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Sample records for length group size

  1. Dependence of micelle size and shape on detergent alkyl chain length and head group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Ryan C; Lipfert, Jan; Fox, Daniel A; Lo, Ryan H; Doniach, Sebastian; Columbus, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Micelle-forming detergents provide an amphipathic environment that can mimic lipid bilayers and are important tools for solubilizing membrane proteins for functional and structural investigations in vitro. However, the formation of a soluble protein-detergent complex (PDC) currently relies on empirical screening of detergents, and a stable and functional PDC is often not obtained. To provide a foundation for systematic comparisons between the properties of the detergent micelle and the resulting PDC, a comprehensive set of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies are systematically investigated. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), micelle shapes and sizes are determined for phosphocholines with 10, 12, and 14 alkyl carbons, glucosides with 8, 9, and 10 alkyl carbons, maltosides with 8, 10, and 12 alkyl carbons, and lysophosphatidyl glycerols with 14 and 16 alkyl carbons. The SAXS profiles are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with an electron rich outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains. The minor axis of the elliptical micelle core from these models is constrained by the length of the alkyl chain, and increases by 1.2-1.5 Å per carbon addition to the alkyl chain. The major elliptical axis also increases with chain length; however, the ellipticity remains approximately constant for each detergent series. In addition, the aggregation number of these detergents increases by ∼16 monomers per micelle for each alkyl carbon added. The data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle shape and size and provide a baseline for correlating micelle properties with protein-detergent interactions.

  2. Dependence of micelle size and shape on detergent alkyl chain length and head group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Oliver

    Full Text Available Micelle-forming detergents provide an amphipathic environment that can mimic lipid bilayers and are important tools for solubilizing membrane proteins for functional and structural investigations in vitro. However, the formation of a soluble protein-detergent complex (PDC currently relies on empirical screening of detergents, and a stable and functional PDC is often not obtained. To provide a foundation for systematic comparisons between the properties of the detergent micelle and the resulting PDC, a comprehensive set of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies are systematically investigated. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, micelle shapes and sizes are determined for phosphocholines with 10, 12, and 14 alkyl carbons, glucosides with 8, 9, and 10 alkyl carbons, maltosides with 8, 10, and 12 alkyl carbons, and lysophosphatidyl glycerols with 14 and 16 alkyl carbons. The SAXS profiles are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with an electron rich outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains. The minor axis of the elliptical micelle core from these models is constrained by the length of the alkyl chain, and increases by 1.2-1.5 Å per carbon addition to the alkyl chain. The major elliptical axis also increases with chain length; however, the ellipticity remains approximately constant for each detergent series. In addition, the aggregation number of these detergents increases by ∼16 monomers per micelle for each alkyl carbon added. The data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle shape and size and provide a baseline for correlating micelle properties with protein-detergent interactions.

  3. Comparison of fish-community size spectra based on length ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimates of fish-community size spectra are promising indicators of the impact of fishing on fish assemblages. Size spectra consist of logarithmic graphs of abundance plotted against fish body size. Size spectra may either be constructed from length frequency data or estimated from the mean sizes and abundances of the ...

  4. How does harvest size vary with hunting season length?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, Peter; Asferg, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    season length (population management/ethical/other). In non-sedentary species, changes in bag size correlated positively with changes in season length (overall response: b = 0.54, 95%CI: 0.14-0.95): reducing the hunting season to 50% of its initial length would on average result in a 31% reduction (95......% CI: 9-48%) of total bag size. This overall effect interacted with the motivation for season length changes, being strongest for ‘other reasons’ (mainly harmonization of hunting periods for related species) but was absent when seasons were changed for reasons of ‘population management’. In sedentary......Manipulating hunting season length is often used as a population management tool but the effects of these changes on total harvest have rarely been studied. We modelled relative changes in national annual bag size as a function of relative change in hunting season length in 63 cases involving 28...

  5. Can physique and gluteal size predict penile length in adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study design: A prospective study to test the scientific veracity of this traditional and apparently mythical belief. ... Conclusion: The supposed relationship between penile length and gluteal size may have a scientific basis, but contrary to belief, large buttocks is more predictive of longer penile length than small buttocks.

  6. Does neighborhood size really cause the word length effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard, Dominic; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Tehan, Gerald; Tolan, Anne

    2018-02-01

    In short-term serial recall, it is well-known that short words are remembered better than long words. This word length effect has been the cornerstone of the working memory model and a benchmark effect that all models of immediate memory should account for. Currently, there is no consensus as to what determines the word length effect. Jalbert and colleagues (Jalbert, Neath, Bireta, & Surprenant, 2011a; Jalbert, Neath, & Surprenant, 2011b) suggested that neighborhood size is one causal factor. In six experiments we systematically examined their suggestion. In Experiment 1, with an immediate serial recall task, multiple word lengths, and a large pool of words controlled for neighborhood size, the typical word length effect was present. In Experiments 2 and 3, with an order reconstruction task and words with either many or few neighbors, we observed the typical word length effect. In Experiment 4 we tested the hypothesis that the previous abolition of the word length effect when neighborhood size was controlled was due to a confounded factor: frequency of orthographic structure. As predicted, we reversed the word length effect when using short words with less frequent orthographic structures than the long words, as was done in both of Jalbert et al.'s studies. In Experiments 5 and 6, we again observed the typical word length effect, even if we controlled for neighborhood size and frequency of orthographic structure. Overall, the results were not consistent with the predictions of Jalbert et al. and clearly showed a large and reliable word length effect after controlling for neighborhood size.

  7. Artificial selection on male genitalia length alters female brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechel, Séverine D; Booksmythe, Isobel; Kotrschal, Alexander; Jennions, Michael D; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-11-30

    Male harassment is a classic example of how sexual conflict over mating leads to sex-specific behavioural adaptations. Females often suffer significant costs from males attempting forced copulations, and the sexes can be in an arms race over male coercion. Yet, despite recent recognition that divergent sex-specific interests in reproduction can affect brain evolution, sexual conflict has not been addressed in this context. Here, we investigate whether artificial selection on a correlate of male success at coercion, genital length, affects brain anatomy in males and females. We analysed the brains of eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), which had been artificially selected for long or short gonopodium, thereby mimicking selection arising from differing levels of male harassment. By analogy to how prey species often have relatively larger brains than their predators, we found that female, but not male, brain size was greater following selection for a longer gonopodium. Brain subregion volumes remained unchanged. These results suggest that there is a positive genetic correlation between male gonopodium length and female brain size, which is possibly linked to increased female cognitive ability to avoid male coercion. We propose that sexual conflict is an important factor in the evolution of brain anatomy and cognitive ability. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Allometry of sexual size dimorphism in turtles: a comparison of mass and length data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Koy W; Meik, Jesse M

    2017-01-01

    The macroevolutionary pattern of Rensch's Rule (positive allometry of sexual size dimorphism) has had mixed support in turtles. Using the largest carapace length dataset and only large-scale body mass dataset assembled for this group, we determine (a) whether turtles conform to Rensch's Rule at the order, suborder, and family levels, and (b) whether inferences regarding allometry of sexual size dimorphism differ based on choice of body size metric used for analyses. We compiled databases of mean body mass and carapace length for males and females for as many populations and species of turtles as possible. We then determined scaling relationships between males and females for average body mass and straight carapace length using traditional and phylogenetic comparative methods. We also used regression analyses to evalutate sex-specific differences in the variance explained by carapace length on body mass. Using traditional (non-phylogenetic) analyses, body mass supports Rensch's Rule, whereas straight carapace length supports isometry. Using phylogenetic independent contrasts, both body mass and straight carapace length support Rensch's Rule with strong congruence between metrics. At the family level, support for Rensch's Rule is more frequent when mass is used and in phylogenetic comparative analyses. Turtles do not differ in slopes of sex-specific mass-to-length regressions and more variance in body size within each sex is explained by mass than by carapace length. Turtles display Rensch's Rule overall and within families of Cryptodires, but not within Pleurodire families. Mass and length are strongly congruent with respect to Rensch's Rule across turtles, and discrepancies are observed mostly at the family level (the level where Rensch's Rule is most often evaluated). At macroevolutionary scales, the purported advantages of length measurements over weight are not supported in turtles.

  9. Discrete hierarchical organization of social group sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W-X; Sornette, D; Hill, R A; Dunbar, R I M

    2005-02-22

    The 'social brain hypothesis' for the evolution of large brains in primates has led to evidence for the coevolution of neocortical size and social group sizes, suggesting that there is a cognitive constraint on group size that depends, in some way, on the volume of neural material available for processing and synthesizing information on social relationships. More recently, work on both human and non-human primates has suggested that social groups are often hierarchically structured. We combine data on human grouping patterns in a comprehensive and systematic study. Using fractal analysis, we identify, with high statistical confidence, a discrete hierarchy of group sizes with a preferred scaling ratio close to three: rather than a single or a continuous spectrum of group sizes, humans spontaneously form groups of preferred sizes organized in a geometrical series approximating 3-5, 9-15, 30-45, etc. Such discrete scale invariance could be related to that identified in signatures of herding behaviour in financial markets and might reflect a hierarchical processing of social nearness by human brains.

  10. Relationships between otolith size and fish length in some mesopelagic teleosts (Myctophidae, Paralepididae, Phosichthyidae and Stomiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, P; Malara, D; Ammendolia, G; Romeo, T; Andaloro, F

    2015-09-01

    Length-mass relationships and linear regressions are given for otolith size (length and height) and standard length (LS ) of certain mesopelagic fishes (Myctophidae, Paralepididae, Phosichthyidae and Stomiidae) living in the central Mediterranean Sea. The length-mass relationship showed isometric growth in six species, whereas linear regressions of LS and otolith size fit the data well for all species. These equations represent a useful tool for dietary studies on Mediterranean marine predators. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. On being the right size: increased body size is associated with reduced telomere length under natural conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ringsby, Thor Harald; Jensen, Henrik; Pärn, Henrik; Kvalnes, Thomas; Boner, Winnie; Gillespie, Robert; Holand, Håkon; Hagen, Ingerid Julie; Rønning, Bernt; Sæther, Bernt-Erik; Monaghan, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of body size is likely to involve trade-offs between body size, growth rate and longevity. Within species, larger body size is associated with faster growth and ageing, and reduced longevity, but the cellular processes driving these relationships are poorly understood. One mechanism that might play a key role in determining optimal body size is the relationship between body size and telomere dynamics. However, we know little about how telomere length is affected when selection for l...

