelombang yang ditunjukkan dengan energi terikatnya. Pada penelitian ini kasus yang ingin diteliti adalah model potensial Lennard-Jones dengan menggunakan metode analisa goal seek yang tersedia pada Microsoft excel. Persamaannya dijabarkan dengan metode Euler terlebih dahulu selanjutnya syarat batas ditentukan agar ketelitian hasil diperoleh. Agar perhitungan goal seek  dapat dilakukan maka harus diubah dari besaran fisis menjadi besaran yang tidak berdimensi dimana parameter v menunjukkan keklasikan suatu sistem dan nilai  ε   menunjukkan kuantisasi energi. Hasil yang diperoleh adalah bahwa dengan memasukkan parameter kontrol nilai v tertentu, telah diperoleh beberapa keadaan energi dengan batas zkiri dan zkanan tertentu. Ketika masukan parameter v yang diberikan semakin besar keadaan energinya pun lebih rapat (ditunjukkan energy state yang diperoleh semakin banyak dibandingkan bila masukan v-nya lebih kecil. Penelitian ini bermanfaat untuk menyederhanakan kasus potensial yang lebih rumit, dimana solusinya dapat diperoleh dengan mudah dan konsep kuantisasi energi akibat model potensial L-J dapat dipahami secara utuh. Solution of the Schrödinger equation in various  potential model is very important in order to provide an overview of  behaviour’s particle under influence of potential model. The solution is a wave function that contains important information are shown by energy state. In this research, the investigated is Lennard Jones potential by using Goal Seek analysis which are available in Microsoft Excel. The equation is described by the Euler method and then boundary condition is determined to perecision result which are obtained. It must be changed in terms dimensionless where

  13. Threshold and Lennard-Jones resonances and elastic lifetimes in the scattering of atoms from crystalline surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1978-01-01

    The GR method for solving the scattering equations of atoms from a hard corrugated surface is applied on accelerated particles above a hard corrugated surface and a hard corrugated surface with an attractive well. The solutions are given for the Rayleigh hypothesis that under the range of corrugation presented in this paper leads to the exact ones. Threshold resonances are studied observing that the appearance and disappearance of beams must be for a general theory with vertical tangent. The structure of the Lennard-Jones resonances given for the model mentioned above. For the first time it is stressed that Lennard-Jones resonances are not observed in metal surfaces in general, and, accordingly, they are unobserved in compact metallic surfaces. This is correlated with the fact that diffraction has not been observed. Both facts are due to the very weak corrugation of the gas-metal interaction potential. According to our results, the Lennard-Jones resonances in metals present greater difficulties to be observed experimentally. It is also noted that the absence of diffraction in compact metal surfaces is because they are almost plane and not because of the Debye-Waller effect. Finally, the lifetimes of the atoms at the crystal surfaces are calculated. These are larger, the smaller the incident energy and the larger the corrugation. But the lifetimes are particularly large at resonance conditions (10 -11 s). (Auth.)

  14. Ab initio study of the atomic motion in liquid metal surfaces: comparison with Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Luis E; Gonzalez, David J

    2006-01-01

    It is established that liquid metals exhibit surface layering at the liquid-vapour interface, while dielectric simple systems, like those interacting through Lennard-Jones potentials, show a monotonic decay from the liquid density to that of the vapour. First principles molecular dynamics simulations of the free liquid surface of several liquid metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ba, Al, Tl and Si), and the Na 3 K 7 alloy near their triple points have been performed in order to study the atomic motion at the interface, mainly at the outer layer. Comparison with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulations of a Lennard-Jones system shows interesting differences and similarities. The probability distribution function of the time of residence in a layer shows a peak at very short times and a long-lasting tail. The mean residence time in a layer increases when approaching the interfacial region, slightly in the Lennard-Jones system but strongly in the metallic systems. The motion within the layers, parallel to the interface, can be described as diffusion enhanced (strongly in the case of the outermost layer) with respect to the bulk, for both types of systems, despite its reduced dimensionality in metals

  15. Water in the presence of inert Lennard-Jones obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtjak, Mario; Urbic, Tomaz

    2014-04-01

    Water confined by the presence of a 'sea' of inert obstacles was examined. In the article, freely mobile two-dimensional Mercedes-Benz (MB) water put to a disordered, but fixed, matrix of Lennard-Jones disks was studied by the Monte Carlo computer simulations. For the MB water molecules in the matrix of Lennard-Jones disks, we explored the structures, hydrogen-bond-network formation and thermodynamics as a function of temperature and size and density of matrix particles. We found that the structure of model water is perturbed by the presence of the obstacles. Density of confined water, which was in equilibrium with the bulk water, was smaller than the density of the bulk water and the temperature dependence of the density of absorbed water did not show the density anomaly in the studied temperature range. The behaviour observed as a consequence of confinement is similar to that of increasing temperature, which can for a matrix lead to a process similar to capillary evaporation. At the same occupancy of space, smaller matrix molecules cause higher destruction effect on the absorbed water molecules than the bigger ones. We have also tested the hypothesis that at low matrix densities the obstacles induce an increased ordering and 'hydrogen bonding' of the MB model molecules, relative to pure fluid, while at high densities the obstacles reduce MB water structuring, as they prevent the fluid to form good 'hydrogen-bonding' networks. However, for the size of matrix molecules similar to that of water, we did not observe this effect.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of Lennard-Jones physisorption on W(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broughton, J.Q.

    1980-01-01

    The physisorption of Xe on W(100) was modeled by Lennard-Jones pair-wise interaction potentials and the dynamics of coverages ranging from one to four adlayers obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. At 115 K, the first two layers were well-ordered and each adsorbed with c(2 x 2) symmetry. Further adsorption produced a surface similar to that of a distorted Xe(100) face. In accord with the work of Broughton and Woodcock, the top layers of the three- and four-adlayer coverages were rough and had liquid-like diffusion coefficients. The potential energies of all layers other than the first were similar, thus corroborating one of the postulates of BET theory. Generally, the effect of adsorbing a layer was to reduce the entropy of all those beneath. (orig.)

  17. Shear viscosity of the Lennard-Jones fluid near the triple point: Green-Kubo results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erpenbeck, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    The long-standing disagreement over the shear viscosity coefficient of the Lennard-Jones fluid near the triple point is reexamined through a series of very extensive Monte Carlo molecular-dynamics calculations of this transport coefficient based on the Green-Kubo theory. The stress autocorrelation function is shown to exhibit a slow decay, principally in the kinetic-potential and the potential-potential terms, which is large compared with the kinetic-kinetic long-time tail predicted by simple mode-coupling theory. Nonetheless, the viscosity coefficient, exclusive of any correction for this tail for times greater than are accessible numerically, is found to agree with that of Schoen and Hoheisel (who discounted the existence of such a tail) as well as nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics calculations. The large value of the viscosity coefficient found by Levesque and co-workers for 864 particles is brought into statistical agreement with the present results by a modest, but not unrealistic, increase in its statistical uncertainty. The pressure is found to exhibit an anomalous dependence on the size of the system, but the viscosity as well as the self-diffusion constant appear to be linear in the inverse of the number of particles, within the precision of our calculations. The viscosity coefficient, including a long-time-tail contribution based on the extended mode-coupling theory is (3.796 +- 0.068)σepsilon-c/m)/sup 1/2/ for the Lennard-Jones potential, fitted to a cubic spline, and (3.345 +- 0.068)σepsilon-c/m)/sup 1/2/ for the potential truncated at 2.5σ

  18. Crystal phases of a glass-forming Lennard-Jones mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Julian R.; Harrowell, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We compare the potential energy at zero temperature of a range of crystal structures for a glass-forming binary mixture of Lennard-Jones particles. The lowest-energy ordered state consists of coexisting phases of a single component face centered cubic structure and an equimolar cesium chloride structure. An infinite number of layered crystal structures are identified with energies close to this ground state. We demonstrate that the finite size increase of the energy of the coexisting crystal with incoherent interfaces is sufficient to destabilize this ordered phase in simulations of typical size. Two specific local coordination structures are identified as of possible structural significance in the amorphous state. We observe rapid crystal growth in the equimolar mixture

  19. Gaussian approximation to single particle correlations at and below the picosecond scale for Lennard-Jones and nanoparticle fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zon, Ramses; Ashwin, S S; Cohen, E G D

    2008-01-01

    To describe short time (picosecond) and small scale (nanometre) transport in fluids, a Green's function approach was recently developed. This approach relies on an expansion of the distribution of single particle displacements around a Gaussian function, yielding an infinite series of correction terms. Applying a recent theorem (van Zon and Cohen 2006 J. Stat. Phys. 123 1–37) shows that for sufficiently small times the terms in this series become successively smaller, so that truncating the series near or at the Gaussian level might provide a good approximation. In this paper, we derive a theoretical estimate for the time scale at which truncating the series at or near the Gaussian level could be supposed to be accurate for equilibrium nanoscale systems. In order to numerically estimate this time scale, the coefficients for the first few terms in the series are determined in computer simulations for a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid, an isotopic LJ mixture and a suspension of a LJ-based model of nanoparticles in a LJ fluid. The results suggest that for LJ fluids an expansion around a Gaussian is accurate at time scales up to a picosecond, while for nanoparticles in suspension (a nanofluid), the characteristic time scale up to which the Gaussian is accurate becomes of the order of 5–10 ps. (invited article)

  20. Longitudinal and bulk viscosities of Lennard-Jones fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankeshwar, K.; Pathak, K. N.; Ranganathan, S.

    1996-12-01

    Expressions for the longitudinal and bulk viscosities have been derived using Green Kubo formulae involving the time integral of the longitudinal and bulk stress autocorrelation functions. The time evolution of stress autocorrelation functions are determined using the Mori formalism and a memory function which is obtained from the Mori equation of motion. The memory function is of hyperbolic secant form and involves two parameters which are related to the microscopic sum rules of the respective autocorrelation function. We have derived expressions for the zeroth-, second-and fourth- order sum rules of the longitudinal and bulk stress autocorrelation functions. These involve static correlation functions up to four particles. The final expressions for these have been put in a form suitable for numerical calculations using low- order decoupling approximations. The numerical results have been obtained for the sum rules of longitudinal and bulk stress autocorrelation functions. These have been used to calculate the longitudinal and bulk viscosities and time evolution of the longitudinal stress autocorrelation function of the Lennard-Jones fluids over wide ranges of densities and temperatures. We have compared our results with the available computer simulation data and found reasonable agreement.

  1. Vacancy behavior in a compressed fcc Lennard-Jones crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeler, J.R. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    This computer experiment study concerns the determination of the stable vacancy configuration in a compressed fcc Lennard-Jones crystal and the migration of this defect in a compressed crystal. Isotropic and uniaxial compression stress conditions were studied. The isotropic and uniaxial compression magnitudes employed were 0.94 less than or equal to eta less than or equal to 1.5, and 1.0 less than or equal to eta less than or equal to 1.5, respectively. The site-centered vacancy (SCV) was the stable vacancy configuration whenever cubic symmetry was present. This includes all of the isotropic compression cases and the particular uniaxial compression case (eta = √2) that give a bcc structure. In addition, the SCV was the stable configuration for uniaxial compression eta 1.20, the SV-OP is an extended defect and, therefore, a saddle point for SV-OP migration could not be determined. The mechanism for the transformation from the SCV to the SV-OP as the stable form at eta = 1.29 appears to be an alternating sign [101] and/or [011] shear process

  2. Flory-Huggins parameter χ, from binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones particles to block copolymer melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chremos, Alexandros; Nikoubashman, Arash; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we develop a coarse-graining methodology for mapping specific block copolymer systems to bead-spring particle-based models. We map the constituent Kuhn segments to Lennard-Jones particles, and establish a semi-empirical correlation between the experimentally determined Flory-Huggins parameter χ and the interaction of the model potential. For these purposes, we have performed an extensive set of isobaric–isothermal Monte Carlo simulations of binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones particles with the same size but with asymmetric energetic parameters. The phase behavior of these monomeric mixtures is then extended to chains with finite sizes through theoretical considerations. Such a top-down coarse-graining approach is important from a computational point of view, since many characteristic features of block copolymer systems are on time and length scales which are still inaccessible through fully atomistic simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of our method for generating parameters by reproducing the morphology diagram of a specific diblock copolymer, namely, poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate), which has been extensively studied in experiments

  3. Flory-Huggins parameter χ, from binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones particles to block copolymer melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chremos, Alexandros, E-mail: achremos@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Centre for Process Systems Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Nikoubashman, Arash, E-mail: arashn@princeton.edu; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    In this contribution, we develop a coarse-graining methodology for mapping specific block copolymer systems to bead-spring particle-based models. We map the constituent Kuhn segments to Lennard-Jones particles, and establish a semi-empirical correlation between the experimentally determined Flory-Huggins parameter χ and the interaction of the model potential. For these purposes, we have performed an extensive set of isobaric–isothermal Monte Carlo simulations of binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones particles with the same size but with asymmetric energetic parameters. The phase behavior of these monomeric mixtures is then extended to chains with finite sizes through theoretical considerations. Such a top-down coarse-graining approach is important from a computational point of view, since many characteristic features of block copolymer systems are on time and length scales which are still inaccessible through fully atomistic simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of our method for generating parameters by reproducing the morphology diagram of a specific diblock copolymer, namely, poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate), which has been extensively studied in experiments.

  4. Simulation of depositions of a Lennard-Jones cluster on a crystalline surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Depositions of amorphous Lennard-Jones clusters on a crystalline surface are numerically investigated. From the results of the molecular dynamics simulation, we found that the deposited clusters exhibit a transition from multilayered adsorption to monolayered adsorption at a critical incident speed. Employing the energy conservation law, we can explain the behavior of the ratio of the number of atoms adsorbed on the substrate to the cluster size. The boundary shape of the deposited cluster depends strongly on the incident speed, and some unstable modes grow during the spread of the deposited cluster on the substrate. We also discuss the wettability between different Lennard-Jones atoms. (author)

  5. Analysis of a Lennard-Jones fcc structure melting to the corresponding frozen liquid: Differences between the bulk and the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivi-Tran, N.; Faivre, A.

    2009-01-01

    We computed a Lennard-Jones frozen liquid with a free surface using classical molecular dynamics. The structure factor curves on the free surface of this sample were calculated for different depths knowing that we have periodic boundary conditions on the other parts of the sample. The resulting structure factor curves show an horizontal shift of their first peak depending on how deep in the sample the curves are computed. We analyze our resulting curves in the light of spatial correlation functions during melting. The conclusion is that the differences between bulk and surface are quite small during melting and that at the end of melting, only the very surface happens to be less dense than the bulk. This result is intrinsic to the shape of the Lennard-Jones potential and does not depend on any other parameter.

  6. Numerical computations of the Lennard-Jones resonances and ''relative displacements'' of the scattered atomic beams from the system He/LiF(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of the attractive part of the interaction potential on the scattering of He atoms from a LiF(001) surface. We calculate, in particular, the Lennard-Jones resonances on the intensities and the phases of the scattered amplitudes, using a square well in the front of a hard corrugated surface model. We show that the amplitudes for incident energies smaller than the depth of the well are dominated by the resonances

  7. Collision frequency of Lennard-Jones fluids at high densities by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebayo, G.A.; Anusionwu, B.C.; Njah, A.N.; Adeniran, O.J.; Mathew, B.; Sunmonu, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Arising from the inability of theoretical calculations to give accurate descriptions of (shear) viscosity in rare gases at high densities, we investigated the likely cause of discrepancy between theory and experiments. Molecular Dynamics simulations were performed to calculate transport coefficients and collision frequency of rare gases at high densities and different temperatures using a Lennard-Jones modelled pair potential. The results, when compared with experiments show an underestimation of the viscosity calculated through the Green-Kubo formalism, but in agreement with some other calculations performed by other groups. In the present work the origin of the underestimation is considered. Analyses of the transport coefficients show a very high collision frequency which suggests an atom may spend much less time in the neighbourhood of the fields of force of another atom and that the distribution in the systems studied adjusts itself to a nearly Maxwellian type which resulted in a locally and temporarily slowly varying temperature. We show that the time spent in the fields of force is so small compared with relaxation time thereby leading to a possible reduction in local velocity auto-correlation between atoms. (author)

  8. Modeling Aggregation Processes of Lennard-Jones particles Via Stochastic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Yakir; Cameron, Maria

    2017-07-01

    We model an isothermal aggregation process of particles/atoms interacting according to the Lennard-Jones pair potential by mapping the energy landscapes of each cluster size N onto stochastic networks, computing transition probabilities from the network for an N-particle cluster to the one for N+1, and connecting these networks into a single joint network. The attachment rate is a control parameter. The resulting network representing the aggregation of up to 14 particles contains 6427 vertices. It is not only time-irreversible but also reducible. To analyze its transient dynamics, we introduce the sequence of the expected initial and pre-attachment distributions and compute them for a wide range of attachment rates and three values of temperature. As a result, we find the configurations most likely to be observed in the process of aggregation for each cluster size. We examine the attachment process and conduct a structural analysis of the sets of local energy minima for every cluster size. We show that both processes taking place in the network, attachment and relaxation, lead to the dominance of icosahedral packing in small (up to 14 atom) clusters.

  9. Comprehensive representation of the Lennard-Jones equation of state based on molecular dynamics simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieprzyk, S.; Brańka, A. C.; Maćkowiak, Sz.; Heyes, D. M.

    2018-03-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is calculated using a new set of molecular dynamics data which extends to higher temperature than in previous studies. The modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) equation, which goes up to ca. T ˜ 6, is reparametrized with new simulation data. A new analytic form for the EoS, which breaks the fluid range into two regions with different analytic forms and goes up to ca. T ≃ 35, is also proposed. The accuracy of the new formulas is at least as good as the MBWR fit and goes to much higher temperature allowing it to now encompass the Amagat line. The fitted formula extends into the high temperature range where the system can be well represented by inverse power potential scaling, which means that our specification of the equation of state covers the entire (ρ, T) plane. Accurate analytic fit formulas for the Boyle, Amagat, and inversion curves are presented. Parametrizations of the extrema loci of the isochoric, CV, and isobaric, CP, heat capacities are given. As found by others, a line maxima of CP terminates in the critical point region, and a line of minima of CP terminates on the freezing line. The line of maxima of CV terminates close to or at the critical point, and a line of minima of CV terminates to the right of the critical point. No evidence for a divergence in CV in the critical region is found.

  10. Liquid-vapour phase behaviour of a polydisperse Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, Nigel B; Sollich, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simulation study of the liquid-vapour phase behaviour of a model polydisperse fluid. Particle interactions are given by a Lennard-Jones potential in which polydispersity features both in the particle sizes and the amplitude of their interactions. We address the computational problem of accurately locating the cloud curve for such a system using Monte Carlo simulations within the grand canonical ensemble. The strongly nonlinear variation of the fractional volumes of the phases across the coexistence region precludes naive extrapolation to determine the cloud point density. Instead we propose an improved estimator for the cloud point location and use scaling arguments to predicts its finite-size behaviour. Excellent agreement is found with the simulation results. Application of the method reveals that the measured cloud curve is highly sensitive to the presence of large particles, even when they are extremely rare. This finding is expected to have implications for the reproducibility of experimentally measured phase diagrams in colloids and polymers

  11. RISM theory distribution functions for Lennard--Jones interaction site fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Hazoume, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    Reference interaction site model (RISM) theory distribution functions for Lennard-Jones interaction site fluids are discussed. The comparison with computer simulation results suggests that these distribution functions are as accurate as RISM distribution functions for fused hard sphere molecular fluids

  12. Application of the RISM theory to Lennard-Jones interaction site molecular fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Hazoume, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    It seems that reference interaction site model (RISM) theory atom--atom distribution functions have been obtained directly from the RISM equations only for fused hard sphere molecular fluids. RISM distribution functions for Lennard-Jones interaction site fluids are presented. Results presented suggest that these distribution functions are as accurate as RISM distribution functions for fused hard sphere molecular fluids

  13. Phase separation of a Lennard-Jones fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain: implications for the nuclear body formation near chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Inrok; Choi, Saehyun; Jung, YounJoon; Kim, Jun Soo

    2015-08-28

    Phase separation in a biological cell nucleus occurs in a heterogeneous environment filled with a high density of chromatins and thus it is inevitably influenced by interactions with chromatins. As a model system of nuclear body formation in a cell nucleus filled with chromatins, we simulate the phase separation of a low-density Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid interacting with a long, condensed polymer chain. The influence of the density variation of LJ particles above and below the phase boundary and the role of attractive interactions between LJ particles and polymer segments are investigated at a fixed value of strong self-interaction between LJ particles. For a density of LJ particles above the phase boundary, phase separation occurs and a dense domain of LJ particles forms irrespective of interactions with the condensed polymer chain whereas its localization relative to the polymer chain is determined by the LJ-polymer attraction strength. Especially, in the case of moderately weak attractions, the domain forms separately from the polymer chain and subsequently associates with the polymer chain. When the density is below the phase boundary, however, the formation of a dense domain is possible only when the LJ-polymer attraction is strong enough, for which the domain grows in direct contact with the interacting polymer chain. In this work, different growth behaviors of LJ particles result from the differences in the density of LJ particles and in the LJ-polymer interaction, and this work suggests that the distinct formation of activity-dependent and activity-independent nuclear bodies (NBs) in a cell nucleus may originate from the differences in the concentrations of body-specific NB components and in their interaction with chromatins.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the hydration of Lennard-Jones solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, A.; Rahman, A.; Stillinger, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    In order to clarify the nature of hydrophobic interactions in water, we have used the molecular dynamics simulation method to study a system comprising two Lennard-Jones solute particles and 214 water molecules. Although the solutes were placed initially in contact, forces in the system drive them slightly apart to permit formation of vertex-sharing solvent ''cages.'' Definite orientational preferences have been observed for water molecules in the first solvation layer around the Lennard-Jones solutes; these preferences are loosely reminiscent of structure in clathrates. Nevertheless, substantial local disorder is obviously present. The dynamical data show that translational and rotational motions of solvation--sheath water molecules are perceptibly slower (by at least 20%) than those in pure bulk water

  15. Fluctuations and thermodynamic response functions in a Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Johnson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic response functions of a nearest-neighbor Lennard-Jones solid--heat capacity, thermal-expansion coefficient, compressibility, and elastic constants--are calculated directly from fluctuations using molecular-dynamics simulations. The algorithm used is the earlier Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics modified to take into account symmetry and rotation invariance of the system under investigation. The convergence is very fast and results are in good agreement with existing Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics results

  16. Melting in Two-Dimensional Lennard-Jones Systems: Observation of a Metastable Hexatic Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Kaplan, T.; Mostoller, M.

    1995-01-01

    Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of two-dimensional melting have been carried out using a recently revised Parrinello-Rahman scheme on massively parallel supercomputers. A metastable state is observed between the solid and liquid phases in Lennard-Jones systems of 36 864 and 102 400 atoms. This intermediate state shows the characteristics of the hexatic phase predicted by the theory of Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson, and Young

  17. Metastability, spectrum, and eigencurrents of the Lennard-Jones-38 network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Maria K.

    2014-01-01

    We develop computational tools for spectral analysis of stochastic networks representing energy landscapes of atomic and molecular clusters. Physical meaning and some properties of eigenvalues, left and right eigenvectors, and eigencurrents are discussed. We propose an approach to compute a collection of eigenpairs and corresponding eigencurrents describing the most important relaxation processes taking place in the system on its way to the equilibrium. It is suitable for large and complex stochastic networks where pairwise transition rates, given by the Arrhenius law, vary by orders of magnitude. The proposed methodology is applied to the network representing the Lennard-Jones-38 cluster created by Wales's group. Its energy landscape has a double funnel structure with a deep and narrow face-centered cubic funnel and a shallower and wider icosahedral funnel. However, the complete spectrum of the generator matrix of the Lennard-Jones-38 network has no appreciable spectral gap separating the eigenvalue corresponding to the escape from the icosahedral funnel. We provide a detailed description of the escape process from the icosahedral funnel using the eigencurrent and demonstrate a superexponential growth of the corresponding eigenvalue. The proposed spectral approach is compared to the methodology of the Transition Path Theory. Finally, we discuss whether the Lennard-Jones-38 cluster is metastable from the points of view of a mathematician and a chemical physicist, and make a connection with experimental works

  18. Analytic Debye-Grüneisen equation of state for a generalized Lennard-Jones solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙久勋; 吴强; 蔡灵仓; 经福谦

    2003-01-01

    The approximate method to treat the practical quantum anharmonic solids proposed by Hardy,Lacks and Shukla is reformulated with explicit physical meanings.It is shown that the quantum effect is important at low temperature,it can be treated in the harmonic framework; and the anharmonic effect is important at high temperature and tends to zero at low temperature,it can be treated by using a classical approximation.The alternative formulation is easier for various applications,and is applied to a Debye-Gruneisen solid with the generalized Lennard-Jones intermolecular interaction.The expressions for the Debye temperature and Gruneisen parameter as a function of volume are analytically derived.The analytic equation of state is applied to predict the thermodynamic properties of solid xenon at normal-pressure with the nearest-neighbour Lennard-Jones interaction,and is further applied to research the properties of solid xenon and krypton at high pressure by using an all-neighbour Lennard-Jones interaction.The theoretical results are in agreement with the experiments.

  19. An index with improved diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease derived from the Lennard-Jones criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, S; Schweiger, K; Pablik, E; Collet-Fenetrier, B; Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Alfaro, I; Panés, J; Moayyedi, P; Reinisch, W

    2016-09-01

    The Lennard-Jones criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing Crohn's disease (CD) and include the items granuloma, macroscopic discontinuity, transmural inflammation, fibrosis, lymphoid aggregates and discontinuous inflammation on histology. The criteria have never been subjected to a formal validation process. To develop a validated and improved diagnostic index based on the items of Lennard-Jones criteria. Included were 328 adult patients with long-standing CD (median disease duration 10 years) from three centres and classified as 'established', 'probable' or 'non-CD' by Lennard-Jones criteria at time of diagnosis. Controls were patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 170). The performance of each of the six diagnostic items of Lennard-Jones criteria was modelled by logistic regression and a new index based on stepwise backward selection and cut-offs was developed. The diagnostic value of the new index was analysed by comparing sensitivity, specificity and accuracy vs. Lennard-Jones criteria. By Lennard-Jones criteria 49% (n = 162) of CD patients would have been diagnosed as 'non-CD' at time of diagnosis (sensitivity/specificity/accuracy, 'established' CD: 0.34/0.99/0.67; 'probable' CD: 0.51/0.95/0.73). A new index was derived from granuloma, fibrosis, transmural inflammation and macroscopic discontinuity, but excluded lymphoid aggregates and discontinuous inflammation on histology. Our index provided improved diagnostic accuracy for 'established' and 'probable' CD (sensitivity/specificity/accuracy, 'established' CD: 0.45/1/0.72; 'probable' CD: 0.8/0.85/0.82), including the subgroup isolated colonic CD ('probable' CD, new index: 0.73/0.85/0.79; Lennard-Jones criteria: 0.43/0.95/0.69). We developed an index based on items of Lennard-Jones criteria providing improved diagnostic accuracy for the differential diagnosis between CD and UC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Properties of Organic Liquids when Simulated with Long-Range Lennard-Jones Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nina M; van Maaren, Paul J; Ditz, Jonas C; Yildirim, Ahmet; van der Spoel, David

    2015-07-14

    In order to increase the accuracy of classical computer simulations, existing methodologies may need to be adapted. Hitherto, most force fields employ a truncated potential function to model van der Waals interactions, sometimes augmented with an analytical correction. Although such corrections are accurate for homogeneous systems with a long cutoff, they should not be used in inherently inhomogeneous systems such as biomolecular and interface systems. For such cases, a variant of the particle mesh Ewald algorithm (Lennard-Jones PME) was already proposed 20 years ago (Essmann et al. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 103, 8577-8593), but it was implemented only recently (Wennberg et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 3527-3537) in a major simulation code (GROMACS). The availability of this method allows surface tensions of liquids as well as bulk properties to be established, such as density and enthalpy of vaporization, without approximations due to truncation. Here, we report on simulations of ≈150 liquids (taken from a force field benchmark: Caleman et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 61-74) using three different force fields and compare simulations with and without explicit long-range van der Waals interactions. We find that the density and enthalpy of vaporization increase for most liquids using the generalized Amber force field (GAFF, Wang et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2004, 25, 1157-1174) and the Charmm generalized force field (CGenFF, Vanommeslaeghe et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2010, 31, 671-690) but less so for OPLS/AA (Jorgensen and Tirado-Rives, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 6665-6670), which was parametrized with an analytical correction to the van der Waals potential. The surface tension increases by ≈10(-2) N/m for all force fields. These results suggest that van der Waals attractions in force fields are too strong, in particular for the GAFF and CGenFF. In addition to the simulation results, we introduce a new version of a web server, http

  1. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2013-09-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2013-01-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell-model prediction of the melting of a Lennard-Jones solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.L.

    1980-01-01

    The classical free energy of the Lennard-Jones 6-12 solid is computed from a single-particle anharmonic cell model with a correction to the entropy given by the classical correlational entropy of quasiharmonic lattice dynamics. The free energy of the fluid is obtained from the Hansen-Ree analytic fit to Monte Carlo equation-of-state calculations. The resulting predictions of the solid-fluid coexistence curves by this corrected cell model of the solid are in excellent agreement with the computer experiments

  4. Self-diffusion coefficients of the metastable Lennard-Jones vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Chu; Zhou Youhua; Marlow, W H; Hassan, Y A

    2008-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients of a metastable Lennard-Jones vapor were obtained using the memory function formalism and the frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function at reduced temperatures from 0.75 to 1.0. The radial density distribution functions used to evaluate the second, fourth and sixth frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function were obtained from the restricted canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation (Corti and Debenedetti 1994 Chem. Eng. Sci. 49 2717). The self-diffusion coefficients at reduced temperature 0.75 do not vary monotonically as the density increases, and for the other three temperatures the self-diffusion coefficients vary normally

  5. Self-diffusion coefficients of the metastable Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie Chu; Zhou Youhua [School of Physics and Information Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Marlow, W H; Hassan, Y A [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)], E-mail: yhzhou@jhun.edu.cn

    2008-10-15

    Self-diffusion coefficients of a metastable Lennard-Jones vapor were obtained using the memory function formalism and the frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function at reduced temperatures from 0.75 to 1.0. The radial density distribution functions used to evaluate the second, fourth and sixth frequency moments of the velocity autocorrelation function were obtained from the restricted canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation (Corti and Debenedetti 1994 Chem. Eng. Sci. 49 2717). The self-diffusion coefficients at reduced temperature 0.75 do not vary monotonically as the density increases, and for the other three temperatures the self-diffusion coefficients vary normally.

  6. Evidence of hexatic phase formation in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones binary arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Johnson, W.L.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1996-01-01

    We report evidence of the hexatic phase formation in Lennard-Jones binary substitutional random arrays from isothermal-isobaric molecular-dynamics simulations. The hexatic phase is analogous to those predicted in Kosterlitz-Thouless theory of melting that is characterized by short-range translational order and quasi-long-range orientational order. At the crystal to hexatic phase transition, dislocation pairs are observed to unbind into isolated dislocations. Further disordering of the hexatic phase, however, does not lead to dissociation of dislocations into disclinations. Instead, the dislocations become clustered and form dislocation networks which results in formation of amorphous phases. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  7. Molecular dynamics studies of the dynamics of supercooled Lennard-Jones liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leeuw, S.W.; Brakkee, M.J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of molecular dynamics experiments, in which the Lennard-Jones liquid is cooled isobarically into the metastable temperature region below the freezing temperature. The variation of the density-density and transverse current correlation functions with temperature is studied. We observed a power-law behaviour for the temperature dependence of dynamical properties (viscosity and coefficienty of self-diffusion) with an exponent in good agreement with prediction of mode coupling theories and recent experimental results. (author). 23 refs, 5 figs

  8. Nonlinear transport processes and fluid dynamics: Cylindrical Couette flow of Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayat, R.E.; Eu, B.C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we report on calculations of flow profiles for cylindrical Couette flow of a Lennard-Jones fluid. The flow is subjected to a temperature gradient and thermoviscous effects are taken into consideration. We apply the generalized fluid dynamic equations which are provided by the modified moment method for the Boltzmann equation reported previously. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo direct simulation method by K. Nanbu [Phys. Fluids 27, 2632 (1984)] for most of Knudsen numbers for which the simulation data are available

  9. ;:::,!,lj

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential effect of the ... coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, drugs which have been shown to be .... The Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins act as important ... Defects in this switching mechanism give rise to disease.

  10. Communication: Studies of the Lennard-Jones fluid in 2, 3, and 4 dimensions highlight the need for a liquid-state 1/d expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent theoretical prediction by Maimbourg and Kurchan [e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/1603.05023 (2016)] that for regular pair-potential systems the virial potential-energy correlation coefficient increases towards unity as the dimension d goes to infinity is investigated for the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones fluid. This is done by computer simulations for d = 2, 3, 4 going from the critical point along the critical isotherm/isochore to higher density/temperature. In both cases the virial potential-energy correlation coefficient increases significantly. For a given density and temperature relative to the critical point, with increasing number of dimension the Lennard-Jones system conforms better to the hidden-scale-invariance property characterized by high virial potential-energy correlations (a property that leads to the existence of isomorphs in the thermodynamic phase diagram, implying that it becomes effectively one-dimensional in regard to structure and dynamics). The present paper also gives the first numerical demonstration of isomorph invariance of structure and dynamics in four dimensions. Our findings emphasize the need for a universally applicable 1/d expansion in liquid-state theory; we conjecture that the systems known to obey hidden scale invariance in three dimensions are those for which the yet-to-be-developed 1/d expansion converges rapidly.

  11. Phase Diagram of Kob-Andersen-Type Binary Lennard-Jones Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-04-01

    The binary Kob-Andersen (KA) Lennard-Jones mixture is the standard model for computational studies of viscous liquids and the glass transition. For very long simulations, the viscous KA system crystallizes, however, by phase separating into a pure A particle phase forming a fcc crystal. We present the thermodynamic phase diagram for KA-type mixtures consisting of up to 50% small (B ) particles showing, in particular, that the melting temperature of the standard KA system at liquid density 1.2 is 1.028(3) in A particle Lennard-Jones units. At large B particle concentrations, the system crystallizes into the CsCl crystal structure. The eutectic corresponding to the fcc and CsCl structures is cutoff in a narrow interval of B particle concentrations around 26% at which the bipyramidal orthorhombic PuBr3 structure is the thermodynamically stable phase. The melting temperature's variation with B particle concentration at two constant pressures, as well as at the constant density 1.2, is estimated from simulations at pressure 10.19 using isomorph theory. Our data demonstrate approximate identity between the melting temperature and the onset temperature below which viscous dynamics appears. Finally, the nature of the solid-liquid interface is briefly discussed.

  12. Disordering scaling and generalized nearest-neighbor approach in the thermodynamics of Lennard-Jones systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, V.S.

    2003-01-01

    We suggest a concept of multiple disordering scaling of the crystalline state. Such a scaling procedure applied to a crystal leads to the liquid and (in low density limit) gas states. This approach provides an explanation to a high value of configuration (common) entropy of liquefied noble gases, which can be deduced from experimental data. We use the generalized nearest-neighbor approach to calculate free energy and pressure of the Lennard-Jones systems after performing this scaling procedure. These thermodynamic functions depend on one parameter characterizing the disordering only. Condensed states of the system (liquid and solid) correspond to small values of this parameter. When this parameter tends to unity, we get an asymptotically exact equation of state for a gas involving the second virial coefficient. A reasonable choice of the values for the disordering parameter (ranging between zero and unity) allows us to find the lines of coexistence between different phase states in the Lennard-Jones systems, which are in a good agreement with the available experimental data

  13. Glass transitions in one-, two-, three-, and four-dimensional binary Lennard-Jones systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Ralf; St-Onge, Denis A; Patterson, Steve [Physics Department, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB, E4L 1E6 (Canada); Kob, Walter [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II and CNRS, 34095 Montpellier Cedex (France)], E-mail: rbruening@mta.ca

    2009-01-21

    We investigate the calorimetric liquid-glass transition by performing simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones mixture in one through four dimensions. Starting at a high temperature, the systems are cooled to T = 0 and heated back to the ergodic liquid state at constant rates. Glass transitions are observed in two, three and four dimensions as a hysteresis between the cooling and heating curves. This hysteresis appears in the energy and pressure diagrams, and the scanning rate dependence of the area and height of the hysteresis can be described using power laws. The one-dimensional system does not experience a glass transition but its specific heat curve resembles the shape of the D{>=}2 results in the supercooled liquid regime above the glass transition. As D increases, the radial distribution functions reflect reduced geometric constraints. Nearest neighbor distances become smaller with increasing D due to interactions between nearest and next-nearest neighbors. Simulation data for the glasses are compared with crystal and melting data obtained with a Lennard-Jones system with only one type of particle and we find that with increasing D crystallization becomes increasingly more difficult.

  14. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbante, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano - Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32 - 20133 Milano (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano - Via La Masa 34 - 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  15. An accurate expression for radial distribution function of the Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsali, Ali; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Ali Mansoori, G.; Abbaspour, Mohsen

    2005-01-01

    A simple and accurate expression for radial distribution function (RDF) of the Lennard-Jones fluid is presented. The expression explicitly states the RDF as a continuous function of reduced interparticle distance, temperature, and density. It satisfies the limiting conditions of zero density and infinite distance imposed by statistical thermodynamics. The distance dependence of this expression is expressed by an equation which contains 11 adjustable parameters. These parameters are fitted to 353 RDF data, obtained by molecular dynamics calculations, and then expressed as functions of reduced distance, temperature and density. This expression, having a total of 65 constants, reproduces the RDF data with an average root-mean-squared deviation of 0.0152 for the range of state variables of 0.5= * = * = * =ρσ 3 are reduced temperature and density, respectively). The expression predicts the pressure and the internal energy of the Lennard-Jones fluid with an uncertainty that is comparable to that obtained directly from the molecular dynamics simulations

  16. Equation of state and Helmholtz free energy for the atomic system of the repulsive Lennard-Jones particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeinia, Ali; Feyzi, Farzaneh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2017-12-07

    Simple and accurate expressions are presented for the equation of state (EOS) and absolute Helmholtz free energy of a system composed of simple atomic particles interacting through the repulsive Lennard-Jones potential model in the fluid and solid phases. The introduced EOS has 17 and 22 coefficients for fluid and solid phases, respectively, which are regressed to the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation data over the reduced temperature range of 0.6≤T * ≤6.0 and the packing fraction range of 0.1 ≤ η ≤ 0.72. The average absolute relative percent deviation in fitting the EOS parameters to the MC data is 0.06 and 0.14 for the fluid and solid phases, respectively. The thermodynamic integration method is used to calculate the free energy using the MC simulation results. The Helmholtz free energy of the ideal gas is employed as the reference state for the fluid phase. For the solid phase, the values of the free energy at the reduced density equivalent to the close-packed of a hard sphere are used as the reference state. To check the validity of the predicted values of the Helmholtz free energy, the Widom particle insertion method and the Einstein crystal technique of Frenkel and Ladd are employed. The results obtained from the MC simulation approaches are well agreed to the EOS results, which show that the proposed model can reliably be utilized in the framework of thermodynamic theories.

  17. Viscous Growth in Spinodal Decomposition of the Two-component Lennard-Jones Model in Two Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, M.; Toxvaerd, S.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of phase separation of a two-component Lennard-Jones model in three dimensions is investigated by means of large scale molecular dynamics simulation. A systematic study over a wide range of quench temperatures within the coexistence region shows that the binary system reaches...

  18. The Monte Carlo dynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones glass-forming mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, L; Kob, W

    2007-01-01

    We use a standard Monte Carlo algorithm to study the slow dynamics of a binary Lennard-Jones glass-forming mixture at low temperature. We find that the Monte Carlo approach is by far the most efficient way to simulate a stochastic dynamics since the relaxation is about 10 times faster than in Brownian dynamics and about 30 times faster than in stochastic dynamics. Moreover, the average dynamical behaviour of the system is in quantitative agreement with that obtained using Newtonian dynamics, apart from at very short times where thermal vibrations are suppressed. We show, however, that dynamic fluctuations quantified by four-point dynamic susceptibilities do retain a dependence on the microscopic dynamics, as recently predicted theoretically

  19. The effect of atom mismatch on the fragility of supercooled Lennard-Jones binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Minhua; Sun Yongli; Wang Aiping; Ma Congxiao; Li Jiayun; Cheng Weidong; Liu Fang

    2006-01-01

    The shear viscosity of the well-known binary Lennard-Jones mixture is simulated under constant temperature and constant volume conditions (NVT) by a molecular-dynamics (MD) method. The effect of atomic size mismatch on the fragility parameter and glass-forming ability is studied. The fragility parameters calculated from shear viscosity data decrease with the increment of the atomic size mismatch. The value of the fragility changes from 168.963 to 22.976 when the mismatch changes from 0.023 to 0.25. It is shown that the fragility parameter is sensitive to the atomic size mismatch. The calculated pair distribution functions and mean square displacements indicate that the glass-forming ability increases with the atomic size mismatch

  20. Dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Vacancies represent an important class of crystallographic defects, and their behaviors can be strongly coupled with relevant material properties. We report the rich dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals in several thermodynamic states. Specifically, we numerically observe significantly faster diffusion of the 2-point vacancy with two missing particles in comparison with other types of vacancies; it opens the possibility of doping 2-point vacancies into atomic materials to enhance atomic migration. In addition, the resulting dislocations in the healing of a long vacancy suggest the intimate connection between vacancies and topological defects that may provide an extra dimension in the engineering of defects in extensive crystalline materials for desired properties. We thank the financial support from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  1. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones fluid: An empirical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugel, Mathilde; Galliero, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    In this work, is presented an empirical correlation on the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones fluid based on extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations results (103 points). Finite size and cutoff radius effects are investigated and taken into account to develop the correlation. This last, composed of low-density, residual and critical enhancement contributions, is built for a wide range of thermodynamics states, even at the vicinity of the critical point, and yields an average absolute deviation of 1.29% compared to our simulations. In addition, a careful analysis of the different contributions to the microscopic flux is carried out which sheds light on the underlying mechanism of the results. Finally, are discussed the limitations of the proposed model when applied to real simple fluids and mixtures using a standard corresponding states scheme and the van der Waals one-fluid approximation

  2. Simulasi Sifat Fisis Model Molekuler Dinamik Gas Argon dengan Potensial Lennard-Jones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wira Bahari Nurdin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DOWNLOAD PDFTelah  dilakukan  pembuatan  dan  pengujian  suatu  simulasi  tentang  sifat  fisis  gasargon  dengan  menggunakan  dinamika  molekuler  menggunakan  potensial Lennard-Jonesdalam sistem terisolasi (ensemble mikrokanonik. Jumlah molekul, energi total sistem danluas  kotak  simulasi  telah  divariasikan.  Untuk  menghitung  perubahan  posisi  digunakanalgoritma Verlet. Sifat fisis yang ditentukan dalam simulasi adalah temperatur dan energitotal  sistem  untuk  menentukan  adanya  fase  transisi.  Dari  hasil  simulasi,  terdapatkesesuaian antara simulasi dengan gas argon dan tidak diperoleh adanya fase transisi.Kata kunci: Simulasi dinamika molekul, argon, potensial Lennard-Jones, ensemblemikrokanonik, algoritma Verlet

  3. Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase transition of the three-dimensional Lennard-Jones particles system is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The gas and liquid densities in the coexisting state are determined with high accuracy. The critical point is determined by the block density analysis of the Binder parameter with the aid of the law of rectilinear diameter. From the critical behavior of the gas-liquid coexisting density, the critical exponent of the order parameter is estimated to be β = 0.3285(7). Surface tension is estimated from interface broadening behavior due to capillary waves. From the critical behavior of the surface tension, the critical exponent of the correlation length is estimated to be ν = 0.63(4). The obtained values of β and ν are consistent with those of the Ising universality class. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Comparison of Green-Kubo and nonequilibrium calculations of the self-diffusion constant of a Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erpenbeck, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    We apply the so-called ''synthetic'' nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics method to the calculation of the self-diffusion constant of a Lennard-Jones fluid at a number density of 0.85/σ 3 and a temperature of 1.08 epsilon-c/k/sub B/ (where epsilon-c and σ are the energy and length parameters of the potential and k/sub B/ is the Boltzmann constant). By comparing with the Green-Kubo calculation for the same state of the system and for the same number of particles, N, we find the latter calculation to yield more precise values of the self-diffusion constant for a given number of molecular-dynamics time steps. Even at small values of the diffusion current, a nontrivial time is needed for the nonequilibrium calculation to reach the steady state. For larger values of the driving force, the steady-state flow appears to become unstable and evidence of a secondary flow pattern is presented. The presence of these instabilities acts as a limit to the range of the driving force for which the steady-state method can be applied. With increasing N the range of stable values of the diffusion current density decreases. For the Green-Kubo calculations, the N dependence of the self-diffusion constant is found to be anomalous for N = 108, with the 1/N dependence only exhibited for at least 500 particles. The nonequilibrium results, while approximately independent of N for 108 and 500 particles, are found to have a similar anomalous N dependence when we extend the calculations to 1372 particles, thereby bringing the Green-Kubo and nonequilibrium results into agreement in the large-system limit

  5. Vapour-liquid equilibrium properties for two- and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids from equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulero, A.; Cuadros, F; Faundez, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour-liquid equilibrium properties for both three- and two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids were obtained using simple cubic-in-density equations of state proposed by the authors. Results were compared with those obtained by other workers from computer simulations and also with results given by other more complex semi-theoretical or semi-empirical equations of state. In the three-dimensional case good agreement is found for all properties and all temperatures. In the two-dimensional case only the coexistence densities were compared, producing good agreement for low temperatures only. The present work is the first to give numerical data for the vapour-liquid equilibrium properties of Lennard-Jones fluids calculated from equations of state. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Australia

  6. A test of the mean density approximation for Lennard-Jones mixtures with large size ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ely, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The mean density approximation for mixture radial distribution functions plays a central role in modern corresponding-states theories. This approximation is reasonably accurate for systems that do not differ widely in size and energy ratios and which are nearly equimolar. As the size ratio increases, however, or if one approaches an infinite dilution of one of the components, the approximation becomes progressively worse, especially for the small molecule pair. In an attempt to better understand and improve this approximation, isothermal molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on a series of Lennard-Jones mixtures. Thermodynamic properties, including the mixture radial distribution functions, have been obtained at seven compositions ranging from 5 to 95 mol%. In all cases the size ratio was fixed at two and three energy ratios were investigated, 22 / 11 =0.5, 1.0, and 1.5. The results of the simulations are compared with the mean density approximation and a modification to integrals evaluated with the mean density approximation is proposed

  7. A perturbed Lennard-Jones chain equation of state for liquid metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousazadeh, M H; Marageh, M Ghanadi [AEOI, JIH Research Laboratory, 11365/8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-05-24

    The perturbed Lennard-Jones chain (PLJC) equation of state is formulated based on first-order variational perturbation theory. The model uses two parameters for a monatomic system, segment size, {sigma}, and segment energy, {epsilon}/k. In this work, we employed the PLJC equation to calculate the liquid density of 26 metals, including alkali and alkali earth metals, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, silver, gold, zinc, cadmium, mercury, aluminium, gallium, indium, thallium, tin, lead, antimony, and bismuth, for which accurate experimental data exist in the literature. The calculations cover a broad range of temperatures ranging from the melting point to close to the critical point and pressures ranging from the vapour-pressure curve up to pressures as high as 2000 bar. The average absolute deviation in the liquid density predicted by the PLJC equation of state in the saturation line compared with experimental data is 1.26%. Also, using the normal melting temperature and liquid density at melting point (T{sub m}, {rho}{sub m}) as input data for the estimation of the equation of state parameters provides a good correlation of liquid density at saturated and compressed pressures.

