WorldWideScience

Sample records for length type fiction

  1. Fictional Separation Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Buhrkal; Birkedal, Lars

    2012-01-01

    , separation means physical separation. In this paper, we introduce \\emph{fictional separation logic}, which includes more general forms of fictional separating conjunctions P * Q, where "*" does not require physical separation, but may also be used in situations where the memory resources described by P and Q...... overlap. We demonstrate, via a range of examples, how fictional separation logic can be used to reason locally and modularly about mutable abstract data types, possibly implemented using sophisticated sharing. Fictional separation logic is defined on top of standard separation logic, and both the meta...

  2. Fictional names and fictional discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Panizza, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    [eng] In this dissertation I present a critical study of fiction, focusing on the semantics of fictional names and fictional discourse. I am concerned with the issue of whether fictional names need to refer, and also with the related issue of whether fictional characters need to exist, in order to best account for our linguistic practices involving fictional names. Fictional names like ‘Sherlock Holmes’, ‘Anna Karenina’, ‘Emma Woodhouse’ and ‘Don Quixote of La Mancha’ ordinarily occur in diff...

  3. Slash Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Trinkewitz, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    This thesis summarises the current theoretical background of reinterpretations of media texts written in slash fiction genre. Slash fiction develops homosocial and relational plot motifs contained in popular movies, series and books into homosexual subplots among particular characters. The thesis highlights the problematic nature when studying slash fiction on the basis of fictions and presents theoretical approaches that might deepen understanding of the phenomenon in researching audience an...

  4. Pushing the limits of design fiction:the case for fictional research papers

    OpenAIRE

    Lindley, Joseph; Coulton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how design fictions in the form of ‘imaginary abstracts’ can be extended into complete ‘fictional papers’. Imaginary abstracts are a type of design fiction that are usually included within the content of ‘real’ research papers, they comprise brief accounts of fictional problem frames, prototypes, user studies and findings. Design fiction abstracts have been proposed as a means to move beyond solutionism to explore the potential societal value and consequences of new HCI c...

  5. Gedanken fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate

    2017-07-01

    The 14 pairs of short story and essay in Thought X: Fictions and Hypotheticals have at their root the concept that thought experiments in science and philosophy tell stories as they build a scenario to prove a point.

  6. Science Fiction on Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  7. The Fictions of Surrealism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter A. Strauss

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Surrealism is an attitude toward life, even more than a literary and artistic movement. It aspired to no less than the remaking of man and the world by reintroducing "everyday" magic and a new idealization of the Female. In many respects, its goal was spiritual renewal. This enterprise was most prominently successful in the domain of poetry and painting. The major spokesman for the movement, Andre Breton, disliked the novel. Nevertheless, the members of the movement and their associates made numerous ventures into prose fiction, with notable results. Four types of fiction are delineated: the neo-Gothic romance; the adventure diary of "magic" experience—this one being probably the most typical of all the kinds of narrative invented; the erotic (or pornographic récit , and the linguistic extravaganza, in which language becomes the major instrument of sorcery. In many ways, the Surrealist "experiment" could be characterized as an attempt at the liberation of languages. This observation raises a number of questions about the impact of Surrealism on subsequent developments in French fiction (and the theatre, as well as upon its impact on Western fiction in general. The conclusion drawn is that Surrealist fiction has been a major contribution, a pioneering effort, in the shaking up of narrative concepts and techniques in the second half of the twentieth century.

  8. Research Notes Patterns of thorn length, density, type and colour in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Notes Patterns of thorn length, density, type and colour in African Acacias. JJ Midgley, MA Botha, D Balfour. Abstract. In Acacia no trade-off occurs between thorn length and thorn density and no correlation exists between thorn length and leaf length. By relating thorn length and density to leaf length it is clear that ...

  9. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  10. Fictional Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    At designe i en fortællemæssig ramme giver brugere og designere mulighed for i fællesskab at udforske fremtidens it-anvendelser. Metoden hedder Fictional Inquiry, og den motiverer brugerne til at tænke ud over dagligdagens begrænsninger og sætte ord på ting i hverdagen, som ellers er svære...

  11. The World of Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheila

    1971-01-01

    Science fiction is discussed from the following standpoints: What Is Science Fiction?; The History of Science Fiction; and The Themes of Science Fiction. A list of films, books, and records about science fiction is given. (DB)

  12. Augmenting the City with Fiction: Fictional Requirements for Mobile Guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldskov, Jesper; Paay, Jeni

    2007-01-01

    In this position paper, we discuss the user experience of a new genre of mobile guide services, which augments the users’ physical surroundings with fiction rather than with facts. First, we outline sources of inspiration from fiction, storytelling in place and on the move, and related research...... within the area of interactive narratives and location-based games. We then present and discuss five overall types of fictional mobile guides embodied by the metaphors of 1) treasure hunts, 2) jig-saw puzzles, 3) playing dominos, 4) playing scrabble, and 5) collecting butterflies. Finally, we describe...... a preliminary design idea for a prototype system intended to explore the design, implementation, and user experience of fictional mobile guides....

  13. Enhanced lifetime of atmospheric circulation types over Europe: fact or fiction?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cahynová, Monika; Huth, Radan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2009), s. 407-416 ISSN 0280-6495 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 115; GA AV ČR IAA300420506 Grant - others:COST(XE) 733 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : atmospheric circulation * classification * circulation types * persistence * synoptic climatology Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.214, year: 2009 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/121645997/PDFSTART

  14. Ethical Design Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Vistisen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we examine how ethical challenges can be approached in and through design fiction. To do so, we develop a new framework for analysis as well as creation of design fictions. Our main focus will be on design fiction within a strategical setting, connecting the notion of design fiction...

  15. Synaptonemal Complex Length Variation in Wild-Type Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil M. Vranis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis yields haploid gametes following two successive divisions of a germ cell in the absence of intervening DNA replication. Balanced segregation of homologous chromosomes in Meiosis I is aided by a proteinaceous structure, the synaptonemal complex (SC. The objective of this study was to determine total average autosomal SC lengths in spermatocytes in three commonly used mouse strains (129S4/SvJae, C57BL/6J, and BALB/c. Our experiments revealed that the total autosomal SC length in BALB/c spermatocytes is 9% shorter than in the two other strains. Shorter SCs are also observed in spermatocytes of (BALB/c × 129S4/SvJae and (C57BL/6J × BALB/c F1 hybrids suggesting a genetic basis of SC length regulation. Along these lines, we studied expression of a selected group of genes implicated in meiotic chromosome architecture. We found that BALB/c testes express up to 6-fold less of Rec8 mRNA and 4-fold less of REC8 protein. These results suggest that the mechanism that defines the SC length operates via a REC8‑dependent process. Finally, our results demonstrate that genetic background can have an effect on meiotic studies in mice.

  16. Using Sports Fiction in Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Vigil, Yvonne Tixier; Edwards, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    One way to encourage the development of critical thinking in physical education students is to incorporate sports fiction for young adults into the curriculum. This type of fiction can have a powerful effect on young people as they read about situations that they may have experienced or imagined. The article describes how to implement sports…

  17. Teaching Science Fiction by Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawerth, Jane

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the 200-year-old tradition of women science fiction authors. Discusses the benefits of teaching science fiction written by women. Describes 5 science fiction short stories and 5 science fiction novels suitable for high school students. (RS)

  18. Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  19. Contemporary American Physics Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alan J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the works by six contemporary American novelists that illustrate the current state of "physics fiction." The discussed examples of physics fiction ranged from the fluent and frequent inclusion of the casual, to the elaborate systems of physics metaphors. (GA)

  20. Jordan Krall's speculative fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doubinsky, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction.......Jordan Krall is one of the most interesting writers in American speculative fiction. This article studies the way Krall redefines the tropes and frames of classical dystopian fiction and references, turning them into an idiosyncratic construction....

  1. Science Fiction & Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerneda, Julie E.

    2006-01-01

    The term "science fiction" has become synonymous, in the media at least, for any discovery in science too incredible or unexpected for the nonscientist to imagine. One of the most common classroom uses of science fiction is for students to pick out flaws in science fiction movies or television shows. Unfortunately, this approach can result in…

  2. Computers in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Science fiction writers' perceptions of the "thinking machine" are examined through a review of Baum's Oz books, Heinlein's "Beyond This Horizon," science fiction magazine articles, and works about robots including Asimov's "I, Robot." The future of computers in science fiction is discussed and suggested readings are listed. (MBR)

  3. Ethical Design Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thessa; Vistisen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we examine how ethical challenges can be approached in and through design fiction. To do so, we develop a new framework for analysis as well as creation of design fictions. Our main focus will be on design fiction within a strategical setting, connecting the notion of design fiction...... to the design process within large corporations as well as strategic design and decision making. Three cases are presented to support our findings. The final contribution will be the design fiction framework found in the conclusion....

  4. Special science-fiction (Science Fiction Special).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francais dans le Monde, 1985

    1985-01-01

    An issue devoted to the use of science fiction in the French language classroom discusses such topics as the development of the genre, literary techniques, themes, imagery, sociolinguistic elements, and potential classroom activities. (MSE)

  5. Application of run length matrix to magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis of alzheimer-type dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeriyama, Tomoharu; Kodama, Naoki; Shimada, Tetsuo; Fukumoto, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    To examine the possibility of diagnosing Alzheimer-type dementia, we studied this condition using the run length matrix, on head MR images of 29 Alzheimer-type dementia patients (8 men, 21 women, 78.7±6.7 years) and healthy elderly controls (10 men, 19 women, 72.3±8.7 years). The results showed that differences in GLN (gray level nonuniformity) and RLN (run length nonuniformity) were statistically significant. Furthermore, discriminant analysis based on GLN and RLN showed a rate of sensitivity of 69.0%, specificity 86.2%, and correct classification 77.6%. Although this rate of correct classification is inferior to the planimetric and volumetric methods, run length matrix is only one method of texture analysis. The results of this study indicate the possibility of MR imaging-based diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia with texture analysis including a run length matrix. (author)

  6. Chinese court case fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2011-01-01

    breathed the breath of life into it? The usual answer is that crime fiction, in fact, was invented by Poe, but another counter-view is that China – at that point – had had a long narrative tradition for stories about crime and detection. The socalled gongan genre – court case fiction – was probably...... established as early as the 6th Century AD, whereas the first substantial evidence of the tradition is from 13th Century and the first Chinese crime fiction novels were written during the 17th Century. This article is, then, a corrective for the international history of crime fiction based on numerous...

  7. Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravetz, David

    2005-01-01

    This article is for teachers looking for new ways to motivate students, increase science comprehension, and understanding without using the old standard expository science textbook. This author suggests reading a science fiction novel in the science classroom as a way to engage students in learning. Using science fiction literature and language…

  8. Building Collections: Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, JoAnn Vergona

    2005-01-01

    Fantasy and science fiction are two genres that are products of imagination. Both present alternate worlds governed by their own laws and values, but it is the plausibility of events in each world that sets the two apart. In fantasy, events happen by magic or inexplicable means. In science fiction, events could happen based on advanced…

  9. The Future as Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lane

    Because good future studies and good fiction have a great deal in common, futurists need to recognize and apply the skills of word artists from all genres, particularly novelists and short-story writers. One form of science fiction that futurists could use is the scenario, which is an exploration of an alternative future. A good scenario should be…

  10. Stranger than fiction: literary and clinical amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This chapter broadly covers literary uses of amnesia and memory disorders. Amnesia in fiction offers authors an efficient and dramatic device to tackle themes such as identity, personal liberty, or guilt. We argue against the common complaint that fictional amnesia is scientifically inaccurate, pointing out that the goals of literature are different from those of science, that amnesia is still poorly understood, and that real-life cases can sometimes be stranger than fiction. The chapter provides examples from the neuropsychological literature, media reports, mythology, historical cases, detective stories, war stories, theatrical plays, and other genres. Special attention is given to retrograde and dissociative amnesia, as these are the most frequent types of amnesia portrayed in fiction, while other types of memory disorders are more shortly treated. We argue that the predominance of disorders affecting autobiographical memory in fiction is in itself a revealing fact about the mechanisms of human memory, illustrating how fictional treatments of pathology can inform back neurological and psychological research. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Screen Present and Fictional Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Le Poidevin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT I intend in this paper to explore the possible consequences for our understanding of fiction of a particular view of the nature of time, namely the hypothesis of the open future. The kind of fiction we will particularly concerned with is film, which provides a convenient way of focusing the general issue I want to raise here. The issue could also be raised in relation to theatre and certain types of novel, but there are nevertheless some disanalogies between film and these other art forms, and I shall indicate these below. The essay is intended as an exercise in bringing metaphysics and aesthetics together, to the benefit (I hope and trust of both.

  12. Chemistry and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Jack H.

    1998-11-01

    This lively collection looks at science as filtered through literature, film, and television. It discusses classic works in science fiction and provides an in-depth look at the chemistry depicted in popular culture, particularly in Start Trek , Star Wars , and Doctor Who . It includes an examination by Nebula Award winner Connie Willis of how science fiction authors use science, and reprints two tongue-in-cheek short stories by Isaac Asimov. The book also includes suggestions for using science fiction as an educational resource.

  13. Dialogue in fiction Dialogue in fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rosa Caldas-Coulthard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do. Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do.

  14. The Effect of Implant Length and Diameter on the Primary Stability in Different Bone Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Barikani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of mechanical characteristics of the implant on primary stability in different bone types, based on resonance frequency analysis (RFA.Materials and Methods: A number of 60 Nobel Biocare Replace Select TiUnit Tapered implants of two different lengths (10 mm and 13 mm and three different widths as 3.4 mm (narrow platform (NP, 4.3 mm (regular platform (RP and 5 mm (wide platform (WP were placed into two different groups of bone blocks. Bone blocks were different in bone quality, but similar to bone types D1 and D3. Immediately, after implant placement, implant stability quotient (ISQ was measured using the Osstell mentor device.Results: ISQ values for implant placements in D1 bone were significantly higher than those for implants placed in D3 bone. In D1 bone, the implant length did not make any significant difference in primary stability; however, in D3 bone, the primary stability of the implant increased when longer implants were utilized. NP implants presented significantly lower ISQ values compared to the two wider implants.Conclusion: In cases of low bone quality, the optimum increase in the implant length and diameter should be taken into account to achieve higher primary stability.

  15. Differential reduction in corneal nerve fiber length in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Maxwell S; Hussain, Munira; Lentz, Stephen I; Raval, Nilesh; Gardner, Thomas W; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Shtein, Roni M

    2014-01-01

    To examine the relationship between corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) and diabetic neuropathy (DN) status in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In this cross-sectional study, we examined 25 diabetic patients without DN, 10 patients with mild DN, 8 patients with severe DN, and 9 controls without diabetes. DN status was assigned based on a combination of clinical symptoms, signs, and electrophysiological testing. Patients underwent corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) of the sub-basal nerve plexus. Post-hoc analysis of the CCM images was performed to quantify the average CNFL, and ANOVA was used to assess for differences in CNFL. All 25 subjects without DN had type 1 DM, and subjects with DN had type 2 DM. Participants with severe DN had significantly lower CNFL (12.5±6.1mm/mm(2)) compared to controls (20.7±2.2mm/mm(2)) (p=0.009). However, lower CNFL was also found in participants with type 1 DM who did not have DN (15.1±4.7mm/mm(2)) relative to controls (p=0.033). CCM of the sub-basal nerve plexus may be an indicator of early peripheral nerve degeneration in type 1 DM. Type of diabetes, in addition to degree of neuropathy, may influence the extent of corneal nerve damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Science Fiction and Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Uses science fiction films such as "Jurassic Park" or "Anaconda" to teach science concepts while fostering student interest. Advocates science fiction as a teaching tool to improve learning and motivation. Describes how to use science fiction in the classroom with the sample activity Twister. (YDS)

  17. Science Fiction: The Academic Awakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelly, Willis E., Ed.

    This book provides background information on science fiction for teachers of English at any level who are approaching science fiction for the first time. Contents are: an introduction by W.E. McNelly; "SF in the Classroom" by J. Williamson; "Second Thoughts on the Course in Science Fiction" by M.R. Hillegas; "Flatland and Beyond: Characterization…

  18. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences.......This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...

  19. Pseudoscience and science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    May, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Aliens, flying saucers, ESP, the Bermuda Triangle, antigravity … are we talking about science fiction or pseudoscience? Sometimes it is difficult to tell the difference. Both pseudoscience and science fiction (SF) are creative endeavours that have little in common with academic science, beyond the superficial trappings of jargon and subject matter. The most obvious difference between the two is that pseudoscience is presented as fact, not fiction. Yet like SF, and unlike real science, pseudoscience is driven by a desire to please an audience – in this case, people who “want to believe”. This has led to significant cross-fertilization between the two disciplines. SF authors often draw on “real” pseudoscientific theories to add verisimilitude to their stories, while on other occasions pseudoscience takes its cue from SF – the symbiotic relationship between ufology and Hollywood being a prime example of this. This engagingly written, well researched and richly illustrated text explores a wide range...

  20. Making fictions sound real

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Birger

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that sound plays in making fictions perceptually real to film audiences, whether these fictions are realist or non-realist in content and narrative form. I will argue that some aspects of film sound practices and the kind of experiences they trigger are related...... to basic rules of human perception, whereas others are more properly explained in relation to how aesthetic devices, including sound, are used to characterise the fiction and thereby make it perceptually real to its audience. Finally, I will argue that not all genres can be defined by a simple taxonomy...... of sounds. Apart from an account of the kinds of sounds that typically appear in a specific genre, a genre analysis of sound may also benefit from a functionalist approach that focuses on how sounds can make both realist and non-realist aspects of genres sound real to audiences....

  1. Mimesis, fiction, paradoxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Lavocat

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Les théories contemporaines de la fiction, comme les poétiques de la Renaissance, privilégient une conception de la mimesis fondée sur la vraisemblance : la démonstration du profit cognitif et moral de la fiction passe toujours par une définition de l’imitation (de quelque façon qu’on la définisse fondée sur la rationalité. L’auteur de cet article examine tout d’abord le statut des contradictions et de l’impossible chez quelques théoriciens actuels (principalement J.-M. Schaeffer, M.-L. Ryan, L. Doležel et poéticiens du 16e siècle (L. Castelvetro et F. Patrizi. Sont ensuite étudiées la forme et la fonction que prend l’impossible dans trois fictions narratives de la Renaissance. L’hypothèse majeure qui est défendue est que ces paradoxes permettent de penser le non-existant, dans la continuité de la scolastique médiévale et en relation avec une problématique religieuse, sérieuse ou parodique. Par là même, et en raison de leur auto-référentialité constitutive, les paradoxes inscrivent dans la fiction une réflexion sur elle-même qui n’a rien d’une apologie. La pensée de la fiction s’articule en définitive de façon bien différente dans les théories et dans les fictions elles-mêmes.Like Renaissance poetics, contemporary theories of fiction do favour a conception of mimesis based on likelihood. In order to underscore the benefits of fiction, in terms of cognition or ethics, both ancient and present-day authors usually identify imitation (however this is understood as a kind of rationality. The aim of this article is to question the status of contradictions and impossibilities, first in current theories of fiction (J-M Schaeffer, M.-L. Ryan, L. Doležel, then in two sixteenth century comments of Aristotle (by L. Castelvetro and F. Patrizi. In the following steps, forms and functions of the impossible are studied in three narratives of the Renaissance. The main hypothesis here is the following: in

  2. Fictional Names, Fictional Characters and Persons Referred to in Narrative Fiction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koťátko, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2017), s. 308-338 ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : fictional name * literary character * fictional world * pretense Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  3. The effect of span length and girder type on bridge costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batikha Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bridges have an important role in impacting the civilization, growth and economy of cities from ancient time until these days due to their function in reducing transportation cost and time. Therefore, development of bridges has been a knowledge domain in civil engineering studies in terms of their types and construction materials to confirm a reliable, safe, economic design and construction. Girder-bridge of concrete deck and I-beam girder has been used widely for short and medium span bridges because of ease and low-cost of fabrication. However, many theoretical and practical investigations are still undertaken regarding the type of beam girder; i.e steel composite or prestressed concrete. This paper evaluates the effect of bridge span and the type of girder on the capital cost and life cycle costs of bridges. Three types of girders were investigated in this research: steel composite, pre-tensioned pre-stressed concrete and post-tensioned pre-stressed concrete. The structural design was analyzed for 5 span lengths: 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40m. Then, the capital construction cost was accounted for 15 bridges according to each span and construction materials. Moreover, the maintenance required for 50 years of bridge life was evaluated and built up as whole life costs for each bridge. As a result of this study, the influence of both span length and type of girder on initial construction cost and maintenance whole life costs were assessed to support the decision makers and designers in the selection process for the optimum solution of girder bridges.

  4. Approaches to Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    as the approach of genre typology and the concept of evil – seemingly disparate concepts and approaches, but all related to the complex processes in the borderlands between crime fiction and society. Using examples from Scandinavian crime fiction, I discuss whether the growing proximity to international genres......The working paper discusses some of the major approaches to Scandinavian crime fiction in the light of the dominant features of crime culture, e.g. the broad exposure of crime fiction via different platforms and media. In this connection, the concept of mediatization is considered as well......, ways of production and standards increasingly removes Scandinavian crime fiction from its original attractions or not....

  5. Leukocyte telomere length and personality: associations with the Big Five and Type D personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoormans, D; Verhoeven, J E; Denollet, J; van de Poll-Franse, L; Penninx, B W J H

    2018-04-01

    Backgrounds Accelerated cellular ageing, which can be examined by telomere length (TL), may be an overarching mechanism underlying the association between personality and adverse health outcomes. This 6-year longitudinal study examined the relation between personality and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) across time among adults with a wide age-range. Data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety were used and included patients with a depression and/or anxiety disorder and healthy controls. Overall, 2936 persons (18-65 years, 66% female) had data on LTL at baseline and 1883 persons had LTL at 6-year follow-up. The Big Five personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) and Type D personality were assessed. Neuroticism was negatively (B = -2.11, p = 0.03) and agreeableness was positively (B = 3.84, p = 0.03) related to LTL measured across two time points, which became just non-significant after adjusting for somatic health, lifestyle factors, and recent life stress (B = -1.99, p = 0.06; and B = 3.01, p = 0.10). Type D personality was negatively (B = -50.16, p Big Five traits high neuroticism and low agreeableness, and Type D personality were associated with shorter LTL measured across a 6-year period. Associations with the Big Five traits became non-significant after controlling for somatic health, lifestyle factors, and recent life stress, yet similar trends were observed. Type D personality remained independently associated with shorter LTL after full adjustment.

  6. Streetwise Urban Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2006-01-01

    One of the hottest literary phenomena of recent years has been the explosion of what has been variously termed hip-hop, street, or urban fiction. Especially popular with younger African Americans, books in this genre are reaching an increasingly broad readership through ties to hip-hop music and culture. These crime stories generally revolve…

  7. Stranger than fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe - correction: 'our' universe - no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  8. Fictions of Restorative Justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraets, V.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that scholars such as John Braithwaite and Lode Walgrave rely on fictions when presenting their utopian vision of restorative justice. Three claims in particular are shown to be fictitious. Proponents of restorative justice maintain, first, that the offender and the victim

  9. Modern Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Jennie Ora Marriott

    The major prerequisite to studying science fiction as literature is determining the criteria by which it is to be evaluated. A middle ground which recognizes both literary merit and the genre's uniqueness (scientific orientation, dominancy of idea, and interest of speculation) proves to be the most workable approach and stresses the versatility…

  10. Pelvic reference selection in patients with unilateral Crowe type IV DDH for measuring leg length inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Wang, Chenyu; Yang, Modi; Wang, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    We identified the presence of deformities in the affected pelvis of unilateral Crowe type IV DDH patients, and if present, whether the teardrop and ischial lines were parallel with the sacral base line. We also verified whether the sacral base line provided a better pelvic landmark than the teardrop line for determining leg length inequality (LLI). After leveling the pelvis by using a block to lift the short leg, standard anterior-posterior full-length radiography was performed on 10 patients and 10 healthy volunteers as controls. The ratio of pelvic heights on each side of the pelvis, the angles formed by the sacral base line and the other 2 lines between 2 groups were measured. LLI were measured by sacral base line and teardrop line respectively. The ratio between the pelvic heights was lower in the patient group than in the control group (0.95 versus 0.99). The angles between the teardrop and ischial lines and the sacral base line in the patient group were both greater than in the control group (6.08° versus 0.92° and 7.13° versus 0.97°). LLI measured from the sacral base line was larger than from the teardrop line in the patient group (5.55 cm versus 4.36 cm). There was pelvic asymmetry and the sacral base line was not parallel with the other 2 lines in unilateral Crowe type IV DDH. The leveled sacral base line was perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body, and may be a better choice for accurate LLI measurement in this situation.

  11. Increased nuchal translucency and short femur length as possible early signs of osteogenesis imperfecta type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimercati, Antonella; Panzarino, Mariantonietta; Totaro, Ilaria; Chincoli, Annarosa; Selvaggi, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    this paper reports an association between an increased Nuchal Translucency (NT) and Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a type of skeletal dysplasia. Measurement of fetal NT at 10-14 weeks of gestation is a sensitive and effective screening method for chromosomal abnormalities. a 35-year- old Caucasian woman in her fourth pregnancy was referred to our clinic for an ultrasound scan at 12 weeks of gestation, that confirmed increased Nuchal Translucency. Chorionic villi sampling was performed, showing a normal karyotype. The patient was evaluated by a team of experienced ultra sonographers for pregnancy follow-up at our Department, that is a tertiary center. in our case the ultrasound scan at 12 week of gestation revealed only an increased NT (3 mm). Cytogenetic analysis on chorionic villi demonstrated a normal male karyotype. US follow-up, performed every 3-4 weeks, confirmed normal anthropometric parameters except for shortening of both femurs, but at 23 weeks an incorrect attitude of the feet was revealed. A clinical and radiographic diagnosis of OI type III was made only at birth, and through follow-up continuing to date. NT screening was successful for chromosomal abnormalities at 11-14 weeks of gestation. An increased NT thickness is also associated with numerous fetal anomalies and genetic syndromes in a chromosomally normal fetus. In our case there were no sonographic signs of imperfect osteogenesis in the first trimester, although there was an increased NT with a normal karyotype. currently, in literature, there are not other cases of OI type III associated with an increased NT. Our report is the first to suggest an association between an increased nuchal translucency, short femur length and osteogenesis imperfecta type III.

  12. Religion in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    Scandinavian media where religion has become mediatized. Consumers of popular culture no longer endorse confidence in institutionalized religion, but that does not mean that people are losing faith: Faith only seem to adjust itself and tiptoe into popular media and popular fiction. Hence, this paper seeks......In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  13. Crime fiction and mediatized religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    Scandinavian media where religion has become mediatized. Consumers of popular culture no longer endorse confidence in institutionalized religion, but that does not mean that people are losing faith: Faith only seems to adjust itself and tiptoe into popular media and popular fiction. Hence, this paper seeks......In recent Scandinavian crime fiction an ongoing discussion on religion and religiosity is taking place. This undercurrent goes historically a long way back, but the past few decades seem to have left room for an altered view on religion in modern crime fiction. Crime fiction has usually been...... into popular crime fiction. In novels by Arne Dahl, Henning Mortensen, Gunnar Staalesen, A.J. Kazinski, Gretelise Holm and several other Scandinavian writers of crime fiction it is possible to locate an interest in theology and topics of religious philosophy which reflects this current trend in modern...

  14. The Effect of Culture Type on the Length of Persian Proverbs Compared to their English Equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohammadian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interrelation of culture and language is to the extent that many classifications of culture are based on linguistic factors. In this article, high and low context cultures division is assessed on English and Persian as they belong to different cultural types. Forty Persian proverbs are contrasted with their equivalents in English to investigate whether there is a difference in the number of word forms used in each. In order to avoid linguistic differences which are effective in enumerating word forms, the second lines in linguistic glosses provided for Persian proverbs including a one to one correspondence of each word in English are used to count word forms. Results show that 70 percent of the Persian proverbs in the data are longer than their English counterparts. This shows that relative length of proverbs can be a distinguishing factor reflecting cultural types. The results not only confirm the applicability of this cultural division in the field of proverbs, but also a matter of tendency rather than a dichotomy in belonging to a high or low context culture is proposed. At the end, there are suggestions for further relevant investigations.

  15. Estimating Length of Stay by Patient Type in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry C; Bennett, Mihoko V; Schulman, Joseph; Gould, Jeffrey B; Profit, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    Objective Develop length of stay prediction models for neonatal intensive care unit patients. Study Design We used data from 2008 to 2010 to construct length of stay models for neonates admitted within 1 day of age to neonatal intensive care units and surviving to discharge home. Results Our sample included 23,551 patients. Median length of stay was 79 days when birth weight was g. Risk factors for longer length of stay varied by weight. Units with shorter length of stay for one weight group had shorter lengths of stay for other groups. Conclusion Risk models for comparative assessments of length of stay need to appropriately account for weight, particularly considering the cutoff of 1,500 g. Refining prediction may benefit counseling of families and health care systems to efficiently allocate resources. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. The Comparison of Typed and Handwritten Essays of Iranian EFL Students in terms of Length, Spelling, and Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Sarbakhshian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to compare typed and handwritten essays of Iranian EFL students in terms of length, spelling, and grammar. To administer the study, the researchers utilized Alice Touch Typing Tutor software to select 15 upper intermediate students with higher ability to write two essays: one typed and the other handwritten. The students were both males and females between the ages of 22 to 35. The analyses of the students’ scores in the three mentioned criteria through three paired samples t-tests indicate that typed essays are significantly better than handwritten ones in terms of length of texts and grammatical mistakes, but not significantly different in spelling mistakes. Positive effects of typing can provide a logical reason for students, especially TOEFL applicants, to spend more time on acquiring typing skill and also for teachers to encourage their students with higher typing ability to choose typed format in their essays.

  17. Fiction Is Truth, and Sometimes Truth Is Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Carol Lakey

    2008-01-01

    The art of fiction tells truth because it is the truth of life that goes into making good fiction: love, hate, fear, courage, delight, sorrow, betrayal, loyalty, confusion, choice, circumstance, luck, injustice. These essential qualities, says the author, are also the qualities of sound theology, with a sense of time and place; and raising…

  18. The Role of Narrative Fiction and Semi-Fiction in Organizational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteman, Gail; Phillips, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the use of narrative fiction and semi-fiction in organizational research and explore the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches. We begin with an introduction reviewing the existing literature and clarifying what we mean by fiction and semi-fiction. We then present and discuss examples of fiction and semi-fiction focusing on how these approaches can be used in organizational research. We argue that fiction is more useful as a source of...

  19. Desperate Housewives – fiction de toutes les fictions

    OpenAIRE

    Cros, Renan

    2016-01-01

    Fiction de toutes les fictions, Desperate Housewives, entre ironie et empathie, accumule et désarticule les codes du soap opera pour mettre sur l’écran l’imaginaire d’une nation. À partir d’un récit balisé, la série fait de la répétition un mode de lecture. Répétition des situations mais aussi répétition de fictions préexistantes, Desperate Housewives fait du feuilleton l’art de la répétition en célébrant la culture populaire américaine. Fiction of all fictions, Desperate Housewives, betwe...

  20. Literary Fiction Influences Attitudes Toward Animal Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecki, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Bogusław; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Literary fiction has been credited with considerable power to improve attitudes toward outgroups. It was even argued that it has been an important factor behind the global decline of violence against various minorities in the last centuries. Could it also help to reduce the human-inflicted suffering of animals? To test this, we studied the attitude toward animal welfare of n = 921 (experimental group) people of both sexes who read a short fragment of an unpublished novel with a motif of the physical abuse of an animal. The control group (n = 912) read a fragment of a similar length but not related to animals. After reading the text all subjects filled out an on-line questionnaire with seven items (camouflaged among many others items) measuring attitudes toward animal welfare. The questionnaire included also demographical questions, such as whether the subject keeps pets. We found that in comparison with the control group, the experimental group was significantly more concerned about animal welfare. This result indicates that literary fiction can influence attitudes toward other species. It is also worth noting that our study is characterized by a high level of ecological validity, i.e. a relatively high extent to which its results can be generalized (or extended) to real-world settings. Due to its specific design, which involved the cooperation of a bestselling author and his publisher, the study approximated the typical conditions in which people read fiction in a remarkably accurate way. Finally, our research has potential practical implications for promoting animal welfare.

  1. The Return of Historical Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycik, Mary Taylor; Rosler, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Recently, historical fiction has begun to dominate major children's book awards. This article describes the values of using high-quality historical fiction in the classroom and presents different ways to respond to this genre including using modern technology. Two tables, one of picture books and one of novels, with paired nonfiction texts, are…

  2. Crime fiction and moral emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    typology of moral systems and how different stages relate to different social systems. Further, a functional description of the various moral emotions is used to characterize crime fictions. The use of moral emotions in crime fiction is exemplified in Oplev’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), angry...

  3. The role of science fiction within the fluidity of slipstream literature

    OpenAIRE

    Janez Steble

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the complex and contradictory role of science fiction in slipstream, the type of postmodern non-realistic literature situated between the fantastic genres and the mainstream literary fiction. Because of its unstable status of occupying an interstitial position between multiple literary conventions, the article first deals with an expansive terminology affiliated with slipstream and elucidates upon using a unified term for it. Avantpop, transrealism, and interstitial fiction...

  4. Postsecularism in Scandinavian Crime Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the postsecular turn in Scandinavian crime fiction. Postsecularism describes a renewed openness towards questions of spirituality, while maintaining the practice of critical scrutiny. Since 2000, we have seen an intensive increase in the number of titles treating religion and....../or spirituality in a way which differs from the genre’s usual approach. Firstly, I will frame the traditional attitude towards religion in crime fiction by Scandinavian welfare modernity, outlining the conspicuous absence of religion in the genre. Secondly, I propose a typology of the treatment of religion...... in crime fiction. My examples are all taken from the vast corpus of contemporary Scandinavian crime fiction, but it would be rather unproblematic to stretch the scope of the theory to an analysis of western crime fiction in general. Within this typology, I will introduce the phenomenon of a religious...

  5. Literacy competence based on fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    tool towards children's general Bildung and more specific development of literacy competence in the first years of school, in 2007 we carried out an investigation about fiction as a part of mother-tongue teaching and the process of children's learning to read. Via the investigation and general studies...... we want to get more knowledge ablout following questions:   How to define fiction which holds a personal and language "Bildung"? How to define the importance of fiction related to children's literacy competence? What kind of fiction do teachers use? How do teachers mediate fiction, how and in what...... extend do teachers make use of drawing and play activities? How to find a balance between to maintain the aesthetical and narrative methods and expressions AND gaining a literacy competence?   This paper has focus on the fourth question....

  6. Testimony, Documentary, Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Lauge

    2017-01-01

    discourses and media from the feminist movement in the 1980s and until today, through which oral testimony and the losing part of the population’s “forgotten” memories are turned into docu-fiction and fictionalised documentary with the purpose of reading history against the grain and presenting memory...... to the memory of the Civil War and Francoist repression: the detective plot, the divided plotline between present and past, and metafictional reflections. But what role did it actually play in the development of the case of the stolen children? This paper studies the relation between different social discourses...

  7. Science or Science Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefsrud, Lianne M.; Meyer, Renate

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the framings and identity work associated with professionals’ discursive construction of climate change science, their legitimation of themselves as experts on ‘the truth’, and their attitudes towards regulatory measures. Drawing from survey responses of 1077 professional......, legitimation strategies, and use of emotionality and metaphor. By linking notions of the science or science fiction of climate change to the assessment of the adequacy of global and local policies and of potential organizational responses, we contribute to the understanding of ‘defensive institutional work...

  8. Fictional Names, Fictional Characters and Persons Referred to in Narrative Fiction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koťátko, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2017), s. 308-338 ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : fictional name * literary character * fictional world * pretense Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion OBOR OECD: Philosophy, History and Philosophy of science and technology

  9. On Sequence Lengths of Some Special External Exclusive OR Type LFSR Structures – Study and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the length of pseudo-random binary sequences generated by Linear- Feedback Shift Registers (LFSRs plays an important role in the design approaches of built-in selftest, cryptosystems, and other applications. However, certain LFSR structures might not be appropriate in some situations. Given that determining the length of generated pseudo-random binary sequence is a complex task, therefore, before using an LFSR structure, it is essential to investigate the length and the properties of the sequence. This paper investigates some conditions and LFSR’s structures, which restrict the pseudo-random binary sequences’ generation to a certain fixed length. The outcomes of this paper are presented in the form of theorems, simulations, and analyses. We believe that these outcomes are of great importance to the designers of built-in self-test equipment, cryptosystems, and other applications such as radar, CDMA, error correction, and Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  11. Science Fiction: A Collection of Critical Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Mark, Ed.

    The articles collected in this volume focus on the literary genre science fiction. Part one, "Backgrounds," includes "Starting Points" (Kingsley Amis), "Science Fiction and Literature" (Robert Conquest), and "The Roots of Science Fiction" (Robert Scholes). Part two, "Theory," contains "On the Poetics of the Science Fiction Genre" (Darko Suvin),…

  12. HLA-DPB1 typing with polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Madsen, H O; Morling, N

    1992-01-01

    We have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique for HLA-DBP1 typing. After PCR amplification of the polymorphic second exon of the HLA-DPB1 locus, the PCR product was digested with seven allele-specific restriction...