  12. Effectiveness of Group-Delivered Cognitive Therapy and Treatment Length in Women Veterans with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane T. Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and length of group-delivered cognitive treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD was examined in a sample of women veterans. The sample included 271 primarily non-Hispanic white (61% and Hispanic (25% women veterans treated in 8-, 10-, or 12-group length sessions with manualized cognitive therapy for PTSD. Outcome was measured with the PTSD Symptom Checklist (PCL in an intention-to-treat analysis (N = 271, in completer subjects (n = 172, and with group as the unit of analysis (n = 47 groups. Significant decreases in PTSD were found in the full sample (effect size [ES] range = 0.27 to 0.38, completers (ES range = 0.37 to 0.54, and group as the unit of analysis (ES range = 0.71 to 0.92, suggesting effectiveness of cognitive group treatment for PTSD. PCL scores significantly improved in the 8, 10, and 12 group lengths, with no differences between each. Clinical improvement showed a third decreasing 10 or more PCL points and 22% no longer meeting PTSD diagnostic criteria, with the best results in the 10-session group. The results suggest group-delivered cognitive therapy is an effective, efficient, time-limited treatment for PTSD.

  13. Conversion of Chord Length Data into Bubble Size Distribution: Generation of Chord Length Data and the Methodology Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, Hoang Nhan; Euh, D. J.; Song, C. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, B. J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Bubble size and its distribution play an important role in thermal hydrodynamic processes in multiphase flow systems. By using the conductivity or optical probe techniques, the size and distribution of bubbles can only be inferred indirectly from a measured chord length data (CLD). Some methods are proposed to convert a CLD into the bubble size distribution (BSD), and they can be classified into parametric, semi-parametric and non-parametric. Most of methods are derived from the following relation of the conditional probability functions that are established under the geometric constraints: P(y) = {infinity}{integral}0 P(R) P(y|R) dR where P(R) is PDF of bubbles of all sizes R pierced by a probe, and P(y|R) is PDF of chord length y corresponding to bubbles of a specified size R. These methods are limited to flows of bubbles having symmetric shapes, i.e. spherical, ellipsoidal, or capspherical. Although the methods were developed from a common relation, there are no physical bases as well as the lack of experimental data to validate them. In this work, the CLD is generated for comparing different conversion methods. The range of bubble size is determined by the Hinze's theory. The CLDs are applied to numerical backward transforms (NBT), analytical backward transform (ABT), and analytical semi-parametric method using Parzen window estimator (ParzenES) to obtain the BSD. A comparison for the obtained results is performed

  14. The roles of productivity and ecosystem size in determining food chain length in tropical terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hillary S; McCauley, Douglas J; Dunbar, Robert B; Hutson, Michael S; Ter-Kuile, Ana Miller; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2013-03-01

    Many different drivers, including productivity, ecosystem size, and disturbance, have been considered to explain natural variation in the length of food chains. Much remains unknown about the role of these various drivers in determining food chain length, and particularly about the mechanisms by which they may operate in terrestrial ecosystems, which have quite different ecological constraints than aquatic environments, where most food chain length studies have been thus far conducted. In this study, we tested the relative importance of ecosystem size and productivity in influencing food chain length in a terrestrial setting. We determined that (1) there is no effect of ecosystem size or productive space on food chain length; (2) rather, food chain length increases strongly and linearly with productivity; and (3) the observed changes in food chain length are likely achieved through a combination of changes in predator size, predator behavior, and consumer diversity along gradients in productivity. These results lend new insight into the mechanisms by which productivity can drive changes in food chain length, point to potential for systematic differences in the drivers of food web structure between terrestrial and aquatic systems, and challenge us to consider how ecological context may control the drivers that shape food chain length.

  15. [The reconstruction of the human body length from the wrist size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, M A; Anushkina, E S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the regression models for the reconstruction of the human body length from the wrist size taking into consideration the availability of the results of the measurements of the palm fragments or the wrist undergoing muscular contracture. The study included 106 Caucasoid subjects (41 men and 65 women) at the age varying from 18 to 76 years. The following parameters were measured: body length, wrist length, the length of the fingers and phalanges on the back of the hand, palmar length and width, ulnar edge size of the palm. It was shown that the selected longitudinal dimensions of the palm and fingers can be used to estimate the body length as accurately as from the wrist length. The high prognostic value of ulnar edge size of the palm was documented which allows this characteristic to be used in the cases of partial palm destruction or in the wrist with pronounced flexion contracture of the fingers. The most exact equations are those derived from the combination of the results of the measurement of the fingers and the ulnar edge size of the palm. Less accurate equations are based on the palmar dimensions alone and on the total wrist size with the exception of the equation for the wrist length with regard to the subject's sex. The gender information needs to be taken into account if the wrist is preserved to the extent that only the length of the palm and of the IV and V fingers can be measured or if the wrist is sufficiently long and wide (short and wide) and the gender is supposed to be masculine. In contrast, this information should be disregarded if the wrist is long and narrow (short and narrow) and the gender is supposedly feminine.

  16. Titin Isoform Size is Not Correlated with Thin Filament Length in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Lewis Greaser

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms controlling thin filament length in muscle remain controversial. It was recently reported that thin filament length was related to titin size, and that the latter might be involved in thin filament length determination. Titin plays several crucial roles in the sarcomere, but its function as it pertains to the thin filament has not been explored. We tested this relationship using several muscles from wild type rats and from a mutant rat model which results in increased titin size. Myofibrils were isolated from skeletal muscles (extensor digitorum longus, external oblique, gastrocnemius, longissimus dorsi, psoas major, and tibialis anterior using both adult wild type (WT and homozygous mutant (HM rats. Phalloidin and antibodies against tropomodulin-4 and nebulin’s N-terminus were used to determine thin filament length. The WT rats studied express skeletal muscle titin sizes ranging from 3.2 to 3.7 MDa, while the HM rats express a giant titin isoform sized at 3.7 MDa. No differences in phalloidin-based thin filament length, nebulin N terminus distances from the Z line, or tropomodulin distances from the Z line were observed across genotypes. The data indicates that, although titin performs many sarcomeric functions, its correlation with thin filament length and structure could not be demonstrated in the rat. Current models of thin filament assembly are inadequate to explain the phalloidin, nebulin N terminus, and tropomodulin staining patterns in the myofibril.

  17. Group size and seasonal pattern of occurrence of humpback ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis and their group size in Algoa Bay, South Africa, are described for the period May 1991–May 1994. The mean group size of dolphins was seven (ranging between 3 and 24). Group size was not affected by diurnal, tidal or lunar variability. Solitary, large individuals were ...

  18. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruifang; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Tian, Wugang; Wu, Xuezhong; Zhou, Weihong; Tang, Ying

    2015-12-21

    The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM), the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm.

  19. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifang Xie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM, the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm.

  20. Austenite Grain Size Estimtion from Chord Lengths of Logarithmic-Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear section of grains in polyhedral material microstructure is a system of chords. The mean length of chords is the linear grain size of the microstructure. For the prior austenite grains of low alloy structural steels, the chord length is a random variable of gamma- or logarithmic-normal distribution. The statistical grain size estimation belongs to the quantitative metallographic problems. The so-called point estimation is a well known procedure. The interval estimation (grain size confidence interval for the gamma distribution was given elsewhere, but for the logarithmic-normal distribution is the subject of the present contribution. The statistical analysis is analogous to the one for the gamma distribution.

  1. Effects of size at birth, childhood growth patterns and growth hormone treatment on leukocyte telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C J Smeets

    Full Text Available Small size at birth and rapid growth in early life are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Short children born small for gestational age (SGA are treated with growth hormone (GH, inducing catch-up in length. Leukocyte telomere length (LTL is a marker of biological age and shorter LTL is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease.To investigate whether LTL is influenced by birth size, childhood growth and long-term GH treatment.We analyzed LTL in 545 young adults with differences in birth size and childhood growth patterns. Previously GH-treated young adults born SGA (SGA-GH were compared to untreated short SGA (SGA-S, SGA with spontaneous catch-up to a normal body size (SGA-CU, and appropriate for gestational age with a normal body size (AGA-NS. LTL was measured using a quantitative PCR assay.We found a positive association between birth length and LTL (p = 0.04, and a trend towards a positive association between birth weight and LTL (p = 0.08, after adjustments for gender, age, gestational age and adult body size. Weight gain during infancy and childhood and fat mass percentage were not associated with LTL. Female gender and gestational age were positively associated with LTL, and smoking negatively. After adjustments for gender, age and gestational age, SGA-GH had a similar LTL as SGA-S (p = 0.11, SGA-CU (p = 0.80, and AGA-NS (p = 0.30.Larger size at birth is positively associated with LTL in young adulthood. Growth patterns during infancy and childhood are not associated with LTL. Previously GH-treated young adults born SGA have similar LTL as untreated short SGA, SGA with spontaneous catch-up and AGA born controls, indicating no adverse effects of GH-induced catch-up in height on LTL.

  2. Day length, reproductive effort, and the avian latitudinal clutch size gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alexandra P; Lyon, Bruce E

    2013-06-01

    Explaining latitudinal patterns in life history traits remains a challenge for ecologists and evolutionary biologists. One such prominent pattern is the latitudinal gradient in clutch size in birds: the number of eggs laid in a reproductive bout increases with latitude in many species. One intuitive hypothesis proposes that the longer days at high latitudes during the breeding season allow parents to spend more time foraging each day, which results in greater total food delivery to the brood each day, and hence more offspring produced. This day length hypothesis is virtually untested, although it was proposed nearly 100 years ago. We developed a conceptual framework for distinguishing between the day length hypothesis and the widely accepted alternative hypothesis that attributes the latitudinal gradient in clutch size to increased per capita food resources at higher latitudes. Using this framework to contrast components of reproductive effort and life history patterns in a mid- and high-latitude Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) population provided clear evidence for the day length hypothesis, but little evidence for the alternative. Our findings suggest that the length of an animal's workday may be an important, but unappreciated, component of reproductive effort.

  3. First working group meeting on the minority carrier diffusion length/lifetime measurement: Results of the round robin lifetime/diffusion length tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cudzinovic, M; Sopori, B [comp.