  8. Spray flow-network flow transition of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2010-07-01

    We simulate gas-liquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model. The model consists of two types of Lennard-Jones particles, which we call liquid particles and gas particles. These two types of particles are distinguished by their mass and strength of interaction: a liquid particle has heavier mass and stronger interaction than a gas particle. By simulations with various initial number densities of these particles, we found that there is a transition from a spray flow to a network flow with an increase of the number density of the liquid particles. At the transition point, the size of the liquid droplets follows a power-law distribution, while it follows an exponential distribution when the number density of the liquid particles is lower than the critical value. The comparison between the transition of the model and that of models of percolation is discussed. The change of the average droplet size with the initial number density of the gas particles is also presented. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficient Implementations of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Lennard-Jones Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, H.

    2011-08-01

    Efficient implementations of the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method for Lennard-Jones particle systems are considered. Not only general algorithms but also techniques that are efficient for some specific CPU architectures are also explained. A simple spatialdecomposition-based strategy is adopted for parallelization. By utilizing the developed code, benchmark simulations are performed on a HITACHI SR16000/J2 system consisting of IBM POWER6 processors which are 4.7 GHz at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) and an SGI Altix ICE 8400EX system consisting of Intel Xeon processors which are 2.93 GHz at the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), the University of Tokyo. The parallelization efficiency of the largest run, consisting of 4.1 billion particles with 8192 MPI processes, is about 73% relative to that of the smallest run with 128 MPI processes at NIFS, and it is about 66% relative to that of the smallest run with 4 MPI processes at ISSP. The factors causing the parallel overhead are investigated. It is found that fluctuations of the execution time of each process degrade the parallel efficiency. These fluctuations may be due to the interference of the operating system, which is known as OS Jitter.

  10. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-14

    The vapor–liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  11. Dodecagonal order in a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.W.; Henley, C.L.; Chester, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones mixture with the interaction parameters chosen so as to favor configurations where the large atoms form squares and equilateral triangles. Many such configurations are possible which by our choice of interactions are nearly degenerate in energy. It is hypothesized that a thermal equilibrium state with 12-fold orientational order exists. Several Monte Carlo simulations were performed to cool the system to a temperature approaching zero. The ordering process was studied by following the evolution of the configurations with temperature. The onset of ordering seemed to be very diffuse in space rather than nucleated at a point. The resulting configurations consist of squares and triangles, except for a few dislocations, and thus have perfect orientational order. We also characterized the deviation from ideal quasiperiodicity in terms of the ''phason strain''; this was analyzed both by fitting a linear relation between the physical space coordinates of the atoms and the corresponding ''perpendicular space'' coordinates, and also by calculating the diffraction peaks. The latter are shifted and broadened, relative to an ideal 12-fold diffraction pattern, as in real quasicrystals

  12. Spray flow-network flow transition of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2010-01-01

    We simulate gas-liquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model. The model consists of two types of Lennard-Jones particles, which we call liquid particles and gas particles. These two types of particles are distinguished by their mass and strength of interaction: a liquid particle has heavier mass and stronger interaction than a gas particle. By simulations with various initial number densities of these particles, we found that there is a transition from a spray flow to a network flow with an increase of the number density of the liquid particles. At the transition point, the size of the liquid droplets follows a power-law distribution, while it follows an exponential distribution when the number density of the liquid particles is lower than the critical value. The comparison between the transition of the model and that of models of percolation is discussed. The change of the average droplet size with the initial number density of the gas particles is also presented. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fowler's approximation for the surface tension and surface energy of Lennard-Jones fluids revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulero, A; Galan, C; Cuadros, F

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the validity of Fowler's approximation for calculating the surface tension and the surface energy of Lennard-Jones fluids. To do so, we consider three different explicit analytical expressions for the radial distribution function (RDF), including one proposed by our research group, together with very accurate expressions for the liquid and vapour densities, also proposed by our group. The calculation of the surface tension from the direct correlation function using both the Percus-Yevick and the hypernetted-chain approximations is also considered. Finally, our results are compared with those obtained by other authors by computer simulations or through relevant theoretical approximations. In particular, we consider the analytical expression proposed by Kalikmanov and Hofmans (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 2207-14) for the surface tension. Our results indicate that the values for the surface energy in Fowler's approximation obtained by other authors are adequate, and can be calculated from the RDF models. For the surface tension, however, the values considered as valid in previous works seem to be incorrect. The correct values can be obtained from our model for the RDF or from the Kalikmanov and Hofmans expression with suitable inputs

  14. Friction between Two Brownian Particles in a Lennard-Jones Solvent: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Song Hi

    2010-01-01

    We presented a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of friction behavior between two very massive Brownian particles (BPs) oriented along the z axis with BP centers at -R 12 /2 and R 12 /2 in a Lennard-Jones solvent as a function of the inter-particle separation, R 12 . In order to fix the BPs in space an MD simulation method with the mass of the BP as 10 90 g/mol was employed in which the total momentum of the system was conserved. The cross friction coefficients of x- and y-components are nearly insensitive to R 12 but that of z-component varies with R 12 in good accord with the simple hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, the self-friction coefficients are estimated as a very small difference from the single particle friction coefficients, ξ 0 , at all inter-particle separations which agrees with the simple hydrodynamic approximation. Consequently ξ (-) xx is nearly independent of R 12 and equal to its asymptotic value of twice the single particle friction coefficient, and the other relative friction, ξ (-) zz , is in good agreement with the simple hydrodynamic approximation. Molecular theory of Brownian motion of a single heavy particle in a fluid had received a considerable attention in earlier years. After molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique was utilized, this subject has been widely studied by a variety of MD simulation methods. The common issues here were about the long time behavior of the force and velocity autocorrelation functions, the system size dependent friction coefficient of a massive Brownian particle, and test of the Stokes-Einstein law

  15. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Geología, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain)

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ{sub 11} = σ{sub 22}, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ{sub 11} = ϵ{sub 22}, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janecek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances r{sub c} and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance r{sub c} is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related

  16. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ 11 = σ 22 , with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ 11 = ϵ 22 , but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janecek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances r c and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance r c is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related with a desorption of the

  17. Fusion process of Lennard-Jones clusters: global minima and magic numbers formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the fusion process of Lennard–Jones (LJ) clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms...

  18. Self-consistent phonons revisited. I. The role of thermal versus quantum fluctuations on structural transitions in large Lennard-Jones clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Ionuţ; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2012-10-14

    The theory of self-consistent phonons (SCP) was originally developed to address the anharmonic effects in condensed matter systems. The method seeks a harmonic, temperature-dependent Hamiltonian that provides the "best fit" for the physical Hamiltonian, the "best fit" being defined as the one that optimizes the Helmholtz free energy at a fixed temperature. The present developments provide a scalable O(N) unified framework that accounts for anharmonic effects in a many-body system, when it is probed by either thermal (ℏ → 0) or quantum fluctuations (T → 0). In these important limits, the solution of the nonlinear SCP equations can be reached in a manner that requires only the multiplication of 3N × 3N matrices, with no need of diagonalization. For short range potentials, such as Lennard-Jones, the Hessian, and other related matrices are highly sparse, so that the scaling of the matrix multiplications can be reduced from O(N(3)) to ~O(N). We investigate the role of quantum effects by continuously varying the de-Boer quantum delocalization parameter Λ and report the N-Λ (T = 0), and also the classical N-T (Λ = 0) phase diagrams for sizes up to N ~ 10(4). Our results demonstrate that the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate already for such weakly quantum systems as neon clusters, or for classical systems much below the melting temperatures.

  19. Finite-field evaluation of the Lennard-Jones atom-wall interaction constant C3 for alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.; Dzuba, V.A.; Safronova, U.I.; Safronova, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    A finite-field scaling method is applied to evaluate the Lennard-Jones interaction constant C 3 for alkali-metal atoms. The calculations are based on the relativistic single-double approximation in which single and double excitations of Dirac-Hartree-Fock wave functions are included to all orders in perturbation theory

  20. Dynamical properties and transport coefficients of one-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Alexiev M.; Heyes, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamics, structure, and transport coefficients, as defined by the Green-Kubo integrals, of the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid are evaluated for a wide range of state points by molecular dynamics computer simulation. These calculations are performed for the first time for thermal conductivity and the viscosity. We observe a transition from hard-rod behavior at low number density to harmonic-spring fluid behavior in the close-packed limit. The self-diffusion coefficient decays with increasing density to a finite limiting value. The thermal conductivity increases with density, tending to ∞ in the close-packed limit. The viscosity in contrast maximizes at intermediate density, tending to zero in the zero density and close-packed limits.

  1. Kapitza thermal conductance at the interface between Lennard-Jones crystals using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merabia, Samy; Termentzidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the thermal Kapitza conductance between Lennard-Jones solids using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We consider a series of perfect interfaces between mass-mismatched solids. We show that both the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM) fail to predict the interfacial conductance even for large acoustic mismatched solids. This poor agreement may be explained by the use of equilibrium distributions of phonons in the expression of the conductance. On the other hand, we show that an extension of AMM taking into account the out-of-equilibrium phonon distribution on both sides of the interface leads to a good agreement with the simulation results, even for interfaces between almost similar materials. This opens the way to understand interfacial heat transport across real semi-conductors and dielectrics.

  2. The importance of accurate interaction potentials in the melting of argon nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, E.; Calvo, F.; Schwerdtfeger, P.

    The melting temperatures of argon clusters ArN (N = 13, 55, 147, 309, 561, and 923) and of bulk argon have been obtained from exchange Monte Carlo simulations and are compared using different two-body interaction potentials, namely the standard Lennard-Jones (LJ), Aziz and extended Lennard-Jones (ELJ) potentials. The latter potential has many advantages: while maintaining the computational efficiency of the commonly used LJ potential, it is as accurate as the Aziz potential but the computer time scales more favorably with increasing cluster size. By applying the ELJ form and extrapolating the cluster data to the infinite system, we are able to extract the melting point of argon already in good agreement with experimental measurements. By considering the additional Axilrod-Teller three-body contribution as well, we calculate a melting temperature of T meltELJ = 84.7 K compared to the experimental value of T meltexp = 83.85 K, whereas the LJ potential underestimates the melting point by more than 7 K. Thus melting temperatures within 1 K accuracy are now feasible.

  3. Simple approach to approximate predictions of the vapor–liquid equilibrium curve near the critical point and its application to Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staśkiewicz, B.; Okrasiński, W.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple analytical form of the vapor–liquid equilibrium curve near the critical point for Lennard-Jones fluids. Coexistence densities curves and vapor pressure have been determined using the Van der Waals and Dieterici equation of state. In described method the Bernoulli differential equations, critical exponent theory and some type of Maxwell's criterion have been used. Presented approach has not yet been used to determine analytical form of phase curves as done in this Letter. Lennard-Jones fluids have been considered for analysis. Comparison with experimental data is done. The accuracy of the method is described. -- Highlights: ► We propose a new analytical way to determine the VLE curve. ► Simple, mathematically straightforward form of phase curves is presented. ► Comparison with experimental data is discussed. ► The accuracy of the method has been confirmed.

  4. Fowler's approximation for the surface tension and surface energy of Lennard-Jones fluids revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulero, A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071-Badajoz (Spain); Galan, C [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071-Badajoz (Spain); Cuadros, F [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071-Badajoz (Spain)

    2003-04-16

    We present a detailed study of the validity of Fowler's approximation for calculating the surface tension and the surface energy of Lennard-Jones fluids. To do so, we consider three different explicit analytical expressions for the radial distribution function (RDF), including one proposed by our research group, together with very accurate expressions for the liquid and vapour densities, also proposed by our group. The calculation of the surface tension from the direct correlation function using both the Percus-Yevick and the hypernetted-chain approximations is also considered. Finally, our results are compared with those obtained by other authors by computer simulations or through relevant theoretical approximations. In particular, we consider the analytical expression proposed by Kalikmanov and Hofmans (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 2207-14) for the surface tension. Our results indicate that the values for the surface energy in Fowler's approximation obtained by other authors are adequate, and can be calculated from the RDF models. For the surface tension, however, the values considered as valid in previous works seem to be incorrect. The correct values can be obtained from our model for the RDF or from the Kalikmanov and Hofmans expression with suitable inputs.

  5. Scaling relation and regime map of explosive gas–liquid flow of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime

    2012-02-01

    We study explosive gasliquid flows caused by rapid depressurization using a molecular dynamics model of Lennard-Jones particle systems. A unique feature of our model is that it consists of two types of particles: liquid particles, which tend to form liquid droplets, and gas particles, which remain supercritical gaseous states under the depressurization realized by simulations. The system has a pipe-like structure similar to the model of a shock tube. We observed physical quantities and flow regimes in systems with various combinations of initial particle number densities and initial temperatures. It is observed that a physical quantity Q, such as pressure, at position z measured along a pipe-like system at time t follows a scaling relation Q(z,t)=Q(zt) with a scaling function Q(ζ). A similar scaling relation holds for time evolution of flow regimes in a system. These scaling relations lead to a regime map of explosive flows in parameter spaces of local physical quantities. The validity of the scaling relations of physical quantities means that physics of equilibrium systems, such as an equation of state, is applicable to explosive flows in our simulations, though the explosive flows involve highly nonequilibrium processes. In other words, if the breaking of the scaling relations is observed, it means that the explosive flows cannot be fully described by physics of equilibrium systems. We show the possibility of breaking of the scaling relations and discuss its implications in the last section. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An EQT-based cDFT approach for a confined Lennard-Jones fluid mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevaselian, M. H.; Mashayak, S. Y.; Aluru, N. R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Empirical potential-based quasi-continuum theory (EQT) provides a route to incorporate atomistic detail into continuum framework such as the Nernst-Planck equation. EQT can also be used to construct a grand potential functional for classical density functional theory (cDFT). The combination of EQT and cDFT provides a simple and fast approach to predict the inhomogeneous density, potential profiles, and thermodynamic properties of confined fluids. We extend the EQT-cDFT approach to confined fluid mixtures and demonstrate it by simulating a mixture of methane and hydrogen inside slit-like channels of graphene. We show that the EQT-cDFT predictions for the structure of the confined fluid mixture compare well with the molecular dynamics simulation results. In addition, our results show that graphene slit nanopores exhibit a selective adsorption of methane over hydrogen.

  7. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: The vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Mendiboure, B. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et leurs Réservoirs, UMR5150, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, B. P. 1155, Pau Cedex 64014 (France); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Centro de Investigación de Física Teórica y Matemática, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Departamento de Geología, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-11-14

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264–6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r{sub c} = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r{sub c} = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial

  8. Effect of dispersive long-range corrections to the pressure tensor: The vapour-liquid interfacial properties of the Lennard-Jones system revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an extension of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janeček [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264–6269 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] to account for the intermolecular potential energy of spherical, rigid, and flexible molecular systems, to deal with the contributions to the microscopic components of the pressure tensor due to the dispersive long-range corrections. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of spherical Lennard-Jones molecules with different cutoff distances, r c = 2.5, 3, 4, and 5σ. In addition, we have also considered cutoff distances r c = 2.5 and 3σ in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections proposed in this work. The normal and tangential microscopic components of the pressure tensor are obtained using the mechanical or virial route in combination with the recipe of Irving and Kirkwood, while the macroscopic components are calculated using the Volume Perturbation thermodynamic route proposed by de Miguel and Jackson [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164109 (2006)]. The vapour-liquid interfacial tension is evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the Test-Area methodology. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, vapour pressure, critical temperature and density, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying particular attention to the effect of the cutoff distance and the long-range corrections on these properties. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cutoff distance (at fixed temperature) is to sharpen the vapour-liquid interface, to decrease the vapour pressure, and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. As a result, the interfacial thickness

  9. Molecular dynamics calculation of half-lives for thermal decay of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has been used with a Lenard-Jones (6-12) potential in order to study the decay behavior of neutral Argon clusters containing between 12 and 14 atoms. The clusters were heated to temperatures well above their melting points and then tracked in time via molecular dynamics until evaporation of one or more atoms was observed. In each simulation, the mode of evaporation, energy released during evaporation, and cluster lifetime were recorded. Results from roughly 2000 simulation histories were combined in order to compute statistically significant values of cluster half-lives and decay energies. It was found that cluster half-life decreases with increasing energy and that for a given value of excess energy (defined as E=(E tot -E gnd )/n), the 13 atom cluster is more stable against decay than clusters containing either 12 or 14 atoms. The dominant decay mechanism for all clusters was determined to be single atom emission. (orig.)

  10. Kinetic-contact-driven gigantic energy transfer in a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined to a rotating pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowniczek, Paweł; Chrzanowska, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    A two-dimensional Lennard-Jones system in a circular and rotating container has been studied by means of molecular dynamics technique. A nonequilibrium transition to the rotating stage has been detected in a delayed time since an instant switching of the frame rotation. This transition is attributed to the increase of the density at the wall because of the centrifugal force. At the same time the phase transition occurs, the inner system changes its configuration of the solid-state type into the liquid type. Impact of angular frequency and molecular roughness on the transport properties of the nonrotating and rotating systems is analyzed.

  11. Computation and analysis of the transverse current autocorrelation function, Ct(k,t), for small wave vectors: A molecular-dynamics study for a Lennard-Jones fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, R.; Hoheisel, C.

    1987-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics (MD) calculations are reported for three thermodynamic states of a Lennard-Jones fluid. Systems of 2048 particles and 105 integration steps were used. The transverse current autocorrelation function, Ct(k,t), has been determined for wave vectors of the range 0.5viscosities which showed a systematic behavior as a function of k. Extrapolation to the hydrodynamic region at k=0 gave shear viscosity coefficients in good agreement with direct Green-Kubo results obtained in previous work. The two-exponential model fit for the memory function proposed by other authors does not provide a reasonable description of the MD results, as the fit parameters show no systematic wave-vector dependence, although the Ct(k,t) functions are somewhat better fitted. Similarly, the semiempirical interpolation formula for the decay time based on the viscoelastic concept proposed by Akcasu and Daniels fails to reproduce the correct k dependence for the wavelength range investigated herein.

  12. Determination of the friction coefficient via the force autocorrelation function. A molecular dynamics investigation for a dense Lennard-Jones fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsang, R.; Hoheisel, C.

    1987-01-01

    For a large region of dense fluid states of a Lennard-Jones system, they have calculated the friction coefficient by the force autocorrelation function of a Brownian-type particle by molecular dynamics (MD). The time integral over the force autocorrelation function showed an interesting behavior and the expected plateau value when the mass of the Brownian particle was chosen to be about a factor of 100 larger than the mass of the fluid particle. Sufficient agreement was found for the friction coefficient calculated by this way and that obtained by calculations of the self-diffusion coefficient using the common relation between these coefficients. Furthermore, a modified friction coefficient was determined by integration of the force autocorrelation function up to the first maximum. This coefficient can successfully be used to derive a reasonable soft part of the friction coefficient necessary for the Rice-Allnatt approximation for the shear velocity and simple liquids

  13. JCZS: An Intermolecular Potential Database for Performing Accurate Detonation and Expansion Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; McGee, B.C.

    1998-11-03

    Exponential-13,6 (EXP-13,6) potential pammeters for 750 gases composed of 48 elements were determined and assembled in a database, referred to as the JCZS database, for use with the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler equation of state (JCZ3-EOS)~l) The EXP- 13,6 force constants were obtained by using literature values of Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential functions, by using corresponding states (CS) theory, by matching pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and by using molecular volume to determine the approach radii with the well depth estimated from high-pressure isen- tropes. The JCZS database was used to accurately predict detonation velocity, pressure, and temperature for 50 dif- 3 Accurate predictions were also ferent explosives with initial densities ranging from 0.25 glcm3 to 1.97 g/cm . obtained for pure liquid shock Hugoniots, static properties of nitrogen, and gas detonations at high initial pressures.

  14. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  15. Analysis of two potential long-distance signaling molecules, LjCLE-RS1/2 and jasmonic acid, in a hypernodulating mutant too much love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magori, Shimpei; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2010-04-01

    Legume plants tightly control the number and development of root nodules. This is partly regulated by a long-distance signaling known as auto-regulation of nodulation (AON). AON signaling involves at least two potential long-distance signals: root-derived signal and shoot-derived signal. However, their molecular characteristics and the mode of action remain unclear. In our recent study, we isolated a novel Lotus japonicus hypernodulating mutant too much love (tml). Based on several grafting experiments, we concluded that its causative gene TML functions as a receptor of the shoot-derived signal. This finding prompted us to ask how the candidates of the long-distance signal molecules, LjCLE-RS1/2 and jasmonic acid (JA), are affected in tml mutants. Expression analysis revealed that rapid induction of LjCLE-RS1/2 upon rhizobial inoculation is still intact in tml, supporting that TML plays a role in reception of the shoot-derived signal but not in generation of the root-derived signal. Furthermore, physiological analysis showed that JA, a candidate of the shoot-derived signal, can suppress tml hypernodulation. Therefore, contrary to the previous report, JA might not be a component of AON signaling.

  16. Detailed balance method for chemical potential determination in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, P.J.; Ray, J.R.; Wolf, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new, nondestructive, method for determining chemical potentials in Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The method estimates a value for the chemical potential such that one has a balance between fictitious successful creation and destruction trials in which the Monte Carlo method is used to determine success or failure of the creation/destruction attempts; we thus call the method a detailed balance method. The method allows one to obtain estimates of the chemical potential for a given species in any closed ensemble simulation; the closed ensemble is paired with a ''natural'' open ensemble for the purpose of obtaining creation and destruction probabilities. We present results for the Lennard-Jones system and also for an embedded atom model of liquid palladium, and compare to previous results in the literature for these two systems. We are able to obtain an accurate estimate of the chemical potential for the Lennard-Jones system at higher densities than reported in the literature

  17. Adsorption of metal atoms at a buckled graphene grain boundary using model potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgee, Edit E.; Isacsson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two model potentials have been evaluated with regard to their ability to model adsorption of single metal atoms on a buckled graphene grain boundary. One of the potentials is a Lennard-Jones potential parametrized for gold and carbon, while the other is a bond-order potential parametrized for the interaction between carbon and platinum. Metals are expected to adsorb more strongly to grain boundaries than to pristine graphene due to their enhanced adsorption at point defects resembling those that constitute the grain boundary. Of the two potentials considered here, only the bond-order potential reproduces this behavior and predicts the energy of the adsorbate to be about 0.8 eV lower at the grain boundary than on pristine graphene. The Lennard-Jones potential predicts no significant difference in energy between adsorbates at the boundary and on pristine graphene. These results indicate that the Lennard-Jones potential is not suitable for studies of metal adsorption on defects in graphene, and that bond-order potentials are preferable

  18. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  19. Intermolecular potential for Ar + D2O from differential scattering cross sections, and its implications for the water pair potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, R.; Porter, R.A.R.; Kalos, F.; Grosser, A.E.

    1975-01-01

    A velocity selected molecular beam of D 2 O was crossed with a nozzle beam of Ar and the angular distribution of the scattered D 2 O was measured mass spectrometrically. By varying the velocity of the D 2 O beam, the differential cross section was measured at two collision energies. The experimental results were compared with synthetic differential cross sections calculated from Lennard-Jones and Kihara-Stockmayer trial potentials to determine potential parameters. Implications for the H 2 O pair potential are discussed

  20. Chemical potential calculations in dense liquids using metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Giberti, F.; Parrinello, M.

    2016-10-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  1. Comparison of potentials for polymeric liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hae Young

    2002-01-01

    Many theories for polymeric liquids are based on the concepts of cell, hole, free volume of lattice etc. In this theories, van der Waals potential, Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential and their modified potentials are commonly used. In this work, Mie(p,6)potential was applied to the Continuous Lattice Fluid Theory (which extends the discrete lattices of Lattice Fluid Theory to classically continuous lattices) and Dee-Walsch's Cell Theory (which modifies Flory's Equation of State Theory). Both of them are known to be successful theories for polymeric liquids. Thus, PVT values changing with p (the exponent in the repulsion potential) were calculated and compared with experimental values. And, calculated values of Lattice Fluid theory, Flory's Equation of State Theory and Cho-Sanchez Theory using perturbation method were also compared. Through the calculated results, van der Waals potential, Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential and Mie(p,6) potential for polymeric liquids were compared with each other

  2. Estimating the density-scaling exponent of a monatomic liquid from its pair potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøhling, Lasse; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates two conjectures for calculating the density dependence of the density-scaling exponent γ of a single-component, pair-potential liquid with strong virial potential-energy correlations. The first conjecture gives an analytical expression for γ directly in terms of the pair...... potential. The second conjecture is a refined version of this involving the most likely nearest-neighbor distance determined from the pair-correlation function. The conjectures are tested by simulations of three systems, one of which is the standard Lennard-Jones liquid. While both expressions give...

  3. A dynamic lattice searching method with rotation operation for optimization of large clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xia; Cai Wensheng; Shao Xueguang

    2009-01-01

    Global optimization of large clusters has been a difficult task, though much effort has been paid and many efficient methods have been proposed. During our works, a rotation operation (RO) is designed to realize the structural transformation from decahedra to icosahedra for the optimization of large clusters, by rotating the atoms below the center atom with a definite degree around the fivefold axis. Based on the RO, a development of the previous dynamic lattice searching with constructed core (DLSc), named as DLSc-RO, is presented. With an investigation of the method for the optimization of Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, i.e., LJ 500 , LJ 561 , LJ 600 , LJ 665-667 , LJ 670 , LJ 685 , and LJ 923 , Morse clusters, silver clusters by Gupta potential, and aluminum clusters by NP-B potential, it was found that both the global minima with icosahedral and decahedral motifs can be obtained, and the method is proved to be efficient and universal.

  4. Note: Modification of the Gay-Berne potential for improved accuracy and speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.

    2012-06-01

    A modification of the Gay-Berne (GB) potential is proposed which is about 10% to 20% more speed efficient and statistically more accurate in reproducing the energy of interaction of two linear Lennard-Jones tetratomics when averaged over all orientations. For the special cases of end-to-end and side-by-side configurations, the new potential is equivalent to the GB one. A simple generalization to dissimilar particles of D∞h symmetry is presented but does not retain the superior agreement with respect to its GB counterpart, except at close range.

  5. Analysis of bound-state spectra near the threshold of neutral particle interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Fang; Cao Zhuangqi; Chen Jianping; Xu Junjie

    2006-01-01

    It is understood that conventional semiclassical approximations deteriorate towards threshold in a typical neutral particle interaction potential which is important for the study of ultra-cold atoms and molecules. In this Letter we give an example of the Lennard-Jones potential with tuning of the strength parameter on the basis of the analytical transfer matrix (ATM) method. Highly accurate quantum mechanical results, such as number of the bound states, energy level density and the eigenvalues with extremely low energies have been derived

  6. Experimental studies of the NaRb ground-state potential up to the v''=76 level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docenko, O.; Nikolayeva, O.; Tamanis, M.; Ferber, R.; Pazyuk, E.A.; Stolyarov, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectra of the C 1 Σ + -X 1 Σ + system of 23 Na 85 Rb and 23 Na 87 Rb have allowed vibrational levels of the electronic ground state up to v '' =76, spanning 99.85% of the potential well to be observed. The ground-state term values have been fitted to a Dunham polynomial expansion, and also to a direct modified Lennard-Jones (MLJ) potential. The analytical MLJ construction allowed us to match previous measured term values for v '' ≤30 with long-range behavior of the potential through the intermediate internuclear distance region covered by the present investigation

  7. Similarity Laws for the Lines of Ideal Free Energy and Chemical Potential in Supercritical Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, E M; Vorob'ev, V S

    2017-09-21

    We have found the curves on the density-temperature plane, along which the values of free energy and chemical potential correspond to ideal gas quantities. At first, we have applied the van der Waals equation to construct them and to derive their equations. Then we have shown that the same lines for real substances (Ar, N 2 , CH 4 , SF 6 , H 2 , H 2 O) and for the model Lennard-Jones system constructed on the basis of the measurements data and calculations are well matched with the derived equations. The validity and deviations from the obtained similarity laws are discussed.

  8. Effect of temperature dependence of the Langmuir constant molecular pair potentials on gas hydrates formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, B.; Enayati, M. [Iranian Offshore Oil Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidaryan, E. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Masjidosolayman Branch

    2008-07-01

    Theoretical methods show that crystalline hydrates can form from single-phase systems consisting of both vapor water with gaseous hydrate former and liquid water with dissolved hydrate former. Two phase systems consist of both liquid water with gaseous hydrate former and with liquid hydrate former on the surface. This paper presented a Langmuir constant related model for the prediction of equilibrium pressures and cage occupancies of pure component hydrates. Intermolecular potentials were fit to quantum mechanical energies to obtain the Langmuir constants, which differed from the procedure utilized with the vdWP model. The paper described the experimental method and model calculations. This included the Fugacity model and Van der Waals and Platteeuw model. The paper also discussed pair potential of non-spherical molecules, including the multicentre (site-site) potential; Gaussian overlap potential; Lennard-Jones potential; and Kihara generalized pair potential. It was concluded that fraction of occupied cavities is a function of pair potentials between hard core and empty hydrate lattice. These pair potentials could be calculated from some model as Kihara cell potential, Gaussian potential, Lennard-Jones potential and multicentre pair potential. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun; Odagaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function

  10. Searching for globally optimal functional forms for interatomic potentials using genetic programming with parallel tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepoy, A; Peters, M D; Thompson, A P

    2007-11-30

    Molecular dynamics and other molecular simulation methods rely on a potential energy function, based only on the relative coordinates of the atomic nuclei. Such a function, called a force field, approximately represents the electronic structure interactions of a condensed matter system. Developing such approximate functions and fitting their parameters remains an arduous, time-consuming process, relying on expert physical intuition. To address this problem, a functional programming methodology was developed that may enable automated discovery of entirely new force-field functional forms, while simultaneously fitting parameter values. The method uses a combination of genetic programming, Metropolis Monte Carlo importance sampling and parallel tempering, to efficiently search a large space of candidate functional forms and parameters. The methodology was tested using a nontrivial problem with a well-defined globally optimal solution: a small set of atomic configurations was generated and the energy of each configuration was calculated using the Lennard-Jones pair potential. Starting with a population of random functions, our fully automated, massively parallel implementation of the method reproducibly discovered the original Lennard-Jones pair potential by searching for several hours on 100 processors, sampling only a minuscule portion of the total search space. This result indicates that, with further improvement, the method may be suitable for unsupervised development of more accurate force fields with completely new functional forms. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. From interatomic interaction potentials via Einstein field equation techniques to time dependent contact mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzer, N

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the principle differences between rheological or simple stress tests like the uniaxial tensile test to contact mechanical tests and the differences between quasistatic contact experiments and oscillatory ones, this study resorts to effective first principles. This study will show how relatively simple models simulating bond interactions in solids using effective potentials like Lennard-Jones and Morse can be used to investigate the effect of time dependent stress-induced softening or stiffening of these solids. The usefulness of the current study is in the possibility of deriving relatively simple dependences of the bulk-modulus B on time, shear and pressure P with time t. In cases where it is possible to describe, or at least partially describe a material by Lennard-Jones potential approaches, the above- mentioned dependences are even completely free of microscopic material parameters. Instead of bond energies and length, only specific integral parameters like Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio are required. However, in the case of time dependent (viscose) material behavior the parameters are not constants anymore. They themselves depend on time and the actual stress field, especially the shear field. A body completely consisting of so called standard linear solid interacting particles will then phenomenologically show a completely different and usually much more complicated mechanical behavior. The influence of the time dependent pressure-shear-induced Young’s modulus change is discussed with respect to mechanical contact experiments and their analysis in the case of viscose materials. (papers)

  12. The role of binary and many-centre molecular interactions in spin crossover in the solid state. Part II. Non-ideality parameters defined via binary molecular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudriavtsev, A.B.; Linert, W.

    2005-01-01

    Parameters of the formalism [1-6] describing spin crossover in the solid state have been defined via molecular potentials in model systems of neutral and ionic complexes. In the first instance Lennard-Jones and electric dipole-dipole potentials have been used whereas in ionic systems Lennard-Jones and electric point-charge potentials have been used. Electric dipole-dipole interaction of neutral complexes brings about a positive excess energy controlled by the difference of electric dipole moments of HS and LS molecules. Differences of the order of Δμ = 1-2D cause an abrupt spin crossover in systems with T 1/2 = 100-150K. Magnetic coupling contributes both to the excess energy and excess entropy, however the overall effect is equivalent to a modest positive excess energy. Ionic systems in the absence of specific interactions are characterized by very small excess energies corresponding to practically linear van't Hoff plots. Detectable positive and negative excess energies in these systems may arise from interactions of ligands belonging to neighbouring complexes. The HOMO-LUMO overlap in HS-LS pairs can bring about a nontrivial variation of the shape of transition curves. Examples of regression analysis of experimental transition curves in terms of molecular potentials are given. (author)

  13. Spatial updating grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithms for fluid simulation: generalization to continuous potentials and parallel implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, C J; Ren, Ruichao; Orkoulas, G

    2007-11-21

    Spatial updating grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithms are generalizations of random and sequential updating algorithms for lattice systems to continuum fluid models. The elementary steps, insertions or removals, are constructed by generating points in space either at random (random updating) or in a prescribed order (sequential updating). These algorithms have previously been developed only for systems of impenetrable spheres for which no particle overlap occurs. In this work, spatial updating grand canonical algorithms are generalized to continuous, soft-core potentials to account for overlapping configurations. Results on two- and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids indicate that spatial updating grand canonical algorithms, both random and sequential, converge faster than standard grand canonical algorithms. Spatial algorithms based on sequential updating not only exhibit the fastest convergence but also are ideal for parallel implementation due to the absence of strict detailed balance and the nature of the updating that minimizes interprocessor communication. Parallel simulation results for three-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids show a substantial reduction of simulation time for systems of moderate and large size. The efficiency improvement by parallel processing through domain decomposition is always in addition to the efficiency improvement by sequential updating.

  14. Empirical potential for molecular simulation of graphene nanoplatelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Alexander J.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2018-04-01

    A new empirical potential for layered graphitic materials is reported. Interatomic interactions within a single graphene sheet are modeled using a Stillinger-Weber potential. Interatomic interactions between atoms in different sheets of graphene in the nanoplatelet are modeled using a Lennard-Jones interaction potential. The potential is validated by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of tensile deformation with the reported elastic constants for graphite. The graphite is found to fracture into graphene nanoplatelets when subjected to ˜15% tensile strain normal to the basal surface of the graphene stack, with an ultimate stress of 2.0 GPa and toughness of 0.33 GPa. This force field is useful to model molecular interactions in an important class of composite systems comprising 2D materials like graphene and multi-layer graphene nanoplatelets.

  15. Interaction potentials and their effect on crystal nucleation and symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular dynamics technique has been used to study the effect of the interaction potential on crystal nucleation and the symmetry of the nucleated phase. Four systems, namely rubidium, Lennard-Jones, rubidium-truncated, and Lennard-Jones-truncated, have been studied each at reduced density 0.95. Two types of calculations were performed. Firstly, starting from a liquid state, each system was quenched rapidly to a reduced temperature of approx.0.1. The nucleation process for these systems was monitored by studying the time dependence of temperature and the pair correlation function, and the resulting crystalline structure analyzed using among other properties the Voronoi polyhedra. Only in the case of rubidium was a b.c.c. structure nucleated. In the other three cases we obtained a f.c.c. ordering. Secondly, we have studied the effect of changing the interaction potential in a system which has already achieved an ordered state under the action of some other potential. After establishing a b.c.c. structure in a rubidium system, the change in the symmetry of the system was studied when the pair potential was modified to one of the other three forms. The results from both types of calculations are consistent: the rubidium potential leads to a b.c.c. structure while the other three potentials give an f.c.c. structure. Metastable disordered structures were not obtained in any of the calculations. However, the time elapse between the moment when the system is quick-quenched and the moment when nucleation occurs appears to depend upon the potential of interaction

  16. Temperature-dependent interaction potential between NF3 molecules and thermophysical properties of gaseous NF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damyanova, M; Balabanova, E; Hohm, U

    2014-01-01

    A temperature-dependent effective intermolecular interaction potential is applied to describe the interaction between two nitrogen fluoride (NF 3 ) molecules in gas phase. To this end, a spherically-symmetric (n-6) Lennard-Jones temperature-dependent potential (LJTDP) is used. The (n-6) LJTDP takes into account the influence of vibrational excitation of the molecules on the potential parameters, namely, the equilibrium distance r m and the potential well depth ε. The potential parameters at T = 0 K were obtained from the very small amount of existing thermophysical equilibrium and transport properties of low-density NF 3 gas. Fitting formulae are tabulated for a fast and reliable prediction of the thermophysical properties and potential parameters in the temperature range between 200 K and 1200 K. A comparison is also presented between our estimates for some thermophysical properties of the NF 3 gas with the available experimental and calculated data.

  17. NVU dynamics. I. Geodesic motion on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Toxværd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole

    2011-01-01

    that ensures potential-energy and step-length conservation; center-of-mass drift is also eliminated. Analytical arguments confirmed by simulations demonstrate that the modified NVU algorithm is absolutely stable. Finally, we present simulations showing that the NVU algorithm and the standard leap-frog NVE......An algorithm is derived for computer simulation of geodesics on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface of a system of N classical particles. First, a basic time-reversible geodesic algorithm is derived by discretizing the geodesic stationarity condition and implementing the constant......-potential-energy constraint via standard Lagrangian multipliers. The basic NVU algorithm is tested by single-precision computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid. Excellent numerical stability is obtained if the force cutoff is smoothed and the two initial configurations have identical potential energy within machine...

  18. Free energy evaluation in polymer translocation via Jarzynski equality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondaini, Felipe, E-mail: fmondaini@if.ufrj.br [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica Celso Suckow da Fonseca, Petrópolis, 25.620-003, RJ (Brazil); Moriconi, L., E-mail: moriconi@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    We perform, with the help of cloud computing resources, extensive Langevin simulations, which provide free energy estimates for unbiased three-dimensional polymer translocation. We employ the Jarzynski equality in its rigorous setting, to compute the variation of the free energy in single monomer translocation events. In our three-dimensional Langevin simulations, the excluded-volume and van der Waals interactions between beads (monomers and membrane atoms) are modeled through a repulsive Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and consecutive monomers are subject to the Finite-Extension Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) potential. Analysing data for polymers with different lengths, the free energy profile is noted to have interesting finite-size scaling properties.

  19. Free energy evaluation in polymer translocation via Jarzynski equality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondaini, Felipe; Moriconi, L.

    2014-01-01

    We perform, with the help of cloud computing resources, extensive Langevin simulations, which provide free energy estimates for unbiased three-dimensional polymer translocation. We employ the Jarzynski equality in its rigorous setting, to compute the variation of the free energy in single monomer translocation events. In our three-dimensional Langevin simulations, the excluded-volume and van der Waals interactions between beads (monomers and membrane atoms) are modeled through a repulsive Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and consecutive monomers are subject to the Finite-Extension Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) potential. Analysing data for polymers with different lengths, the free energy profile is noted to have interesting finite-size scaling properties.

  20. Comment on 'Path integral solution for a Mie-type potential'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, F.

    1985-01-01

    We comment on several incorrect results given in a recent paper by Erkoc and Sever (ES). In particular, it is pointed out that their path integral formula for the one-dimensional Mie-Lennard-Jones potential is wrong, since a quantum correction proportional to (h/2π) 2 - which is a consequence of the stochastic nature of the Feynman paths - has been overlooked. The correct expression can be obtained from a general path integral formula, which we have derived in a previous paper. For the particular potential discussed in detail by ES, we give a complete path integral treatment, which allows us to derive the energies and normalized wave functions of the discrete spectrum. (orig.)

  1. Efficient Implementations of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Lennard-Jones Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, H.; Suzuki, M.; Ito, N.