  13. Effects of exposure to literary narrative fiction : From book smart to street smart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Mulder, H.N.M.; Hakemulder, F.; van den Berghe, Rianne; Klaassen, F.; van Berkum, J.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Literary narrative fiction may be particularly effective in enhancing Theory of Mind (ToM), as it requires readers to contemplate author and character intentions in filling the literary ‘gaps’ that have been suggested to characterise this fiction type. The current study investigates direct and

  14. Selection of optimal dental implant diameter and length in type IV bone: a three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T; Kong, L; Wang, Y; Hu, K; Song, L; Liu, B; Li, D; Shao, J; Ding, Y

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed to create a 3D finite element model for continuous variation of implant diameter and length, thereby identifying their optimal range in type IV bone under biomechanical consideration. Implant diameter ranged from 3.0 to 5.0mm, and implant length ranged from 6.0 to 14.0mm. The results suggest that under axial load, the maximum Von Mises stresses in cortical and cancellous bones decrease by 50% and 27%, respectively; and under buccolingual load, by 52% and 60%, respectively. Under these two loads, the maximum displacements of implant-abutment complex decrease by 39% and 43%, respectively. These results indicate that in type IV bone, implant length is more crucial in reducing bone stress and enhancing the stability of implant-abutment complex than implant diameter. Biomechanically, implant diameter exceeding 4.0mm and implant length exceeding 9.0mm are the combination with optimal properties for a screwed implant in type IV bone.

  15. Crime fiction and moral emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2011-01-01

    The article first discusses how crime fiction centrally activates moral emotions related to feelings of social trust and social conflicts. The article uses psychological theory to analyse audio-visual fiction, and it takes an evolutionary stance in relation to morality; within film studies......, and especially within literary studies, the inspiration from evolutionary studies has been strong in the last decade. Humans are adapted to group living, and emotions linked to fairness have an innate basis. The article then shows how different crime stories activate different stages in Kohlberg’s functional...... typology of moral systems and how different stages relate to different social systems. Further, a functional description of the various moral emotions is used to characterize crime fictions. The use of moral emotions in crime fiction is exemplified in Oplev’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2009), angry...

  16. High on Crime Fiction and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the psychological and neurological underpinnings of crime fiction and discusses the interrelation between cultural and biological-evolutionary determinants of fictions of detection. It argues that although crime fiction is a product of modern life conditions, it is also...... how crime fiction activates strong salience (in some respects similar to the effect of dopamine-drugs like cocaine, Ritalin, and amphetamine) and discusses the role of social intelligence in crime fiction. It further contrasts the unempathic classical detector fictions with two subtypes of crime...... fiction that blend seeking with other emotions: the hardboiled crime fiction that blends detection with action and hot emotions like anger and bonding, and the moral crime fiction that strongly evokes moral disgust and contempt, often in conjunction with detectors that perform hard to fake signals...

  17. The cognitive science of fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, Keith

    2012-07-01

    Fiction might be dismissed as observations that lack reliability and validity, but this would be a misunderstanding. Works of fiction are simulations that run on minds. They were the first kinds of simulation. All art has a metaphorical quality: a painting can be both pigments on canvas and a person. In literary art, this quality extends to readers who can be both themselves and, by empathetic processes within a simulation, also literary characters. On the basis of this hypothesis, it was found that the more fiction people read the better were their skills of empathy and theory-of-mind; the inference from several studies is that reading fiction improves social skills. In functional magnetic resonance imaging meta-analyses, brain areas concerned with understanding narrative stories were found to overlap with those concerned with theory-of-mind. In an orthogonal effect, reading artistic literature was found to enable people to change their personality by small increments, not by a writer's persuasion, but in their own way. This effect was due to artistic merit of a text, irrespective of whether it was fiction or non-fiction. An empirically based conception of literary art might be carefully constructed verbal material that enables self-directed personal change. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:425-430. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1185 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Anthropological reading of science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Gavrilović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the prevalence of the analysis of science fiction literature and science fiction in other segments of popular culture in Serbian anthropology. This overview is preceded by a consideration of science fiction as a genre while keeping in mind the fluidity of the genre and the interweaving of subgenres as well as the transformations which science fiction is undergoing in certain media (books, films, TV shows and video games. In Serbian anthropology research on science fiction is more prevalent than the study of other phenomena, as the number of anthropologists whose work is represented in the paper is fairly large compared to the size of the anthropological community as a whole. The causes for this can primarily be found in a collective focus on questions such as: who are we and who the others are, what the basis of creating and building identity is or what the role of context in recognition of species is. Anthropology gives answers to these questions through the interpretation, explanation and understanding of the world around us, while science fiction does it through the literary considerations of these same questions.

  19. The history of science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This book is the definitive critical history of science fiction. The 2006 first edition of this work traced the development of the genre from Ancient Greece and the European Reformation through to the end of the 20th century. This new 2nd edition has been revised thoroughly and very significantly expanded. An all-new final chapter discusses 21st-century science fiction, and there is new material in every chapter: a wealth of new readings and original research. The author’s groundbreaking thesis that science fiction is born out of the 17th-century Reformation is here bolstered with a wide range of new supporting material and many hundreds of 17th- and 18th-century science fiction texts, some of which have never been discussed before. The account of 19th-century science fiction has been expanded, and the various chapters tracing the twentieth-century bring in more writing by women, and science fiction in other media including cinema, TV, comics, fan-culture and other modes.

  20. The effect of post type and length on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, John D; McLaren, Charles I; Yaman, Peter; Bin-Shuwaish, Mohammed S; Dennison, Joseph D; McDonald, Neville J

    2009-03-01

    Few studies have been conducted to determine a correlation between the flexural modulus of metal and fiber-reinforced posts and the fracture resistance and failure mode of teeth restored with posts. Questions remain as to whether a longer post length or a post with a higher flexural modulus will significantly improve the fracture resistance of a tooth restored with a prefabricated post and core. The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with 3 different post systems, including 2 fiber-reinforced posts (Light-Post and Snowlight) and a stainless steel post (ParaPost XP). Seventy single-rooted premolars were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction and then endodontically treated. Teeth were distributed into 7 groups. Three different prefabricated posts were cemented into a post space either 5 or 10 mm in depth, and composite resin (ParaPost ParaCore automix) cores were fabricated. A composite resin core group without a post served as a negative control. Specimens were loaded at 90 degrees to the longitudinal axis until ultimate failure occurred. An initial failure load and mode of failure were also recorded. Statistical analysis was performed for initial and ultimate failure loads of groups by using 2-way ANOVA (P=.05). The groups with ParaPost XP posts demonstrated significantly higher initial and ultimate mean failure loads when compared with the fiber-reinforced post groups. The highest mean (SD) initial failure load was with the ParaPost XP group with a 10-mm post length (170.05 (60.08) N), and the lowest was with the Snowlight group with the 5-mm post length (62.85 (18.47) N). The stiffness and the load to initial fracture of the teeth restored with ParaPost XP posts were higher compared with the fiber-reinforced post groups.

  1. Literary Fiction Influences Attitudes Toward Animal Welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Małecki

    Full Text Available Literary fiction has been credited with considerable power to improve attitudes toward outgroups. It was even argued that it has been an important factor behind the global decline of violence against various minorities in the last centuries. Could it also help to reduce the human-inflicted suffering of animals? To test this, we studied the attitude toward animal welfare of n = 921 (experimental group people of both sexes who read a short fragment of an unpublished novel with a motif of the physical abuse of an animal. The control group (n = 912 read a fragment of a similar length but not related to animals. After reading the text all subjects filled out an on-line questionnaire with seven items (camouflaged among many others items measuring attitudes toward animal welfare. The questionnaire included also demographical questions, such as whether the subject keeps pets. We found that in comparison with the control group, the experimental group was significantly more concerned about animal welfare. This result indicates that literary fiction can influence attitudes toward other species. It is also worth noting that our study is characterized by a high level of ecological validity, i.e. a relatively high extent to which its results can be generalized (or extended to real-world settings. Due to its specific design, which involved the cooperation of a bestselling author and his publisher, the study approximated the typical conditions in which people read fiction in a remarkably accurate way. Finally, our research has potential practical implications for promoting animal welfare.

  2. Lack of association of colonic epithelium telomere length and oxidative DNA damage in Type 2 diabetes under good metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Hugh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeres are DNA repeat sequences necessary for DNA replication which shorten at cell division at a rate directly related to levels of oxidative stress. Critical telomere shortening predisposes to cell senescence and to epithelial malignancies. Type 2 diabetes is characterised by increased oxidative DNA damage, telomere attrition, and an increased risk of colonic malignancy. We hypothesised that the colonic mucosa in Type 2 diabetes would be characterised by increased DNA damage and telomere shortening. Methods We examined telomere length (by flow fluorescent in situ hybridization and oxidative DNA damage (flow cytometry of 8 – oxoguanosine in the colonic mucosal cells of subjects with type 2 diabetes (n = 10; mean age 62.2 years, mean HbA1c 6.9% and 22 matched control subjects. No colonic pathology was apparent in these subjects at routine gastrointestinal investigations. Results Mean colonic epithelial telomere length in the diabetes group was not significantly different from controls (10.6 [3.6] vs. 12.1 [3.4] Molecular Equivalent of Soluble Fluorochrome Units [MESF]; P = 0.5. Levels of oxidative DNA damage were similar in both T2DM and control groups (2.6 [0.6] vs. 2.5 [0.6] Mean Fluorescent Intensity [MFI]; P = 0.7. There was no significant relationship between oxidative DNA damage and telomere length in either group (both p > 0.1. Conclusion Colonic epithelium in Type 2 diabetes does not differ significantly from control colonic epithelium in oxidative DNA damage or telomere length. There is no evidence in this study for increased oxidative DNA damage or significant telomere attrition in colonic mucosa as a carcinogenic mechanism.

  3. The Modernization of a Long-Focal Length Fringe-Type Laser Velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Fletcher, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    A long-focal length laser velocimeter constructed in the early 1980's was upgraded using current technology to improve usability, reliability and future serviceability. The original, free-space optics were replaced with a state-of-the-art fiber-optic subsystem which allowed most of the optics, including the laser, to be remote from the harsh tunnel environment. General purpose high-speed digitizers were incorporated in a standard modular data acquisition system, along with custom signal processing software executed on a desktop computer, served as the replacement for the signal processors. The resulting system increased optical sensitivity with real-time signal/data processing that produced measurement precisions exceeding those of the original system. Monte Carlo simulations, along with laboratory and wind tunnel investigations were used to determine system characteristics and measurement precision.

  4. Restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of infectious bursal disease virus field strains in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareyyüpoğlu, B; Akan, M

    2006-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD), also known as Gumboro disease, is a highly contagious, immunosuppressive disease of immature chickens. It is caused by IBD virus (IBDV) and is responsible for major economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, 280 bursa samples from 56 commercially reared chicken flocks in Turkey with clinical symptoms of IBD were examined for IBDVs using the reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay. The assay was conducted on a 743-bp fragment of the VP2 gene with the restriction enzymes BstNI, MboI, and SspI. The results indicate the existence of field isolates with new molecular patterns different from those previously published that may well be unique and specific to geographical regions.

  5. Science Fiction: Better than Delphi Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Milton T.

    1994-01-01

    Considers science fiction as a literary genre and as a predictor of technological advances, particularly in the information industry. An annotated bibliography is included of 11 science fiction titles and 1 nonfiction book that suggest possible information futures. (LRW)

  6. "Dreams Written Out": Libraries in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, James

    1995-01-01

    Through various classic texts, this article examines the concept of "library" and the many forms in which libraries are portrayed in science fiction. A sidebar contains a bibliography of recent anthologies of science fiction stories and novellas. (AEF)

  7. Description of fiction in Wikipedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Šauperl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject description of fiction in the Slovenian Cooperative On-line Bibliographic Database (COBIB is still inadequate. Participation in COBIB is granted to librarians who have successfully passed the exam. As a consequence, the number of contributing librarians is limited. However, all Slovenian librarians can collaborate in the Slovenian Wikipedia. Slovenian and foreign library science researchers have proposed the structure of subject description of fiction. An analysis of articles describing nine works of fiction in five wikipedias (English, French, Spanish, Croatian and Slovenian has shown new characteristics. Drawing on these findings, a suggestion of an optimal structure is made. An article describing a work of fiction should begin with a general introductory statement comprising the name of the author, his/her nationality and genre.Translators and original title should be written if a translation is presented. Illustrators and other contributors, the background and other specific information on the work should be added if relevant. The main body of the text should be structured in the following chapters: 1 contents, 2 collection, 3 reviews and awards, 4 editions and translations, 5 adaptations, 6 see also, 7 links and 8 sources. An "infobox: book" with Slovenian adaptation and relevant categories should be inserted. Copying these Wikipedia articles into the library catalogue would enhance subject description and provide better subject access to fiction.

  8. THE COMMUNICATIVE RELEVANCE IN FICTIONAL DISCOURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Godoy,Elena; Ferreira,Rodrigo Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Searle (1975) evidenced two programmatic questions about the logic of fictional discourse: why evolution would have selected fiction as a cross-cultural behavior and what enables an author to use words literally without committing to their literal meanings in fictional communication. Ferreira (in press) argues that part of the problem lies on a Searle's conception that by violating the logical rules of assertive sentences, the fictional communication constitutes itself as parasitic ordinary l...

  9. Conjugation Length Effect on TPA-Based Optical Limiting Performance of a Series of Ladder-Type Chromophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical properties of a series of newly-synthesized ladder-type chromophores containing oligo-p-phenylene moiety with different π-conjugated lengths were theoretically studied by numerically solving the rate equations and the field intensity equation with an iterative predictor-corrector finite-difference time-domain technique. Ab initio calculation results show that the compounds can be described by the three-level model. Based on the two-photon absorption mechanism, highly efficient optical limiting performances are demonstrated in the chromophores, which strongly depend on the π-conjugated length of the molecule. Special attention has been paid to the dynamical two-photon absorption, indicating that the parameter of the medium can affect the dynamical two-photon absorption cross section. Our numerical results agree well with the experimental measurements. It reveals that the increase in the π-conjugated length of ladder-type oligo-p-phenylene for these chromophores leads to enhanced nonlinear optical absorption. The results also provide a method to modulate the optical limiting and dynamical two-photon absorption of the compounds by changing the molecular density and thickness of the absorber.

  10. Science Fiction: Serious Reading, Critical Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigo, Diane; Moore, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Science fiction deserves a greater respect, serious and critical reading and a better place in high school literature classes. Some of the science fiction books by Isaac Asimov, Alfred Bester, Ray Bradbury and Octavia L. Butler and various activities for incorporating science fiction into the English language arts instruction classroom are…

  11. A Guide to Teaching Creative Writing: Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Linda, Ed.; And Others

    Intended for both elementary and secondary school teachers who have little or no experience in teaching creative fiction writing, this booklet presents sample lesson plans for writing short stories, fables, myths, mysteries, science fiction, and historical fiction. The lesson plans discuss such elements as plot, setting, characterization, mood,…

  12. Synthesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 neoglycoproteins varying in oligosaccharide chain length, loading and carrier protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Lefeber, D.J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation is described of a range of neoglycoproteins containing synthesised fragments of the capsular polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3, that is beta-D-GlcpA-(1->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1->O)-(CH2)3NH2 (1), beta-D-Glcp-(1->3)-beta-D-GlcpA-(1->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1->O)-(CH2)3NH2 (2), and

  13. Adaptation of fictional and online conversations to communication media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alis, C. M.; Lim, M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Conversations allow the quick transfer of short bits of information and it is reasonable to expect that changes in communication medium affect how we converse. Using conversations in works of fiction and in an online social networking platform, we show that the utterance length of conversations is slowly shortening with time but adapts more strongly to the constraints of the communication medium. This indicates that the introduction of any new medium of communication can affect the way natural language evolves.

  14. M protein typing of Thai group A streptococcal isolates by PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Good Michael F

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A streptococcal (GAS infections can lead to the development of severe post-infectious sequelae, such as rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD. RF and RHD are a major health concern in developing countries, and in indigenous populations of developed nations. The majority of GAS isolates are M protein-nontypeable (MNT by standard serotyping. However, GAS typing is a necessary tool in the epidemiologically analysis of GAS and provides useful information for vaccine development. Although DNA sequencing is the most conclusive method for M protein typing, this is not a feasible approach especially in developing countries. To overcome this problem, we have developed a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP-based assay for molecular typing the M protein gene (emm of GAS. Results Using one pair of primers, 13 known GAS M types showed one to four bands of PCR products and after digestion with Alu I, they gave different RFLP patterns. Of 106 GAS isolates examined from the normal Thai population and from patients with GAS-associated complications including RHD, 95 isolates gave RFLP patterns that corresponded to the 13 known M types. Only 11 isolates gave RFLP patterns that differed from the 13 known M types. These were then analyzed by DNA sequencing and six additional M types were identified. In addition, we found that M93 GAS was the most common M type in the population studied, and is consistent with a previous study of Thai GAS isolates. Conclusion PCR-RFLP analysis has the potential for the rapid screening of different GAS M types and is therefore considerably advantageous as an alternative M typing approach in developing countries in which GAS is endemic.

  15. Genotypic characterization of Salmonella by multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpdahl, Mia; Skov, Marianne N.; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    subspecies enterica isolates. A total of 25 serotypes were investigated that had been isolated from humans or veterinary sources in Denmark between 1995 and 2001. All isolates were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and amplified fragment length...... polymorphism (AFLP). When making genetic trees, all three methods resulted in similar clustering that often corresponded with serotype, although some serotypes displayed more diversity than others. Of the three techniques, MLST was the easiest to interpret and compare between laboratories. Unfortunately...

  16. The in-vitro response of pollen germination and tube length to different types of acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, E; Bellani, L M

    1990-01-01

    Pollen germination and tube growth are among the most sensitive responses to atmospheric pollution. Both these are inhibited by the acidity of the growth medium. Pollen grains from two species (Pinus cembra L. and Sambucus nigra L.) were germinated in media over a range of pHs (5.0, 4.5, 4.0, 3.5, 3.0 and 2.5) and six types of acidity (H(2)SO(4), HNO(3), H(2)SO(4): HNO(3) in 1:1, 2:1, 3:1 and 5:1 ratio). Pollen of the Gymnosperm is shown to be more resistant to acidity in the medium. Sulphuric acid alone and the ratio 2:1 with nitric acid are demonstrated to be the more harmful for P. cembra and S. nigra, respectively. The latter species was sensitive to all mixtures, particularly in respect to germination percentage.

  17. Type III secretion as a generalizable strategy for the production of full-length biopolymer-forming proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Anum; Li, Cheng; Metcalf, Kevin J; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-11-01

    Biopolymer-forming proteins are integral in the development of customizable biomaterials, but recombinant expression of these proteins is challenging. In particular, biopolymer-forming proteins have repetitive, glycine-rich domains and, like many heterologously expressed proteins, are prone to incomplete translation, aggregation, and proteolytic degradation in the production host. This necessitates tailored purification processes to isolate each full-length protein of interest from the truncated forms as well as other contaminating proteins; owing to the repetitive nature of these proteins, the truncated polypeptides can have very similar chemistry to the full-length form and are difficult to separate from the full-length protein. We hypothesized that bacterial expression and secretion would be a promising alternative option for biomaterials-forming proteins, simplifying isolation of the full-length target protein. By using a selective secretion system, truncated forms of the protein are not secreted and thus are not found in the culture harvest. We show that a synthetically upregulated type III secretion system leads to a general increase in secretion titer for each protein that we tested. Moreover, we observe a substantial enhancement in the homogeneity of full-length forms of pro-resilin, tropo-elastin crosslinking domains, and silk proteins produced in this manner, as compared with proteins purified from the cytosol. Secretion via the type III apparatus limits co-purification of truncated forms of the target protein and increases protein purity without extensive purification steps. Demonstrating the utility of such a system, we introduce several modifications to resilin-based peptides and use an un-optimized, single-column process to purify these proteins. The resulting materials are of sufficiently high quantity and yield for the production of antimicrobial hydrogels with highly reproducible rheological properties. The ease of this process and its

  18. Strain: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée

    2017-04-01

    2017 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of John Ramsay's well known textbook "Folding and Fracturing of Rocks" - ... and the 30th anniversary of the rejection of a rather less well known paper entitled "Strain: Fact or Fiction?" submitted by Renée Panozzo to the Journal of Structural Geology. The gist of the paper was simple and straight forward: it was argued that not every fabric that can be observed in deformed rocks is necessarily a measure of the amount of strain the rock incurred. A distinction was made between a general "fabric", i.e., the traceable geometry of grain boundaries, for example, and a so-called "strain fabric", i.e., the model geometry that would result from homogeneously straining an initially isotropic fabric and that would exhibit at least orthorhombic symmetry. To verify if a given fabric was indeed a strain fabric it was therefore suggested to use the SURFOR method (published by Panozzo) and to carry out a so-called strain test, i.e., a check of symmetry, before interpreting the results of a fabric analysis in terms of strain. The problem with the paper was that it was very obviously written out of frustration. The frustration came form having reviewed a number of manuscripts which tried to use the then novel SURFOR method for strain analysis without first checking if the the fabric was a indeed a "strain fabric" or not, and then blaming the SURFOR method for producing ambiguous results. As a result, the paper was not exactly well balanced and carefully thought out. It was considered "interesting but not scholarly" by one of the reviewers and down-right offensive by the second. To tell the truth, however, the paper was not formally rejected. The editor Sue Treagus strongly encouraged Panozzo to revise the paper, ... and 30 years later, I will follow her advise and offer a revised paper as a tribute to John Ramsay. To quote from the original manuscript: "We should be a little more impressed that strain works so well, and less

  19. Subjectivity in Children's Fictional Narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Lynne E.; Duchan, Judith Felson

    1995-01-01

    The literature on how children begin understanding subjectivity and point of view in fictional stories is considered. Examination of the oral stories of a five-year-old child indicated the ability to depict the beliefs, intentions, feelings, and perceptions of the story characters. Implications for assessment and interventions to help children…

  20. The Science in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Peter, Ed.

    This 12-chapter book discusses the scientific facts behind the ideas included in the novels of Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, Frederik Pohl, Arthur C. Clark and other science fiction writers. Areas explored in the first 11 chapters include: exploration of deep space; energy and exotic power sources; likelihood of extra-terrestrial life and the…

  1. Fictions of Ambivalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    unconscious of suppressed guilt and anxiety, or it can be dealt with as a general way of delivering social critique through fiction. Nevertheless, the order of society and the democratic scenery is, in the narrative, muddled by religious problems with Christian roots. Correspondingly, this paper reflects upon...

  2. Science Fiction in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Mark; Thornton, Rosi

    2003-01-01

    Considers science fiction as an imaginative forum to focus on the relationships between science, culture, and society. Outlines some of the ways in which using the genre can help achieve a dynamic and pluralistic understanding of the nature and evolution of science. (Author/KHR)

  3. Energy supplies: facts and fiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, P.R.

    1991-12-01

    A brief review of fictional ideas and fallacies which have supported Western European governmental energy policies for the last twenty years shows how much damage misunderstanding of Europe's indigenous energy supply potential relative to reasonable demand expectations has caused to our economies.

  4. Fictional Narrative as Speech Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Miles A.

    The issue addressed in this paper is the relationship between form in fictional prose and form in other uses of language, particularly those uses important in composition theory. Form in composition theory has traditionally had two ways of identifying units of analysis: (1) the sentence and semantic units, and (2) pragmatic and rhetorical units.…

  5. The material co-construction of hard science fiction and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-12-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of doing science. There are many kinds of fiction within the science fiction genre. In the presented empirical exploration physics students seem particularly fond of what is called `hard science fiction': a particular type of science fiction dealing with technological developments (Hartwell and Cramer in The hard SF renaissance, Orb/TOR, New York, 2002). Especially hard science fiction as a motivating fantasy may, however, also come with a gender bias. The locally materialized techno-fantasies spurring dreams of the terraforming of planets like Mars and travels in time and space may not be shared by all physics students. Especially female students express a need for other concerns in science. The entanglement of physics with hard science fiction may thus help develop some students' interest in learning school physics and help create an interest for studying physics at university level. But research indicates that especially female students are not captured by the hard techno-fantasies to the same extent as some of their male colleagues. Other visions (e.g. inspired by soft science fiction) are not materialized as a resource in the local educational culture. It calls for an argument of how teaching science is also teaching cultural values, ethics and concerns, which may be gendered. Teaching materials, like the use of hard science fiction in education, may not just be (yet another) gender bias in science education but also carrier of particular visions for scientific endeavours.

  6. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byoung Rib; Park, Chang Seo

    1998-01-01

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows ; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 ± 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 ± 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 ± 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p 0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm margin of error. 3. In determining whether the thickness of

  7. The Accuracy of the Digital imaging system and the frequency dependent type apex locator in root canal length measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byoung Rib; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    In order to achieve a successful endodontic treatment, root canals must be obturated three-dimensionally without causing any damage to apical tissues. Accurate length determination of the root canal is critical in this case. For this reason, I've used the conventional periapical radiography, Digora (digital imaging system) and Root ZX (the frequency dependent type apex locator) to measure the length of the canal and compare it with the true length obtained by cutting the tooth in half and measuring the length between the occlusal surface and the apical foramen. From the information obtained by these measurements, I was able to evaluate the accuracy and clinical usefulness of each systems, whether the thickness of files used in endodontic therapy has any effect on the measuring systems was also evaluated in an effort to simplify the treatment planning phase of endodontic treatment. 29 canals of 29 sound premolars were measured with no 15, no 20, no 25 files by 3 different dentists each using the periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX. The measurements were then compared with the true length. The results were as follows; 1. In comparing mean discrepancies between measurements obtained by using periapical radiography (mean error : -0.449 {+-} 0.444 mm), Digora (mean error : -0.417 {+-} 0.415 mm) and Root ZX (mean error : 0.123 {+-} 0.458 mm) with true length, periapical radiography and Digora system had statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in most cases while root zx showed none (p>0.05). 2. By subtracting values obtained by using periapical radiography, Digora and Root ZX from the true length and making a distribution table of their absolute values, the following analysis was possible. In the case of periapical film, 140 out of 261 (53.6%) were clinically acceptable satisfying the margin of error of less than 0.5 mm, 151 out of 261 (53,6%) were acceptable in the Digora system while Root ZX had 197 out of 261 (75.5%) within the limits of 0.5 mm

  8. Haruspicating With Science Fiction Or Through the Looking Glass -- Dimly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, George N.

    This paper examines the use of science fiction to predict the future. First, science fiction is compared to other fiction literature forms; then the changes in science fiction over the last 20 years are discussed. The influence of recent scientific advances on science fiction is also presented. The generation of alternative scenarios of the future…

  9. Evolutionary Models of Red Supergiants: Evidence for A Metallicity-dependent Mixing Length and Implications for Type IIP Supernova Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sang-Hyun; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Jung, Moo-Keon; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Jihoon

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies on the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) in the local universe provide us with an excellent observational constraint on RSG models. We calibrate the mixing length parameter by comparing model predictions with the empirical RSG temperatures in Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Milky Way, and M31, which are inferred from the TiO band and the spectral energy distribution (SED). Although our RSG models are computed with the MESA code, our result may be applied to other stellar evolution codes, including the BEC and TWIN codes. We find evidence that the mixing length increases with increasing metallicity for both cases where the TiO and SED temperatures of RSGs are used for the calibration. Together with the recent finding of a similar correlation in low-mass red giants by Tayar et al., this implies that the metallicity dependence of the mixing length is a universal feature in post-main sequence stars of both low and high masses. Our result implies that typical Type IIP supernova (SN IIP) progenitors with initial masses of ∼ 10{--}16 {M}ȯ have a radius range of 400 {R}ȯ ≲ R≲ 800 {R}ȯ regardless of metallicity. As an auxiliary result of this study, we find that the hydrogen-rich envelope mass of SN IIP progenitors for a given initial mass is predicted to be largely independent of metallicity if the Ledoux criterion with slow semiconvection is adopted, while the Schwarzschild models predict systematically more massive hydrogen-rich envelopes for lower metallicity.

  10. [Asperger syndrome in contemporary fictions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourre, F; Aubert, E; Andanson, J; Raynaud, J-P

    2012-12-01

    During recent years, fictions featuring a character with Asperger syndrome have been increasingly produced in literature, cinema and TV. Thus, the public has gradually discovered the existence of this specific category of autism spectrum, which is far removed from old popular representations of autistic disorders, often associated with mental retardation. To describe the reactions generated by these characters in order to identify their major functions and also to try to explain their recent increase in fictions. First, we explored international publications concerning this topic. A group of experienced clinicians systematically examined works of fiction produced between 2000 and 2010 that included a character with Asperger syndrome. More than 30 productions have been identified and analyzed using a method adapted from focus group. Over 30 productions have been recorded and analyzed. The reactions generated by these characters are described. They range from fascination to empathy; if these heroes sometimes induce laughter (because of comedy situations), they also lead us to question our vision of the world and ask ourselves about notions such as difference, normality and tolerance. We illustrate this phenomenon with examples from literature, cinema or television. Four hypotheses are proposed trying to explain the recent multiplication of these fictional characters with Asperger syndrome. The first puts forward authors' informative and educational motivations, these authors being aware of this issue. The second is supported by the "hero" concept, which has evolved gradually into the figures of the scientific world and the so-called "Geek" community. The third hypothesis, a metaphorical one, considers these heroes as symbols of a future society: a hyper systematized society, devoid of empathy, as if to warn of a risk of evolution of humanity toward a generalized mental blindness. The fourth and last hypothesis explores the personal resonance, supported by

  11. High on Crime Fiction and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2010-01-01

    centrally fueled in the minds of viewers and readers by the mammalian dopamine seeking/wanting system developed for seeking out resources by foraging and hunting and important for focused mental and physical goal-directed activities. The article describes the way the working of the seeking system explains...... how crime fiction activates strong salience (in some respects similar to the effect of dopamine-drugs like cocaine, Ritalin, and amphetamine) and discusses the role of social intelligence in crime fiction. It further contrasts the unempathic classical detector fictions with two subtypes of crime...... fiction that blend seeking with other emotions: the hardboiled crime fiction that blends detection with action and hot emotions like anger and bonding, and the moral crime fiction that strongly evokes moral disgust and contempt, often in conjunction with detectors that perform hard to fake signals...

  12. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, Mai N. T.; Kremer, Kristin; Lan, Nguyen T. N.; Buu, Tran N.; Cobelens, Frank G. J.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of

  13. Traumaculture and Telepathetic Cyber Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkall, Jacquelene

    This paper explores the interactive CD-ROM No Other Symptoms: Time Travelling with Rosalind Brodsky, usingtelepathetic socio-psychological, psychoanalytic and narrative theories. The CD-ROMexists as a contemporary artwork and published interactive hardcover book authored by painter and new-media visual artist Suzanne Treister. The artwork incorporates Treister's paintings, writing, photoshop, animation, video and audio work with narrative structures taken from world history, the history of psychoanalysis, futurist science and science fiction, family history and biography.

  14. The Role of Narrative Fiction and Semi-Fiction in Organizational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Whiteman (Gail); N. Phillips (Nelson)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this chapter, we discuss the use of narrative fiction and semi-fiction in organizational research and explore the strengths and weaknesses of these alternative approaches. We begin with an introduction reviewing the existing literature and clarifying what we mean by fiction and

  15. Science fiction and the medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gavin; McFarlane, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Research on science fiction within the medical humanities should articulate interpretative frameworks that do justice to medical themes within the genre. This means challenging modes of reading that encourage unduly narrow accounts of science fiction. Admittedly, science studies has moved away from reading science fiction as a variety of scientific popularisation and instead understands science fiction as an intervention in the technoscientific imaginary that calls for investment in particular scientific enterprises, including various biomedical technologies. However, this mode of reading neglects science fiction's critical relationship to the construction of 'the future' in the present: the ways in which science fiction proposes concrete alternatives to hegemonic narratives of medical progress and fosters critical self-awareness of the contingent activity which gives 'the future' substance in the here-and-now. Moreover, the future orientation of science fiction should not distract from the function of medical science fiction as 'cognitive estrangement': the technological innovations that dominate science-fiction narratives are less concrete predictions and more generic devices that explain in historical time the origins of a marvellous world bearing provocative correspondences to our own, everyday reality. The editorial concludes with a series of introductions to the articles comprising the special issue, covering the print edition and a special online-only section. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. 'Length'at Length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    He was interested to know how `large' is the set of numbers x for which the series is convergent. Here large refers to its length. But his set is not in the class ♢. Here is another problem discussed by Borel. Consider .... have an infinite collection of pairs of new shoes and want to choose one shoe from each pair. We have an ...

  17. Polyglutamine length-dependent toxicity from α1ACT in Drosophila models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ling Tsou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6 is a neurodegenerative disease that results from abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ repeat. SCA6 is caused by CAG triplet repeat expansion in the gene CACNA1A, resulting in a polyQ tract of 19-33 in patients. CACNA1A, a bicistronic gene, encodes the α1A calcium channel subunit and the transcription factor, α1ACT. PolyQ expansion in α1ACT causes degeneration in mice. We recently described the first Drosophila models of SCA6 that express α1ACT with a normal (11Q or hyper-expanded (70Q polyQ. Here, we report additional α1ACT transgenic flies, which express full-length α1ACT with a 33Q repeat. We show that α1ACT33Q is toxic in Drosophila, but less so than the 70Q version. When expressed everywhere, α1ACT33Q-expressing adults die earlier than flies expressing the normal allele. α1ACT33Q causes retinal degeneration and leads to aggregated species in an age-dependent manner, but at a slower pace than the 70Q counterpart. According to western blots, α1ACT33Q localizes less readily in the nucleus than α1ACT70Q, providing clues into the importance of polyQ tract length on α1ACT localization and its site of toxicity. We expect that these new lines will be highly valuable for future work on SCA6.

  18. Genetic predisposition to higher body mass index or type 2 diabetes and leukocyte telomere length in the Nurses' Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Although cross-sectional studies have linked higher body mass index (BMI and type 2 diabetes (T2D to shortened telomeres, whether these metabolic conditions play a causal role in telomere biology is unknown. We therefore examined whether genetic predisposition to higher BMI or T2D was associated with shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL.We conducted an analysis of 3,968 women of European ancestry aged 43-70 years from the Nurses' Health Study, who were selected as cases or controls in genome-wide association studies and studies of telomeres and disease. Pre-diagnostic relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes, collected in 1989-1990, was measured by quantitative PCR. We combined information from multiple risk variants by calculating genetic risk scores based on 32 polymorphisms near 32 loci for BMI, and 36 polymorphisms near 35 loci for T2D.After adjustment for age and case-control status, there was no association between the BMI genetic risk score and LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.01; SE: 0.02; P = 0.52. Similarly, the T2D genetic score was not associated with LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.006; SE: 0.02; P = 0.69.In this population of middle-aged and older women of European ancestry, those genetically predisposed to higher BMI or T2D did not possess shortened telomeres. Although we cannot exclude weak or modest effects, our findings do not support a causal relation of strong magnitude between these metabolic conditions and telomere dynamics.

  19. Linking Science Fiction and Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Krista K.

    2016-05-01

    Generally, cohorts or learning communities enrich higher learning in students. Learning communities consist of conventionally separate groups of students that meet together with common academic purposes and goals. Types of learning communities include paired courses with concurrent student enrollment, living-learning communities, and faculty learning communities. This article discusses a learning community of 21 students that I created with a colleague in the English department. The community encompasses two general education courses: an algebra-based physics course entitled "Intro to Physics" and a literature course entitled "Science Fiction, Science Fact." Students must enroll in both of these courses during the same semester. Additionally, I highlight advantages to linking these courses through surveying the assignments and course materials that we used in our learning community. Figure 1 shows the topics that are covered in both physics and literature courses.

  20. The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Jakobsen

    Full Text Available Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1 Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak] and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak walking (IW3; 2 Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1 and 3 No walking (CON. The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P 0.05 for both. Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257190.

  1. Fictions of the Apocalypse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Brian Russell

    coldly, formalist groupings of different types of culture texts. I argue that the fact that our culture is characterised by representations of degrees of ‘world’s end’ is deeply suggestive of the actual meaning of these texts. I conclude my talk with a series of reflections upon the meaning...... of these stories which steers a course away from conservative and pessimistic conclusion about the genre....

  2. MARGARET ATWOOD'S NON-FICTION ABOUT FICTION: PAYBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maver

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood's provocative recent book of non-fiction contains many literary references, which help to effectively highlight her points about such a topical matter as debt, debt as a philosophical, politico-economic, religious, and historical issue over the centuries. In the central chapters of the book she looks at the Protestant Reformation and the introduction of interest on loans and in this light analyzes the novels by Dickens, Irving, Thackeray and G. Eliot. Her final statement in the book is, however, about the ecological debt we all have to pay to Earth in order to ensure our existence.