    1995-11-01

    As was noted in the cover letter that accompanied the samples, the eleven bare silicon samples were from various manufacturers. Table I lists the codes for the samples and the manufacturer of each sample. It also notes if the sample was single or poly-crystalline. The samples had been polished on one side before being sent out for measurements, but no further processing was done. The participants of the study were asked to measure either the lifetime or diffusion length of each of the samples using their standard procedure. Table II shows the experimental conditions used by the groups who measured diffusion length. All the diffusion length measurements were performed using the Surface Photovoltage method (SPV). Table M shows the experimental conditions for the lifetime measurements. All the lifetime measurements were made using the Photoconductance Decay method (PCD) under low level injection. These tables show the diameter of the spot size used during the measurement (the effective sampling area), the locations where measurements were taken, and the number of measurements taken at each location. Table N shows the results of the measurements. The table is divided into diffusion length and lifetime measurements for each sample. The values listed are the average values reported by each group. One of the immediate artifacts seen in the data is the large variation in the lifetime measurements. The values from MIT and Mobil are generally close. However, the measurements from NCSU are typically an order of magnitude lower.

  4. The effect of group size on vigilance in Ruddy Turnstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, R.A.; Bearhop, S.; Metcalfe, N.B.; Piersma, T.

    2013-01-01

    Foraging birds can manage time spent vigilant for predators by forming groups of various sizes. However, group size alone will not always reliably determine the optimal level of vigilance. For example, variation in predation risk or food quality between patches may also be influential. In a field

  5. Health inequalities in Ethiopia: modeling inequalities in length of life within and between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranvåg, Eirik Joakim; Ali, Merima; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2013-07-11

    Most studies on health inequalities use average measures, but describing the distribution of health can also provide valuable knowledge. In this paper, we estimate and compare within-group and between-group inequalities in length of life for population groups in Ethiopia in 2000 and 2011. We used data from the 2011 and 2000 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey and the Global Burden of Disease study 2010, and the MODMATCH modified logit life table system developed by the World Health Organization to model mortality rates, life expectancy, and length of life for Ethiopian population groups stratified by wealth quintiles, gender and residence. We then estimated and compared within-group and between-group inequality in length of life using the Gini index and absolute length of life inequality. Length of life inequality has decreased and life expectancy has increased for all population groups between 2000 and 2011. Length of life inequality within wealth quintiles is about three times larger than the between-group inequality of 9 years. Total length of life inequality in Ethiopia was 27.6 years in 2011. Longevity has increased and the distribution of health in Ethiopia is more equal in 2011 than 2000, with length of life inequality reduced for all population groups. Still there is considerable potential for further improvement. In the Ethiopian context with a poor and highly rural population, inequality in length of life within wealth quintiles is considerably larger than between them. This suggests that other factors than wealth substantially contribute to total health inequality in Ethiopia and that identification and quantification of these factors will be important for identifying proper measures to further reduce length of life inequality.

  6. Group Size Predicts Social but Not Nonsocial Cognition in Lemurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Evan L; Sandel, Aaron A; Bray, Joel; Oldenkamp, Ricki E; Reddy, Rachna B; Hare, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    The social intelligence hypothesis suggests that living in large social networks was the primary selective pressure for the evolution of complex cognition in primates. This hypothesis is supported by comparative studies demonstrating a positive relationship between social group size and relative brain size across primates. However, the relationship between brain size and cognition remains equivocal. Moreover, there have been no experimental studies directly testing the association between group size and cognition across primates. We tested the social intelligence hypothesis by comparing 6 primate species (total N = 96) characterized by different group sizes on two cognitive tasks. Here, we show that a species' typical social group size predicts performance on cognitive measures of social cognition, but not a nonsocial measure of inhibitory control. We also show that a species' mean brain size (in absolute or relative terms) does not predict performance on either task in these species. These data provide evidence for a relationship between group size and social cognition in primates, and reveal the potential for cognitive evolution without concomitant changes in brain size. Furthermore our results underscore the need for more empirical studies of animal cognition, which have the power to reveal species differences in cognition not detectable by proxy variables, such as brain size.

  7. Individual variation in tooth-size/ arch-length changes from the primary to permanent dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2006-01-01

    To determine the individual variation in the maxillary and mandibular tooth-size/arch-length relationships after the complete eruption of the primary dentition (mean age, 4.0 years) and at the time of eruption of the second permanent molars (mean age, 13.3 years). Records of 32 males and 27 females were evaluated. Each subject had a clinically acceptable occlusion; that is, a normal molar and canine relationship at the time of eruption of the primary and permanent teeth. In addition, each subject had a complete set of data at the 2 stages of dental development. These selection criteria limited the number of subjects in this investigation to 59. The mesiodistal diameter of all primary teeth and their permanent successors, as well as various dental arch length parameters were measured in the primary and permanent dentitions. A total of 60 parameters were measured or calculated. The findings from the present investigation indicated that of the total sample of 59 male and female subjects observed on a longitudinal basis, 29 (49%) maintained their relative tooth-size/arch-length relationship ranking in the 2 dentitions, while 30 (51%) changed to either a more favorable or less favorable relationship in the permanent dentition. The cases with the lower ranking of tooth-size/arch-length relationship in the primary dentition, 50% maintained their relatively lower rank in the permanent dentition, while the other 50% changed to a relatively more favorable rank in the permanent dentition. There is a similar probability for maintaining the same ranking in the primary and permanent dentitions in the mandibular arch (51%), as in the maxillary arch (49%). The clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  8. Effectiveness of Group-Delivered Cognitive Therapy and Treatment Length in Women Veterans with PTSD

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Diane T.; Lacefield, Katharine; C’de Baca, Janet; Blankenship, Abby; Qualls, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness and length of group-delivered cognitive treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was examined in a sample of women veterans. The sample included 271 primarily non-Hispanic white (61%) and Hispanic (25%) women veterans treated in 8-, 10-, or 12-group length sessions with manualized cognitive therapy for PTSD. Outcome was measured with the PTSD Symptom Checklist (PCL) in an intention-to-treat analysis (N = 271), in completer subjects (n = 172), and with group as the ...

  9. Group-size diversity in public goods games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    Public goods games are models of social dilemmas where cooperators pay a cost for the production of a public good while defectors free ride on the contributions of cooperators. In the traditional framework of evolutionary game theory, the payoffs of cooperators and defectors result from interactions in groups formed by binomial sampling from an infinite population. Despite empirical evidence showing that group-size distributions in nature are highly heterogeneous, most models of social evolution assume that the group size is constant. In this article, I remove this assumption and explore the effects of having random group sizes on the evolutionary dynamics of public goods games. By a straightforward application of Jensen's inequality, I show that the outcome of general nonlinear public goods games depends not only on the average group size but also on the variance of the group-size distribution. This general result is illustrated with two nonlinear public goods games (the public goods game with discounting or synergy and the N-person volunteer's dilemma) and three different group-size distributions (Poisson, geometric, and Waring). The results suggest that failing to acknowledge the natural variation of group sizes can lead to an underestimation of the actual level of cooperation exhibited in evolving populations. © 2011 The Author. Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the notations and terminologies are standard and readers may refer to [6]. A well-known problem in group theory is to study the influence of conjugacy class sizes on the structure of a group. For instance, as regards to groups with conjugacy class sizes. {1, m}, Itô [3] proved that G is nilpotent, m = pa for some prime p, and ...

  11. Nativity, US Length of Residence, and BMI Among Diverse Asian American Ethnic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lisa G; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V; Sánchez, Brisa N

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about body mass index (BMI) patterns by nativity and length of US residence among Asian American ethnic groups. We used linear regression to examine the association of BMI with nativity and length of residence across six ethnic groups (Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, South Asians, and Vietnamese) using data from the California Health Interview Study. There was significant heterogeneity in the nativity/length of residence patterns in unadjusted BMI across ethnic groups (p residence was positively associated with BMI among all groups, though only significant among Filipinos and Koreans. Programs targeting Asian Americans should take into consideration BMI patterns by nativity and US length of residence among diverse Asian American ethnic groups.

  12. Dynamics of telomere length in different age groups in a Latvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zole, Egija; Pliss, Liana; Ranka, Renate; Krumina, Astrida; Baumanis, Viesturs

    2013-12-01

    The shortening of telomeres with ageing is a well-documented observation; however, the reported number of nucleotides in telomeres varies between different laboratories and studies. Such variability is likely caused by ethnic differences between the populations studied. Until now, there were no studies that investigated the variability of telomere length in a senescent Latvian population of the most common mitochondrial haplogroups, defined as H (45%), U (25%), Y chromosomal N1c (40%) and R1a1 (40%). Telomere length was determined in 121 individuals in different age groups, including a control group containing individuals of 20-40 years old and groups of individuals between 60-70 years old, 71-80 years old, 81-90 years old, and above 90 years old. Telomere length was determined using the Southern blot telomeric restriction fragment assay (TRF). Decreased telomere length with ageing was confirmed, but a comparison of centenarians and individuals between 60-90 years of age did not demonstrate a significant difference in telomere length. However, significant variability in telomere length was observed in the control group, indicating probable rapid telomere shortening in some individuals that could lead up to development of health status decline appearing with ageing. Telomere length measured in mononuclear blood cells (MNC) was compared with the telomere length measured in whole peripheral white blood cells (WBC) using TRF. Telomere length in MNC was longer than in WBC for the control group with individuals 20 to 40 years old; in contrast, for the group of individuals aged 65 to 85 years old, measured telomere length was shorter in MNC when compared to WBC.

  13. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  14. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, G. A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  15. Characteristic length scale of input data in distributed models: implications for modeling grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, Guleid A.; Neale, C. M. U.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2000-01-01

    The appropriate spatial scale for a distributed energy balance model was investigated by: (a) determining the scale of variability associated with the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data; and (b) examining the effects of input data spatial aggregation on model response. The semi-variogram and the characteristic length calculated from the spatial autocorrelation were used to determine the scale of variability of the remotely sensed and GIS-generated model input data. The data were collected from two hillsides at Upper Sheep Creek, a sub-basin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, in southwest Idaho. The data were analyzed in terms of the semivariance and the integral of the autocorrelation. The minimum characteristic length associated with the variability of the data used in the analysis was 15 m. Simulated and observed radiometric surface temperature fields at different spatial resolutions were compared. The correlation between agreement simulated and observed fields sharply declined after a 10×10 m2 modeling grid size. A modeling grid size of about 10×10 m2 was deemed to be the best compromise to achieve: (a) reduction of computation time and the size of the support data; and (b) a reproduction of the observed radiometric surface temperature.