    2011-01-01

    simple spatialdecomposition-based strategy is adopted for parallelization. By utilizing the developed code, benchmark simulations are performed on a HITACHI SR16000/J2 system consisting of IBM POWER6 processors which are 4.7 GHz at the National Institute

  2. Single-site Lennard-Jones models via polynomial chaos surrogates of Monte Carlo molecular simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim; Siripatana, Adil; Sun, Shuyu; Knio, Omar; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two Polynomial Chaos (PC) surrogates were generated to reproduce Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation results of the canonical (single-phase) and the NVT-Gibbs (two-phase) ensembles for a system of normalized structureless Lennard

  3. L-J phase in a Cu2.2Mn0.8Al alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, S. C.; Liu, T. F.

    1995-06-01

    A new type of precipitate (designated L-J phase) with two variants was observed within the (DO3 + L21) matrix in a Cu2.2Mn0.8Al alloy. Transmission electron microscopy examinations indicated that the L-J phase has an orthorhombic structure with lattice parameters a = 0.413 nm, b = 0.254 nm and c = 0.728 nm. The orientation relationship between the L-J phase and the matrix is (100)L-J//(011) m , (010)L-J//(111) m and (001)L-J//(211) m . The rotation axis and rotation angle between two variants of the L-J phase are [021] and 90 deg. The L-J phase has never been observed in various Cu-Al, Cu-Mn, and Cu-Al-Mn alloy systems before.

  4. Effective pair potentials for spherical nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zon, Ramses

    2009-01-01

    An effective description for rigid spherical nanoparticles in a fluid of point particles is presented. The points inside the nanoparticles and the point particles are assumed to interact via spherically symmetric additive pair potentials, while the distribution of points inside the nanoparticles is taken to be spherically symmetric and smooth. The resulting effective pair interactions between a nanoparticle and a point particle, as well as between two nanoparticles, are then given by spherically symmetric potentials. If overlap between particles is allowed, as can occur for some forms of the pair potentials, the effective potential generally has non-analytic points. It is shown that for each effective potential the expressions for different overlapping cases can be written in terms of one analytic auxiliary potential. Even when only non-overlapping situations are possible, the auxiliary potentials facilitate the formulation of the effective potentials. Effective potentials for hollow nanoparticles (appropriate e.g. for buckyballs) are also considered and shown to be related to those for solid nanoparticles. For hollow nanoparticles overlap is more physical, since this covers the case of a smaller particle embedded in a larger, hollow nanoparticle. Finally, explicit expressions are given for the effective potentials derived from basic pair potentials of power law and exponential form, as well as from the commonly used London–van der Waals, Morse, Buckingham, and Lennard-Jones potentials. The applicability of the latter is demonstrated by comparison with an atomic description of nanoparticles with an internal face centered cubic structure

  5. Biocontrol agent Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LJ02 induces systemic resistance against cucurbits powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Gu, Yilin; Li, Juan; Xu, Mingzhu; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuanhong

    2015-01-01

    Powdery mildew is a fungal disease found in a wide range of plants and can significantly reduce crop yields. Bacterial strain LJ02 is a biocontrol agent (BCA) isolated from a greenhouse in Tianjin, China. In combination of morphological, physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic analyses, strain LJ02 was classified as a new member of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Greenhouse trials showed that LJ02 fermentation broth (LJ02FB) can effectively diminish the occurrence of cucurbits powdery mildew. When treated with LJ02FB, cucumber seedlings produced significantly elevated production of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase as compared to that of the control. We further confirmed that the production of free salicylic acid (SA) and expression of one pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 in cucumber leaves were markedly elevated after treating with LJ02FB, suggesting that SA-mediated defense response was stimulated. Moreover, LJ02FB-treated cucumber leaves could secrete resistance-related substances into rhizosphere that inhibit the germination of fungi spores and the growth of pathogens. Finally, we separated bacterium and its fermented substances to test their respective effects and found that both components have SA-inducing activity and bacterium plays major roles. Altogether, we identified a BCA against powdery mildew and its mode of action by inducing systemic resistance such as SA signaling pathway.

  6. Molecular Simulation of the Vapor-Liquid Phase Behavior of Lennard-Jones Mixtures in Porous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    sur la Catalyse, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Group de Chimie Theorique, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex, France...and Group de Chimie Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 Allee d’Italie, 69364 Lyon, Cedex 07, France 14. ABSTRACT We present vapor...Scientifique, Group de Chimie Theorique, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex, France and Group de Chimie Theorique, Ecole Normale

  7. Scaling relation and regime map of explosive gas–liquid flow of binary Lennard-Jones particle system

    KAUST Repository

    Inaoka, Hajime; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2012-01-01

    liquid droplets, and gas particles, which remain supercritical gaseous states under the depressurization realized by simulations. The system has a pipe-like structure similar to the model of a shock tube. We observed physical quantities and flow regimes

  8. Lennard-Jones triple-point bulk and shear viscosities. Green-Kubo theory, Hamiltonian mechanics, and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, W.G.; Evans, D.J.; Hickman, R.B.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Ashurst, W.T.; Moran, B.

    1980-01-01

    A new Hamiltonian method for deformation simulations is related to the Green-Kubo fluctuation theory through perturbation theory and linear-response theory. Numerical results for the bulk and shear viscosity coefficients are compared to corresponding Green-Kubo calculations. Both viscosity coefficients depend similarly on frequency, in a way consistent with enhanced ''long-time tails.''

  9. Lennard-Jones fluids in two-dimensional nano-pores. Multi-phase coexistence and fluid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, Petr; Savva, Nikos; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2014-03-01

    We present a number of fundamental findings on the wetting behaviour of nano-pores. A popular model for fluid confinement is a one-dimensional (1D) slit pore formed by two parallel planar walls and it exhibits capillary condensation (CC): a first-order phase transition from vapour to capillary-liquid (Kelvin shift). Capping such a pore at one end by a third orthogonal wall forms a prototypical two-dimensional (2D) pore. We show that 2D pores possess a wetting temperature such that below this temperature CC remains of first order, above it becomes a continuous phase transition manifested by a slab of capillary-liquid filling the pore from the capping wall. Continuous CC exhibits hysteresis and can be preceded by a first-order capillary prewetting transition. Additionally, liquid drops can form in the corners of the 2D pore (remnant of 2D wedge prewetting). The three fluid phases, vapour, capillary-liquid slab and corner drops, can coexist at the pore triple point. Our model is based on the statistical mechanics of fluids in the density functional formulation. The fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate interactions are dispersive. We analyze in detail the microscopic fluid structure, isotherms and full phase diagrams. Our findings also suggest novel ways to control wetting of nano-pores. We are grateful to the European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031 for support.

  10. A free energy study of the liquid-liquid phase transition of the Jagla ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Appendix” preliminary free energy surface calculations for select parameterizations of the generalized family of Jagla potentials spanning from the original (anomalous,water-like) Jagla model to the Lennard-Jones model. These calculations ...

  11. A Dicarboxylate Transporter, LjALMT4, Mainly Expressed in Nodules of Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Kojiro; Sasaki, Takayuki; Kan, Tomohiro; Saida, Yuka; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Yoko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2016-07-01

    Legume plants can establish symbiosis with soil bacteria called rhizobia to obtain nitrogen as a nutrient directly from atmospheric N2 via symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Legumes and rhizobia form nodules, symbiotic organs in which fixed-nitrogen and photosynthetic products are exchanged between rhizobia and plant cells. The photosynthetic products supplied to rhizobia are thought to be dicarboxylates but little is known about the movement of dicarboxylates in the nodules. In terms of dicarboxylate transporters, an aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) family is a strong candidate responsible for the membrane transport of carboxylates in nodules. Among the seven ALMT genes in the Lotus japonicus genome, only one, LjALMT4, shows a high expression in the nodules. LjALMT4 showed transport activity in a Xenopus oocyte system, with LjALMT4 mediating the efflux of dicarboxylates including malate, succinate, and fumarate, but not tricarboxylates such as citrate. LjALMT4 also mediated the influx of several inorganic anions. Organ-specific gene expression analysis showed LjALMT4 mRNA mainly in the parenchyma cells of nodule vascular bundles. These results suggest that LjALMT4 may not be involved in the direct supply of dicarboxylates to rhizobia in infected cells but is responsible for supplying malate as well as several anions necessary for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, via nodule vasculatures.

  12. Addendum to ''Density fluctuations in liquid rubidium''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, S.W.; Mountain, R.D.; Hsu, C.S.; Rahman, A.

    1980-01-01

    We performed molecular-dynamics simulations of liquid rubidium and the Lennard-Jones fluid at several densities and temperatures, and of a system whose pair potential is the repulsive core of the rubidium potential. In all cases, propagating density fluctuations occurred in the rubidiumlike systems at much shorter wavelengths than in the Lennard-Jones system. This indicates that the repulsive part of the pair potential is the dominant factor in determining the relaxation of short-wavelength density fluctuations

  13. Adhesive contact: from atomistic model to continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Kang-Qi; Jia Jian-Yuan; Zhu Ying-Min; Zhang Xiu-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Lennard-Jones potential are widely used in modeling adhesive contacts. However, the relationships between the parameters of the two types of Lennard-Jones potential are not well defined. This paper employs a self-consistent method to derive the Lennard-Jones surface force law from the interatomic Lennard-Jones potential with emphasis on the relationships between the parameters. The effect of using correct parameters in the adhesion models is demonstrated in single sphere-flat contact via continuum models and an atomistic model. Furthermore, the adhesion hysteresis behaviour is investigated, and the S-shaped force-distance relation is revealed by the atomistic model. It shows that the adhesion hysteresis loop is generated by the jump-to-contact and jump-off-contact, which are illustrated by the S-shaped force-distance curve. (atomic and molecular physics)

  14. A Classical Potential to Model the Adsorption of Biological Molecules on Oxidized Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Julian; Ciacchi, Lucio Colombi

    2011-02-08

    The behavior of titanium implants in physiological environments is governed by the thin oxide layer that forms spontaneously on the metal surface and mediates the interactions with adsorbate molecules. In order to study the adsorption of biomolecules on titanium in a realistic fashion, we first build up a model of an oxidized Ti surface in contact with liquid water by means of extensive first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. Taking the obtained structure as reference, we then develop a classical potential to model the Ti/TiOx/water interface. This is based on the mapping with Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials of the adsorption energy landscape of single water and ammonia molecules on the rutile TiO2(110) surface. The interactions with arbitrary organic molecules are obtained via standard combination rules to established biomolecular force fields. The transferability of our potential to the case of organic molecules adsorbing on the oxidized Ti surface is checked by comparing the classical potential energy surfaces of representative systems to quantum mechanical results at the level of density functional theory. Moreover, we calculate the heat of immersion of the TiO2 rutile surface and the detachment force of a single tyrosine residue from steered molecular dynamics simulations, finding good agreement with experimental reference data in both cases. As a first application, we study the adsorption behavior of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide on the oxidized titanium surface, focusing particularly on the calculation of the free energy of desorption.

  15. Classical square-plus-triangle well fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghdadi, M.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified model for the intermolecular-potential function which consists of a hard core and a square-plus-triangle well is proposed. The square width is taken to be lambda 1 -1 and the triangle width is lambda 2 -lambda 1 , where the diameter of the molecules is assumed to be epsilon. Under the restriction that the area under the potential well should be equal to 0.5epsilon, which has its own reason, it is shown that the appropriate choice of lambda 1 and lambda 2 that best mimics the Lennard-Jones (LJ) cut-off results is 1.15 and 1.85 respectively. With this choice for lambda 1 and lambda 2 , the proposed model is effective and satisfactory

  16. Pseudo hard-sphere potential for use in continuous molecular-dynamics simulation of spherical and chain molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, J; Haslam, A J; Galindo, A; Jackson, G; Müller, E A

    2012-10-14

    We present a continuous pseudo-hard-sphere potential based on a cut-and-shifted Mie (generalized Lennard-Jones) potential with exponents (50, 49). Using this potential one can mimic the volumetric, structural, and dynamic properties of the discontinuous hard-sphere potential over the whole fluid range. The continuous pseudo potential has the advantage that it may be incorporated directly into off-the-shelf molecular-dynamics code, allowing the user to capitalise on existing hardware and software advances. Simulation results for the compressibility factor of the fluid and solid phases of our pseudo hard spheres are presented and compared both to the Carnahan-Starling equation of state of the fluid and published data, the differences being indistinguishable within simulation uncertainty. The specific form of the potential is employed to simulate flexible chains formed from these pseudo hard spheres at contact (pearl-necklace model) for m(c) = 4, 5, 7, 8, 16, 20, 100, 201, and 500 monomer segments. The compressibility factor of the chains per unit of monomer, m(c), approaches a limiting value at reasonably small values, m(c) theory. Simulation results are also presented for highly asymmetric mixtures of pseudo hard spheres, with diameter ratios of 3:1, 5:1, 20:1 over the whole composition range.

  17. Effects of microwave electric fields on the translational diffusion of dipolar molecules in surface potential: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranov, Sergey V.; Kouzaev, Guennadi A.

    2018-01-01

    Variations of effective diffusion coefficient of polar molecules exposed to microwave electric fields in a surface potential are studied by solving coupled stochastic differential equations of motion with a deterministic component of the surface force. Being an essential tool for the simulation interpretation, a theoretical approach to effective diffusion in surface potential is first developed. The effective diffusion coefficient is represented as the product of the normal diffusion coefficient and potential-dependent correction function, whose temperature dependence is close to the Arrhenius form. The analytically found zero-diffusion condition defines the state of thermal equilibrium at the surface. The diffusion of a water-like dipole molecule in the potential of graphite surface is simulated in the field-free conditions and in the presence of the alternating electric fields of various magnitude intensities and frequencies. Temperature dependence of the correction function exhibits field-induced variations of the effective Lennard-Jones energy parameter. It demonstrates maximum departure from the zero-field value at certain frequencies and intensities, which is associated with variations in the rotational dynamics. A concept of the amplitude-frequency resonance put forward to interpret the simulation results is explained using a heuristic reasoning and is corroborated by semi-quantitative considerations in terms of the Dissado-Hill cluster theory of dielectric relaxation.

  18. Pair Potential That Reproduces the Shape of Isochrones in Molecular Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arno; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    -dependent function of density, h(ρ), which for real liquids is well approximated by a power law, ργ. However, in simulations, a power law is not adequate when density changes are large; typical models, such as Lennard-Jones liquids, show that γ(ρ) ≡ d ln h(ρ)/d ln ρ is a decreasing function of density. This article...... presents results from computer simulations using a new pair potential that diverges at a nonzero distance and can be tuned to give a more realistic shape of γ(ρ). Our results indicate that the finite size of molecules is an important factor to take into account when modeling liquids over a large density......Many liquids have curves (isomorphs) in their phase diagrams along which structure, dynamics, and some thermodynamic quantities are invariant in reduced units. A substantial part of their phase diagrams is thus effectively one dimensional. The shapes of these isomorphs are described by a material...

  19. Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method in Fluoride glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kotbi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. On the other hand, the so-called Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a Fluoride glass system BaMnMF7 (M = Fe,V using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions (PDFs. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

  20. Conformational temperature-dependent behavior of a histone H2AX: a coarse-grained Monte Carlo approach via knowledge-based interaction potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Fritsche

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are not only important due to their vital role in cellular processes such as DNA compaction, replication and repair but also show intriguing structural properties that might be exploited for bioengineering purposes such as the development of nano-materials. Based on their biological and technological implications, it is interesting to investigate the structural properties of proteins as a function of temperature. In this work, we study the spatial response dynamics of the histone H2AX, consisting of 143 residues, by a coarse-grained bond fluctuating model for a broad range of normalized temperatures. A knowledge-based interaction matrix is used as input for the residue-residue Lennard-Jones potential.We find a variety of equilibrium structures including global globular configurations at low normalized temperature (T* = 0.014, combination of segmental globules and elongated chains (T* = 0.016,0.017, predominantly elongated chains (T* = 0.019,0.020, as well as universal SAW conformations at high normalized temperature (T* ≥ 0.023. The radius of gyration of the protein exhibits a non-monotonic temperature dependence with a maximum at a characteristic temperature (T(c* = 0.019 where a crossover occurs from a positive (stretching at T* ≤ T(c* to negative (contraction at T* ≥ T(c* thermal response on increasing T*.

  1. A strategy to find minimal energy nanocluster structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, José; Varas, Alejandro; Valdivia, Juan Alejandro; Kiwi, Miguel

    2013-11-05

    An unbiased strategy to search for the global and local minimal energy structures of free standing nanoclusters is presented. Our objectives are twofold: to find a diverse set of low lying local minima, as well as the global minimum. To do so, we use massively the fast inertial relaxation engine algorithm as an efficient local minimizer. This procedure turns out to be quite efficient to reach the global minimum, and also most of the local minima. We test the method with the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, for which an abundant literature does exist, and obtain novel results, which include a new local minimum for LJ13 , 10 new local minima for LJ14 , and thousands of new local minima for 15≤N≤65. Insights on how to choose the initial configurations, analyzing the effectiveness of the method in reaching low-energy structures, including the global minimum, are developed as a function of the number of atoms of the cluster. Also, a novel characterization of the potential energy surface, analyzing properties of the local minima basins, is provided. The procedure constitutes a promising tool to generate a diverse set of cluster conformations, both two- and three-dimensional, that can be used as an input for refinement by means of ab initio methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The role of pressure in rubber elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, A F; Weiner, J H

    2004-06-22

    We describe a series of molecular dynamics computations that reveal an intimate connection at the atomic scale between difference stress (which resists stretches) and pressure (which resists volume changes) in an idealized elastomer, in contrast to the classical theory of rubber elasticity. Our simulations idealize the elastomer as a "pearl necklace," in which the covalent bonds are stiff linear springs, while nonbonded atoms interact through a Lennard-Jones potential with energy epsilon(LJ) and radius sigma(LJ). We calculate the difference stress t(11)-(t(22)+t(33))/2 and mean stress (t(11)+t(22)+t(33))/3 induced by a constant volume extension in the x(1) direction, as a function of temperature T and reduced density rho(*)=Nsigma(IJ) (3)/nu. Here, N is the number of atoms in the simulation cell and nu is the cell volume. Results show that for rho(*)rubber elasticity, which neglects nonbonded interactions. However, data presented by van Krevelen [Properties of Polymers, 3rd ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1990), p. 79] indicate that rubber at standard conditions corresponds to rho(*)=1.2. For rho(*)>1, the system is entropic for kT/epsilon(LJ)>2, but at lower temperatures the difference stress contains an additional energy component, which increases as rho(*) increases and temperature decreases. Finally, the model exhibits a glass transition for rho(*)=1.2 and kT/epsilon(LJ) approximately 2. The atomic-scale processes responsible for generating stress are explored in detail. Simulations demonstrate that the repulsive portion of the Lennard-Jones potential provides a contribution sigma(nbr)>0 to the difference stress, the attractive portion provides sigma(nba) approximately 0, while the covalent bonds provide sigma(b)nbr)0, and Pi(b)nbr)=-APi(nbr)P(2)(theta(b)), sigma(b)=BPi(b)P(2)(theta(b)), where P(2)(theta(b)) is a measure of the anisotropy of the orientation of the covalent bonds, and A and B are coefficients that depend weakly on rho(*) and temperature. For high

  3. Molar excess volumes of liquid hydrogen and neon mixtures from path integral simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challa, S.R.; Johnson, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    Volumetric properties of liquid mixtures of neon and hydrogen have been calculated using path integral hybrid Monte Carlo simulations. Realistic potentials have been used for the three interactions involved. Molar volumes and excess volumes of these mixtures have been evaluated for various compositions at 29 and 31.14 K, and 30 atm. Significant quantum effects are observed in molar volumes. Quantum simulations agree well with experimental molar volumes. Calculated excess volumes agree qualitatively with experimental values. However, contrary to the existing understanding that large positive deviations from ideal mixtures are caused due to quantum effects in Ne - H 2 mixtures, both classical as well as quantum simulations predict the large positive deviations from ideal mixtures. Further investigations using two other Ne - H 2 potentials of Lennard - Jones (LJ) type show that excess volumes are very sensitive to the cross-interaction potential. We conclude that the cross-interaction potential employed in our simulations is accurate for volumetric properties. This potential is more repulsive compared to the two LJ potentials tested, which have been obtained by two different combining rules. This repulsion and a comparatively lower potential well depth can explain the positive deviations from ideal mixing. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  4. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-08-28

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of T(c)=623 K, rho(c)=0.351 g/cm(3), and P(c)=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of T(c)=647.1 K, rho(c)=0.322 g/cm(3), and P(c)=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (T(c)=631 K and rho(c)=0.308 g/cm(3)). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300-450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase

  5. Dynamical phases of attractive particles sliding on a structured surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, J; Jungblut, S; Dellago, C

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by experiments on quartz crystal microbalance setups, we study the mobility of a monolayer of Lennard-Jones particles driven over a hexagonal external potential. We pay special attention to the changes in the dynamical phases that arise when the lattice constant of the external substrate potential and the Lennard-Jones interaction are mismatched. We find that if the average particle separation is such that the particles repel each other, or interact harmonically, the qualitative behavior of the system is akin to that of a monolayer of purely repulsive Yukawa particles. On the other hand, if the particles typically attract each other, the ensuing dynamical states are determined entirely by the relative strength of the Lennard-Jones interaction with respect to that of the external potential. (paper)

  6. Equation of state of a hard core fluid with a two-Yukawa tail: toward a simple analytic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedrzejek, C.

    1980-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of simple fluids are calculated using variational theory for a system of hard-core potential with a two-Yukawa tail. Likewise one Yukawa-tail case the working formulas are analytic. Five parameters of the two Yukawa system are chosen so as to get the best fit to a real argon potential or an ''argon-like'' Lennard-Jones potential. The results are fairly good in light of the extreme simplicity of the method. The discrepancies result from using the variational method and a different shape of Yukawa type potential in comparision to the real argon and Lennard-Jones potentials. (author)

  7. Characterizing water-metal interfaces and machine learning potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczko, Kevin

    In this thesis, we first discuss the fundamentals of ab initio electronic structure theory and density functional theory (DFT). We also discuss statistics related to computing thermodynamic averages of molecular dynamics (MD). We then use this theory to analyze and compare the structural, dynamical, and electronic properties of liquid water next to prototypical metals including platinum, graphite, and graphene. Our results are built on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) generated using density functional theory (DFT) which explicitly include van der Waals (vdW) interactions within a first principles approach. All calculations reported use large simulation cells, allowing for an accurate treatment of the water-electrode interfaces. We have included vdW interactions through the use of the optB86b-vdW exchange correlation functional. Comparisons with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange correlation functional are also shown. We find an initial peak, due to chemisorption, in the density profile of the liquid water-Pt interface not seen in the liquid water-graphite interface, liquid watergraphene interface, nor interfaces studied previously. To further investigate this chemisorption peak, we also report differences in the electronic structure of single water molecules on both Pt and graphite surfaces. We find that a covalent bond forms between the single water molecule and the platinum surface, but not between the single water molecule and the graphite surface. We also discuss the effects that defects and dopants in the graphite and graphene surfaces have on the structure and dynamics of liquid water. Lastly, we introduce artificial neural networks (ANNs), and demonstrate how they can be used to machine learn electronic structure calculations. As a proof of principle, we show the success of an ANN potential energy surfaces for a dimer molecule with a Lennard-Jones potential.

  8. 77 FR 5990 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane, Pilot-Compartment View Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ..., and the FAA must issue a finding of regulatory adequacy pursuant to Sec. 611 of Public Law 92-574, the ``Noise Control Act of 1972.'' The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in... novel or unusual design features: The Model LJ-200-1A10 airplane flight deck design incorporates a...

  9. Anomalous vibrational properties in the continuum limit of glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masanari; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Atsushi

    2018-02-01

    The low-temperature thermal properties of glasses are anomalous with respect to those of crystals. These thermal anomalies indicate that the low-frequency vibrational properties of glasses differ from those of crystals. Recent studies revealed that, in the simplest model of glasses, i.e., the harmonic potential system, phonon modes coexist with soft localized modes in the low-frequency (continuum) limit. However, the nature of low-frequency vibrational modes of more realistic models is still controversial. In the present work, we study the Lennard-Jones (LJ) system using large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation and establish that the vibrational property of the LJ glass converges to coexistence of the phonon modes and the soft localized modes in the continuum limit as in the case of the harmonic potential system. Importantly, we find that the low-frequency vibrations are rather sensitive to the numerical scheme of potential truncation, which is usually implemented in the MD simulation, and this is the reason why contradictory arguments have been reported by previous works. We also discuss the physical origin of this sensitiveness by means of a linear stability analysis.

  10. Low pressure broadening and shift of the 540.06 nm line of neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielski, A.; Dokurno, W.; Szudy, J.; Wolnikowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The collision broadening and shift of the 540.06 nm line of neon emitted from a low pressure glow discharge in pure neon and a neon-helium mixture have been measured. The values of the broadening and shift coefficients were determined and compared with the results of calculations based on the Lindholm-Foley impact theory assuming a Lennard-Jones potential. The results for pure neon demonstrate the inadequacy of the Lennard-Jones potential for the Ne-Ne interaction. (orig.)

  11. Rare events in many-body systems: reactive paths and reaction constants for structural transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picciani, M.

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the study of fundamental physics phenomena, with applications to nuclear materials of interest. We have developed methods for the study of rare events related to thermally activated structural transitions in many body systems. The first method involves the numerical simulation of the probability current associated with reactive paths. After deriving the evolution equations for the probability current, a Diffusion Monte Carlo algorithm is implemented in order to sample this current. This technique, called Transition Current Sampling was applied to the study of structural transitions in a cluster of 38 atoms with Lennard-Jones potential (LJ-38). A second algorithm, called Transition Path Sampling with local Lyapunov bias (LyTPS), was then developed. LyTPS calculates reaction rates at finite temperature by following the transition state theory. A statistical bias based on the maximum local Lyapunov exponents is introduced to accelerate the sampling of reactive trajectories. To extract the value of the equilibrium reaction constants obtained from LyTPS, we use the Multistate Bennett Acceptance Ratio. We again validate this method on the LJ-38 cluster. LyTPS is then used to calculate migration constants for vacancies and divacancies in the α-Iron, and the associated migration entropy. These constants are used as input parameter for codes modeling the kinetic evolution after irradiation (First Passage Kinetic Monte Carlo) to reproduce numerically resistivity recovery experiments in α-Iron. (author) [fr

  12. Comparisons of perturbation and integral equation theories for the angular pair correlation function in molecular fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murad, S.; Gubbins, K.E.; Gray, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    We compare several recently proposed theories for the angular pair correlation function g(rω 1 ω 2 ), including first- and second-order perturbation theory (the u-expansion), a Pade approximant to this series, first-order f-expansion, the single superchain, generalized mean field, linearized hypernetted chain, and quadratic hypernetted chain approximations. Numerical results from these theories are compared with available computer simulation data for four model fluids whose intermolecular pair potential is of the form u 0 +usub(a), where u 0 is a hard-sphere of Lennard-Jones model, while usub(a) is a dipole-dipole or quadrupole-quadrupole interaction; we refer to these model fluids as HS+μμ, HS+QQ, LJ+μμ, and LJ+QQ. Properties studied include the angular pair correlation function and its spherical harmonic components, the thermodynamic properties, and the angular correlation parameters G 1 and G 2 that are related to the dielectric and Kerr constants. The second-order perturbation theory is superior to the integral equation theories for the thermodynamic harmonics of g(rω 1 ω 2 ) and for the thermodynamic properties themselves at moderate multipole strengths. For other harmonics and properties, the integral equation theories are better, with the quadratic hypernetted chain approximation being the best overall. (orig.)

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.R.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. However, this property is apparently located directly over the old Lodi Brook streambed. This factor in combination with the elevated gamma logs of several auger holes is sufficient to recommend this site for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rate earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Act program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Results of the radiological survey at 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 70 State Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ094)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 70 State Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ094), was conducted during 1988. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 72 Sidney Stret, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ067)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residues used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 72 Sidney Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ067), was conducted during 1987. Results indicated concentrations of 232 Th slightly in excess of the DOE remedial action criterion for subsurface soil. This finding, coupled with the fact that adjacent properties have been designated by DOE for remedial action, and that the old Lodi Brook streambed is apparently beneath the property, suggests that it be considered for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  1. Results of the radiological survey at 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Results of the radiological survey at 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1961 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ082)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residue, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 112 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ082), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 108 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ084)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 108 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ084), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 15 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ087)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 15 John Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ087), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 3 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ038)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 3 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ038), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 79 Avenue B, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ091)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 79 Avenue B, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ091), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 112 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ068)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 112 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ068), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. Results of the survey indicated radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extracting process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area

  17. Results of the radiological survey at 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclides analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monozite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 113 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ081)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 113 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ081), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs, 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Gamma logging results found during this survey and during a previous survey conducted by Bechtel National, Incorporated, strongly indicated radionuclide concentrations in subsurface soil in excess of DOE remedial action criteria. This finding, coupled with the fact that adjacent properties have been found to be contaminated and that Lodi Brook apparently flows under the property, suggests that it be considered for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Results of the radiological survey at 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE remedial action criteria, primarily from the 232 Th decay chain, with some contamination from 226 Ra. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 90 C Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ079)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an investigative radiological survey during 1988 at 90 C Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ079), one of the properties in the vicinity of the MCW site. The survey included a gamma radiation scan of the surface and at one meter above the surface, as well as radionuclide sampling of surface and subsurface soil. The survey objective was to determine whether this site was contaminated with radioactive residues derived from MCW, principally 232 Th. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE remedial action criteria, primarily from the 232 Th decay chain, with some contamination from 226 Ra. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047), was conducted during 1985, 1986, 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the Survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 14 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ070)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 14 Long Valley Road, Lodi New Jersey (LJ070), was conducted during 1987. Survey measurements indicate that the property contained radioactive contamination primarily from the 232 Th decay chain. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from processing operations at the MCW. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling from radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth, earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. AT the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 48 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ085)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 48 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ085), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 105 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 105 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ065), was conducted during 1987. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 104 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ086)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-12-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 104 Avenue E, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ086), was conducted during 1988. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Reconciling the understanding of 'hydrophobicity' with physics-based models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-03-02

    The idea that a 'hydrophobic energy' drives protein folding, aggregation, and binding by favoring the sequestration of bulky residues from water into the protein interior is widespread. The solvation free energies (ΔGsolv) of small nonpolar solutes increase with surface area (A), and the free energies of creating macroscopic cavities in water increase linearly with A. These observations seem to imply that there is a hydrophobic component (ΔGhyd) of ΔGsolv that increases linearly with A, and this assumption is widely used in implicit solvent models. However, some explicit-solvent molecular dynamics studies appear to contradict these ideas. For example, one definition (ΔG(LJ)) of ΔGhyd is that it is the free energy of turning on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions between the solute and solvent. However, ΔG(LJ) decreases with A for alanine and glycine peptides. Here we argue that these apparent contradictions can be reconciled by defining ΔGhyd to be a near hard core insertion energy (ΔGrep), as in the partitioning proposed by Weeks, Chandler, and Andersen. However, recent results have shown that ΔGrep is not a simple function of geometric properties of the molecule, such as A and the molecular volume, and that the free energy of turning on the attractive part of the LJ potential cannot be computed from first-order perturbation theory for proteins. The theories that have been developed from these assumptions to predict ΔGhyd are therefore inadequate for proteins.

  13. Evaluating thermodynamic integration performance of the new amber molecular dynamics package and assess potential halogen bonds of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) benzimidazole inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin-Chih; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-04-05

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) can provide accurate binding free energy insights in a lead optimization program, but its high computational expense has limited its usage. In the effort of developing an efficient and accurate TI protocol for FabI inhibitors lead optimization program, we carefully compared TI with different Amber molecular dynamics (MD) engines (sander and pmemd), MD simulation lengths, the number of intermediate states and transformation steps, and the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb Softcore potentials parameters in the one-step TI, using eleven benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with Francisella tularensis enoyl acyl reductase (FtFabI). To our knowledge, this is the first study to extensively test the new AMBER MD engine, pmemd, on TI and compare the parameters of the Softcore potentials in the one-step TI in a protein-ligand binding system. The best performing model, the one-step pmemd TI, using 6 intermediate states and 1 ns MD simulations, provides better agreement with experimental results (RMSD = 0.52 kcal/mol) than the best performing implicit solvent method, QM/MM-GBSA from our previous study (RMSD = 3.00 kcal/mol), while maintaining similar efficiency. Briefly, we show the optimized TI protocol to be highly accurate and affordable for the FtFabI system. This approach can be implemented in a larger scale benzimidazole scaffold lead optimization against FtFabI. Lastly, the TI results here also provide structure-activity relationship insights, and suggest the parahalogen in benzimidazole compounds might form a weak halogen bond with FabI, which is a well-known halogen bond favoring enzyme. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The anti-tumor effects of the recombinant toxin protein rLj-RGD3 from Lampetra japonica on pancreatic carcinoma Panc-1 cells in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Tu, Zuoyu; Dai, Yongguo; Xu, Hong; Lv, Li; Wang, Jihong

    2017-02-01

    Recombinant Lampetra japonica RGD peptide (rLj-RGD3) is a soluble toxin protein with three RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) motifs and a molecular weight of 13.5kDa. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of rLj-RGD3 on tumor growth and survival in pancreatic carcinoma Panc-1 cell-bearing mice. A Panc-1 human pancreatic carcinoma-bearing nude mouse model was successfully generated, and the animals were treated with different doses of rLj-RGD3 for 3 weeks. The volume and weight of the subcutaneous tumors, the survival of the nude mice, histopathological changes, the intratumoral MVD, the number of apoptotic Panc-1 cells, and apoptosis-related proteins and gene expressions were determined. rLj-RGD3 significantly decreased the tumor volumes and weights, and the maximum tumor volume and weight IR values were 53.2% (pPanc-1-bearing nude mice treated with rLj-RGD3 was increased by 56.3% (pPanc-1 cells in a nude mouse model, implying that rLj-RGD3 may serve as a potent clinical therapeutic agent for human pancreatic carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential. respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials. (ii) calculation of the chemical...

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 9 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ069)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process waste and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monozite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Areas residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with teas and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigate radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 9 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ069), was conducted during 1987. Measurements at the private property located at 9 Redstone Lane indicate slightly elevated gamma exposure rates in association with cinder-like material observed in logging holes. These elevated levels result from naturally occurring radioactivity present in such substances as ashes and cinders. They are not related to the deposit of residues from processing operations at the MCW site. All other radiological findings conform to the guidelines established by the DOE for the Maywood, New Jersey, area remedial action plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Molecular beam scattering experiments with polar molecules. 1. Differential elastic scattering of H2+NH3 and H2+H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Scoles, G.; Smith, K.M.

    1974-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections with well resolved quantum oscillations have been measuremed for the systems H 2 +NH 3 and H 2 +H 2 O. Assuming a spherically symmetric interaction the data show that a simple spherical potential (i.e. Lennard-Jones) does not properly describe the scattering

  18. Elastic properties of surfactant monolayers at liquid-liquid interfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    Using a simple molecular model based on the Lennard-Jones potential, we systematically study the elastic properties of liquid-liquid interfaces containing surfactant molecules by means of extensive and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. The main elastic constants of the interface, corres...

  19. Stochasticity thresholds in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callegari, B.; Galgani, L.; Milan Univ.

    1979-01-01

    The authors consider the celebrated model of Fermi, Pasta and Ulam and give a numerical estimate for its thresholds of stochasticity, thus determining a critical energy as a function of the frequency of the corresponding oscillators. The results turn out to be qualitatively similar to those already obtained for a chain of particles with nearest-neighbour Lennard-Jones interaction potential. (author)

  20. Stochasticity thresholds in the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callegari, B [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica; Carotta, M C; Ferrario, C [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Lo Vecchio, G [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Gruppo Nazionale di Struttura della Materia, Ferrara (Italy)); Galgani, L [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica)

    1979-12-11

    The authors consider the celebrated model of Fermi, Pasta and Ulam and give a numerical estimate for its thresholds of stochasticity, thus determining a critical energy as a function of the frequency of the corresponding oscillators. The results turn out to be qualitatively similar to those already obtained for a chain of particles with nearest-neighbour Lennard-Jones interaction potential.

  1. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. O akinlade. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  2. G A Adebayo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. G A Adebayo. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  3. Pramana – Journal of Physics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. L A Hussain. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 64 Issue 2 February 2005 pp 269-279 Research Articles. Structures and autocorrelation functions of liquid Al and Mg modelled via Lennard-Jones potential from molecular dynamics simulation.

  4. HNC variational calculations of boson matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantto, L.J.; Jackson, A.D.; Siemens, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple and reliable numerical technique is given for determining the two-body distribution function which minimizes the HNC energy of boson matter. Numerical results are presented for the neutron matter homework problem and the 4 He Lennard-Jones potential. The resulting distribution function is found to have proper asymptotic behaviour and yields reasonable binding energies. (Auth.)

  5. Webbaserad pedagogisk meritportfölj - från idé till verklighet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Johansson

    2011-03-01

    åväl sökanden som bedömare. Det finns behov av redovisning av pedagogiska meriter även för andra ändamål än vid tjänstetillsättningar. Många medarbetare (som inte avser att söka akademisk tjänst gör betydande insatser i undervisningen exempelvis i form av administration, föreläsningar, seminarieledning samt klinisk handledning, och dessa prestationer bör användas som underlag för exempelvis planeringssamtal, löneförhandlingar och kompetensutveckling. Många finner det svårt att redovisa dessa undervisningsinsatser. Orsaken till detta är sannolikt delvis bristen på tradition att bokföra pedagogiskt arbetet (i kontrast till vetenskapligt arbete, men också bristen på ett användarvänligt verktyg för bokföring. Detta var startskottet för ett projekt som syftade till att framställa en personlig webbaserad pedagogisk meritportfölj som skulle kunna överbrygga det praktiska bekymret och ge medarbetarna ett smidigt verktyg för dokumentation av och reflektion runt pedagogiska meriter. Detta samtidigt som det skulle vara acceptabelt som instrument för sökande av akademisk tjänst genom att bygga på Uppsala universitets pedagogiska program och riktlinjer för meritvärdering. Denna artikel beskriver processen från idé till färdig webbaserad pedagogisk meritportfölj för vetenskapsområdet för medicin och farmaci vid Uppsala universitet. Även om det sannolikt existerar liknande webb-verktyg för bokföring av pedagogiska meriter så är detta oss veterligen det första verktyg i sitt slag som framställts och beskrivits. Syftet med artikeln är att sprida kunskap om både konceptet och arbetsprocessen för att underlätta spridning till andra fakulteter och lärosäten.

  6. Statistical mechanics of addition polymerisation. Calculations of the expectation and variance of the average atmosphere in growing self avoiding walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniya, Abraham; Deepthi, Murali; Padmanabhan, Alapat

    2018-06-01

    Recent calculations on the change in radial dimensions of reacting (growing) polyethylene in the gas phase experiencing Lennard Jones and Kihara type potentials revealed that a single reacting polyethylene molecule does not experience polymer collapse. This implies that a transition that is the converse of what happens when molten polyethylene crystallizes, i.e. it transforms from random coil like structure to folded rigid rod type structure, occurs. The predicted behaviour of growing polyethylene was explained by treating the head of the growing polymer chain as myopic whereas as the whole chain (i.e. when under equilibrium conditions) being treated as having normal vision, i.e. the growing chain does not see the attractive part of the LJ or Kihara Potentials. In this paper we provide further proof for this argument in two ways. Firstly we carry forward the exact enumeration calculations on growing self avoiding walks reported in that paper to larger values of number of steps by using Monte Carlo type calculations. We thereby assign physical significance to the connective constant of self avoiding walks, which until now was treated as a purely abstract mathematical entity. Secondly since a reacting polymer molecule that grows by addition polymerisation sees only one step ahead at a time, we extend this calculation by estimating the average atmosphere for molecules, with repulsive potential only (growing self avoiding walks in two dimensions), that look at two, three, four, five ...steps ahead. Our calculation shows that the arguments used in the previous work are correct.

  7. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  8. Mechanics of single-walled carbon nanotubes inside open single-walled carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.; Hosseinzadeh, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) inside open single-walled carbon nanocones (CNCs). New semi-analytical expressions are presented to evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions between CNTs and open CNCs. Continuum approximation, along with the the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, is used in this study. The effects of geometrical parameters on alterations in vdW potential energy and the interaction force are extensively examined for the concentric CNT-open CNC configuration. The CNT is assumed to enter the nanocone either through the small end or the wide end of the cone. The preferred position of the CNT with respect to the nanocone axis is fully investigated for various geometrical parameters. The optimum nanotube radius minimizing the total potential energy of the concentric configuration is determined for different radii of the small end of the cone. The examined configuration generates asymmetric oscillation; thus, the system constitutes a nano-oscillator.

  9. Study of structural and transport properties of argon, krypton, and their binary mixtures at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Sunil; Adhikari, Narayan Prasad

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of argon, krypton, and their binary mixtures were performed at different temperatures and constant pressure (P = 1.013 bar) using GROMACS - Groningen Machine for Chemical Simulations. The gases are modeled by Lennard-Jones pair potential, with parameters taken from the literature. The study of radial distribution functions (RDFs) shows a single peak which indicates that there is no packing effect in gaseous state for argon, krypton, and their binary mixtures. The self-diffusion coefficients of argon and krypton is determined by using mean-square displacement(MSD) method and the mutual diffusion coefficients of binary mixtures are determined using Darken's relation. The values of simulated diffusion coefficients are compared with their corresponding theoretical values, numerical estimation, and experimental data. A good agreement between these sets of data is found. The diffusion coefficients obey Arrhenius behavior to a good extent for both pure components and binary mixtures. The values of simulated diffusion coefficient are used to estimate viscosities and thermal conductivities which agree with theoretical values, numerical estimation, and experimental data within 10 %. These results support that the LJ potential is sufficient for description of molecular interactions in argon and krypton.

  10. Morse index for figure-eight choreographies of the planar equal mass three-body problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    We report on numerical calculations of the Morse index for figure-eight choreographic solutions to a system of three identical bodies in a plane interacting through the homogeneous potential, -1/r a , or through the Lennard-Jones-type (LJ) potential, 1/r12 - 1/r6 , where r is a distance between the bodies. The Morse index is a number of independent variational functions giving negative second variation S (2) of action functional S. We calculated three kinds of Morse indices, N, N c and N e, in the domain of the periodic, the choreographic and the figure-eight choreographic function, respectively. For the homogeneous system, we obtain N  =  4 for 0 ≤slant a index for the solution tending to the figure-eight solution of the a  =  6 homogeneous system for the period T \\to ∞ . We obtain N, N c and N e as monotonically increasing functions of T from T \\to ∞ , which start with N=N_c=N_e=0 , jump at the smallest T by 1, and reach N  =  12, N_c=4 , and N_e=1 for T \\to ∞ in the other branch.

  11. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos of Microcantilever-Based TM-AFMs with Squeeze Film Damping Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Yu Chen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In Atomic force microscope (AFM examination of a vibrating microcantilever, the nonlinear tip-sample interaction would greatly influence the dynamics of the cantilever. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics and chaos of a tip-sample dynamic system being run in the tapping mode (TM were investigated by considering the effects of hydrodynamic loading and squeeze film damping. The microcantilever was modeled as a spring-mass-damping system and the interaction between the tip and the sample was described by the Lennard-Jones (LJ potential. The fundamental frequency and quality factor were calculated from the transient oscillations of the microcantilever vibrating in air. Numerical simulations were carried out to study the coupled nonlinear dynamic system using the bifurcation diagram, Poincaré maps, largest Lyapunov exponent, phase portraits and time histories. Results indicated the occurrence of periodic and chaotic motions and provided a comprehensive understanding of the hydrodynamic loading of microcantilevers. It was demonstrated that the coupled dynamic system will experience complex nonlinear oscillation as the system parameters change and the effect of squeeze film damping is not negligible on the micro-scale.