  3. Fictional metaphysics of fiction: Metaphysics and imagination in the humanities

    OpenAIRE

    Johann-Albrecht Meylahn

    2017-01-01

    A very simplified description of physics could be, according to Wikipedia, natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion and behaviour through space and time. In relation to this simplified description of physics, metaphysics would then be that which gives matter, or metaphysics would be the reflection on the space and time in which matter is given. Yet, how are space and time connected? It is in language, or more specifically narrative (fiction), that space and time are co...

  4. IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of Mycobacterium avium from patients admitted to a reference hospital in Campinas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Panunto

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium is an important pathogen among immunodeficient patients, especially patients with AIDS. The natural history of this disease is unclear. Several environmental sources have been implicated as the origin of this infection. Polyclonal infection with this species is observed, challenging the understanding of its pathogenesis and treatment. In the present study 45 M. avium strains were recovered from 39 patients admitted to a reference hospital between 1996 and 1998. Species identification was performed using a species-specific nucleic acid hybridization test (AccuProbe® from Gen-Probe®. Strains were genotyped using IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing. Blood was the main source of the organism. In one patient with disseminated disease, M. avium could be recovered more than once from potentially sterile sites. Strains isolated from this patient had different genotypes, indicating that the infection was polyclonal. Four patient clones were characterized in this population, the largest clone being detected in eight patients. This finding points to a common-source transmission of the organism.

  5. Transmission of tuberculosis in Havana, Cuba: a molecular epidemiological study by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz R

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of molecular and conventional epidemiological methods has improved the knowledge about the transmission of tuberculosis in urban populations. To examine transmission of tuberculosis in Havana, Cuba, with DNA fingerprinting, we studied 51 out of 92 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from tuberculosis patients who resided in Havana and whose infection was culture-confirmed in the period from September 1997 to March 1998. Isolates from 28 patients (55% had unique IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP patterns, while isolates from 23 others (45% had identical patterns and belonged to 7 clusters. Three clusters consisting of six, five and two cases were each related to small outbreaks that occurred in a closed setting. Three other clustered cases were linked to a large outbreak that occurred in another institution. Younger patients were more correlated to clustering than older ones. The finding that 45% of the isolates had clustered RFLP patterns suggests that recent transmission is a key factor in the tuberculosis cases in Havana. The IS6110 RFLP typing made it possible to define the occurrence of outbreaks in two closed institutions.

  6. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Horror 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents the annual annotated list of the best science fiction, fantasy, and horror titles for teens that have been reviewed in this journal. Also includes a sidebar with four annotated titles of nonfiction resources related to science fiction, fantasy, and horror. (LRW)

  7. "Frankenstein" as Science Fiction and Fact

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Often called the first of its kind, "Frankenstein" paved the way for science fiction writing. Its depiction of a then impossible scientific feat has in our time become possible and is essentially recognizable in what we now refer to as bioengineering, biomedicine, or biotechnology. The fiction of "Frankenstein" has as it were given way to…

  8. The Outsider in Fiction and Fantasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yep, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of feeling like an outsider. Teenagers are literally outsiders in their bodies because they are unable to stop or control the physical changes that are happening. Laurence Yep, whether writing historical and contemporary fiction, science fiction, or fantasy, has outsider as the dominant theme in his writing.

  9. Online Fan Fiction and Critical Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Rebecca W.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores English-language-learning (ELL) youths' engagement with popular media through composing and publicly posting stories in an online fan fiction writing space. Fan fiction is a genre that lends itself to critical engagement with media texts as fans repurpose popular media to design their own narratives. Analyses describe how…

  10. The Affordances of Fiction for Teaching Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerrick, Randy K.; Simons, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    As science fiction has a way of capturing the human imagination that few other genres can rival, this study sought to investigate the effects of using science fiction on the performance and interest of high school chemistry students. An action research approach was used to guide the first author's practice as she studied two college preparatory…

  11. Transgressing the Non-fiction Transmedia Narrative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gifreu-Castells, Arnau; Misek, Richard; Verbruggen, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    abstractOver the last years, interactive digital media have greatly affected the logics of production, exhibition and reception of non-fiction audiovisual works, leading to the emergence of a new area called ‘interactive and transmedia non-fiction’. Whilethe audiovisual non-fiction field has been

  12. HIPPOCRATES: FACTS AND FICTION 1. INTRODUCTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIPPOCRATES: FACTS AND FICTION. ABSTRACT. Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, is reviewed as a historical person and in terms of his contribution to medicine in order to distinguish fact from fiction. Contem- porary and later sources reveal that many (possibly untrue) legends accumulated around this enigmatic ...

  13. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyen, M.N.; Kremer, K.; Lan, N.T.; Buu, T.N.; Cobelens, F.G.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Haas, P. de; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard

  14. Effects of cane length and diameter and judgment type on the constant error ratio for estimated height in blindfolded, visually impaired, and sighted participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Chen; Leung, Cherng-Yee; Wang, Hsiu-Feng

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of blindfolded, visually impaired, and sighted individuals to estimate object height as a function of cane length, cane diameter, and judgment type. 48 undergraduate students (ages 20 to 23 years) were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were divided into low-vision, severely myopic, and normal-vision groups. Five stimulus heights were explored with three cane lengths, varying cane diameters, and judgment types. The participants were asked to estimate the stimulus height with or without reference to a standard block. Results showed that the constant error ratio for estimated height improved with decreasing cane length and comparative judgment. The findings were unclear regarding the effect of cane length on haptic perception of height. Implications were discussed for designing environments, such as stair heights, chairs, the magnitude of apertures, etc., for visually impaired individuals.

  15. Food irradiation: Facts or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1990-01-01

    Food irradiation is at a political crossroad. In one direction, it is moving forward supported by overwhelming scientific evidence of its safety and benefits to economy and health. In the opposite direction, it threatens to be derailed by misleading claims about its safety and usefulness. Whether people will ultimately benefit from the use of irradiation to help fight serious food problems, or whether they will allow the technology to go to waste, will be determined by how successful people are in separating the facts from the fiction of food irradiation

  16. On fiction, art and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    This is a deliberately eclectic and eccentric meditation on some of the connections between writing fiction, academic research in the history of medicine and the practice of medicine. The essay discusses creativity in research and writing, suggesting comparisons with the instincts of experienced clinicians, and explains the author's interest in women's entry to the medical profession. There is the suggestion of parallels between artists' models and surgical patients in late 19th century British culture. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Normal telomere lengths in naive and memory CD4+ T cells in HIV type 1 infection: a mathematical interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, K. C.; Noest, A. J.; Otto, S. A.; Miedema, F.; de Boer, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    To study CD4+ T cell productivity during HIV-1 infection, CD4+ T cell telomere lengths were measured. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of HIV-1-infected individuals with CD4+ T cells counts >300 cells/mm3 showed normal average telomeric restriction fragment (TRF) length and normal

  18. Normal telomere lengths in naive and memory CD4 T cells in HIV type 1 infection : a mathematical interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, K.C.; Noest, A.J.; Otto, S.A.; Miedema, F.; Boer, R.J. de

    1999-01-01

    To study CD4+ T cell productivity during HIV-1 infection, CD4+ T cell telomere lengths were measured. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of HIV-1-infected individuals with CD4+ T cells counts >300 cells/mm3 showed normal average telomeric restriction fragment (TRF) length and normal

  19. Teaching Tomorrow: A Handbook of Science Fiction for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Elizabeth; McGhan, Barry

    Science Fiction appeals to young people and is suited for use in a wide range of classrooms. This handbook of Science Fiction for Teachers suggests ways of using Science Fiction to teach literature and English skills. Study guides based on two Science Fiction stories are presented, with activities such as individual papers and small group…

  20. Exploring science through science fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Luokkala, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    How does Einstein’s description of space and time compare with Dr. Who? Can James Bond really escape from an armor-plated railroad car by cutting through the floor with a laser concealed in a wristwatch? What would it take to create a fully-intelligent android, such as Star Trek’s Commander Data? How might we discover intelligent civilizations on other planets in the galaxy? Is human teleportation possible? Will our technological society ever reach the point at which it becomes lawful to discriminate on the basis of genetic information, as in the movie GATTACA? Exploring Science Through Science Fiction addresses these and other interesting questions, using science fiction as a springboard for discussing fundamental science concepts and cutting-edge science research. The book is designed as a primary text for a college-level course which should appeal to students in the fine arts and humanities as well as to science and engineering students. It includes references to original research papers, landmark scie...

  1. A Comparative Analysis on Two Types of Oral Implants, Bone-Level and Tissue-Level, with Different Cantilever Lengths of Fixed Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavar, Alireza; Nili, Monireh; Hashemi, Sayed Raouf; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    Depending on esthetic, anatomical, and functional aspects, in implant-prosthetic restoration of a completely edentulous jaw, the selection of implant type is highly important; however, bone- and tissue-level implants and their stress distribution in bone have not yet been comparatively investigated. Hence, finite element analysis was used to study the influence of cantilever length in a fixed prosthesis on stress distribution in peri-implant bone around these two types of oral implants. A 3D edentulous mandible was modeled. In simulations, a framework with four posterior cantilever lengths and two types of implants, bone-level and tissue-level, was considered. A compressive load was applied to the distal regions of the cantilevers, and the von-Mises stress of peri-implant bone was investigated. The independent t-test and the Pearson correlation coefficient analyzed the results (α = 0.05). Stresses in the cortical bone around the bone-level implants were greater than those in the tissue-level implants with the same cantilever length. In addition, by extending the cantilever length, the stress values in peri-implant bone increased. Therefore, when the cantilever was at its maximum length, the maximum stress was in cortical bone and around the bone-level distal implants. The results of the present study indicate that treatment with tissue-level implants is potentially more advantageous than with bone-level implants for implant-supported fixed prostheses. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. The evolution and extinction of science fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrotic, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Science fiction literature reflects our constantly evolving attitudes towards science and technological innovations, and the kinds of societal impacts believed possible. The newly popular subgenre 'steampunk' shows that these attitudes have significantly shifted. Examined from a cognitive anthropological perspective, science fiction reveals the cultural evolution of the genre as intelligently designed, and implies a cognitive mechanism of group membership reliant on implicit memory. However, such an analysis also suggests that genre science fiction as it was in the 20th century may no longer exist. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. 21st Century South African Science Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARAIVAN LUIZA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses some aspects of South African science fiction, starting with its beginnings in the 1920s and focusing on some 21st century writings. Thus Lauren Beukes’ novels Moxyland (2008 and Zoo City (2010 are taken into consideration in order to present new trends in South African literature and the way science fiction has been marked by Apartheid. The second South African science fiction writer whose writings are examined is Henrietta Rose-Innes (with her novel Nineveh, published in 2011 as this consolidates women's presence in the SF world.

  4. Effect of questionnaire length, personalisation and reminder type on response rate to a complex postal survey: randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Minimising participant non-response in postal surveys helps to maximise the generalisability of the inferences made from the data collected. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of questionnaire length, personalisation and reminder type on postal survey response rate and quality and to compare the cost-effectiveness of the alternative survey strategies. Methods In a pilot study for a population study of travel behaviour, physical activity and the environment, 1000 participants sampled from the UK edited electoral register were randomly allocated using a 2 × 2 factorial design to receive one of four survey packs: a personally addressed long (24 page) questionnaire pack, a personally addressed short (15 page) questionnaire pack, a non-personally addressed long questionnaire pack or a non-personally addressed short questionnaire pack. Those who did not return a questionnaire were stratified by initial randomisation group and further randomised to receive either a full reminder pack or a reminder postcard. The effects of the survey design factors on response were examined using multivariate logistic regression. Results An overall response rate of 17% was achieved. Participants who received the short version of the questionnaire were more likely to respond (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.07). In those participants who received a reminder, personalisation of the survey pack and reminder also increased the odds of response (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.95). Item non-response was relatively low, but was significantly higher in the long questionnaire than the short (9.8% vs 5.8%; p = .04). The cost per additional usable questionnaire returned of issuing the reminder packs was £23.1 compared with £11.3 for the reminder postcards. Conclusions In contrast to some previous studies of shorter questionnaires, this trial found that shortening a relatively lengthy questionnaire significantly increased the response. Researchers should consider the trade off

  5. Chain length-dependent effects of inulin-type fructan dietary fiber on human systemic immune responses against hepatitis-B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Leonie M; Elderman, Marlies E; Borghuis, Theo; de Haan, Bart J; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Scope: In vivo studies demonstrating that only specific dietary-fibers contribute to immunity are still inconclusive, as measuring immune effects in healthy humans remains difficult. We applied a relatively inefficacious vaccination-challenge to study chain length-dependent effects of inulin-type

  6. THE HUMAN FUMARYLACETOACETATE GENE : CHARACTERIZATION OF RESTRICTION-FRAGMENT-LENGTH-POLYMORPHISMS AND IDENTIFICATION OF HAPLOTYPES IN TYROSINEMIA TYPE-1 AND PSEUDODEFICIENCY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROOTWELT, H; KVITTINGEN, EA; HOIE, K; AGSTERIBBE, E; HARTOG, M; BERGER, R

    Deficiency of human fumarylacetoacetase (FAH) activity results in hereditary tyrosinemia type I. Using the restriction enzymes BglII, KpnI and StuI and a 1.3-kb cDNA probe for the FAH gene, we have found 6 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). These RFLPs were utilised in 3 tyrosinemia

  7. Facts about real antimatter collide with fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    Siegfried, Tom

    2004-01-01

    When science collides with fiction, sometimes a best seller emerges from the debris. Take Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, for instance, a murder mystery based on science at CERN, the European nuclear research laboratory outside Geneva

  8. Markus Davidsen on Fiction-Based Religions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Markus Altena

    2012-01-01

    Interview with Christ Cotter from the Religious Studies Project. The podcast can be foudn here: http://www.religiousstudiesproject.com/2012/04/02/podcast-markus-davidsen-on-fiction-based-religions/...

  9. Radioactivity and Nuclear Issues in Science Fiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this work are presented and reviewed science fiction narratives, films and comics that exploit radioactivity and nuclear issues. These topics to some science fiction authors serve as metaphor of evil and holocaust as well as nice instrument for elaborating various manipulations and conspiracy theories. In that context are of special interest science fiction works depicting apocalyptic post-nuclear worlds and societies, such works being closely connected with cyberpunk genre. However, other more technologically optimistic authors nuclear energy and research regarding nuclear technology and radioactivity consider as eligible and inevitable solution for world peace and prosperity Nowadays, public interest and global fears are shifted from radioactivity and nuclear issues to other catastrophic scenarios threatening future of the mankind, these for example being climate changes and global warming, asteroid impact, collapse of information infrastructure, nanotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence etc. Consequently, these issues are as well increasingly reflected in contemporary science fiction stories.(author)

  10. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  11. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Samothrakis

    Full Text Available Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  12. Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice of Youth Advocates, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 81 science fiction, fantasy, and horror genre titles that were judged best-reads by reviewers in "Voice of Youth Advocates" from June 2001 through April 2002. (LRW)

  13. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman’s model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear. PMID:26524352

  14. Psychopathy and the cinema: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J; Linkowski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between cinema and psychopathy to describe and analyze the portrayal of fictional psychopathic characters in popular films and over cinematic history. From 400 films (1915-2010), 126 fictional psychopathic characters (21 female and 105 male) were selected based on the realism and clinical accuracy of their profiles. Movies were then analyzed by senior forensic psychiatrists and cinema critics. Secondary (71%) and manipulative (48%) subtypes were the most common in the female group, while secondary (51%) and prototypical (34%) were the most common in the male group. Corresponding to the increased understanding of clinical psychopathy by professional mental health providers over time, the clinical description of and epidemiological data on fictional psychopaths in popular films have become more realistic. Realistic fictional psychopaths remain in the minority but are very important for didactic purposes in Academic facilities, as "teaching Movies." © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. West Indian Prose Fiction in the Sixties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brathwaite, Edward

    1971-01-01

    A Review and critical discussion of the West Indian prose fiction in the sixties by one of the best-known poets of the Carribean and a member of the faculty of the University of West Indies, Jamaica. (JM)

  16. Meeting George Bush versus meeting Cinderella: the neural response when telling apart what is real from what is fictional in the context of our reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anna; von Cramon, D Yves; Schubotz, Ricarda I

    2008-06-01

    A considerable part of our lives is spent engaging in the entertaining worlds of fiction that are accessible through media such as books and television. Little is known, however, about how we are able to readily understand that fictional events are distinct from those occurring within our real world. The present functional imaging study explored the brain correlates underlying such abilities by having participants make judgments about the possibility of different scenarios involving either real or fictional characters being true, given the reality of our world. The processing of real and fictional scenarios activated a common set of regions including medial-temporal lobe structures. When the scenarios involved real people, brain regions associated with episodic memory retrieval and self-referential thinking, the anterior prefrontal cortex and the precuneus/posterior cingulate, were more active. In contrast, areas along the left lateral inferior frontal gyrus, associated with semantic memory retrieval, were implicated for scenarios with fictional characters. This implies that there is a fine distinction in the manner in which conceptual information concerning real persons in contrast to fictional characters is represented. In general terms, the findings suggest that fiction relative to reality tends to be represented in more factual terms, whereas our representations of reality relative to fiction are colored by personal subjectivity. What modulates our understanding of the relative difference between reality and fiction seems to be whether such character-type information is coded in self-relevant terms or not.

  17. Deoxyribonucleic acid telomere length shortening can predict the incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Fan; Li, Zeng-Yi; Lv, Ke; Zhou, Mei-Cen; Dong, Ya-Xiu; Sun, Qi; Li, Yu-Xiu

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effect of telomere shortening and other predictive factors of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a 6-year prospective cohort study. A total of 70 type 2 diabetes mellitus (mean age 57.8 ± 6.7 years) patients without NAFLD were included in the study, and 64 of them were successfully followed up 6 years later, excluding four cases with significant alcohol consumption. NAFLD was diagnosed by the hepatorenal ratio obtained by a quantitative ultrasound method using NIH image analysis software. The 39 individuals that developed NAFLD were allocated to group A, and the 21 individuals that did not develop NAFLD were allocated to group B. Fluorescent real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure telomere length. There was no significant difference between the two groups in baseline telomere length; however, at the end of the 6th year, telomere length had become shorter in group A compared with group B. There were significant differences between these two groups in baseline body mass index, waistline, systolic blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin and fasting C-peptide level. In addition, the estimated indices of baseline insulin resistance increased in group A. Fasting insulin level, body mass index, systolic blood pressure at baseline and the shortening of telomere length were independent risk factors of NAFLD in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Telomere length became shorter in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who developed NAFLD over the course of 6 years. Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who developed NAFLD had more serious insulin resistance compared with those who did not develop NAFLD a long time ago. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Characterization of near full-length genomes of HIV type 1 strains in Denmark: basis for a universal therapeutic vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Betina S; Vinner, Lasse; Tang, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    directly on DNA extracted from short-term cocultures of PBMCs. The near full-length genomes did not contain any major insertions, deletions, or rearrangements. Sixteen of the isolates were characterized as nonrecombinant subtype B and one isolate as nonrecombinant subtype C. Phylogenetic analysis...

  19. Characterization of near full-length genomes of HIV type 1 strains in Denmark: Basis for a universal therapeutic vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Betina S.; Vinner, Lasse; Tang, Sheila Tuyet

    2007-01-01

    We report here the near full-length sequence characterization of 17 Danish clinical HIV-1 strains isolated from HLA-A02 patients not in need of ART, with relatively low viral loads and normal CD4 cell counts. Sequencing was performed directly on DNA extracted from short-term cocultures of PBMCs. ...... of a universal immunotherapeutic vaccine construct based on these epitopes....

  20. The Schizophrenic Theme in Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-06-01

    Victorian religious millenialism which was virtually destroyed by the bitter experiences of two world wars. Science fiction writers seem to be the ...Distribution Unlimnited lo- ABSTRACT COL Franklin D. Jones, MD The Psychiatry and Neurology Con~ultant Office of The Surgeon General of the Army...Title: The Schizophrenic Theme in Science Fiction Author: Franklin D. Jones, MD, COL, MC Originally presented in 1965, this paper reports the results of

  1. Stranger than fiction: Fan identity in cosplay

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolle Lamerichs

    2011-01-01

    Academic accounts of fan cultures usually focus on creative practices such as fan fiction, fan videos, and fan art. Through these practices, fans, as an active audience, closely interpret existing texts and rework them with texts of their own. A practice scarcely examined is cosplay ("costume play"), in which fans produce their own costumes inspired by fictional characters. Cosplay is a form of appropriation that transforms and actualizes an existing story in close connection to the fan commu...

  2. Analytical Approach to Fictional Elements of Sandbadnameh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    a عارفی

    2014-05-01

    Using stock and allegorical characters, fixed tone and style in dialogue tales, lack of variegated plot and logical and stable relationship between events make this work far from contemporary criteria of fiction writing in spite of its great volume, and introduce it as a symbolic and allegorical tale. On the other hand, bombastic and embellished prose as well as being loyal to ancient fiction writing have added to literary significance of this literary work.

  3. Women and the art of fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Women wrote about art in the nineteenth century in a variety of genres, ranging from the formal historical or technical treatise and professional art journalism, to travel writing, poetry, and fiction. Their fiction is often less ideologically circumscribed than their formal art histories: the visual arts constituted a language for writing about the social position of women, and about questions of gender and sexuality. This essay considers how women introduced the visual arts and artist figur...

  4. Clustering of Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the Mekong delta in Vietnam on the basis of variable number of tandem repeat versus restriction fragment length polymorphism typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huyen Mai NT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP typing, variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR typing is easier to perform, faster and yields results in a simple, numerical format. Therefore, this technique has gained recognition as the new international gold standard in typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, some reports indicated that VNTR typing may be less suitable for Beijing genotype isolates. We therefore compared the performance of internationally standardized RFLP and 24 loci VNTR typing to discriminate among 100 Beijing genotype isolates from the Southern Vietnam. Methods Hundred Beijing genotype strains defined by spoligotyping were randomly selected and typed by RFLP and VNTR typing. The discriminatory power of VNTR and RFLP typing was compared using the Bionumerics software. Results Among 95 Beijing strains available for analysis, 14 clusters were identified comprising 34 strains and 61 unique profiles in 24 loci VNTR typing ((Hunter Gaston Discrimination Index (HGDI = 0.994. 13 clusters containing 31 strains and 64 unique patterns in RFLP typing (HGDI = 0.994 were found. Nine RFLP clusters were subdivided by VNTR typing and 12 VNTR clusters were split by RFLP. Five isolates (5% revealing double alleles or no signal in two or more loci in VNTR typing could not be analyzed. Conclusions Overall, 24 loci VNTR typing and RFLP typing had similar high-level of discrimination among 95 Beijing strains from Southern Vietnam. However, loci VNTR 154, VNTR 2461 and VNTR 3171 had hardly added any value to the level of discrimination.

  5. Rapid RT-PCR amplification of full-length poliovirus genomes allows rapid discrimination between wild-type and recombinant vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Hein J; Schepp, Rutger M; van Nunen, Femke J H B; Kimman, Tjeerd G

    2004-03-01

    Poliomyelitis outbreaks in areas that were free for a long time of wild-type polioviruses have been reported. Characterization at nucleotide level of the causative agents showed that the isolated viruses were recombinant oral polio vaccine (OPV)-derived polioviruses. To allow rapid identification and detailed analysis of such recombinant polioviruses, a robust full-length reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) was developed using SuperScript II (RT) and expand (PCR). Without extensive purification, it was possible to amplify and characterize the full-length genomes of all selected vaccine, wild-type, and recombinant vaccine-derived polioviruses within a week. Endonuclease nuclease analysis (SpeI) of the full-length amplicons allowed easy discrimination between recombinant and non-recombinant polioviruses. Furthermore, sequence analysis of cloned full-length amplicons of a recombinant vaccine-derived poliovirus strain showed that the quasi-species nature of a viral stock is preserved during the RT-PCR procedure. This robust and rapid RT-PCR method will allow rapid characterization of (recombinant) poliovirus strains in case of a local poliomyelitis outbreak, and will help to assess the risk of the appearance of such strains after wild-type poliovirus has been eradicated globally.

  6. Characterization of near full-length genomes of HIV type 1 strains in Denmark: basis for a universal therapeutic vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Betina S; Vinner, Lasse; Tang, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    directly on DNA extracted from short-term cocultures of PBMCs. The near full-length genomes did not contain any major insertions, deletions, or rearrangements. Sixteen of the isolates were characterized as nonrecombinant subtype B and one isolate as nonrecombinant subtype C. Phylogenetic analysis...... not subtype-specific or region-specific. This lends support for the concept of a universal immunotherapeutic vaccine construct based on these epitopes...

  7. Historical Fiction or Fictionalized History? Problems for Writers of Historical Novels for Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanne

    1998-01-01

    Considers the problems associated with writing historical fiction for young adults. Discusses problems of definition, "truth," balance between historical details and fictional elements, accuracy, and provenance. Discusses how such writing negotiates the fine line between contemporary sensibilities and historical accuracy, offering a lens…

  8. Fiction and Non-Fiction Reading and Comprehension in Preferred Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Are the books preferred and most enjoyed by children harder than other books they read? Are non-fiction books read and understood at the same level of difficulty as fiction books? The Accelerated Reader software offers computerized comprehension quizzes of real books individually chosen by children, giving children (and teachers, librarians, and…

  9. Not Just Pulp Fiction: Science Fiction Integral to U.S. Culture and LC Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric A.; Stumbaugh, Colleen R. C.

    1996-01-01

    Traces the evolution of the science fiction genre and its representation at the Library of Congress, including original paperbacks, hardcovers, television, film, and sound recordings. Highlights include science fiction "classics", the Library of Congress collection development policy, library programs, and preservation activities…

  10. Effect of botulinum toxin type A in lateral abdominal wall muscles thickness and length of patients with midline incisional hernia secondary to open abdomen management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Hurtado, T R; Nuño-Guzmán, C M; Miranda-Díaz, A G; Troyo-Sanromán, R; Navarro-Ibarra, R; Bravo-Cuéllar, L

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal wall hernia secondary to open abdomen management represents a surgical challenge. The hernia worsens due to lateral muscle retraction. Our objective was to evaluate if Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTA) application in lateral abdominal wall muscles modifies its thickness and length. A clinical trial of male trauma patients with hernia secondary to open abdomen management was performed from January 2009 to July 2011. Thickness and length of lateral abdominal muscles were measured by a basal Computed Tomography and 1 month after BTA application. A dosage of 250 units of BTA was applied at five points at each side between the external and internal oblique muscles under ultrasonographic guidance. Statistical analysis for differences between basal and after BTA application measures was performed by a paired Student's t test (significance: p abdominal muscles decreases its thickness and increases its length in abdominal wall hernia patients secondary to open abdomen management.

  11. Il reale in finzione. L'ibridazione di fiction e non-fiction nella letteratura contemporanea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mongelli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Questo saggio propone un breve excursus della storia dell’ibridazione di fiction e non-fiction in ambito occidentale, a partire dal new journalism e dal nonfiction novel fino all’attuale proliferazione di oggetti narrativi in cui è presente una finzionalizzazione del reale. A partire da alcuni faction contemporanei si illustreranno le diverse intenzioni e i diversi risultati estetici a cui possono giungere i tentativi di ibridare la fiction con il reportage giornalistico, il racconto di un caso di cronaca o di un pezzo di Storia, la biografia e il diario. Nelle forme sempre specifiche in cui ogni testo pensa e mette in scena il reale è spesso presente la convinzione che una verità ulteriore, più “vera”, si dia attraverso la menzogna letteraria, ovvero la fiction. This paper provides a brief account of the history of hybridization between fiction and non-fiction within Western literature, from the origins – the new journalism and the non-fiction novel – to the contemporary hypertrofia of “narrative objects” in which we can trace a process of fictionalization. Starting from contemporary factions we will illustrate the different intentions and the different aesthetic results of the attempts to hybridize fiction with journalistic reportage, true crime report, narrative history, diary or biography. Although each text thinks and depicts reality in a very specific form, it will clearly emerge that all factions share the belief that narrative fiction might be used as a key to achieve a more  authentic truth.

  12. Australian Queer Science Fiction Fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Stephen Craig

    2017-10-23

    Science fiction (sf) does more than provide a fleeting moment of entertainment; it has many personal and social functions. In addition to offering audiences "romantic escapism" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6), sf also enables the "postulation of an alternative reality from which to contemplate this one" (Gerrold, 1996, pp. 5-6); as such, it is especially important "for groups which have had limited stakes in the status quo" (Jenkins, 1995, p. 242). To date, no research has been undertaken on the relationship between Australian queers and sf fandom. This article reports the findings of an online survey and explores the psycho-social features of Australian queer sf fans and why they like the genre. While the characteristics of this sample mirror those of Australian queers generally, they also have slightly higher rates of mental illness and are far more likely to state they have "no religion." Furthermore, while enjoying the "sciency" (P10, bisexual woman) aspects of sf, Australian queers also like the "poignant metaphors for our own civilization" (P45, asexual man).

  13. TypeLoader: A fast and efficient automated workflow for the annotation and submission of novel full-length HLA alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendranath, V; Albrecht, V; Hayhurst, J D; Schöne, B; Robinson, J; Marsh, S G E; Schmidt, A H; Lange, V

    2017-07-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the discovery of novel allelic variants of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. Commonly, only the exons encoding the peptide binding domains of novel HLA alleles are submitted. As a result, the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database lacks sequence information outside those regions for the majority of known alleles. This has implications for the application of the new sequencing technologies, which deliver sequence data often covering the complete gene. As these technologies simplify the characterization of the complete gene regions, it is desirable for novel alleles to be submitted as full-length sequences to the database. However, the manual annotation of full-length alleles and the generation of specific formats required by the sequence repositories is prone to error and time consuming. We have developed TypeLoader to address both these facets. With only the full-length sequence as a starting point, Typeloader performs automatic sequence annotation and subsequently handles all steps involved in preparing the specific formats for submission with very little manual intervention. TypeLoader is routinely used at the DKMS Life Science Lab and has aided in the successful submission of more than 900 novel HLA alleles as full-length sequences to the European Nucleotide Archive repository and the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database with a 95% reduction in the time spent on annotation and submission when compared with handling these processes manually. TypeLoader is implemented as a web application and can be easily installed and used on a standalone Linux desktop system or within a Linux client/server architecture. TypeLoader is downloadable from http://www.github.com/DKMS-LSL/typeloader. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The role of science fiction within the fluidity of slipstream literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Steble

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the complex and contradictory role of science fiction in slipstream, the type of postmodern non-realistic literature situated between the fantastic genres and the mainstream literary fiction. Because of its unstable status of occupying an interstitial position between multiple literary conventions, the article first deals with an expansive terminology affiliated with slipstream and elucidates upon using a unified term for it. Avantpop, transrealism, and interstitial fiction all help us in understanding the vast postmodern horizon of slipstream. Furthermore, the slipstream's philosophy of cognitive dissonance in comparison to science fiction's is analysed to see the similarities and differences between them. The section is mainly concerned on expanding Darko Suvin's concept of cognition and viewing it as partially compatible with slipstream's estrangement techniques. The final part is focused on the exemplary slipstream novel Vurt by Jeff Noon, a perfect example of science fiction providing material, including latest post-Newtonian paradigms of science, for slipstream to mould it in its own fashion.

  15. Automated Fictional Ideation via Knowledge Base Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llano, Maria Teresa; Colton, Simon; Hepworth, Rose; Gow, Jeremy

    The invention of fictional ideas (ideation) is often a central process in the creative production of artefacts such as poems, music and paintings, but has barely been studied in the computational creativity community. We present here a general approach to automated fictional ideation that works by manipulating facts specified in knowledge bases. More specifically, we specify a number of constructions which, by altering and combining facts from a knowledge base, result in the generation of fictions. Moreover, we present an instantiation of these constructions through the use of ConceptNet, a database of common sense knowledge. In order to evaluate the success of these constructions, we present a curation analysis that calculates the proportion of ideas which pass a typicality judgement. We further evaluate the output of this approach through a crowd-sourcing experiment in which participants were asked to rank ideas. We found a positive correlation between the participant's rankings and a chaining inference technique that automatically assesses the value of the fictions generated through our approach. We believe that these results show that this approach constitutes a firm basis for automated fictional ideation with evaluative capacity.

  16. Tidal Response to Sea-Level Rise in Different Types of Estuaries: The Importance of Length, Bathymetry, and Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Zhengui; Wang, Ya Ping; Yu, Xin; Sisson, Mac; Wang, Harry V.

    2018-01-01

    Tidal response to sea-level rise (SLR) varies in different coastal systems. To provide a generic pattern of tidal response to SLR, a systematic investigation was conducted using numerical techniques applied to idealized and realistic estuaries, with model results cross-checked by analytical solutions. Our results reveal that the response of tidal range to SLR is nonlinear, spatially heterogeneous, and highly affected by the length and bathymetry of an estuary and weakly affected by the estuary convergence with an exception of strong convergence. Contrary to the common assumption that SLR leads to a weakened bottom friction, resulting in increased tidal amplitude, we demonstrate that tidal range is likely to decrease in short estuaries and in estuaries with a narrow channel and large low-lying shallow areas.

  17. Fictional Discourse. Replies to Organon F Papers (Part II)

    OpenAIRE

    Koťátko, P. (Petr)

    2016-01-01

    The author replies to the second part of the papers collected in the Supplementary Volume of Organon F 2015. He discusses the status of the literary text and the text-work relation, defends the account of fictional characters as complete beings situated (within the interpretation of narrative fiction) in the actual world, argues that the Kripkean causal theory of proper names is properly applicable also to texts of narrative fiction, defends an ontologically modest account of fictional charac...

  18. Subject cataloguing of the works of fiction at the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Kovač

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the principles of construction and policies of application of subject headings to works of fiction at the National and University Library in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The records are created in COMARC format, and the literary type, genre and the language of a document are each assigned a code, whereas literature is also indexed by using UDC class numbers. The principles for constructing and assigning subject headings for fiction are in accordance with the IFLA Principles Underlying Subject Heading Languages, and the rules of the Slovenian General List of Subject Headings (2002. The author presents the general and more specific rules and procedures for the construction of subject headings. Most frequently used subject headings for the works of fiction are name, topical or geographic headings.

  19. Introduction: Victorian Fiction and the Material Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mills

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available How should we deal with the ‘stuff' in books? This is the question addressed in the lead articles of the Spring 2008 issue of 19, all of which focus on some aspect of the material in relation to Victorian fiction. Gas, rocks, jewellery, automata and the entire contents of houses are examined in essays that explore the material imagination of Dickens, Hardy, George Eliot and Thackeray, among others. Moving forward from the previous edition, which different types of collected object, here contributors examine how the material is brought into collision with literature. The phrase 'material imagination' can be traced to the work of Gaston Bachelard who identifies two types of imagination, the formal and the material. Whereas the former focuses on surfaces and the visual perception of images, the latter consists of '…this amazing need for penetration which, going beyond the attractions of the imagination of forms, thinks matter, dreams in it, lives in it, or, in other words, materializes the imaginary'. As Bachelard suggests, the material imagination involves more than just a focus on the representation of objects and the contributions to this edition explore such wide ranging subjects as the gender politics of ownership, dispossession, the body as object, the politics of collecting and display and the dichotomy between the material and immaterial. In addition, this edition features a forum on digitisation and materiality. We are particularly pleased to be able to make use of 19's digital publishing format to further debates about digital media. In the forum, five contributors respond to a series of questions about the nature of the virtual object. All five have worked or are working on nineteenth-century digitisation projects so they are uniquely placed to consider issues surrounding representation and the nature of digital space.

  20. The Role of Fiction in Experiments within Design, Art & Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Christensen, Poul Rind

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a typology for understanding design fiction as a new approach in design research. The typology allows design researchers to explain design fictions according to 5 criteria.The typology is premised on the idea that fiction may integrate with reality in many different ways in design...

  1. Juvenile delinquency and violence in the fiction of three Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay is a preliminary examination of crime and violence in postcolonial Kenyan fiction. It examines how three Kenyan writers have dealt with the themes of crime and violence in their fiction. Through examination of the fiction of John Kiriamiti, Meja Mwangi and John Kigia, the paper postulates that the prevalence of ...

  2. Faith Fictions: "The Word between This World and God"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tran, Mai-Anh

    2009-01-01

    The search for religious truth and depth in "fiction" invites a conceptualization of life and fictional narratives as "faith fictions"--narrative accounts of human experiences and the human condition that bridge this world and God. This article juxtaposes "Mother Crocodile", "Hunger", and "Lost in Translation" to highlight the ways in which they,…

  3. Using Fan Fiction to Teach Critical Reading and Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about fan fiction, which is defined by Jenkins (2008) as "original stories and novels which are set in the fictional universe of favorite television series, films, comics, games or other media properties." Fan fiction generally involves writing stories with a combination of established characters and established…

  4. Children Reading Fiction Books Because They Want To

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the reading of fiction books by 15-year-olds in 18 OECD countries.It appears that girls fiction books more often than boys, whereas boys read comic books more often than girls.The intensity by which children read fiction books is influenced by parental education, family

  5. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  6. Which Fiction Genres Are Notable & Best from 2000-2005?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ruth Cox

    2005-01-01

    The fiction genre novels published in the US for children as well as for young adults and their responses to contemporary realistic fiction are discussed. The novels from both the 2000-2005 Children's Notables and Best Books for Young Adults lists displays a strong preference for historical fictions.