  16. Nonapeptides and the Evolution of Social Group Sizes in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Goodson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Species-typical patterns of grouping have profound impacts on many aspects of physiology and behavior. However, prior to our recent studies in estrildid finches, neural mechanisms that titrate species-typical group size preferences, independent of other aspects of social organization (e.g., mating system and parental care, have been wholly unexplored, likely because species-typical group size is typically confounded with other aspects of behavior and biology. An additional complication is that components of social organization are evolutionarily labile and prone to repeated divergence and convergence. Hence, we cannot assume that convergence in social structure has been produced by convergent modifications to the same neural characters, and thus any comparative approach to grouping must include not only species that differ in their species-typical group sizes, but also species that exhibit convergent evolution in this aspect of social organization. Using five estrildid finch species that differ selectively in grouping (all biparental and monogamous we have demonstrated that neural motivational systems evolve in predictable ways in relation to species-typical group sizes, including convergence in two highly gregarious species and convergence in two relatively asocial, territorial species. These systems include nonapeptide (vasotocin and mesotocin circuits that encode the valence of social stimuli (positive-negative, titrate group-size preferences, and modulate anxiety-like behaviors. Nonapeptide systems exhibit functional and anatomical properties that are biased towards gregarious species, and experimental reductions of nonapeptide signaling by receptor antagonism and antisense oligonucleotides significantly decrease preferred group sizes in the gregarious zebra finch. Combined, these findings suggest that selection on species-typical group size may reliably target the same neural motivation systems when a given social structure evolves

  17. The effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides: Field observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haijun; Cui, Peng; Regmi, Amar Deep; Hu, Sheng; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we characterize and consider the effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides. To carry out this study, we employ data on 275 loess slides within Zhidan County, Central Loess Plateau, China. These data were collected in the field and supplemented by the interpretation of remote sensing images. Both the field observations and slope stability analysis show that loess slide size increases with the slope length. Slide sizes is significantly correlated with slope length, showing a power law relationship in both cases. However, the simulation results show that slope gradient is not associated with loess slide size. The main part of the link between slope gradient and slide size seen in the observations is only apparent, as indicated by the strong connection between slope gradient and length. Statistical analysis of the field observations reveals that slope gradient decreases with increasing slope length, and this correlation interferes with the potential relationship between landslide sizes and slope gradient seen in the field observations. In addition, the probability densities of the areas of loess slides occurring on slopes of different slope lengths are determined using kernel density estimation. This analysis shows that slope length controls the rollover of the frequency-size distribution of loess slides. The scaling exponent increases with slope length.

  18. Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts onto kaolinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhua, Xu; Yuehua, Hu; Faqin, Dong; Hao, Jiang; Houqin, Wu; Zhen, Wang; Ruohua, Liu

    2015-06-01

    Effects of particle size and chain length on flotation of quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) onto kaolinite have been investigated by flotation tests. Dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) were used as collectors for kaolinite in different particle size fractions (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm, 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm, 0 ~ 0.045 mm). The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite have been further explained based on crystal structure considerations by adsorption tests and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results show that the flotation recovery of kaolinite in all different particle size fractions decreases with an increase in pH. As the concentration of collectors increases, the flotation recovery increases. The longer the carbon chain of QAS is, the higher the recoveries of coarse kaolinite (0.075 ~ 0.01 mm and 0.045 ~ 0.075 mm) are. But the flotation recovery of the finest kaolinite (0 ~ 0.045 mm) decreases with chain lengths of QAS collectors increasing, which is consistent with the flotation results of unscreened kaolinite (0 ~ 0.075 mm). It is explained by the froth stability related to the residual concentration of QAS collector in mineral pulp. In lower residual concentration, the froth stability becomes worse. Within the range of flotation collector concentration, it's easy of CTAC to be completely adsorbed by kaolinite in the particle size fraction (0-0.045 mm), which led to lower flotation recovery. Moreover, it is interesting that the coarser particle size of kaolinite is, the higher flotation recovery is. The anomalous flotation behavior of kaolinite is rationalized based on crystal structure considerations. The results of MD simulations show that the (001) kaolinite surface has the strongest interaction with DTAC, compared with the (00 1) face, (010) and (110) edges. On the other hand, when particle size of kaolinite is altered, the number of basal planes and edge planes is changed. It is observed that the finer kaolinite

  19. Eye size and shape in newborn children and their relation to axial length and refraction at 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Laurence Shen; Chua, Sharon; Tan, Pei Ting; Cai, Shirong; Chong, Yap-Seng; Kwek, Kenneth; Gluckman, Peter D; Fortier, Marielle V; Ngo, Cheryl; Qiu, Anqi; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2015-07-01

    To determine if eye size and shape at birth are associated with eye size and refractive error 3 years later. A subset of 173 full-term newborn infants from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the dimensions of the internal eye. Eye shape was assessed by an oblateness index, calculated as 1 - (axial length/width) or 1 - (axial length/height). Cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1) and optical biometry (IOLMaster) were performed 3 years later. Both eyes of 173 children were analysed. Eyes with longer axial length at birth had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes with larger baseline volumes and surface areas had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years (p Eyes which were more oblate at birth had greater increases in axial length at 3 years (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eyes had smaller increases in axial length at 3 years compared to oblate eyes (p eye size and shape at birth and refraction, corneal curvature or myopia at 3 years. Eyes that are larger and have prolate or spherical shapes at birth exhibit smaller increases in axial length over the first 3 years of life. Eye size and shape at birth influence subsequent eye growth but not refractive error development. © 2015 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2015 The College of Optometrists.

  20. A Study of an Information Retrieval Performance Measure: Expected Search Length as a Function of File Size and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Donald R.; Kraft, Donald H.

    A framework is developed to evaluate expected search length, an important measure of an information storage and retrieval system's performance, as a function of the size of the information file and its organization in terms of indexing search structure. Previous research pertaining to search length by W.S. Cooper and others is surveyed and…

  1. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Let G be a finite group. We prove as follows: Let G be a p-solvable group for a fixed prime p. If the conjugacy class sizes of all elements of primary and biprimary orders of G are {1, pa, n} with a and n two positive integers and (p, n) = 1, then G is p-nilpotent or G has abelian Sylow p-subgroups. Keywords. Conjugacy ...

  2. SMART amplification combined with cDNA size fractionation in order to obtain large full-length clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poustka Annemarie

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA libraries are widely used to identify genes and splice variants, and as a physical resource for full-length clones. Conventionally-generated cDNA libraries contain a high percentage of 5'-truncated clones. Current library construction methods that enrich for full-length mRNA are laborious, and involve several enzymatic steps performed on mRNA, which renders them sensitive to RNA degradation. The SMART technique for full-length enrichment is robust but results in limited cDNA insert size of the library. Results We describe a method to construct SMART full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large insert sizes. Sub-libraries were generated from size-fractionated cDNA with an average insert size of up to seven kb. The percentage of full-length clones was calculated for different size ranges from BLAST results of over 12,000 5'ESTs. Conclusions The presented technique is suitable to generate full-length enriched cDNA libraries with large average insert sizes in a straightforward and robust way. The representation of full-coding clones is high also for large cDNAs (70%, 4–10 kb, when high-quality starting mRNA is used.

  3. Conjugacy class sizes and solvability of finite groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a finite group and * be the set of primary, biprimary and triprimary elements of . We prove that if the conjugacy class sizes of * are {1,,,} with positive coprime integers and ,then is solvable. This extends a recent result of Kong (Manatsh. Math. 168(2)(2012) 267–271).

  4. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Vargas, Sabrina; Gronenberg, Wulfila; Wcislo, William T; Mueller, Ulrich

    2015-02-22

    Group size in both multicellular organisms and animal societies can correlate with the degree of division of labour. For ants, the task specialization hypothesis (TSH) proposes that increased behavioural specialization enabled by larger group size corresponds to anatomical specialization of worker brains. Alternatively, the social brain hypothesis proposes that increased levels of social stimuli in larger colonies lead to enlarged brain regions in all workers, regardless of their task specialization. We tested these hypotheses in acacia ants (Pseudomyrmex spinicola), which exhibit behavioural but not morphological task specialization. In wild colonies, we marked, followed and tested ant workers involved in foraging tasks on the leaves (leaf-ants) and in defensive tasks on the host tree trunk (trunk-ants). Task specialization increased with colony size, especially in defensive tasks. The relationship between colony size and brain region volume was task-dependent, supporting the TSH. Specifically, as colony size increased, the relative size of regions within the mushroom bodies of the brain decreased in trunk-ants but increased in leaf-ants; those regions play important roles in learning and memory. Our findings suggest that workers specialized in defence may have reduced learning abilities relative to leaf-ants; these inferences remain to be tested. In societies with monomorphic workers, brain polymorphism enhanced by group size could be a mechanism by which division of labour is achieved. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Anomalous length dependence of conductance of aromatic nanoribbons with amine anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2012-09-06

    Two sets of aromatic nanoribbons, based around a common hexagonal scaffolding, with single and dual terminal amine groups have been considered as potential molecular wires in a junction formed by gold leads. Charge transport through the two-terminal device has been modeled using density functional theory (with and without self-interaction correction) and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. The effects of wire length, multiple terminal contacts, and pathways across the junction have been investigated. For nanoribbons with the oligopyrene motif and conventional single amine terminal groups, an increase in the wire length causes an exponential drop in the conductance. In contrast, for the nanoribbons with the oligoperylene motif and dual amine anchoring groups the predicted conductance rises with the wire length over the whole range of investigated lengths. Only when the effects of self-interaction correction are taken into account, the conductance of the oligoperylene ribbons exhibits saturation for longer members of the series. The oligoperylene nanoribbons, with dual amine groups at both terminals, show the potential to fully harness the highly conjugated system of π molecular orbitals across the junction. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  7. Influence of Group Size and Group Composition on the Adhered Distance Headway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duives, D.C.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Research into the influence of groups on pedestrian flow dynamics has been limited. Previous research found that group size influences the walking velocity of pedestrians within the group and as such the capacity the pedestrian infrastructure. This paper's aim is to provide quantitative insights

  8. Length and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueming; Huang, Yanhui; Cao, Bingyang; To, Albert C.

    2017-09-01

    Carbyne is an ideal one-dimensional conductor and the thinnest interconnection in an ultimate nano-device and it requires an understanding of the mechanical properties that affect device performance and reliability. Here, we report the mechanical properties of finite-size carbyne, obtained by a molecular dynamics simulation study based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order potential. To avoid confusion in assigning the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne, the value of the effective cross-sectional area of carbyne (4.148 Å2) was deduced via experiment and adopted in our study. Ends-constraints effects on the ultimate stress (maximum force) of the carbyne chains are investigated, revealing that the molecular dynamics simulation results agree very well with the experimental results. The ultimate strength, Young's Modulus and maximum strain of carbyne are rather sensitive to the temperature and all decrease with the temperature. Opposite tendencies of the length dependence of the overall ultimate strength and maximum strain of carbyne at room temperature and very low temperature have been found, and analyses show that this originates in the ends effect of carbyne.