  13. The existence of a plastic phase and a solid-liquid dynamical bistability region in small fullerene cluster (C60)7: molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatek, A; Dawid, A; Gburski, Z

    2006-01-01

    We have simulated (by the molecular dymanics (MD) method) the dynamics of fullerenes (C 60 ) in an extremely small cluster composed of only as many as seven C 60 molecules. The interaction is taken to be the full 60-site pairwise additive Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which generates both translational and anisotropic rotational motions of each molecule. Our atomically detailed MD simulations discover the plastic phase (no translations but active reorientations of fullerenes) at low energies (temperatures) of the (C 60 ) 7 cluster. We provide the in-depth evidence of the dynamical solid-liquid bistability region in the investigated cluster. Moreover, we confirm the existence of the liquid phase in (C 60 ) 7 , the finding of Gallego et al (1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 5258) obtained earlier on the basis of Girifalco's model, which assumes single-site only and spherically symmetrical interaction between C 60 molecules. We have calculated the translational and angular velocity autocorrelation functions and estimated the diffusion coefficient of fullerene in the liquid phase

  14. Hemoglobin LjGlb1-1 is involved in nodulation and regulates the level of nitric oxide in the Lotus japonicus-Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukudome, Mitsutaka; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Kado, Tomohiro; Osuki, Ken-Ichi; Rubio, Maria Carmen; Murakami, Ei-Ichi; Nagata, Maki; Kucho, Ken-Ichi; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Becana, Manuel; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Leghemoglobins transport and deliver O2 to the symbiosomes inside legume nodules and are essential for nitrogen fixation. However, the roles of other hemoglobins (Hbs) in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are unclear. Several Lotus japonicus mutants affecting LjGlb1-1, a non-symbiotic class 1 Hb, have been used to study the function of this protein in symbiosis. Two TILLING alleles with single amino acid substitutions (A102V and E127K) and a LORE1 null allele with a retrotransposon insertion in the 5'-untranslated region (96642) were selected for phenotyping nodulation. Plants of all three mutant lines showed a decrease in long infection threads and nodules, and an increase in incipient infection threads. About 4h after inoculation, the roots of mutant plants exhibited a greater transient accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) than did the wild-type roots; nevertheless, in vitro NO dioxygenase activities of the wild-type, A102V, and E127K proteins were similar, suggesting that the mutated proteins are not fully functional in vivo The expression of LjGlb1-1, but not of the other class 1 Hb of L. japonicus (LjGlb1-2), was affected during infection of wild-type roots, further supporting a specific role for LjGlb1-1. In conclusion, the LjGlb1-1 mutants reveal that this protein is required during rhizobial infection and regulates NO levels. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Phase equilibria of binary mixtures by molecular simulation and cubic equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral V.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular simulation data were used to study the performance of equations of state (EoS and combining rules usually employed in thermodynamic property calculations. The Monte Carlo method and the Gibbs ensemble technique were used for determining composition and densities of vapor and liquid phases in equilibrium for binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. Simulation results are compared to data in the literature and to those calculated by the t-PR-LJ EoS. The use of adequate combining rules has been shown to be very important for the satisfactory representation of molecular simulation data.

  16. Cluster growing process and a sequence of magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2003-01-01

    demonstrate that in this way all known global minimum structures of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence for the clusters of noble gas atoms......We present a new theoretical framework for modeling the cluster growing process. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system, and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing paths up to the cluster sizes of more than 100 atoms. We...

  17. Accelerating Monte Carlo Molecular Simulations Using Novel Extrapolation Schemes Combined with Fast Database Generation on Massively Parallel Machines

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2013-05-01

    We introduce an efficient thermodynamically consistent technique to extrapolate and interpolate normalized Canonical NVT ensemble averages like pressure and energy for Lennard-Jones (L-J) fluids. Preliminary results show promising applicability in oil and gas modeling, where accurate determination of thermodynamic properties in reservoirs is challenging. The thermodynamic interpolation and thermodynamic extrapolation schemes predict ensemble averages at different thermodynamic conditions from expensively simulated data points. The methods reweight and reconstruct previously generated database values of Markov chains at neighboring temperature and density conditions. To investigate the efficiency of these methods, two databases corresponding to different combinations of normalized density and temperature are generated. One contains 175 Markov chains with 10,000,000 MC cycles each and the other contains 3000 Markov chains with 61,000,000 MC cycles each. For such massive database creation, two algorithms to parallelize the computations have been investigated. The accuracy of the thermodynamic extrapolation scheme is investigated with respect to classical interpolation and extrapolation. Finally, thermodynamic interpolation benefiting from four neighboring Markov chains points is implemented and compared with previous schemes. The thermodynamic interpolation scheme using knowledge from the four neighboring points proves to be more accurate than the thermodynamic extrapolation from the closest point only, while both thermodynamic extrapolation and thermodynamic interpolation are more accurate than the classical interpolation and extrapolation. The investigated extrapolation scheme has great potential in oil and gas reservoir modeling.That is, such a scheme has the potential to speed up the MCMC thermodynamic computation to be comparable with conventional Equation of State approaches in efficiency. In particular, this makes it applicable to large-scale optimization of L-J

  18. Results of the radiological survey at Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, Kennedy Park, Money and Sidney Streets, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ062), was conducted during 1986 and 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Results of the radiological survey at Interstate 80, North Right of Way at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and oil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, on the North Right of Way of Interstate 80 at Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ077), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Results of the radiological survey at the property at Main Street and Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ074)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurements of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site located at the intersection of Main Street and Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ074), was conducted during 1987. While some radiological measurements taken at the vacant lot at the intersection of Main Street and Highway 46 were greater than background levels typically encountered in the northern New Jersey area, no radiation levels nor radionuclide concentrations exceeded the applicable DOE criteria. The survey results demonstrate that the radiological condition of this property conforms to DOE guidelines for remedial action. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Results of the radiological survey at the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Napp Chemical Company, 199 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ076), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  2. The Voronoi volume and molecular representation of molar volume: equilibrium simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunjan, Jagtar Singh; Eu, Byung Chan

    2010-04-07

    The Voronoi volume of simple fluids was previously made use of in connection with volume transport phenomena in nonequilibrium simple fluids. To investigate volume transport phenomena, it is important to develop a method to compute the Voronoi volume of fluids in nonequilibrium. In this work, as a first step to this goal, we investigate the equilibrium limit of the nonequilibrium Voronoi volume together with its attendant related molar (molal) and specific volumes. It is proved that the equilibrium Voronoi volume is equivalent to the molar (molal) volume. The latter, in turn, is proved equivalent to the specific volume. This chain of equivalences provides an alternative procedure of computing the equilibrium Voronoi volume from the molar volume/specific volume. We also show approximate methods of computing the Voronoi and molar volumes from the information on the pair correlation function. These methods may be employed for their quick estimation, but also provide some aspects of the fluid structure and its relation to the Voronoi volume. The Voronoi volume obtained from computer simulations is fitted to a function of temperature and pressure in the region above the triple point but below the critical point. Since the fitting function is given in terms of reduced variables for the Lennard-Jones (LJ) model and the kindred volumes (i.e., specific and molar volumes) are in essence equivalent to the equation of state, the formula obtained is a reduced equation state for simple fluids obeying the LJ model potential in the range of temperature and pressure examined and hence can be used for other simple fluids.

  3. A polarizable QM/MM approach to the molecular dynamics of amide groups solvated in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwörer, Magnus; Wichmann, Christoph; Tavan, Paul, E-mail: tavan@physik.uni-muenchen.de [Lehrstuhl für BioMolekulare Optik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München, Oettingenstr. 67, 80538 München (Germany)

    2016-03-21

    The infrared (IR) spectra of polypeptides are dominated by the so-called amide bands. Because they originate from the strongly polar and polarizable amide groups (AGs) making up the backbone, their spectral positions sensitively depend on the local electric fields. Aiming at accurate computations of these IR spectra by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which derive atomic forces from a hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Hamiltonian, here we consider the effects of solvation in bulk liquid water on the amide bands of the AG model compound N-methyl-acetamide (NMA). As QM approach to NMA we choose grid-based density functional theory (DFT). For the surrounding MM water, we develop, largely based on computations, a polarizable molecular mechanics (PMM) model potential called GP6P, which features six Gaussian electrostatic sources (one induced dipole, five static partial charge distributions) and, therefore, avoids spurious distortions of the DFT electron density in hybrid DFT/PMM simulations. Bulk liquid GP6P is shown to have favorable properties at the thermodynamic conditions of the parameterization and beyond. Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of the DFT fragment NMA are optimized by comparing radial distribution functions in the surrounding GP6P liquid with reference data obtained from a “first-principles” DFT-MD simulation. Finally, IR spectra of NMA in GP6P water are calculated from extended DFT/PMM-MD trajectories, in which the NMA is treated by three different DFT functionals (BP, BLYP, B3LYP). Method-specific frequency scaling factors are derived from DFT-MD simulations of isolated NMA. The DFT/PMM-MD simulations with GP6P and with the optimized LJ parameters then excellently predict the effects of aqueous solvation and deuteration observed in the IR spectra of NMA. As a result, the methods required to accurately compute such spectra by DFT/PMM-MD also for larger peptides in aqueous solution are now at hand.

  4. lJ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-15

    Jun 15, 1974 ... a particular abnormality necessitates treatment. Strabismus is diagnosed ... Paralysis of movement of the extra-ocular muscles may indicate involvement ... such as pigmentary dystrophy, vessel attenuation more marked in the ...

  5. NVU dynamics. II. Comparing to four other dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Toxværd, Søren; Schrøder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -potential-energy hypersurface. Here, simulations of NVU dynamics are compared to results for four other dynamics, both deterministic and stochastic. First, NVU dynamics is compared to the standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics by simulations of the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquid, its WCA version (i.......e., with cut-off's at the pair potential minima), and the Lennard-Jones Gaussian liquid. We find identical results for all quantities probed: radial distribution functions, incoherent intermediate scattering functions, and mean-square displacement as function of time. Arguments are presented...... on the constant-potential-energy hypersurface, and to Nos-Hoover NVT dynamics. If time is scaled for the two stochastic dynamics to make single-particle diffusion constants identical to that of NVE dynamics, the simulations show that all five dynamics are equivalent at low temperatures except at short times....

  6. Kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen: a path integral Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoppi, M.; Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The translational (center of mass) kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen have been recently measured by means of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering. We have evaluated the same quantity, in similar thermodynamic conditions, by means of Path Integral Monte Carlo computer simulation, modelling the system as composed of a set of spherical molecules interacting through a pairwise additive Lennard-Jones potential. In spite of the crude approximations on the interaction potential, the agreement is excellent. The pressure was also computed by means of the same simulations. This quantity, compared with the equation of state for solid para-hydrogen given by Driessen and Silvera, gives an agreement of a lesser quality and a negative value for the liquid state. We attribute this discrepancy to the limitations of the Lennard-Jones potential. (orig.)

  7. Equilibrium properties of dense hydrogen isotope gases based on the theory of simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; MacElroy, J M D

    2006-08-03

    We present a new method for the prediction of the equilibrium properties of dense gases containing hydrogen isotopes. The proposed approach combines the Feynman-Hibbs effective potential method and a deconvolution scheme introduced by Weeks et al. The resulting equations of state and the chemical potentials as functions of pressure for each of the hydrogen isotope gases depend on a single set of Lennard-Jones parameters. In addition to its simplicity, the proposed method with optimized Lennard-Jones potential parameters accurately describes the equilibrium properties of hydrogen isotope fluids in the regime of moderate temperatures and pressures. The present approach should find applications in the nonlocal density functional theory of inhomogeneous quantum fluids and should also be of particular relevance to hydrogen (clean energy) storage and to the separation of quantum isotopes by novel nanomaterials.

  8. Effective diameters and corresponding states of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Fernando

    Effective hard-sphere diameters of fluids with purely repulsive interactions are derived from a generalized corresponding-states principle of Leland, Rowlinson and coworkers. Various alternative definitions are discussed and related. Virial expansions of the effective diameters and their corresponding volumes are obtained and compared with results of perturbation theory. Applications are made to inverse-power potentials, the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential and hard spherocylinders and dumbells.

  9. Statistical mechanical calculations of molecular pair correlation functions and scattering intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, H.

    1978-01-01

    For the case of special molecular models representing the acetonitrile molecule the expansion coefficients of the molecular par distribution function are calculated by use of pertubation theory. These results are used to get theoretical access to scattering intensities in the frame of several approximations. The first model describes the molecule by three hard spheres and uses a hard sphere liquid as reference. In the second cast the calculations are based on an anisotropic Lennard-Jones potential by application of a model of overlapping ellipsoids and by use of a Lennard-Jones liquid as a reference system. In the third model dipolar attractive forces are taken into account with an anisotropic hard-sphere liquid as a reference. In the third model dipolar attractive forces are taken into account with an anisotropic hard-sphere liquid as a reference. Finally all the calculations with different intermolecular potentials are compared with neutron scattering experiments. (orig.) 891 HK [de

  10. Influence of pressure on the crystallization of systems characterized by different intermolecular attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, K.; Affouard, F.; Gerges, J.; Valdes, L.-C.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we examine, in terms of the classical nucleation theory, how the strengthening of the attractive intermolecular interactions influences the crystallization process for systems like Lennard-Jones at different isobaric conditions. For this purpose, we modify the standard Lennard-Jones potential, and as a result, we obtain three different systems characterized by various strengths of attractive potentials occurring between molecules, which are in direct relationship to the physical quantities describing molecules, e.g., its polarizability or dipole moment. Based on performed analysis, we demonstrate that the molecular attraction primarily impacts the thermodynamics of the interface between liquid and crystal. This is reflected in the behavior of nucleation and overall crystallization rates during compression of the system.

  11. Phononless soliton waves as early forerunners of crystalline material fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovskij, O.A.; Orlov, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    Phononless soliton waves of compression are shown to generate at a critical tension of crystals featuring real Lennard-Jones potential of interatomic interaction just before their fracture. A new method of nonlinear micro dynamics was applied to define the initial atomic displacements at high excitation energies. A solution is found that corresponds to a soliton wave running before the front of fracture. In a bounded crystal, the soliton being reflected from the crystal boundary passes the front of fracture and deforms while moving in the opposite direction. The amplitude and spectral characteristics of that type of soliton waves in crystals with a modified Lennard-Jones potential have been investigated. An approximate analytical solution was found for the soliton waves [ru

  12. Molecular dynamic simulation of Copper and Platinum nanoparticles Poiseuille flow in a nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toghraie, Davood; Mokhtari, Majid; Afrand, Masoud

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, simulation of Poiseuille flow within nanochannel containing Copper and Platinum particles has been performed using molecular dynamic (MD). In this simulation LAMMPS code is used to simulate three-dimensional Poiseuille flow. The atomic interaction is governed by the modified Lennard-Jones potential. To study the wall effects on the surface tension and density profile, we placed two solid walls, one at the bottom boundary and the other at the top boundary. For solid-liquid interactions, the modified Lennard-Jones potential function was used. Velocity profiles and distribution of temperature and density have been obtained, and agglutination of nanoparticles has been discussed. It has also shown that with more particles, less time is required for the particles to fuse or agglutinate. Also, we can conclude that the agglutination time in nanochannel with Copper particles is faster that in Platinum nanoparticles. Finally, it is demonstrated that using nanoparticles raises thermal conduction in the channel.

  13. Structure and stability of small Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )-Xen (n = 1-6) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Sameh; Ghanmi, Chedli; Berriche, Hamid

    2014-04-01

    We have studied the structure and stability of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters for special symmetry groups. The potential energy surfaces of these clusters, are described using an accurate ab initio approach based on non-empirical pseudopotential, parameterized l-dependent polarization potential and analytic potential forms for the Li+Xe and Xe-Xe interactions. The pseudopotential technique has reduced the number of active electrons of Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )-Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters to only one electron, the Li valence electron. The core-core interactions for Li+Xe are included using accurate CCSD(T) potential fitted using the analytical form of Tang and Toennies. For the Xe-Xe potential interactions we have used the analytical form of Lennard Jones (LJ6 - 12). The potential energy surfaces of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g )Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters are performed for a fixed distance of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g ) alkali dimer, its equilibrium distance. They are used to extract information on the stability of the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters. For each n, the stability of the different isomers is examined by comparing their potential energy surfaces. Moreover, we have determined the quantum energies ( D 0), the zero-point-energies (ZPE) and the ZPE%. To our best knowledge, there are neither experimental nor theoretical works realized for the Li2 +(X2Σ+ g Xe n ( n = 1-6) clusters, our results are presented for the first time.

  14. On the equivalence of continuum and lattice models for fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2000-01-01

    It was demonstrated that finely discretized lattice models for fluids with particles interacting via Lennard-Jones or exponential-6 potentials have essentially identical thermodynamic and structural properties to their continuum counterparts. Grand canonical histogram reweighting Monte Carlo calculations were performed for systems with repulsion exponents between 11 and 22. Critical parameters were determined from mixed-field finite-size scaling methods. Numerical equivalence of lattice and continuous space models, within simulation uncertainties, was observed for lattices with ratio of particle diameter σ to grid spacing of 10. The lattice model calculations were more efficient computationally by factors between 10 and 20. It was also shown that Lennard-Jones and exponential-6 based models with identical critical properties can be constructed by appropriate choice of the repulsion exponent. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  15. Graphene on Cu(111) at the nonzero temperatures: Molecular dynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenkov, A. V.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Saletsky, A. M.

    2017-11-01

    We present results of molecular dynamic simulation of continuous graphene monolayer on Cu(111). In this paper, we investigate the dependencies of the average binding energy and the average binding distance on the temperature. The interaction between carbon and copper atoms was described by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the binding energy practically remains constant in a wide range of temperatures 0-800 K. However, in the same temperature range, the binding distance of graphene on Cu(111) surface has a linear dependence on temperature. The dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the binding distance on Lennard-Jones parameters has been calculated. We suggest a simple theoretical model to explain this dependence qualitatively.

  16. Isomorph invariance of Couette shear flows simulated by the SLLOD equations of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Separdar, Leila; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    fluctuations of virial and potential energy. Such systems have good isomorphs (curves in the thermodynamic phase diagram along which structural, dynamical, and some thermodynamic quantities are invariant when expressed in reduced units). The SLLOD equations of motion were used to simulate Couette shear flows......Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties of the single-component Lennard-Jones and the Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones liquids. Both systems are known to have strong correlations between equilibrium thermal...... of the two systems. We show analytically that these equations are isomorph invariant provided the reduced strain rate is fixed along the isomorph. Since isomorph invariance is generally only approximate, a range of strain rates were simulated to test for the predicted invariance, covering both the linear...

  17. Cluster pair correlation function of simple fluids: energetic connectivity criteria

    OpenAIRE

    Pugnaloni, Luis A.; Zarragoicoechea, Guillermo J.; Vericat, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    We consider the clustering of Lennard-Jones particles by using an energetic connectivity criterion proposed long ago by T.L. Hill [J. Chem. Phys. 32, 617 (1955)] for the bond between pairs of particles. The criterion establishes that two particles are bonded (directly connected) if their relative kinetic energy is less than minus their relative potential energy. Thus, in general, it depends on the direction as well as on the magnitude of the velocities and positions of the particles. An integ...

  18. The second virial coefficients of some halogenated ethanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Friedrich; van Nhu, Nguyen

    The second virial coefficients of 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane and 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane have been calculated on the basis of two-centre-Lennard-Jones + superimposed dipole model potentials and compared with experimental results. These can be explained taking into account the reduced dipole moments and the angle between dipole moment and molecular axis.

  19. First order phase transition of expanding matter and its fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazumi, Shinpei; Iwamoto, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Using an expanding matter model with a Lennard-Jones potential, the instability of the expanding system is investigated. The pressure, the temperature, and the density fluctuations are calculated as functions of density during the time evolution of the expanding matter, which are compared to the coexistence curve calculated by the Gibbs ensemble. The expanding matter undergoes the first order phase transition in the limit of the quasistatic expansion. The resultant fragment mass distributions are also investigated. (author)

  20. Condensation and Evaporation Transitions in Deep Capillary Grooves

    OpenAIRE

    Malijevský, A. (Alexandr); Parry, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    We study the order of capillary condensation and evaporation transitions of a simple fluid adsorbed in a deep capillary groove using a fundamental measure density functional theory (DFT). The walls of the capillary interact with the fluid particles via long-ranged, dispersion, forces while the fluid-fluid interaction is modelled as a truncated Lennard-Jones-like potential. We find that below the wetting temperature $T_w$ condensation is first-order and evaporation is continuous with the metas...

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of a chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.; Gryko, J.

    1988-06-01

    Molecular dynamics is used to study the chemical reaction A+A→B+B. It is shown that the reaction rate constant follows the Arrhenius law both for Lennard-Jones and hard sphere interaction potentials between substrate particles. A. For the denser systems the reaction rate is proportional to the value of the radial distribution function at the contact point of two hard spheres. 10 refs, 4 figs

  2. Parsing partial molar volumes of small molecules: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Dubins, David N; Pomès, Régis; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2011-04-28

    We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conjunction with the Kirkwood-Buff theory to compute the partial molar volumes for a number of small solutes of various chemical natures. We repeated our computations using modified pair potentials, first, in the absence of the Coulombic term and, second, in the absence of the Coulombic and the attractive Lennard-Jones terms. Comparison of our results with experimental data and the volumetric results of Monte Carlo simulation with hard sphere potentials and scaled particle theory-based computations led us to conclude that, for small solutes, the partial molar volume computed with the Lennard-Jones potential in the absence of the Coulombic term nearly coincides with the cavity volume. On the other hand, MD simulations carried out with the pair interaction potentials containing only the repulsive Lennard-Jones term produce unrealistically large partial molar volumes of solutes that are close to their excluded volumes. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the reported schemes for parsing partial molar volume data on small solutes. In particular, our determined interaction volumes() and the thickness of the thermal volume for individual compounds are in good agreement with empirical estimates. This work is the first computational study that supports and lends credence to the practical algorithms of parsing partial molar volume data that are currently in use for molecular interpretations of volumetric data.

  3. A test of systematic coarse-graining of molecular dynamics simulations: Thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Chun; Kulkarni, Pandurang M.; Scott Shell, M.; Gary Leal, L.

    2012-10-01

    Coarse-graining (CG) techniques have recently attracted great interest for providing descriptions at a mesoscopic level of resolution that preserve fluid thermodynamic and transport behaviors with a reduced number of degrees of freedom and hence less computational effort. One fundamental question arises: how well and to what extent can a "bottom-up" developed mesoscale model recover the physical properties of a molecular scale system? To answer this question, we explore systematically the properties of a CG model that is developed to represent an intermediate mesoscale model between the atomistic and continuum scales. This CG model aims to reduce the computational cost relative to a full atomistic simulation, and we assess to what extent it is possible to preserve both the thermodynamic and transport properties of an underlying reference all-atom Lennard-Jones (LJ) system. In this paper, only the thermodynamic properties are considered in detail. The transport properties will be examined in subsequent work. To coarse-grain, we first use the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) to determine a CG potential for a (1-ϕ)N mesoscale particle system, where ϕ is the degree of coarse-graining, so as to reproduce the radial distribution function (RDF) of an N atomic particle system. Even though the uniqueness theorem guarantees a one to one relationship between the RDF and an effective pairwise potential, we find that RDFs are insensitive to the long-range part of the IBI-determined potentials, which provides some significant flexibility in further matching other properties. We then propose a reformulation of IBI as a robust minimization procedure that enables simultaneous matching of the RDF and the fluid pressure. We find that this new method mainly changes the attractive tail region of the CG potentials, and it improves the isothermal compressibility relative to pure IBI. We also find that there are optimal interaction cutoff lengths for the CG system, as a function of

  4. Resolving dispersion and induction components for polarisable molecular simulations of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pádua, Agílio A. H.

    2017-05-01

    One important development in interaction potential models, or atomistic force fields, for molecular simulation is the inclusion of explicit polarisation, which represents the induction effects of charged or polar molecules on polarisable electron clouds. Polarisation can be included through fluctuating charges, induced multipoles, or Drude dipoles. This work uses Drude dipoles and is focused on room-temperature ionic liquids, for which fixed-charge models predict too slow dynamics. The aim of this study is to devise a strategy to adapt existing non-polarisable force fields upon addition of polarisation, because induction was already contained to an extent, implicitly, due to parametrisation against empirical data. Therefore, a fraction of the van der Waals interaction energy should be subtracted so that the Lennard-Jones terms only account for dispersion and the Drude dipoles for induction. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory is used to resolve the dispersion and induction terms in dimers and to calculate scaling factors to reduce the Lennard-Jones terms from the non-polarisable model. Simply adding Drude dipoles to an existing fixed-charge model already improves the prediction of transport properties, increasing diffusion coefficients, and lowering the viscosity. Scaling down the Lennard-Jones terms leads to still faster dynamics and densities that match experiment extremely well. The concept developed here improves the overall prediction of density and transport properties and can be adapted to other models and systems. In terms of microscopic structure of the ionic liquids, the inclusion of polarisation and the down-scaling of Lennard-Jones terms affect only slightly the ordering of the first shell of counterions, leading to small decreases in coordination numbers. Remarkably, the effect of polarisation is major beyond first neighbours, significantly weakening spatial correlations, a structural effect that is certainly related to the faster dynamics of

  5. Theoretical equation of state for classical fluids. I. Test by perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Villegas, A.; Chavez, M.; Del Rio, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper shows how to construct the theoretical equation of state (TEOS) of a classical simple fluid. The theory relies on the mean collisional diameter and range, and maps the thermodynamical properties of the fluid into those of an equivalent square-well (ESW) fluid of appropriate depth ε , diameter σ and range R. It is shown that the ESW has the same pressure as the fluid of interest. Hence the THEOS of any simple fluid takes the form of a SW EOS of the given ε , σ and R. The theory is applied to a Lennard-Jones (LJ) system in a first-order perturbation. The mapping equation have a physical solution for densities where the SW EOS is accurate; the resulting LJ TEOS agrees very well with the results of computer simulations, and compares favorably with the recent TEOS developed by Song and Mason. (Author). 17 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  6. rLj-RGD3, a Novel Recombinant Toxin Protein from Lampetra japonica, Protects against Cerebral Reperfusion Injury Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Involving the Integrin-PI3K/Akt Pathway in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lu

    Full Text Available The RGD-toxin protein Lj-RGD3 is a naturally occurring 118 amino acid peptide that can be obtained from the salivary gland of the Lampetra japonica fish. This unique peptide contains 3 RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motifs in its primary structure. Lj-RGD3 is available in recombinant form (rLj-RGD3 and can be produced in large quantities using DNA recombination techniques. The pharmacology of the three RGD motif-containing peptides has not been studied. This study investigated the protective effects of rLj-RGD3, a novel polypeptide, against ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage to the brain caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in a rat stroke model. We also explored the mechanism by which rLj-RGD3 acts by measuring protein and mRNA expression levels, with an emphasis on the FAK and integrin-PI3K/Akt anti-apoptosis pathways.rLj-RGD3 was obtained from the buccal secretions of Lampetra japonica using gene recombination technology. Sprague Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into the following seven groups: a sham group; a vehicle-treated (VT group; 100.0 μg·kg-1, 50.0 μg·kg-1 and 25.0 μg·kg-1 dose rLj-RGD3 groups; and two positive controls, including 1.5 mg·kg-1 Edaravone (ED and 100.0 μg·kg-1 Eptifibatide (EP. MCAO was induced using a model consisting of 2 h of ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion. Behavioral changes were observed in the normal and operation groups after focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was applied. In addition, behavioral scores were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after reperfusion. Brain infarct volumes were determined based on 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. Pathological changes in brain tissues were observed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining. Moreover, neuronal apoptosis was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL assays. We determined the expression levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K, protein kinase B

  7. Phase transitions of quadrupolar fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OShea, S.F.; Dubey, G.S.; Rasaiah, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Gibbs ensemble simulations are reported for Lennard-Jones particles with embedded quadrupoles of strength Q * =Q/(εσ 5 ) 1/2 =2.0 where ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones parameters. Calculations revealing the effect of the dispersive forces on the liquid endash vapor coexistence were carried out by scaling the attractive r -6 term in the Lennard-Jones pair potential by a factor λ ranging from 0 to 1. Liquid endash vapor coexistence is observed for all values of λ including λ=0 for Q * =2.0, unlike the corresponding dipolar fluid studied by van Leeuwen and Smit et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] which showed no phase transition below λ=0.35 when the reduced dipole moment μ * =2.0. The simulation data are analyzed to estimate the critical properties of the quadrupolar fluid and their dependence on the strength λ of the dispersive force. The critical temperature and pressure show a clear quadratic dependence on λ, while the density is less confidently identified as being linear in λ. The compressibility is roughly linear in λ. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. Continuum modeling investigation of gigahertz oscillators based on a C60 fullerene inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-02-01

    Research concerning the fabrication of nano-oscillators with operating frequency in the gigahertz (GHz) range has become a focal point in recent years. In this paper, a new type of GHz oscillators is introduced based on a C60 fullerene inside a cyclic peptide nanotube (CPN). To study the dynamic behavior of such nano-oscillators, using the continuum approximation in conjunction with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, analytical expressions are derived to determine the van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force between the two interacting molecules. Employing Newton's second law, the equation of motion is solved numerically to arrive at the telescopic oscillatory motion of a C60 fullerene inside CPNs. It is shown that the fullerene molecule exhibits different kinds of oscillation inside peptide nanotubes which are sensitive to the system parameters. Furthermore, for the precise evaluation of the oscillation frequency, a novel semi-analytical expression is proposed based on the conservation of the mechanical energy principle. Numerical results are presented to comprehensively study the effects of the number of peptide units and initial conditions (initial separation distance and velocity) on the oscillatory behavior of C60 -CPN oscillators. It is found out that for peptide nanotubes comprised of one unit, the maximum achievable frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to its preferred positions located outside the tube, while for other numbers of peptide units, such frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to the preferred positions situated in the space between the two first or the two last units. It is further found out that four peptide units are sufficient to obtain the optimal frequency.

  9. Light hydrogen isotopes in the single - walled carbon nano tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khugaev, A.V.; Sultanov, R.A.; Guster, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Progress of our understanding of the molecular hydrogen behavior in the nano tube interior open an intriguing possibility for the applications of these knowledge's to the solution of the hydrogen storage problem and light isotopes gas selectivity. That can strongly change the situation at the energy production in the world and completely change our civil life. These investigations underline the influence of the quantum effects on the properties of molecular hydrogen in the nano tube interior and it leads to the pure quantum-mechanical reformulation of the problem for the hydrogen behavior inside carbon nano tube as a problem of molecular quantum system behavior in the external field induced by the regular nano tube surface. In the present paper the molecular hydrogen behavior in the carbon nano tube was considered in the simple quantum mechanical manner. The main attention was paid to the investigation of the quantum sieving selectivity in the dependence of nano tube composition, radius and symmetry properties. For the interaction potential between hydrogen and nano tube surface was taken some phenomenological LJ(12,6) - (Lennard - Jones) potential and the external field induced by the nano tube in its interior is considered as a simple sum over the all nano tube carbon atoms. Influence of the structure of rotation (vibration) spectrum of the energy levels of diatomic molecules, such as H 2 , HD and D 2 on the final results and finite size of the nano tube along the axis of symmetry, its boundary effects is discussed in details. Thermal oscillations of nano tube surface were considered separately in the dependence of the temperature gradient along of the axis of symmetry

  10. Importance of dispersion and electron correlation in ab initio protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Cui, Guanglei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2009-04-16

    Dispersion is well-known to be important in biological systems, but the effect of electron correlation in such systems remains unclear. In order to assess the relationship between the structure of a protein and its electron correlation energy, we employed both full system Hartree-Fock (HF) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) calculations in conjunction with the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) on the native structures of two proteins and their corresponding computer-generated decoy sets. Because of the expense of the MP2 calculation, we have utilized the fragment molecular orbital method (FMO) in this study. We show that the sum of the Hartree-Fock (HF) energy and force field (LJ6)-derived dispersion energy (HF + LJ6) is well correlated with the energies obtained using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) theory. In one of the two examples studied, the correlation energy as well as the empirical dispersive energy term was able to discriminate between native and decoy structures. On the other hand, for the second protein we studied, neither the correlation energy nor dispersion energy showed discrimination capabilities; however, the ab initio MP2 energy and the HF+LJ6 both ranked the native structure correctly. Furthermore, when we randomly scrambled the Lennard-Jones parameters, the correlation between the MP2 energy and the sum of the HF energy and dispersive energy (HF+LJ6) significantly drops, which indicates that the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters is important.

  11. Thermodynamic scaling of α-relaxation time and viscosity stems from the Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the coupling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K L; Habasaki, J; Prevosto, D; Capaccioli, S; Paluch, Marian

    2012-07-21

    By now it is well established that the structural α-relaxation time, τ(α), of non-associated small molecular and polymeric glass-formers obey thermodynamic scaling. In other words, τ(α) is a function Φ of the product variable, ρ(γ)/T, where ρ is the density and T the temperature. The constant γ as well as the function, τ(α) = Φ(ρ(γ)/T), is material dependent. Actually this dependence of τ(α) on ρ(γ)/T originates from the dependence on the same product variable of the Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation time, τ(β), or the primitive relaxation time, τ(0), of the coupling model. To support this assertion, we give evidences from various sources itemized as follows. (1) The invariance of the relation between τ(α) and τ(β) or τ(0) to widely different combinations of pressure and temperature. (2) Experimental dielectric and viscosity data of glass-forming van der Waals liquids and polymer. (3) Molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, the Lewis-Wahnström model of ortho-terphenyl, 1,4 polybutadiene, a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, and a molten salt 2Ca(NO(3))(2)·3KNO(3) (CKN). (4) Both diffusivity and structural relaxation time, as well as the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in CKN obey thermodynamic scaling by ρ(γ)/T with the same γ. (5) In polymers, the chain normal mode relaxation time, τ(N), is another function of ρ(γ)/T with the same γ as segmental relaxation time τ(α). (6) While the data of τ(α) from simulations for the full LJ binary mixture obey very well the thermodynamic scaling, it is strongly violated when the LJ interaction potential is truncated beyond typical inter-particle distance, although in both cases the repulsive pair potentials coincide for some distances.

  12. Approaches to Learning or Levels of Processing: What Did Marton and Säljö (1976a) Really Say? the Legacy of the Work of the Göteborg Group in the 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Marton and Säljö ("Br J Educ Psychol" 46:4-11, 1976a) described deep-level and surface-level processing in experiments in which students read and recalled academic texts. They did not discuss whether levels of processing had any counterparts in students' everyday studies. However, their article is often credited as the source of the…

  13. Results of the radiological survey at the Firemen's Memorial Park and Fire Hall No. 2, Garibaldi Avenue and Kennedy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ066)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of the gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Firemen's Memorial Park and Fire Hall number sign 2, Garibaldi Avenue and Kennedy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ066) was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Results of the radiological survey of the Saddle River's East Bank, from State Highway 46 to the River's confluence with Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ083)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally 232 Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, the Saddle River's East Bank, from State Highway 46 to the River's Confluence with Lodi Brook, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ083), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  15. What Is a Simple Liquid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond S. Ingebrigtsen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to identify the real essence of simplicity of liquids in John Locke’s understanding of the term. Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlations between virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a direct property of the intermolecular potential because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS. This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of the structure and dynamics of several atomic and three molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. The liquids studied are inverse power-law systems (r^{-n} pair potentials with n=18,6,4, Lennard-Jones (LJ models (the standard LJ model, two generalized Kob-Andersen binary LJ mixtures, and the Wahnstrom binary LJ mixture, the Buckingham model, the Dzugutov model, the LJ Gaussian model, the Gaussian core model, the Hansen-McDonald molten salt model, the Lewis-Wahnstrom ortho-terphenyl model, the asymmetric dumbbell model, and the single-point charge water model. The final part of the paper summarizes properties of strongly correlating liquids, emphasizing that these are simpler than liquids in general. Simple liquids, as defined here, may be

  16. A Four-Site Molecular Model for Simulations of Liquid Methanol and Water-Methanol Mixtures: MeOH-4P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jiménez, Manuel; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2018-04-17

    In this work, we present a new four-site potential for methanol, MeOH-4P, fitted to reproduce the dielectric constant ε, the surface tension γ s , and the liquid density ρ of the pure liquid at T = 298.15 K and p = 1 bar. The partial charges on each site were taken from the OPLS/2016 model with the only difference of putting the negative charge on the fourth site ( M) instead of on the O atom, as done in four-site water models. The original Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters of OPLS/2016 for the methyl moiety (Me) were modified for the fitting of ρ and γ s , whereas the parameters of the TIP4P-FB water model were used for the O atom without change. Taking into account the energetic cost of the enhanced dipole relative to the isolated molecule, the results from simulations with this model showed good agreement with experiments for ρ, α p , κ T , C p , and Δ H v- l . Also, the temperature dependence of γ s and ε is satisfactory in the interval between 260 and 360 K, and the critical point description is similar to that of OPLS/2016. It is shown that orientational correlations, described by the Kirkwood factor G k , play a prominent role in the appropriate description of dielectric constants in existing models; unfortunately, the enhancement of the dipole moment produced a low diffusion coefficient D MeOH ; thus, a compromise was required between a good reproduction of ε and an acceptable D MeOH . The use of a fourth site resulted in a significant improvement for water-methanol mixtures described with TIP4P-FB and MeOH-4P, respectively, but required the modification of the LJ geometric combination rule to allow a good description of the methanol molar-fraction dependence of ρ, ε, and methanol (water) diffusion coefficients D MeOH ( D H 2 O ) and excess volume of mixing Δ V mix in the entire range of composition. The resulting free energy of hydration Δ G hyd shows excellent agreement with experiments in the interval between 280 and 360 K.

  17. Calculations on isotope separation by laser induced photodissociation of polyatomic molecules. Progress report, February 1, 1977--June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, W.E. Jr.

    1978-07-01

    The molecule SF 6 is treated as a classical dynamical system obeying Newton's laws of motion. This report describes how the current SF 6 potential is determined. The initial approach is described in terms of a pair of Lennard--Jones potential functions with arbitrary coefficients. A method for determining the potential constants is developed. The SF 6 spectrum was reproduced by including three-body forces. By specifying certain parameters such as the 1/r 6 F-F constant and the total dissociation energy of the molecule, a satisfactory global potential was obtained. The laser-molecule interaction energy was developed

  18. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethe, Martin; Rubi, J. Miguel; Fita, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  19. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethe, Martin, E-mail: martingoethe@ub.edu; Rubi, J. Miguel [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  20. Crustal thermal state and origin of silicic magma in Iceland: the case of Torfajökull, Ljósufjöll and Snæfellsjökull volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Sigmarsson, O.

    2007-05-01

    Pleistocene and Holocene peralkaline rhyolites from Torfajökull (South Iceland Volcanic Zone) and Ljósufjöll central volcanoes and trachytes from Snæfellsjökull (Snæfellsnes Volcanic Zone) allow the assessment of the mechanism for silicic magma genesis as a function of geographical location and crustal geothermal gradient. The low δ18O (2.4‰) and low Sr concentration (12.2 ppm) measured in Torfajökull rhyolites are best explained by partial melting of hydrated metabasaltic crust followed by major fractionation of feldspar. In contrast, very high 87Sr/86Sr (0.70473) and low Ba (8.7 ppm) and Sr (1.2 ppm) concentrations measured in Ljósufjöll silicic lavas are best explained by fractional crystallisation and subsequent 87Rb decay. Snæfellsjökull trachytes are also generated by fractional crystallisation, with less than 10% crustal assimilation, as inferred from their δ18O. The fact that silicic magmas within, or close to, the rift zone are principally generated by crustal melting whereas those from off-rift zones are better explained by fractional crystallisation clearly illustrates the controlling influence of the thermal state of the crust on silicic magma genesis in Iceland.

  1. Effect of pairwise additivity on finite-temperature behavior of classical ideal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekaari, Ashkan; Jafari, Mahmoud

    2018-05-01

    Finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to inquire into the effect of pairwise additivity on the behavior of classical ideal gas within the temperature range of T = 250-4000 K via applying a variety of pair potentials and then examining the temperature dependence of a number of thermodynamical properties. Examining the compressibility factor reveals the most deviation from ideal-gas behavior for the Lennard-Jones system mainly due to the presence of both the attractive and repulsive terms. The systems with either attractive or repulsive intermolecular potentials are found to present no resemblance to real gases, but the most similarity to the ideal one as temperature rises.

  2. Thermodynamical Properties of the Solidified Rare Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbsjoe, I

    1971-12-15

    Lattice parameter, isothermal bulk modulus and specific heat at constant volume are calculated from Helmholtz free energy for solid Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe. The lattice potential energy is expanded to the fourth order in the nuclear displacements. A perturbation treatment in the quasi harmonic approximation of the partition function includes the cubic anharmonic term to second order and the quartic to first order. Detailed numerical calculations are presented for two interatomic pair potentials, the Lennard-Jones (12,6) and the (exp,a,6). The three nearest neighbours have been taken into account. It is shown that earlier nearest neighbour calculations exaggerate the breakdown of the theory at higher temperatures

  3. Oscillations of spherical fullerenes interacting with graphene sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal, E-mail: ghavanloo@shirazu.ac.ir; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the oscillations of spherical fullerenes in the vicinity of a fully constrained graphene sheet are investigated. Using the continuous approximation and Lennard-Jones potential, the van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction forces are obtained. The equation of motion is derived and directly solved based on the actual force distribution between the fullerene molecules and the graphene sheet. Numerical results are obtained and shown that the oscillation is sensitive to the size of the fullerene as well as the distance between the center of the fullerene and the graphene sheet.

  4. An Analytical Model of Nanometer Scale Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Surfaces Measured Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    have been developed ranging from measuring surface details to modifying surface structures . This chapter focuses on aspects of AFM modeling the- ory and...how far apart they are. An example of a poten- tial function is the Lennard-Jones potential, which is also called the 6-12 potential. It can be...γ1 + γ2 + γ12, (31) where γ1 and γ2 are the surface energies of the two adhering spheres, and γ12 is the interfacial energy between the two spheres

  5. Time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2005-01-01

    We have derived a new relation between the time-dependent friction and solvation time correlation function (STCF) for non-polar fluids. The friction values calculated using this relation and simulation results on STCF for a Lennard-Jones fluid are shown to have excellent agreement with the same obtained through mode-coupling theory. Also derived is a relation between the time-dependent dielectric friction and STCF for polar fluids. Routes are thus provided to obtain the time-dependent friction (non-polar as well as dielectric) from an experimentally measured quantity like STCF, even if the interparticle interaction potential is not known

  6. Exponential and Bessel fitting methods for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptis, A.D.; Cash, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is developed for the numerical integration of the one dimensional radial Schroedinger equation. This method involves using different integration formulae in different parts of the range of integration rather than using the same integration formula throughout. Two new integration formulae are derived, one which integrates Bessel and Neumann functions exactly and another which exactly integrates certain exponential functions. It is shown that, for large r, these new formulae are much more accurate than standard integration methods for the Schroedinger equation. The benefit of using this new approach is demonstrated by considering some numerical examples based on the Lennard-Jones potential. (orig.)

  7. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R.; Heyes, David M.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2018-02-01

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  8. Isomorphs in the phase diagram of a model liquid without inverse power law repulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veldhorst, Arnold Adriaan; Bøhling, Lasse; Dyre, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    scattering function are calculated. The results are shown to reflect a hidden scale invariance; despite its exponential repulsion the Buckingham potential is well approximated by an inverse power-law plus a linear term in the region of the first peak of the radial distribution function. As a consequence...... the dynamics of the viscous Buckingham liquid is mimicked by a corresponding model with purely repulsive inverse-power-law interactions. The results presented here closely resemble earlier results for Lennard-Jones type liquids, demonstrating that the existence of strong correlations and isomorphs does...... not depend critically on the mathematical form of the repulsion being an inverse power law....

  9. Solitons on H bonds in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ovidio, F.; Bohr, H.G.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2003-01-01

    system shows that the solitons are spontaneously created and are stable and moving along the helix axis. A perturbation on one of the three H-bond lines forms solitons on the other H bonds as well. The robust solitary wave may explain very long-lived modes in the frequency range of 100 cm(-1) which...... are found in recent x-ray laser experiments. The dynamics parameters of the Toda lattice are in accordance with the usual Lennard-Jones parameters used for realistic H-bond potentials in proteins....