  7. Romance versus Reality: A Look at YA Romantic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundin, Susan G.

    1985-01-01

    Study of young adult literature found that both formula romance fiction and contemporary realistic fiction reflect problems young people face daily. Three problem-concern areas were addressed by an average of 32.81% of romance books and 30.13% of realistic fiction--personal, intrafamily, and interpersonal. Romance books studied are listed. (14…

  8. The Role of Fiction in Experiments within Design, Art & Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Christensen, Poul Rind

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a typology for understanding design fiction as a new approach in design research. The typology allows design researchers to explain design fictions according to 5 criteria: (1) “What if scenarios” as the basic construal principle of design fiction; (2) the manifestation of criti...

  9. Fictional Discourse. Replies to Organon F Papers (Part II)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koťátko, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2016), s. 102-124 ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : fictional worlds * fictional characters * fictional names * pretense * text-work relation Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0258865

  10. First Contact: Science Fiction in the Library, 1920-1949.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kathryn

    This report examining the status of science fiction in libraries during the 30-year period of the genre's infancy discusses past attitudes toward science fiction and policies concerning its selection and acquisition. In order to determine how strong an influence reviews would have been on the purchase of science fiction, the book announcements and…

  11. Taming the Alien Genre: Bringing Science Fiction into the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Kathrine T.; Manning, M. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Notes the popularity of the science fiction/fantasy genre, and offers a definition of these genres. Discusses teachers' reluctance to read or teach science fiction, but emphasizes its appeal and its usefulness. Discusses how teachers can select and use good science fiction books. Offers a checklist for evaluating such books, and suggests 18…

  12. Fiction, History and Pedagogy: A Double-Edged Sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Penney; Sears, Alan

    2017-01-01

    There are many areas of overlap between history and fiction. Teachers of history have long recognized this connection and used a range of fictional accounts in their teaching. In this article, we argue that fiction is a double-edged sword that must be handled carefully. On the one hand, it presents compelling characters and accounts that provide…

  13. Molecular cloning and analysis of full-length genome of HIV type 1 strains prevalent in countries of the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masharsky, Alexei E; Klimov, Nikolai A; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2003-10-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs) in countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) was caused mainly by two HIV-1 variants: subtype A and CRF03-AB. To date only three full-length HIV-I genomes from the FSU have been sequenced: one subtype A from Byelorussia and two CRF03-AB from Russia. We report the full-length genome cloning and analysis of two more HIV-1 strains from the FSU countries (98UA0116 of subtype A and 98BY10443 of CRF03-AB). Isolate 98UA0116 is the second cloned and sequenced full-length HIV-1 genome of subtype A lineage from the FSU, which may be a novel subsubtype within sub-type A. Isolate 98BY10443 is the third full-length HIV-1 genome of CRF03-AB in the world to be cloned and sequenced. Additionally, it is the first CRF03-AB strain discovered in Byelorussia. Cloned genomic sequences of the FSU HIV-1 isolates are being used for the development of a region-specific HIV-1 vaccine.

  14. Modifiable futures: science fiction at the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Colin

    2010-09-01

    Science fiction remains an alien dimension of the history of science. Historical and literary studies of science have become increasingly attentive to various "literary technologies" in scientific practice, the metaphorical features of scientific discourse, and the impact of popular science writing on the social development of scientific knowledge. But the function of science fiction and even literature as such in the history of scientific and technological innovation has often been obscured, misconstrued, or repudiated owing to conventional notions of authorship, influence, and the organic unity of texts. The better to address those close encounters where scientific practice makes use of speculative fiction, this essay proposes that we instead analyze such exchanges as processes of appropriation, remixing, and modification.

  15. Stranger than fiction: Fan identity in cosplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Lamerichs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Academic accounts of fan cultures usually focus on creative practices such as fan fiction, fan videos, and fan art. Through these practices, fans, as an active audience, closely interpret existing texts and rework them with texts of their own. A practice scarcely examined is cosplay ("costume play", in which fans produce their own costumes inspired by fictional characters. Cosplay is a form of appropriation that transforms and actualizes an existing story in close connection to the fan community and the fan's own identity. I provide analytical insights into this fan practice, focusing on how it influences the subject. Cosplay is understood as a performative activity and analyzed through Judith Butler's concept of performativity. I specifically focus on boundaries between the body and dress, and on those between reality and fiction. I aim to show that cosplay emphasizes the personal enactment of a narrative, thereby offering new perspectives on fan identity.

  16. High on Crime Fiction and Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2010-01-01

    centrally fueled in the minds of viewers and readers by the mammalian dopamine seeking/wanting system developed for seeking out resources by foraging and hunting and important for focused mental and physical goal-directed activities. The article describes the way the working of the seeking system explains...... of moral commitment that make them role models for modern work ethics. The article is part of bio-cultural research that describes how biology and culture interact as argued in Grodal’s Embodied Visions. K......This article analyzes the psychological and neurological underpinnings of crime fiction and discusses the interrelation between cultural and biological-evolutionary determinants of fictions of detection. It argues that although crime fiction is a product of modern life conditions, it is also...

  17. Reading literary fiction improves theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, David Comer; Castano, Emanuele

    2013-10-18

    Understanding others' mental states is a crucial skill that enables the complex social relationships that characterize human societies. Yet little research has investigated what fosters this skill, which is known as Theory of Mind (ToM), in adults. We present five experiments showing that reading literary fiction led to better performance on tests of affective ToM (experiments 1 to 5) and cognitive ToM (experiments 4 and 5) compared with reading nonfiction (experiments 1), popular fiction (experiments 2 to 5), or nothing at all (experiments 2 and 5). Specifically, these results show that reading literary fiction temporarily enhances ToM. More broadly, they suggest that ToM may be influenced by engagement with works of art.

  18. Fictions et interactions : les fictions artistiques et la question de l’espace

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Guelton

    2015-01-01

    Dans cette courte présentation, je vais esquisser quelques questions sur les rapports possibles entre l’espace et la fiction puis je vais faire un aperçu sur l’évolution de la ligne de recherche Fictions et interactions. Dans la première partie, je vais aborder trois questions : 1) le rapport entre la fiction et l’espace des images, 2) les espaces immersifs et 3) trois exemples d’oeuvres artistiques et performatives qui mettent en jeu les espaces en réalités alternées. RESUMO Nessa cur...

  19. Network Fictions and the Global Unhomely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Mousoutzanis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests that the increasing proliferation of network fictions in literature, film, television and the internet may be interpreted through a theoretical framework that reconceptuallises the originally strictly psychoanalytic concept of the 'Unheimlich' (Freud’s idea of the ‘unhomely’ or ‘uncanny’ within the context of political, economic and cultural disources fo globalisation. ‘Network fictions’ are those texts consisting of multiple interlocking narratives set in various times and places that explore the interconnections of characters and events across different storylines: novels such as William Gibson’s 'Pattern Recognition' (2003, Hari Kunzro’s 'Transmission' (2005 and 'Gods Without Men' (2011, David Mitchell’s 'Cloud Atlas' (2004, or Rana Dasgupta’s 'Tokyo Cancelled' (2005 are some examples. My argument is that central to these fictions is a sense of a ‘global unhomely’. The sense of displacement, unhomeliness and global mobility that is conveyed in these fictions is fundamental to the experience of the 'Unheimlich'. In addition, the ability of the concept to convey a combined sense of the familiar and the strange is useful in exploring the ways in which these fictions engage with theoretical debates on globalisation that perceive the interaction between global flows and local cultures either in terms of homogenisation and uniformity or of heterogenisation and hybridity. Moreover, the repetitive temporality of the 'Unheimlich' is another distinctive aspect that allows a reading of the disjunctive, non-linear temporal structure of these fictions from this perspective. The ‘repetition compulsion’, however, that Freud considered to be an example of uncanniness was also theorised by him as a post-traumatic symptom, and this implicit association of uncanniness with post-traumatic experience also allows to interpret the persistent preoccupation of these fictions with suffering and disaster, as well as

  20. Assessing onset and length of greening period in six vegetation types in Oaxaca, Mexico, using NDVI-precipitation relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Mendoza, L; Galicia, L; Cuevas-Fernández, M L; Magaña, V; Gómez, G; Palacio-Prieto, J L

    2008-07-01

    Variations in the normalized vegetation index (NDVI) for the state of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico, were analyzed in terms of precipitation anomalies for the period 1997-2003. Using 10-day averages in NDVI data, obtained from AVHRR satellite information, the response of six types of vegetation to intra-annual and inter-annual fluctuations in precipitation were examined. The onset and temporal evolution of the greening period were studied in terms of precipitation variations through spectral analysis (coherence and phase). The results indicate that extremely dry periods, such as those observed in 1997 and 2001, resulted in low values of NDVI for much of Oaxaca, while good precipitation periods produced a rapid response (20-30 days of delay) from a stressed to a non-stressed condition in most vegetation types. One of these rapid changes occurred during the transition from dry to wet conditions during the summer of 1998. As in many parts of the tropics and subtropics, the NDVI reflects low frequency variations in precipitation on several spatial scales. Even after long dry periods (2001-2002), the various regional vegetation types are capable of recovering when a good rainy season takes place, indicating that vegetation types such as the evergreen forests in the high parts of Oaxaca respond better to rainfall characteristics (timing, amount) than to temperature changes, as is the case in most mid-latitudes. This finding may be relevant to prepare climate change scenarios for forests, where increases in surface temperature and precipitation anomalies are expected.

  1. HLA-DPB1 typing with polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.; Madsen, Hans O; Morling, Niels

    1992-01-01

    endonucleases: RsaI, FokI, ApaI, SacI, BstUI, EcoNI, and DdeI, and the DNA fragments were separated by electrophoresis in agarose gels. Altogether, 71 individuals were investigated and 16 different HLA-DPB1 types were observed in 26 different heterozygotic combinations, as well as five possible homozygotes...

  2. Censorship in Young Adult Fiction: What's Out There and What Should Be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Suzann

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of censorship of young adult books focuses on works of fiction that deal with censorship. Includes 14 annotated bibliographies; discusses stereotyped views of censors; and considers types of materials that have not been discussed in novels regarding censorship, including music and Internet filters. (LRW)

  3. Science Fiction and Life after Death

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, Stephen Louis

    2014-01-01

    Science fiction (SF) is, and has been since its inception as a self-conscious genre, centrally and persistently interested in presenting some version of or figure for an afterlife, some way to survive the death of the body, some place where our consciousness might live on after we die. We can find representations of an afterlife within every period of SF properly so-called, from late-nineteenth-century “scientific romance” to Campbellian magazine fiction, to the New Wave of the 1960s, to the ...

  4. Homophobia, heteronormativity, and slash fan fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April S. Callis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available I analyze the relationship between homophobia/heteronormativity and slash fan fiction. Through reading and coding almost 6,000 pages of Kirk/Spock fan fiction written from 1978 to 2014, I illuminate shifts in how normative gender and sexuality are portrayed by K/S authors. Writers of K/S, while ostensibly writing about the 23rd century, consciously or unconsciously include cultural norms from the 20th and 21st centuries. Thus, slash becomes a lens through which readers can view a decrease in both homophobia and heteronormativity in US culture over the past several decades.

  5. Homophobia, heteronormativity, and slash fan fiction

    OpenAIRE

    April S. Callis

    2016-01-01

    I analyze the relationship between homophobia/heteronormativity and slash fan fiction. Through reading and coding almost 6,000 pages of Kirk/Spock fan fiction written from 1978 to 2014, I illuminate shifts in how normative gender and sexuality are portrayed by K/S authors. Writers of K/S, while ostensibly writing about the 23rd century, consciously or unconsciously include cultural norms from the 20th and 21st centuries. Thus, slash becomes a lens through which readers can view a decrease in ...

  6. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  7. Effect of post length and type of luting agent on the dislodging time of metallic prefabricated posts by using ultrasonic vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Dastgurdi, Maziar; Khabiri, Masud; Khademi, Abbasali; Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Hosseini Dastnaei, Peimaneh

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the times needed to dislodge prefabricated titanium posts of different luting lengths with various cements. Eighty-one intact extracted, single-canal human teeth were selected and endodontically treated. Specimens were randomly divided into 9 groups, which were arranged according to the post space length (5, 7, and 9 mm) and cement type (zinc phosphate, glass ionomer, and resin cement). Titanium posts were cemented into the post spaces, and after 1 week of storage they were subjected to ultrasonic vibration. The dislodging times were recorded and analyzed by using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (P ultrasonic device. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relative leg length is associated with type 2 diabetes differently according to pubertal timing: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Noel T.; Duncan, Bruce B.; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Chor, Dora; Vigo, Alvaro; Aquino, Estela M. L.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies from developed societies have shown that individuals with short legs relative to height have higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This has been much less explored in less developed populations where influences on relative leg length and diabetes may differ. The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (in Portuguese, ELSA-Brasil) allows us to test, in a cohort born (1934–1975) and raised when undernutrition was common, whether short legs relative to height is positively associated with diabetes, independent of early-life factors, including birth weight, age at menarche, and young-adult BMI. Methods We used baseline, cross-sectional data from 15,105 participants aged 35–74 years participating in ELSA-Brasil. We created age-and-sex-specific Z scores for leg length index (leg length/height x 100) according to an external reference. Diabetes was defined by self-reported physician diagnosis, medication use, fasting and 2-hour post-75g-load glucose, and A1C. Results A one-unit decrement in leg-length-index Z score was associated with 12% (8–17%) higher prevalence of diabetes in Brazilian adults, after adjustment through Poisson regression for confounders, including race, maternal education, and birth weight. This association persisted after further adjustment for menarche age, BMI (at age 20), buttocks circumference, and waist circumference. It was stronger among women with early menarche (p interaction=0.02). Leg length index was also positively associated with fasting glucose, fasting insulin, 2-hour glucose, and A1C (plegs relative to height is positively associated with diabetes independent of measures of intrauterine growth, pubertal timing, young-adult adiposity. This association is stronger in women with early menarche. PMID:25327531

  9. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  10. Children Reading Fiction Books Because They Want To

    OpenAIRE

    van Ours, Jan C

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the reading of fiction books by 15-year-olds in 18 OECD countries. It appears that girls read fiction books more often than boys, whereas boys read comic books more often than girls. The intensity by which children read fiction books is influenced by parental education, family structure, and the number of books and TVs at home. Reading comic books does not affect the reading of fiction books. Parents who want their children to read fiction books frequently should have ...

  11. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of rRNA genes for molecular typing of members of the family Legionellaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsborg, J M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Colding, H

    1995-01-01

    Typing of Legionella pneumophila remains important in the investigation of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease and in the control of organisms contaminating hospital water. We found that the discriminatory power of a nonradioactive ribotyping method could be improved by combining results obtained...... of the combinations of enzymes used. Some strains belonging to the same serogroup were assigned to different ribotypes, and some ribotypes contained members of different serogroups, indicating, as others have found, that serogroup and genotype are not always related. The discriminatory power of the method...

  12. Acyclic cucurbit[n]uril-type molecular containers: influence of glycoluril oligomer length on their function as solubilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Laura; Zhang, Ben; Zavalij, Peter Y; Sindelar, Vladimir; Isaacs, Lyle

    2015-04-07

    We present the synthesis of a series of six new glycoluril derived molecular clips and acyclic CB[n]-type molecular containers (1–3) that all feature SO3(−) solubilizing groups but differ in the number of glycoluril rings between the two terminal dialkoxyaromatic sidewalls. We report the X-ray crystal structure of 3b which shows that its dialkoxynaphthalene sidewalls actively define a hydrophobic cavity with high potential to engage in π–π interactions with insoluble aromatic guests. Compounds 1–3 possess very good solubility characteristics (≥38 mM) and undergo only very weak self-association (Ks containers 3a and 3b which feature three glycoluril rings between the terminal dialkoxy-o-xylylene and dialkoxynaphthalene sidewalls are less efficient solubilizing agents than 4a and 4b because of their smaller hydrophobic cavities. Containers 1 and 2 behave as molecular clip type receptors and therefore possess the ability to bind to and thereby solubilize aromatic drugs like camptothecin, ziprasidone, and PBS-1086.

  13. Teaching Science Fact with Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raham, R. Gary

    2004-01-01

    The literature of science fiction packs up the facts and discoveries of science and runs off to futures filled with both wonders and warnings. Kids love to take the journeys it offers for the thrill of the ride, but they can learn as they travel, too. This book will provide the reader with: (1) an overview of the past 500 years of scientific…

  14. Reaching Nonscience Students through Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 I had the chance to design a physics course for students not majoring in scientific fields. I chose to shape the course around science fiction, not as a source for quantitative problems but as a means for conveying important physics concepts. I hoped that, by encountering these concepts in narratives, students with little or no science or…

  15. Understanding Management, Trade, and Society Through Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Robin; Zundel, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The article analyzes the television series "The Wire," focusing on elements of the series of interest in relation to management science. The authors discuss strengths of the show as fiction, including the density of its portrayal of urban life and its avoidance of closure. Other topics include...

  16. Fiction and Conviction | Blackburn | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I claim that there is nothing so unusual in the interleaving of myth or fiction and history that Williams finds in Herodotus. I also reflect on the difficulty of separating acceptance of truth from acceptance of myth, metaphor, and model, not only in history but also in science. Philosophical Papers Vol.32(3) 2003: 243-260 ...

  17. Stranger that fiction parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    Hautefeuille, Annie

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe -- correction: 'our' universe -- no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  18. Urban Image in Iranian Fiction Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ravadrad

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tehran as a symbol of Iranian modernity has been considered in many Iranian fiction films. Representation of Tehran in cinema can be the representation of Iranian modernity revolution. This study focuses on the representation of urban image in Iranian fiction films through critical theories such as Simmel or Benjamin opinions. In this article we discus about the mediator role of cinema for representing the Urban life Image and confliction of modernity in Iran.Meanwhile some megalopolis such as Paris, Berlin, Moscow, New York and sanpitersboorg est.…have had great opportunity for understanding confliction of modernity in their situation, Tehran has never have that chance. Regarding to this vacuum we want to explain the role of Iranian fiction films for understanding the entrance of modernity consequences in different eras. We believed that fiction films can represent confliction of city and village, represent of modern dualities, non cohesive rationality and many other gaps in Iranian modernity that we have to know.

  19. A COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF FICTIONAL PROSE STYLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KROEBER, KARL

    FUNDAMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FICTIONAL PROSE STYLE WERE STUDIED THROUGH SYSTEMATIC AND OBJECTIVE ANALYSES OF NOVELISTIC SYNTAX AND VOCABULARY. SAMPLE PASSAGES FROM THE MAJOR NOVELS OF JANE AUSTEN, THE BRONTE SISTERS, AND GEORGE ELIOT AS WELL AS NOVELS BY 13 OTHER AUTHORS WERE ANALYZED. INFORMATION ON PASSAGE SENTENCES, CLAUSES, AND WORDS WAS…

  20. Stranger than fiction parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too. We may not be able -- at least not yet -- to prove they exist, many serious scientists say, but there are plenty of reasons to think that parallel dimensions are more than figments of eggheaded imagination.

  1. Aphra Behn--Fiction: Sources for Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, and is intended to help students find sources of criticism on the fiction of the British Restoration writer, Aphra Behn. The guide explains important reference sources in the Atkins library reference collection and how to…

  2. Fiction and Religious Education: Be Not Afraid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siejk, Cate

    2009-01-01

    This article is the conversion story of a university professor and voracious reader who has always been afraid to incorporate fiction into her classes. It maps her journey from believing that novels and short stories are effective pedagogical tools only when they are in the hands of competent English professors to recognizing the innumerable…

  3. Online Fan Fiction, Global Identities, and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Rebecca W.

    2009-01-01

    Based on longitudinal data from a three year ethnographic study, this article uses discourse analytic methods to explore the literacy and social practices of three adolescent English language learners writing in an online fan fiction community. Theoretical constructs within globalization and literacy studies are used to describe the influences of…

  4. A Pedagogical Approach to Detective Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    One of the main concerns when teaching a foreign language is how to encourage students to read and become interested in its literature. This article presents detective fiction as a pedagogical tool that provides the key elements to make it appealing for young readers. In this way, the mystery, the action and the suspense in the story; the figure…

  5. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  6. Stranger than fiction: parallel universes beguile science

    CERN Multimedia

    Hautefeuille, Annie

    2007-01-01

    Is the universe-correction: 'our' universe-no more than a speck of cosmic dust amid an infinite number of parallel worlds? A staple of mind-bending science fiction, the possibility of multiple universes has long intrigued hard-nosed physicists, mathematicians and cosmologists too.

  7. Modern Kannada Fiction: A Critical Anthology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, M.G., Ed.; Ramanujan, A.K.

    This anthology of modern Kannada fiction is written for the second-year student of Kannada who has finished an intensive course such as is covered in "Kannada: A Cultural Introduction to the Spoken Styles of Language" (ED 016 196). It is assumed that the student is familiar with all the basic structures of the language and writing system and will…

  8. Sisters Hope - Protected by the Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawaetz, Anna; Hallberg, Gry Worre

    2011-01-01

    In this article we will introduce the fictional and art-pedagogical universe of Sisters Hope and describe how it in different ways transcends into contexts beyond the art world and thus functions as a tool to democratize the aesthetic dimension and mode of being within high schools, academia...

  9. Oral Insulin-Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  10. Stepping into Science Fiction: Understanding the Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Diane; Barone, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript focuses on fifth graders' understanding of science fiction. It is argued that it is necessary for students to understand both reading strategies and the key elements of a genre for comprehension. Students read "The Giver" within literature circles and conversation and written responses about the book were used for…

  11. Science Fiction, Ethics and the Human Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Christian; Halvorsen, Peter Nicolai; Cornea, Christine

    This book explores what science fiction can tell us about the human condition in a technological world (with the dilemma's and consequences that this entails) and also engages with the genre at points where we apparently find it on the far side of science, technology or human existence. As such, ...

  12. Hippocrates: facts and fiction | Retief | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hippocrates, the Father of Medicine, is reviewed as a historical person and in terms of his contribution to medicine in order to distinguish fact from fiction. Contemporary and later sources reveal that many (possibly untrue) legends accumulated around this enigmatic figure. The textual tradition and the composition of the ...

  13. Hybrid Fictionality and Vicarious Narrative Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatavara, Mari Annukka; Mildorf, Jarmila

    2017-01-01

    – an interview and an online museum exhibition – show that the employment of fictional modes of mind representation and cognitive attribution occur in conversational and documentary storytelling even if the reference is to the actual world. The results indicate that the procedures used to present and engage...

  14. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  15. Teaching Modern Literature: Poetry and Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damashek, Richard

    This monograph, part of a series for language arts teachers, discusses the essential components for teaching modern poetry and modern fiction. The section on modern poetry considers traditional versus modern poetry, modernism in poetry, imagism, the function of poetry in modern times, social change in poetry, and offers a brief list of recommended…

  16. The Structure of a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) Ruler Protein Suggests a Molecular Mechanism for Needle Length Sensing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Julien R. C.; Fernández, Lucia; Wasney, Gregory A.; Vuckovic, Marija; Reffuveille, Fany; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the bacterial flagellum are related pathogenicity-associated appendages found at the surface of many disease-causing bacteria. These appendages consist of long tubular structures that protrude away from the bacterial surface to interact with the host cell and/or promote motility. A proposed “ruler” protein tightly regulates the length of both the T3SS and the flagellum, but the molecular basis for this length control has remained poorly characterized and controversial. Using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa T3SS as a model system, we report the first structure of a T3SS ruler protein, revealing a “ball-and-chain” architecture, with a globular C-terminal domain (the ball) preceded by a long intrinsically disordered N-terminal polypeptide chain. The dimensions and stability of the globular domain do not support its potential passage through the inner lumen of the T3SS needle. We further demonstrate that a conserved motif at the N terminus of the ruler protein interacts with the T3SS autoprotease in the cytosolic side. Collectively, these data suggest a potential mechanism for needle length sensing by ruler proteins, whereby upon T3SS needle assembly, the ruler protein's N-terminal end is anchored on the cytosolic side, with the globular domain located on the extracellular end of the growing needle. Sequence analysis of T3SS and flagellar ruler proteins shows that this mechanism is probably conserved across systems. PMID:26589798

  17. Adiponectin, Leptin, and Chemerin in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Close Linkage with Obesity and Length of the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão Proença, Jorge; Neuparth, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and aging are closely associated and adipokines seem to have a crucial role in their pathophysiology. We aim to study the relationship between aging and chemerin, adiponectin, and leptin levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Age correlated positively with chemerin and leptin and inversely with adiponectin. Body mass index (BMI) correlated positively with leptin (in males) and chemerin and inversely with adiponectin. The patients with ≥65 years (n = 34) showed significantly higher leptin and chemerin and lower adiponectin levels than middle-aged (38–64 years) patients (n = 39) and controls (n = 20). After statistical adjustment for length of disease, there was a loss of significance, between T2DM groups, for adiponectin and, in female, for leptin. In the older group, BMI correlated with adiponectin and with leptin, but not with chemerin. Adiponectin and leptin levels in elderly T2DM patients seem to be closely linked to obesity and to length of the disease. In elderly T2DM patients, chemerin concentrations are increased and seem to be independent of length of disease and BMI, suggesting that adipocyte dysfunction is enhanced with aging. The understanding of the glucose homeostasis impairment in the elderly is mandatory in order to achieve ways to improve their quality of life and longevity. PMID:25105135

  18. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins

  19. European Urban Fictions in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hassenpflug

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Les fictions des cités européennes en Chine. À propos des travesties urbaines, des parodies et des transpositions mimétiques. En Chine règne une forme de Gründerzeit (années de fondation lors de l’ère wilhelminienne correspondant à une période d’expansion économique. Une des manifestations est le mouvement migratoire très important de la province vers les villes. Plus de 200 millions de travailleurs se précipitent ainsi actuellement vers les métropoles. Pour soulager ces grandes villes désormais pleines à craquer, s’est engagé un processus de construction de « villes-satellites » et de « villes-dortoirs» partout dans le pays. Dans ce contexte, on explore de nouvelles voies post-modernes qui se distinguent manifestement des planifications pour décharger les villes, en cours aux XIXe et XXe siècles. À souligner en particulier dans ce processus de construction sont notamment les« villes à thème » à travers lesquelles on essaie d’amener l’esprit de construction urbaine, l’art de vivre ou tout simplement l’image de cultures étrangères en Chine. Ces physionomies de villes « importées » des cultures occidentales se confrontent ainsi à un code urbain qui est caractérisé par un accroissement dense, une centralité linéaire-hiérarchique, des façades d’écrans et surtout par un dualisme prononcé entre un espace urbain fermé et un espace urbain ouvert. Cette dernière est représentée par des espaces de mobilité et de commerce. À l’inverse, l’espace fermé s’exprime en dehors des institutions de production, d’administration, d’éducation et de justice notamment par les lotissements. En Chine, les citadins habitent presque intégralement dans des voisinages clos (‘compounds’. Au final, toute orchestration de la ville chinoise se soumet à ce dualisme de l’espace ouvert et l’espace fermé.    L’article décrit et analyse les implications spatiales d’une transposition

  20. Fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of fundamental length was first put forward by Heisenberg from purely dimensional reasons. From a study of the observed masses of the elementary particles known at that time, it is sumrised that this length should be of the order of magnitude 1 approximately 10 -13 cm. It was Heisenberg's belief that introduction of such a fundamental length would eliminate the divergence difficulties from relativistic quantum field theory by cutting off the high energy regions of the 'proper fields'. Since the divergence difficulties arise primarily due to infinite number of degrees of freedom, one simple remedy would be the introduction of a principle that limits these degrees of freedom by removing the effectiveness of the waves with a frequency exceeding a certain limit without destroying the relativistic invariance of the theory. The principle can be stated as follows: It is in principle impossible to invent an experiment of any kind that will permit a distintion between the positions of two particles at rest, the distance between which is below a certain limit. A more elegant way of introducing fundamental length into quantum theory is through commutation relations between two position operators. In quantum field theory such as quantum electrodynamics, it can be introduced through the commutation relation between two interpolating photon fields (vector potentials). (K.B.)

  1. Young Adult Fiction by African American Writers, 1968-1993: A Critical and Annotated Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutenplon, Deborah; Olmstead, Ellen

    This bibliography presents annotations and critical appraisals of all fiction titles published between 1968 and 1993 by African American authors and targeting young adult readers--166 titles by 57 authors. Only works of fiction--historical fiction, modern realistic fiction, fantasy and science fiction, and mystery and suspense--by African American…

  2. A Study on Emotional Healing Efficacy of Fiction for Undergraduate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Su-May Sheih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern society, undergraduates may encounter multiple pressures and thus feel the sense of alienation, anxiety, disturbance and depression. For undergraduates, reading can be independently conducted without the intervention of an instructor; therefore, undergraduates who feel reluctant to expose private emotions to counselors can help themselves through the reading of emotional healing books. This is the application of bibliotherapy. Among various resources, fiction can serve as an appropriate emotional reading material. The researcher deployed semi-structured in-depth interview, and interviewed 21 undergraduates in Taipei City and Taipei County. This study is aimed to understand the kinds of fictions undergraduates read when they are upset and to analyze the emotional healing process of identification, catharsis, and insight so that the emotional healing efficacy can be evaluated. The findings showed that romance, realistic fiction, fantasy, martial arts novel, inspirational fiction, historical fiction, and science fiction can provide full process of emotional healing efficacy. However, detective fiction, online novel, psychological fiction, and horror fiction can only provide parts of the healing process. Besides, the healing efficacy of a specific fiction is different from reader to reader.

  3. Based on Brevity: Fiction in 140 Characters or Less

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritika Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how short-short stories published on social media platforms such asFacebook and Twitter experiment with brevity. It examines the use of devices such as planned spaces between words, colors, and enjambments, a genre called twitter fiction, to deliver the literary after-taste of ‘byte-sized’ fiction. What are the ramifications, requirements, and results of this form of brevity? Since the works are written and published on/for the digital media, what other aids supplement the reading process, if any? What forms of innovation does this conciseness allow? Two platforms of reading and writing short-short stories (of 140 characters or less will be used to examine these questions: Terribly Tiny Tales on Facebook and Very Short Story (@veryshortstoryon Twitter. Keywords: digital humanities, twitter fiction, brevity, short story, technology, social mediaThe six-word story by Ernest Hemingway, written in the 1920s, can be seen as an exemplary precursor to the recent burgeoning of short-short stories on Twitter and Facebook. To clearly define the term in the context of length is a complicated process as not only do short-short stories have different names, there is no fixity in terms of how short they must be or which style or form they deal with – ranging from myths and fables to serialized novels. However, works that are strictly 140 characters or less come under the subset of short-short stories and are popularly known as ‘140 stories,’ ‘short-shorts,’ and ‘very short stories.’ These are mostly published on social platforms like Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and personal blogs to allow immediacy in writing, self-publishing, and reaching out to an audience. Restricting the work to this minimum character limit allows the writer to publish the work across different social platforms.Therefore, the underlining requirement of this form of literature is that it must be brief. This becomes the first and the most important

  4. The Structure of a Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) Ruler Protein Suggests a Molecular Mechanism for Needle Length Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Julien R C; Fernández, Lucia; Wasney, Gregory A; Vuckovic, Marija; Reffuveille, Fany; Hancock, Robert E W; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2016-01-22

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the bacterial flagellum are related pathogenicity-associated appendages found at the surface of many disease-causing bacteria. These appendages consist of long tubular structures that protrude away from the bacterial surface to interact with the host cell and/or promote motility. A proposed "ruler" protein tightly regulates the length of both the T3SS and the flagellum, but the molecular basis for this length control has remained poorly characterized and controversial. Using the Pseudomonas aeruginosa T3SS as a model system, we report the first structure of a T3SS ruler protein, revealing a "ball-and-chain" architecture, with a globular C-terminal domain (the ball) preceded by a long intrinsically disordered N-terminal polypeptide chain. The dimensions and stability of the globular domain do not support its potential passage through the inner lumen of the T3SS needle. We further demonstrate that a conserved motif at the N terminus of the ruler protein interacts with the T3SS autoprotease in the cytosolic side. Collectively, these data suggest a potential mechanism for needle length sensing by ruler proteins, whereby upon T3SS needle assembly, the ruler protein's N-terminal end is anchored on the cytosolic side, with the globular domain located on the extracellular end of the growing needle. Sequence analysis of T3SS and flagellar ruler proteins shows that this mechanism is probably conserved across systems. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Molecular typing of Iranian mycobacteria isolates by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 360-bp rpoB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadifar, Shima; Moghim, Sharareh; Fazeli, Hossein; GhasemianSafaei, Hajieh; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Farid, Fariba; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and typing of Mycobacterium genus provides basic tools for investigating the epidemiology and pathogenesis of this group of bacteria. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) is an accurate method providing diagnosis and typing of species of mycobacteria. The present study is conducted by the purpose of determining restriction fragment profiles of common types of mycobacteria by PRA method of rpoB gene in this geographical region. Totally 60 clinical and environmental isolates from February to October, 2013 were collected and subcultured and identified by phenotypic methods. A 360 bp fragment of the rpoB gene amplified by PCR and products were digested by MspI and HaeIII enzymes. In the present study, of all mycobacteria isolates identified by PRA method, 13 isolates (21.66%) were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 34 isolates (56.66%) were rapidly growing Nontuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) that including 26 clinical isolates (43.33%) and 8 environmental isolates (13.33%), 11 isolates (18.33%) were clinical slowly growing NTM. among the clinical NTM isolates, Mycobacterium fortuitum Type I with the frequency of 57.77% was the most prevalent type isolates. Furthermore, an unrecorded of the PRA pattern of Mycobacterium conceptionense (HeaIII: 120/90/80, MspI: 120/105/80) was found. This study demonstrated that the PRA method was high discriminatory power for identification and typing of mycobacteria species and was able to identify 96.6% of all isolates. Based on the result of this study, rpoB gene could be a potentially useful tool for identification and investigation of molecular epidemiology of mycobacterial species.

  6. THE FUNCTIONS OF VIENNESE DIALECT IN THE WORKS OF MODERN AUSTRIAN FICTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukshis Vadim Andreevich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of definition of linguistic status of the Austrian dialects and their functions in Austrian fiction continues to preserve the academic value. The main peculiarities of Viennese dialect are given, the conclusions of its status among the other Austrian dialects are made in the article, the characteristic features of the functions of the Viennese dialect are given in the works of Austrian fiction. The author of the article proceeds from the position that the Viennese dialect is the important stylistic means and makes the conclusion about its functions in the works of Austrian fiction. Three novels and one story of modern Austrian writers have been selected for the analysis: H. Anderle (The Worthy Funeral. The Mortal Histories, E. Menasse (Vienna, F. Nabl (Edhof, P Campa (The Second Travel. The article studies four functions of Viennese dialect based on the research of the texts of the Austrian fiction works. The analysis based on the utterances of the heroes helped to prove that Austrian writers use the Viennese dialect as 1 means of marking the regional characteristics; 2 means of marking the age; 3 means of marking the social type and 4 means of emotions expression. The research of the speech of the heroes permitted to reveal the most common Viennese words and expressions and demonstrate their role in the texts not only as the means of creating the speech portrait of the heroes but only the markers of the originality of modern Austrian German.

  7. Preschoolers can infer general rules governing fantastical events in fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vondervoort, Julia W; Friedman, Ori

    2014-05-01

    Young children are frequently exposed to fantastic fiction. How do they make sense of the unrealistic and impossible events that occur in such fiction? Although children could view such events as isolated episodes, the present experiments suggest that children use such events to infer general fantasy rules. In 2 experiments, 2- to 4-year-olds were shown scenarios in which 2 animals behaved unrealistically (N = 78 in Experiment 1, N = 94 in Experiment 2). When asked to predict how other animals in the fiction would behave, children predicted novel behaviors consistent with the nature of the fiction. These findings suggest that preschoolers can infer the general rules that govern the events and entities in fantastic fiction and can use these rules to predict what events will happen in the fiction. The findings also provide evidence that children may infer fantasy rules at a more superordinate level than the basic level. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. [Pathology and pathologists in fiction revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizze, H

    2008-11-01

    Pathology and pathologists are rarely the subjects of works of fiction. In the existing sources, the kind of representation naturally depends on the occupations and attitudes of the respective authors. The surgeon and gynecologist Carl Ludwig Schleich recollected Rudolf Virchow's free and easy handling of an autopsy assistant and his simultaneous understanding for a mourning husband. The dermatologist Gottfried Benn processed his disturbing impressions of pathology as an expressionistic dialogue between professor and students, with a violent ending. The writer and dramatic adviser Günther Weisenborn recalled unpleasant details about the autopsy course in his earlier medical studies, which he linked with individual views about the life of a deceased young woman. Praise, so to speak, to the dissecting pathologist have been sensitively written by the lawyer Maxence van der Meersch and by the surgeon Peter Bamm. Finally, the bestselling novelist Arthur Hailey gives an excellent fictional portrayal of the microscopic pathologist in The Final Diagnosis.