  9. Parietal cortex mediates perceptual Gestalt grouping independent of stimulus size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Pablo R; Zaretskaya, Natalia; Bartels, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    The integration of local moving elements into a unified gestalt percept has previously been linked to the posterior parietal cortex. There are two possible interpretations for the lack of involvement of other occipital regions. The first is that parietal cortex is indeed uniquely functionally specialized to perform grouping. Another possibility is that other visual regions can perform grouping as well, but that the large spatial separation of the local elements used previously exceeded their neurons' receptive field (RF) sizes, preventing their involvement. In this study we distinguished between these two alternatives. We measured whole-brain activity using fMRI in response to a bistable motion illusion that induced mutually exclusive percepts of either an illusory global Gestalt or of local elements. The stimulus was presented in two sizes, a large version known to activate IPS only, and a version sufficiently small to fit into the RFs of mid-level dorsal regions such as V5/MT. We found that none of the separately localized motion regions apart from parietal cortex showed a preference for global Gestalt perception, even for the smaller version of the stimulus. This outcome suggests that grouping-by-motion is mediated by a specialized size-invariant mechanism with parietal cortex as its anatomical substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Length of training, hostility and the martial arts: a comparison with other sporting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K; Thornton, E

    1992-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that training in the martial arts leads to a reduction in levels of hostility. However, such research has only compared hostility within martial arts groups. The present research compares two martial arts groups and two other sporting groups on levels of assaultive, verbal and indirect hostility. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between length of training in the respondent's stated sport and whether that sport was a martial art in predicting assaultive and verbal hostility. The form of the interaction suggests that participation in the martial arts is associated, over time, with decreased feelings of assaultive and verbal hostility. PMID:1422642

  11. Length of training, hostility and the martial arts: a comparison with other sporting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K; Thornton, E

    1992-09-01

    Previous research has indicated that training in the martial arts leads to a reduction in levels of hostility. However, such research has only compared hostility within martial arts groups. The present research compares two martial arts groups and two other sporting groups on levels of assaultive, verbal and indirect hostility. Moderated multiple regression analyses revealed a significant interaction between length of training in the respondent's stated sport and whether that sport was a martial art in predicting assaultive and verbal hostility. The form of the interaction suggests that participation in the martial arts is associated, over time, with decreased feelings of assaultive and verbal hostility.

  12. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosapia eLauro Grotto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: 1 they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious emotions to combine into structured group patterns; 2 they have a certain degree of stability in time; 3 they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; 4 they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical 'leadership’ pattern, and in 'cognitive’ terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e. the group behaves 'as if’ it was assuming that…. Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: 1 are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? 3 can these states be differentiated in structural terms? 3 to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical

  13. Metastable structures and size effects in small group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro Grotto, Rosapia; Guazzini, Andrea; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    In his seminal works on group dynamics Bion defined a specific therapeutic setting allowing psychoanalytic observations on group phenomena. In describing the setting he proposed that the group was where his voice arrived. This physical limit was later made operative by assuming that the natural dimension of a therapeutic group is around 12 people. Bion introduced a theory of the group aspects of the mind in which proto-mental individual states spontaneously evolve into shared psychological states that are characterized by a series of features: (1) they emerge as a consequence of the natural tendency of (both conscious and unconscious) emotions to combine into structured group patterns; (2) they have a certain degree of stability in time; (3) they tend to alternate so that the dissolution of one is rapidly followed by the emergence of another; (4) they can be described in qualitative terms according to the nature of the emotional mix that dominates the state, in structural terms by a kind of typical "leadership" pattern, and in "cognitive" terms by a set of implicit expectations that are helpful in explaining the group behavior (i.e., the group behaves "as if" it was assuming that). Here we adopt a formal approach derived from Socio-physics in order to explore some of the structural and dynamic properties of this small group dynamics. We will described data from an analytic DS model simulating small group interactions of agents endowed with a very simplified emotional and cognitive dynamic in order to assess the following main points: (1) are metastable collective states allowed to emerge in the model and if so, under which conditions in the parameter space? (2) can these states be differentiated in structural terms? (3) to what extent are the emergent dynamic features of the systems dependent of the system size? We will finally discuss possible future applications of the quantitative descriptions of the interaction structure in the small group clinical setting.

  14. Effects of brood size manipulation and common origin on phenotype and telomere length in nestling collared flycatchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voillemot Marie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is accumulating that telomere length is a good predictor of life expectancy, especially early in life, thus calling for determining the factors that affect telomere length at this stage. Here, we investigated the relative influence of early growth conditions and origin (genetics and early maternal effects on telomere length of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis at fledging. We experimentally transferred hatchlings among brood triplets to create reduced, control (i.e. unchanged final nestling number and enlarged broods. Results Although our treatment significantly affected body mass at fledging, we found no evidence that increased sibling competition affected nestling tarsus length and telomere length. However, mixed models showed that brood triplets explained a significant part of the variance in body mass (18% and telomere length (19%, but not tarsus length (13%, emphasizing that unmanipulated early environmental factors influenced telomere length. These models also revealed low, but significant, heritability of telomere length (h2 = 0.09. For comparison, the heritability of nestling body mass and tarsus length was 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, which was in the range of previously published estimates for those two traits in this species. Conclusion Those findings in a wild bird population demonstrate that telomere length at the end of the growth period is weakly, but significantly, determined by genetic and/or maternal factors taking place before hatching. However, we found no evidence that the brood size manipulation experiment, and by extension the early growth conditions, influenced nestling telomere length. The weak heritability of telomere length suggests a close association with fitness in natural populations.

  15. Morphological study of extrauterine length of the fallopian tube at different age group in Bangladeshi people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Z G; Islam, M S; Sultana, S Z; Mannan, S; Zaman, U K; Rahman, M M; Sen, S

    2010-01-01

    This cross sectional descriptive study was done to see the length of the right & left fallopian tube in Bangladeshi female and to increase the knowledge regarding variational anatomy in our country. Sixty post mortem specimens containing uterus, uterine tube, ureter and surrounding structures were collected by non random or purposive sampling technique from cadavers of different age groups and fixed in 10% formol saline solution. This study was carried out in the department of Anatomy of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh from July 2006 to June 2007. Gross and fine dissection was carried out to study the length of fallopian tube (right & left). In this study our findings were compared with those of the standard text books. Maximum length of fallopian tube was found in middle age group (B = 13 to 45 years). It is about 9.19 cm in right side and 8.82 cm in left side. It is also important to note that more kinking was observed in middle age group.

  16. Preoperative estimation of tibial nail length--because size does matter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, J G

    2012-11-01

    Selecting the correct tibial nail length is essential for satisfactory outcomes. Nails that are inserted and are found to be of inappropriate length should be removed. Accurate preoperative nail estimation has the potential to reduce intra-operative errors, operative time and radiation exposure.

  17. Effects of word width and word length on optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eTeramoto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated whether word width and length affect the optimal character size for reading of horizontally scrolling Japanese words, using reading speed as a measure. In Experiment 1, three Japanese words, each consisting of 4 Hiragana characters, sequentially scrolled on a display screen from right to left. Participants, all Japanese native speakers, were instructed to read the words aloud as accurately as possible, irrespective of their order within the sequence. To quantitatively measure their reading performance, we used rapid serial visual presentation paradigm, where the scrolling rate was increased until the participants began to make mistakes. Thus, the highest scrolling rate at which the participants’ performance exceeded 88.9% correct rate was calculated for each character size (0.3, 0.6, 1.0, and 3.0° and scroll window size (5 or 10 character spaces. Results showed that the reading performance was highest in the range of 0.6° to 1.0°, irrespective of the scroll window size. Experiment 2 investigated whether the optimal character size observed in Experiment 1 was applicable for any word width and word length (i.e., the number of characters in a word. Results showed that reading speeds were slower for longer than shorter words and the word width of 3.6° was optimal among the word lengths tested (3, 4, and 6 character words. Considering that character size varied depending on word width and word length in the present study, this means that the optimal character size can be changed by word width and word length.

  18. The optimal intestinal segment length for experimental size-mismatched intestinal transplantation: Defining the maximum length with the lowest blood flow needs in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frongia, Giovanni; Majlesara, Ali; Saffari, Arash; Emami, Golnaz; Golriz, Mohammad; Günther, Patrick; Mehrabi, Arianeb

    2018-03-01

    Transplanted Intestinal Segments (IS) must match the perfusion capacities of the recipient. This can be challenging during a size-mismatched SBTX. In this study, we defined the maximum IS length with lowest blood flow needs in a porcine model by evaluating the physiological perfusion rates of different IS lengths. Blood flow in the SMA, aorta segment four, and general circulatory parameters were monitored before and after sequential intestinal resection. IS lengths of 30 cm, 60 cm, 120 cm, and 300 cm (n = 8 each) were compared. The IS blood flow requirements increased with IS length (30 cm: 19.5 ± 3.4 mL/min; 60 cm: 16.9 ± 6.7 mL/min; 120 cm: 34.9 ± 8.5 mL/min; 300 cm: 62.9 ± 11.6 mL/min). Absolute IS blood flow (P = .004), percentage IS blood flow uptake from the SMA (P = .001), and percentage IS blood flow uptake from the aorta (P = .005) increased significantly between 60 cm and 120 cm. We concluded that 60 cm was the maximum IS length before blood flow demands significantly increased in a porcine model. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Red blood cell size is inversely associated with leukocyte telomere length in a large multi-ethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlitina, Julia; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-01-01

    Although mutations in the genes encoding either the protein or RNA component of telomerase have been found in patients with various blood disorders, the impact of telomere length on hematopoiesis is less well understood for subjects from the general population. Here we have measured telomere lengths of genomic DNA isolated from circulating leukocytes of 3157 subjects, ranging from 18 to 85 years of age, enrolled in a large multiethnic population based study, the Dallas Heart Study 2. Shorter telomere lengths are marginally associated with lower red blood cell counts in this cohort, but are significantly associated with larger mean red blood cell size (as measured by the MCV), increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW), higher hemoglobin levels and lower platelet counts, even after correction for age, gender and ethnicity (p-values of 50 years vs. p = 0.0006 for size in a large urban US population and suggests a biologic mechanism for macrocytosis of aging.

  20. Accumulation of Stable Full-Length Circular Group I Intron RNAs during Heat-Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper L.; Beckert, Bertrand; Masquida, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Group I introns in nuclear ribosomal RNA of eukaryotic microorganisms are processed by splicing or circularization. The latter results in formation of full-length circular introns without ligation of the exons and has been proposed to be active in intron mobility. We applied qRT-PCR to estimate...... the copy number of circular intron RNA from the myxomycete Didymium iridis. In exponentially growing amoebae, the circular introns are nuclear and found in 70 copies per cell. During heat-shock, the circular form is up-regulated to more than 500 copies per cell. The intron harbours two ribozymes that have...