  10. Theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-10-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones-type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analog in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed. In particular, the predicted plasma electron density in a sonoluminescent bubble turns out to be in good agreement with the value measured in recent experiments.

  11. Layered interfaces between immiscible liquids studied by density-functional theory and molecular-dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geysermans, P; Elyeznasni, N; Russier, V

    2005-11-22

    We present a study of the structure in the interface between two immiscible liquids by density-functional theory and molecular-dynamics calculations. The liquids are modeled by Lennard-Jones potentials, which achieve immiscibility by suppressing the attractive interaction between unlike particles. The density profiles of the liquids display oscillations only in a limited part of the simple liquid-phase diagram (rho,T). When approaching the liquid-vapor coexistence, a significant depletion appears while the layering behavior of the density profile vanishes. By analogy with the liquid-vapor interface and the analysis of the adsorption this behavior is suggested to be strongly related to the drying transition.

  12. On the sighting of unicorns: A variational approach to computing invariant sets in dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, Oliver; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2017-06-01

    We propose to compute approximations to invariant sets in dynamical systems by minimizing an appropriate distance between a suitably selected finite set of points and its image under the dynamics. We demonstrate, through computational experiments, that this approach can successfully converge to approximations of (maximal) invariant sets of arbitrary topology, dimension, and stability, such as, e.g., saddle type invariant sets with complicated dynamics. We further propose to extend this approach by adding a Lennard-Jones type potential term to the objective function, which yields more evenly distributed approximating finite point sets, and illustrate the procedure through corresponding numerical experiments.

  13. Communication: Simple liquids' high-density viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, Lorenzo; Pedersen, Ulf R; Heyes, David M; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2018-02-28

    This paper argues that the viscosity of simple fluids at densities above that of the triple point is a specific function of temperature relative to the freezing temperature at the density in question. The proposed viscosity expression, which is arrived at in part by reference to the isomorph theory of systems with hidden scale invariance, describes computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones system as well as argon and methane experimental data and simulation results for an effective-pair-potential model of liquid sodium.

  14. Argon line broadening by neutral atoms and application to the measurement of oscillator strengths of AI resonance lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, O.; Ranson, P.; Chapelle, J.

    1977-01-01

    AI line broadening was studied from collisions between neutral argon atoms (3p 5 4p-3p 5 4s transitions) in a weakly ionised plasma jet (neutral atoms temperature T 0 approximately 4000K, electrons temperature Tsub(e) approximately 6000K, electronic density Nsub(e) 15 cm -3 , ionisation rate α -4 , and pressure range from 1 to 3 kg/cm 2 ). A satisfactory description of Van der Waals broadened lines is obtained by means of a Lennard-Jones potential. Measurement of line widths whose corresponding transitions occur on resonant levels, gives with relatively good accuracy the oscillator strength of the argon resonance lines [fr

  15. Capillary condensation in pores with rough walls: a density functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, P; Rzysko, W; Malijevsky, Al; Sokołowski, S

    2007-09-01

    The effect of surface roughness of slit-like pore walls on the capillary condensation of a spherical particles and short chains is studied. The gas molecules interact with the substrate by a Lennard-Jones (9,3) potential. The rough layer at each pore wall has a variable thickness and density and consists of a disordered quenched matrix of spherical particles. The system is described in the framework of a density functional approach and using computer simulations. The contribution due to attractive van der Waals interactions between adsorbate molecules is described by using first-order mean spherical approximation and mean-field approximation.

  16. Modulation of capillary condensation by trace component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqi Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Impact of trace component on capillary condensation (CC is investigated systematically using a classical density functional theory. It is discovered that (i presence of the trace component makes the CC to occur at much lower condensation pressure than when its absence; (ii Lennard-Jones potential parameters like size parameter and energy parameter of the trace component, and its concentration in the bulk adsorption system, show their effects the most remarkably within a particular range beyond which the effects eventually become insignificant. The present discoveries have implications in low pressure storage of gases, separation and enrichment of low concentration component, and easy control of CC transition, etc.

  17. Microscopic theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analogue in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed.

  18. Theoretical Assessment of Compressibility Factor of Gases by Using Second Virial Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Bahtiyar A.; Somuncu, Elif; Askerov, Iskender M.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new analytical approximation for determining the compressibility factor of real gases at various temperature values. This algorithm is suitable for the accurate evaluation of the compressibility factor using the second virial coefficient with a Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential. Numerical examples are presented for the gases H2, N2, He, CO2, CH4 and air, and the results are compared with other studies in the literature. Our results showed good agreement with the data in the literature. The consistency of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of our analytical approximation for real gases.

  19. Chaotic dynamics in dense fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posch, H.A.; Hoover, W.G.

    1987-09-01

    We present calculations of the full spectra of Lyapunov exponents for 8- and 32-particle systems with periodic boundary conditions and interacting with the repulsive part of a Lennard-Jones potential both in equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady states. Lyapunov characteristic exponents λ/sub n/ describe the mean exponential rates of divergence and convergence of neighbouring trajectories in phase-space. They are useful in characterizing the stochastic properties of a dynamical system. A new algorithm for their calculation is presented which incorporates ideas from control theory and constraint nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. 4 refs., 1 fig

  20. A new shared-memory programming paradigm for molecular dynamics simulations on the Intel Paragon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the use of shared memory emulation with DOLIB (Distributed Object Library) to simplify parallel programming on the Intel Paragon. A molecular dynamics application is used as an example to illustrate the use of the DOLIB shared memory library. SOTON-PAR, a parallel molecular dynamics code with explicit message-passing using a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, is rewritten using DOLIB primitives. The resulting code has no explicit message primitives and resembles a serial code. The new code can perform dynamic load balancing and achieves better performance than the original parallel code with explicit message-passing

  1. Um modelo para a superfície líquida no estudo da dinâmica do espalhamento de Xe e Ne pelo esqualano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Alexandre S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a theoretical model to investigate the scattering of Xe and Ne by a liquid squalane surface. The liquid surface is modeled as a grid of harmonic oscillators with frequencies adjusted to experimental vibration as frequencies of the liquid squalane and the atom-surface interaction potential is modeled by a Lennard-Jones function. The three dimensional description of the dynamics of the process which occurs at the gas-liquid interface is obtained by the classical trajectory method. The general characteristics of the dynamics of the scattering process are in good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Complexity, rate of energy exchanges and stochasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casartelli, M.; Sello, S.

    1987-01-01

    The complexity of trajectories in the phase of anharmonic crystal (mostly a Lennard-Jones chain) is analysed by the variance of microcanonical density and by new parameters P and chi defined, respectively, as the mean value of the time averages and the relative variance of the absolute exchange rate of energies among the normal modes. Evidence is given to the trapping action of residual invariant surfaces in low stochastic regime of motion. The parameter chi, moreover, proves efficient in exploring the border of stochasticity. A simple power law for P vs. the specific energy is obtained and proved to be independent of stochasticity and of the type of anharmonic potential

  3. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-21

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of f(ex-ref), chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  4. Molecular dispersion energy parameters for alkali and halide ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, S.; Deublein, S.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions containing alkali and halide ions are determined by molecular simulation. The following ions are studied: Li + , Na + , K + , Rb + , Cs + , F − , Cl − , Br − , and I − . The employed ion force fields consist of one Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and one concentric point charge with a magnitude of ±1 e. The SPC/E model is used for water. The LJ size parameter of the ion models is taken from Deublein et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 084501 (2012)], while the LJ energy parameter is determined in the present study based on experimental self-diffusion coefficient data of the alkali cations and the halide anions in aqueous solutions as well as the position of the first maximum of the radial distribution function of water around the ions. On the basis of these force field parameters, the electric conductivity, the hydration dynamics of water molecules around the ions, and the enthalpy of hydration is predicted. Considering a wide range of salinity, this study is conducted at temperatures of 293.15 and 298.15 K and a pressure of 1 bar

  5. Translational and rotational diffusion of dilute solid amorphous spherical nanocolloids by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, D. M.; Nuevo, M. J.; Morales, J. J.

    Following on from our previous study (Heyes, D. M., Nuevo, M. J, and Morales, J. J., 1996, Molec. Phys., 88, 1503), molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out of translational and rotational diffusion of atomistically rough near-spherical solid Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters immersed in a Weeks-Chandler-Andersen liquid solvent. A single cluster consisting of up to about 100LJ particles as part of an 8000 atom fluid system was considered in each case. The translational and rotational diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing cluster size and solvent density (roughly in proportion to the molar volume of the solvent). The simulations reveal that for clusters in excess of about 30LJ atoms there is a clear separation of timescales between angular velocity and orientation relaxation which adhere well to the small-step diffusion model encapsulated in Hubbard's relationship. For 100 atom clusters both the StokesEinstein (translation) and Stokes-Einstein-Debye (rotation) equations apply approximately. The small departures from these reference solutions indicate that the translational relaxation experiences a local viscosity in excess of the bulk value (typically by ~ 30%), whereas rotational relaxation experiences a smaller viscosity than the bulk (typically by ~ 30%) reasonably in accord with the Gierer-Wirtz model. Both of these observations are consistent with an observed layering of the liquid molecules next to the cluster observed in our previous study.

  6. Quantum complex rotation and uniform semiclassical calculations of complex energy eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.N.L.; Smith, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum and semiclassical calculations of complex energy eigenvalues have been carried out for an exponential potential of the form V 0 r 2 exp(-r) and Lennard-Jones (12,6) potential. A straightforward method, based on the complex coordinate rotation technique, is described for the quantum calculation of complex eigenenergies. For singular potentials, the method involves an inward and outward integration of the radial Schroedinger equation, followed by matching of the logarithmic derivatives of the wave functions at an intermediate point. For regular potentials, the method is simpler, as only an inward integration is required. Attention is drawn to the World War II researches of Hartree and co-workers who anticipated later quantum mechanical work on the complex rotation method. Complex eigenenergies are also calculated from a uniform semiclassical three turning point quantization formula, which allows for the proximity of the outer pair of complex turning points. Limiting cases of this formula, which are valid for very narrow or very broad widths, are also used in the calculations. We obtain good agreement between the semiclassical and quantum results. For the Lennard-Jones (12,6) potential, we compare resonance energies and widths from the complex energy definition of a resonance with those obtained from the time delay definition

  7. Optimization of partial multicanonical molecular dynamics simulations applied to an alanine dipeptide in explicit water solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2011-01-07

    The partial multicanonical algorithm for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations samples a wide range of an important part of the potential energy. Although it is a strong technique for structure prediction of biomolecules, the choice of the partial potential energy has not been optimized. In order to find the best choice, partial multicanonical molecular dynamics simulations of an alanine dipeptide in explicit water solvent were performed with 15 trial choices for the partial potential energy. The best choice was found to be the sum of the electrostatic, Lennard-Jones, and torsion-angle potential energies between solute atoms. In this case, the partial multicanonical simulation sampled all of the local-minimum free-energy states of the P(II), C(5), α(R), α(P), α(L), and C states and visited these states most frequently. Furthermore, backbone dihedral angles ϕ and ψ rotated very well. It is also found that the most important term among these three terms is the electrostatic potential energy and that the Lennard-Jones term also helps the simulation to overcome the steric restrictions. On the other hand, multicanonical simulation sampled all of the six states, but visited these states fewer times. Conventional canonical simulation sampled only four of the six states: The P(II), C(5), α(R), and α(P) states.

  8. Heat conduction in diatomic chains with correlated disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Alexander V.; Zolotarevskiy, Vadim; Gendelman, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers heat transport in diatomic one-dimensional lattices, containing equal amounts of particles with different masses. Ordering of the particles in the chain is governed by single correlation parameter - the probability for two neighboring particles to have the same mass. As this parameter grows from zero to unity, the structure of the chain varies from regular staggering chain to completely random configuration, and then - to very long clusters of particles with equal masses. Therefore, this correlation parameter allows a control of typical cluster size in the chain. In order to explore different regimes of the heat transport, two interatomic potentials are considered. The first one is an infinite potential wall, corresponding to instantaneous elastic collisions between the neighboring particles. In homogeneous chains such interaction leads to an anomalous heat transport. The other one is classical Lennard-Jones interatomic potential, which leads to a normal heat transport. The simulations demonstrate that the correlated disorder of the particle arrangement does not change the convergence properties of the heat conduction coefficient, but essentially modifies its value. For the collision potential, one observes essential growth of the coefficient for fixed chain length as the limit of large homogeneous clusters is approached. The thermal transport in these models remains superdiffusive. In the Lennard-Jones chain the effect of correlation appears to be not monotonous in the limit of low temperatures. This behavior stems from the competition between formation of long clusters mentioned above, and Anderson localization close to the staggering ordered state.

  9. Combination Rules for Morse-Based van der Waals Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Sun, Lei; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2018-02-15

    In traditional force fields (FFs), van der Waals interactions have been usually described by the Lennard-Jones potentials. Conventional combination rules for the parameters of van der Waals (VDW) cross-termed interactions were developed for the Lennard-Jones based FFs. Here, we report that the Morse potentials were a better function to describe VDW interactions calculated by highly precise quantum mechanics methods. A new set of combination rules was developed for Morse-based FFs, in which VDW interactions were described by Morse potentials. The new set of combination rules has been verified by comparing the second virial coefficients of 11 noble gas mixtures. For all of the mixed binaries considered in this work, the combination rules work very well and are superior to all three other existing sets of combination rules reported in the literature. We further used the Morse-based FF by using the combination rules to simulate the adsorption isotherms of CH 4 at 298 K in four covalent-organic frameworks (COFs). The overall agreement is great, which supports the further applications of this new set of combination rules in more realistic simulation systems.

  10. The thermodynamic properties of normal liquid helium 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, M.; Moshfegh, H. R.

    2009-09-01

    The thermodynamic properties of normal liquid helium 3 are calculated by using the lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method. The Landau Fermi liquid model and Fermi-Dirac distribution function are considered as our statistical model for the uncorrelated quantum fluid picture and the Lennard-Jones and Aziz potentials are used in our truncated cluster expansion (LOCV) to calculate the correlated energy. The single particle energy is treated variationally through an effective mass. The free energy, pressure, entropy, chemical potential and liquid phase diagram as well as the helium 3 specific heat are evaluated, discussed and compared with the corresponding available experimental data. It is found that the critical temperature for the existence of the pure gas phase is about 4.90 K (4.45 K), which is higher than the experimental prediction of 3.3 K, and the helium 3 flashing temperature is around 0.61 K (0.50 K) for the Lennard-Jones (Aziz) potential.

  11. A study on the contact angles of a water droplet on smooth and rough solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Young; Ha, Man Yeong; Choi, Ho Jin; Hong, Seung Do; Yoon, Hyun Sik

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the wetting characteristics such as contact angle, wetting radius and topography of water droplets on smooth and random solid surfaces. Molecular dynamic simulation is employed to analyze the wetting behavior of water droplets on smooth and rough surfaces by considering different potential energy models of bond, angle, Lennard-Jones and Coulomb to calculate the interacting forces between water molecules. The Lennard-Jones potential energy model is adopted as an interaction model between water molecules and solid surface atoms. The randomly rough surface is generated by changing the standard deviation of roughness height from 1 A to 3 A with the fixed autocorrelation length. The size of water droplet considered is in the range from 2,000 to 5,000 molecules. The contact angles increase generally with increasing number of water molecules. For a hydrophobic surface whose characteristic energy is 0.1 kcal/mol, the contact angles depend rarely on the standard deviation of the roughness height. However, when the surface energy is 0.5 and 1.0 kcal/mol, the contact angles depend on both the roughness height of surfaces and droplet size

  12. An adaptive immune optimization algorithm with dynamic lattice searching operation for fast optimization of atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xia; Wu, Genhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A high efficient method for optimization of atomic clusters is developed. • Its performance is studied by optimizing Lennard-Jones clusters and Ag clusters. • The method is proved to be quite efficient. • A new Ag 61 cluster with stacking-fault face-centered cubic motif is found. - Abstract: Geometrical optimization of atomic clusters is performed by a development of adaptive immune optimization algorithm (AIOA) with dynamic lattice searching (DLS) operation (AIOA-DLS method). By a cycle of construction and searching of the dynamic lattice (DL), DLS algorithm rapidly makes the clusters more regular and greatly reduces the potential energy. DLS can thus be used as an operation acting on the new individuals after mutation operation in AIOA to improve the performance of the AIOA. The AIOA-DLS method combines the merit of evolutionary algorithm and idea of dynamic lattice. The performance of the proposed method is investigated in the optimization of Lennard-Jones clusters within 250 atoms and silver clusters described by many-body Gupta potential within 150 atoms. Results reported in the literature are reproduced, and the motif of Ag 61 cluster is found to be stacking-fault face-centered cubic, whose energy is lower than that of previously obtained icosahedron

  13. Termodinâmica estatística de líquidos com o método de Monte Carlo. II. O líquido clorofórmio

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    Barlette Vania Elisabeth

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic properties and radial distribution functions for liquid chloroform were calculated using the Monte Carlo method implemented with Metropolis algorithm in the NpT ensemble at 298 K and 1 atm. A five site model was developed to represent the chloroform molecules. A force field composed by Lennard-Jones and Coulomb potential functions was used to calculate the intermolecular energy. The partial charges needed to represent the Coulombic interactions were obtained from quantum chemical ab initio calculations. The Lennard-Jones parameters were adjusted to reproduce experimental values for density and enthalpy of vaporization for pure liquid. All thermodynamic results are in excelent agreement with experimental data. The correlation functions calculated are in good accordance with theoretical results avaliable in the literature. The free energy for solvating one chloroform molecule into its own liquid at 298 K and 1 atm was computed as an additional test of the potential model. The result obtained compares well with the experimental value. The medium effects on cis/trans convertion of a hypotetical solute in water TIP4P and chloroform solvents were also accomplished. The results obtained from this investigation are in agreement with estimates of the continuous theory of solvation.

  14. Divergence of activity expansions: Is it actually a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushcats, M. V.; Bulavin, L. A.; Sysoev, V. M.; Ushcats, S. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    For realistic interaction models, which include both molecular attraction and repulsion (e.g., Lennard-Jones, modified Lennard-Jones, Morse, and square-well potentials), the asymptotic behavior of the virial expansions for pressure and density in powers of activity has been studied taking power terms of high orders into account on the basis of the known finite-order irreducible integrals as well as the recent approximations of infinite irreducible series. Even in the divergence region (at subcritical temperatures), this behavior stays thermodynamically adequate (in contrast to the behavior of the virial equation of state with the same set of irreducible integrals) and corresponds to the beginning of the first-order phase transition: the divergence yields the jump (discontinuity) in density at constant pressure and chemical potential. In general, it provides a statistical explanation of the condensation phenomenon, but for liquid or solid states, the physically proper description (which can turn the infinite discontinuity into a finite jump of density) still needs further study of high-order cluster integrals and, especially, their real dependence on the system volume (density).

  15. Carbon nanotori as traps for atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yue; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotori surely represent an ideal location to trap both charged and uncharged atoms, since they are open, accessible and possess strong attractive energy. In this paper, we investigate the plausibility of carbon nanotori as atomic traps and we use the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential to model the encapsulation of an atom or ion by a nanotorus. The critical geometric factors such as the minor and major radii, i.e. r and R of the nanotorus, for which the maximum interaction between the atom and the nanotorus occurs, are determined. For various atoms, assumed situated along the axis of the torus, the minimum potential energy between the atom and the nanotorus is calculated and compared, and shown to be approximately kηεσ 2 , where η is the uniform atomic density, ε and σ are the Lennard-Jones well depth and the van der Waals radius, respectively, and k is a universal non-dimensional constant with the approximate value -12.42. The results given in this paper might be used for future drug delivery and biosensing design.

  16. Simplicity of condensed matter at its core: generic definition of a Roskilde-simple system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2014-11-28

    The isomorph theory is reformulated by defining Roskilde-simple systems by the property that the order of the potential energies of configurations at one density is maintained when these are scaled uniformly to a different density. If the potential energy as a function of all particle coordinates is denoted by U(R), this requirement translates into U(Ra) < U(Rb) ⇒ U(λRa) < U(λRb). Isomorphs remain curves in the thermodynamic phase diagram along which structure, dynamics, and excess entropy are invariant, implying that the phase diagram is effectively one-dimensional with respect to many reduced-unit properties. In contrast to the original formulation of the isomorph theory, however, the density-scaling exponent is not exclusively a function of density and the isochoric heat capacity is not an exact isomorph invariant. A prediction is given for the latter quantity's variation along the isomorphs. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Lennard-Jones and Lennard-Jones Gaussian systems validate the new approach.

  17. Molecular simulation of thermodynamic and transport properties for the H{sub 2}O+NaCl system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, Gustavo A.; Jiang, Hao; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z., E-mail: azp@princeton.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Moultos, Othonas A.; Economou, Ioannis G. [Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A and M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar)

    2014-12-21

    Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to obtain thermodynamic and transport properties of the binary mixture H{sub 2}O+NaCl at temperatures from T = 298 to 473 K. In particular, vapor pressures, liquid densities, viscosities, and vapor-liquid interfacial tensions have been obtained as functions of pressure and salt concentration. Several previously proposed fixed-point-charge models that include either Lennard-Jones (LJ) 12-6 or exponential-6 (Exp6) functional forms to describe non-Coulombic interactions were studied. In particular, for water we used the SPC and SPC/E (LJ) models in their rigid forms, a semiflexible version of the SPC/E (LJ) model, and the Errington-Panagiotopoulos Exp6 model; for NaCl, we used the Smith-Dang and Joung-Cheatham (LJ) parameterizations as well as the Tosi-Fumi (Exp6) model. While none of the model combinations are able to reproduce simultaneously all target properties, vapor pressures are well represented using the SPC plus Joung-Cheathem model combination, and all LJ models do well for the liquid density, with the semiflexible SPC/E plus Joung-Cheatham combination being the most accurate. For viscosities, the combination of rigid SPC/E plus Smith-Dang is the best alternative. For interfacial tensions, the combination of the semiflexible SPC/E plus Smith-Dang or Joung-Cheatham gives the best results. Inclusion of water flexibility improves the mixture densities and interfacial tensions, at the cost of larger deviations for the vapor pressures and viscosities. The Exp6 water plus Tosi-Fumi salt model combination was found to perform poorly for most of the properties of interest, in particular being unable to describe the experimental trend for the vapor pressure as a function of salt concentration.

  18. Ablation by ultrashort laser pulses: Atomistic and thermodynamic analysis of the processes at the ablation threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Arun K.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Rethfeld, Baerbel; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrafast laser irradiation of solids may ablate material off the surface. We study this process for thin films using molecular-dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis. Both metals and Lennard-Jones (LJ) materials are studied. We find that despite the large difference in thermodynamical properties between these two classes of materials--e.g., for aluminum versus LJ the ratio T c /T tr of critical to triple-point temperature differs by more than a factor of 4--the values of the ablation threshold energy E abl normalized to the cohesion energy, ε abl =E abl /E coh , are surprisingly universal: all are near 0.3 with ±30% scattering. The difference in the ratio T c /T tr means that for metals the melting threshold ε m is low, ε m abl , while for LJ it is high, ε m >ε abl . This thermodynamical consideration gives a simple explanation for the difference between metals and LJ. It explains why despite the universality in ε abl , metals thermomechanically ablate always from the liquid state. This is opposite to LJ materials, which (near threshold) ablate from the solid state. Furthermore, we find that immediately below the ablation threshold, the formation of large voids (cavitation) in the irradiated material leads to a strong temporary expansion on a very slow time scale. This feature is easily distinguished from the acoustic oscillations governing the material response at smaller intensities, on the one hand, and the ablation occurring at larger intensities, on the other hand. This finding allows us to explain the puzzle of huge surface excursions found in experiments at near-threshold laser irradiation

  19. Analysis of three-phase equilibrium conditions for methane hydrate by isometric-isothermal molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Brumby, Paul E.; Wu, David T.; Sum, Amadeu K.; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2018-05-01

    To develop prediction methods of three-phase equilibrium (coexistence) conditions of methane hydrate by molecular simulations, we examined the use of NVT (isometric-isothermal) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. NVT MD simulations of coexisting solid hydrate, liquid water, and vapor methane phases were performed at four different temperatures, namely, 285, 290, 295, and 300 K. NVT simulations do not require complex pressure control schemes in multi-phase systems, and the growth or dissociation of the hydrate phase can lead to significant pressure changes in the approach toward equilibrium conditions. We found that the calculated equilibrium pressures tended to be higher than those reported by previous NPT (isobaric-isothermal) simulation studies using the same water model. The deviations of equilibrium conditions from previous simulation studies are mainly attributable to the employed calculation methods of pressure and Lennard-Jones interactions. We monitored the pressure in the methane phase, far from the interfaces with other phases, and confirmed that it was higher than the total pressure of the system calculated by previous studies. This fact clearly highlights the difficulties associated with the pressure calculation and control for multi-phase systems. The treatment of Lennard-Jones interactions without tail corrections in MD simulations also contributes to the overestimation of equilibrium pressure. Although improvements are still required to obtain accurate equilibrium conditions, NVT MD simulations exhibit potential for the prediction of equilibrium conditions of multi-phase systems.

  20. Solvation in atomic liquids: connection between Gaussian field theory and density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sergiievskyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the problem of molecular solvation, formulated as a liquid submitted to the external potential field created by a molecular solute of arbitrary shape dissolved in that solvent, we draw a connection between the Gaussian field theory derived by David Chandler [Phys. Rev. E, 1993, 48, 2898] and classical density functional theory. We show that Chandler's results concerning the solvation of a hard core of arbitrary shape can be recovered by either minimising a linearised HNC functional using an auxiliary Lagrange multiplier field to impose a vanishing density inside the core, or by minimising this functional directly outside the core — indeed a simpler procedure. Those equivalent approaches are compared to two other variants of DFT, either in the HNC, or partially linearised HNC approximation, for the solvation of a Lennard-Jones solute of increasing size in a Lennard-Jones solvent. Compared to Monte-Carlo simulations, all those theories give acceptable results for the inhomogeneous solvent structure, but are completely out-of-range for the solvation free-energies. This can be fixed in DFT by adding a hard-sphere bridge correction to the HNC functional.

  1. Test of a new heat-flow equation for dense-fluid shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel; Ravelo, Ramon

    2010-09-21

    Using a recently proposed equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, we model shockwave propagation in the dense Lennard-Jones fluid. Disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the kinetic temperature in the direction of a planar shock wave and those in the transverse directions, particularly in the region near the shock front, gives rise to a new transport (equilibration) mechanism not seen in usual one-dimensional heat-flow situations. The modification of the heat-flow equation was tested earlier for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which had been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes-Fourier solutions. Now, the Lennard-Jones fluid, whose equation of state and transport properties have been determined from independent calculations, allows us to study the case where potential, as well as kinetic contributions are important. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations under strong shock wave conditions, compared to Navier-Stokes.

  2. Accelerating Monte Carlo molecular simulations by reweighting and reconstructing Markov chains: Extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages and second derivatives to different temperature and density conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoura, Ahmad; Sun, Shuyu, E-mail: shuyu.sun@kaust.edu.sa; Salama, Amgad

    2014-08-01

    Accurate determination of thermodynamic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids is of great interest to many applications, especially in petroleum engineering and chemical engineering. Molecular simulation has many appealing features, especially its requirement of fewer tuned parameters but yet better predicting capability; however it is well known that molecular simulation is very CPU expensive, as compared to equation of state approaches. We have recently introduced an efficient thermodynamically consistent technique to regenerate rapidly Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMCs) at different thermodynamic conditions from the existing data points that have been pre-computed with expensive classical simulation. This technique can speed up the simulation more than a million times, making the regenerated molecular simulation almost as fast as equation of state approaches. In this paper, this technique is first briefly reviewed and then numerically investigated in its capability of predicting ensemble averages of primary quantities at different neighboring thermodynamic conditions to the original simulated MCMCs. Moreover, this extrapolation technique is extended to predict second derivative properties (e.g. heat capacity and fluid compressibility). The method works by reweighting and reconstructing generated MCMCs in canonical ensemble for Lennard-Jones particles. In this paper, system's potential energy, pressure, isochoric heat capacity and isothermal compressibility along isochors, isotherms and paths of changing temperature and density from the original simulated points were extrapolated. Finally, an optimized set of Lennard-Jones parameters (ε, σ) for single site models were proposed for methane, nitrogen and carbon monoxide.

  3. Droplet spreading driven by van der Waals force: a molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2010-07-07

    The dynamics of droplet spreading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations for two immiscible fluids of equal density and viscosity. All the molecular interactions are modeled by truncated Lennard-Jones potentials and a long-range van der Waals force is introduced to act on the wetting fluid. By gradually increasing the coupling constant in the attractive van der Waals interaction between the wetting fluid and the substrate, we observe a transition in the initial stage of spreading. There exists a critical value of the coupling constant, above which the spreading is pioneered by a precursor film. In particular, the dynamically determined critical value quantitatively agrees with that determined by the energy criterion that the spreading coefficient equals zero. The latter separates partial wetting from complete wetting. In the regime of complete wetting, the radius of the spreading droplet varies with time as R(t) ∼ √t, a behavior also found in molecular dynamics simulations where the wetting dynamics is driven by the short-range Lennard-Jones interaction between liquid and solid. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Accelerating Monte Carlo molecular simulations by reweighting and reconstructing Markov chains: Extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages and second derivatives to different temperature and density conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2014-08-01

    Accurate determination of thermodynamic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids is of great interest to many applications, especially in petroleum engineering and chemical engineering. Molecular simulation has many appealing features, especially its requirement of fewer tuned parameters but yet better predicting capability; however it is well known that molecular simulation is very CPU expensive, as compared to equation of state approaches. We have recently introduced an efficient thermodynamically consistent technique to regenerate rapidly Monte Carlo Markov Chains (MCMCs) at different thermodynamic conditions from the existing data points that have been pre-computed with expensive classical simulation. This technique can speed up the simulation more than a million times, making the regenerated molecular simulation almost as fast as equation of state approaches. In this paper, this technique is first briefly reviewed and then numerically investigated in its capability of predicting ensemble averages of primary quantities at different neighboring thermodynamic conditions to the original simulated MCMCs. Moreover, this extrapolation technique is extended to predict second derivative properties (e.g. heat capacity and fluid compressibility). The method works by reweighting and reconstructing generated MCMCs in canonical ensemble for Lennard-Jones particles. In this paper, system\\'s potential energy, pressure, isochoric heat capacity and isothermal compressibility along isochors, isotherms and paths of changing temperature and density from the original simulated points were extrapolated. Finally, an optimized set of Lennard-Jones parameters (ε, σ) for single site models were proposed for methane, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Analysis of three-phase equilibrium conditions for methane hydrate by isometric-isothermal molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhara, Daisuke; Brumby, Paul E; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2018-05-14

    To develop prediction methods of three-phase equilibrium (coexistence) conditions of methane hydrate by molecular simulations, we examined the use of NVT (isometric-isothermal) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. NVT MD simulations of coexisting solid hydrate, liquid water, and vapor methane phases were performed at four different temperatures, namely, 285, 290, 295, and 300 K. NVT simulations do not require complex pressure control schemes in multi-phase systems, and the growth or dissociation of the hydrate phase can lead to significant pressure changes in the approach toward equilibrium conditions. We found that the calculated equilibrium pressures tended to be higher than those reported by previous NPT (isobaric-isothermal) simulation studies using the same water model. The deviations of equilibrium conditions from previous simulation studies are mainly attributable to the employed calculation methods of pressure and Lennard-Jones interactions. We monitored the pressure in the methane phase, far from the interfaces with other phases, and confirmed that it was higher than the total pressure of the system calculated by previous studies. This fact clearly highlights the difficulties associated with the pressure calculation and control for multi-phase systems. The treatment of Lennard-Jones interactions without tail corrections in MD simulations also contributes to the overestimation of equilibrium pressure. Although improvements are still required to obtain accurate equilibrium conditions, NVT MD simulations exhibit potential for the prediction of equilibrium conditions of multi-phase systems.

  6. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine nanoparticles: experiments and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai-Xia; Wang, Hao-Bo; Oppong, Daniel; Wang, Jie-Xin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2014-11-03

    Hydrophilic excipients can be used to increase the solubility and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In this work, the conventional water-soluble pharmaceutical excipients hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and lactose (LAC) were used as solid supports to prevent drug nanoparticles from aggregation and enhance drug dissolution. Excipient-assisted vinpocetine (VIN) nanoparticles were prepared by reactive precipitation. The analysis results indicated that HPMC was a suitable excipient to prepare VIN nanoparticles. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a mean size of 130 nm within a narrow distribution. The dissolution rate of VIN nanoparticles was significantly faster than those of a physical mixture of VIN/HPMC and raw VIN. VIN/HPMC nanoparticles had a higher dissolution profile than VIN/PVP and VIN/LAC nanoparticles. Besides, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was applied to investigate the molecular interactions between VIN and excipients. The calculated results revealed that VIN interacted with excipients by Coulomb and Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. Few hydrogen bonds were formed between VIN and excipients. The HPMC affording smaller particle size may be a result of the stronger interactions between VIN and HPMC (mainly LJ interaction) and the property of HPMC. These characteristics may greatly influence the adsorption behavior and may be the crucial parameter for the better performance of HPMC.

  7. Evaporation of liquid droplets of nano- and micro-meter size as a function of molecular mass and intermolecular interactions: experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hołyst, Robert; Litniewski, Marek; Jakubczyk, Daniel

    2017-09-13

    Transport of heat to the surface of a liquid is a limiting step in the evaporation of liquids into an inert gas. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a two component Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid revealed two modes of energy transport from a vapour to an interface of an evaporating droplet of liquid. Heat is transported according to the equation of temperature diffusion, far from the droplet of radius R. The heat flux, in this region, is proportional to temperature gradient and heat conductivity in the vapour. However at some distance from the interface, Aλ, (where λ is the mean free path in the gas), the temperature has a discontinuity and heat is transported ballistically i.e. by direct individual collisions of gas molecules with the interface. This ballistic transport reduces the heat flux (and consequently the mass flux) by the factor R/(R + Aλ) in comparison to the flux obtained from temperature diffusion. Thus it slows down the evaporation of droplets of sizes R ∼ Aλ and smaller (practically for sizes from 10 3 nm down to 1 nm). We analyzed parameter A as a function of interactions between molecules and their masses. The rescaled parameter, A(k B T b /ε 11 ) 1/2 , is a linear function of the ratio of the molecular mass of the liquid molecules to the molecular mass of the gas molecules, m 1 /m 2 (for a series of chemically similar compounds). Here ε 11 is the interaction parameter between molecules in the liquid (proportional to the enthalpy of evaporation) and T b is the temperature of the gas in the bulk. We tested the predictions of MD simulations in experiments performed on droplets of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, triethylene glycol and tetraethylene glycol. They were suspended in an electrodynamic trap and evaporated into dry nitrogen gas. A changes from ∼1 (for ethylene glycol) to approximately 10 (for tetraethylene glycol) and has the same dependence on molecular parameters as obtained for the LJ fluid in MD simulations. The value of x = A

  8. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-01-01

    century by Gibbs and then promoted by Tolman) with a microscopic DFT treatment allows for a direct and unambiguous description of the interfacial properties of drops of arbitrary size; DFT provides all of the bulk and surface characteristics of the system that are required to uniquely define its thermodynamic properties. In this vein, we propose a non-local mean-field DFT for Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids to examine drops of varying size. A comparison of the predictions of our DFT with recent simulation data based on a second-order fluctuation analysis (Sampayo et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 141101) reveals the consistency of the two treatments. This observation highlights the significance of fluctuation effects in small drops, which give rise to additional entropic (thermal non-mechanical) contributions, in contrast to what one observes in the case of planar interfaces which are governed by the laws of mechanical equilibrium. A small negative Tolman length (which is found to be about a tenth of the molecular diameter) and a non-monotonic behaviour of the surface tension with the drop radius are predicted for the LJ fluid. Finally, the limits of the validity of the Tolman approach, the effect of the range of the intermolecular potential, and the behaviour of bubbles are briefly discussed.

  9. Thermal conductivity at the nanoscale: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyver, John W., IV

    With the growing use of nanotechnology and nanodevices in many fields of engineering and science, a need for understanding the thermal properties of such devices has increased. The ability for nanomaterials to conduct heat is highly dependent on the purity of the material, internal boundaries due to material changes and the structure of the material itself. Experimentally measuring the heat transport at the nanoscale is extremely difficult and can only be done as a macro output from the device. Computational methods such as various Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques for studying the contribution of atomic vibrations associated with heat transport properties are very useful. The Green--Kubo method in conjunction with Fourier's law for calculating the thermal conductivity, kappa, has been used in this study and has shown promise as one approach well adapted for understanding nanosystems. Investigations were made of the thermal conductivity using noble gases, modeled with Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions, in solid face-centered cubic (FCC) structures. MC and MD simulations were done to study homogeneous monatomic and binary materials as well as slabs of these materials possessing internal boundaries. Additionally, MD simulations were done on silicon carbide nanowires, nanotubes, and nanofilaments using a potential containing two-body and three-body terms. The results of the MC and MD simulations were matched against available experimental and other simulations and showed that both methods can accurately simulate real materials in a fraction of the time and effort. The results of the study show that in compositionally disordered materials the selection of atomic components by their mass, hard-core atomic diameter, well depth, and relative concentration can change the kappa by as much as an order of magnitude. It was found that a 60% increase in mass produces a 25% decrease in kappa. A 50% increase in interatomic strength produces a 25% increase in

  10. The structural second virial coefficient: a spherical-core pair-potential for sulphur hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Deraman; Powles, J.G.; Dore, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron diffraction data for sulphur hexafluoride gas is reanalysed following the same procedure described in our previous paper but using a spherical-core potential which was not considered in that report. The new spherical-core potential, with parameters epsilon/Ksub(B)K = 405, delta/A = 5.042 and α/A = 0.9225, gives a satisfactory fit to both the virial and structural data. There are now three model potentials, a site-site, a LJ 28-7, and this spherical core which all fit the data very well, indeed the core potential reported here fits rather better than the others. The anisotropic site-site potential is still to be preferred on physical grounds but the new core-potential will be useful where an isotopic potential suffices since it is much simpler to use. (author)

  11. Simulating prescribed particle densities in the grand canonical ensemble using iterative algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasics, Attila; Gillespie, Dirk; Boda, Dezso

    2008-03-28

    We present two efficient iterative Monte Carlo algorithms in the grand canonical ensemble with which the chemical potentials corresponding to prescribed (targeted) partial densities can be determined. The first algorithm works by always using the targeted densities in the kT log(rho(i)) (ideal gas) terms and updating the excess chemical potentials from the previous iteration. The second algorithm extrapolates the chemical potentials in the next iteration from the results of the previous iteration using a first order series expansion of the densities. The coefficients of the series, the derivatives of the densities with respect to the chemical potentials, are obtained from the simulations by fluctuation formulas. The convergence of this procedure is shown for the examples of a homogeneous Lennard-Jones mixture and a NaCl-CaCl(2) electrolyte mixture in the primitive model. The methods are quite robust under the conditions investigated. The first algorithm is less sensitive to initial conditions.

  12. Classical molecular dynamics simulation on the dynamical properties of H2 on silicene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casuyac Miqueas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the diffusion of hydrogen molecule physisorbed on the surface of silicene nanoribbon (SiNRusing the classical molecular dynamic (MD simulation in LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator. The interactions between silicon atoms are modeled using the modified Tersoff potential, the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO potential for hydrogen – hydrogen interaction and the Lennard – Jones potential for the physisorbed H2 on SiNR. By varying the temperatures (60 K Δ 130 K, we observed that the Δxdisplacement of H2 on the surface SiNR shows a Brownian motion on a Lennard-Jones potential and a Gaussian probability distribution can be plotted describing the diffusion of H2. The calculated mean square displacement (MSD was approximately increasing in time and the activation energy barrier for diffusion has been found to be 43.23meV.

  13. Si-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes under axial loads: An atomistic simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), the imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT and several perfect armchair SWCNTs under axial loads were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions between atoms were modeled using the empirical Tersoff potential and the Tersoff-Brenner potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. We get Young's modulus of the defective (5, 5) nanotube with and without the Si coating under axial tension 1107.92 and 1076.02 GPa, respectively. The results also show that the structure failure of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT under axial compression occurs at a slightly higher strain than for the perfect (5, 5) SWCNT. Therefore, we can confirm the protective effect of Si as a coating material for defective SWCNTs. We also obtain the critical buckling strains of perfect SWCNTs

  14. Density-Dependent Formulation of Dispersion-Repulsion Interactions in Hybrid Multiscale Quantum/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curutchet, Carles; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Kongsted, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    embedding approaches, respectively, nonelectrostatic dispersion and repulsion interactions are instead commonly described through classical potentials despite their quantum mechanical origin. Here we present an extension of the Tkatchenko-Scheffler semiempirical van der Waals (vdWTS) scheme aimed......Mixed multiscale quantum/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models are widely used to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of complex chemical systems. Whereas such models typically include electrostatics and potentially polarization in so-called electrostatic and polarizable...... at describing dispersion and repulsion interactions between quantum and classical regions within a QM/MM polarizable embedding framework. Starting from the vdWTSexpression, we define a dispersion and a repulsion term, both of them density-dependent and consistently based on a Lennard-Jones-like potential. We...

  15. Shukla-Eliasson attractive force: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi

    2013-04-01

    By investigating the dielectric response of the Fermi-Dirac plasma in the linear limit and evaluating the electrostatic potential around the positive stationary test charge, we find that the Shukla-Eliasson attractive force is present for the plasma density range expected in the interiors of large planets for a wide range of plasma atomic number. This research, which is based on the generalized electron Fermi-momentum, further confirms the existence of the newly discovered Lennard-Jones-like attractive potential and its inevitable role in plasma crystallization in the cores of planets. Moreover, it is observed that the characteristics of the attractive potential are strongly sensitive to the variation of plasma density and composition. Current research can also have applications in the study of strong laser-matter interactions and inertially confined plasmas.

  16. The environmental effect on the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes. II. Shell model approximation for internally and externally adsorbed fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2006-11-01

    We have previously shown that the upshift in the radial breathing mode (RBM) of closed (or infinite) carbon nanotubes in solution is almost entirely due to coupling of the RBM with an adsorbed layer of fluid on the nanotube surface. The upshift can be modeled analytically by considering the adsorbed fluid as an infinitesimally thin shell, which interacts with the nanotube via a continuum Lennard-Jones potential. Here we extend the model to include internally as well as externally adsorbed waterlike molecules, and find that filling the nanotubes leads to an additional upshift of two to six wave numbers. We show that using molecular dynamics, the RBM can be accurately reproduced by replacing the fluid molecules with a mean field harmonic shell potential, greatly reducing simulation times.

  17. The effect of normal load on polytetrafluoroethylene tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Peter R; Chiu, Patrick Y; Perry, Scott S; Sawyer, W Gregory; Phillpot, Simon R; Sinnott, Susan B

    2009-04-08

    The tribological behavior of oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) sliding surfaces is examined as a function of sliding direction and applied normal load in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The forces are calculated with the second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential for short-range interactions, and with a Lennard-Jones potential for long-range interactions. The range of applied normal loads considered is 5-30 nN. The displacement of interfacial atoms from their initial positions during sliding is found to vary by a factor of seven, depending on the relative orientation of the sliding chains. However, within each sliding configuration the magnitude of the interfacial atomic displacements exhibits little dependence on load over the range considered. The predicted friction coefficients are also found to vary with chain orientation and are in excellent quantitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  18. Numerical investigation of elastic mechanical properties of graphene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgantzinos, S.K.; Giannopoulos, G.I.; Anifantis, N.K.