  9. Some like it bad: testing a model on perceiving and experiencing fictional characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijn, E.A.; Hoorn, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    We developed an encompassing theory that explains how readers of fiction and spectators of motion pictures establish affective relationships with fictional characters (FCs). The perceiving and experiencing fictional characters (PEFiC) theory is anchored in art perception, psychological aesthetics,

  10. Science Fiction and Ontologies of Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Vizmuller-Zocco

    2014-01-01

    The role of leadership in science fiction receives a particular analysis which is based on what can be termed transhumanist novels published in Italy between 2008 and 2013. The main purpose of this study is to answer the following question: What happens to (the nature of) leadership in a technologically-driven society? Four novels form the backbone of the description of futuristic leadership. The four conclusions drawn from this analysis regarding the nature of leadership in a technologically...

  11. Wordplay, mindplay: Fan fiction and postclassical narratology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Van Steenhuyse

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent narrative theories on story worlds, or the worlds evoked by narratives, call attention to the process of fan reading and the role which the canon plays in that process. This paper posits that such theories can help us understand literary techniques that make a difference on the level of the reading experience that is implied by fan fiction texts. This is illustrated with a close reading of Naguabo's "The Mother of All Marriage Proposals," a Jane Austen fic.

  12. Multimodal Diversity of Postmodernist Fiction Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. I. Tykha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of structural and functional manifestations of multimodal diversity in postmodernist fiction texts. Multimodality is defined as the coexistence of more than one semiotic mode within a certain context. Multimodal texts feature a diversity of semiotic modes in the communication and development of their narrative. Such experimental texts subvert conventional patterns by introducing various semiotic resources – verbal or non-verbal.

  13. Radical Homemaking in Contemporary American Environmental Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Kristin J. Jacobson

    2018-01-01

    Ursula K. Heise in ‘Ecocriticism and the Transnational Turn in American Studies’ critiques ‘the portrayal of multicultural and sometimes transnational nuclear families as the narrative solution to environmental and political problems’ (Heise, 2008: 383). This essay places Heise’s critique of the ‘ecological family romance’ in conversation with three other ecological domestic fictions: T. C. Boyle’s 'A Friend of the Earth' (2000), Jonathan Franzen’s 'Freedom' (2010), and Barbara Kingsolver’s '...

  14. Fascinating! Popular Science Communication and Literary Science Fiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Some see literary Science Fiction as a possible vehicle for critical discussions about the future development and the ethical implications of science-based technologies. According to that understanding, literary Science Fiction constitutes a variety of science communication. Along related lines......, popular science communication with science fiction features might be expected to serve a similar purpose. Only, it is far from obvious that it actually works that way....

  15. POPULAR TV FICTION, MEDIASCAPE, AND MALAY CULTURAL IDENTITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Idrus, Mohd Muzhafar; Hashim, Ruzy Suliza; M, Raihanah M.; Sidek, Harison Mohd; Baharun, Hazleena; Mat Saad, Noor Saazai; Abdul Hamid, Yurni Emilia; Selamat, Suzanah

    2016-01-01

    In Malaysia, a number of issues have transpiredconcerning the proliferation of TV fiction. Many of these complicationsinclude, but are not limited to concerns regarding feminism, patriarchy, economicimbalance, equity, power, social inequity, and religion. In this paper, we aimto locate TV fiction and Malay cultural identities across mediascape. Twoprimary objectives are central; firstly, this review embodies contextualizationof TV fiction through examining some trajectories in which many popu...

  16. Genetic Typing of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP and Identification of a New Subtype in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuta Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis was developed for genetic typing of Polish strains of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV. The method was applied using 60 BVDV isolates, which included BVDV genotype 1, subtypes a, b, d, e, f, and g, and genotype 2a. RT-PCR products of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR were digested using three enzymes. Restriction patterns classified the strains into seven groups, each with a specific and different pattern from other subtypes. These findings were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results suggest that RFLP analysis is a simple, reliable, and fast genotyping method for BVDV strains in comparison with sequencing. This method can distinguish six subtypes of BVDV-1 including a new subtype 1e, identified exclusively by this method, and it allows differentiation of BVDV-1 from BVDV-2 genotype.

  17. The living dead: fiction, horror, and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belling, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Popular fiction responds to, and may exacerbate, public anxieties in ways that more highbrow literary texts may not. Robin Cook's 1977 novel Coma exemplifies the ways in which medical thrillers participate in the public discourse about health care. Written shortly after the medical establishment promoted "irreversible coma," or brain death, as a new definition of dying, and at a time when the debate over the removal of Karen Ann Quinlan from life support was the subject of popular attention, Coma crystallized public fears over the uses of medical technology. While Cook hoped that Coma would encourage public participation in health-care decision-making, the book may have fueled public concerns about medicine in ways that he did not anticipate. The public engagement that accompanied the rise of bioethics and that led to increased transparency and patient autonomy in medical decision-making had its birth, in part, in the distrust and paranoia reflected in the medical thriller. Because fiction can shape public perceptions of health-care dilemmas and may affect decision-making on bioethical issues, bioethicists need to pay attention to popular fictional accounts of medicine.

  18. Discovery Mondays: 'Separating science from fiction'

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Photo credit: ESA/NASA, the AVO project and Paolo PadovaniDoes the imaginary word of fiction always end up becoming scientific reality? What futuristic visions can we extrapolate from today's technologies? Here is a short quiz to test your knowledge. Can YOU tell truth from fiction? True False The laser swords featuring in the Star Wars films really exist. Time travel is possible using black holes. You could eat a cake of antimatter. Levitation vehicles really exist. Dan Brown is a space alien. How can you distinguish truth from fiction, dreams from reality, real science and technology from the sci-fi fantasies so realistically described in novels, television and cinema? You are invited to come and discuss these questions at a Discovery Monday at the very frontiers of science..... Join us at Microcosm (Reception, Building 33, Meyrin site), on Monday, 4 September from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Entrance Free The event will be conducted in French. http://www.cern.ch/LundisDecouverte/ ...

  19. What's in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Lisa M; Barber, Rebecca T; Wynne, Clive D L

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters.

  20. What’s in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Lisa M.; Barber, Rebecca T.; Wynne, Clive D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters. PMID:27008213

  1. What's in a Name? Effect of Breed Perceptions & Labeling on Attractiveness, Adoptions & Length of Stay for Pit-Bull-Type Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Gunter

    Full Text Available Previous research has indicated that certain breeds of dogs stay longer in shelters than others. However, exactly how breed perception and identification influences potential adopters' decisions remains unclear. Current dog breed identification practices in animal shelters are often based upon information supplied by the relinquishing owner, or staff determination based on the dog's phenotype. However, discrepancies have been found between breed identification as typically assessed by welfare agencies and the outcome of DNA analysis. In Study 1, the perceived behavioral and adoptability characteristics of a pit-bull-type dog were compared with those of a Labrador Retriever and Border Collie. How the addition of a human handler influenced those perceptions was also assessed. In Study 2, lengths of stay and perceived attractiveness of dogs that were labeled as pit bull breeds were compared to dogs that were phenotypically similar but were labeled as another breed at an animal shelter. The latter dogs were called "lookalikes." In Study 3, we compared perceived attractiveness in video recordings of pit-bull-type dogs and lookalikes with and without breed labels. Lastly, data from an animal shelter that ceased applying breed labeling on kennels were analyzed, and lengths of stay and outcomes for all dog breeds, including pit bulls, before and after the change in labeling practice were compared. In total, these findings suggest that breed labeling influences potential adopters' perceptions and decision-making. Given the inherent complexity of breed assignment based on morphology coupled with negative breed perceptions, removing breed labels is a relatively low-cost strategy that will likely improve outcomes for dogs in animal shelters.

  2. ‘Every age gets the art it deserves’ ‐ science fiction : history, background and definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Vassallo, Clare; Callus, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    It would be logical to commence this essay by attempting to identify the approximate locus of SF within the general corpus of literature as perceived by the academy. Fiction might here be seen as having four main categories: canonical fiction (the classics), serious fiction that strives to become canonical, plain fiction (best sellers or general works) and junk fiction: popular and gauche fiction that includes mysteries, thrillers, westerns, romances, fantasy, and SF. It has been argued that ...

  3. Comprimento da estaca e tipo de substrato na propagação vegetativa de atroveran Shoot cutting length and substrate types on vegetative propagation of atroveran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Corrêa do Bomfim Costa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A propagação vegetativa de espécies medicinais vem despertando interesse das pesquisas agronômicas, uma vez que se constitui no ponto de partida e em ferramenta básica para qualquer cultivo em escala comercial. Este trabalho objetivou determinar o comprimento de estaca e o tipo de substrato mais adequados para a propagação vegetativa de atroveran. Em condições de casa de vegetação sob nebulização intermitente, foram testados dois comprimentos de estacas (10 e 20cm e três substratos (areia lavada, casca de arroz carbonizada e substrato comercial Plantmax®, em delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições e cinco estacas por parcela. Aos trinta e cinco dias, foram avaliados a porcentagem de enraizamento, o comprimento da maior raiz (cm e a biomassa seca das folhas e das raízes (mg. Os resultados indicaram que a propagação vegetativa de atroveran por meio de estaquia é viável, uma vez que o seu enraizamento médio ficou acima de 70%. As mudas de atroveran obtidas de estacas com 20cm apresentaram maior biomassa seca das folhas e das raízes, apesar de o comprimento da estaca não ter afetado a porcentagem de enraizamento e o comprimento da raiz. Os tipos de substrato não proporcionaram efeito sobre o desenvolvimento das estacas de atroveran. Recomenda-se a produção de mudas de atroveran com estacas de 20cm de comprimento, utilizando-se qualquer um dos três substratos testados.The vegetative propagation of medicinal species is in increasing agronomic interest because it is the starting point and a basic tool for any cultivation in commercial scale. The objective of this work was to determine the best shoot cutting length and the best substrate for vegetative propagation of Ocimum selloi. Cuttings were placed in greenhouse conditions under intermittent mist. Two cutting sizes (10 and 20cm and three substrate types (washed sand, carbonized rice hulls and commercial substrate Plantmax® were tested

  4. Differences in Use and Function of Verbal Irony between Real and Fictional Discourse: (Mis)interpretation and Irony Blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Kapogianni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a contrastive approach to the presence of two distinct types of verbal irony in real (natural, unscripted) versus fictional (scripted) discourse, with a special focus on irony blindness, i.e. the inability to recognize ironic utterances. Irony strategies are categorized into two general types, based on the relationship between the expressed and the intended meaning (Type 1: meaning reversal and Type 2: meaning replacement). First, the differences between these two types ar...

  5. Quelques commentaires sur les personnages de fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Eco

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available L’auteur met en place des observations et développe des analyses sur le statut des personnages de fiction, mettant à contribution les ressources de l’histoire, de la littérature, de la sémiotique, de la logique et de la narratologie. De quelle vie particulière vivent les personnages de roman, qui fait que nous sommes capables de les tenir pour plus réels que des personnages réels, et que nous sommes enclins à éprouver les sentiments qu’ils éprouvent, même si nous savons qu’ils n’existent pas ? Comment ces personnages de fiction existent-ils, selon quelle « partition » leur existence se développe-t-elle au point d’interférer avec la nôtre ? L’interrogation porte sur la nature de ce flux émotionnel qui s’écoule du lecteur vers les personnages de fiction et les investit de valeur, sur ce qui se projette de la vie vers le roman, entraînant avec lui le lecteur qui se trouve de la sorte impliqué malgré lui dans l’histoire, et se trouve pris dans le mécanisme de l’identification et de la vie fictive.Some commentaries about fiction charactersPutting into form a number of observations and developing an analysis on the status of fiction characters, the author draws on resources coming from history, literature, semiotic, logic et narration. What is that particular life lived by fiction characters that enable us to consider them as being more real than real characters, and to experience the feelings that they experience, even though we know that they do not exist? How do these characters exist? In other words, according to what “script” does their existence develop to the point of interfering with ours? The questioning centres on the nature of the emotional flux which flows from the reader towards the fictional characters thus giving them value, and on what it is which is projected from real life towards the novel and which is capable of sweeping up the reader who, without having particularly intended to do

  6. Le langage et la fiction : la description linguistique de la fiction littéraire

    OpenAIRE

    Chalonge, Florence de

    2016-01-01

    La fiction ne concerne pas seulement la littérature. On sait qu’elle a une existence en tant que concept qu’elle intervient en philosophie et dans les disciplines scientifiques pour renvoyer au domaine heuristique ; de même, en droit, la fiction légale s’apparente à la supposition qui sert à établir un fondement juridique. Aujourd’hui, la fiction écrite se trouve également concurrencée par les nombreux mondes virtuels proposés par les ordinateurs – ces fictions électroniques –, ou plus simple...

  7. High-Resolution Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing of Lactococcus lactis Strains Enables Identification of Genetic Markers for Subspecies-Related Phenotypes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütahya, Oylum Erkus; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology was developed to achieve the delineation of closely related Lactococcus lactis strains. The differentiation depth of 24 enzyme-primer-nucleotide combinations was experimentally evaluated to maximize the number of polymorphisms. The resolution depth was confirmed by performing diversity analysis on 82 L. lactis strains, including both closely and distantly related strains with dairy and nondairy origins. Strains clustered into two main genomic lineages of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genotypes and a third novel genomic lineage rooted from the L. lactis subsp. lactis genomic lineage. Cluster differentiation was highly correlated with small-subunit rRNA homology and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) studies. Additionally, the selected enzyme-primer combination generated L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype-specific fragments irrespective of the genotype. These phenotype-specific markers allowed the differentiation of L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype from L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype strains within the same L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genomic lineage, illustrating the potential of AFLP for the generation of phenotype-linked genetic markers. PMID:21666014

  8. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Macek, K J

    1980-01-01

    A brief history of the development of the field of aquatic toxicology is provided. In order to provide a perspective on the state-of-the-art in aquatic toxicology relative to classical toxicology, the two fields are compared from the standpoint of the type of scientist practicing each field, the respective objectives of each, the forces which drive the activity in each field, and the major advantages and disadvantages accruing to the practitioner of aquatic toxicology as a result of the diffe...

  9. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by region of differentiation-typing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaki, Seydeh Zeinab; Mosavari, Nader; Nazari, Razieh; Akbarian, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common zoonotic infectious diseases in the world. Identification of Mycobacterium isolates is essential for proper treatment of TB. The aim of this study was to identify Mycobacterium isolates collected from TB patients in Alborz Province, Iran, by region of differentiation (RD)-typing. Fifty samples from tuberculosis patients were cultured in pyruvate and glycerinated Lowenstein-Jensen medium. DNA was extracted from the isolates by the van Solingen method and subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-16SrRNA, PCR-IS6110, and RD-typing with primers RD1, RD4, RD9, and RD12, respectively. Out of 50 isolates, only one isolate appeared negative in IS6110-PCR and was considered nontuberculosis complex. The remaining isolates gave PCR products of approximately 543bp, 245bp, 146bp, 172bp, 235bp, and 369bp with 16s-rRNA, IS6110-PCR, RD-1, RD-4, RD-9, and RD-12 PCR, respectively. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of oxyR pseudogene confirmed the results. All isolates except one from Alborz Province appeared positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Based on the obtained results, all isolates except one were identified as M. tuberculosis. The only negative isolate appeared 93% and 97% similar to Nocardia or Mycobacterium sp. (Mycobacterium neoaurum), respectively, based on sequencing and alignment of 16s-rRNA and hsp65. Accurate identification of Mycobacterium isolates is of utmost importance for proper and immediate treatment of TB patients. In this study, RD-typing appeared to be a suitable method for correct identification of M. tuberculosis isolates. Copyright © 2016.

  10. Fictions et interactions : les fictions artistiques et la question de l’espace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Guelton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dans cette courte présentation, je vais esquisser quelques questions sur les rapports possibles entre l’espace et la fiction puis je vais faire un aperçu sur l’évolution de la ligne de recherche Fictions et interactions. Dans la première partie, je vais aborder trois questions : 1 le rapport entre la fiction et l’espace des images, 2 les espaces immersifs et 3 trois exemples d’oeuvres artistiques et performatives qui mettent en jeu les espaces en réalités alternées. RESUMO Nessa curta apresentação, vou esboçar algumas questões sobre as relações possíveis entre o espaço e a ficção, depois farei um panorama da evolução da linha de pesquisa Fictions & Interactions (Ficções & Interações. Na primeira parte abordarei três questões: 1 a relação entre a ficção e a espacialidade das imagens; 2 os espaços imersivos; e 3 três exemplos de obras artísticas e performativas que põem em jogo a noção de espaço em realidades alternadas. PALAVRAS-CHAVE Ficção, espaço, imersão.

  11. Fiction and fictions: On Ricoeur on the route to the self | Beck | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In reaching his narrative view of the self in Oneself as Another, Paul Ricoeur argues that, while literature offers revealing insights into the nature of the self, the sort of fictions involving brain transplants, fission, and so on, that philosophers often take seriously do not (and cannot). My paper is a response to Ricoeur's charge ...

  12. Helicobacter pylori: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, M G

    1990-01-01

    The recent isolation and classification of the spiral gastric bacteria Helicobacter pylori has led to an explosion of worldwide research. The data strongly suggest that H. pylori is the causative agent for type-B active chronic gastritis. The role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer awaits clarification, and, more importantly, potential treatment regimens need clear documentation and further detailed research. The past decade has revealed many intriguing facts about H. pylori infection. If, during the 1990s, eradication of H. pylori by means of appropriate and safe medication can lead to the control and prevention of gastroduodenal disease, then major clinical and economic benefits can be anticipated.

  13. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, K J

    1980-02-01

    A brief history of the development of the field of aquatic toxicology is provided. In order to provide a perspective on the state-of-the-art in aquatic toxicology relative to classical toxicology, the two fields are compared from the standpoint of the type of scientist practicing each field, the respective objectives of each, the forces which drive the activity in each field, and the major advantages and disadvantages accruing to the practitioner of aquatic toxicology as a result of the differences in objectives and driving forces.

  14. The Pleasures of Reading Mystery Fiction and Mystery Readers’ Book Selection Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu-Yen Wu; Chi-Shiou Lin

    2016-01-01

    The mystery fiction is a popular pleasure reading genre in Taiwan. This article describes a grounded theory study that explored the reading pleasures and selection behavior of mystery fans. Based on the in-depth interview with 21 engaged mystery readers, this study identified seven types of reading pleasures, i.e., a sense of achievement from puzzle solving, feelings of amazement from the revelation of truths, satisfaction of curiosity for the unknown, a sense of compensation from seeing just...

  15. Teaching Evolution with the Aid of Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Students obtain much misinformation from TV and movies. Teachers can use the analysis of science fiction to correct misconceptions about biology and spur students' interests in the subject. Suggestions for discussions and assignments based on literary-quality science fiction works are included.

  16. The Double Helix: Why Science Needs Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Athena

    2003-01-01

    Discusses why science needs science fiction, commenting on the author's book about science that draws heavily on the "Star Trek" series. The best science, in spite of popular thinking, comes from leaps of intuition, and science fiction provides a creative spark that encourages participation in science. (SLD)

  17. Critique and Fiction: Doing Science Right in Rural Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Craig

    2009-01-01

    This essay explains the relevance of fiction to the practice of rural education research, in so doing engaging questions about the nature and purposes of research and, therefore, of science itself. Although many may assume science and fiction (in this account, novels) harbor contrary purposes and devices, this essay argues that, to the contrary,…

  18. Science Fiction Handbook, Revised: A Guide to Writing Imaginative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camp, L. Sprague; de Camp, Catherine C.

    This book provides the general reader with an introduction to the field of imaginative fiction. The first two chapters describe the growth of science fiction from Aristophanes to Asimov and give the history of its parent literature, fantasy. The rest of the book affords the apprentice writer an overview of skills necessary for creating imaginative…

  19. Bridget Jones Meets Mr. Darcy: Challenges of Contemporary Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Justine

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study seeks to investigate the collection practices of English Literature librarians with regard to contemporary fiction, including popular genres such as detective fiction and "chick lit". Results of an online survey suggest literature librarians are increasingly receptive to the acquisition of popular genres and identify the…

  20. LIFE AS FICTION, OR SOME NOTES ON ANTERO DE QUENTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Figueiredo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of essayistic route of Antero de Quental . Analysis of the main ideas of Quental's thought and its relation with the biographical path of the poet. The (re creation of fictional "A genius who was a saint", according Eça de Queiroz . The biography as a form of fictional writing.

  1. Inviting Spaces: First Person Narrative in Young Adult Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, Emma

    2000-01-01

    Examines some of the characteristics of third-person narrative used commonly in teenage fiction prior to the 1990's. Explores whether first person narrative actually provides a more engaging mode of reading, and how exactly it does this. Concludes that teenagers are responding to Young Adult fiction enthusiastically because these books are very…

  2. Politely Disregarded: Street Fiction, Mass Incarceration, and Critical Praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orman, Karin; Lyiscott, Jamila

    2013-01-01

    Due to prevailing attitudes about the prison industrial complex and African American and Latino/Latina communities, the literary production of urban street fiction has been politely disregarded by our society. Through the use of critical praxis, utilizing urban street fiction in the classroom is a necessary and urgent act of social justice. Street…

  3. The Role of Fiction in Experiments within Design, Art & Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, Eva; Markussen, Thomas; Christensen, Poul Rind

    2013-01-01

    of critique; (3) design aims; (4) materializations and forms; and (5) the aesthetic of design fictions. The typology is premised on the idea that fiction may integrate with reality in many different ways in design experiments. The explanatory power of the typology is exemplified through the analyses of 6 case...

  4. Fiction as an Introduction to Computer Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Judy; Mattei, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The undergraduate computer science curriculum is generally focused on skills and tools; most students are not exposed to much research in the field, and do not learn how to navigate the research literature. We describe how fiction reviews (and specifically science fiction) are used as a gateway to research reviews. Students learn a little about…

  5. Pairing Books for Learning: The Union of Informational and Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Allison L.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to present an annotated bibliography of paired books--one fiction and one informational--about multiple topics in history and social studies that, when read together, can help support students' learning through experiencing the topic from multiple perspectives and voices. It begins with a brief rationale for pairing fiction and…

  6. Fact or Fiction? Libraries Can Thrive in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Today's school library uses an increasing number of digital resources to supplement a print collection that is moving more toward fiction and literary non-fiction. Supplemental resources, including streaming video, online resources, subscription databases, audiobooks, e-books, and even games, round out the new collections. Despite the best…

  7. Science Fiction and Introductory Sociology: The "Handmaid" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laz, Cheryl

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the uses of science fiction to teach sociology and develop critical and creative thinking. Maintains that in the last 20 years science fiction has become concerned increasingly with social themes. Concludes with a detailed description of the use of "The Handmaid's Tale" in an introductory sociology course. (MJP)

  8. The Muse and the Masses: Popular Fiction in Literature Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jan

    Popular literature consists of novels, stories, and essays--and by extension, plays, movies, and teledramas--that attract a significant audience. Having students study popular fiction in English classes can help to "hook" the non-reader because popular fiction is more accessible and simpler in structure and language than the literary classics.…

  9. A training purpose for the Bachelor: physics and Fiction Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacas Leal, P.; Martin, M.J.; Perera Cendal, F.; Pizarro Galan, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Science fiction can be used in the classroom as a fantastic narrative which exploits the imaginative outlooks of modern science. In this paper some of the teaching prospects which science fiction offers are analysed, and for instance, those offered by A.C. Clarke's Maelstrom II are developed. (Author)

  10. Reflections on Science Fiction in Light of Today's Global Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiex, Patrick K.

    Science fiction is a literary genre that can be used in humanities courses to discuss ideas, attitudes, ethics, morality, and the effects of science and technology on the world's population. One of the best examples of a "classic" science fiction novel which can provoke class discussion is Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World,"…

  11. Textbook vs. Historical Fiction: Impact on Social Studies Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding historical fiction novels as a supplement to the textbook in an eighth grade social studies course. This qualitative study focused on student interest and feedback as their social studies class was altered through the addition of historical fiction novels. The research questions were…

  12. Amazing Stories: Acquiring and Avoiding Inaccurate Information from Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, David N.; Hinze, Scott R.; Slaten, Daniel G.; Horton, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Authors of fiction need not provide accurate accounts of the world, which might generate concern about the kinds of information people can acquire from narratives. Research has demonstrated that readers liberally encode and rely upon the information provided in fictional stories. To date, materials used to demonstrate these effects have largely…

  13. Sifting through the Essential Fictions of Nonfiction: Contextualizing Ben Franklin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Karl

    One of the greatest myths or fictions of nonfiction is that it contains no fiction. Ben Franklin's flight from Boston to Philadelphia illustrates how changes occur in the retelling of the "facts" of a life. In his "Autobiography," Franklin writes that his friend, Collins, arranged for a ship's passage for Franklin by telling…

  14. A Fictional Dialogue on Infinitude of Primes: Introducing Virtual Duoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazkis, Rina; Koichu, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We introduce "virtual duoethnography" as a novel research approach in mathematics education, in which researchers produce a text of a dialogic format in the voices of fictional characters, who present and contrast different perspectives on the nature of a particular mathematical phenomenon. We use fiction as a form of research linked to…

  15. Auto-fictional narratives about death in the family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    What are the interrelations of fiction-based and non-fiction based research? In this presentation I explore these interrelations through researching, retracing, and writing about my father’s suicide. In tandem, I consider the methodological issues of using narratives – that they enable a reader t...

  16. Science Fiction at the Far Side of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2017-01-01

    . Further, those with a concern for the future may find inspiration in what a study of the politics and ethics of science fiction can tell us about the moral and political dilemmas of our own time. Although this book is more likely to be picked up by someone who already has an interest in science fiction...

  17. The construction of fictional space in participatory design practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the creation of fictional space in participatory design and relates the notion of fictional space to the more general conception of design space as a space created through the situated practices of participants. The notion of fictional space provides insights for understanding...... the process through which participants in participatory design create a design space in which established conventions of everyday practice are altered or suspended. With inspiration from literary theory, it is argued that the production of fictional space may be understood in terms of participants practicing...... games of make-believe mediated by props. The motivation for discussing fictional space is traced through ongoing work on designing new exhibition spaces for museums. Through a case study from a participatory design session, it is explored how games of make-believe progress and the role of props...

  18. Princesses, Princes, and Superheroes: Children's Gender Cognitions and Fictional Characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinella, Lisa M; Claps, Juliana M; Lewandowski, Gary W

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to identify whether children recognize the gender stereotypes prevalent within the increasingly popular princess, prince, and superhero characters. Interviews with 126 children from the northeast region of the Unites States (3-11 years old) indicated that children recognized the gender-typed personality traits of princesses, princes, and superheroes, with older children holding more gender-typed cognitions about the characters. Children's own-schemas (i.e., beliefs that apply to themselves) and superordinate schemas (i.e., include beliefs about others' preferences and behaviors) for the characters were mostly gender typed and congruent. Older children gender-typed princesses as for girls more than younger children, whereas older children considered superheroes to be for boys and girls more than younger children did. Older children also considered the characters to be for them less, potentially reducing the negative implications of exposure to gender-typed messages associated with the characters. Individual differences exist in children's perceptions of these fictional characters, with children's own androgyny being positively correlated with their perceptions of princesses' androgyny levels. Further, girls were more flexible in their stereotyping of princesses, noting they were "for girls and boys" more. The authors discuss the results' practical and theoretical implications.

  19. Abyssal fiction: common shares, colonial cleavages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Montaury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to develop a reflection on the interaction between the legacies of colonialism and traditional symbolic and cultural practices in African Portuguese-speaking spaces. From a preliminary analysis of fictional texts of wide circulation in Brazil, aims to examine the cleavages, or “abyssal lines” that constitute experiences printed in the daily life of the former Portuguese colony of Cape Verde, Mozambique and Angola.---DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21881/abriluff.2016n17a378

  20. Children's Contemporary Realistic Fiction Portraying Dyslexic Characters: An Examination of the Issues Confronted and the Gender of the Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-seven contemporary realistic fiction children's books portraying a dyslexic character were published in the United States between 1993 and 2003. This study examined the texts to determine what types of issues the reading difficulty posed for the character. Texts were analyzed to determine if there was a relationship between the gender of…

  1. Social Robots, fiction, and sentimentality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodogno, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    I examine the nature of human-robot pet relations that appear to involve genuine affective responses on behalf of humans towards entities, such as robot pets, that, on the face of it, do not seem to be deserving of these responses. Such relations have often been thought to involve a certain degree...... of sentimentality, the morality of which has in turn been the object of critical attention (Sparrow in Ethics Inf Technol 78:346–359, 2002; Blackford in Ethics Inf Technol 14:41–51, 2012). In this paper, I dispel the claim that sentimentality is involved in this type of relations. My challenge draws on literature...... of argument, however, I assume in the remaining part of the paper that sentimentality is indeed at play and bring to the fore aspects of its badness or viciousness that have not yet been discussed in connection with robot pets. I conclude that not even these aspects of sentimentality are at issue here. Yet, I...

  2. Leucocyte telomere length and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: new prospective cohort study and literature-based meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willeit

    Full Text Available Short telomeres have been linked to various age-related diseases. We aimed to assess the association of telomere length with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in prospective cohort studies.Leucocyte relative telomere length (RTL was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 684 participants of the prospective population-based Bruneck Study (1995 baseline, with repeat RTL measurements performed in 2005 (n = 558 and 2010 (n = 479. Hazard ratios for T2DM were calculated across quartiles of baseline RTL using Cox regression models adjusted for age, sex, body-mass index, smoking, socio-economic status, physical activity, alcohol consumption, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, log high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and waist-hip ratio. Separate analyses corrected hazard ratios for within-person variability using multivariate regression calibration of repeated measurements. To contextualise findings, we systematically sought PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE for relevant articles and pooled results using random-effects meta-analysis.Over 15 years of follow-up, 44 out of 606 participants free of diabetes at baseline developed incident T2DM. The adjusted hazard ratio for T2DM comparing the bottom vs. the top quartile of baseline RTL (i.e. shortest vs. longest was 2.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.90 to 4.49; P = 0.091, and 2.31 comparing the bottom quartile vs. the remainder (1.21 to 4.41; P = 0.011. The corresponding hazard ratios corrected for within-person RTL variability were 3.22 (1.27 to 8.14; P = 0.014 and 2.86 (1.45 to 5.65; P = 0.003. In a random-effects meta-analysis of three prospective cohort studies involving 6,991 participants and 2,011 incident T2DM events, the pooled relative risk was 1.31 (1.07 to 1.60; P = 0.010; I2 = 69%.Low RTL is independently associated with the risk of incident T2DM. To avoid regression dilution biases in observed associations of RTL with disease risk, future studies should implement

  3. Fiction as a Blend of Fact and Imagination in Chimamanda Ngozi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fiction is an imaginative story rather than being a documentation of any historical fact. However, fiction,as a branch of literature,reflects the author's society. This is why fiction is believed to be a mirror through which a society is seen. Since fiction is something that mirrors society, facts and imagination are always well ...

  4. Horror from the Soul--Gothic Style in Allan Poe's Horror Fictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe made tremendous contribution to horror fiction. Poe's inheritance of gothic fiction and American literature tradition combined with his living experience forms the background of his horror fictions. He inherited the tradition of the gothic fictions and made innovations on it, so as to penetrate to subconsciousness. Poe's horror…

  5. Fictional and Factual Discourses in Narratives - and the Grey Zone Between

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Leif

    2012-01-01

    fictionalizing, non fiction fictionalizing and meta fictionalizing. Exemples from international literature during centuries. Part 2: Blending of discourses in contemporary Danish Literature with special focus on Knud Romer and Das Beckwerk (Claus Beck-Nielsen). Judicial and ethical problems in the use of proper...

  6. [The democratic side of science-fiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2011-04-01

    Suspicion towards technological advances has progressively grown during the xx(th) century. However, in the XXI(st) century, reading the NBIC (nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science) report of the National Science Foundation, we can note that science has caught up with science fiction. These changes in public mentality on one side and in scientific capacities on the other argue for an evolution of the debate on sciences. The recent example of the national debate on nanotechnology in France has clearly shown that the public is no longer waiting for additional sources of scientific knowledge but rather waiting for the recognition of its authority to participate in the definition of the national R&D priority and associated scientific strategies. This is all the more legitimate that these strategies will have profound impact on the future of our societies and therefore cannot be decided only by scientists. Hence, it is crucial to identify innovative tools promoting debate on sciences and their technological spin-off. Here, we contend that science fiction has major assets that could face this challenge and facilitate the dialogue between sciences and society.

  7. Welsh Women's Industrial Fiction 1880–1910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohata, Kirsti; Jones, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT From the beginning of the genre, women writers have made a major contribution to the development of industrial writing. Although prevented from gaining first-hand experience of the coalface, Welsh women writers were amongst the first to try to fictionalize those heavy industries—coal and metal in the south, and slate in the north—which dominated the lives of the majority of the late nineteenth-century Welsh population. Treatment of industrial matter is generally fragmentary in this early women's writing; industrial imagery and metaphor may be used in novels that are not primarily “about” industry at all. Yet from c. 1880–1910, Welsh women writers made a significant—and hitherto critically neglected—attempt to make sense in literature of contemporary industrial Wales in powerful and innovative ways. This essay maps their contribution and considers anglophone Welsh women writers' adaptations and innovations of form (particularly romance) as they try to find a way of representing industrial landscapes, communities and the daily realities of industrial labour. It identifies the genesis in women's writing of tropes that would become central to later industrial fiction, including depictions of industrial accident, injury, death and disability. And it explores the representation of social relations (class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality) and conflict on this tumultuous, dangerous new stage. PMID:29118469

  8. "Fact" and "fiction": enlivening health care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Alison; O'Sullivan, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate how close analysis of cultural narratives can be employed as effective pedagogical tools in the explication and critique of specific workplace issues relevant to health management education. Two narratives have been selected to illustrate this point: the apparently "fictional" UK-based medical television drama series Bodies (2005-2006) and the apparently "factual" report of an Australian state government public inquiry into acute health care, the Garling Report. Through their demonstration of how analyses of selected segments of these texts can be used in health management education, the authors conclude that the comparative analyses of ostensibly "fictional" and "factual" narratives allow for analysis and critique of the inadequacies of new public management (NPM) applied to the health care industry, leading to a greater understanding of wider ideological effects on public perceptions. The authors argue that these understandings enliven students' learning experiences, and that such comparative analyses should be applied more widely across health management education to develop students' critical skills and openness to exploring alternative models. Comparative analysis of cultural texts is novel in health care education, and allows for the interrogation of ideology and its effects.

  9. "Angels & Demons" - Distinguishing truth from fiction

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Dan Brown's best-selling novel "Angels & Demons" was published in French on 2 March. A web page on CERN's public site is dedicated to separating truth from fiction in this novel. After the extraordinary success of Dan Brown's "Da Vinci Code", one of his earlier novels "Angels & Demons", published in 2000, has now become a best seller and has generated a flood of questions about CERN. This detective story is about a secret society, the Illuminati, who wish to destroy the Vatican with an antimatter bomb stolen from - wait for it - CERN! Inevitably, CERN has been bombarded with calls about the technologies described in the novel that are supposed to be under development in the Laboratory. The Press Office has always explained that, even if the novel appears to be very informative, it is in fact a mixture of fact and fiction. For instance, according to the novel CERN is supposed to own a plane that can cover the distance between Massachusetts in the United States and Switzerland in just over an hour! ...

  10. Welsh Women's Industrial Fiction 1880-1910.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohata, Kirsti; Jones, Alexandra

    2017-10-02

    From the beginning of the genre, women writers have made a major contribution to the development of industrial writing. Although prevented from gaining first-hand experience of the coalface, Welsh women writers were amongst the first to try to fictionalize those heavy industries-coal and metal in the south, and slate in the north-which dominated the lives of the majority of the late nineteenth-century Welsh population. Treatment of industrial matter is generally fragmentary in this early women's writing; industrial imagery and metaphor may be used in novels that are not primarily "about" industry at all. Yet from c. 1880-1910, Welsh women writers made a significant-and hitherto critically neglected-attempt to make sense in literature of contemporary industrial Wales in powerful and innovative ways. This essay maps their contribution and considers anglophone Welsh women writers' adaptations and innovations of form (particularly romance) as they try to find a way of representing industrial landscapes, communities and the daily realities of industrial labour. It identifies the genesis in women's writing of tropes that would become central to later industrial fiction, including depictions of industrial accident, injury, death and disability. And it explores the representation of social relations (class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality) and conflict on this tumultuous, dangerous new stage.