  1. Distribution of dislocation source length and the size dependent yield strength in freestanding thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shishvan, Siamak Soleymani; Van der Giessen, Erik

    A method is proposed to estimate the size-dependent yield strength of columnar-grained freestanding thin films. The estimate relies on assuming a distribution of the size of Frank-Read sources, which is then translated into a log-normal distribution of the source strength, depending on film

  2. Dietary patterns, food groups and telomere length: a systematic review of current studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, N; Golpour Hamedani, S; Barak, F; Safavi, S M; Miraghajani, M

    2017-02-01

    Telomere length (TL) is recognized as a biomarker of aging and shorter telomeres are linked with shorter lifespan. Inter-individual variability in telomere length is highly heritable. However, there has been a resurgence of interest in the controversial relationship between diet and TL. Evaluating the impact of diet at the food group and dietary pattern level will provide greater insight into the effect of diet on TL dynamics, which are of significant importance in health and longevity. This article reports the first systematic review of the relation between food groups, dietary patterns and TL in human populations based on PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Science Direct, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for all relevant studies, up to November 2015. Among the 17 included studies, 3 and 10 of them were regarding the effect of dietary patterns and various food groups on TL, respectively. Also, in 4 studies, both dietary patterns and different food groups were assessed in relation to TL. Mediterranean dietary pattern was related to longer TL in 3 studies. Five studies indicated beneficial effect of fruits or vegetables on TL. In 7 studies, a reverse association between TL and intake of cereals, processed meat, and fats and oils was reported. Our systematic review supports the health benefits of adherence to Mediterranean diet on TL. Except for the fruits and vegetables, which showed positive association with TL, results were inconsistent for other dietary factors. Also, certain food categories including processed meat, cereals and sugar-sweetened beverages may be associated with shorter TLs. However, additional epidemiological evidence and clinical trials should be considered in future research in order to develop firm conclusions in this regard.

  3. Group size of a permanent large group of agile mangabeys (Cercocebus agilis) at Bai Hokou, Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devreese, Lieven; Huynen, Marie-Claude; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Todd, Angelique

    2013-01-01

    White-eyelid mangabeys (genus Cercocebus) live in groups of highly variable size. Because of their semi-terrestrial behaviour and preference for dense forest habitats, re-liable data on group size are scarce. During a 5-month study, we collected 17 group counts on a habituated group of agile mangabeys (C. agilis) at Bai Hokou in the Central African Republic. We found a stable group size of approximately 135 individuals. This permanent large grouping pattern is known to occur among several populations of white-eyelid mangabeys and is congruent with extreme group sizes reported in mandrills at Lopé in Gabon. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. [Groups of resource utilization in acute care units and average length of stay at geriatrics services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Jaurrieta, J J; Baztán Cortés, J J; Hornillos Calvo, M; Carbonell Collar, A; Tardón García, A

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, Patient Classifications Systems (PCS's) have been implement in Spain for the purpose of gauging the "hospital product". However, the most conventional systems are not very well-suited to the senior citizen population, among whom illness-related disability is a determining factor with regard to explaining the usage of resources and the results of the health care provided. Therefore, the idea was brought forth of implementing a system in units providing senior citizen care which would entail this parameter, that is, the Resource Usage Groups (RUG's), analyzing the characteristics and differences in the RUG-related spread in four Geriatrics Units. A cross-sectional study based on consecutive cutoff points in periods longer than the average stay in each unit, the patients admitted in the acute care units and average stay in the Geriatrics Unit of the Hospital Monte Narango (HMN) (n = 318), Hospital Central de la Cruz Roja (HCCR) (n = 384), Hospital General de Guadalajara (HG) (n = 272) and Hospital Virgen del Valle (HVV) (n = 390), with regard to the spread thereof according to the RUG-T18 classification. The possible differences among the hospitals in question were analyzed by means of the chi-square statistical test (SPSS for Windows). For the overall sample, the patients were divided into groups R, S and C of the classification, groups P and B being represented to a very small degree, differences having been found to exist among the different hospitals. Hence, the HCCR is that which handles the largest percentage of patients in the R group (47.64% vs. 23.66% at HMN; 20.57% at HG and 20.53% at HVV) and a smaller percentage of patients in the S Group (3.12% vs. 6.40% at HMN; 9.92% at HG and 9.76% at HVV) and the C Group (48.94% vs. 76.29% at HMN; 66.89% at HG and 68.36% at HVV). Differences were likewise found to exist in the individual analysis for the acute care units and average length of stay. The resource usage groups can be useful with regard to

  5. Conductance of Conjugated Molecular Wires: Length Dependence, Anchoring Groups, and Band Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Guowen; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2009-01-01

    characteristic of tunneling through a barrier, G = Gc exp(−βL). For thiophene, pyrrole, and phenyl wires with thiol end-groups, we calculate decay constants (β) of 0.211, 0.257, and 0.264 Å−1, respectively, and contact conductances (Gc) of 1.25, 2.90, and 1.22G0, where G0 = 2e2/h is the conductance quantum....... In comparison, the corresponding values for amine-terminated thiophene are calculated to be β = 0.160 Å−1 and Gc = 0.038G0. These results show that (1) the contact resistance is mainly determined by the anchoring group and (2) the decay constant, which determines the conductance in the long wire limit......The conductance of π-conjugated molecular wires bonded to gold electrodes at zero bias is studied using density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green’s function method. For all systems considered, we find that the conductance length dependence follows the simple exponential law...

  6. Sexual Dimorphism and Estimation of Height from Body Length Anthropometric Parameters among the Hausa Ethnic Group of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Aliyu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to investigate the sexual dimorphism in length and other anthropometric parameters. To also generate formulae for height estimation using anthropometric measurements of some length parameters among Hausa ethnic group of Kaduna State, Nigeria. A cross sectional study was conducted and a total of 500 subjects participated in this study which was mainly secondary school students between the age ranges of 16-27 years, anthropometric measurements were obtained using standard protocols. It was observed that there was significant sexual dimorphism in all the parameters except for body mass index. In all the parameters males tend to have significantly (P < 0.05 higher mean values except biaxillary distances. Height showed positive and strongest correlations with demispan length, followed by knee height, thigh length, sitting height, hand length, foot length, humeral length, forearm length and weight respectively. There were weak and positive correlations between height and neck length as well as biaxillary length. The demi span length showed the strongest correlation coefficient and low standard error of estimate indicating the strong estimation ability than other parameters. The combination of two parameters tends to give better estimations and low standard error of estimates, so also combining the three parameters gives better estimations with a lower standard error of estimates. The better correlation coefficient was also observed with the double and triple parameters respectively. Male Hausa tend to have larger body proportion compared to female. Height showed positive and strongest correlations with demispan length. Body length anthropometric proved to be useful in estimation of stature among Hausa ethnic group of Kaduna state Nigeria.

  7. Length and volume of morphologically normal kidneys in Korean Children: Ultrasound measurement and estimation using body size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Hwee; Kim, Myung Joon; Lim, Sok Hwan; Lee, Mi Jung; Kim, Ji Eun

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between anthropometric measurements and renal length and volume measured with ultrasound in Korean children who have morphologically normal kidneys, and to create simple equations to estimate the renal sizes using the anthropometric measurements. We examined 794 Korean children under 18 years of age including a total of 394 boys and 400 girls without renal problems. The maximum renal length (L) (cm), orthogonal anterior-posterior diameter (D) (cm) and width (W) (cm) of each kidney were measured on ultrasound. Kidney volume was calculated as 0.523 x L x D x W (cm 3 ). Anthropometric indices including height (cm), weight (kg) and body mass index (m 2 /kg) were collected through a medical record review. We used linear regression analysis to create simple equations to estimate the renal length and the volume with those anthropometric indices that were mostly correlated with the US-measured renal sizes. Renal length showed the strongest significant correlation with patient height (R2, 0.874 and 0.875 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). Renal volume showed the strongest significant correlation with patient weight (R2, 0.842 and 0.854 for the right and left kidneys, respectively, p < 0.001). The following equations were developed to describe these relationships with an estimated 95% range of renal length and volume (R2, 0.826-0.884, p < 0.001): renal length = 2.383 + 0.045 x Height (± 1.135) and = 2.374 + 0.047 x Height (± 1.173) for the right and left kidneys, respectively; and renal volume 7.941 + 1.246 x Weight (± 15.920) and = 7.303 + 1.532 x Weight (± 18.704) for the right and left kidneys, respectively. Scatter plots between height and renal length and between weight and renal volume have been established from Korean children and simple equations between them have been developed for use in clinical practice.

  8. A novel length back-calculation approach accounting for ontogenetic changes in the fish length - otolith size relationship during the early life of sprat (Sprattus sprattus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenther, Claudia C.; Temming, Axel; Baumann, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    An individual-based length back-calculation method was developed for juvenile Baltic sprat (Sprattus sprattus), accounting for ontogenetic changes in the relationship between fish length and otolith length. In sprat, metamorphosis from larvae to juveniles is characterized by the coincidence of low...... length growth, strong growth in body height, and maximal otolith growth. Consequently, the method identifies a point of metamorphosis for an individual as the otolith radius at maximum increment widths. By incorporating this information in our back-calculation method, estimated length growth...

  9. Evolution of avian clutch size along latitudinal gradients: do seasonality, nest predation or breeding season length matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebeler, E M; Caprano, T; Böhning-Gaese, K

    2010-05-01

    Birds display a latitudinal gradient in clutch size with smaller clutches in the tropics and larger in the temperate region. Three factors have been proposed to affect this pattern: seasonality of resources (SR), nest predation and length of the breeding season (LBS). Here, we test the importance of these factors by modelling clutch size evolution within bird populations under different environmental settings. We use an individual-based ecogenetic simulation model that combines principles from population ecology and life history theory. Results suggest that increasing SR from the tropics to the poles by itself or in combination with a decreasing predation rate and LBS can generate the latitudinal gradient in clutch size. Annual fecundity increases and annual adult survival rate decreases from the tropics to the poles. We further show that the annual number of breeding attempts that (together with clutch size) determines total annual egg production is an important trait to understand latitudinal patterns in these life history characteristics. Field experiments that manipulate environmental factors have to record effects not only on clutch size, but also on annual number of breeding attempts. We use our model to predict the outcome of such experiments under different environmental settings.