    2010-01-01

    The computation of the elastic mechanical properties of graphene sheets, nanoribbons and graphite flakes using spring based finite element models is the aim of this paper. Interatomic bonded interactions as well as van der Waals forces between carbon atoms are simulated via the use of appropriate spring elements expressing corresponding potential energies provided by molecular theory. Each layer is idealized as a spring-like structure with carbon atoms represented by nodes while interatomic forces are simulated by translational and torsional springs with linear behavior. The non-bonded van der Waals interactions among atoms which are responsible for keeping the graphene layers together are simulated with the Lennard-Jones potential using appropriate spring elements. Numerical results concerning the Young's modulus, shear modulus and Poisson's ratio for graphene structures are derived in terms of their chilarity, width, length and number of layers. The numerical results from finite element simulations show good agreement with existing numerical values in the open literature.

  19. Coronene molecules in helium clusters: Quantum and classical studies of energies and configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Cantano, Rocío; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Hernández, Marta I.; Campos-Martínez, José; González-Lezana, Tomás, E-mail: t.gonzalez.lezana@csic.es; Villarreal, Pablo [Instituto de Física Fundamental, IFF-CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hernández-Rojas, Javier; Bretón, José [Departamento de Física and IUdEA, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-12-14

    Coronene-doped helium clusters have been studied by means of classical and quantum mechanical (QM) methods using a recently developed He–C{sub 24}H{sub 12} global potential based on the use of optimized atom-bond improved Lennard-Jones functions. Equilibrium energies and geometries at global and local minima for systems with up to 69 He atoms were calculated by means of an evolutive algorithm and a basin-hopping approach and compared with results from path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) calculations at 2 K. A detailed analysis performed for the smallest sizes shows that the precise localization of the He atoms forming the first solvation layer over the molecular substrate is affected by differences between relative potential minima. The comparison of the PIMC results with the predictions from the classical approaches and with diffusion Monte Carlo results allows to examine the importance of both the QM and thermal effects.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Mechanical Properties of CNT/Polymer Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Hwa; Cho, Maeg Hyo

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain mechanical properties of CNT/Polymer nano-composites, molecular dynamics simulation is performed. Overall system was modeled as a flexible unit cell in which carbon nanotubes are embedded into a polyethylene matrix for N σ T ensemble simulation. COMPASS force field was chosen to describe inter and intra molecular potential and bulk effect was achieved via periodic boundary conditions. In CNT-polymer interface, only Lennard-Jones non-bond potential was considered. Using Parrinello-Rahman fluctuation method, mechanical properties of orthotropic nano-composites under various temperatures were successfully obtained. Also, we investigated thermal behavior of the short CNT reinforced nanocomposites system with predicting glass transition temperature

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Linear Nanomotor Driven by Thermophoretic Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    Molecular Dynamics of a Linear Nanomotor Driven by Thermophoresis Harvey A. Zambrano1, Jens H. Walther1,2 and Richard L. Jaffe3 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Mechanics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark; 2Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH...... future molecular machines a complete understanding of the friction forces involved on the transport process at the molecular level have to be addressed.18 In this work we perform Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the MD package FASTTUBE19 to study a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial...... the valence forces within the CNT using Morse, harmonic angle and torsion potentials.19We include a nonbonded carbon-carbon Lennard-Jones potential to describe the vdW interaction between the carbon atoms within the double wall portion of the system. We equilibrate the system at 300K for 0.1 ns, by coupling...

  2. Molecular simulation of water removal from simple gases with zeolite NaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csányi, Eva; Ható, Zoltán; Kristóf, Tamás

    2012-06-01

    Water vapor removal from some simple gases using zeolite NaA was studied by molecular simulation. The equilibrium adsorption properties of H(2)O, CO, H(2), CH(4) and their mixtures in dehydrated zeolite NaA were computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations employed Lennard-Jones + Coulomb type effective pair potential models, which are suitable for the reproduction of thermodynamic properties of pure substances. Based on the comparison of the simulation results with experimental data for single-component adsorption at different temperatures and pressures, a modified interaction potential model for the zeolite is proposed. In the adsorption simulations with mixtures presented here, zeolite exhibits extremely high selectivity of water to the investigated weakly polar/non-polar gases demonstrating the excellent dehydration ability of zeolite NaA in engineering applications.

  3. Application of a non-integer Bessel uniform approximation to inelastic molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.N.L.; Mayne, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A non-integer Bessel uniform approximation has been used to calculate transition probabilities for collinear atom-oscillator collisions. The collision systems used are a harmonic oscillator interacting via a Lennard-Jones potential and a Morse oscillator interacting via an exponential potential. Both classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions have been treated. The order of the Bessel function is chosen by a physical argument that makes use of information contained in the final-action initial-angle plot. Limitations of this procedure are discussed. It is shown that the non-integer Bessel approximation is accurate for elastic 0 → 0 collisions at high collision energies, where the integer Bessel approximation is inaccurate or inapplicable. (author)

  4. Long-range interaction of anisotropic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junyi

    2015-02-01

    The first-order electrostatic interaction energy between two far-apart anisotropic atoms depends not only on the distance between them but also on their relative orientation, according to Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. Using the first-order interaction energy and the continuum model, we study the long-range interaction between a pair of parallel pristine graphene sheets at zero temperature. The asymptotic form of the obtained potential density, &epsi:(D) &prop: ?D ?3 ?O(D?4), is consistent with the random phase approximation and Lifshitz theory. Accordingly, neglectance of the anisotropy, especially the nonzero first-order interaction energy, is the reason why the widely used Lennard-Jones potential approach and dispersion corrections in density functional theory give a wrong asymptotic form ε(D) &prop: ?D?4. © EPLA, 2015.

  5. Further Study of Λ-Related Quantum Interference of Π-State Diatomic on Collision-Induced Rotational Energy Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongqing; Song Peng; Chen Yuehui; Wang Weili; Ma Fengcai

    2005-01-01

    In our previous theoretical studies [Meng-Tao Sun, Yong-Qing Lee, and Feng-Cai Ma, Chem. Phys. Lett. 371 (2003) 342], we have reported the quantum interference on collision-induced rotational energy transfer on CO (A 1 Π, v = 3) with inert gases, which originates from the difference between the two Λ-related collision potential energy surfaces. The interference angle, which measures the degree of coherence, is presented in this paper. Based on the time-dependent first order Born approximation, taking into account the anisotropic Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, the relation of the interference angle with the factors, including experimental temperature, partner, and rotational quantum number, are obtained. The changing tendencies with them are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understanding and performing this kind of experiment.

  6. Shape matters: The case for Ellipsoids and Ellipsoidal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillack, Andreas F. [ORNL; Robinson, Bruce H. [University of Washington, Seattle

    2017-11-01

    We describe the shape potentials used for the van der Waals interactions between soft-ellipsoids used to coarse-grain molecular moieties in our Metropolis Monte-Carlo simulation software. The morphologies resulting from different expressions for these van der Waals interaction potentials are discussed for the case of a prolate spheroid system with a strong dipole at the ellipsoid center. We also show that the calculation of ellipsoids is, at worst, only about fivefold more expensive computationally when compared to a simple Lennard- Jones sphere. Finally, as an application of the ellipsoidal shape we parametrize water from the original SPC water model and observe – just through the difference in shape alone – a significant improvement of the O-O radial distribution function when compared to experimental data.

  7. Long-range interaction of anisotropic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junyi; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2015-01-01

    The first-order electrostatic interaction energy between two far-apart anisotropic atoms depends not only on the distance between them but also on their relative orientation, according to Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. Using the first-order interaction energy and the continuum model, we study the long-range interaction between a pair of parallel pristine graphene sheets at zero temperature. The asymptotic form of the obtained potential density, &epsi:(D) &prop: ?D ?3 ?O(D?4), is consistent with the random phase approximation and Lifshitz theory. Accordingly, neglectance of the anisotropy, especially the nonzero first-order interaction energy, is the reason why the widely used Lennard-Jones potential approach and dispersion corrections in density functional theory give a wrong asymptotic form ε(D) &prop: ?D?4. © EPLA, 2015.

  8. Adsorption isoterms and capillary condensation in a nanoslit with rough walls: a density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berim, Gersh O; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2012-08-07

    Adsorption isoterms and capillary condensation in an open slit with walls decorated with arrays of pillars are examined using the density functional theory. Compared with the main substrate, the pillars can have the same or different parameters in the Lennard-Jones interaction potential between them and the fluid in the slit. The roughness of the solid surface, defined as the ratio between the area of the actual surface and the area of the surface free of pillars, is controlled by the height of the pillars. It is shown that the capillary condensation pressure first increases with increasing roughness, passes through a maximum, and then decreases. The amount of adsorbed fluid at constant volume of the slit has, in general, a nonmonotonic dependence on roughness. These features of adsorption and capillary condensation are results of increased surface area and changes in the fluid-solid potential energy due to changes in roughness.

  9. Mechanical properties of pillared-graphene nanostructures using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Fang, Te-Hua; Sun, Wei-Li

    2014-01-01

    The deformation behaviour and mechanical properties of three-dimensional (3D) pillared graphene are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff–Brenner many-body potential model is employed to evaluate the interactions between 3D pillared-graphene carbon atoms and nanotube carbons. The Lennard-Jones potential model is used to compute the interactions between a conical indenter and 3D pillared-graphene carbon atoms. The effects of the size and geometric structure of 3D pillared-graphene are evaluated in terms of the indentation force and contact stiffness. The simulation results for an armchair nanotube of 3D pillared graphene show that the contact stiffness increases with increasing chiral vector of the 3D-pillared graphene. However, the adhesive force sharply decreases with increasing chiral vector of the 3D-pillared graphene. A zigzag nanotube of 3D-pillared graphene exhibits better mechanical properties compared with those of the armchair nanotube. (paper)

  10. Theoretical-experimental study of the solvation enthalpy of acetone in dilute aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, S. Tolosa; Martin, J.A. Sanson; Garcia, A. Hidalgo

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions at infinite dilution with acetone as solute. Lennard-Jones with electrostatic term (12-6-1 potentials) were employed to describe the solute-solvent interactions. The Morokuma decomposition scheme of ab initio interaction energies at the SCF level and the ESIE charges on the solute atoms were used to reproduce the exchange and Coulomb electrostatic contributions of the solute-water interaction potential. Some extensions, such as including the dispersion component evaluated at MP2 level, were added to the traditional calculation procedures in order to improve the results of the solvation enthalpy. The results obtained with the EX-DIS-ES model were compared with the experimental calorimetry values, the observed agreement being acceptable

  11. Application of Statistical Thermodynamics in Refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avsec, J.; Marcic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the mathematical model for computing the thermodynamical properties in the liquid, gas and two-phase domain by means of statistical thermodynamics. The paper features all important components (translation, rotation, internal rotation, vibration, intermolecular potential energy and influence of electron and nuclei excitation). To calculate the thermodynamic properties of real gases, we have developed the cluster theory, which yields better results than the virial equation. In case of real liquids, the Johnson-Zollweg-Gubbins model based on the modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR) equation was applied. The Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential was used. The analytical results are compared with the thermodynamical data and models obtained from classical thermodynamics, and they show relatively good agreement. (author)

  12. Alternative Hamiltonian for molecular dynamics simulations in the grand canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.; Palmer, B.

    1995-01-01

    An alternative to the Hamiltonian of Cagin and Pettitt for performing molecular dynamics simulations in the grand canonical ensemble is presented and used as the basis for a new algorithm. The algorithm is tested on the ideal gas and the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones fluid. Simulations are used to calculate the vapor--liquid coexistence points for the Lennard-Jones system and are found to be in agreement with previous calculations using Gibbs ensemble calculations and with the Nicolas equation of state. Simulations are also performed on the Lennard-Jones solid

  13. Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation with Isobaric-Isothermal and Gibbs-NPT Ensembles

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Shouhong

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents Monte Carlo methods for simulations of phase behaviors of Lennard-Jones fluids. The isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble and Gibbs-NPT ensemble are introduced in detail. NPT ensemble is employed to determine the phase diagram of pure component. The reduced simulation results are verified by comparison with the equation of state by by Johnson et al. and results with L-J parameters of methane agree considerably with the experiment measurements. We adopt the blocking method for variance estimation and error analysis of the simulation results. The relationship between variance and number of Monte Carlo cycles, error propagation and Random Number Generator performance are also investigated. We review the Gibbs-NPT ensemble employed for phase equilibrium of binary mixture. The phase equilibrium is achieved by performing three types of trial move: particle displacement, volume rearrangement and particle transfer. The simulation models and the simulation details are introduced. The simulation results of phase coexistence for methane and ethane are reported with comparison of the experimental data. Good agreement is found for a wide range of pressures. The contribution of this thesis work lies in the study of the error analysis with respect to the Monte Carlo cycles and number of particles in some interesting aspects.

  14. Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation with Isobaric-Isothermal and Gibbs-NPT Ensembles

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Shouhong

    2012-05-01

    This thesis presents Monte Carlo methods for simulations of phase behaviors of Lennard-Jones fluids. The isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensemble and Gibbs-NPT ensemble are introduced in detail. NPT ensemble is employed to determine the phase diagram of pure component. The reduced simulation results are verified by comparison with the equation of state by by Johnson et al. and results with L-J parameters of methane agree considerably with the experiment measurements. We adopt the blocking method for variance estimation and error analysis of the simulation results. The relationship between variance and number of Monte Carlo cycles, error propagation and Random Number Generator performance are also investigated. We review the Gibbs-NPT ensemble employed for phase equilibrium of binary mixture. The phase equilibrium is achieved by performing three types of trial move: particle displacement, volume rearrangement and particle transfer. The simulation models and the simulation details are introduced. The simulation results of phase coexistence for methane and ethane are reported with comparison of the experimental data. Good agreement is found for a wide range of pressures. The contribution of this thesis work lies in the study of the error analysis with respect to the Monte Carlo cycles and number of particles in some interesting aspects.

  15. Laser-irradiated thermodynamic behaviors of spallation and recombination at solid-state interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.-Y.; Huang, P.-H.

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic insight of interfacial spallation and recombination behaviors at multilayer thin-film interface induced by incident femtosecond pulsed laser is presented in this paper. Such two different aforementioned behaviors are investigated via the thermodynamic trajectories obtained by using standard Lennard-Jones (L-J) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on the simulation results, the interfacial damages of multilayer thin film are dominated by a critical threshold that induces an extraordinary expansive dynamics and phase transitions leading to the structural softened and tensile spallation at interface. The critical damage threshold is evaluated at around 8.5 J/m 2 which governs the possible occurrence of two different regimes, i.e. interfacial spallaiton and recombination. In interfacial damage region, quasi-isothermal thermodynamic trajectories can be observed after the interfacial spallation occurs. Moreover, the result of thermodynamic trajectories analyses indicates that, the relaxation of pressure wave may cause the over-heated interfacial zone to reduce volumetric density, thus leading to structural softness and even weaken interfacial structural strength. The crucial effect leading to the phenomenon of low tension spallation is identified

  16. Molecular dynamics investigation of tracer diffusion in a simple liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ould-Kaddour, F.; Barrat, J.L.

    1991-05-01

    Extensive Molecular-Dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out for a model trace-solvent system made up of 100 solvent molecules and 8 tracer molecules interacting through truncated Lennard-Jones potentials. The influence of the size ratio between solute and solvent, of their mass ratio and of the solvent viscosity on the diffusivity of a small tracer were investigated. Positive deviations from a Stokes-Einstein behaviour are observed, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. It was also observed that as tracer and solvent become increasingly dissimilar, their respective dynamics becomes decoupled. We suggest that such decouplings can be interpreted by writing their mobility of the tracer as the sum of two terms, the first one arising from a coupling between tracer dynamics and hydrodynamics modes of the solvent, and the second one describing jump motion in a locally nearly frozen environment. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  17. Effects of temperature and velocity of droplet ejection process of simulated nanojets onto a moving plate's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, T.-H.; Chang, W.-J.; Lin, S.-L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses molecular dynamics simulation based on the Lennard-Jones potential to study the effects that temperature and velocity have on, the nanojet droplet ejection process, when the droplet is ejected at an angle onto a moving plate's surface. According to the analysis, it was found that the width of the spreading droplet increased as the temperature and the time were increased. Also found was an energy wave phenomenon. The contact angle of the droplet deposited on the plate decreased as the temperature was increased. Furthermore, the layer phenomena became apparent when the atoms were deposited on a moving plate. Thinner film layers were obtained as the velocity of the moving plate was increased. The contact angle on the left side of the droplet was larger than that on the right side when the plate was moving from right to left

  18. Molecular dynamics of contact behavior of self-assembled monolayers on gold using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Te-Hua [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Chang, Win-Jin, E-mail: changwj@mail.ksu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering Kun Shan University, Tainan 710, Taiwan (China); Fan, Yu-Cheng [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Weng, Cheng-I [Department of Mechanical Engineering National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 710, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study nanoindentation of the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on an Au surface. The interaction of SAM atoms is described by a general universal force field (UFF), the tight-binding second-moment approximation (TB-SMA) is used for Au substrate, and the Lennard-Jones potential function is employed to describe interaction among the indenter, the SAMs, and the Au substrate atoms. The model consists of a planar Au substrate with n-hexadecanethiol SAM chemisorbed to the substrate. The simulation results show that the contact pressure increases as the SAMs temperature increases. In addition, the contact pressure also increases as the depth and velocity of indentation increase.

  19. Molecular dynamics of contact behavior of self-assembled monolayers on gold using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Fan, Yu-Cheng; Weng, Cheng-I

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study nanoindentation of the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on an Au surface. The interaction of SAM atoms is described by a general universal force field (UFF), the tight-binding second-moment approximation (TB-SMA) is used for Au substrate, and the Lennard-Jones potential function is employed to describe interaction among the indenter, the SAMs, and the Au substrate atoms. The model consists of a planar Au substrate with n-hexadecanethiol SAM chemisorbed to the substrate. The simulation results show that the contact pressure increases as the SAMs temperature increases. In addition, the contact pressure also increases as the depth and velocity of indentation increase.

  20. Local elastic properties of nano-confined fluids: A density functional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zongli, E-mail: zongli_sun@163.com [Science and Technology College, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071051 (China); Kang, Yanshuang [College of Science, Agriculture University of Hebei, Baoding 071001 (China)

    2014-05-01

    The understanding of mechanical properties of confined fluids is essential for modeling and manipulating of nano-scaled systems. Unlike the uniform phase, the confined fluids usually display different features in structure and related properties. Due to the presence of the confining geometry, the density profile and many physical and chemical properties may be position-dependent. The aim of our research is to derive an expression for the local elastic property by using the classical elastic theory. Both the bulk and shear moduli are expressed as functional of density of particle. The theoretical result derived is applied to the Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nano-cavity. Comparison of our numerical result and the simulation result is made and qualitative agreement is observed. Further, influence of bulk density, temperature and external potential on moduli is calculated and the physical mechanism is analyzed. Relationship between contact modulus and the interfacial tension is also calculated. Their opposite trend with temperature is observed.

  1. A variational approach to nucleation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggi, Pablo M; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-12-22

    We study by computer simulation the nucleation of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor into the liquid phase. The large free energy barriers to transition make the time scale of this process impossible to study by ordinary molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore we use a recently developed enhanced sampling method [Valsson and Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett.113, 090601 (2014)] based on the variational determination of a bias potential. We differ from previous applications of this method in that the bias is constructed on the basis of the physical model provided by the classical theory of nucleation. We examine the technical problems associated with this approach. Our results are very satisfactory and will pave the way for calculating the nucleation rates in many systems.

  2. Exploring the free energy surfaces of clusters using reconnaissance metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A.; Cuny, Jérôme; Eshet, Hagai; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-09-01

    A new approach is proposed for exploring the low-energy structures of small to medium-sized aggregates of atoms and molecules. This approach uses the recently proposed reconnaissance metadynamics method [G. A. Tribello, M. Ceriotti, and M. Parrinello. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107(41), 17509 (2010), 10.1073/pnas.1011511107] in tandem with collective variables that describe the average structure of the coordination sphere around the atoms/molecules. We demonstrate this method on both Lennard-Jones and water clusters and show how it is able to quickly find the global minimum in the potential energy surface, while exploring the finite temperature free energy surface.

  3. Continuum modelling for carbon and boron nitride nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M

    2007-01-01

    Continuum based models are presented here for certain boron nitride and carbon nanostructures. In particular, certain fullerene interactions, C 60 -C 60 , B 36 N 36 -B 36 N 36 and C 60 -B 36 N 36 , and fullerene-nanotube oscillator interactions, C 60 -boron nitride nanotube, C 60 -carbon nanotube, B 36 N 36 -boron nitride nanotube and B 36 N 36 -carbon nanotube, are studied using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, which assumes a uniform distribution of atoms on the surface of each molecule. Issues regarding the encapsulation of a fullerene into a nanotube are also addressed, including acceptance and suction energies of the fullerenes, preferred position of the fullerenes inside the nanotube and the gigahertz frequency oscillation of the inner molecule inside the outer nanotube. Our primary purpose here is to extend a number of established results for carbon to the boron nitride nanostructures

  4. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kann, Z. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H 2 from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions.

  5. Sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation of simple gases from liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kann, Z. R.; Skinner, J. L., E-mail: skinner@chem.wisc.edu [Theoretical Chemistry Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Non-Maxwellian evaporation of light atoms and molecules (particles) such as He and H{sub 2} from liquids has been observed experimentally. In this work, we use simulations to study systematically the evaporation of Lennard-Jones particles from liquid water. We find instances of sub- and super-Maxwellian evaporation, depending on the mass of the particle and the particle-water interaction strength. The observed trends are in qualitative agreement with experiment. We interpret these trends in terms of the potential of mean force and the effectiveness and frequency of collisions during the evaporation process. The angular distribution of evaporating particles is also analyzed, and it is shown that trends in the energy from velocity components tangential and normal to the liquid surface must be understood separately in order to interpret properly the angular distributions.

  6. Membrane methods for separation of radioactive noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.; Bozhenko, E.I.; Ievlev, A.L.; Kazankin, Yu.N.; Nikonov, V.N.; Teplyakov, V.V.; Shvyryaev, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Using the different ial permeability method at different temperatures (20-120 deg C) transport characteristics of inert gases, N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 , CQ 2 and H 2 as the main components of waste gases in homogeneous films of arylate-siloxane block-copolymer (silar) of different composition, as well as of its components - polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyarylate, have been measured. Dependences of diffusion and permeability coefficients on inert gas atom dimensions, and solubility coefficient - on strength constant of the Lennard-Jones potential, are analyzed. It is shown that selectivity of silar gas permbility is determined by the properties of siloxane component, and the values of permeability coefficients decrease with the increase of polyarylate block part due to dominating decrease in diffusion coefficients as compared with solubility coefficients

  7. The effects of nanoscale geometry and spillover on room temperature storage of hydrogen on silica nanosprings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corti, Giancarlo; Zhan, Yingqian; Wang, Lidong; Hare, Brian; Cantrell, Timothy; II, Miles Beaux; Prakash, Tej; Ytreberg, F Marty; McIlroy, David N; Miller, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanosprings (NSs) consisting of multiple nanowires intertwined were demonstrated to reversibly store 0.85 wt% hydrogen at 20 bar and room temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates a mixed 3 + –4 + ionization state of the silicon atoms and partially explains the enhanced surface adsorption of H 2 relative to other forms of silica. Theoretical modeling and simulation using a Lennard-Jones potential demonstrated that interstitial sites between the silica nanowires forming the NS are energetically more favorable adsorption sites relative to single nanowires. The addition of Pd nanoparticles to the surface of the silica NSs was demonstrated to increase the hydrogen storage capacity to ≈3.5 wt% at 66 bar and room temperature. Palladium-nanoparticle-induced hydrogen spillover is attributed to the enhanced storage capacity relative to bare silica NSs. (paper)

  8. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The investigation is based on the stability of the shadow energy, obtained by including the first term in the asymptotic expansion, and on the exact solution of discrete dynamics for a single harmonic mode. The exact solution of discrete dynamics for a harmonic potential with frequency ω gives a criterion...... for the limit of stability h ⩽ 2/ω. Simulations of the Lennard-Jones system and the viscous Kob-Andersen system show that one can use the limit of stability of the shadow energy or the stability criterion for a harmonic mode on the spectrum of instantaneous frequencies to determine the limit of stability of MD...

  9. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V.; Rasmussen, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy

  10. Interaction energy for a fullerene encapsulated in a carbon nanotorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapat, Pakhapoom; Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.

    2018-06-01

    The interaction energy of a fullerene symmetrically situated inside a carbon nanotorus is studied. For these non-bonded molecules, the main interaction originates from the van der Waals energy which is modelled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. Upon utilising the continuum approximation which assumes that there are infinitely many atoms that are uniformly distributed over the surfaces of the molecules, the total interaction energy between the two structures is obtained as a surface integral over the spherical and the toroidal surfaces. This analytical energy is employed to determine the most stable configuration of the torus encapsulating the fullerene. The results show that a torus with major radius around 20-22 Å and minor radius greater than 6.31 Å gives rise to the most stable arrangement. This study will pave the way for future developments in biomolecules design and drug delivery system.

  11. New theories for smectic and nematic liquid crystalline polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, F.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of results from new statistical-physics theories for both backbone and side-chain liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) and for mixtures with LCPs is presented. Thermodynamic and molecular ordering properties (including odd-even effects) have been calculated as a function of pressure, density, temperature, and molecule chemical structures (including degree of polymerization and the following properties of the chemical structures of the repeat units: lengths and shapes, intra-chain rotation energies, dipole moments, site-site polarizabilities and Lennard-Jones potentials, etc.) in nematic and multiple smectic-A LC phases and in the isotropic liquid phase. These theories can also be applied to combined LCPs. Since these theories have no ad hoc or arbitrarily adjustable parameters, these theories have been used to design new LCPs and new solvents and to predict and explain properties

  12. Influence of attractions on the static and dynamic properties of simulated single and multichain systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, M.; Kalos, M.H.; Frisch, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of the attractive portion of the Lennard-Jones potential on the statics and dynamics of both single chain and multichain systems is investigated by reptation and molecular dynamics simulations. There is no significant effect at a reduced temperature of 10.0. At a temperature of 1.7 the single chain and multichain system at low densities (0.1) indicate that the attractions cause both the chains to be significantly more compact and a slowing of the time autocorrelation functions of the square of the end-to-end distance and radius of gyration. At a moderate density of 0.5, the attractions have almost no effect on the static structure, but they still influence the dynamic properties

  13. Density functional study of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous Lennard—Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zong-Li; Liu Zhi-Cheng; Kang Yan-Shuang; Ma Heng-Xin; Kang Yan-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Based on classical density functional theory, an expression of the pressure tensor for inhomogeneous fluids is presented. This takes into account greater correlation between particles, especially for systems that are geometrically confined or involve an interface. The density and pressure components of Lennard-Jones fluids confined in hard and softened nano-cavities are calculated. A comparison between the results of this work and IK expression suggests that the agreement depends on temperature. The interfacial tension for hard sphere fluids agrees well with the Monte Carlo result when the bulk density is not too large. The results of the solid-fluid interfacial tension for Lennard—Jones fluids demonstrate that different types of external potentials modulate the interfacial tension in different manners. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  14. New theories for smectic and nematic liquid-crystal polymers: Backbone LCPs [liquid crystalline polymers] and their mixtures and side-chain LCPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowell, F.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of predictions and explanations from statistical-physics theories for both backbone and side-chain liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) and for mixtures with backbone LCPs are presented. Trends in the thermodynamic and molecular ordering properties have been calculated as a function of pressure, density, temperature, and molecule chemical structures (including degree of polymerization and the following properties of the chemical structures of the repeat units: lengths and shapes, intra-chain rotation energies, dipole moments, site-site polarizabilities and Lennard-Jones potentials, etc.) in nematic and multiple smectic-A LC phases and in the isotropic liquid phase. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. These theories can also be applied to combined LCPs. Since these theories have no ad hoc or arbitrarily adjustable parameters, these theories can be used to design new LCPs and new solvents as well as to predict and explain properties. 27 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Continuous approximation for interaction energy of adamantane encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.; Bacsa, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    The interaction energy for two adjacent adamantane molecules and that of adamantane molecules encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes are investigated considering only dipole-dipole induced interaction. The Lennard-Jones potential and the continuous approximation are utilised to derive analytical expressions for these interaction energies. The equilibrium distance 3.281 Å between two adamantane molecules is determined. The smallest carbon nanotube radius b0 that can encapsulate the adamantane molecule and the radius of the tube bmax that gives the maximum suction energy, linearly depend on the adamantane radius, are calculated. For larger diameter tubes, the off axis position has been calculated, and equilibrium distance between molecule and tube wall is found to be close to the interlayer spacing in graphene.

  16. Computer simulations of nanoindentation in Mg-Cu and Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paduraru, Anca; Andersen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Thyssen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The formation of shear bands during plastic deformation of Cu0.50Zr0.50 and Mg0.85Cu0.15 metallic glasses is studied using atomic-scale computer simulations. The atomic interactions are described using realistic many-body potentials within the effective medium theory, and are compared with similar...... simulations using a Lennard-Jones description of the material. The metallic glasses are deformed both in simple shear and in a simulated nanoindentation experiment. Plastic shear localizes into shear bands with a width of approximately 5 nm in CuZr and 8 nm in MgCu. In simple shear, the shear band formation...... is very clear, whereas only incipient shear bands are seen in nanoindentation. The shear band formation during nanoindentation is sensitive to the indentation velocity, indenter radius and the cooling rate during the formation of the metallic glass. For comparison, a similar nanoindentation simulation...

  17. The effect of system boundaries on the mean free path for confined gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooraj K. Prabha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mean free path of rarefied gases is accurately determined using Molecular Dynamics simulations. The simulations are carried out on isothermal argon gas (Lennard-Jones fluid over a range of rarefaction levels under various confinements (unbounded gas, parallel reflective wall and explicit solid platinum wall bounded gas in a nanoscale domain. The system is also analyzed independently in constitutive sub-systems to calculate the corresponding local mean free paths. Our studies which predominate in the transition regime substantiate the boundary limiting effect on mean free paths owing to the sharp diminution in molecular free paths near the planar boundaries. These studies provide insight to the transport phenomena of rarefied gases through nanochannels which have established their potential in microscale and nanoscale heat transfer applications.

  18. Communication: Thermodynamic analysis of critical conditions of polymer adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimino, R.; Neimark, A. V., E-mail: aneimark@rutgers.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Rasmussen, C. J. [DuPont Central Research and Development, Corporate Center for Analytical Sciences, Macromolecular Characterization, Route 141 and Henry Clay, Wilmington, Delaware 19803 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    Polymer adsorption to solid surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon, which has attracted long-lasting attention. Dependent on the competition between the polymer-solid adsorption and polymer-solvent solvation interactions, a chain may assume either 3d solvated conformation when adsorption is weak or 2d adsorbed conformation when adsorption is strong. The transition between these conformations occurring upon variation of adsorption strength is quite sharp, and in the limit of “infinite” chain length, can be treated as a critical phenomenon. We suggest a novel thermodynamic definition of the critical conditions of polymer adsorption from the equality of incremental chemical potentials of adsorbed and free chains. We show with the example of freely jointed Lennard-Jones chains tethered to an adsorbing surface that this new definition provides a link between thermodynamic and geometrical features of adsorbed chains and is in line with classical scaling relationships for the fraction of adsorbed monomers, chain radii of gyration, and free energy.

  19. Atomistic simulation of processes in Ni-base alloys with account for local relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursik, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Ordering in Ni-base superalloys is the crucial process controlling the development of the characteristic two-phase microstructure and subsequently the mechanical properties. Systems containing up to six alloying elements typical of advanced Ni-based superalloys are modelled in this work using a Monte Carlo approach with phenomenological Lennard-Jones pair potentials and interactions up to the third coordination sphere. Three-dimensional crystal block is used with over 10 5 atoms. Molecular dynamics approach is used to relax local atomic positions in course of ordering processes under applied stress. The importance of taking into account both relaxation of modelled block dimensions and relaxation of local atomic positions is discussed

  20. Equilibrium location for spherical DNA and toroidal cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapat, Pakhapoom; Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.

    2018-05-01

    Cyclodextrin comprises a ring structure composed of glucose molecules with an ability to form complexes of certain substances within its central cavity. The compound can be utilised for various applications including food, textiles, cosmetics, pharmaceutics, and gene delivery. In gene transfer, the possibility of forming complexes depends upon the interaction energy between cyclodextrin and DNA molecules which here are modelled as a torus and a sphere, respectively. Our proposed model is derived using the continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential, and the total interaction energy is obtained by integrating over both the spherical and toroidal surfaces. The results suggest that the DNA prefers to be symmetrically situated about 1.2 Å above the centre of the cyclodextrin to minimise its energy. Furthermore, an optimal configuration can be determined for any given size of torus and sphere.

  1. Application of the cluster variation method to ordering in an interstitital solid solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekelharing, Marjon I.; Böttger, Amarante; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The tetrahedron approximation of the cluster variation method (CVM) was applied to describe the ordering on the fcc interstitial sublattice of gamma-Fe[N] and gamma'-Fe4N1-x. A Lennard-Jones potential was used to describe the dominantly strain-induced interactions, caused by misfitting of the N...... atoms in the interstitial octahedral sites. The gamma-Fe[N]/gamma'-Fe4N1-x miscibility gap, short range ordering (SRO), and long-range ordering (LRO) of nitrogen in gamma-Fe[N] and gamma'-Fe4N1-x, respectively, and lattice parameters of gamma and gamm' were calculated. For the first time, N distribution...... parameters,as calculated by CVM, were compared directly to Mössbauer data for specific surroundings of Fe atoms....

  2. Weak temperature dependence of ageing of structural properties in atomistic model glassformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Thomas; Crowther, Peter; Turci, Francesco; Royall, C. Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Ageing phenomena are investigated from a structural perspective in two binary Lennard-Jones glassformers, the Kob-Andersen and Wahnström mixtures. In both, the geometric motif assumed by the glassformer upon supercooling, the locally favoured structure (LFS), has been established. The Kob-Andersen mixture forms bicapped square antiprisms; the Wahnström model forms icosahedra. Upon ageing, we find that the structural relaxation time has a time-dependence consistent with a power law. However, the LFS population and potential energy increase and decrease, respectively, in a logarithmic fashion. Remarkably, over the time scales investigated, which correspond to a factor of 104 change in relaxation times, the rate at which these quantities age appears almost independent of temperature. Only at temperatures far below the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman temperature do the ageing dynamics slow.

  3. Local elastic properties of nano-confined fluids: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zongli; Kang, Yanshuang

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of mechanical properties of confined fluids is essential for modeling and manipulating of nano-scaled systems. Unlike the uniform phase, the confined fluids usually display different features in structure and related properties. Due to the presence of the confining geometry, the density profile and many physical and chemical properties may be position-dependent. The aim of our research is to derive an expression for the local elastic property by using the classical elastic theory. Both the bulk and shear moduli are expressed as functional of density of particle. The theoretical result derived is applied to the Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nano-cavity. Comparison of our numerical result and the simulation result is made and qualitative agreement is observed. Further, influence of bulk density, temperature and external potential on moduli is calculated and the physical mechanism is analyzed. Relationship between contact modulus and the interfacial tension is also calculated. Their opposite trend with temperature is observed.

  4. Response functions for crystals and surfaces, with applications to surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.A.; Steele, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A general solution of the equations of forced motion of a harmonic crystal or other vibrating system with arbitrary time-dependent forces acting on the atoms is given. The solution is given in terms of dynamical 'response functions', for which expressions in terms of the normal mode frequencies and eigenvectors (polarization vectors) are given. Numerical calculations of the response functions are described for (111) and (100) surfaces of face-centered cubic crystals interacting with Lennard-Jones 6-12 potentials, and the qualitative features of the surface and bulk response functions are discussed. The use of these functions in problems of atomic scattering from surface is outlined, and convenient parametrized forms for this application are given. (Auth.)

  5. Structural models for amorphous transition metal binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, W.Y.; Lin, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A dense random packing of 445 hard spheres with two different diameters in a concentration ratio of 3 : 1 was hand-built to simulate the structure of amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloys. By introducing appropriate pair potentials of the Lennard-Jones type, the structure is dynamically relaxed by minimizing the total energy. The radial distribution functions (RDF) for amorphous Fe 0 . 75 P 0 . 25 , Ni 0 . 75 P 0 . 25 , Co 0 . 75 P 0 . 25 are obtained and compared with the experimental data. The calculated RDF's are resolved into their partial components. The results indicate that such dynamically constructed models are capable of accounting for some subtle features in the RDF of amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloys

  6. Computational study of heat transport in compositionally disordered binary crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyver, John W.; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of compositionally disordered binary crystals with atoms interacting through Lennard-Jones potentials has been studied as a function of temperature. The two species in the crystal differ in mass, hard-core atomic diameter, well depth and relative concentration. The isobaric Monte Carlo was used to equilibrate the samples at near-zero pressure. The isoenergy molecular dynamics combined with the Green-Kubo approach was taken to calculate the heat current time-dependent autocorrelation function and determine the lattice thermal conductivity of the sample. The inverse temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity was shown to fail at low temperatures when the atomic diameters of the two species differ. Instead, the thermal conductivity was nearly a constant across temperatures for species with different atomic diameters. Overall, it is shown that there is a dramatic decrease of the lattice thermal conductivity with increasing atomic radii ratio between species and a moderate decrease due to mass disorder

  7. Cluster dynamics: A classical trajectory study of A + A/sub n/arrow-right-leftA*/sub n/+1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, J.W.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of the collision of an atom A with a small cluster of atoms, A/sub n/, leading to the formation of a quasibound A*/sub n/+1 complex, which subsequently decays, has been studied using classical trajectories. Pairwise Lennard-Jones potentials (with parameters appropriate for argon) were used to describe the identical point masses (Ar). The results illustrate the feasibility of direct calculations of microscopic rates for nucleation processes. The dissociation of collisionally formed A*/sub n/+1 (n=3,4, and 5) occurs by first-order exponential decay. Furthermore the energy dependence of the dissociation rate constants appears to be well described by the RRK functional form

  8. Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakak Khadem, Masoud

    The thermal conductivity of graphite nano-fibers (GNFs) with different styles is predicted computationally. GNFs are formed as basal planes of graphene stacked based on the catalytic configuration. The large GNF thermal conductivity relative to a base phase change material (PCM) may lead to improved PCM performance when embedded with GNFs. Three different types of GNFs are modeled: platelet, ribbon, and herringbone. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used in this study as a means to predict the thermal conductivity tensor based on atomic behavior. The in-house MD code, Molecular Dynamics in Arbitrary Geometries (MDAG), was updated with the features required to create the predictions. To model both interlayer van-der Waals and intralayer covalent bonding of carbon atoms in GNFs, a combination of the optimized Tersoff potential function for atoms within the layers and a pairwise Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function to model the interactions between the layers was used. Tests of energy conservation in the NVE ensemble have been performed to validate the employed potential model. Nose-Hoover, Andersen, and Berendsen thermostats were also incorporated into MDAG to enable MD simulations in NVT ensembles, where the volume, number of atoms, and temperature of the system are conserved. Equilibrium MD with Green-Kubo (GK) relations was then employed to extract the thermal conductivity tensor for symmetric GNFs (platelet and ribbon). The thermal conductivity of solid argon at different temperatures was calculated and compared to other studies to validate the GK implementation. Different heat current formulations, as a result of using the three-body Tersoff potential, were considered and the discrepancy in the calculated thermal conductivity values of graphene using each formula was resolved by employing a novel comparative technique that identifies the most accurate formulation. The effect of stacking configuration on the thermal conductivity of platelet and ribbon GNFs

  9. Towards the Irving-Kirkwood limit of the mechanical stress tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. R.; Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.

    2017-06-01

    The probability density functions (PDFs) of the local measure of pressure as a function of the sampling volume are computed for a model Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid using the Method of Planes (MOP) and Volume Averaging (VA) techniques. This builds on the study of Heyes, Dini, and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 145, 104504 (2016)] which only considered the VA method for larger subvolumes. The focus here is typically on much smaller subvolumes than considered previously, which tend to the Irving-Kirkwood limit where the pressure tensor is defined at a point. The PDFs from the MOP and VA routes are compared for cubic subvolumes, V =ℓ3. Using very high grid-resolution and box-counting analysis, we also show that any measurement of pressure in a molecular system will fail to exactly capture the molecular configuration. This suggests that it is impossible to obtain the pressure in the Irving-Kirkwood limit using the commonly employed grid based averaging techniques. More importantly, below ℓ ≈3 in LJ reduced units, the PDFs depart from Gaussian statistics, and for ℓ =1.0 , a double peaked PDF is observed in the MOP but not VA pressure distributions. This departure from a Gaussian shape means that the average pressure is not the most representative or common value to arise. In addition to contributing to our understanding of local pressure formulas, this work shows a clear lower limit on the validity of simply taking the average value when coarse graining pressure from molecular (and colloidal) systems.

  10. Phase-coexistence simulations of fluid mixtures by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method using single-particle models

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2013-09-01

    We present a single-particle Lennard-Jones (L-J) model for CO2 and N2. Simplified L-J models for other small polyatomic molecules can be obtained following the methodology described herein. The phase-coexistence diagrams of single-component systems computed using the proposed single-particle models for CO2 and N2 agree well with experimental data over a wide range of temperatures. These diagrams are computed using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method based on the Gibbs-NVT ensemble. This good agreement validates the proposed simplified models. That is, with properly selected parameters, the single-particle models have similar accuracy in predicting gas-phase properties as more complex, state-of-the-art molecular models. To further test these single-particle models, three binary mixtures of CH4, CO2 and N2 are studied using a Gibbs-NPT ensemble. These results are compared against experimental data over a wide range of pressures. The single-particle model has similar accuracy in the gas phase as traditional models although its deviation in the liquid phase is greater. Since the single-particle model reduces the particle number and avoids the time-consuming Ewald summation used to evaluate Coulomb interactions, the proposed model improves the computational efficiency significantly, particularly in the case of high liquid density where the acceptance rate of the particle-swap trial move increases. We compare, at constant temperature and pressure, the Gibbs-NPT and Gibbs-NVT ensembles to analyze their performance differences and results consistency. As theoretically predicted, the agreement between the simulations implies that Gibbs-NVT can be used to validate Gibbs-NPT predictions when experimental data is not available. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Diffusion processes and memory effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V; Yulmetyev, Renat M; Haenggi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of the numerical estimation of statistical memory effects in diffusion for two various systems: Lennard-Jones fluids and the model of the Brownian particle in a one-dimensional harmonic lattice. We have found the relation between the diffusion coefficient and the non-Markovity parameter, which is linear for the Lennard-Jones systems in liquid state. The relation between the memory measure and the excess entropy is also discussed here

  12. Bimolecular Master Equations for a Single and Multiple Potential Wells with Analytic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2018-04-12

    The analytic solutions, that is, populations, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular master equations, separately, for a single and multiple potential wells and reaction channels, where K is the component of the total angular momentum J along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination products at a given energy E. The analytic approach provides the functional dependence of the population of molecules on its K-active or K-adiabatic dissociation, association rate constants and the intermolecular energy transfer, where the approach may complement the usual numerical approaches for reactions of interest. Our previous work, Part I, considered the solutions for a single potential well, whereby an assumption utilized there is presently obviated in the derivation of the exact solutions and farther discussed. At the high-pressure limit, the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular master equations may each reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high-pressure limit expressions) for bimolecular recombination rate constant, for a single potential well, and augmented by isomerization terms when multiple potential wells are present. In the low-pressure limit, the expression for population above the dissociation limit, associated with a single potential well, becomes equivalent to the usual presumed detailed balance between the association and dissociation rate constants, where the multiple well case is also considered. When the collision frequency of energy transfer, Z LJ , between the chemical intermediate and bath gas is sufficiently less than the dissociation rate constant k d ( E' J' K') for postcollision ( E' J' K), then the solution for population, g( EJK) + , above the critical energy further simplifies such that depending on Z LJ , the dissociation and association rate constant k r ( EJK), as g( EJK) + = k r ( EJK)A·BC/[ Z LJ + k d ( EJK)], where A and BC are the reactants, for

  13. Jollrnal of EAEA, VoL lJ, 1996

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (voltage, current, resistance, inductance, capacitance) variation suitable for the signal conditioning system which may be a combination of a bridge circuit, an amplifier, an oscillator and a filter circuit. Signal conversion (analog to digital or digital to analog cooversion) is needed only when digital techniques are necessary.