  11. Radical Homemaking in Contemporary American Environmental Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin J. Jacobson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ursula K. Heise in ‘Ecocriticism and the Transnational Turn in American Studies’ critiques ‘the portrayal of multicultural and sometimes transnational nuclear families as the narrative solution to environmental and political problems’ (Heise, 2008: 383. This essay places Heise’s critique of the ‘ecological family romance’ in conversation with three other ecological domestic fictions: T. C. Boyle’s 'A Friend of the Earth' (2000, Jonathan Franzen’s 'Freedom' (2010, and Barbara Kingsolver’s 'Flight Behavior' (2012. Heise’s critique and Shannon Hayes’ 'Radical Homemakers' (2010 frame my close readings of the novels’ interconnected themes of radical homemaking, transnationalism, and environmentalism. My reading of the novels highlights their shared use of marginalized, racially-other characters to develop their entwined romantic and environmental plots (Lalitha in 'Freedom', several minor characters in 'A Friend of the Earth', and Ovid in 'Flight Behavior' and their use of sentimental deaths, especially of key female characters (Lalitha in Freedom, Sierra in A Friend of the Earth, and Dellarobia’s uncertain fate in Flight Behavior. By adopting the sentimental, domestic romance plot for ecological aims, the three novels highlight how environmental aims get stymied when cultural and ecological diversity are relegated to the margins. They also suggest that more is gained than lost through their use of ecological allegory. While the fictions do not offer solutions, they do push their readers to confront the Anthropocene’s ecological realities and their radical domestic-environmental politics.

  12. Amateur mythographies: Fan fiction and the myth of myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Willis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on classical scholarship on myth in order to critically examine three ways in which scholars and fans have articulated a relationship between fan fiction and myth. These are (1 the notion of fan fiction as a form of folk culture, reclaiming popular story from corporate ownership; (2 the notion of myth as counterhegemonic, often feminist, discourse; (3 the notion of myth as a commons of story and a universal story world. I argue that the first notion depends on an implicit primitivizing of fan fiction and myth, which draws ultimately on the work of Gottfried von Herder in the 18th century and limits our ability to produce historically and politically nuanced understandings of fan fiction. The second notion, which is visible in the work of Henry Jenkins and Constance Penley, is more helpful because of its attention to the politics of narration. However, it is the third model of myth, as a universal story world, where we find the richest crossover between fan fiction's creative power and contemporary classical scholarship on myth, especially in relation to Sarah Iles Johnston's analysis of hyperserial narrative. I demonstrate this through some close readings of fan fiction from the Greek and Roman Mythology fandom on Archive of Our Own. I conclude the paper by extending Johnston's arguments to show that fan-fictional hyperseriality, specifically, can be seen as mythic because it intervenes not only in the narrative worlds of its source materials but also in the social world of its telling.

  13. Journeys beyond pages: The use of fiction in tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipovšek Emilija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at looking into the examples of most popular literary induced tours on the European continent in order to establish interconnectivity between works of fiction as created cultural forms and their impact on tourism industry and consumer society. Accordingly, not only does the human urge to travel refer to the phenomenon of escapism and escapism into fictional, but it is also intrinsically linked to the fact of recreating oneself, i.e. finding one's own destiny/destination. Therefore, the focus is on the acknowledgement that fictional is employed in the non-fictional setting so as to produce man-made tourist attractions. Thus, the illusion of the fictional is perpetuated into the actual places used as attractions for avid readers and cinephiles. For instance, 221b Baker Street in London known as the Sherlock Holmes's home is recreated in reality and made into a museum for those intrigued by the mystery of Conan Doyle's fiction. The tourist is thus perceived both as a consumer and homo ludens in the postmodern contemporary context. The same way as a reader immerses into the text, the tourist embarks on a journey. Thus, various literary tours represent a twofold experience of the fictional world.

  14. Trashing the millenium: Subjectivity and technology in cyberpunk science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sey

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available 'Cyberpunk’ science fiction is a self-proclaimed movement within the genre which began in the 1980s. As the name suggests, it is an extrapolative form of science fiction which combines an almost obsessional interest in machines (particularly information machines with an anarchic, amoral, streetwise sensibility This paper sketches the development of the movement and seeks to make qualified claims for the radical. potential of its fiction. Of crucial importance are the ways in which human subjectivity (viewed in psychoanalytic terms interacts with 'technological subjectivity' in cyberpunk, particularly with regard to implications of these interactions for oedipalization.

  15. Apps: a new medium for non-fiction innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Allen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Apps are now a dominant content medium: in the US people spend more time on apps than they do watching TV. Non-fiction content is being avidly consumed on mobile devices, but in a completely different way to the book model. This article explores three strands of potential that the app medium holds for non-fiction content, putting forward the case that apps have the power to further weave non-fiction into the fabric of society and life.

  16. Science, Science-Fiction and Things in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Gregory

    2000-04-01

    Science Fiction and Mysteries offer the opportunity to introduce the general reading audience to physicists with engaging personalities--ones who don't want to take over the world, don't leave the house with two different socks on, and aren't social misfits. The authors have written mystery and science fiction novels that foreground science in authentic fashion, including how scientists work and think. This method of reaching the public is overlooked in most earnest discussions of popularizing science, ignoring the fact that most laymen get their views of science through fictional forms--including those from journalists.

  17. The Pleasures of Reading Mystery Fiction and Mystery Readers’ Book Selection Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Yen Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The mystery fiction is a popular pleasure reading genre in Taiwan. This article describes a grounded theory study that explored the reading pleasures and selection behavior of mystery fans. Based on the in-depth interview with 21 engaged mystery readers, this study identified seven types of reading pleasures, i.e., a sense of achievement from puzzle solving, feelings of amazement from the revelation of truths, satisfaction of curiosity for the unknown, a sense of compensation from seeing justice, senses of empathy and sympathy from identifying with the story characters, and the reflection of the social issues and values raised in the stories. The charms of mystery fiction may be systematically described by following four of Hudson’s (1910 conceptualization of fiction elements: i.e. the plot, characters, time and place, and the author’s view of life prevailed in the stories. In regards to readers’ selection behavior, this study identified four selection approaches commonly used by the experienced readers to discover works that possibly meet their expectations, i.e., the subgenre-oriented, author-oriented, series-oriented, and story-oriented approaches. In addition, six factors may influence readers’ selection of works, i.e., availability of expert comments, trust and confidence in the publishers, book award information, adaptation into movies or television, quality of translation, and first impression of the physical books.

  18. What we 'see' when we read: Visualization and vividness in reading fictional narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Renate

    2017-08-24

    Visualization is defined as the production of mental images in the process of reading (Esrock 2005: 633). This article is concerned with varieties of visualization during an absorbing reading of a fictional narrative, the mental images that range from an indistinct and largely automatic default visualization to the much more vivid images that occur at significant stages in the narrative. Neuroscientific studies of vision have collected a large and impressively varied body of experimental evidence for two major processing streams - the dorsal and the ventral-specialized for vision-for-action and vision for-perception respectively. Further experiments distinguish different dispositional specializations: visualizers with a high spatial visualizing ability demonstrating a more efficient use of resources in the dorsal pathway, and those with a high object visualization and more efficient use of the ventral pathway (Kozhevnikov et al., 2010: 29). We can assume that both types of mental processing will be prompted in fictional narratives with differences in prominence depending on their authors' inclinations and the design and purpose of the narrative text. According to Amedeo D'Angiulli (2013: 7), who conducted elaborate tests of vividness in mental imagery using written descriptive passages as stimulus, dynamic imagery was significantly less vivid than static imagery. These results confirm traditional literary criticism based on introspection which argues that detailed description of static objects elicits an especially lively imagination. However, narratives can provoke even stronger visualizations by rendering subjective moments of seeing in which a fictional character is emotionally involved. In encouraging readers to shift now and then from the default mode of motion-oriented visualizing to a more affective and more conscious object visualization, literary fictions exercise their power to evoke imaginings that one would not generate by oneself. This may indicate

  19. Passionate Virtue: Conceptions of Medical Professionalism in Popular Romance Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Medical romance fiction is a subgenre of popular romance fiction that features medical professionals in their work environment. This essay explores the way professionalism is portrayed in popular medical romance fiction written during the early twenty-first century, a period of significant disruption in both the public image and self-understanding of organized medicine. I analyze a selection of contemporary medical romance novels, published between 2008 and 2012, demonstrating that medical romance fiction is a form of public intervention in apparently insular debates over medical professionalism. I conclude that they promote "nostalgic professionalism," a vision of physicians as a select group of highly educated, self-regulated experts who provide, with a caring and altruistic attitude, a vitally important service to society, while at the same time generating implicit critiques of it.

  20. Science Fiction at the Far Side of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2017-01-01

    This book explores what science fiction can tell us about the human condition in a technological world (with the dilemma's and consequences that this entails) and also engages with the genre at points where we apparently find it on the far side of science, technology or human existence. As such....... It is our hope that this interdisciplinary approach will set an example for those who, like us, have been busy assessing the ways in which fictional attempts to fathom the possibilities of science and technology speak to central concerns about what it means to be human in a contemporary world of technology....... Although a scholarly work, this book is also designed to be accessible to a general audience that has an interest in science fiction as well as a broader academic audience. Aspiring (or experienced) science fiction writers may be interested in reading critical assessments of the science and technology...

  1. Fate, Fiction and the Future | Le Poidevin | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Oedipus, Time and the Conways, The Time Machine) and the problems encountered in reconciling them with various accounts of truth in fiction (David Lewis', Gregory Currie's, Alex Byrne's) elaborated. Connections are drawn between ...

  2. YA Afro-American Fiction: An Update for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Carolyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Includes annotated bibliographies of young adult books written in the 1980s by Black authors. Selections intended to interest Black teenagers represent both historical and contemporary realistic fiction. (NKA)

  3. Literature as Window: Developing Interracial Understanding through Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Allen H.

    1988-01-01

    Using Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart" as a case study, demonstrates the evocative power of fiction to promote interracial understanding. Creative art, by appealing to the imagination, can evoke feelings and insights that make human relationships vivid and personal. (BJV)

  4. Perceiving and experiencing fictional characters: an integrative account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.F.; Konijn, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Fictional characters (PCs) and mediated persons in literature, theater, film, art, TV, and digital media fulfill basic psychological functions, although the processes involved remain unspecified. Departing from identification and empathy hypotheses, a new context-sensitive model draws upon

  5. Manipulating Our Futures: The Role of Science Fiction in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Walt

    1979-01-01

    A rationale is presented for using science fiction in the English classroom, emphasizing that students like the genre and that it teaches them to analyze and interpret social and technological change. (SJL)

  6. Fan fiction, early Greece, and the historicity of canon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuvia Kahane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The historicity of canon is considered with an emphasis on contemporary fan fiction and early Greek oral epic traditions. The essay explores the idea of canon by highlighting historical variance, exposing wider conceptual isomorphisms, and formulating a revised notion of canonicity. Based on an analysis of canon in early Greece, the discussion moves away from the idea of canon as a set of valued works and toward canon as a practice of containment in response to inherent states of surplus. This view of canon is applied to the practice of fan fiction, reestablishing the idea of canonicity in fluid production environments within a revised, historically specific understanding in early oral traditions on the one hand and in digital cultures and fan fiction on the other. Several examples of early epigraphic Greek texts embedded in oral environments are analyzed and assessed in terms of their implications for an understanding of fan fiction and its modern contexts.

  7. Inulin-Type Fructans Modulates Pancreatic-Gut Innate Immune Responses and Gut Barrier Integrity during Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yue; Wu, Chengfei; Li, Jiahong; Li, Hongli; Sun, Zhenghua; Zhang, Hao; de Vos, Paul; Pan, Li-Long; Sun, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common abdominal inflammatory disorder and one of the leading causes of hospital admission for gastrointestinal disorders. No specific pharmacological or nutritional therapy is available but highly needed. Inulin-type fructans (ITFs) are capable of modifying gut immune and barrier homeostasis in a chemistry-dependent manner and hence potentially applicable for managing AP, but their efficacy in AP has not been demonstrated yet. The current study aimed to examine and compare modulatory effects of ITFs with different degrees of fermentability on pancreatic-gut immunity and barrier function during experimentally induced AP in mice. BALB/c mice were fed short (I)- or long (IV)-chain ITFs supplemented diets for up to 3 days before AP induction by caerulein. Attenuating effects on AP development were stronger with ITF IV than with ITF I. We found that long-chain ITF IV attenuated the severity of AP, as evidenced by reduced serum amylase levels, lipase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity, pancreatic edema, and histological examination demonstrating reduced pancreatic damage. Short-chain ITF I demonstrated only partial protective effects. Both ITF IV and ITF I modulated AP-associated systemic cytokine levels. ITF IV but not ITF I restored AP-associated intestinal barrier dysfunction by upregulating colonic tight junction modulatory proteins, antimicrobial peptides, and improved general colonic histology. Additionally, differential modulatory effects of ITF IV and ITF I were observed on pancreatic and gut immunity: ITF IV supplementation prevented innate immune cell infiltration in the pancreas and colon and tissue cytokine production. Similar effects were only observed in the gut with ITF I and not in the pancreas. Lastly, ITF IV but not ITF I downregulated AP-triggered upregulation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) and phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and a net decrease of phosphor-nuclear factor kappa

  8. Inulin-Type Fructans Modulates Pancreatic–Gut Innate Immune Responses and Gut Barrier Integrity during Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yue; Wu, Chengfei; Li, Jiahong; Li, Hongli; Sun, Zhenghua; Zhang, Hao; de Vos, Paul; Pan, Li-Long; Sun, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common abdominal inflammatory disorder and one of the leading causes of hospital admission for gastrointestinal disorders. No specific pharmacological or nutritional therapy is available but highly needed. Inulin-type fructans (ITFs) are capable of modifying gut immune and barrier homeostasis in a chemistry-dependent manner and hence potentially applicable for managing AP, but their efficacy in AP has not been demonstrated yet. The current study aimed to examine and compare modulatory effects of ITFs with different degrees of fermentability on pancreatic–gut immunity and barrier function during experimentally induced AP in mice. BALB/c mice were fed short (I)- or long (IV)-chain ITFs supplemented diets for up to 3 days before AP induction by caerulein. Attenuating effects on AP development were stronger with ITF IV than with ITF I. We found that long-chain ITF IV attenuated the severity of AP, as evidenced by reduced serum amylase levels, lipase levels, pancreatic myeloperoxidase activity, pancreatic edema, and histological examination demonstrating reduced pancreatic damage. Short-chain ITF I demonstrated only partial protective effects. Both ITF IV and ITF I modulated AP-associated systemic cytokine levels. ITF IV but not ITF I restored AP-associated intestinal barrier dysfunction by upregulating colonic tight junction modulatory proteins, antimicrobial peptides, and improved general colonic histology. Additionally, differential modulatory effects of ITF IV and ITF I were observed on pancreatic and gut immunity: ITF IV supplementation prevented innate immune cell infiltration in the pancreas and colon and tissue cytokine production. Similar effects were only observed in the gut with ITF I and not in the pancreas. Lastly, ITF IV but not ITF I downregulated AP-triggered upregulation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) and phosphor-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and a net decrease of phosphor-nuclear factor kappa

  9. ‘More than the Sum of its Parts’: Popular Music, Gender, and Myth in Haruki Murakami’s Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather H. Yeung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The work of Haruki Murakami is riven through with references to music. Indeed, music was Murakami’s livelihood before he started writing novels, and the author has written various essays and books about jazz and has published a book-length conversation with classical conductor Seiji Ozawa, and jazz and classical music pervade in Murakami’s fictional works. Popular music, too, provides an important international narrative texture to Murakami’s fiction, yet less critical attention has been paid to this musical indebtedness. The intertexts provided in Murakami’s work by the frequent references to pop songs and bands provide the starting point for a consideration of gender constructions in Murakami; in his work, we discover, musical and gender identities are inextricable and often assume highly affective, mythic roles.

  10. Probing the limits of reality: the metaphysics in science fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John L.

    2003-01-01

    Science fiction provides a genre in which metaphysical questions concerning the ultimate structure of reality regularly arise. In addressing these questions, contemporary scientists tend to assume that the questions are of a scientific nature and should be handled solely by reference to our best theories. In this paper, it is argued that we cannot afford to neglect the role of conceptual analysis - a distinctively philosophical task - in thinking critically about the possibilities that science fiction claims to describe.

  11. Comparative Study of IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in the Netherlands, Based on a 5-Year Nationwide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beer, J.L. de; Ingen, J. van; Vries, G. de; Erkens, C.; Sebek, M.; Mulder, A.; Sloot, R.; Brandt, A.M. van den; Enaimi, M.; Kremer, K.; Supply, P.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    In order to switch from IS6110 and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the national tuberculosis control program in The Netherlands, a

  12. Comparative study of IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism and variable-number tandem-repeat typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in the Netherlands, based on a 5-year nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Jessica L.; van Ingen, Jakko; de Vries, Gerard; Erkens, Connie; Sebek, Maruschka; Mulder, Arnout; Sloot, Rosa; van den Brandt, Anne-Marie; Enaimi, Mimount; Kremer, Kristin; Supply, Philip; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    In order to switch from IS6110 and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the national tuberculosis control program in The Netherlands, a

  13. Genetic characterization of human herpesvirus type 1: Full-length genome sequence of strain obtained from an encephalitis case from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay P Bondre

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the full-length genome sequence generated from an Indian HSV-1 isolate shared close genetic relationship with the American KOS and Chinese CR38 strains which belonged to the Asian genetic lineage. Recombination analysis of Indian isolate demonstrated multiple recombination crossover points throughout the genome. This full-length genome sequence amplified from the Indian isolate would be helpful to study HSV evolution, genetic basis of differential pathogenesis, host-virus interactions and viral factors contributing towards differential clinical outcome in human infections.

  14. Gesturing beyond the Frame: Transnational Trauma and US War Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. H. Lahti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The convergent boundary between the fields of trauma theory and US war fiction has resulted in a narrow focus on the subjectivity of the American soldier in war fiction, which partly conditions American war fiction's privileging of the soldier-author. However, this focus on American soldiers does not adequately account for the essentially interactive nature of war trauma, and it elides the experiences of nurses and noncombatants on all sides of the battle while also obscuring women's distinctive war experiences, even when the fiction itself sometimes includes these dimensions. In this essay, Lahti argues that a transnational method can counter these imbalances in trauma theory and in studies of US war fiction. She engages Tim O'Brien's highly influential The Things They Carried from a transnational perspective by interrogating the text's figuring of the survivor author and focusing on critically neglected scenes of interaction between the American soldiers and Vietnamese civilians. In order to discern the way these scenes reveal the text's own struggle with its national US frame, she elaborates a methodology of close reading characters' bodily gestures to foreground the way that fiction offers a glimpse into war as a relational event, always involving two or more participants. In the case of The Things They Carried, this approach brings into view a heretofore unnoticed pattern of mimicry between the American characters and Vietnamese characters that reshapes our scholarly understanding of the text's representation of war trauma.

  15. The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'The Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Harold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense of the study and appreciation of fictional worlds, as distinguished from the works of fiction with which they are associated.

  16. Hannibal Lecter: Case study of a fictional character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Repišti Selman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the case of the imaginary character, Dr. Hannibal Lecter, based on content analysis of four books ('Hannibal', 'Hannibal Rising', 'Silence of the Lambs' and 'Red Dragon', four films with the same title and two seasons of 13 episodes of the serial 'Hannibal'. In the first part, the analysis refers to the consideration of the aforementioned case, taking into account the following diagnostic classifications: DSM-IV, DSM-5 and ICD-10. Then, we offered a description of Dr. Lecter's personality through modern models of personality structure: Big Five Model, HEXACO Model, The Big Seven Model, Two-factor Model and One-factor Model. In particular, we address the interpretation of behavioral patterns of this fictional character from the perspective of classical psychodynamic theory, and through the prism of a theoretical point of Jacques Lacan. In addition, his behavior is explained by applying the postulates of cognitive-behavioral paradigm as well as evolutionary psychology. At the end of the paper are listed conclusions, created as a synthesis of previous interpretations, or an eclectic approach used in these analyses. In addition, there are featured disadvantages of this type of analysis, in the form of methodological limitations of qualitative research in one subject (case studies and problems of differential diagnosis in the case of a controversial character such as Dr. Hannibal Lecter.

  17. Science Fiction and Ontologies of Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vizmuller-Zocco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of leadership in science fiction receives a particular analysis which is based on what can be termed transhumanist novels published in Italy between 2008 and 2013. The main purpose of this study is to answer the following question: What happens to (the nature of leadership in a technologically-driven society? Four novels form the backbone of the description of futuristic leadership. The four conclusions drawn from this analysis regarding the nature of leadership in a technologically-driven society point to a much greater need for leadership studies to pay attention to technological advances (and the philosophical underpinnings of, specifically, transhumanism. The impact of nano-bio-technology affecting the role of leaders, followers, goals, alignment, commitment has ontological repercussions on the manner in which (augmented and unaugmented humans deal with each other. If early augmented humans/cyborgs and any other sentient beings are in fact comparable to Giambattista Vico’s brutes, and if his corsi e ricorsi (ebbs and flows of human history can apply to non-human, sentient beings’ history, then the work is cut out for all disciplines, but especially for those which deal with ontologies of leadership.

  18. Teaching Geisha in History, Fiction, and Fantasy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bardsley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Artists skilled in performing classical music and dance, geisha are famous the world over as emblems of Japanese culture at its most erotic and exotic. Everything from novels and comedies to fashion and films document Euro-American fascination with geisha from the late 19th through the 20th centuries. Japanese essayists have long, and often ruefully, observed this foreign curiosity for the 'geisha gaaru'. Yet, the literature on geisha in Japan includes a range of works, too, including fiction, academic study, tips for would-be connoisseurs as well as memoirs and etiquette manuals penned by geisha themselves. Well into the twenty-first century, geisha still intrigue at home and abroad. Exploring multiple representations of geisha in an Asian Studies course easily engages students, but also challenges them to think critically. Not only do they learn about geisha past and present, but they also understand geisha studies as a field. Their study also explores the constructed nature of gender, leading to comparisons of Japan, the U.S., and a host of models of ideal femininity and masculinity. It is students’ involvement with learning how knowledge is produced, fantasies sustained, and questions asked and avoided, that makes teaching the geisha course rewarding.

  19. SWEDISH CRIME FICTION AS SOCIALLY INVOLVED LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Samsel-Chojnacka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Swedish crime novel has been transforming for many years to become more socially involved. The ambition of many writers is not only to entertain the readers but also to participating in the social debate, criticizing the political and economical system, focusing on important issues such as violence against women, exploitation of working class by the privileged ruling class, the problems of a modern family and the situation of immigrants. Since the moment when in the mid 60’s two journalists Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö decided to use popular literature to spread social matters many other Swedish writers have decided to follow their way. Some of them are journalists – like Liza Marklund, Börge Hellström and Anders Roslund or Stieg Larsson. Their novels as well as the ones written by Henning Mannkel on Kurt Wallander have become crucial evidence of changes of Swedish society in the past twenty years. Modern Swedish crime fiction illustrates the population in the model fashion that is the reason why it can become one of the interests of the sociology of literature.

  20. Using fiction in the teaching of physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, Lior M.

    2016-03-01

    Fiction has been used in teaching since Plato told the story of Atlantis. However, relatively little use is made of it in teaching physics. We have created short stories that form the basis of case studies. One short story tells the story of a possible radioactive contamination on Earth because of the detonation by terrorists of a dirty bomb in a densely populated urban area. The short story discusses in what many would find an engaging way both the physics of radioactivity and the health aspects of radiation exposure and radiation sickness. Another case tells the story of a hypothetical future crewed mission to the Moon. The astronauts encounter a giant solar flare that would inevitably give the crew lethal dose of radiation. The astronauts do not have enough time to either abort the mission, or land on the Moon and seek shelter. There is, however, something they can do, but they do not think of think of it until it is too late to do anything about it, and being saved beccomes a matter of chance. This case discusses the history and future of lunar and space exploration, solar wind and space weather, and elements of planetary science. We describe some examples of short stories, and how we incorporate them in the teaching of physics and allied disciplines.

  1. Fictionalized History: Signifying Changes to the Malaysian Nation and Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim Chee Cheang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the cornerstones of fiction, writers often use and confront history in their claim to “reality” and “identity” in their writing. Linda Hutcheon’s claim for “a postmodern concern for the multiplicity and dispersion of truth(s; truth(s relative to the specificity of place and culture” (1988, p. 108 is relevant to the use of history in recent Malaysian literature. The multiple and varied claims of truth(s as reflected through the fictionalizing of Malaysian history is the focus of the analysis in this article, which aims to expose the social, economic, and political implications of the Malaysian identity. The analysis of three current works of fictionalized Malaysian history from the different fictional genres of comic series, children’s history, and occidental history, represents a cross section of genres that challenge the supremacy of history’s ontological claim over identity. The deliberate contestation of received Malaysian history in fictional modes acknowledges the peripheral identity structures of race, religion, and economics that are sensitive in a multiracial country such as Malaysia.

  2. Literary fiction and social science. Two partially overlapping magisteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Stelian Rusu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Literary fiction and social science, despite the fact that they comprise two methodologically autonomous cultures, are nonetheless creatively interfere with each other. This paper explores the multiple points of contact between literature and social science and tracks the influences that literary fiction has had on social-scientific knowledge. Nine cases of ideas originally developed in literary sphere and then taken over by various social sciences and integrated into their conceptual vocabularies form the analytic material of this study. The main argument defended in this paper is that literary fiction is a great source of ideas that can inspire theory construction in social sciences. The corpus of literary texts which make up the textual universe of literature contains many embryonically foreshadowed concepts and proto-theories that can be worked out by social sciences into full-blown scientific conceptualizations. Literary tradition is also the depository of punctual propositions that can be distilled from fiction and translated into empirically testable hypotheses. This quality of literary fiction, of providing ‘Prêt-à-tester’ propositions, makes it a predilect source of inspiration for social science theorizing.

  3. Proximal Region of the Gene Encoding Cytadherence-Related Protein Permits Molecular Typing of Mycoplasma genitalium Clinical Strains by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musatovova, Oxana; Herrera, Caleb; Baseman, Joel B.

    2006-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR-amplified proximal region of the gene encoding cytadherence accessory protein P110 (MG192) revealed DNA sequence divergences among 54 Mycoplasma genitalium clinical strains isolated from the genitourinary tracts of women attending a sexually transmitted disease-related health clinic, plus one from the respiratory tract and one from synovial fluid. Seven of 56 (12.5%) strains exhibited RFLPs following digestion of the proximal region with restriction endonuclease MboI or RsaI, or both. No sequence variability was detected in the distal portion of the gene. PMID:16455921

  4. Teaching the Future: On the Use of Science Fiction in English Language Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Outlines the features of "pulpstyle" and its continuing influence on later science fiction. Considers some science fiction texts that explicitly address language issues. These ideas are related to practical techniques of using science fiction in the language classroom. (Author/VWL)

  5. Teaching and Learning Psychology through an Analysis of Social Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, William E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is designed to accompany an appearance by the author as a panelist during a session on science fiction and teaching methods at the I-CON 28 Science Fiction Convention held April 3-5, 2009, on Long Island (near New York City). The author describes how he employs social science fiction in an honors course at the university level to…

  6. Thomas Hardy's Victorian Gothic: Reassessing Hardy's Fiction and His Gothic Sensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Norma Walrath

    Proposing that Thomas Hardy's fiction exhibits strong Gothic sensibilities which offer insight into his artistic vision and add to the power of his fiction, creating a new form of the Gothic, a Victorian Gothic, this dissertation reassesses the Gothic strains in Hardy's fiction. The dissertation is in eight chapters: (1) Introduction to Hardy's…

  7. Eliciting physics students mental models via science fiction stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment which investigated the effects of the using science fiction stories in physics lessons. A questionnaire form containing 2 open-ended questions related to Jules Vernes story From the Earth to the Moon was used with 353, 9th and 10th grade students to determine their pre-conceptions about gravity and weightlessness. Mental models explaining students scientific and alternative views were constructed, according to students replies. After these studies, 6 students were interviewed. In this interview, researches were done about whether science fiction stories had an effect on bringing students pre-conceptions related to physics subjects out, on students inquiring their own concepts and on increasing students interest and motivation towards physics subjects. Studies in this research show that science fiction stories have an effect on arousing students interest and curiosity, have a role encouraging students to inquire their own concepts and are effective in making students alternative views come out

  8. L Ron Hubbard's science fiction quest against psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshbein, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Layfayette Ronald Hubbard (1911-1986) was a colourful and prolific American writer of science fiction in the 1930s and 1940s. During the time between his two decades of productivity and his return to science fiction in 1980, Hubbard founded the Church of Scientology. In addition to its controversial status as a religion and its troubling pattern of intimidation and litigation directed towards its foes, Scientology is well known as an organised opponent to psychiatry. This paper looks at Hubbard's science fiction work to help understand the evolution of Scientology's antipsychiatry stance, as well as the alternative to psychiatry offered by Hubbard. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Le style modal de la science-fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Boisset

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La faiblesse de style dont souffrirait la science-fiction est en fait le signe que la science y est davantage discours du possible que description du réel. Un « style modal » va suspendre la valeur de vérité, et le style de la possibilité va décontextualiser les métaphores disponibles. En science-fiction, le processus métaphorique génère et structure la diégèse. Un exemple chez Iain M. Banks montre un dialogue quasi incompréhensible mettre à l’épreuve la signification comme possibilité. Les métaphores figées sont revitalisées par la décontextualisation de la fiction, dont le texte peut exploiter l’impertinence.

  10. Holy sci-fi! where science fiction and religion intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Can a computer have a soul? Are religion and science mutually exclusive? Is there really such a thing as free will? If you could time travel to visit Jesus, would you (and should you)? For hundreds of years, philosophers, scientists, and science fiction writers have pondered these questions and many more. In Holy Sci-Fi!, popular writer Paul Nahin explores the fertile and sometimes uneasy relationship between science fiction and religion. With a scope spanning the history of religion, philosophy, and literature, Nahin follows religious themes in science fiction from Feynman to Foucault, and from Asimov to Aristotle. An intriguing journey through popular and well-loved books and stories, Holy Sci-Fi! shows how sci-fi has informed humanity's attitudes towards our faiths, our future, and ourselves.

  11. Imagining the future: The Power of Climate Change Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr Sullivan, S. M.; Kellagher, E.; Poppleton, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Fiction has galvanized the public imagination around societal concerns throughout US history, on issues including slavery, worker abuse and animal cruelty. A growing body of fiction concerned with climate change, 'cli-fi', provides the opportunity for students to engage with climate science in more visceral and affective ways. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project ran a climate and energy book club from Spring 2012 through Winter 2013, in which educators, scientists and writers participated. The fictional works were intended for audiences ranging from youth through adult, with themes of dystopia, renewal, hope, oppression, and innovation. This presentation will describe the benefits, opportunities and caveats of using these works within science teaching contexts, highlight some of the works which stood out from the rest and provide an annotated bibliography of books which were included or considered.

  12. Presenting a Model for Setting in Narrative Fiction Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Salimi Namin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims at presenting a model for evaluating and enhancing training the setting in illustration for narrative fictions for undergraduate students of graphic design who are weak in setting. The research utilized expert’s opinions through a survey. The designed model was submitted to eight experts, and their opinions were used to have the model adjusted and improved. Used as research instruments were notes, materials in text books, papers, and related websites, as well as questionnaires. Results indicated that, for evaluating and enhancing the level of training the setting in illustration for narrative fiction to students, one needs to extract sub-indexes of setting. Moreover, definition and recognition of the model of setting helps undergraduate students of graphic design enhance the level of setting in their works skill by recognizing details of setting. Accordingly, it is recommended to design training packages to enhance these sub-indexes and hence improve the setting for narrative fiction illustration.

  13. Science fiction as a culture of global innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas MICHAUD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Science fiction participates to the creation of a global culture of innovation. It is diffused in most of the developed countries to promote technical innovation and has motivated a lot of actors of capitalism to imitate the utopian technologies represented in these very popular movies and novels. The stake of this article is to define the strategic habitus in a cultural environment constituted of multiple centers of Research and Development (R&D organized in network. The management of science fiction is necessary to optimize innovation at a global level. After the step of the ideological filtering of science fiction, the construction of discursive philters permits to manage productive systems with common and normalized cultural considerations. The approaches of sensemaking, storytelling and “strategy as discourse” are used at the theoretical level.

  14. Science fiction by scientists an anthology of short stories

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This anthology contains fourteen intriguing short stories by active research scientists and other writers trained in science. Science is at the heart of real science fiction, which is more than just westerns with ray guns or fantasy with spaceships. The people who do science and love science best are scientists. Scientists like Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, and Fred Hoyle wrote some of the legendary tales of golden age science fiction. Today there is a new generation of scientists writing science fiction informed with the expertise of their fields, from astrophysics to computer science, biochemistry to rocket science, quantum physics to genetics, speculating about what is possible in our universe. Here lies the sense of wonder only science can deliver. All the stories in this volume are supplemented by afterwords commenting on the science underlying each story.

  15. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together. PMID:26283953

  16. The Availability of Access Features in Children's Non-Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. Ladd

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the availability of access features in children's non-fiction as compared to their prevalence in adult non-fiction because such features are an important part of the research process increasingly demanded of younger and younger students in schools. Access features studied include: table of contents, index, bibliography, endnotes/footnotes, glossary, and suggestions for further reading list. This study found that children's non-fiction books were less likely to include bibliographies or endnotes, but more likely to include glossaries or suggested reading lists. Tables of contents and indexes were the two most popular access features in each section. Results are divided by Dewey Decimal Classification classes.

  17. Using Science Fiction in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2002-09-01

    At the University of Arizona, all non-science majors are required to take two Tier 1 and one Tier 2 General Education science classes. These are the only science classes that most of these students will take at the University. This includes all future K-8 certified teachers --- our future teachers of science. Improving reading comprehension in science and improving writing skills are two of the main requirements of the General Education classes. For my 150 -- 300 students (1 -- 2 classes per semester) I have chosen to use science fiction stories to meet part of these requirements. This assignment provides for assessment of students' writing in several ways: As an alternative assessment: connecting the course material to what they have read. As an alternative assessment: student knowledge of science and technology in general. This assignment also provides for assessment of their comprehension of the authors' application of science fact: Making students aware of how our science knowledge and technology have changed in the years since these books were written (30 -- 140 years ago). Students are required to turn in a short draft version of the assignment about halfway through the semester. They receive feedback on their format (i.e., following directions), appropriateness of chosen topics, spelling, grammar, etc. Books are chosen at a variety of reading levels to accommodate a range of proficiencies, including choices appropriate for students with limited proficiency in English and those with learning disabilities. The books that we are presently using and examples of student writing will be displayed. This work was supported in part with a grant from the Department of Education (AzTEC).

  18. Near full-length genomic characterization of a novel HIV type 1 subtype B/C recombinant strain from Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Chen, Lili; Yang, Shaomin; Liu, Yongjian; Li, Hanping; Bao, Zuoyi; Wang, Zheng; Zhuang, Daomin; Liu, Siyang; Li, Jingyun

    2010-06-01

    Recombination contributes substantially to the genetic diversity of HIV-1, and mosaic strains arise frequently, especially in populations in which multiple subtypes circulate. Yunnan, which borders the "Golden triangle" region of Southeast Asia in the south, was considered as the epicenter of China. B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC, and CRF08_BC are all currently involved in the HIV-1 epidemiology in the area, which suggested the possible emergence of a new recombination. This study presented a near full-length genomic analysis of a novel HIV-1 recombination involving B and C. Different from the reported CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC, the new recombination revealed more breakpoints. This is the first report of a novel recombination involving subtype B and C in Yunnan, China. More work is needed to determine the epidemiologic significance of the new recombination.

  19. The Use of "Literary Fiction" to Promote Mentalizing Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Maria Chiara; Mazza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is a multidimensional process that incorporates both mentalizing and emotional sharing dimensions. Empathic competencies are important for creating interpersonal relationships with other people and developing adequate social behaviour. The lack of these social components also leads to isolation and exclusion in healthy populations. However, few studies have investigated how to improve these social skills. In a recent study, Kidd and Castano (2013) found that reading literary fiction increases mentalizing ability and may change how people think about other people's emotions and mental states. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of reading literary fiction, compared to nonfiction and science fiction, on empathic abilities. Compared to previous studies, we used a larger variety of empathy measures and utilized a pre and post-test design. In all, 214 healthy participants were randomly assigned to read a book representative of one of three literary genres (literary fiction, nonfiction, science fiction). Participants were assessed before and after the reading phase using mentalizing and emotional sharing tests, according to Zaki and Ochsner' s (2012) model. Comparisons of sociodemographic, mentalizing, and emotional sharing variables across conditions were conducted using ANOVA. Our results showed that after the reading phase, the literary fiction group showed improvement in mentalizing abilities, but there was no discernible effect on emotional sharing abilities. Our study showed that the reading processes can promote mentalizing abilities. These results may set important goals for future low-cost rehabilitation protocols for several disorders in which the mentalizing deficit is considered central to the disease, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders and Schizophrenia.

  20. From "I Don't Like Mondays" to "Pumped up Kicks": Rampage School Shootings in Young Adult Fiction and Young Adult Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Gwynne Ellen; Saunders, Jane M.