  10. Do male secondary sexual characters correlate with testis size and sperm length in the small hairy maggot blowfly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie D; Wallman, James F; Byrne, Phillip G

    2015-12-01

    The phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis proposes that secondary sexual characters (SSCs) advertise a male's fertility to prospective mates. However, findings from empirical studies attempting to test this hypothesis are often ambivalent or even contradictory, and few studies have simultaneously evaluated how both morphological and behavioural SSCs relate to ejaculate characteristics. Males of the small hairy maggot blowfly, Chrysomya varipes, possess conspicuous foreleg ornaments and display highly stereotyped courtship behaviour. These traits are favoured by females during pre-copulatory mate choice, but it remains unknown whether they correlate with post-copulatory traits expected to influence male fertility. The aim of this study was to investigate whether male courtship and ornamentation correlate with testis size and sperm length in C. varipes. We found that males investing more in courtship had bigger testes, and males with more extensive foreleg ornamentation released sperm with longer tails. Based on the assumption that larger testes enable males to produce more sperm, and that sperm with longer tails have greater propulsive force, our findings suggest that more vigorous and more ornamented males may be more fertile. These findings lend support to the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis. However, a complete test of this hypothesis will require evaluating whether testis size and sperm length influence male fertilisation ability, as well as female fecundity and/or fertility. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Microfluidic magnetic switching valves based on aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles: Effects of aggregate length and nanoparticle sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiemsakul, Thanakorn [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Thanon Phahonyothin, Tambon Khlong Nueng, Amphoe Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Manakasettharn, Supone, E-mail: supone@nanotec.or.th [National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Thanon Phahonyothin, Tambon Khlong Nueng, Amphoe Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Kanharattanachai, Sivakorn; Wanna, Yongyuth [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Wangsuya, Sujint [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 272 Rama VI Road, Ratchathewi District, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pratontep, Sirapat [College of Nanotechnology, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chalongkrung Road, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2017-01-15

    We demonstrate microfluidic switching valves using magnetic nanoparticles blended within the working fluid as an alternative microfluidic flow control in microchannels. Y-shaped microchannels have been fabricated by using a CO{sub 2} laser cutter to pattern microchannels on transparent poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheets covered with thermally bonded transparent polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sheets. To examine the performance of the microfluidic magnetic switching valves, an aqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspension was injected into the microchannels by a syringe pump. Neodymium magnets were then employed to attract magnetic nanoparticles and form an aggregate that blocked the microchannels at a required position. We have found that the maximum volumetric flow rate of the syringe pump that the magnetic nanoparticle aggregate can withstand scales with the square of the external magnetic flux density. The viscosity of the fluid exhibits dependent on the aggregate length and the size of the magnetic nanoparticles. This microfluidic switching valve based on aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles has strong potentials as an on-demand flow control, which may help simplifying microfluidic channel designs. - Highlights: • We demonstrate microfluidic switching valves based on aggregates of magnetic particles. • Maximum flow rate that the aggregate can withstand scales with the square of the external magnetic flux density. • Aggregates with smaller magnetic nanoparticle size can withstand higher flow rate. • Aggregate length exhibits a linear dependence with flow resistance of a viscous fluid.

  12. The impact of group size on damaging behaviours, aggression, fear and stress in farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Koene, P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the impact of group size on damaging behaviours, aggression, fear and stress in farm animals and to identify housing- and management options that can help to reduce problems caused by suboptimal group sizes. Increasing group size was found to increase the risk of

  13. Finite groups with three conjugacy class sizes of some elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (G)). Hence the Sylow p-subgroup of G is abelian as required. Now by the hypothesis we suppose that x is a p-element of G such that [G : CG(x)] = pa. By Lemma 2.1, we know that the normal closure of x will be a p-group, say H. Let Z = CG(H).

  14. Perception of Groups, Size of Opposition, and Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the relationship between social influence and the number of persons attempting influence. Findings suggest that the manner in which persons are initially organized into groups and aggregates of individuals affects their persuasive impact on observers. (Editor/RK)

  15. The Number of Cultural Traits Is Correlated with Female Group Size but Not with Male Group Size in Chimpanzee Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Johan; Lindenfors, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    What determines the number of cultural traits present in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) communities is poorly understood. In humans, theoretical models suggest that the frequency of cultural traits can be predicted by population size. In chimpanzees, however, females seem to have a particularly important role as cultural carriers. Female chimpanzees use tools more frequently than males. They also spend more time with their young, skewing the infants’ potential for social learning towards their ...

  16. Molecularly imprinted macroporous monoliths for solid-phase extraction: Effect of pore size and column length on recognition properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Korneeva, Yu M; Tennikova, T B

    2016-09-01

    The series of macroporous monolithic molecularly imprinted monoliths differed by pore size, column length (volume) and amount of template used for imprinting was synthesized using methacrylic acid and glycerol dimethacrylate as co-monomers and antibiotic ciprofloxacin as a template. The prepared monoliths were characterized regarding to their permeability, pore size, porosity, and resistance to the flow of a mobile phase. The surface morphology was also analyzed. The slight dependence of imprinting factor on flow rate, as well as its independence on pore size of macroporous molecularly imprinted monolithic media was observed. The column obtained at different conditions exhibited different affinity of ciprofloxacin to the imprinted sites that was characterized with Kdiss values in the range of 10(-5)-10(-4)M. The solid-phase extraction of ciprofloxacin from such biological liquids as human blood serum, human urine and cow milk serum was performed using the developed monolithic columns. In all cases, the extraction was found to be 95.0-98.6%. Additionally, the comparison of extraction of three fluoroqinolone analogues, e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, from human blood plasma was carried out. Contrary to ciprofloxacin extracted with more than 95%, this parameter did not exceed 40% for its analogues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Intergroup Discrimination in Positive and Negative Outcome Allocations: Impact of Stimulus Valence, Relative Group Status, and Relative Group Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Sabine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Three studies investigated the determination of social discrimination by the valence of stimuli that are allocated between groups. The studies were based on either the minimal group paradigm or a more reality-based laboratory intergroup setting, with stimulus valence, group status, and group size as factors and with pull scores on Tajfel matrices…

  18. The Relation of Utterance Length to Grammatical Complexity in Normal and Language-Disordered Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Hollis S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines mean length of utterance (MLU) in morphemes as a predictor of the grammatical complexity of the natural language corpora of normal preschoolers and of children and adolescents with delayed language, Fragile X Syndrome, Down Syndrome, and autism. (43 references) (GLR)

  19. Record length, mass, and clutch size in the nonindigenous Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysko, Kenneth L.; Hart, Kristen M.; Smith, Brian J.; Selby, Thomas H.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Coutu, Nicholas T.; Reichart, Rebecca M.; Nuñez, Leroy P.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Snow, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    The Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), is indigenous to northern India,east to southern China, and south to Vietnam and a few islands in Indonesia (Barker and Barker 2008, Reed and Rodda 2009). This species has been introduced since at least 1979 in southern Florida, USA, where it likely began reproducing and became established during the 1980s (Meshaka et al. 2000, Snowet al. 2007b,Kraus 2009, Krysko et al. 2011, Willson et al. 2011). Python bivittatus has been documented in Florida consuming a variety of mammals and birds, and the American Alligator(Alligator mississippiensis) (Snowet al. 2007a, 2007b; Harvey et al. 2008; Rochford et al. 2010b; Holbrook and Chesnes 2011), many of which are protected species. Herein, we provide details on two of the largest known wild P. bivittatus in Florida to date, including current records on length,mass,clutch size, and diet.

  20. LENGTH-WEIGHT RELATIONSHIP, SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND ANNUAL CPUE’s OF ALBACORE IN EASTERN INDIAN OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Setyadji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Albacore (Thunnus alalunga, Bonnaterre, 1788 is one of the tropical tuna species in the Eastern Indian Ocean incidentally caught by the Indonesian tuna longliner. Scientific observer series data during the period of 2005 – 2012 showed that the catches were geographically distributed within the area bordered by 5 – 350 S and 75 – 1300 E. High CPUE mainly occurred in sub area between 250 and 350 S. Some biological observations indicated that immature albacore specimens were mainly recorded in areas of south of 250 S while mature albacore were concentrated in the area between 100 S and 250 S. Length – weight measurements for pooled male and female was W= 0.00008FL2.7271. The hook-rates from onboard observation showed that increasing rates occurred during 2009 to 2012. The annual landing showed that that highest occurred in 2008 and the lowest in 2011 with overall tend to decrease until 2011 and increased slightly in 2012. Series number of length frequency measurements (2005 - 2012 showed that the albacore were caught within the range of 40 – 135 cm FL and there was a tendency that the average size decreased gradually from 103 cmFL (2005 to 84 cmFL (2012. As a preliminary finding these estimates contribute as important element for consideration in the national and regional tuna fisheries management in the area.

  1. Role of the ratio of biopolyelectrolyte persistence length to nanoparticle size in the structural tuning of electrostatic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Carn, Florent; Boué, François; Buhler, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of nanoparticles of given size R induced by addition of a polymer strongly depends on its degree of rigidity. This is shown here on a large variety of silica nanoparticle self-assemblies obtained by electrostatic complexation with carefully selected oppositely charged biopolyelectrolytes of different rigidity. The effective rigidity is quantified by the total persistence length LT representing the sum of the intrinsic (Lp) and electrostatic (Le) polyelectrolyte persistence length, which depends on the screening, i.e., on ionic strength due to counterions and external salt concentrations. We experimentally show that the ratio LT/R is the main tuning parameter that controls the fractal dimension Df of the nanoparticles' self-assemblies, which is determined using small-angle neutron scattering: (i) For LT/R nanoparticles in excess, hence ramified structures with Df˜2 . (ii) For 0.3 nanoparticles), in good agreement with computer simulations. (iii) For LT/R >1 ,Le is strongly increased due to the absence of salt and repulsions between nanoparticles cannot be compensated for by the polyelectrolyte wrapping, which allows a spacing between nanoparticles and the formation of one-dimensional pearl necklace complexes. (iv) Finally, electrostatic screening, i.e., ionic strength, turned out to be a reliable way of controlling Df and the phase diagram behavior. It finely tunes the short-range interparticle potential, resulting in larger fractal dimensions at higher ionic strength.