  14. CalCOFI Larvae Counts, Scientific Names LJ to MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish larvae counts and standardized counts for larvae captured in CalCOFI icthyoplankton nets (primarily vertical [Calvet or Pairovet], oblique [bongo or ring nets],...

  15. LJ Best of 2009 Business Books: 32 Titles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cords, Sarah Statz

    2010-01-01

    It should come as no surprise that a large share of this year's business books focus squarely on the 2008-09 financial crisis and security-backed mortgage implosion. Investing books followed the trend as either alarmist titles advocating selling stocks, or books urging readers to take advantage of this time to buy undervalued investments. An…

  16. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  17. On the equilibrium contact angle of sessile liquid drops from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Galindo, Amparo

    2018-04-28

    We present a new methodology to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops from molecular simulations by using the Gaussian convolution method of Willard and Chandler [J. Phys. Chem. B 114, 1954-1958 (2010)] to calculate the coarse-grained density from atomic coordinates. The iso-density contour with average coarse-grained density value equal to half of the bulk liquid density is identified as the average liquid-vapor (LV) interface. Angles between the unit normal vectors to the average LV interface and unit normal vector to the solid surface, as a function of the distance normal to the solid surface, are calculated. The cosines of these angles are extrapolated to the three-phase contact line to estimate the sessile drop contact angle. The proposed methodology, which is relatively easy to implement, is systematically applied to three systems: (i) a Lennard-Jones (LJ) drop on a featureless LJ 9-3 surface; (ii) an SPC/E water drop on a featureless LJ 9-3 surface; and (iii) an SPC/E water drop on a graphite surface. The sessile drop contact angles estimated with our methodology for the first two systems are shown to be in good agreement with the angles predicted from Young's equation. The interfacial tensions required for this equation are computed by employing the test-area perturbation method for the corresponding planar interfaces. Our findings suggest that the widely adopted spherical-cap approximation should be used with caution, as it could take a long time for a sessile drop to relax to a spherical shape, of the order of 100 ns, especially for water molecules initiated in a lattice configuration on a solid surface. But even though a water drop can take a long time to reach the spherical shape, we find that the contact angle is well established much faster and the drop evolves toward the spherical shape following a constant-contact-angle relaxation dynamics. Making use of this observation, our methodology allows a good estimation of the sessile drop contact

  18. Highly efficient molecular simulation methods for evaluation of thermodynamic properties of crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Sabry Gad Al-Hak Mohammad

    shown to vary slowly with system-size. This allow us to get the FE in the thermodynamic limit by extrapolating the one isomer results to infinity and correct for that by the effect from considering proton-disorder measured at a small system. These techniques are applied to empty hydrates (of types: SI, SII, and SH) to estimate their thermodynamic stability. For conditions where the harmonic model fails, performing MS is needed to estimate rigorously the full (harmonic plus anharmonic) quantity. Although several MS methods are available for that purpose, they do not benefit from the harmonic nature of crystals---which represents the main contribution and is cheap to compute. In other words, those "conventional" methods always "start from scratch" even at states where anharmonic part is negligible. In this work, we develop very efficient MS methods that leverage information, on-the-fly, from the harmonic behavior of configurations such that the anharmonic contributions are directly measured. The approach is named harmonically-mapped averaging (HMA) for the rest of this thesis. Since the major contribution of thermodynamic properties comes from the harmonic nature of crystal, the fluctuations in the anharmonic quantities is to be small; hence, uncertainty associated with the HMA method is small. The HMA method is given in a general formulation such that it can handle properties related to both first- and second-derivatives of free energy. The HMA approach is first applied to Lennard-Jones (LJ) model. First- and second-derivatives of FE with respect to temperature and volume yield the following properties: energy, pressure, isochoric heat capacity, bulk modulus, and thermal pressure coefficient. A considerable improvement in the efficiency of measuring those properties is observed even at melting conditions where anharmonicity is non-negligible. First-derivative properties are computed with 100 to 10,000 times less computational effort, while speedup for the second

  19. Accurate and precise determination of critical properties from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Bai, Peng; Allan, Douglas A.; Siepmann, J. Ilja

    2015-01-01

    Since the seminal paper by Panagiotopoulos [Mol. Phys. 61, 813 (1997)], the Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) method has been the most popular particle-based simulation approach for the computation of vapor–liquid phase equilibria. However, the validity of GEMC simulations in the near-critical region has been questioned because rigorous finite-size scaling approaches cannot be applied to simulations with fluctuating volume. Valleau [Mol. Simul. 29, 627 (2003)] has argued that GEMC simulations would lead to a spurious overestimation of the critical temperature. More recently, Patel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 024101 (2011)] opined that the use of analytical tail corrections would be problematic in the near-critical region. To address these issues, we perform extensive GEMC simulations for Lennard-Jones particles in the near-critical region varying the system size, the overall system density, and the cutoff distance. For a system with N = 5500 particles, potential truncation at 8σ and analytical tail corrections, an extrapolation of GEMC simulation data at temperatures in the range from 1.27 to 1.305 yields T c = 1.3128 ± 0.0016, ρ c = 0.316 ± 0.004, and p c = 0.1274 ± 0.0013 in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic limit determined by Potoff and Panagiotopoulos [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 10914 (1998)] using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling. Critical properties estimated using GEMC simulations with different overall system densities (0.296 ≤ ρ t ≤ 0.336) agree to within the statistical uncertainties. For simulations with tail corrections, data obtained using r cut = 3.5σ yield T c and p c that are higher by 0.2% and 1.4% than simulations with r cut = 5 and 8σ but still with overlapping 95% confidence intervals. In contrast, GEMC simulations with a truncated and shifted potential show that r cut = 8σ is insufficient to obtain accurate results. Additional GEMC simulations for hard-core square-well particles with various

  20. Non-chiral, auxetic system of noncentrosymmetric molecules in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, K.W.

    2002-12-01

    A two-dimensional model of tri-atomic molecules (which 'atoms' are distributed on vertices of equilateral triangles, and which are further referred to as cyclic trimers) is solved exactly in the static (zero-temperature) limit for the nearest-neighbor site-site interactions. It is shown that the cyclic trimers (noncentrosymmetric by the definition) can form a mechanically stable and elastically isotropic non-chiral phase of negative Poisson ratio. The properties of the system are illustrated by three examples of the atom-atom interaction potentials: (i) the purely repulsive (n-inverse-power) potential, (ii) the purely attractive (n-power) potential and (iii) the Lennard-Jones-like potential which shows both the repulsive and the attractive part. The analytic form of the dependence of the Poisson ratio on the interatomic potential is obtained. It is shown that the Poisson ratio depends, in a universal way, only on the trimer anisotropy parameter both (1) in the limit of n → ∞ for the cases (i) and (ii), as well as (2) at the zero external pressure for any potential with a doubly differentiable minimum, the case (iii) is an example. (author)

  1. Non-chiral, molecular model of negative Poisson ratio in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, K W

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of tri-atomic molecules (in which 'atoms' are distributed on vertices of equilateral triangles, and which are further referred to as cyclic trimers) is solved exactly in the static (zero-temperature) limit for the nearest-neighbour site-site interactions. It is shown that the cyclic trimers form a mechanically stable and elastically isotropic non-chiral phase of negative Poisson ratio. The properties of the system are illustrated by three examples of atom-atom interaction potentials: (i) the purely repulsive (n-inverse-power) potential, (ii) the purely attractive (n-power) potential and (iii) the Lennard-Jones potential which shows both the repulsive and the attractive part. The analytic form of the dependence of the Poisson ratio on the interatomic potential is obtained. It is shown that the Poisson ratio depends, in a universal way, only on the trimer anisotropy parameter both (1) in the limit of n → ∞ for cases (i) and (ii), as well as (2) at the zero external pressure for any potential with a doubly differentiable minimum, case (iii) is an example

  2. Separating the effects of repulsive and attractive forces on the phase diagram, interfacial, and critical properties of simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Herrera, M; Moreno-Razo, J A; Guzmán, O; López-Lemus, J; Ibarra-Tandi, B

    2016-06-07

    Molecular simulations in the canonical and isothermal-isobaric ensembles were performed to study the effect of varying the shape of the intermolecular potential on the phase diagram, critical, and interfacial properties of model fluids. The molecular interactions were modeled by the Approximate Non-Conformal (ANC) theory potentials. Unlike the Lennard-Jones or Morse potentials, the ANC interactions incorporate parameters (called softnesses) that modulate the steepness of the potential in their repulsive and attractive parts independently. This feature allowed us to separate unambiguously the role of each region of the potential on setting the thermophysical properties. In particular, we found positive linear correlation between all critical coordinates and the attractive and repulsive softness, except for the critical density and the attractive softness which are negatively correlated. Moreover, we found that the physical properties related to phase coexistence (such as span of the liquid phase between the critical and triple points, variations in the P-T vaporization curve, interface width, and surface tension) are more sensitive to changes in the attractive softness than to the repulsive one. Understanding the different roles of attractive and repulsive forces on phase coexistence may contribute to developing more accurate models of liquids and their mixtures.

  3. Potential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lukeš, Jaroslav; Netuka, Ivan; Veselý, Jiří

    1988-01-01

    Within the tradition of meetings devoted to potential theory, a conference on potential theory took place in Prague on 19-24, July 1987. The Conference was organized by the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, with the collaboration of the Institute of Mathematics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, the Department of Mathematics, Czech University of Technology, the Union of Czechoslovak Mathematicians and Physicists, the Czechoslovak Scientific and Technical Society, and supported by IMU. During the Conference, 69 scientific communications from different branches of potential theory were presented; the majority of them are in­ cluded in the present volume. (Papers based on survey lectures delivered at the Conference, its program as well as a collection of problems from potential theory will appear in a special volume of the Lecture Notes Series published by Springer-Verlag). Topics of these communications truly reflect the vast scope of contemporary potential theory. Some contributions deal...

  4. Potential bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.L.; Tomio, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, relativistic confining potential models, endowed with bag constants associated to volume energy terms, are investigated. In contrast to the usual bag model, these potential bags are distinguished by having smeared bag surfaces. Based on the dynamical assumptions underlying the fuzzy bag model, these bag constants are derived from the corresponding energy-momentum tensor. Explicit expressions for the single-quark energies and for the nucleon bag constant are obtained by means of an improved analytical version of the saddle-point variational method for the Dirac equation with confining power-law potentials of the scalar plus vector (S + V) or pure scalar (S) type

  5. Dimensional scaling for quasistationary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kais, S.; Herschbach, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Complex energy eigenvalues which specify the location and width of quasibound or resonant states are computed to good approximation by a simple dimensional scaling method. As applied to bound states, the method involves minimizing an effective potential function in appropriately scaled coordinates to obtain exact energies in the D→∞ limit, then computing approximate results for D=3 by a perturbation expansion in 1/D about this limit. For resonant states, the same procedure is used, with the radial coordinate now allowed to be complex. Five examples are treated: the repulsive exponential potential (e - r); a squelched harmonic oscillator (r 2 e - r); the inverted Kratzer potential (r -1 repulsion plus r -2 attraction); the Lennard-Jones potential (r -12 repulsion, r -6 attraction); and quasibound states for the rotational spectrum of the hydrogen molecule (X 1 summation g + , v=0, J=0 to 50). Comparisons with numerical integrations and other methods show that the much simpler dimensional scaling method, carried to second-order (terms in 1/D 2 ), yields good results over an extremely wide range of the ratio of level widths to spacings. Other methods have not yet evaluated the very broad H 2 rotational resonances reported here (J>39), which lie far above the centrifugal barrier

  6. Transport in simple liquids and dense gases: kinetic mean-field theory and the KAC limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkheck, J.; Stell, G.; Martina, E.

    1982-01-01

    Maximization of entropy is used in conjunction with the BBGKY hierarchy to obtain a closed one-particle kinetic equation. For an interparticle potential of hard-sphere core plus smooth attractive tail, this equation contains a hard-core collision integral, identical to that of the revised Enskog theory, plus a mean-field term which is linear in the tail strength. The thermodynamics contained therein leads directly to the now-standard statistical-mechanical methods to construct a state-dependent effective hard-core potential in relation to a more realistic potential. These methods induce an extension of the transport coefficients to the Lennard-Jones potential. Predictions of the resulting transport theory compare very favorably with thermal conductivity and shear viscosity experimental results for real simple liquids and dense gases, and also with molecular dynamics simulation results. Poor agreement between theory and experiment is found for moderately dense and dilute gases. The kinetic theory also contains an entropy functional and an H-theorem is proven. Extension to mixtures is straightforward and the Kac-limit is discussed in detail

  7. ABCluster: the artificial bee colony algorithm for cluster global optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dolg, Michael

    2015-10-07

    Global optimization of cluster geometries is of fundamental importance in chemistry and an interesting problem in applied mathematics. In this work, we introduce a relatively new swarm intelligence algorithm, i.e. the artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm proposed in 2005, to this field. It is inspired by the foraging behavior of a bee colony, and only three parameters are needed to control it. We applied it to several potential functions of quite different nature, i.e., the Coulomb-Born-Mayer, Lennard-Jones, Morse, Z and Gupta potentials. The benchmarks reveal that for long-ranged potentials the ABC algorithm is very efficient in locating the global minimum, while for short-ranged ones it is sometimes trapped into a local minimum funnel on a potential energy surface of large clusters. We have released an efficient, user-friendly, and free program "ABCluster" to realize the ABC algorithm. It is a black-box program for non-experts as well as experts and might become a useful tool for chemists to study clusters.

  8. Exponential 6 parameterization for the JCZ3-EOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, B.C.; Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1998-07-01

    A database has been created for use with the Jacobs-Cowperthwaite-Zwisler-3 equation-of-state (JCZ3-EOS) to determine thermochemical equilibrium for detonation and expansion states of energetic materials. The JCZ3-EOS uses the exponential 6 intermolecular potential function to describe interactions between molecules. All product species are characterized by r*, the radius of the minimum pair potential energy, and {var_epsilon}/k, the well depth energy normalized by Boltzmann`s constant. These parameters constitute the JCZS (S for Sandia) EOS database describing 750 gases (including all the gases in the JANNAF tables), and have been obtained by using Lennard-Jones potential parameters, a corresponding states theory, pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and fit values using an empirical EOS. This database can be used with the CHEETAH 1.40 or CHEETAH 2.0 interface to the TIGER computer program that predicts the equilibrium state of gas- and condensed-phase product species. The large JCZS-EOS database permits intermolecular potential based equilibrium calculations of energetic materials with complex elemental composition.

  9. Structural behavior of supercritical fluids under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanka; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of the Frenkel line in the supercritical regime of a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid shown through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initially and later corroborated by experiments on argon opens up possibilities of understanding the structure and dynamics of supercritical fluids in general and of the Frenkel line in particular. The location of the Frenkel line, which demarcates two distinct physical states, liquidlike and gaslike within the supercritical regime, has been established through MD simulations of the velocity autocorrelation (VACF) and radial distribution function (RDF). We, in this article, explore the changes in the structural features of supercritical LJ fluid under partial confinement using atomistic walls. The study is carried out across the Frenkel line through a series of MD simulations considering a set of thermodynamics states in the supercritical regime (P =5000 bar, 240 K ≤T ≤1500 K ) of argon well above the critical point. Confinement is partial, with atomistic walls located normal to z and extending to "infinity" along the x and y directions. In the "liquidlike" regime of the supercritical phase, particles are found to be distributed in distinct layers along the z axis with layer spacing less than one atomic diameter and the lateral RDF showing amorphous-like structure for specific spacings (packing frustration) and non-amorphous-like structure for other spacings. Increasing the rigidity of the atomistic walls is found to lead to stronger layering and increased structural order. For confinement with reflective walls, layers are found to form with one atomic diameter spacing and the lateral RDF showing close-packed structure for the smaller confinements. Translational order parameter and excess entropy assessment confirms the ordering taking place for atomistic wall and reflective wall confinements. In the "gaslike" regime of the supercritical phase, particle distribution along the spacing and the lateral RDF exhibit features

  10. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    4Department of Geology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Corresponding ... integrated for the classification of the study area into different groundwater potential zones. .... table is mainly controlled by subsurface movement of water into ...

  11. Calculation of thermal-diffusion coefficients from plane-wave fluctuations in the heat energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method to calculate the thermal diffusivity D T from spontaneous fluctuations in the local heat energy density is presented. Calculations of the thermal diffusivity are performed for the Lennard-Jones fluid, carbon dioxide, and water. The results for the Lennard-Jones fluid are in agreement with calculations of the thermal conductivity using Green-Kubo relations and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics techniques. The results for carbon dioxide and water give thermal diffusivities within a factor of 2 of the experimental values

  12. Laser Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    inverted by the first, i.e., at the moment of time t = T, such that i = (2n+)lT, where 0 is the Rabi frequency (Oraevski et al., 1976). . classical... anisotropic molecule present. CW HeNe, Ar+ and Kr+ lasers are used, and the filter method is necessary because of time-scales lo8 - 10ll Hz. Some general...e.g., truncated harmonic oscillator, square well, spherically symmetric Morse or Lennard-Jones, anisotropic (angle-dependent) Morse or Lennard-Jones

  13. Density-Dependent Formulation of Dispersion-Repulsion Interactions in Hybrid Multiscale Quantum/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curutchet, Carles; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Kongsted, Jacob; Corni, Stefano; Frediani, Luca; Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Guido, Ciro A; Scalmani, Giovanni; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2018-03-13

    Mixed multiscale quantum/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) models are widely used to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of complex chemical systems. Whereas such models typically include electrostatics and potentially polarization in so-called electrostatic and polarizable embedding approaches, respectively, nonelectrostatic dispersion and repulsion interactions are instead commonly described through classical potentials despite their quantum mechanical origin. Here we present an extension of the Tkatchenko-Scheffler semiempirical van der Waals (vdW TS ) scheme aimed at describing dispersion and repulsion interactions between quantum and classical regions within a QM/MM polarizable embedding framework. Starting from the vdW TS expression, we define a dispersion and a repulsion term, both of them density-dependent and consistently based on a Lennard-Jones-like potential. We explore transferable atom type-based parametrization strategies for the MM parameters, based on either vdW TS calculations performed on isolated fragments or on a direct estimation of the parameters from atomic polarizabilities taken from a polarizable force field. We investigate the performance of the implementation by computing self-consistent interaction energies for the S22 benchmark set, designed to represent typical noncovalent interactions in biological systems, in both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. Overall, our results suggest that the present implementation is a promising strategy to include dispersion and repulsion in multiscale QM/MM models incorporating their explicit dependence on the electronic density.

  14. Molecular dynamics study on the structure I clathrate-hydrate of methane + ethane mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erfan-Niya, Hamid; Modarress, Hamid; Zaminpayma, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the structure I stability of methane + ethane clathrate-hydrates at temperatures 273, 275 and 277 K. NVT- and NPT-ensembles are utilized in MD simulation, and each consists of 3 x 3 x 3 replica unit cells containing 46 water molecules which are considered as the host molecules and up to eight methane + ethane molecules considered as the guest molecules. In MD simulations for host-host interactions, the potential model used was a type of simple point charge (SPC) model, and for guest-guest and host-guest interactions the potential used was Lennard-Jones model. In the process of MD simulation, achieving equilibrium of the studied system was recognized by stability in calculated pressure for NVT-ensemble and volume for NPT-ensemble. To understand the characteristic configurations of the structure I hydrate, the radial distribution functions (RDFs) of host-host, host-guest and guest-guest molecules as well as other properties including kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy were calculated. The results show that guest molecules interaction with host molecules cannot decompose the hydrate structure, and these results are consistent with most previous experimental and theoretical investigations that methane + ethane mixtures form structure I hydrates over the entire mixture composition range.

  15. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: Quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good

  16. Contributions to atomic microdynamics study in some liquid metals by means of soft neutrons scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotarescu, G.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of inelastic scattering of soft neutrons on Bi and liquid Pb, applying all the necessary corrections in view of obtaining the dYnamic structure factor S(Q,ω) were performed. The F(Q,t) function of intermediate scattering was obtained by means of the Fourier transformation of S(Q,ω). Special attention was devoted to one multiple scattering correction, especially at small scattering angles, taking into account its influence on the results. A comparison of the experimental results with three recent theoretical models has shown a good agreement in the range of intermediate and high Q values. Measurements of neutron inelastic scattering on liquid sodium at a temperature of 233 Cdeg within a momentum transfer range of 1 A -1 -1 were performed. The scattering law S(α,β) that was compared to a series of theoretical models has been determined from the experimental data. The validity of the theoretical models for different ranges of energy and momenta was thoroughly checked. S(α,β) was calculated for each type of scattering since sodium proves a mixed, coherent and incoherent scattering agent. A study on the influence of the even interaction potential upon the S(Q,ω) dynamic structure factor, the fourth order momentum ω 4 (Q) and uoon the spectral function C(Q,ω) of longitudinal current correlations was performed. For this purpose, four potentials with oscillations at great distances and a Lennard-Jones type potential were used. (author)

  17. Statistical mechanics of Roskilde liquids: configurational adiabats, specific heat contours, and density dependence of the scaling exponent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Nicholas P; Bøhling, Lasse; Veldhorst, Arno A; Schrøder, Thomas B; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2013-11-14

    We derive exact results for the rate of change of thermodynamic quantities, in particular, the configurational specific heat at constant volume, CV, along configurational adiabats (curves of constant excess entropy Sex). Such curves are designated isomorphs for so-called Roskilde liquids, in view of the invariance of various structural and dynamical quantities along them. The slope of the isomorphs in a double logarithmic representation of the density-temperature phase diagram, γ, can be interpreted as one third of an effective inverse power-law potential exponent. We show that in liquids where γ increases (decreases) with density, the contours of CV have smaller (larger) slope than configurational adiabats. We clarify also the connection between γ and the pair potential. A fluctuation formula for the slope of the CV-contours is derived. The theoretical results are supported with data from computer simulations of two systems, the Lennard-Jones fluid, and the Girifalco fluid. The sign of dγ∕dρ is thus a third key parameter in characterizing Roskilde liquids, after γ and the virial-potential energy correlation coefficient R. To go beyond isomorph theory we compare invariance of a dynamical quantity, the self-diffusion coefficient, along adiabats and CV-contours, finding it more invariant along adiabats.

  18. Crystallization in Two Dimensions and a Discrete Gauss-Bonnet Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, L.; Friesecke, G.

    2018-02-01

    We show that the emerging field of discrete differential geometry can be usefully brought to bear on crystallization problems. In particular, we give a simplified proof of the Heitmann-Radin crystallization theorem (Heitmann and Radin in J Stat Phys 22(3):281-287, 1980), which concerns a system of N identical atoms in two dimensions interacting via the idealized pair potential V(r)=+∞ if r1. This is done by endowing the bond graph of a general particle configuration with a suitable notion of discrete curvature, and appealing to a discrete Gauss-Bonnet theorem (Knill in Elem Math 67:1-7, 2012) which, as its continuous cousins, relates the sum/integral of the curvature to topological invariants. This leads to an exact geometric decomposition of the Heitmann-Radin energy into (i) a combinatorial bulk term, (ii) a combinatorial perimeter, (iii) a multiple of the Euler characteristic, and (iv) a natural topological energy contribution due to defects. An analogous exact geometric decomposition is also established for soft potentials such as the Lennard-Jones potential V(r)=r^{-6}-2r^{-12}, where two additional contributions arise, (v) elastic energy and (vi) energy due to non-bonded interactions.

  19. Improved modeling of two-dimensional transitions in dense phases on crystalline surfaces. Krypton-graphite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E A

    2015-02-21

    This paper presents a refined technique to describe two-dimensional phase transitions in dense fluids adsorbed on a crystalline surface. Prediction of parameters of 2D liquid-solid equilibrium is known to be an extremely challenging problem, which is mainly due to a small difference in thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases and lack of accuracy of numerical experiments in case of their high density. This is a serious limitation of various attempts to circumvent this problem. To improve this situation, a new methodology based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method was applied. The methodology involves analysis of equilibrium gas-liquid and gas-solid systems undergoing an external potential, which allows gradual shifting parameters of the phase coexistence. The interrelation of the chemical potential and tangential pressure for each system is then treated with the Gibbs-Duhem equation to obtain the point of intersection corresponding to the liquid/solid-solid equilibrium coexistence. The methodology is demonstrated on the krypton-graphite system below and above the 2D critical temperature. Using experimental data on the liquid-solid and the commensurate-incommensurate transitions in the krypton monolayer derived from adsorption isotherms, the Kr-graphite Lennard-Jones parameters have been corrected resulting in a higher periodic potential modulation.

  20. Energy of the Isolated Metastable Iron-Nickel FCC Nanocluster with a Carbon Atom in the Tetragonal Interstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, Natalya V; Nedolya, Anatoliy V

    2017-12-01

    The energy of the isolated iron-nickel nanocluster was calculated by molecular mechanics method using Lennard-Jones potential. The cluster included a carbon atom that drifted from an inside octahedral interstice to a tetrahedral interstice in [Formula: see text] direction and after that in direction to the surface. In addition, one of 14 iron atoms was replaced by a nickel atom, the position of which was changing during simulation.The energy of the nanocluster was estimated at the different interatomic distances. As a result of simulation, the optimal interatomic distances of Fe-Ni-C nanocluster was chosen for the simulation, in which height of the potential barrier was maximal and face-centered cubic (FCC) nanocluster was the most stable.It is shown that there were three main positions of a nickel atom that significantly affected nanocluster's energy.The calculation results indicated that position of the carbon atom in the octahedral interstice was more energetically favorable than tetrahedral interstice in the case of FCC nanocluster. On the other side, the potential barrier was smaller in the direction [Formula: see text] than in the direction .This indicates that there are two ways for carbon atom to drift to the surface of the nanocluster.

  1. Toward Structure Prediction for Short Peptides Using the Improved SAAP Force Field Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Dedachi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the observation that Ramachandran-type potential energy surfaces of single amino acid units in water are in good agreement with statistical structures of the corresponding amino acid residues in proteins, we recently developed a new all-atom force field called SAAP, in which the total energy function for a polypeptide is expressed basically as a sum of single amino acid potentials and electrostatic and Lennard-Jones potentials between the amino acid units. In this study, the SAAP force field (SAAPFF parameters were improved, and classical canonical Monte Carlo (MC simulation was carried out for short peptide models, that is, Met-enkephalin and chignolin, at 300 K in an implicit water model. Diverse structures were reasonably obtained for Met-enkephalin, while three folded structures, one of which corresponds to a native-like structure with three native hydrogen bonds, were obtained for chignolin. The results suggested that the SAAP-MC method is useful for conformational sampling for the short peptides. A protocol of SAAP-MC simulation followed by structural clustering and examination of the obtained structures by ab initio calculation or simply by the number of the hydrogen bonds (or the hardness was demonstrated to be an effective strategy toward structure prediction for short peptide molecules.

  2. Turbulent resuspension of small nondeformable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaridis, M.; Drossinos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    An energy-balance resuspension model is modified and applied to the resuspension of a monolayer of nondeformable spherical particles. The particle-surface adhesive force is calculated from a microscopic model based on the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential. Pairwise additivity of intermolecular interactions is assumed and elastic flattening of the particles is neglected. From the resulting particle-surface interaction potential the natural frequency of vibration of a particle on a surface and the depth of the potential well are calculated. The particle resuspension rate is calculated using the results of a previously developed energy-balance model, where the influence of fluid flow on the bound particle motion is recognized. The effect of surface roughness is included by introducing an effective particle radius that results in log-normally distributed adhesive forces. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental results for the resuspension of Al 2 O 3 particles from stainless steel surfaces. Particle resuspension due to turbulent fluid flow is important in the interaction of the atmosphere with various surfaces and in numerous industrial processes. For example, in the nuclear industry, fission-product aerosols released during a postulated severe accident in a Light Water Reactor may deposit and resuspend repeatedly in the vessel circuit and containment

  3. Trajectory study of supercollision relaxation in highly vibrationally excited pyrazine and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziman; Sansom, Rebecca; Bonella, Sara; Coker, David F; Mullin, Amy S

    2005-09-01

    Classical trajectory calculations were performed to simulate state-resolved energy transfer experiments of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (E(vib) = 37,900 cm(-1)) and CO(2), which were conducted using a high-resolution transient infrared absorption spectrometer. The goal here is to use classical trajectories to simulate the supercollision energy transfer pathway wherein large amounts of energy are transferred in single collisions in order to compare with experimental results. In the trajectory calculations, Newton's laws of motion are used for the molecular motion, isolated molecules are treated as collections of harmonic oscillators, and intermolecular potentials are formed by pairwise Lennard-Jones potentials. The calculations qualitatively reproduce the observed energy partitioning in the scattered CO(2) molecules and show that the relative partitioning between bath rotation and translation is dependent on the moment of inertia of the bath molecule. The simulations show that the low-frequency modes of the vibrationally excited pyrazine contribute most to the strong collisions. The majority of collisions lead to small DeltaE values and primarily involve single encounters between the energy donor and acceptor. The large DeltaE exchanges result from both single impulsive encounters and chattering collisions that involve multiple encounters.

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of superionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, A.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years computer modeling of liquids and solids has become a useful method of understanding the structural and dynamical correlations in these systems. Some characteristics of the method are presented with an example from work on homogeneous nucleation in monoatomic liquids; the interaction potential determines the structure: a Lennard--Jones system nucleates a close packed structure while an alkali metal potential nucleates a bcc packing. In the study of ionic systems like CaF 2 the Coulomb interaction together with the short range repulsion is enough to produce a satisfactory model for the motion of F - ions in CaF 2 at approx. 1600 0 K. Analysis of this motion shows that F - ions reside at their fluorite sites for about 6 x 10 -12 s and that the diffusion is mainly due to F - jumps in the 100 direction. The motion can be analyzed in terms of the generation and annihilation of anti-Frenkel pairs. The temperature dependence of the F - diffusion constant at two different densities has also been calculated. The computer model does not correspond with experiment in this regard

  5. Simplified TiO2 force fields for studies of its interaction with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    Engineered TiO2 nanoparticles have been routinely applied in nanotechnology, as well as in cosmetics and food industries. Despite active experimental studies intended to clarify TiO2's biological effects, including potential toxicity, the relation between experimentally inferred nanotoxicity and industry standards for safely applying nanoparticles remains somewhat ambiguous with justified concerns. Supplemental to experiments, molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be efficacious in investigating the molecular mechanism of a biological process occurring at nanoscale. In this article, to facilitate the nanotoxicity and nanomedicine research related to this important metal oxide, we provide a simplified force field, based on the original Matsui-Akaogi force field but compatible to the Lennard-Jones potentials normally used in modeling biomolecules, for simulating TiO2 nanoparticles interacting with biomolecules. The force field parameters were tested in simulating the bulk structure of TiO2, TiO2 nanoparticle-water interaction, as well as the adsorption of proteins on the TiO2 nanoparticle. We demonstrate that these simulation results are consistent with experimental data/observations. We expect that simulations will help to better understand the interaction between TiO2 and molecules.

  6. Friction of N-bead macromolecules in solution: Effects of the bead-solvent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvarov, Alexander; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    The role of the bead-solvent interaction has been studied for its influence on the dynamics of an N-bead macromolecule which is immersed into a solution. Using a Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space distribution function of the macromolecule, we show that all the effects of the solution can be treated entirely in terms of the friction tensors which are assigned to each pair of interacting beads in the chain. For the high-density as well as for the critical solvent, the properties of these tensors are discussed in detail and are calculated by using several (realistic) choices of the bead-solvent potential. From the friction tensors, moreover, an expression for the center-of-mass friction coefficient of a (N-bead) chain macromolecule is derived. Numerical data for this coefficient for 'truncated' Lennard-Jones bead-solvent potential are compared with results from molecular dynamic simulations and from the phenomenological theoretical data as found in the literature

  7. Compaction simulation of nano-crystalline metals with molecular dynamics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoei A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular-dynamics analysis is presented for 3D compaction simulation of nano-crystalline metals under uniaxial compaction process. The nano-crystalline metals consist of nickel and aluminum nano-particles, which are mixed with specified proportions. The EAM pair-potential is employed to model the formation of nano-particles at different temperatures, number of nano-particles, and mixing ratio of Ni and Al nano-particles to form the component into the shape of a die. The die-walls are modeled using the Lennard-Jones inter-atomic potential between the atoms of nano-particles and die-walls. The forming process is model in uniaxial compression, which is simulated until the full-dense condition is attained at constant temperature. Numerical simulations are performed by presenting the densification of nano-particles at different deformations and distribution of dislocations. Finally, the evolutions of relative density with the pressure as well as the stress-strain curves are depicted during the compaction process.

  8. Coupling of ab initio density functional theory and molecular dynamics for the multiscale modeling of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, T Y; Yeak, S H; Liew, K M

    2008-01-01

    A multiscale technique is developed that couples empirical molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio density functional theory (DFT). An overlap handshaking region between the empirical MD and ab initio DFT regions is formulated and the interaction forces between the carbon atoms are calculated based on the second-generation reactive empirical bond order potential, the long-range Lennard-Jones potential as well as the quantum-mechanical DFT derived forces. A density of point algorithm is also developed to track all interatomic distances in the system, and to activate and establish the DFT and handshaking regions. Through parallel computing, this multiscale method is used here to study the dynamic behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under asymmetrical axial compression. The detection of sideways buckling due to the asymmetrical axial compression is reported and discussed. It is noted from this study on SWCNTs that the MD results may be stiffer compared to those with electron density considerations, i.e. first-principle ab initio methods

  9. Structural organisation and dynamics in king penguin colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerum, Richard; Richter, Sebastian; Fabry, Ben; Le Bohec, Céline; Bonadonna, Francesco; Nesterova, Anna; Zitterbart, Daniel P.

    2018-04-01

    During breeding, king penguins do not build nests, however they show strong territorial behaviour and keep a pecking distance to neighbouring penguins. Penguin positions in breeding colonies are highly stable over weeks and appear regularly spaced, but thus far no quantitative analysis of the structural order inside a colony has been performed. In this study, we use the radial distribution function to analyse the spatial coordinates of penguin positions. Coordinates are obtained from aerial images of two colonies that were observed for several years. Our data demonstrate that the structural order in king penguin colonies resembles a 2D liquid of particles with a Lennard-Jones-type interaction potential. We verify this using a molecular dynamics simulation with thermally driven particles, whereby temperature corresponds to penguin movements, the energy well depth ɛ of the attractive potential corresponds to the strength of the colony-forming behaviour, and the repulsive zone corresponds to the pecking radius. We can recapitulate the liquid disorder of the colony, as measured by the radial distribution function, when the particles have a temperature of several (1.4–10) \

  10. Effects of solute--solvent attractive forces on hydrophobic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, L.R.; Chandler, D.

    1980-01-01

    A theory is presented for the effect of slowly varying attractive forces on correlations between nonpolar solutes in dilute aqueous solution. We find that hydrophobic correlations are sensitive to relatively long range slowly varying interactions. Thus, it is possible to make qualitative changes in these correlations by introducing small changes in the attractive forces. Several model calculations are presented to illustrate these facts. The contributions of the Lennard-Jones attractive forces to the computer simulation results of Pangali, Rao, and Berne are calculated. For this case it is found that the potential of mean force between spherical nonpolar solutes is hardly affected by inclusion of attractive forces. However, the osmotic second virial coefficient is dominated by the contributions of the attractive forces. For spherical solutes which provide a reasonable model for the methane molecule, inclusion of attractive forces produces a qualitative change in the methane--methane potential of mean force. The connection between these effects of slowly varying attractive forces and the enthalpic part of Ben-Naim's deltaA/sup H/I is discussed

  11. Calculation of the mean force constants of the rare gases and the rectilinear law of mean force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.W.; Bigeleisen, J.

    1977-01-01

    The mean energies, (U), and the mean force constants, (nabla 2 U), have been calculated for liquid argon and liquid krypton using the WCA perturbation theory, and for gaseous argon and krypton along the coexistence line by solution of the PY equation for the radial distribution function. Calculations have been made for the Lennard-Jones, Barker-Henderson, and Maitland-Smith potentials. There is little difference in the values of (U) and (nabla 2 U) calculated for the three potentials. The calculated values are in good agreement with experimental data. Correlation of the calculated values of (nabla 2 U) for the liquid and gas leads to an empirical relationship between (nabla 2 U) and the density of the phase along the coexistence line. When the latter is combined with the law of rectilinear diameters of the density, the rectilinear law of mean force is obtained, which is in good agreement with experimental data on argon. It is shown that the scaling exponent for the mean force constant, (nabla 2 U)/sub l/-(nabla 2 U)/sub g/, is larger than the scaling exponent of the density below the critical temperature and becomes equal to it at the critical temperature. The rationale for the rectilinear law of mean force is provided by an expansion of the radial distribution function of the liquid in powers of the density and the use of the WCA approximation to the radial distribution function

  12. Oscillation of nested fullerenes (carbon onions) in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Nested spherical fullerenes, which are sometimes referred to as carbon onions, of I h symmetries which have N(n) carbon atoms in the nth shell given by N(n) = 60n 2 are studied in this paper. The continuum approximation together with the Lennard-Jones potential is utilized to determine the resultant potential energy. High frequency nanoscale oscillators or gigahertz oscillators created from fullerenes and both single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes have attracted much attention for a number of proposed applications, such as ultra-fast optical filters and ultra-sensitive nano-antennae that might impact on the development of computing and signalling nano-devices. Further, it is only at the nanoscale where such gigahertz frequencies can be achieved. This paper focuses on the interaction of nested fullerenes and the mechanics of such molecules oscillating in carbon nanotubes. Here we investigate such issues as the acceptance condition for nested fullerenes into carbon nanotubes, the total force and energy of the nested fullerenes, and the velocity and gigahertz frequency of the oscillating molecule. In particular, optimum nanotube radii are determined for which nested fullerenes oscillate at maximum velocity and frequency, which will be of considerable benefit for the design of future nano-oscillating devices

  13. Needlelike motion of prolate ellipsoids in the sea of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthi, R.; Ravichandran, S.; Bagchi, Biman

    2001-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of translational motion of isolated prolate ellipsoids in the sea of spheres have been carried out for several different values of the aspect ratio (κ), obtained by changing either the length or the diameter of the ellipsoids, at several different solvent densities. The interaction among the spheres is given by the Lennard-Jones pair potential while that between spheres and ellipsoids is given by a modified Gay-Berne potential. Both the mean-square displacements of the center of mass of the ellipsoids and their orientational time correlation function have been calculated. It is found that at short to intermediate times, the motion of ellipsoids is anisotropic and primarily needlelike—the molecules prefer to move parallel to their long axis. The ratio of these two diffusion constants (D∥ and D⊥) approaches κ, suggesting a decoupling of D∥ from the length of the ellipsoid. The diffusion becomes isotropic in the long time with the total diffusion coefficient given by D∥+2D⊥. The crossover from the anisotropic to the isotropic diffusion is surprisingly sharp and clear in most cases.

  14. Clustering and phase behaviour of attractive active particles with hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ricard Matas; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2015-10-14

    We simulate clustering, phase separation and hexatic ordering in a monolayered suspension of active squirming disks subject to an attractive Lennard-Jones-like pairwise interaction potential, taking hydrodynamic interactions between the particles fully into account. By comparing the hydrodynamic case with counterpart simulations for passive and active Brownian particles, we elucidate the relative roles of self-propulsion, interparticle attraction, and hydrodynamic interactions in determining clustering and phase behaviour. Even in the presence of an attractive potential, we find that hydrodynamic interactions strongly suppress the motility induced phase separation that might a priori have been expected in a highly active suspension. Instead, we find only a weak tendency for the particles to form stringlike clusters in this regime. At lower activities we demonstrate phase behaviour that is broadly equivalent to that of the counterpart passive system at low temperatures, characterized by regimes of gas-liquid, gas-solid and liquid-solid phase coexistence. In this way, we suggest that a dimensionless quantity representing the level of activity relative to the strength of attraction plays the role of something like an effective non-equilibrium temperature, counterpart to the (dimensionless) true thermodynamic temperature in the passive system. However there are also some important differences from the equilibrium case, most notably with regards the degree of hexatic ordering, which we discuss carefully.

  15. Lithium ion storage between graphenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we investigate the storage of lithium ions between two parallel graphene sheets using the continuous approximation and the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. The continuous approximation assumes that the carbon atoms can be replaced by a uniform distribution across the surface of the graphene sheets so that the total interaction potential can be approximated by performing surface integrations. The number of ion layers determines the major storage characteristics of the battery, and our results show three distinct ionic configurations, namely single, double, and triple ion forming layers between graphenes. The number densities of lithium ions between the two graphenes are estimated from existing semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations, and the graphene sheets giving rise to the triple ion layers admit the largest storage capacity at all temperatures, followed by a marginal decrease of storage capacity for the case of double ion layers. These two configurations exceed the maximum theoretical storage capacity of graphite. Further, on taking into account the charge-discharge property, the double ion layers are the most preferable choice for enhanced lithium storage. Although the single ion layer provides the least charge storage, it turns out to be the most stable configuration at all temperatures. One application of the present study is for the design of future high energy density alkali batteries using graphene sheets as anodes for which an analytical formulation might greatly facilitate rapid computational results.

  16. Formation of graphene on BN substrate by vapor deposition method and size effects on its structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Nguyen Hoang; Hanh, Tran Thi Thu; Ngoc, Le Nhu; Nga, Nguyen To; Van Hoang, Vo

    2018-04-01

    We report MD simulation of the growth of graphene by the vapor deposition on a two-dimensional hBN substrate. The systems (containing carbon vapor and hBN substrate) are relaxed at high temperature (1500 K), and then it is cooled down to room one (300 K). Carbon atoms interact with the substrate via the Lennard-Jones potential while the interaction between carbon atoms is computed via the Tersoff potential. Depending on the size of the model, different crystalline honeycomb structures have been found. Structural properties of the graphene obtained at 300 K are studied by analyzing radial distribution functions (RDFs), coordination numbers, ring statistics, interatomic distances, bond-angle distributions and 2D visualization of atomic configurations. We find that the models containing various numbers of atoms have a honeycomb structure. Besides, differences in structural properties of graphene formed by the vapor deposition on the substrate and free standing one are found. Moreover, the size effect on the structure is significant.

  17. Violent Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard; Søgaard, Thomas Friis

    2015-01-01

    ” plays a critical role in relation to Bugkalot men’s construction of hegemonic masculinity and the sustaining of complex egalitarian relations. The Bugkalot have a notoriously violent history; until the late 1970s more than half of the adult men engaged in ritual killings. While most Bugkalot men has...... that can also be used in other contexts to understand how men construct hegemonic masculinity by strategically adopting the interspace of civility and violence.......This article explores the social significance of violence as potentiality and performance among former headhunters. Taking its outset in an ethnographic study of violence and masculinity among the Philippine people known as the Bugkalot, we explore how violence as “performed violent potentiality...

  18. Potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helms, Lester L

    2014-01-01

    Potential Theory presents a clear path from calculus to classical potential theory and beyond, with the aim of moving the reader into the area of mathematical research as quickly as possible. The subject matter is developed from first principles using only calculus. Commencing with the inverse square law for gravitational and electromagnetic forces and the divergence theorem, the author develops methods for constructing solutions of Laplace's equation on a region with prescribed values on the boundary of the region. The latter half of the book addresses more advanced material aimed at those with the background of a senior undergraduate or beginning graduate course in real analysis. Starting with solutions of the Dirichlet problem subject to mixed boundary conditions on the simplest of regions, methods of morphing such solutions onto solutions of Poisson's equation on more general regions are developed using diffeomorphisms and the Perron-Wiener-Brelot method, culminating in application to Brownian motion. In ...