    2018-01-01

    This essay considers 12 books of contemporary young adult fiction, published in the United States between 2000 and 2016, with plots directly related to rampage school shootings. It compares the shooters' psychological types, ages, races, genders, roles, motives and the narrative points of view in the books with dominant cultural scripts for…

  1. Censorship in All Seasons: Considering the Fiction of the Past, the Present, and the Future to Help Students Understanding the Concept of Censorship in Our World Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreen, Jean

    A curriculum that asks students to consider the implications of censorship would include not only "Fahrenheit 451" but also other works of adolescent literature, Holocaust literature, and science fiction. Works written about the Holocaust, which can be considered a type of absolute censorship, help students to consider censorship's…

  2. Da Platone a Hollywood: due problemi della fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The argument of fiction with respect to spectators’ illusion is very vast. This paper outlines the interconnection between two particular issues of this immense area of study, which pertain to two paradoxical effects of fiction: (1 the spectator’s cognitive and emotional illusion induced either by theatrical or by cinematographic representation and (2 the more unclear and long-run effects of such representations on everyday life. Plato’s myth of the cave, and some of Husserl’s ideas about “artistic illusion” awakened through the stage performance, will help in delineating some philosophical aspects of the problem

  3. Miku's mask: Fictional encounters in children's costume play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, Espen

    2015-11-01

    Children's engagement with Japanese toys and fictional characters has taken on new significance in the age of YouTube. Drawing on ethnographic research on technology-mediated play among 8- and 9-year-olds in Norway, this article shows how boundaries between "real" humans and "fake" non-humans are blurred and undermined when children take on the perspective of a fictional pop star known as Miku. I argue that YouTube provides a platform for children's playful experimentation with posthuman subjectivities, where they orient themselves toward the future not in terms of becoming adult but in terms of multiple becomings.

  4. The Emergence of Irish Gothic Fiction - Histories, Origins, Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Killeen, Jarlath

    2013-01-01

    Provides a new account of the emergence of Irish gothic fiction in mid-eighteenth century. This book provides a robustly theorised and thoroughly historicised account of the ‘beginnings’ of Irish gothic fiction, maps the theoretical terrain covered by other critics, and puts forward a new history of the emergence of the genre in Ireland. The main argument the book makes is that the Irish gothic should be read in the context of the split in Irish Anglican public opinion that opened in the...

  5. Scottish science fiction: writing Scottish literature back into history

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The increasing vigour of Scottish literature since the 1980s has led not only to a revival in literary fiction, but also to a growing diversification into other narrative genres. The detective story – in the form of so-called “tartan noir” – has been the most obvious popular genre to undergo revival, but science fiction has also blossomed in the work of authors such as Alasdair Gray, Iain (M.) Banks, and Ken MacLeod. In this article, I trace something of the problematic history of Scottish sc...

  6. The Act of Fictional Communication in a Hermeneutic Pragmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Wood Tahir

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with fictional communication, as the act of an author in relation to a reader. Fictional discourse exhibits certain complexities that are not observable in other forms of discourse. For example, the author’s act is mediated for the reader by that set of persons called characters. This fact generates a range of relations, firstly the triad of author-reader, author-character, and reader-character. But closer observation reveals that this mediation may be such that it giv...

  7. The Realistic Fallacy, or: The Conception of Literary Narrative Fiction in Analytic Aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Jukka Mikkonen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, my aim is to show that in Anglo-American analytic aesthetics, the conception of narrative fiction is in general realistic and that it derives from philosophical theories of fiction-making, the act of producing works of literary narrative fiction. I shall firstly broadly show the origins of the problem and illustrate how the so-called realistic fallacy – the view which maintains that fictions consist of propositions which represent the fictional world “as it is” – is committed t...

  8. Inulin-Type Fructans Modulates PancreaticGut Innate Immune Responses and Gut Barrier Integrity during Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in a Chain Length-Dependent Manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Yue; Wu, Chengfei; Li, Jiahong; Li, Hongli; Sun, Zhenghua; Zhang, Hao; de Vos, Paul; Pan, Li-Long; Sun, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common abdominal inflammatory disorder and one of the leading causes of hospital admission for gastrointestinal disorders. No specific pharmacological or nutritional therapy is available but highly needed. Inulin-type fructans (ITFs) are capable of modifying gut immune

  9. The prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in Turkish children, and geno typing of isolates by nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamer, Gulden S.; Turk, M.; Dagci, H.; Pektas, B.; Guruz, Adnan Y.; Uner, A.; Guy, E.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to verify the incidence of cryptosporidiosis among Turkish elementary school students. The study was conducted in the Dept. of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Ege University, Turkey during a 3-month period in 2006. We assessed the fecal samples of 707 children using modified acid-fast and phenol-auramine staining followed by modified Ritchie concentration method. All cryptosporidium species isolates were analysed by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to differentiate genotypes of the isolates. After the coprological examination, 4 samples were found to be positive for cryptosporidium species oocysts. In the present study, all 4 oocysts were of zoonotic origin and belonged to cryptoporodium parvum genotype 2 indicating that in Turkey the potential sources of human cryptosporidiosis is from animals. The application of genotyping to clinical isolates of cryptosporidium has significantly increased our knowledge and understanding of the distribution and epidemiology of this parasite. The PCR and RFLP techniques represent a more rapid and simple method of genotyping to support epidemiological and clinical investigations than conventional analytical DNA techniques. (author)

  10. Comparison of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Markers typing and IS1245 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism fingerprinting of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marttila Harri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mycobacterioses are regarded as a potential zoonotic risk and cause economical losses world wide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis is a slow-growing subspecies found in mycobacterial infected humans and pigs and therefore rapid and discriminatory typing methods are needed for epidemiological studies. The genetic similarity of M. avium subsp. hominissuis from human and porcine origins using two different typing methods have not been studied earlier. The objective of this study was to compare the IS1245 RFLP pattern and MIRU-VNTR typing to study the genetic relatedness of M. avium strains isolated from slaughter pigs and humans in Finland with regard to public health aspects. Methods A novel PCR-based genotyping method, variable number tandem repeat (VNTR typing of eight mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs, was evaluated for its ability to characterize Finnish Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis strains isolated from pigs (n = 16 and humans (n = 13 and the results were compared with those obtained by the conventional IS1245 RFLP method. Results The MIRU-VNTR results showed a discriminatory index (DI of 0,92 and the IS1245 RFLP resulted in DI 0,98. The combined DI for both methods was 0,98. The MIRU-VNTR test has the advantages of being simple, reproducible, non-subjective, which makes it suitable for large-scale screening of M. avium strains. Conclusions Both typing methods demonstrated a high degree of similarity between the strains of human and porcine origin. The parallel application of the methods adds epidemiological value to the comparison of the strains and their origins. The present approach and results support the hypothesis that there is a common source of M. avium subsp. hominissuis infection for pigs and humans or alternatively one species may be the infective source to the other.

  11. The question of Fiction – nonexistent objects, a possible world response from Paul Ricoeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzpatrick Noel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The question of fiction is omnipresent within the work of Paul Ricoeur throughout his prolific career. However, Ricoeur raises the questions of fiction in relation to other issues such the symbol, metaphor and narrative. This article sets out to foreground a traditional problem of fiction and logic, which is termed the existence of non-existent objects, in relation to the Paul Ricoeur’s work on narrative. Ricoeur’s understanding of fiction takes place within his overall philosophical anthropology where the fictions and histories make up the very nature of identity both personal and collective. The existence of non-existent objects demonstrates a dichotomy between fiction and history, non-existent objects can exist as fictional objects. The very possibility of the existence of fictional objects entails ontological status considerations. What ontological status do fictional objects have? Ricoeur develops a concept of narrative configuration which is akin to the Kantian productive imagination and configuration frames the question historical narrative and fictional narrative. It is demonstrated that the ontological status of fictional objects can be best understood in a model of possible worlds.

  12. When Fiction Is Just as Real as Fact: No Differences in Reading Behavior between Stories Believed to be Based on True or Fictional Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Hartung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have shown that compared to fictional texts, readers read factual texts faster and have better memory for described situations. Reading fictional texts on the other hand seems to improve memory for exact wordings and expressions. Most of these studies used a “newspaper” vs. “literature” comparison. In the present study, we investigated the effect of reader's expectation to whether information is true or fictional with a subtler manipulation by labeling short stories as either based on true or fictional events. In addition, we tested whether narrative perspective or individual preference in perspective taking affects reading true or fictional stories differently. In an online experiment, participants (final N = 1,742 read one story which was introduced as based on true events or as fictional (factor fictionality. The story could be narrated in either 1st or 3rd person perspective (factor perspective. We measured immersion in and appreciation of the story, perspective taking, as well as memory for events. We found no evidence that knowing a story is fictional or based on true events influences reading behavior or experiential aspects of reading. We suggest that it is not whether a story is true or fictional, but rather expectations toward certain reading situations (e.g., reading newspaper or literature which affect behavior by activating appropriate reading goals. Results further confirm that narrative perspective partially influences perspective taking and experiential aspects of reading.

  13. Does Science-Fiction predict [or change] the future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christian Graswohl; Jan Westren-Doll; Douglas Fenech

    2010-01-01

    This research paper looks at a selection of science-fiction films and its connection with the progression of the use of television, telephone and print media. It also analyzes statistical data obtained from a questionnaire conducted by the research group regarding the use of communication media.

  14. The fact and fiction of the nuclear question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, Isabelle.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear theme is one that gives rise to much speculation and hearsay. To study the nuclear question is to delve into a social and tangible reality which as a product of flights of fancy, calls for a special approach and appropriate methods of investigation. The author sets out to try and draw a line between fact and fiction [fr

  15. Science Fiction in Education: Case Studies from Classroom Implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrasidas, Charalambos; Avraamidou, Lucy; Theodoridou, Katerina; Themistokleous, Sotiris; Panaou, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript reports on findings from the implementation of the EU project "Science Fiction in Education" (Sci-Fi-Ed). The project provides teachers with tools, training, and guidance that will assist them in enhancing their teaching, making science more attractive to students, connecting it with real-life issues such as the…

  16. Freeze, Wait, Reanimate: Cryonic Suspension and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Grant

    2010-01-01

    This essay takes as its chief point of departure Jacques Ellul's contention that imaginative treatments of malevolent technology in antitechnological science fiction, by way of inviting rejection, refusal, dismissal, or condemnation, conspire in facilitating human acceptance of and adjustment to technology as it otherwise presently is. The author…

  17. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  18. Mobility Narratives that Move Me. Fiction & Evidence in ESE research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jonas Andreasen; Kronlid, David

    , learning how to proactively adapt to such insecurities is a question of survival. In this wicked space, many of the world´s young draw their experiences from fiction (poetry, face book, internet porn, prose, music, songs, storytelling, nursery rhymes, art, movies, graffiti, crafts, motorcycling, etc...

  19. Something to Chew On: Canadian Fiction for Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Beverley

    An annotated bibliography of fiction about Canada or written by Canadian authors is presented. The list is intended as a guide for Canadian young adult readers in search of a literature they can identify as their own. It can also be used by librarians and teachers who need assistance in selecting novels and short stories for young Canadians. Over…

  20. Science Fiction: Popular Culture as Reading and Learning Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontell, Val

    Tools for teaching students how to question intelligently are badly needed. Science fiction provides many such tools in a variety of subjects by stimulating the imagination and thus motivating students to learn. Such vehicles are available at all grade levels. From Mark Twain and H.G. Wells to Anne McCaffrey and Isaac Asimov, novels and short…

  1. Chemistry in Victorian Detective Fiction: "A Race with the Sun"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Arthur M.

    2012-01-01

    The late-Victorian era provided aficionados of detective fiction with an abundance of short stories belonging to this literary genre. Many of these works contained some aspect of chemistry, either in the execution of a crime or in the identification of the perpetrator. In the example discussed in this article, the gas-phase reaction of hydrogen…

  2. Developing Environmental Agency and Engagement through Young People's Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen; Webb, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which stories for young people encourage environmental engagement and a sense of agency. Our discussion is informed by the work of Paul Ricoeur (on hermeneutics and narrative), John Dewey (on primacy of experience) and John Macmurray (on personal agency in society). We understand fiction reading about place as…

  3. Future Tense: Science Fiction Confronts the New Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, Janice

    1990-01-01

    Describes 10 science fiction stories for young readers whose contents address recent developments on the frontiers of scientific research, including genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, and robotics. The use of these materials to inform young readers about the issues and dangers involved in scientific developments is discussed. (CLB)

  4. Implant removal after fracture healing : facts and fiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    A frequently asked question to trauma and orthopaedic surgeons is whether and if yes, when an implant will be removed? Although implant removal after fracture healing is daily practice, a scientific basis doesn’t exist. All studies in this thesis were performed to unravel the facts and fiction of

  5. Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My focus in this paper is to examine these problems from the point of view of the so-called 'higher-order thought theory of consciousness' (HOT theory) which says that the best explanation for what makes a mental state conscious is that it is accompanied by a thought that one is in that state. I examine the feeling fiction ...

  6. "I Am No Lady!": The Tomboy in Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levstik, Linda S.

    1983-01-01

    Despite the often repeated contention that children's fiction has consistently presented a narrow and stereotypical view of the lives of girls and women, a review of books written in the 1920s and 1930s indicates a degree of female dissatisfaction with the status quo. (HOD)

  7. Post-dialectic: politics in postcolonial African fiction | Gaylard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their attempt to find political agency is via a rigorous critique of the Marxist dialectic utilised by African nationalism, a critique which, at the least, extends that dialectic into a constellation of multiple dialectics and consequently defamiliarises previous notions of the political. The politics of this fiction might be described as ...

  8. Characterizations in High-Interest/Low-Vocabulary Level Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Helen E.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes 25 high-interest low-vocabulary fiction books and compares them to representative young adult literature in terms of 10 characteristics: youthful protagonist; adolescent's interpretation; direct exposition, dialogue, and confrontation; structural conventions; independent protagonist; consequential events; authoritative portrayals;…

  9. Tough Girls: Fiction for African American Urban Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Miranda

    2002-01-01

    Includes annotated bibliographies for 10 books of fiction that appeal to urban African American girls, five adult titles and five young adult titles. Identifies seven essential characteristics present in the most popular books in a teen section, based on conversations with teens. (LRW)

  10. Commodification of culture in fiction-induced tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipovšek Emilija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the fiction-induced tourism, the illusion of the fictional world is maintained for the sake of the tourist in the real locations and thus it can be used to attract readership and cinephiles alike. Their desire to travel is based on the chronotope (Bakhtin, 1981 that is used as the background in their favourite books and films. Upon reading a book or seeing a film, the audience is inspired to visit the locations in a city where the plot took place. Thus the chronotope of the city featured in fiction develops palimpsestic features. If the flâneur experiences the city, its streets and inhabitants as he/she wanders aimlessly and translates afterwards all this into words in the urban narrative (Benjamin, 1968, then the tourist acts as a 'flâneur ranversé', while they walk the city and observe it in search of the places described in their favourite works of fiction. Moreover, the paper will consider some of the examples of the commodification of cultural products, including Harry Potter bookshop, guided walks and themed studio tours.

  11. A Novel Approach: Historical Fiction in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Bárbara C.

    2013-01-01

    Barbara Cruz describes how what began as a challenge (i.e., finding or justifying the time to spend on history instruction in an environment of high-stakes testing) turned into a rich learning experience for students using historical fiction. By designing experiences that were literacy centered but based in historical content, this group of…

  12. Critical Readings: African American Girls and Urban Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Simone

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this writing is to introduce the reader to the urban fiction genre, explore why adolescent African American girls may be engaging with novels from the genre, and how teachers may be able to use texts from the genre to increase literacy skills.

  13. Narrating National Identity: Fiction, Citizenship And The Asian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper is a literary construction of the citizenship question in East Africa. It examines how national identity and citizenship are narrated in the East African Asian fiction, particularly in the selected novels of M.G. Vassanji (The Gunny Sack), Yusuf K. Dawood (Water under the Bridge and Return to Paradise), and Peter ...

  14. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  15. All in the Family: Parents in Teen Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    Argues that realistic adolescent fiction is necessary so that teens will know they are not alone in their experiences, but that literature offering positive parenting and family models is also needed. Twenty-four books encompassing both genres are briefly reviewed. (CLB)

  16. Representations of Adoption in Contemporary Realistic Fiction for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sue Christian; Fuxa, Robin; Kander, Faryl; Hardy, Dana

    2017-01-01

    In this critical content analysis of thirty-seven contemporary realistic fiction books about adoption, the authors examine how adoption and adoptive families are depicted in young adult (YA) literature. The critical literacy theoretical frame brings into focus significant social implications of these depictions as the researchers illuminate and…

  17. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  18. Picturing the African Diaspora in recent fiction | Jacobs | Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coetzee's engagement with the theme of diasporic migration in Disgrace signals an important direction in contemporary South African fiction. Coetzee himself has foregrounded immigrant cultural identities in Slow Man (2005), whereas the historical African diaspora and its continuation into the present-day dispersal of ...

  19. Redefining otherness: Writing fictional (auto)biography and centring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezeigbo redefines otherness in Children of the Eagle by exploring the narrative elements of the sub-genre of fictional autobiography in centring female subjects. By foregrounding one of Regenia Gagnier's descriptions of a subject—one that is “a ...

  20. FICTIONS IN ARTS, MYTHS AND DREAMS: A SEMANTIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Cabanchik

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The world, or worlds, in which we live, contain symbols as well as real objects. We use symbols both to refer to real objects and to speak of fictions (as in works of art, games, rituals, or dreams. In this paper, I will introduce some elements for a semantic approach to fiction. I will depart from an inscriptional theory of fiction, and will apply this theory to different fields, covering myths, dreams and works of art. Many of the ideas I advance here are inspired by the philosophy of Nelson Goodman. However, in this paper I will extend to myths and dreams some ideas he applies only to the arts. Scheffler's idea of mention - selection which he introduced for the treatment of fictions and applied also to ritual practices will be a resource in the development of my approach. I use some conceptual tools to gain a better understanding of Freud's treatment of dreams, taking into account Wittgenstein's criticism of psychoanalysis. In the final section of this paper, I will evaluate some alternatives to the proposal developed here, so we can best appreciate the advantages of the semantic approach, or at least how it can complement the pragmatic approach.

  1. Integrating African American Fiction into the Middle School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacharach, Nancy; Miller, Terry

    1996-01-01

    Examines the psychosocial development of middle school readers and suggests ways to use fiction with admirable African American characters to help develop cultural awareness and sensitivity during the middle school years. Covers mystery or problem-solving units, historical and survival units, and friends and family relationships units. Includes a…

  2. Exposure to Fictional Medical Television and Health: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Beth L.; Shensa, Ariel; Wessel, Charles; Hoffman, Robert; Primack, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    Fictional medical television programs have long been a staple of television programming, and they remain popular today. We aimed to examine published literature assessing the influence of medical television programs on health outcomes. We conducted systematic literature searches in PubMed, PsychINFO and CINAHL. Selected studies had to be scholarly…

  3. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  4. Supervision Satirized: Fictional Narratives of Student-Supervisor Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Frances

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to further dialogue between the disciplines of English literature and Higher Education by offering a different approach to examining the practice of graduate supervision--a comparison of three fictional narratives: two recently published novels and one ongoing online comic strip. It considers what these narratives reveal about…

  5. Narratives of Being There: Computer Games, Presence and Fictional Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbelman, T.

    2013-01-01

    Narrative game designer, or simply narrative designer, is a role in contemporary computer game development. The narrative designer is responsible for designing the player’s experience of a game’s fictional world. This study delves into the practice of narrative design from the perspective of

  6. Topos of the cosmic space in science fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poutilo Oleg Olegovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the forms of cosmic space in science fiction, its characteristics and main trends of evolution. Cosmic space is seen as a dichotomy of “our” and “their”, though their interaction is complicated and full interiorization is impossible. The specificity of the described cosmic space is the absence of the traditional system of coordinates associated with the sides of the world. Authors have to resort to the use of “map-route”, describing the journey sequentially, from the point of view of a moving person. In this regard, in recent years there has been a tendency to reduce the role of images of cosmic space in science fiction novels. Their appearance in the works becomes a kind of stamp, a concession to the classical traditions of the genre. Once popular genres of strict science fiction or space opera inferior position to the other, recreating a far more convincing picture of the probable future of humanity - cyberpunk dystopia and post-apocalyptic fiction.

  7. Imagine That!: Science Fiction as a Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontell, Val

    2003-01-01

    This article, based on a presentation made by the author at the 2003 California Library Association conference, provides examples of how librarians and teachers can use Science Fiction to provide catalysts for discussion in a variety of subjects; teach students how to question intelligently; and stimulate their imaginations, thus motivating them…

  8. Teaching Science Fiction Film Genre: Theory, Form, and Theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lane

    Intended to provide a paradigm for teachers planning a course in science fiction film, the instructional approach outlined in this paper examines films in relation to each other and to culture. The paper provides a course outline, a discussion of lecture topics, a suggested reading list, and a film list. The instructional approach suggested by the…

  9. A Question of Ethics: Themes in the Science Fiction Genre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNurlin, Kathleen Woitel

    1995-01-01

    Continues an article that began in the summer 1995 "Interdisciplinary Humanities." Examines ethical concerns about nuclear power, societal control, and prejudice articulated in science fiction literature. Authors studied include Ray Bradbury, Philip K. Dick, and Damon Knight. The earlier article covered literature concerned with ecology…

  10. Children's Acquisition of Literary Genre: Science Fiction versus Fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Myriam; Schecter, Sandra R.

    Using ethnographic observations of 30 children in a multicultural inner-city fifth grade class over a period of one year, a study examined the children's classroom interactions with the literary genres of science fiction and fantasy, investigating their sequential acquisition of the constitutive elements of the two genres as well as their…

  11. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction : Pitfalls, parameters and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest

  12. Fictionalizing the Readers of Scholarly Articles in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragson, Gay; Selzer, Jack

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes two scientific journal articles from a reader-response perspective. Elaborates the rhetorical nature of scientific discourse and demonstrates that even within the constraints of the journal articles, scientists have considerable freedom to exercise choices. Explicates how writers use cues to direct readers into fictional roles. (MG)

  13. Translating Metaphors Functioning as Characterisation Techniques in Narrative Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Alet

    A discussion of the translation of fiction focuses on metaphors in the speech of characters. Illustrations are drawn from an Afrikaans novel, "Fiela se kind" ("Fiela's Child"), translated into English by its author, Dalene Matthee. It is argued that if the interdependence of the intratextual components of narrative texts is not…

  14. Religions in Fiction for Junior and Senior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafle, June D.

    2001-01-01

    Examines current adolescent fiction of award-winning and widely read authors according to religious themes concerning Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Native American religions, African spirit religions, and the occult, supernatural, and New Age. Finds that the portrayal of religions and its adherents is very mixed, depending upon the religion.…

  15. The Religious Affordance of Fiction : A Semiotic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidsen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    A curious aspect of late modern religion is the emergence of fiction-based religions, such as Jediism, based on George Lucas’ Star Wars saga, and Tolkien spirituality, based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s literary mythology about Middle-earth. This article draws on narrative semiotics to explain why some

  16. Engineering in Children's Fiction--Not a Good Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Allyson; Panozza, Lisa; Prieto, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Responding to concerns that engineering is a poorly understood occupation and that young people are exposed to stereotyped images of scientists and engineers at an early age, this investigation sought to identify how science and engineering is portrayed in contemporary junior fiction (ages 8-12) and to what extent. An examination of 4,800 junior…

  17. Comparative Study of IS6110 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in the Netherlands, Based on a 5-Year Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Jessica L.; van Ingen, Jakko; de Vries, Gerard; Erkens, Connie; Sebek, Maruschka; Mulder, Arnout; Sloot, Rosa; van den Brandt, Anne-Marie; Enaimi, Mimount; Kremer, Kristin; Supply, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In order to switch from IS6110 and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to 24-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates in the national tuberculosis control program in The Netherlands, a detailed evaluation on discriminatory power and agreement with findings in a cluster investigation was performed on 3,975 tuberculosis cases during the period of 2004 to 2008. The level of discrimination of the two typing methods did not differ substantially: RFLP typing yielded 2,733 distinct patterns compared to 2,607 in VNTR typing. The global concordance, defined as isolates labeled unique or identically distributed in clusters by both methods, amounted to 78.5% (n = 3,123). Of the remaining 855 cases, 12% (n = 479) of the cases were clustered only by VNTR, 7.7% (n = 305) only by RFLP typing, and 1.8% (n = 71) revealed different cluster compositions in the two approaches. A cluster investigation was performed for 87% (n = 1,462) of the cases clustered by RFLP. For the 740 cases with confirmed or presumed epidemiological links, 92% were concordant with VNTR typing. In contrast, only 64% of the 722 cases without an epidemiological link but clustered by RFLP typing were also clustered by VNTR typing. We conclude that VNTR typing has a discriminatory power equal to IS6110 RFLP typing but is in better agreement with findings in a cluster investigation performed on an RFLP-clustering-based cluster investigation. Both aspects make VNTR typing a suitable method for tuberculosis surveillance systems. PMID:23363841

  18. Gore vidal's early Hollywood: history, fiction and film Gore vidal's early Hollywood: history, fiction and film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas LaBorie Burns

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Although Gore Vidal has both worked as a Hollywood screenwriter and written criticism on Film—in this regard, he is perhaps best known for a sustained attack on the auteur theory of the magisterial director—I am concerned in this paper mainly with his fiction account of the early days of film-making in his novel Hollywood (1990 and the relation of film to national political life depicted therein. This novel is the sixth in a series that gives a more or less continuous historical picture of the social and political history of the US from colonial times to the present. “Political” for Vidal, however, means primarily the acts of statesmen, diplomats, and high-ranking military personnel, and the social history he presents is that of the upper-class which supplies their ranks, so that what Vidal is in fact offering in these six novels is what one might call the history of the American “movers-and-shakers”. Although Gore Vidal has both worked as a Hollywood screenwriter and written criticism on Film—in this regard, he is perhaps best known for a sustained attack on the auteur theory of the magisterial director—I am concerned in this paper mainly with his fiction account of the early days of film-making in his novel Hollywood (1990 and the relation of film to national political life depicted therein. This novel is the sixth in a series that gives a more or less continuous historical picture of the social and political history of the US from colonial times to the present. “Political” for Vidal, however, means primarily the acts of statesmen, diplomats, and high-ranking military personnel, and the social history he presents is that of the upper-class which supplies their ranks, so that what Vidal is in fact offering in these six novels is what one might call the history of the American “movers-and-shakers”.

  19. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: relationship between different probe types and procedure time on length and extent of osteonecrosis in dog long bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, J.; Bueno, A. [Fundacion Hospital Alcorcon, Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagen, Alcorcon, Madrid (Spain); Dominguez, M.P. [Fundacion Hospital Alcorcon, Departamento de Patologia, Alcorcon, Madrid (Spain); Llorens, P.; Quiros, J.; Delgado, C. [Universidad Complutense, Facultad de Veterinaria, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    We have been using radiofrequency ablation for the percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteoma since 2001. Frequently, lesions are located near the joint surface, involve the vertebral body or are close to major nerves. We seek to determine whether radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used safely in these cases. A total of 65 lesions were induced in 4 dogs. Each dog underwent RFA on the diaphysis of long bones, as well as femoral and humeral heads. Four different sessions were carried out by using 1- and 2-cm probes with or without a cool-tip system and by varying the timing of the procedure. Plain film, CT, and MRI were obtained. All bone samples were examined histologically. The dogs' activity after the procedure was normal. No pathologic fractures occurred despite unrestricted activity of the animals. Cortical bone was always respected; therefore, articular cartilage has not been damaged. Radiological findings were characteristic. There were no significant differences in lesion size, probe type, and the duration of the procedure. The mean lesion diameter perpendicular to the electrode was 18.5 mm. Our study confirms the insulative effect of cortical bone. RFA can be safely performed close to the joint surface without damaging the cartilage. (orig.)

  20. When fiction is just as real as fact: No differences in reading behavior between stories believed to be based on true or fictional events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartung, F.C.; Withers, P.J.; Hagoort, P.; Willems, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments have shown that compared to fictional texts, readers read factual texts faster and have better memory for described situations. Reading fictional texts on the other hand seems to improve memory for exact wordings and expressions. Most of these studies used a 'newspaper' versus

  1. Analysis of CTG repeat length variation in the DMPK gene in the general population and the molecular diagnosis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Kathlin K; Ishak, Taufik; Lian, Lay-Hoong; Goh, Khean-Jin; Wong, Kum-Thong; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-03-31

    The lack of epidemiological data and molecular diagnostic services in Malaysia has hampered the setting-up of a comprehensive management plan for patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), leading to delayed diagnosis, treatment and support for patients and families. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of DM1 in the 3 major ethnic groups in Malaysia and evaluate the feasibility of a single tube triplet-primed PCR (TP-PCR) method for diagnosis of DM1 in Malaysia. We used PCR to determine the size of CTG repeats in 377 individuals not known to be affected by DM and 11 DM1 suspected patients, recruited from a tertiary hospital in Kuala Lumpur. TP-PCR was performed on selected samples, followed by Southern blot hybridisation of PCR amplified fragments to confirm and estimate the size of CTG expansion. The number of individuals not known to be affected by DM with (CTG) >18 was determined according to ethnic group and as a whole population. The χ 2 test was performed to compare the distribution of (CTG) >18 with 12 other populations. Additionally, the accuracy of TP-PCR in detecting CTG expansion in 11 patients with DM1 was determined by comparing the results with that from Southern blot hybridisation. Of the 754 chromosomes studied, (CTG) >18 frequency of 3.60%, 1.57% and 4.00% in the Malay, Chinese and Indian subpopulations, respectively, was detected, showing similarities to data from Thai, Taiwanese and Kuwaiti populations. We also successfully detected CTG expansions in 9 patients using the TP-PCR method followed by the estimation of CTG expansion size via Southern blot hybridisation. The results show a low DM1 prevalence in Malaysia with the possibility of underdiagnosis and demonstrates the feasibility of using a clinical and TP-PCR-based approach for rapid and cost-effective DM1 diagnosis in developing countries. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. How does fiction reading influence empathy? An experimental investigation on the role of emotional transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P Matthijs; Veltkamp, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced over a period of one week for people who read a fictional story, but only when they were emotionally transported into the story. No transportation led to lower empathy in both studies, while study 1 showed that high transportation led to higher empathy among fiction readers. These effects were not found for people in the control condition where people read non-fiction. The study showed that fiction influences empathy of the reader, but only under the condition of low or high emotional transportation into the story.

  3. How Does Fiction Reading Influence Empathy? An Experimental Investigation on the Role of Emotional Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, P. Matthijs; Veltkamp, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced over a period of one week for people who read a fictional story, but only when they were emotionally transported into the story. No transportation led to lower empathy in both studies, while study 1 showed that high transportation led to higher empathy among fiction readers. These effects were not found for people in the control condition where people read non-fiction. The study showed that fiction influences empathy of the reader, but only under the condition of low or high emotional transportation into the story. PMID:23383160

  4. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  5. The Turn to Precarity in Twenty-First Century Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Jago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen several attempts by writers and critics to understand the changed sensibility in post-9/11 fiction through a variety of new -isms. This essay explores this cultural shift in a different way, finding a ‘turn to precarity’ in twenty-first century fiction characterised by a renewal of interest in the flow and foreclosure of affect, the resurgence of questions about vulnerability and our relationships to the other, and a heightened awareness of the social dynamics of seeing. The essay draws these tendencies together via the work of Judith Butler in Frames of War, in an analysis of Trezza Azzopardi’s quasi-biographical study of precarious life, Remember Me.

  6. The Body Not in the Room: Reading Gossip as Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Bush

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It can be useful to return to some fundamentals when thinking about what gives gossip its power, whether words spoken aloud or words that spread and leave their indelible traces throughout the digital realm. As a novelist and storyteller, I’d like to employ some lines of thought about what we do when we read fiction in order to consider gossip as an act of creative reading. Gossip, like a gift, depends on being received by someone, is defined by the intention to be received. Current fMRI studies have shown the empathetic capacities generated in individuals after reading works of fiction. I want to consider what happens when we imagine something about someone else, and how the engaged creativity of the recipient is essential to the act of gossiping.

  7. Claiming lesbian history: the romance between fact and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The contested field of lesbian history exists along a continuum, with undisputed evidence on one end and informed speculation on the other. Lesbian historical fiction extends the spectrum, envisioning the lives of lesbian pirates, war heroes, pioneers, bandits, and stock romantic characters, as well as the handful of protagonists examined here whose quests specifically highlight the difficulty and importance of researching the lesbian past. The genre blossomed in the 1980s, just as the Foucauldian insistence that homosexual identity did not exist before the late nineteenth century gained sway in the academy. The proliferation of lesbian historical fictions signals the growing desire for more thorough (if not completely factual) historical underpinnings of the burgeoning lesbian identities, communities, and politics set in motion in the 1970s.

  8. Graham Greene's novel: The peculiar experiment in modern fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar-Vujnović Mirjana N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Graham Greene's The Quiet American could be understood as the specific and unique example in experimental modern and post modern fiction during the twentieth century. This novel could be accepted as the peculiar application of the experiment what makes it almost the exceptional case in modern fiction. Greene used some innovative and usual modern elements expressing them through the prism of completely unusual experimental aspect of form. In the novel, Greene made the combination of already known innovative and usual modern elements and traditional elements of form. Actually, he covered the experimental innovations with the common thematic structure, narrative form and partly with the specific psychoanalytical presentation of character's minds, observing and expressing them all at the same time.

  9. ‘Fabricated Lives’: Shakespearean Collaboration in Fictional Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sawyer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The essay examines fictionalized accounts of the collaboration between Shakespeare and his contemporaries, focusing on those that portray Christopher Marlowe as occasionally Shakespeare’s co-author. Beginning with two novels by Anthony Burgess, Nothing Like the Sun: A Story of Shakespeare’s Love-life (1964 and A Dead Man in Deptford (1994, I then look at Peter Whelan’s play, The School of Night (1992, before concluding with the film Shakespeare in Love (1998. By looking at these popularized renditions of collaboration and biography, I conclude that the more collaborative that the fictionalized work is in origin, the more positively it portrays such relationships in Shakespeare’s time.

  10. The Neuroaesthetics of Prose Fiction: Pitfalls, Parameters and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eBurke

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroaesthetics tends not to do literature. To put it more precisely, neuroaesthetics tends not to do literature very often and when it does, it is inclined not to do it with much conviction, belief and rigour. This is not the case in the very many impressive studies that have been conducted on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music, dance, sculpture and the like. Why is this the case and, of greater importance, how can it best be resolved? In this paper, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics.

  11. Narratives of psychiatric malingering in works of fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, V

    2006-12-01

    This paper argues that the representation of psychiatric malingering in literary and cinematographic narratives informs societal stereotypes, and thus influences the clinical phenomenology of malingering. The study aims to identify sociocultural models of malingering in contemporary Western society based on the narrative analysis of about 60 fictional and non-fiction texts. Two behavioural patterns derived from the Foucauldian categories folly and madness are recognisable in naïve conceptualisations of fake insanity. Fabricated significations of deviation originate in grand societal narratives rather than in medical discourse, and construct characters such as animal like underdeveloped simpletons or detached, irrational, violent madmen. Each pattern stems from its own archaic conceptual basis and dictates a distinct framework for strategies of malingering. The semiotic structure of artistic narratives of malingering is discussed in comparison with the symptomatology of existing psychiatric models.

  12. Shamans, shepherds, scientists, and others in Jamaican fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Johnson

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Study of the evolution of the character of the Obeah practioner in a selection of novels set in Jamaica and written in the late 19th and 20th c. Author relates the changing image of the Obeah practioner to changes in social outlook and demonstrates one way in which literature responds to changing social relationships. Portraits of the Obeah practioner became increasingly complex as fiction was placed in an historical revisionist framework.

  13. Use of traditional motives in Serbian science-fiction literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of this paper is consideration of use of traditional motives in Serbian science-fiction literature in relation with socio-cultural milieu of Serbia from late 80s until now. The author tries to point out ways of usage and construction of some traditional and mythological patterns in certain literature works. This genre of literary production is perceived as a popular culture phenomenon - with this premise, the paper intents to analyze communication process between text and audiences.

  14. The Representation of Workingwomen in Spanish Television Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lacalle, Charo; Gómez, Beatriz (UNIR)

    2016-01-01

    During the sixties and seventies the limited presence of women in the public sphere was reflected in the restricted repertoire of roles played by female characters in television fiction (mainly those of mothers and wives). The strengthening of the feminist movement in the following decades increased and diversified the portrayals of women in the workplace, and further encouraged academic research on the social construction of working women. Despite the relevance of female professionals in cur...

  15. A Study on Emotional Healing Efficacy of Fiction for Undergraduate

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Su-May Sheih; Pi-Fen Chang Chien

    2014-01-01

    In modern society, undergraduates may encounter multiple pressures and thus feel the sense of alienation, anxiety, disturbance and depression. For undergraduates, reading can be independently conducted without the intervention of an instructor; therefore, undergraduates who feel reluctant to expose private emotions to counselors can help themselves through the reading of emotional healing books. This is the application of bibliotherapy. Among various resources, fiction can serve as an appropr...

  16. Performance in the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writing Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Angus, Tiffani

    2017-01-01

    This paper looks at the dynamic of science fiction and fantasy (SFF) writing workshop critique groups. Because of the nature of SFF as a fandom group, critiques and feedback in writing workshops—in this case, affinity groups with the same goal—can cross the line from participation to performance; group members tend to perform depending on their levels of cultural literacy and impostor syndrome, both of which influence fans working to become published writers. The performance can have positive...