  19. Fluids in micropores. V. Effects of thermal motion in the walls of a slit-micropore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diestler, D.J.; Schoen, M.

    1996-01-01

    Previous articles in this series have concerned the prototypal slit-pore with rigid walls, in which a Lennard-Jones (12,6) monatomic film is constrained between two plane-parallel walls comprising like atoms fixed in the face-centered-cubic (fcc) (100) configuration. The behavior of molecularly thin films in the rigid-wall prototype is governed by the template effect, whereby solid films can form epitaxially when the walls are properly aligned in the lateral directions. In this article the influence of thermal motion of the wall atoms on the template effect is investigated. The walls are treated as Einstein solids, the atoms moving independently in harmonic potentials centered on rigidly fixed equilibrium positions in the fcc (100) configuration. The force constant f c is a measure of the stiffness of the walls, the rigid-wall limit being f c =∞. Formal thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses of the system are carried out. The results of grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations indicate that for values of f c characteristic of a soft (e.g., noble-gas) crystal dynamic coupling between wall and film has a substantial influence on such equilibrium properties as normal stress (load) and interfacial tensions. In general, the softer the walls (i.e., the smaller the value of f c ), the weaker the template effect and hence the softer and more disordered the confined film. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Wettability of graphitic-carbon and silicon surfaces: MD modeling and theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The wettability of graphitic carbon and silicon surfaces was numerically and theoretically investigated. A multi-response method has been developed for the analysis of conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of droplets wettability. The contact angle and indicators of the quality of the computations are tracked as a function of the data sets analyzed over time. This method of analysis allows accurate calculations of the contact angle obtained from the MD simulations. Analytical models were also developed for the calculation of the work of adhesion using the mean-field theory, accounting for the interfacial entropy changes. A calibration method is proposed to provide better predictions of the respective contact angles under different solid-liquid interaction potentials. Estimations of the binding energy between a water monomer and graphite match those previously reported. In addition, a breakdown in the relationship between the binding energy and the contact angle was observed. The macroscopic contact angles obtained from the MD simulations were found to match those predicted by the mean-field model for graphite under different wettability conditions, as well as the contact angles of Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces. Finally, an assessment of the effect of the Lennard-Jones cutoff radius was conducted to provide guidelines for future comparisons between numerical simulations and analytical models of wettability

  1. Interactions of hydrogen with graphite at low pressure and elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, E.

    1991-03-01

    The plasma facing components of the vacuum chamber for thermonuclear fusion experiments are clad with graphite. Recycling of gases affects the plasma properties, and the tritium quantity accumulated in the graphite during the operation of Tokamaks with DT must be known. An adsorption isotherm for deuterium on the nuclear grade graphitic Matrix A3-3 was measured by using a volumetric method at 1173 K at pressures c = 2.5 eV/D 2 using Fowler's equation and isotherms were calculated for this E c value. These isotherms predict saturation of the adsorption sites in graphite at T D2 > 0.1 Pa. At T > 1173 K and P D2 -2 Pa the adsorbed quantity is less than 1% of the saturation level. The release kinetics of deuterium was measured at temperatures uo to 2000 K. D 2 desorption commenced at 1170 K. The maximum of the release rate is observed at T p = 1770 K. A Lennard-Jones potential energy diagram was calculated, which suggests a C-H bond energy E b ≅ 3.4 eV/D and an activation energy of desorption E d ≅ 4 eV/D 2 . The partial pressures of hydrocarbons C n ≤3 H m in equilibrium with graphite were calculated. At total pressures -2 Pa the partial pressures of these hydrocarbons are less than 10 -7 Pa in the temperature range 600-1500 K. (orig./MM)

  2. Stokes-Einstein relation for pure simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelezzo, M.; Capellari, C. A.; Pezzin, S. H.; Coelho, L. A. F.

    2007-06-01

    The authors employed the equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to calculate the self-diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity for simple fluids that obey the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential in order to investigate the validity of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation for pure simple fluids. They performed calculations in a broad range of density and temperature in order to test the SE relation. The main goal of this work is to exactly calculate the constant, here denominated by α, present in the SE relation. Also, a modified SE relation where a fluid density is raised to a power in the usual expression is compared to the classical expression. According to the authors' simulations slip boundary conditions (α=4) can be satisfied in some state points. An intermediate value of α =5 was found in some regions of the phase diagram confirming the mode coupling theory. In addition depending on the phase diagram point and the definition of hydrodynamics radius, stick boundary condition (α=6) can be reproduced. The authors investigated the role of the hydrodynamic radius in the SE relation using three different definitions. The authors also present calculations for α in a hard-sphere system showing that the slip boundary conditions hold at very high density. They discuss possible explanations for their results and the role of the hydrodynamic radius for different definitions in the SE relation.

  3. Computer simulation of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, C.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation performed on modern computer workstations provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the static and dynamic characteristics of liquid crystal phases. In this thesis molecular dynamics computer simulations have been performed for two model systems. Simulations of 4,4'-di-n-pentyl-bibicyclo[2.2.2]octane demonstrate the growth of a structurally ordered phase directly from an isotropic fluid. This is the first time that this has been achieved for an atomistic model. The results demonstrate a strong coupling between orientational ordering and molecular shape, but indicate that the coupling between molecular conformational changes and molecular reorientation is relatively weak. Simulations have also been performed for a hybrid Gay-Berne/Lennard-Jones model resulting in thermodynamically stable nematic and smectic phases. Frank elastic constants have been calculated for the nematic phase formed by the hybrid model through analysis of the fluctuations of the nematic director, giving results comparable with those found experimentally. Work presented in this thesis also describes the parameterization of the torsional potential of a fragment of a dimethyl siloxane polymer chain, disiloxane diol (HOMe 2 Si) 2 O, using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. (author)

  4. Deformation and fracture of Coarse-grained Model of Filled Rubber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagita, Katsumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Doi, Masao; Takano, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    We presented a result of coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics simulation of filled polymer melts with Sulfur-crosslink under deformation based on the Kremer-Grest Model. Under uni-axial deformation (extension) by setting Poisson's ratio to less than 0.5, facture of this polymer nanocomoposites occurs due to volume increase for increasing the strain. In order to study facture behavior, we use the original Lennard Jones potential formula (with attractive part) as interaction between polymers. The size of simulation box under periodic boundary conditions (PBC) is set to about 133nm. We put 2048 fillers, 5120 polymer chains of 1024 particles, and many crosslink into the PBC box. Due to the crosslink, all polymer chains are connected to one network gel. One filler consists of 320 particles of the C320 fullerene structure. A repulsive force from the center of the filler is applied to the particles of C320 in order to make a sphere whose diameter is about 7nm. We can observe the fracture occurs due to void created near surface of fillers for the case that interaction between polymer and filler is relatively non- attractive. Various cases of Poisson's ratio and interaction between polymer and filler are examined.

  5. Comparative molecular simulation study of low and high density polymer glasses: A competition between attractive and repulsive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jalim; Jose, Prasanth

    Results of molecular dynamics simulations of a system of Kremer and Grest linear polymer melts are presented at moderate and high number density. A detailed study of molecular pair distribution function shows that potential of mean force between the molecules has form of Gaussian with an attractive tail at number density ρ = 0.85 (in Lennard-Jones units), which is due to the dominating attractive interactions from temperature T = 0.7. This system shows gelation assisted glass transition, which is interpreted from peaks of molecular structure factor at small wave-numbers. At low temperature, this system phase separate to form dense domains whose local density is high; these domains show many dynamical features of glass transition in monomer and molecular level of relaxation indicating glass transition is assisted by gelation in this system. In the same system, at ρ = 1.0, repulsive interactions dominate, structure does not change even at low temperatures; the system exhibits dynamic heterogeneity and known to undergo glass transition. In this work, we compare and contrast the structure and dynamics of the system near its glass transition. Also, we computed correlation length of systems from the peak value of four-point structural dynamic susceptibility. HPC facility at IIT Mandi.

  6. Development of CHARMM-Compatible Force-Field Parameters for Cobalamin and Related Cofactors from Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Anna; Parks, Jerry M; Gumbart, James C

    2018-02-13

    Corrinoid cofactors such as cobalamin are used by many enzymes and are essential for most living organisms. Therefore, there is broad interest in investigating cobalamin-protein interactions with molecular dynamics simulations. Previously developed parameters for cobalamins are based mainly on crystal structure data. Here, we report CHARMM-compatible force field parameters for several corrinoids developed from quantum mechanical calculations. We provide parameters for corrinoids in three oxidation states, Co 3+ , Co 2+ , and Co 1+ , and with various axial ligands. Lennard-Jones parameters for the cobalt center in the Co(II) and Co(I) states were optimized using a helium atom probe, and partial atomic charges were obtained with a combination of natural population analysis (NPA) and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) fitting approaches. The Force Field Toolkit was used to optimize all bonded terms. The resulting parameters, determined solely from calculations of cobalamin alone or in water, were then validated by assessing their agreement with density functional theory geometries and by analyzing molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of several corrinoid proteins for which X-ray crystal structures are available. In each case, we obtained excellent agreement with the reference data. In comparison to previous CHARMM-compatible parameters for cobalamin, we observe a better agreement for the fold angle and lower RMSD in the cobalamin binding site. The approach described here is readily adaptable for developing CHARMM-compatible force-field parameters for other corrinoids or large biomolecules.

  7. Collision of hydrogen molecules interacting with two grapheme sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malivuk-Gak Dragana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It have been performed the computational experiments with two hydrogen molecules and two graphene sheets. Hydrogen - hydrogen and hydrogen - carbon interactions are described by Lennard - Jones potential. Equations of motion of the wave packet centre are solved numerically. The initial molecule velocity was determined by temperature and collisions occur in central point between two sheets. The molecules after collision stay near or get far away of graphene sheets. Then one can find what temperatures, graphene sheet sizes and their distances are favourable for hydrogen storage. It is found that quantum corrections of the molecule classical trajectories are not significant here. Those investigations of possibility of hydrogen storage by physisorption are of interest for improvement of the fuel cell systems. The main disadvantages of computational experiments are: (1 it cannot compute with very large number of C atoms, (2 it is assumed that carbon atoms are placed always in their equilibrium positions and (3 the changes of wave packet width are not considered.

  8. Collision broadening and shift of the potassium 4P-7S and 4P-5D lines by argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A two-step laser excitation technique has been used to investigate the collisional broadening and shift of excited-state potassium transitions. Values for the argon collisional broadening and shift constants for the potassium 4p-7s and 4p-5d transitions were determined from line shapes for argon pressures up to 100 Torr. The values of these constants (in units of 10 -9 rad s -1 atom -1 cm 3 ) are (4P/sub 1/2/-7S/sub 1/2/): γ=11.60 +- 0.07, β=-6.68 +- 0.11; (4P/sub 3/2/-7S/sub 1/2/): γ=11.49 +- 0.15, β=-6.82 +- 0.14; (4P/sub 1/2/-5D/sub 3/2/): γ=8.64 +- 0.07, β=-4.62 +- 0.04; (4P/sub 3/2/-5D/sub 3/2/): γ=8.58 +- 0.10, β=-3.49 +- 0.32; (4P/sub 3/2/-5D/sub 5/2/): γ=9.13 +- 0.10, β=-4.73 +- 0.09. These broadening and shift constants are interpreted in terms of a Lennard-Jones interaction potential

  9. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Properties of liquid clusters in large-scale molecular dynamics nucleation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    We have performed large-scale Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous vapor-to-liquid nucleation, with 10 9 atoms. This large number allows us to resolve extremely low nucleation rates, and also provides excellent statistics for cluster properties over a wide range of cluster sizes. The nucleation rates, cluster growth rates, and size distributions are presented in Diemand et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 74309 (2013)], while this paper analyses the properties of the clusters. We explore the cluster temperatures, density profiles, potential energies, and shapes. A thorough understanding of the properties of the clusters is crucial to the formulation of nucleation models. Significant latent heat is retained by stable clusters, by as much as ΔkT = 0.1ε for clusters with size i = 100. We find that the clusters deviate remarkably from spherical—with ellipsoidal axis ratios for critical cluster sizes typically within b/c = 0.7 ± 0.05 and a/c = 0.5 ± 0.05. We examine cluster spin angular momentum, and find that it plays a negligible role in the cluster dynamics. The interfaces of large, stable clusters are thinner than planar equilibrium interfaces by 10%−30%. At the critical cluster size, the cluster central densities are between 5% and 30% lower than the bulk liquid expectations. These lower densities imply larger-than-expected surface areas, which increase the energy cost to form a surface, which lowers nucleation rates

  11. The energetics and structure of nickel clusters: Size dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, C.L.; Landman, U.

    1991-01-01

    The energetics of nickel clusters over a broad size range are explored within the context of the many-body potentials obtained via the embedded atom method. Unconstrained local minimum energy configurations are found for single crystal clusters consisting of various truncations of the cube or octahedron, with and without (110) faces, as well as some monotwinnings of these. We also examine multitwinned structures such as icosahedra and various truncations of the decahedron, such as those of Ino and Marks. These clusters range in size from 142 to over 5000 atoms. As in most such previous studies, such as those on Lennard-Jones systems, we find that icosahedral clusters are favored for the smallest cluster sizes and that Marks' decahedra are favored for intermediate sizes (all our atomic systems larger than about 2300 atoms). Of course very large clusters will be single crystal face-centered-cubic (fcc) polyhedra: the onset of optimally stable single-crystal nickel clusters is estimated to occur at 17 000 atoms. We find, via comparisons to results obtained via atomistic calculations, that simple macroscopic expressions using accurate surface, strain, and twinning energies can usefully predict energy differences between different structures even for clusters of much smaller size than expected. These expressions can be used to assess the relative energetic merits of various structural motifs and their dependence on cluster size

  12. Fast optimization of binary clusters using a novel dynamic lattice searching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xia; Cheng, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Global optimization of binary clusters has been a difficult task despite of much effort and many efficient methods. Directing toward two types of elements (i.e., homotop problem) in binary clusters, two classes of virtual dynamic lattices are constructed and a modified dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method, i.e., binary DLS (BDLS) method, is developed. However, it was found that the BDLS can only be utilized for the optimization of binary clusters with small sizes because homotop problem is hard to be solved without atomic exchange operation. Therefore, the iterated local search (ILS) method is adopted to solve homotop problem and an efficient method based on the BDLS method and ILS, named as BDLS-ILS, is presented for global optimization of binary clusters. In order to assess the efficiency of the proposed method, binary Lennard-Jones clusters with up to 100 atoms are investigated. Results show that the method is proved to be efficient. Furthermore, the BDLS-ILS method is also adopted to study the geometrical structures of (AuPd) 79 clusters with DFT-fit parameters of Gupta potential

  13. New Scenario of Dynamical Heterogeneity in Supercooled Liquid and Glassy States of 2D Monatomic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoang, Vo; Teboul, Victor; Odagaki, Takashi

    2015-12-24

    Via analysis of spatiotemporal arrangements of atoms based on their dynamics in supercooled liquid and glassy states of a 2D monatomic system with a double-well Lennard-Jones-Gauss (LJG) interaction potential, we find a new scenario of dynamical heterogeneity. Atoms with the same or very close mobility have a tendency to aggregate into clusters. The number of atoms with high mobility (and size of their clusters) increases with decreasing temperature passing over a maximum before decreasing down to zero. Position of the peak moves toward a lower temperature if mobility of atoms in clusters is lower together with an enhancement of height of the peak. In contrast, the number of atoms with very low mobility or solidlike atoms (and size of their clusters) has a tendency to increase with decreasing temperature and then it suddenly increases in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature leading to the formation of a glassy state. A sudden increase in the number of strongly correlated solidlike atoms in the vicinity of a glass transition temperature (Tg) may be an origin of a drastical increase in viscosity of the glass-forming systems approaching the glass transition. In fact, we find that the diffusion coefficient decays exponentially with a fraction of solidlike atoms exhibiting a sudden decrease in the vicinity of the glass transition region.

  14. Modal analysis of graphene-based structures for large deformations, contact and material nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Reza; Sauer, Roger A.

    2018-06-01

    The nonlinear frequencies of pre-stressed graphene-based structures, such as flat graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes, are calculated. These structures are modeled with a nonlinear hyperelastic shell model. The model is calibrated with quantum mechanics data and is valid for high strains. Analytical solutions of the natural frequencies of various plates are obtained for the Canham bending model by assuming infinitesimal strains. These solutions are used for the verification of the numerical results. The performance of the model is illustrated by means of several examples. Modal analysis is performed for square plates under pure dilatation or uniaxial stretch, circular plates under pure dilatation or under the effects of an adhesive substrate, and carbon nanotubes under uniaxial compression or stretch. The adhesive substrate is modeled with van der Waals interaction (based on the Lennard-Jones potential) and a coarse grained contact model. It is shown that the analytical natural frequencies underestimate the real ones, and this should be considered in the design of devices based on graphene structures.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of disjoining pressure effects in ultra-thin water films on a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Han; Sun, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Disjoining pressure, the excess pressure in an ultra-thin liquid film as a result of van der Waals interactions, is important in lubrication, wetting, flow boiling, and thin film evaporation. The classic theory of disjoining pressure is developed for simple monoatomic liquids. However, real world applications often utilize water, a polar liquid, for which fundamental understanding of disjoining pressure is lacking. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to gain insights into the effect of disjoining pressure in a water thin film. Our MD models were firstly validated against Derjaguin's experiments on gold-gold interactions across a water film and then verified against disjoining pressure in an argon thin film using the Lennard-Jones potential. Next, a water thin film adsorbed on a gold surface was simulated to examine the change of vapor pressure with film thickness. The results agree well with the classic theory of disjoining pressure, which implies that the polar nature of water molecules does not play an important role. Finally, the effects of disjoining pressure on thin film evaporation in nanoporous membrane and on bubble nucleation are discussed.

  16. Wetting behavior of nonpolar nanotubes in simple dipolar liquids for varying nanotube diameter and solute-solvent interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Malay Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu, E-mail: amalen@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Atomistic simulations of model nonpolar nanotubes in a Stockmayer liquid are carried out for varying nanotube diameter and nanotube-solvent interactions to investigate solvophobic interactions in generic dipolar solvents. We have considered model armchair type single-walled nonpolar nanotubes with increasing radii from (5,5) to (12,12). The interactions between solute and solvent molecules are modeled by the well-known Lennard-Jones and repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potentials. We have investigated the density profiles and microscopic arrangement of Stockmayer molecules, orientational profiles of their dipole vectors, time dependence of their occupation, and also the translational and rotational motion of solvent molecules in confined environments of the cylindrical nanopores and also in their external peripheral regions. The present results of structural and dynamical properties of Stockmayer molecules inside and near atomistically rough nonpolar surfaces including their wetting and dewetting behavior for varying interactions provide a more generic picture of solvophobic effects experienced by simple dipolar liquids without any specific interactions such as hydrogen bonds.

  17. Thermodynamical modeling of nuclear glasses: coexistence of amorphous phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjanor, G.

    2007-11-01

    Investigating the stability of borosilicate glasses used in the nuclear industry with respect to phase separation requires to estimate the Gibbs free energies of the various phases appearing in the material. In simulation, using current computational resources, a direct state-sampling of a glassy system with respect to its ensemble statistics is not ergodic and the estimated ensemble averages are not reliable. Our approach consists in generating, at a given cooling rate, a series of quenches, or paths connecting states of the liquid to states of the glass, and then in taking into account the probability to generate the paths leading to the different glassy states in ensembles averages. In this way, we introduce a path ensemble formalism and calculate a Landau free energy associated to a glassy meta-basin. This method was validated by accurately mapping the free energy landscape of a 38-atom glassy cluster. We then applied this approach to the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of binary amorphous Lennard-Jones alloys, and checked the correlation between the observed tendencies to order or to phase separate and the computed Gibbs free energies. We finally computed the driving force to phase separation in a simplified three-oxide nuclear glass modeled by a Born-Mayer-Huggins potential that includes a three-body term, and we compared the estimated quantities to the available experimental data. (author)

  18. The 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoro-methylsulfonyl)-imide ionic liquid nanodroplets on solid surfaces and in electric field: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dengpan; Vatamanu, Jenel P.; Wei, Xiaoyu; Bedrov, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the wetting states of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoro-methylsulfonyl)-imide ionic liquid (IL) nanodroplets on surfaces with different strengths of van der Waals (VDW) interactions and in the presence of an electric field. By adjusting the depth of Lennard-Jones potential, the van der Waals interaction between the solid surface and ionic liquid was systematically varied. The shape of the droplets was analyzed to extract the corresponding contact angle utilized to characterize wetting states of the nanodroplets. The explored range of surface-IL interactions allowed contact angles ranging from complete IL spreading on the surface to poor wettability. The effect of the external electrical field was explored by adding point charges to the surface atoms. Systems with two charge densities (±0.002 e/atom and ±0.004 e/atom) that correspond to 1.36 V/nm and 2.72 V/nm electric fields were investigated. Asymmetrical wetting states were observed for both cases. At 1.36 V/nm electric field, contributions of IL-surface VDW interactions and Coulombic interactions to the wetting state were competitive. At 2.72 V/nm field, electrostatic interactions dominate the interaction between the nanodroplet and surface, leading to enhanced wettability on all surfaces.

  19. High-Throughput Characterization of Porous Materials Using Graphics Processing Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihan; Martin, Richard L.; Rübel, Oliver; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend

    2012-05-08

    We have developed a high-throughput graphics processing units (GPU) code that can characterize a large database of crystalline porous materials. In our algorithm, the GPU is utilized to accelerate energy grid calculations where the grid values represent interactions (i.e., Lennard-Jones + Coulomb potentials) between gas molecules (i.e., CH$_{4}$ and CO$_{2}$) and material's framework atoms. Using a parallel flood fill CPU algorithm, inaccessible regions inside the framework structures are identified and blocked based on their energy profiles. Finally, we compute the Henry coefficients and heats of adsorption through statistical Widom insertion Monte Carlo moves in the domain restricted to the accessible space. The code offers significant speedup over a single core CPU code and allows us to characterize a set of porous materials at least an order of magnitude larger than ones considered in earlier studies. For structures selected from such a prescreening algorithm, full adsorption isotherms can be calculated by conducting multiple grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations concurrently within the GPU.

  20. The free energy of the metastable supersaturated vapor via restricted ensemble simulations. III. An extension to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Chu; Geng, Jun; Marlow, William H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the sampling of restricted microstates in our previous work [C. Nie, J. Geng, and W. H. Marlow, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 154505 (2007); 128, 234310 (2008)] and quantitatively predict thermal properties of supersaturated vapors, an extension is made to the Corti and Debenedetti subcell constraint algorithm [D. S. Corti and P. Debenedetti, Chem. Eng. Sci. 49, 2717 (1994)], which restricts the maximum allowed local density at any point in a simulation box. The maximum allowed local density at a point in a simulation box is defined by the maximum number of particles N m allowed to appear inside a sphere of radius R, with this point as the center of the sphere. Both N m and R serve as extra thermodynamic variables for maintaining a certain degree of spatial homogeneity in a supersaturated system. In a restricted canonical ensemble, at a given temperature and an overall density, series of local minima on the Helmholtz free energy surface F(N m , R) are found subject to different (N m , R) pairs. The true equilibrium metastable state is identified through the analysis of the formation free energies of Stillinger clusters of various sizes obtained from these restricted states. The simulation results of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor at reduced temperature 0.7 including the vapor pressure isotherm, formation free energies of critical nuclei, and chemical potential differences are presented and analyzed. In addition, with slight modifications, the current algorithm can be applied to computing thermal properties of superheated liquids.

  1. Monte Carlo Studies of Phase Separation in Compressible 2-dim Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S. J.; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using high resolution Monte Carlo simulations, we study time-dependent domain growth in compressible 2-dim ferromagnetic (s=1/2) Ising models with continuous spin positions and spin-exchange moves [1]. Spins interact with slightly modified Lennard-Jones potentials, and we consider a model with no lattice mismatch and one with 4% mismatch. For comparison, we repeat calculations for the rigid Ising model [2]. For all models, large systems (512^2) and long times (10^ 6 MCS) are examined over multiple runs, and the growth exponent is measured in the asymptotic scaling regime. For the rigid model and the compressible model with no lattice mismatch, the growth exponent is consistent with the theoretically expected value of 1/3 [1] for Model B type growth. However, we find that non-zero lattice mismatch has a significant and unexpected effect on the growth behavior.Supported by the NSF.[1] D.P. Landau and K. Binder, A Guide to Monte Carlo Simulations in Statistical Physics, second ed. (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2005).[2] J. Amar, F. Sullivan, and R.D. Mountain, Phys. Rev. B 37, 196 (1988).

  2. The molecular dynamic simulation on impact and friction characters of nanofluids with many nanoparticles system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Minli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impact and friction model of nanofluid for molecular dynamics simulation was built which consists of two Cu plates and Cu-Ar nanofluid. The Cu-Ar nanofluid model consisted of eight spherical copper nanoparticles with each particle diameter of 4 nm and argon atoms as base liquid. The Lennard-Jones potential function was adopted to deal with the interactions between atoms. Thus motion states and interaction of nanoparticles at different time through impact and friction process could be obtained and friction mechanism of nanofluids could be analyzed. In the friction process, nanoparticles showed motions of rotation and translation, but effected by the interactions of nanoparticles, the rotation of nanoparticles was trapped during the compression process. In this process, agglomeration of nanoparticles was very apparent, with the pressure increasing, the phenomenon became more prominent. The reunited nanoparticles would provide supporting efforts for the whole channel, and in the meantime reduced the contact between two friction surfaces, therefore, strengthened lubrication and decreased friction. In the condition of overlarge positive pressure, the nanoparticles would be crashed and formed particles on atomic level and strayed in base liquid.

  3. Melting behavior of a model molecular crystalline GeI4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Asano, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    A model molecular crystalline GeI 4 was examined using molecular dynamics simulation. The model was constructed in such a way that rigid tetrahedral molecules interact with each other via Lennard-Jones potentials whose centers are located at the vertices of a tetrahedron. Because no other interaction that can “soften” the intermolecular interaction was introduced, the melting curve of the model crystalline material does not exhibit the anomaly that was found for the real substance. However, the current investigation is useful in that it could settle the upper bound of pressure below which the model can predict properties of the molecular liquid. Moreover, singularity-free nature of the melting curve allowed us to analytically treat the melting curve in the light of the Kumari-Dass-Kechin equation. As a result, we could definitely conclude that the well-known Simon equation for the melting curve is merely an approximate expression. The condition for the validity of Simon’s equation was identified. (author)

  4. Interfacial layering and capillary roughness in immiscible liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geysermans, P; Pontikis, V

    2010-08-21

    The capillary roughness and the atomic density profiles of extended interfaces between immiscible liquids are determined as a function of the interface area by using molecular dynamics and Lennard-Jones (12-6) potentials. We found that with increasing area, the interface roughness diverges logarithmically, thus fitting the theoretical mean-field prediction. In systems small enough for the interfacial roughness not to blur the structural details, atomic density profiles across the fluid interface are layered with correlation length in the range of molecular correlations in liquids. On increasing the system size, the amplitude of the thermally excited position fluctuations of the interface increases, thus causing layering to rapidly vanish, if density profiles are computed without special care. In this work, we present and validate a simple method, operating in the direct space, for extracting from molecular dynamics trajectories the "intrinsic" structure of a fluid interface that is the local density profile of the interface cleaned from capillary wave effects. Estimated values of interfacial properties such as the tension, the intrinsic width, and the lower wavelength limit of position fluctuations are in agreement with results collected from the literature.

  5. Theory of static friction: temperature and corrugation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchini, A; Brigazzi, M; Santoro, G; Bortolani, V

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the static friction, as a function of temperature, between two thick solid slabs. The upper one is formed of light particles and the substrate of heavy particles. We focus our attention on the interaction between the phonon fields of the two blocks and on the interface corrugation, among the various mechanisms responsible for the friction. To give evidence of the role played by the dynamical interaction of the substrate with the upper block, we consider both a substrate formed by fixed atoms and a substrate formed by mobile atoms. To study the effect of the corrugation, we model it by changing the range parameter σ in the Lennard-Jones interaction potential. We found that in the case of the mobile substrate there is a large momentum transfer from the substrate to the upper block. This momentum transfer increases on increasing the temperature and produces a large disorder in the upper block favouring a decrease of the static friction with respect to the case for a rigid substrate. Reducing the corrugation, we found that with a rigid substrate the upper block becomes nearly commensurate, producing an enhancement of the static friction with respect to that with a mobile substrate

  6. Equilibrium and non equilibrium in fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Chernomoretz, A.; Lopez, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In this communication we present recent results regarding the interplay of equilibrium and non equilibrium in the process of fragmentation of excited finite Lennard Jones drops. Because the general features of such a potential resemble the ones of the nuclear interaction (fact that is reinforced by the similarity between the EOS of both systems) these studies are not only relevant from a fundamental point of view but also shed light on the problem of nuclear multifragmentation. We focus on the microscopic analysis of the state of the fragmenting system at fragmentation time. We show that the Caloric Curve (i e. the functional relationship between the temperature of the system and the excitation energy) is of the type rise plateau with no vapor branch. The usual rise plateau rise pattern is only recovered when equilibrium is artificially imposed. This result puts a serious question on the validity of the freeze out hypothesis. This feature is independent of the dimensionality or excitation mechanism. Moreover we explore the behavior of magnitudes which can help us determine the degree of the assumed phase transition. It is found that no clear cut criteria is presently available. (Author)

  7. Yield point of metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Ogata, Shigenobu; Li, Ju

    2006-01-01

    Shear bands form in most bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) within a narrow range of uniaxial strain ε y ≅ 2%. We propose this critical condition corresponds to embryonic shear band (ESB) propagation, not its nucleation. To propagate an ESB, the far-field shear stress τ ∞ ∼ Eε y /2 must exceed the quasi-steady-state glue traction τ glue of shear-alienated glass until the glass transition temperature is approached internally due to frictional heating, at which point ESB matures as a runaway shear crack. The incubation length scale l inc necessary for this maturation is estimated to be ∼10 2 nm for Zr-based BMGs, below which sample size-scale shear localization does not happen. In shear-alienated glass, the last resistance against localized shearing comes from extremely fast downhill dissipative dynamics of timescale comparable to atomic vibrations, allowing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to capture this recovery process which governs τ glue . We model four metallic glasses: a binary Lennard-Jones system, two binary embedded atom potential systems and a quinternary embedded atom system. Despite vast differences in the structure and interatomic interactions, the four MD calculations give ε y predictions of 2.4%, 2.1%, 2.6% and 2.9%, respectively

  8. Monolayer Adsorption of Ar and Kr on Graphite: Theoretical Isotherms and Spreading Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero; Cuadros

    1997-02-01

    The validity of analytical equations for two-dimensional fluids in the prediction of monolayer adsorption isotherms and spreading pressures of rare gases on graphite is analyzed. The statistical mechanical theory of Steele is used to relate the properties of the adsorbed and two-dimensional fluids. In such theory the model of graphite is a perfectly flat surface, which means that only the first order contribution of the fluid-solid interactions are taken into account. Two analytical equations for two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids are used: one proposed by Reddy-O'Shea, based in the fit on pressure and potential energy computer simulated results, and other proposed by Cuadros-Mulero, based in the fit of the Helmholtz free energy calculated from computer simulated results of the radial distribution function. The theoretical results are compared with experimental results of Constabaris et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 37, 915 (1962)) for Ar and of Putnam and Fort (J. Phys. Chem. 79, 459 (1975)) for Kr. Good agreement is found using both equations in both cases.

  9. Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study of the sublimation energetics of cyclopentadienyltricarbonylmanganese (Cymantrene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciochi, Ricardo; Canongia Lopes, José N; Diogo, Hermínio P; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2008-10-16

    The standard molar enthalpy of sublimation of monoclinic cyclopentadienyltricarbonylmanganese, Mn(eta (5)-C 5H 5)(CO) 3, at 298.15 K, was determined as Delta sub H m (o)[Mn(eta (5)-C 5H 5)(CO) 3] = 75.97 +/- 0.37 kJ x mol (-1) from Knudsen effusion and Calvet-drop microcalorimetry measurements, thus considerably improving the very large inaccuracy (>10 kJ x mol (-1)) of the published data. The obtained value was used to assess the extension of the OPLS-based all-atom force field we previously developed for iron metallocenes to manganese organometallic compounds. The modified force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties (density and unit-cell volume) of crystalline Mn(eta (5)-C 5H 5)(CO) 3 with a deviation of 0.6% and the experimentally determined enthalpy of sublimation with an accuracy of 1 kJ x mol (-1). The interaction (epsilon) and atomic-diameter (sigma) parameters of the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function used to calculate dispersion contributions within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable from iron to manganese.

  10. Analysis of the static properties of cluster formations in symmetric linear multiblock copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fytas, N G; Theodorakis, P E

    2011-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the static properties of a single linear multiblock copolymer chain under poor solvent conditions varying the block length N, the number of blocks n, and the solvent quality by variation of the temperature T. We study the most symmetrical case, where the number of blocks of monomers of type A, n A , equals that of monomers B, n B (n A = n B = n/2), the length of all blocks is the same irrespective of their type, and the potential parameters are also chosen symmetrically, as for a standard Lennard-Jones fluid. Under poor solvent conditions the chains collapse and blocks with monomers of the same type form clusters, which are phase separated from the clusters with monomers of the other type. We study the dependence of the size of the clusters formed on n, N and T. Furthermore, we discuss our results with respect to recent simulation data on the phase behaviour of such macromolecules, providing a complete picture for the cluster formations in single multiblock copolymer chains under poor solvent conditions.

  11. Macroscopic Expressions of Molecular Adiabatic Compressibility of Methyl and Ethyl Caprate under High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxi Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular compressibility, which is a macroscopic quantity to reveal the microcompressibility by additivity of molecular constitutions, is considered as a fixed value for specific organic liquids. In this study, we introduced two calculated expressions of molecular adiabatic compressibility to demonstrate its pressure and temperature dependency. The first one was developed from Wada’s constant expression based on experimental data of density and sound velocity. Secondly, by introducing the 2D fitting expressions and their partial derivative of pressure and temperature, molecular compressibility dependency was analyzed further, and a 3D fitting expression was obtained from the calculated data of the first one. The third was derived with introducing the pressure and temperature correction factors based on analogy to Lennard-Jones potential function and energy equipartition theorem. In wide range of temperatures (293

  12. Fabrication and Molecular Transport Studies of Highly c-Oriented AFI Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yang

    2017-01-10

    The AFI membrane with one-dimensional straight channels is an ideal platform for various applications. In this work, we report the fabrication of a highly c-oriented, compact and stable AFI membrane by epitaxial growth from an almost close-packed and c-oriented monolayer of plate-like seeds that is manually assembled on a porous alumina support. The straight channels in the membrane are not only aligned vertically along the membrane depth, but are also continuous without disruption. The transport resistance is thus minimized and as a result, the membrane shows almost two orders of magnitude greater permeance in pervaporation of hydrocarbons compared to reported values in the literature. The selectivity of p-xylene to 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) is approximately 850. In addition, through gas permeation studies on a number of gas and liquid molecules, different transport mechanisms including activated Knudsen diffusion, surface diffusion and molecular sieving were discovered for different diffusion species. The ratio of kinetic diameter to channel diameter, dm/dc, and the ratio of the Lennard-Jones length constant to channel diameter, σm/dc, are found very useful in explaining the different transport behaviors. These results should be useful not only for potential industrial applications of the AFI membranes but also for the fundamental understanding of transport in nanoporous structures.

  13. 369 TFlop/s molecular dynamics simulations on the Roadrunner general-purpose heterogeneous supercomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminarayan, Sriram [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fossum, Gordon C [IBM CORPORATION

    2008-01-01

    The authors present timing and performance numbers for a short-range parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code, SPaSM, that has been rewritten for the heterogeneous Roadrunner supercomputer. Each Roadrunner compute node consists of two AMD Opteron dual-core microprocessors and four PowerXCell 8i enhanced Cell microprocessors, so that there are four MPI ranks per node, each with one Opteron and one Cell. The interatomic forces are computed on the Cells (each with one PPU and eight SPU cores), while the Opterons are used to direct inter-rank communication and perform I/O-heavy periodic analysis, visualization, and checkpointing tasks. The performance measured for our initial implementation of a standard Lennard-Jones pair potential benchmark reached a peak of 369 Tflop/s double-precision floating-point performance on the full Roadrunner system (27.7% of peak), corresponding to 124 MFlop/Watt/s at a price of approximately 3.69 MFlops/dollar. They demonstrate an initial target application, the jetting and ejection of material from a shocked surface.

  14. Optimization of linear and branched alkane interactions with water to simulate hydrophobic hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.; Liu, Lixin; Surampudi, Lalitanand N.

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies of simple gas hydration have demonstrated that the accuracy of molecular simulations at capturing the thermodynamic signatures of hydrophobic hydration is linked both to the fidelity of the water model at replicating the experimental liquid density at ambient pressure and an accounting of polarization interactions between the solute and water. We extend those studies to examine alkane hydration using the transferable potentials for phase equilibria united-atom model for linear and branched alkanes, developed to reproduce alkane phase behavior, and the TIP4P/2005 model for water, which provides one of the best descriptions of liquid water for the available fixed-point charge models. Alkane site/water oxygen Lennard-Jones cross interactions were optimized to reproduce the experimental alkane hydration free energies over a range of temperatures. The optimized model reproduces the hydration free energies of the fitted alkanes with a root mean square difference between simulation and experiment of 0.06 kcal/mol over a wide temperature range, compared to 0.44 kcal/mol for the parent model. The optimized model accurately reproduces the temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration, as characterized by the hydration enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities, as well as the pressure response, as characterized by partial molar volumes.

  15. A Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Hydrated Proton Transfer in Perfluorosulfonate Ionomer Membranes (Nafion 117

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamic model based on Lennard-Jones Potential, the interaction force between two particles, molecular diffusion, and radial distribution function (RDF is presented. The diffusion of the hydrated ion, triggered by both Grotthuss and vehicle mechanisms, is used to study the proton transfer in Nafion 117. The hydrated ion transfer mechanisms and the effects of the temperature, the water content in the membrane, and the electric field on the diffusion of the hydrated ion are analyzed. The molecular dynamic simulation results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. The modeling results show that when the water content in Nafion 117 is low, H3O+ is the main transfer ion among the different hydrated ions. However, at higher water content, the hydrated ion in the form of H+(H2O2 is the main transfer ion. It is also found that the negatively charged sulfonic acid group as the fortified point facilitates the proton transfer in Nafion 117 better than the free water molecule. The diffusion of the hydrated ion can be improved by increasing the cell temperature, the water content in Nafion, and the electric field intensity.

  16. COMMUNICATION: Resonant activation in polymer translocation: new insights into the escape dynamics of molecules driven by an oscillating field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, N.; Fiasconaro, A.; Persano Adorno, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2010-09-01

    The translocation of molecules across cellular membranes or through synthetic nanopores is strongly affected by thermal fluctuations. In this work we study how the dynamics of a polymer in a noisy environment changes when the translocation process is driven by an oscillating electric field. An improved version of the Rouse model for a flexible polymer has been adopted to mimic the molecular dynamics, by taking into account the harmonic interactions between adjacent monomers and the excluded-volume effect by introducing a Lennard-Jones potential between all beads. A bending recoil torque has also been included in our model. The polymer dynamics is simulated in a two-dimensional domain by numerically solving the Langevin equations of motion. Thermal fluctuations are taken into account by introducing a Gaussian uncorrelated noise. The mean first translocation time of the polymer centre of inertia shows a minimum as a function of the frequency of the oscillating forcing field. This finding represents the first evidence of the resonant activation behaviour in the dynamics of polymer translocation.

  17. Optimized theory for simple and molecular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucho, M; Montgomery Pettitt, B

    2007-03-28

    An optimized closure approximation for both simple and molecular fluids is presented. A smooth interpolation between Perkus-Yevick and hypernetted chain closures is optimized by minimizing the free energy self-consistently with respect to the interpolation parameter(s). The molecular version is derived from a refinement of the method for simple fluids. In doing so, a method is proposed which appropriately couples an optimized closure with the variant of the diagrammatically proper integral equation recently introduced by this laboratory [K. M. Dyer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 204512 (2005)]. The simplicity of the expressions involved in this proposed theory has allowed the authors to obtain an analytic expression for the approximate excess chemical potential. This is shown to be an efficient tool to estimate, from first principles, the numerical value of the interpolation parameters defining the aforementioned closure. As a preliminary test, representative models for simple fluids and homonuclear diatomic Lennard-Jones fluids were analyzed, obtaining site-site correlation functions in excellent agreement with simulation data.

  18. Simple relationship between the virial-route hypernetted-chain and the compressibility-route Percus-Yevick values of the fourth virial coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrés; Manzano, Gema

    2010-04-14

    As is well known, approximate integral equations for liquids, such as the hypernetted chain (HNC) and Percus-Yevick (PY) theories, are in general thermodynamically inconsistent in the sense that the macroscopic properties obtained from the spatial correlation functions depend on the route followed. In particular, the values of the fourth virial coefficient B(4) predicted by the HNC and PY approximations via the virial route differ from those obtained via the compressibility route. Despite this, it is shown in this paper that the value of B(4) obtained from the virial route in the HNC theory is exactly three halves the value obtained from the compressibility route in the PY theory, irrespective of the interaction potential (whether isotropic or not), the number of components, and the dimensionality of the system. This simple relationship is confirmed in one-component systems by analytical results for the one-dimensional penetrable-square-well model and the three-dimensional penetrable-sphere model, as well as by numerical results for the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones model, the one-dimensional Gaussian core model, and the three-dimensional square-well model.

  19. Condensation and evaporation transitions in deep capillary grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Parry, Andrew O

    2014-09-03

    We study the order of capillary condensation and evaporation transitions of a simple fluid adsorbed in a deep capillary groove using a fundamental measure density functional theory (DFT). The walls of the capillary interact with the fluid particles via long-ranged, dispersion, forces while the fluid-fluid interaction is modelled as a truncated Lennard-Jones-like potential. We find that below the wetting temperature Tw condensation is first-order and evaporation is continuous with the metastability of the condensation being well described by the complementary Kelvin equation. In contrast above Tw both phase transitions are continuous and their critical singularities are determined. In addition we show that for the evaporation transition above Tw there is an elegant mapping, or covariance, with the complete wetting transition occurring at a planar wall. Our numerical DFT studies are complemented by analytical slab model calculations which explain how the asymmetry between condensation and evaporation arises out of the combination of long-ranged forces and substrate geometry.

  20. Parallel continuous simulated tempering and its applications in large-scale molecular simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Tianwu; Yu, Linglin; Zhang, Chong [Applied Physics Program and Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Ma, Jianpeng, E-mail: jpma@bcm.tmc.edu [Applied Physics Program and Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, BCM-125, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, we introduce a parallel continuous simulated tempering (PCST) method for enhanced sampling in studying large complex systems. It mainly inherits the continuous simulated tempering (CST) method in our previous studies [C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 194112 (2009); C. Zhang and J. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244101 (2010)], while adopts the spirit of parallel tempering (PT), or replica exchange method, by employing multiple copies with different temperature distributions. Differing from conventional PT methods, despite the large stride of total temperature range, the PCST method requires very few copies of simulations, typically 2–3 copies, yet it is still capable of maintaining a high rate of exchange between neighboring copies. Furthermore, in PCST method, the size of the system does not dramatically affect the number of copy needed because the exchange rate is independent of total potential energy, thus providing an enormous advantage over conventional PT methods in studying very large systems. The sampling efficiency of PCST was tested in two-dimensional Ising model, Lennard-Jones liquid and all-atom folding simulation of a small globular protein trp-cage in explicit solvent. The results demonstrate that the PCST method significantly improves sampling efficiency compared with other methods and it is particularly effective in simulating systems with long relaxation time or correlation time. We expect the PCST method to be a good alternative to parallel tempering methods in simulating large systems such as phase transition and dynamics of macromolecules in explicit solvent.