  17. The Use of ?Literary Fiction? to Promote Mentalizing Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Pino, Maria Chiara; Mazza, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is a multidimensional process that incorporates both mentalizing and emotional sharing dimensions. Empathic competencies are important for creating interpersonal relationships with other people and developing adequate social behaviour. The lack of these social components also leads to isolation and exclusion in healthy populations. However, few studies have investigated how to improve these social skills. In a recent study, Kidd and Castano (2013) found that reading literary fiction i...

  18. American television fiction transforming Danish teenagers' religious imaginations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that American television fiction with supernatural themes offers Danish teenage audiences a playground for exploring different religious imaginations in a continuous process of internal negotiations; thereby transforming their imaginations. This process of the mediatization...... narratives. This essay presents the findings of an empirical qualitative study of seventy-two Danish teenagers and considers two primary parameters for the case-based reception study: the teenagers' levels of fandom and their connection with institutionalized religion. In other words, how are religious...

  19. Science fiction/science fact: medical genetics in news stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alan; Anderson, Alison; Allan, Stuart

    2005-12-01

    News media coverage of biotechnology issues offers a rich source of fictional portrayals, with stories drawing strongly on popular imagery and metaphors in descriptions of the powers and dangers of biotechnology. This article examines how science fiction metaphors, imagery and motifs surface in British newspaper (broadsheet and tabloid) coverage of medical genetic issues, focusing on press reporting of two recent highly publicised news media events; namely, the Hashmi and Whitaker families' plights to use stem cells from a 'perfectly matched sibling' for the treatment of their diseased children. It is concerned in particular with the extent to which journalists' use of certain literary devices encourages preferred formulations of medical genetics, and thereby potentially shapes public deliberation about scientific developments and their consequences for society. Understanding how science fiction sustains science fact, and vice versa, and how the former is portrayed in news media, it is argued, would thus seem to be crucial in the effort to understand why people respond so strongly to biotechnologies, and what they imagine their consequences to be.

  20. EQUIVOCATION IN THE FOUNDATIONS OF LEIBNIZ’S INFINITESIMAL FICTIONS

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    Tzuchien THO

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I address two different kinds of equivocations in reading Leibniz’s fictional infinite and infinitesimal. These equivocations form the background of a reductive reading of infinite and infinitesimal fictions either as ultimately finite or as something whose status can be taken together with any other mathematical object as such. The first equivocation is the association of a foundation of infinitesimals with their ontological status. I analyze this equivocation by criticizing the logicist influence on 20th century Anglophone reception of the syncategorematical infinite and infinitesimal. The second equivocation is the association of the rigor of mathematical demonstration with the problem of the admissibility of infinite or infinitesimal terms. I analyze this by looking at Leibniz’s constructive method and apagogic argument style in his quadrature method. In treating these equivocations, I critique some assumptions that underlie the reductive reading of Leibniz’s fictionalism concerning infinite and infinitesimals. In turn, I suggest that these infinitesimal “fictions” pointed to a problematic within Leibniz’s work that was conceived and reconsidered in Leibniz’s work from a range of different contexts and methods.Keywords: Leibniz, differential calculu

  1. Writing social psychology: fictional things and unpopulated texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Michael

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the author's position on the question how to write social psychology. It reflects the author's long-term interest in rhetoric and his more recent concerns about the writing of social scientists. The author argues that social psychologists tend to produce unpopulated texts, writing about 'fictional things' rather than people. Social psychologists assume that their technical terms are more precise than ordinary language terms. The author contests this assumption. He suggests that when it comes to describing human actions, ordinary language on the whole tends to be more precise. The paper analyses why this should be the case, drawing on ideas from linguistics and Vaihinger's notion of fictions. The author presents examples to show how psychological writers, by using passives and nominals, can omit information about the agents of action and the nature of the actions that they are performing. Although their texts may appear impressively technical, they can, in fact, be highly imprecise. Moreover, social psychologists, by using this nominal style of writing, tend to write about processes as if they were things and then attribute actions to these things. In so doing, they create 'fictional things', which they treat as if they were real things. The author offers six recommendations for writing in simpler, clearer ways. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: katica@ifs.hr; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C. [Institut Neel, Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties.

  3. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljakovic, K.; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties

  4. Vers une esthétique de la science-fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Russ, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Les outils critiques élaborés en ayant à l’esprit une littérature entièrement différente ne fonctionnent pas quand ils sont appliqués à la science-fiction. Dans cet article, j’avance la proposition suivante : que la science-fiction est didactique. Malgré des similitudes superficielles avec la fiction moderne naturaliste (ou autre), les personnages de science-fiction sont toujours des personnes collectives, jamais individuelles. Je suggère que la critique littéraire contemporaine n’est pas l’...

  5. Telomere length analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andrés; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A

    2007-01-01

    Most somatic cells of long-lived species undergo telomere shortening throughout life. Critically short telomeres trigger loss of cell viability in tissues, which has been related to alteration of tissue function and loss of regenerative capabilities in aging and aging-related diseases. Hence, telomere length is an important biomarker for aging and can be used in the prognosis of aging diseases. These facts highlight the importance of developing methods for telomere length determination that can be employed to evaluate telomere length during the human aging process. Telomere length quantification methods have improved greatly in accuracy and sensitivity since the development of the conventional telomeric Southern blot. Here, we describe the different methodologies recently developed for telomere length quantification, as well as their potential applications for human aging studies.

  6. T. rex and Godzilla: Finding Science in Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, G. F.; Chure, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Works of fiction act as a powerful vehicle for inculcating an intuitive understanding (or misunderstanding) of scientific concepts in the audience. They can communicate information about scientific phenomena or how science is done. These entertainments can contribute to scientific literacy of the public and provide valuable outreach opportunities, but scientific accuracy is rarely even a minor consideration in developing fictional stories. Science educators can still make use of popular fiction to promote science education and outreach. Varied approaches have focused on the physical science in classic space operas, but historical sciences can make use of public interest in fictional tales involving prehistoric creatures and settings. Dinosaurs like T. rex inspire awe and widespread popular appeal that can nurture an interest in fossils but also serves as a gateway to all the other sciences on which paleontology depends, and to the scientific endeavor itself. But the portrayal of dinosaurs has met with negative criticism of details that is not likely to be productive of further discussion and learning. Perhaps it is not so important that authors and film makers didn't get it right; that "correctness" of terms and reconstructions is less important than the opportunity to improve public understanding of how science works; to cultivate a habit of critical thinking and an analytical approach to interpreting the world. Dinosaurs and other long extinct creatures can provide examples of how we know what we know; what kind of evidence is available and how it can be interpreted; how creative framing of hypotheses allows imaginative conjectures to be constrained by observations. They can open informative discussions of how scientists work in gathering data and developing and testing hypotheses. For example, how do paleontologists find fossils? Monsters, unrealistic fantasy creatures like Godzilla, have great charismatic appeal, and can prompt discussions of the obstacles

  7. The Phantasmatic "I". On Imagination-based Uses of the First-person Pronoun across Fiction and Non-fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevia Dolcini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional accounts regard the first-person pronoun as a special token-reflexive indexical whose referent, the utterer, is identified by the linguistic rule expressed by the term plus the context of utterance. This view falls short in accounting for all the I-uses in narrative practices, a domain broader than fiction including storytelling, pretense, direct speech reports, delayed communication, the historical present, and any other linguistic act in which the referent of the indexical is not perceptually accessible to the receiver. I propose a model for the reference of “I” based on the distinction between three functions carried out by indexicals in communication, namely, the anaphoric, perceptual, and phantasmatic functions. The referential mechanism of the phantasmatic “I”, that is, the “I” used in phantasmatic function, is understood as an instance of imagination-oriented pointing exploiting the phantasmatic context, and not the perceptual context relevant in perceptual uses of indexicals. The rule for “I” is revised in light of the perceptual vs. phantasmatic deixis distinction; the resulting rule governing the reference of the phantasmatic “I” allows for a homogeneous treatment of ‘I’-tokens in narrative practices spanning the spectrum from fiction to non-fiction.

  8. Drug delivery interfaces in the 21st century: from science fiction ideas to viable technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; Webber, Matthew J; Succi, Marc D; Langer, Robert

    2013-10-07

    Early science fiction envisioned the future of drug delivery as targeted micrometer-scale submarines and "cyborg" body parts. Here we describe the progression of the field toward technologies that are now beginning to capture aspects of this early vision. Specifically, we focus on the two most prominent types of systems in drug delivery: the intravascular micro/nano drug carriers for delivery to the site of pathology and drug-loaded implantable devices that facilitate release with the predefined kinetics or in response to a specific cue. We discuss the unmet clinical needs that inspire these designs, the physiological factors that pose difficult challenges for their realization, and viable technologies that promise robust solutions. We also offer a perspective on where drug delivery may be in the next 50 years based on expected advances in material engineering and in the context of future diagnostics.

  9. The Dark Side of British Horror Fiction: Politics, Taboos and Censorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lázaro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly two and a half centuries have passed since the first British Gothic novels began to attract attention with their pages full of monstrous characters, excessive violence, explicit sexual content and all kinds of horrific scenes. For the most part, the reception of this type of literature has been very positive, though not exempt from controversies. This paper seeks to show how, beyond the alluring mystery, inventive plots and attraction of the dark side, British horror fiction appeals to the reader’s inner desires and imagination by means of transgressive political, religious or sexual contents that often defy taboos and social decorum. To illustrate this argument, three well-known authors and texts from three different periods will be discussed: Matthew Gregory Lewis’s The Monk (1796, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Carmilla” (1872 and Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange (1962.

  10. Branded webseries. Strategic actions of the advertiser based on corporate online fiction and marketing content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Segarra-Saavedra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past, advertisers and brands have adhered to audiovisual content, film and television, through production sponsorship, product or brand placement and bartering. It´s strategy basically accessible to prominent budgets. But changes in communication and the democratization of creation and distribution of content have opened this tactic to other advertisers whose advertising items try to join brand values to entertainment through branded webseries. We present an exploratory study about the creation, dissemination, promotion, reception and socialization of webseries, brand stories based on fiction and Internet. From methodological triangulation, is dealt the case study of Risi and the three seasons of the webserie ¿Por qué esperar? With depth interviews with the creative, their descriptive analysis, as well as quantitative analysis audience and their interactions. The comparative results describe the use of creativity, famous characters related to the target and the effect generated by this type of stories that generate engagement.

  11. Comparison of clinical and radiographic parameters around short (6 to 8 mm in length) and long (11 mm in length) dental implants placed in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus: 3-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Amri, Mohammad D; Abduljabbar, Tariq S; Al-Johany, Sulieman S; Al Rifaiy, Mohammad Q; Alfarraj Aldosari, Abdullah M; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A

    2017-10-01

    To compare the clinical and radiographic parameters around short (6 to 8 mm in length) and long (11 mm in length) dental implants placed in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Forty-five male patients with T2DM (Group-1) and 42 male non-diabetic controls (Group-2) who had undergone implant therapy in the posterior mandible were included. Depending upon the length of the implant, patients were divided into two subgroups: (a) patients with short implants (6-8 mm long) and (b) patients with long implants (11 mm long). Peri-implant plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD) and crestal bone loss (CBL) were measured at 18 and 36 months of follow-up in both groups. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured at baseline and after 18 and 36 months of follow-up in both groups. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age of patients in groups 1 and 2 was 42.5 and 40.6 years, respectively. The mean HbA1c levels at baseline among patients in groups 1 and 2 were 7.7% and 4.5%, respectively. At 18 and 36 months of follow-up, the mean HbA1c levels among patients in groups 1 and 2 were 6.6% and 4.5% and 6.5% and 4.4%, respectively. The mean duration of T2DM among patients that received short and long implants was 4.3 years and 4.1 years, respectively. There was no significant difference in PI, BOP, PD and CBL around implants placed in both groups at 18 and 36 months of follow-up. Success rate of short and long dental implants was 100% in both groups. Short implants can demonstrate clinical and radiographic stability in a manner similar to conventional long implants in patients with and without T2DM. The role of oral hygiene and glycemic maintenance in this scenario cannot be disregarded. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Linking Science Fiction and Physics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Krista K.

    2016-01-01

    Generally, cohorts or learning communities enrich higher learning in students. Learning communities consist of conventionally separate groups of students that meet together with common academic purposes and goals. Types of learning communities include paired courses with concurrent student enrollment, living-learning communities, and faculty…

  13. Comparison of textbook passages, nonfiction trade book passages and fiction trade book passages as instructional tools for learning science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cynthia

    This study examined the impact of different types of text on student achievement in elementary school science. Gender was also examined to see if the type of text passage read had any differential effect on boys' and girls' achievement. This study was a pretest/posttest/retention test design. Eighty-four fourth grade students from a public charter elementary school in South Florida were randomly assigned a passage from a physical science textbook, a physical science nonfiction trade book, a physical science fiction trade book, a biological science textbook or a biological science nonfiction trade book. Results in the physical science content area revealed that students in the textbook passage group had higher posttest and retention test results than students in the nonfiction and fiction trade book passage groups. There was no difference on the posttest results of students in the biological science textbook and nonfiction trade book passage groups. Students in the biological science textbook passage group had higher retention results than students in the biological science nonfiction passage group. Gender results in the physical science content area revealed that boys had a higher retention score than girls in the fiction trade book passage group. There were no gender achievement differences as a result of the text passage read in the biological science content area. It was concluded that no definitive answer as to the efficacy of textbooks versus trade books was possible based upon results of the study. Recommendations for future research include examining the effects of different types of texts in conjunction with other authentic teaching methods.

  14. Telomere length and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Rode, Line

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been cross-sectionally associated with short telomeres as a measure of biological age. However, the direction and nature of the association is currently unclear. AIMS: We examined whether short telomere length is associated with depression cross-sectionally as well...... as prospectively and genetically. METHOD: Telomere length and three polymorphisms, TERT, TERC and OBFC1, were measured in 67 306 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Danish general population and associated with register-based attendance at hospital for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication....... RESULTS: Attendance at hospital for depression was associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not prospectively. Further, purchase of antidepressant medication was not associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally or prospectively. Mean follow-up was 7.6 years (range 0...

  15. Myofilament length dependent activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C. (IIT); (Loyola)

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  16. Writing Oneself into Someone Else s Story Experiments With Identity And Speculative Life Writing in Twilight Fan Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    Fan fiction offers rich data to explore readers’ understanding of gendered discourses informing the narrative construction of fictional and real-life identities. This paper focuses on gender identity construction in self-insertion fan fiction texts – stories that involve avatars of fan writers – based on Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight novels. Self-insertion fan fiction stories can be considered a form of life writing where authors play with their identity in a virtual context in te...

  17. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, sho...

  18. Final Report on TREAT Tests R4 and R5; Seven-pin, Loss-of-flow Tests with Full-length, Unirradiated FFTF-type Fuel Pins -- Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. W.

    1979-04-01

    Two seven-pin loss-of-flow simulation tests have been performed in-pile in support of LMFBR safety analyses. These integral-type tests were executed in the R-series test apparatus at TREAT, designed to provide a prototypic thermal hydraulic flowing sodium system. The test fuel pins were full-length FFTF-type, containing unirradiated UO{sub 2} fuel. In LOF test R4, the sequence was run at constant fuel power well beyond the inception of molten fuel motion; in R5, the sequence was terminated prior to fuel melting to preserve evidence of early molten cladding motion. The tests were consistent with one another, showing the anticipated sequence of sodium boiling, channel voiding, cladding dryout, cladding failures, molten cladding motion and, for R4, fuel melting and motion. Thin planar upper cladding blockages were formed as were thick lower blockages, effectively plugging the bundle at the extremities of the active fuel region. There was no sodium reentry, and there were no significant pressurization events. Comparison of test results with SAS code calculations revealed differences associated with early voiding behavior, release of noncondensible fuel pin plenum gas, and the thickness and location of the upper blockage. In general, however, the overall sequence of significant events observed in R4 and R5 is in quite good agreement with SAS code analysis of the test conditions. Features of SAS related to overall voiding, cladding motion, and to some extent fuel motion have been substantiated in these results.

  19. Science Fiction Movies as a Tool for Revealing Students' Knowledge and Alternative Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongel-Erdal, Sevinc; Sonmez, Duygu; Day, Rob

    2004-01-01

    According to renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, "science fiction is useful both for stimulating the imagination and for diffusing fear of the future." Indeed, several studies suggest that using science fiction movies as a teaching aid can improve both motivation and achievement. However, if a movie's plot crosses the line between good…

  20. Are We Really the Prey? Nanotechnology as Science and Science Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Diana M.; Hodge, Graeme A.; Binks, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Popular culture can play a significant role in shaping the acceptance of evolving technologies, with nanotechnology likely to be a case in point. The most popular fiction work to date in this arena has been Michael Crichton's techno-thriller "Prey," which fuses together nanotechnology science with science fiction. Within the context of "Prey,"…

  1. The Impact of Science Fiction Film on Student Understanding of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael; Wagner, Heather; Gatling, Anne; Anderson, Janice; Houle, Meredith; Kafka, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Researchers who have investigated the public understanding of science have argued that fictional cinema and television has proven to be particularly effective at blurring the distinction between fact and fiction. The rationale for this study lies in the notion that to teach science effectively, educators need to understand how popular culture…

  2. Forging Futures with Teens and Science Fiction: A Conversation with Greg Bear and David Brin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltz, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Greg Bear and David Brin, two science fiction writers who started Reading for the Future, an international project geared toward secondary school students that shows teachers and librarians how science fiction inspires young readers. Discusses programs that have come out of this group; standards for books geared toward…

  3. The Rustle of a Star: An Annotated Bibliography of Deaf Characters in Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 136 works of fiction, published in English, which feature deaf characters. Included are novels for adult readers, short stories, fiction for young adults and older children, and books for young children. Each item's status in print is indicated. (three references) (LRW)

  4. "Normal" feelings in "abnormal" worlds : on the political uses of emotion in science fiction manga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Carl Ka-hei

    2015-01-01

    Scholars such as Darko Suvin have successfully argued for science fiction (SF) as fiction that portrays political alternatives through a focus on cognitive processes. This conception of SF minimizes the importance of character emotions, which has opened it to criticism from those who argue in favor

  5. Street Fiction: What Is It and What Does It Mean for English Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Marc Lamont; Perez, Biany; Irby, Decoteau J.

    2008-01-01

    Street fiction is a popular new genre of novels that focus on contemporary urban life. Marc Lamont Hill, Biany Perez, and Decoteau J. Irby introduce this genre, describing what it is, who writes it, and who reads it. They also offer critiques of the genre and strategies for linking street fiction to the English classroom. (Contains 1 note.)

  6. The Chicana Subject in Ana Castillo's Fiction and the Discursive Zone of Chicana/o Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Benjamin D.

    2007-01-01

    In the world of Chicana fiction, Ana Castillo has achieved the kind of status Maxine Hong Kingston has attained within Asian American discourse. Castillo's work is popular not only with the general reading public but in many academic circles as well. What sets Castillo apart from so many other Chicana fiction writers is that she is also a…

  7. How does fiction reading influence empathy? An experimental investigation on the role of emotional transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, P.M.; Veltkamp, M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated whether fiction experiences change empathy of the reader. Based on transportation theory, it was predicted that when people read fiction, and they are emotionally transported into the story, they become more empathic. Two experiments showed that empathy was influenced

  8. Fiction Criticizing Reality: Abbas Kiarostami and the Cracked Windshield of Cinema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Blake Ewing

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that Abbas Kiarostami uses documentaries and fiction films to examine the distinction between reality and fiction. Through the use of an arthouse style of filmmaking, the insertion of a surrogate director into the narrative and a recurring breakdown in technology, Kiarostami demonstrates that film’s ability to capture reality is a flawed, sometimes broken, endeavor.

  9. Jane Austen's (1775-1817) references to headache: fact and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, A J

    2010-11-01

    References to headache in Jane Austen's works, both fictional and non-fictional, and in biographical works undertaken by Austen family members have been collated. These multiple references suggest that Jane Austen used headache as a narrative device to reflect not only physiological bodily processes but also psychological states, possibly based on her own experience of headache and that of female relations and acquaintances.

  10. Anarchic alchemists : dissident androgyny in Anglo-American gothic fiction from Godwin to Melville

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Evert Jan van

    2006-01-01

    The dissertation Anarchic Alchemists: Dissident Androgyny in Anglo-American Gothic Fiction from Godwin to Melville investigates the close generic links between British and American Gothic fictions from the late eighteenth-century up to the middle of the nineteenth century, including studies on

  11. Upper Elementary Students' Motivation to Read Fiction and Nonfiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Allison Ward; Parsons, Seth A.; Malloy, Jacquelynn A.; Gambrell, Linda B.; Marinak, Barbara A.; Reutzel, D. Ray; Applegate, Mary D.; Applegate, Anthony J.; Fawson, Parker C.

    2018-01-01

    This research explores upper elementary students' motivation to read fiction and nonfiction. Using expectancy-value theory, the researchers developed separate surveys to measure motivation to read fiction and nonfiction. Researchers administered surveys to 1,104 upper elementary students (grades 3-6) in multiple locations across the United States…

  12. Parallel Stories, Differentiated Histories. Exploring Fiction and Memory in Spanish and Portuguese Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda Laffond, José Carlos; Coronado Ruiz, Carlota; Duff Burnay, Catarina; Díaz Pérez, Susana; Guerra Gómez, Amparo; Santos, Rogério

    2013-01-01

    abstractIntegrated into an international project on the characteristics of historical fiction on TV in Spain and Portugal during 2001–2012, the study traces the main aspects of these productions as entertainment products and memory strategies. Historical fiction on Iberian television channels

  13. Toward Improved Collections in Medical Humanities: Fiction in Academic Health Sciences Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dali, Keren; Dilevko, Juris

    2006-01-01

    Although fiction plays a prominent role in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities (MH), it is physically and intellectually isolated from non-fiction in academic health sciences libraries. Using the Literature, Arts, and Medicine Database (LAMD) as a tool for selection and subject analysis, we suggest a method of integrating fiction…

  14. Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton: Black Women Writers and Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Gregory Jerome; Brooks, Wanda M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that African American literature has always had science fiction elements in its focus on narratives of the alienated and marginalized "other." Contends that Octavia Butler and Virginia Hamilton are two African American writers of science fiction who examine the connections between the stories of a culture and the genre of science…

  15. Exploring Mars and Beyond: Science Fiction a Resource for Environmental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryder W.

    The purpose of this article is to show how traditional science fiction, an empowering literature of social criticism, can be used by environmental educators to reach the traditional goals of environmental education. The sub-genres of science fiction are discussed along with ways in which they can be used to reach certain goals of environmental…

  16. How to Tell the Schlock from the Good Stuff in Science Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, June

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that not all science fiction is great. Discusses ways to tell the difference between the good and the bad. Encourages even those teachers who are most leery of a genre with which they are unfamiliar to jump in and try science fiction as a way of opening up student minds and imaginations. (PRA)

  17. The Female Rescuer in Newbery Fiction: Exploring the Archetype of Mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth

    2002-01-01

    Examines the identity of female characters who rescue male protagonists in three works of Newbery-winning fiction, and realizes their archetypal roles of Mother. Provides readers with a vehicle for revisiting the interaction among characters in young adult fiction. Presents a rationale for using literary criticism to help students explore how…

  18. Textual Features in the Descriptions and Fictional Narratives of Young Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Ann

    To examine the textual features that distinguish descriptions and fictional narratives in the products of eight- and nine-year old writers, a study analyzed 14 compositions (seven descriptions and seven fictional narratives) written by 14 third grade students. The samples were rated by two qualified professionals working in writing research,…

  19. Contemporary Ghost Stories: Cyberspace in Fiction for Children and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Marla

    2005-01-01

    This essay identifies a genre of popular fiction for children and young adults, prevalent in the 1990s and continuing into the early twenty-first century, that incorporates computers and the internet, e-mails and chat rooms, into its plots. However, along with a focus on technology, this fiction frequently features the supernatural. So, too,…

  20. Fiction and Religion : How Narratives About the Supernatural Inspire Religious Belief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidsen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Thematic issue on 'Fiction and Religion: How Narratives About the Supernatural Inspire Religious Belief', volume 46(4) of Religion. The thematic issue inclues the following articles: Davidsen, Markus Altena, "Fiction and Religion: How Narratives About the Supernatural Inspire Religious Belief –

  1. Filling the Gaps: What's Happening in the World of Fan Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tara

    2006-01-01

    When one reads and greatly enjoys a book, he or she would naturally want to repeat the experience. Readers seeking to do so can perhaps find what they are looking for in fan fiction if aspiring fan fiction writers are capable of supplying answers to questions left by the original author in a manner that does justice to that author's style or…

  2. Report from Middle-Earth: Fan Fiction Tasks in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon; Sundmark, Björn

    2016-01-01

    This study builds upon work in task-based language teaching and literary studies to explore the use of fan fiction as a pedagogical tool in a technology-enhanced university foreign language class. A task-based fan fiction project, The Blogging Hobbit, modelled on blog-based role-play storytelling found in online media fandoms, was carried out in a…

  3. Bottom of the Iceberg: The Archontic Text - Review of Fanged Fan Fiction (McFarland, 2013)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Lindgren, Maria og Malin Isaksson, Fanged Fan Fiction: Variations on Twilight, True Blood and The Vampire Diaries (McFarland, 2013)......Anmeldelse af Lindgren, Maria og Malin Isaksson, Fanged Fan Fiction: Variations on Twilight, True Blood and The Vampire Diaries (McFarland, 2013)...

  4. The Material Co-Construction of Hard Science Fiction and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between hard science fiction and physics and a gendered culture of science. Empirical studies indicate that science fiction references might spur some students' interest in physics and help develop this interest throughout school, into a university education and even further later inspire the practice of…

  5. An Annotated Bibliography: Recent Realistic Fiction and Informational Books for Young Children Portraying Asian-American and Native American Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Frances A.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of recent realistic fiction and informational books for young children portraying Asian American and Native American cultures. Lists 23 fiction and 8 informational books on Asian Americans and 19 fiction and 15 informational books on Native Americans. Lists nine books for adults. (SLD)

  6. Source confusion as an explanation of cultivation: A test of the mechanisms underlying confusion of fiction with reality on television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolstra, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Cultivation studies have found evidence that heavy television viewers adopt a world view congruent with how the world is portrayed in fictional television programs. An explanation is that viewers may remember fictional TV stories as realistic stories or news (fiction-to-news confusion). Until now,

  7. Fiction, existence et référence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie L. Thomasson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available L’article publié ici se propose d’emprunter une voie qui n’avait pas été empruntée dans les explorations précédentes de l’auteur. En effet, on verra qu’il s’agit ici de surmonter les difficultés auxquelles sont confrontées les théories réalistes de la fiction et en particulier la théorie artefactuelle dont Amie Thomasson est l’auteur.La question principale s’édicte en ces termes : s’il y a des personnages de fiction, comment se fait-il qu’il nous soit naturel de dire que tel ou tel personnage n’existe pas ?  Comment rendre compte des affirmations de non-existence des personnages de fiction, en particulier lorsqu’on est un réaliste de la fiction ?L’auteur confronte trois manières de traiter ces affirmations : l’approche par la quantification restreinte et l’approche linguistique et enfin l’approche des conditions d’application, point de vue auquel l’auteur se rallie. La première approche consiste à faire des restrictions spatiales ou catégorielles afin de cerner le champ de la référence. La seconde approche, qui est celle que les théoriciens de la référence directe emploient majoritairement, consiste à passer par le métalangage, c’est-à-dire de passer à un niveau sémantique supérieur. La dernière approche, celle par les conditions d’application, est construite sur les vertus des deux premières approches. Enfin, l’auteur élargira l’apport de cette dernière approche aux débats métaphysiques.The Amie Thomasson’s paper continues to explore the thesis she developed in Fiction and Metaphysics about the problems of reference. More precisely, the issues are about the problems that a realistic view of abstract objects can encounter. Here, the question has to be written in a particular way: if there are fictional characters, why do we quite naturally say that such or such character doesn’t exist? How can a realist overthrow such difficulties explaining the claims of non

  8. De l’avantage (ou non) de définir la science-fiction : théorie des genres, science-fiction et Histoire

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, John

    2013-01-01

    Cet essai a pour but d’aider à la clarification et au renforcement de l’impact d’une théorie historique des genres dans les études sur la science-fiction. Il explique et défend cinq propositions sur ce genre, chacune pouvant servir de thèse en elle-même : la science-fiction est historique et mouvante ; la science-fiction n’a pas d’essence, pas de caractéristique unifiante, et pas de point originel ; la science-fiction n’est pas un ensemble de textes, mais plutôt un usage des textes et une man...

  9. Deceived by orchids: sex, science, fiction and Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersby, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Between 1916 and 1927, botanists in several countries independently resolved three problems that had mystified earlier naturalists - including Charles Darwin: how did the many species of orchid that did not produce nectar persuade insects to pollinate them? Why did some orchid flowers seem to mimic insects? And why should a native British orchid suffer 'attacks' from a bee? Half a century after Darwin's death, these three mysteries were shown to be aspects of a phenomenon now known as pseudocopulation, whereby male insects are deceived into attempting to mate with the orchid's flowers, which mimic female insects; the males then carry the flower's pollen with them when they move on to try the next deceptive orchid. Early twentieth-century botanists were able to see what their predecessors had not because orchids (along with other plants) had undergone an imaginative re-creation: Darwin's science was appropriated by popular interpreters of science, including the novelist Grant Allen; then H.G. Wells imagined orchids as killers (inspiring a number of imitators), to produce a genre of orchid stories that reflected significant cultural shifts, not least in the presentation of female sexuality. It was only after these changes that scientists were able to see plants as equipped with agency, actively able to pursue their own, cunning reproductive strategies - and to outwit animals in the process. This paper traces the movement of a set of ideas that were created in a context that was recognizably scientific; they then became popular non-fiction, then popular fiction, and then inspired a new science, which in turn inspired a new generation of fiction writers. Long after clear barriers between elite and popular science had supposedly been established in the early twentieth century, they remained porous because a variety of imaginative writers kept destabilizing them. The fluidity of the boundaries between makers, interpreters and publics of scientific knowledge was a highly

  10. Dickens and Science Fiction: A Study of Artificial Intelligence in Great Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete Robert Orford

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dickens didn't write science fiction - or did he? More to the point, why on earth wouldn't Dickens write science fiction? In an era when writers were experimenting more and more with the fusion of science and the unknown in their writing, the apparent absence of such a work by Dickens appears conspicuous. This article addresses this issue by exploring the confused beginnings of science fiction and goes on to present a detailed study of robotics in 'Great Expectations. 'It seeks out the resonances between Dickens's novel and early robot fiction of the nineteenth century, examining Estella's inhumanity and the way in which both she and Pip are 'made' by Miss Havisham and Magwitch. Ultimately, the paper aims to show that Dickens's writing does indeed have a place in the study of science fiction.

  11. BOUNDARIES BETWEEN FICTION AND FACT IN THE LIGHT OF THE THREE LEVEL COMPARATIVE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Lavocat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author’s aim is to reconsider the difference between fact and fiction in diachronic, comparative, and interdisciplinary perspective. The study covers a long period, mainly from the 17 th Century to the present time, drawing on literary studies but also on law studies and cognitive science. A comparative methodology it employs counterpoises artefacts pertaining to different times, cultural epochs, and geographies (paying attention to the tension between the Far East and the Western world, in particular as well as to different media. Considering these multiple dimensions, fiction is understood as a trans-historical, transcultural, and trans-medial phenomenon. The author defines fiction as a possible world that has its own peculiar ontology and focuses on a cluster of related questions including fictional characters, paradox and “metalepsis,” a rhetorical figure that reinforces the boundary between fact and fiction as it creates the illusion of crossing it.

  12. From fantasy to reality: managing biomedical risk emotions in and through fictional media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Marci D; Fisher, Jill A

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore the role that fictional media (film and television) play in evoking and managing collective and individual anxieties towards biomedical research. We draw on two data sets: fictional media depictions of human research subjects and interviews with Phase I clinical trial participants conducted in the USA in 2013. We show how fictional media provide an outlet for collective uncertainties surrounding biomedical research through depictions that mock and dehumanise research participants, using such emotions of shock, disgust, pity, amusement and humour. We analyse how themes from fictional media are also used to manage actual clinical trial participants' own anxiety concerning the unknown risks of research participation. By contrasting the reality of their research experience with fantasy derived from entertainment media, clinical trial participants minimise the seriousness of the side effects they have or may experience in actual Phase I clinical trials. We conclude that fictional media serve an important role in the collective and individual management of risk emotion.

  13. Renal stem cells: fact or science fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCampbell, Kristen K; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2012-06-01

    The kidney is widely regarded as an organ without regenerative abilities. However, in recent years this dogma has been challenged on the basis of observations of kidney recovery following acute injury, and the identification of renal populations that demonstrate stem cell characteristics in various species. It is currently speculated that the human kidney can regenerate in some contexts, but the mechanisms of renal regeneration remain poorly understood. Numerous controversies surround the potency, behaviour and origins of the cell types that are proposed to perform kidney regeneration. The present review explores the current understanding of renal stem cells and kidney regeneration events, and examines the future challenges in using these insights to create new clinical treatments for kidney disease.

  14. [Experimentation with women: science fiction or reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar Amigó, Vicente M

    2008-01-01

    Many people will not have heard about the experimentation that has been, and continues to be, carried out on women, because much of the media makes no mention of the matter. Just a few examples that could be mentioned are experimentation with the contraceptive pill, forced sterilization, egg donation, surrogate motherhood, kidney and other organ donation, and unnecessary therapy and surgery. In a few cases such experimentation could well be termed exploitation of women, with all kinds of excuses or humanitarian reasons, and sometimes communitarian purposes and even reasons concerning possible benefits for the whole of society, being mentioned. The present work aims to stimulate reflection about some types of research which can only be regarded as exploitation of women.

  15. REVIEW OF SCHREIBMAN'S THE SCIENCE AND FICTION OF AUTISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Linda A; Losowski-Sullivan, Sheryl; Riley, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Although the awareness of autism in the general public has increased significantly over the past 20 years, much of the widely disseminated information is not fully grounded in scientific fact. In The Science and Fiction of Autism (2005), Laura Schreibman addresses a series of debates and controversies in areas ranging from diagnostic practices and etiological theories to effective clinical practices. This book provides an overview of the field of autism that is suitable for well-educated parents and new professionals in the field.

  16. Science and Fiction. On Don Quijote’s Epistemological Skepticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Schmelzer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work seeks to analyze the representation of scientific knowledge in Cervantes’ Quixote, focusing on various passages that underline the scientific expertise of don Quixote himself. It is shown that the novel contains a subtle critique of science, based on an epistemological skepticism with regard to the arbitrariness of our world concepts. The characterization of don Quixote as a man of science even permits deducting that he suffers from a ‘double mental damage’, caused by the lecture of both books of cavalry and science. Cervantes thus would consider science to be fiction, a very modern point of view.

  17. On the Scale of Grey in Brazilian Crime Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva Martínez Teixeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, the intention is to map the plurality of crime writing —that is detective, mystery or crime fiction— which has appeared in Brazil over the last quarter of a century. Working from reflections which have already been published as well as specific reading choices, a “biased” corpus of reference has been established. It incorporates the spectrum of this unique grisaille fiction, with regard to the conventional parameters of the genre, in both the more orthodox works and the more unorthodox works, favouring those that examine the issues of human social concerns.

  18. “The Invention of Fact”: Autobiography, Biography, Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    Rowan, Lou

    2018-01-01

    Comparing the sources of a novel and a biography leads to the paradox that the freedom of fiction can allow a more “realistic” treatment of character than the restriction of biography to documented facts allows. The distinctions and the paradox are asserted to be less poignant and crucial in the light of David Antin’s theory of narrative and Johan Huizinga’s exploration of the play element of culture. La comparaison des sources d’un roman et de celles d’une biographie conduit au paradoxe q...

  19. The Missing Thread - How Fiction Cheats Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, Henry J

    2017-09-01

    Mental health nursing occupies an important place in mental health care, and nurses perform valuable work, yet fiction writers tend to rely on outdated imagery to portray the profession. This imagery reinforces negative stereotypes of mental health nursing. This article examines the problem and explores the implications for the profession, particularly in relation to stigma and public confidence. It outlines a significant gap in narrative literature, specifically in relation to the therapeutic relationship, and asks what can be done to encourage more realistic portrayals of the role.

  20. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Astronomy: Cosmic Fiction, Drama and Poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-09-01

    I have spent four decades teaching introductory astronomy to university students whose primary subject of study is not astronomy, as well as developing activities to help the public appreciate astronomical ideas and developments. One of the more effective tools that I have found for capturing the interest of non-scientists has been approaching astronomy through its influence on the humanities. In this article I examine some examples of astronomical inspiration in the humanities, looking at plays, poetry and fiction. A second paper, devoted to music inspired by astronomy, will appear in a future issue of the CAPjournal.