  2. How to Appropriately Calculate Effective Dose for CT Using Either Size-Specific Dose Estimates or Dose-Length Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Samuel L; Mirro, Amy E; Moore, Bria M; Kaufman, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to show how to calculate effective dose in CT using size-specific dose estimates and to correct the current method using dose-length product (DLP). Data were analyzed from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT images. Size-specific dose estimate was used as a surrogate for organ dose in the chest and abdominopelvic regions. Organ doses were averaged by patient weight-based populations and were used to calculate effective dose by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 103 method using tissue-weighting factors (EICRP). In addition, effective dose was calculated using population-averaged CT examination DLP for the chest and abdominopelvic region using published k-coefficients (EDLP = k × DLP). EDLP differed from EICRP by an average of 21% (1.4 vs 1.1) in the chest and 42% (2.4 vs 3.4) in the abdominopelvic region. The differences occurred because the published kcoefficients did not account for pitch factor other than unity, were derived using a 32-cm diameter CT dose index (CTDI) phantom for CT examinations of the pediatric body, and used ICRP 60 tissue-weighting factors. Once it was corrected for pitch factor, the appropriate size of CTDI phantom, and ICRP 103 tissue-weighting factors, EDLP improved in agreement with EICRP to better than 7% (1.4 vs 1.3) and 4% (2.4 vs 2.5) for chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Current use of DLP to calculate effective dose was shown to be deficient because of the outdated means by which the k-coefficients were derived. This study shows a means to calculate EICRP using patient size-specific dose estimate and how to appropriately correct EDLP.

  3. The number of cultural traits is correlated with female group size but not with male group size in chimpanzee communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Lind

    Full Text Available What determines the number of cultural traits present in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes communities is poorly understood. In humans, theoretical models suggest that the frequency of cultural traits can be predicted by population size. In chimpanzees, however, females seem to have a particularly important role as cultural carriers. Female chimpanzees use tools more frequently than males. They also spend more time with their young, skewing the infants' potential for social learning towards their mothers. In Gombe, termite fishing has been shown to be transmitted from mother to offspring. Lastly, it is female chimpanzees that transfer between communities and thus have the possibility of bringing in novel cultural traits from other communities. From these observations we predicted that females are more important cultural carriers than males. Here we show that the reported number of cultural traits in chimpanzee communities correlates with the number of females in chimpanzee communities, but not with the number of males. Hence, our results suggest that females are the carriers of chimpanzee culture.

  4. The number of cultural traits is correlated with female group size but not with male group size in chimpanzee communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Johan; Lindenfors, Patrik

    2010-03-24

    What determines the number of cultural traits present in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) communities is poorly understood. In humans, theoretical models suggest that the frequency of cultural traits can be predicted by population size. In chimpanzees, however, females seem to have a particularly important role as cultural carriers. Female chimpanzees use tools more frequently than males. They also spend more time with their young, skewing the infants' potential for social learning towards their mothers. In Gombe, termite fishing has been shown to be transmitted from mother to offspring. Lastly, it is female chimpanzees that transfer between communities and thus have the possibility of bringing in novel cultural traits from other communities. From these observations we predicted that females are more important cultural carriers than males. Here we show that the reported number of cultural traits in chimpanzee communities correlates with the number of females in chimpanzee communities, but not with the number of males. Hence, our results suggest that females are the carriers of chimpanzee culture.

  5. Group Representations and Intergroup Bias: Positive Affect, Similarity, and Group Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovidio, John F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined how social appearance and affective factors can influence social categorization and intergroup bias. Positive affect increased the extent to which subjects formed inclusive group representations, anticipating that the members of two groups would feel like one. Subjects in dissimilarly dressed groups expected the members to feel less like…

  6. Optimum sample length for estimating anchovy size distribution and the proportion of juveniles per fishing set for the Peruvian purse-seine fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Joo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The length distribution of catches represents a fundamental source of information for estimating growth and spatio-temporal dynamics of cohorts. The length distribution of caught is estimated based on samples of catched individuals. This work studies the optimum sample size of individuals at each fishing set in order to obtain a representative sample of the length and the proportion of juveniles in the fishing set. For that matter, we use anchovy (Engraulis ringens length data from different fishing sets recorded by observers at-sea from the On-board Observers Program from the Peruvian Marine Research Institute. Finally, we propose an optimum sample size for obtaining robust size and juvenile estimations. Though the application of this work corresponds to the anchovy fishery, the procedure can be applied to any fishery, either for on board or inland biometric measurements.

  7. Interactions among social monitoring, anti-predator vigilance and group size in eastern grey kangaroos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, François-René; Goldizen, Anne W; Pays, Olivier

    2010-07-07

    Group size is known to affect both the amount of time that prey animals spend in vigilance and the degree to which the vigilance of group members is synchronized. However, the variation in group-size effects reported in the literature is not yet understood. Prey animals exhibit vigilance both to protect themselves against predators and to monitor other group members, and both forms of vigilance presumably influence group-size effects on vigilance. However, our understanding of the patterns of individual investment underlying the time sharing between anti-predator and social vigilance is still limited. We studied patterns of variation in individual vigilance and the synchronization of vigilance with group size in a wild population of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) subject to predation, in particular focusing on peripheral females because we expected that they would exhibit both social and anti-predator vigilance. There was no global effect of group size on individual vigilance. The lack of group-size effect was the result of two compensating effects. The proportion of time individuals spent looking at other group members increased, whereas the proportion of time they spent scanning the environment decreased with group size; as a result, overall vigilance levels did not change with group size. Moreover, a degree of synchrony of vigilance occurred within groups and that degree increased with the proportion of vigilance time peripheral females spent in anti-predator vigilance. Our results highlight the crucial roles of both social and anti-predator components of vigilance in the understanding of the relationship between group size and vigilance, as well as in the synchronization of vigilance among group members.

  8. Effect of environmental enrichment and group size on behaviour and live weight in growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zucca

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the effects of group size and environmental enrichment on behaviour and growth of 108 hybrid growing rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus. We compared the behaviour (time budget and reactions to specific behavioural tests: “tonic immobility” and “emergence test” and live weight of growing rabbits housed in cages with a different number of rabbits per cage (2, 3 and 4; same density:14 rabbits/m2. Half of the cages were enriched with a wooden stick (Robinia Pseudoacacia, length: 20 cm – diameter: 6 cm, cylindrical hanging from the ceiling of the cage. The stick and number of animals per cage had no effect on weight gain or on behavioural tests responses. Interaction with the stick was significantly higher at the beginning of the growing period. Principal component analysis performed on the data for the whole period showed significant differences according to the treatments: increasing the number of rabbits per cage and introducing a wooden stick seemed to affect locomotor activity frequency and social interactions. Rabbits housed 3 and 4 per cage showed less lying behaviour and higher locomotor activity and sitting. The larger functional space allowance enabled rabbits to perform more natural behaviours compared to smaller cages (2 rabbits/cage. Environmental enrichment seems to be related to higher allogrooming behaviour frequency, which could indicate a social behaviour related to pheromonal olfactory stimulation and mutual recognition.

  9. Sex allocation adjustment to mating group size in a simultaneous hermaphrodite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicke, Tim; Marie-Orleach, Lucas; De Mulder, Katrien; Berezikov, Eugene; Ladurner, Peter; Vizoso, Dita B; Schärer, Lukas

    2013-11-01

    Sex allocation theory is considered as a touchstone of evolutionary biology, providing some of the best supported examples for Darwinian adaptation. In particular, Hamilton's local mate competition theory has been shown to generate precise predictions for extraordinary sex ratios observed in many separate-sexed organisms. In analogy to local mate competition, Charnov's mating group size model predicts how sex allocation in simultaneous hermaphrodites is affected by the mating group size (i.e., the number of mating partners plus one). Until now, studies have not directly explored the relationship between mating group size and sex allocation, which we here achieve in the simultaneously hermaphroditic flatworm Macrostomum lignano. Using transgenic focal worms with ubiquitous expression of green-fluorescent protein (GFP), we assessed the number of wild-type mating partners carrying GFP+ sperm from these focal worms when raised in different social group sizes. This allowed us to test directly how mating group size was related to the sex allocation of focal worms. We find that the proportion of male investment initially increases with increasing mating group size, but then saturates as predicted by theory. To our knowledge, this is the first direct test of the mating group size model in a simultaneously hermaphroditic animal. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Comparison of feeding behavior between two different-sized groups of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Hanya, Goro

    2015-05-13

    Group-living animals face intragroup scramble and intergroup contest competitions. Many studies have shown that larger groups bear the costs of intragroup scramble competition, which negatively affects the reproductive success of females. Unlike most primate species, Japanese macaques in the Yakushima coastal forest show increased reproductive success with group size. However, it remains unclear how group size affects the behavior of macaques. The present study examined the effects of group size on the feeding behavior of Japanese macaques in the Yakushima coastal forest. We investigated 9-13 adult females from two different-sized groups via focal animal sampling during October 2012-August 2013. We compared the feeding behavior, including patch use, between the two groups. The larger group had a larger home range and spent more time feeding, especially on mature leaves. This suggests that intragroup feeding competition should be more intense in the larger group than in the smaller group. The feeding of mature leaves might enable the larger group to increase the number of co-feeding individuals. Contrary to the predictions that the larger group travels longer distances and spends more time moving, the smaller group traveled longer distances, and spent more time moving, although the number of visited patches did not differ between the two groups. The immediate consequences of the loss of inter-group encounters could accumulate as daily travel costs, considering that group size is associated with inter-group dominance and that intergroup aggressive encounters occur frequently in the Yakushima coastal forest. This suggests that the smaller group has increased travel costs as a result of intergroup contest competition, which leads to decline in reproductive success. Am. J. Primatol. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  12. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of spacer chain lengths and polar terminal groups on the mesomorphic properties of tethered 5-phenylpyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundula F. Starkulla

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl-2-octylpyrimidine 8, 5-phenylpyrimidine derivatives 3–7, 9 with different spacer chain lengths (C2 up to C6 and different terminal polar groups (Br, Cl, N3, OH, CN were synthesized by etherification and nucleophilic substitution. The mesomorphic behaviour of these compounds was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, polarizing optical microscopy (POM and X-ray diffraction (WAXS and SAXS and revealed smectic A mesophases for bromides, chlorides and azides 3, 4 and 6. For these compounds a maximum phase width was observed for the C5 spacer regardless of the terminal group, whereas the hydroxy- and cyano-substituted derivatives 5 and 7, respectively, were non mesomorphic and showed only melting transitions.

  14. When is bigger better? The effects of group size on the evolution of helping behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Simon T; Lehmann, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the evolution of sociality in humans and other species requires understanding how selection on social behaviour varies with group size. However, the effects of group size are frequently obscured in the theoretical literature, which often makes assumptions that are at odds with empirical findings. In particular, mechanisms are suggested as supporting large-scale cooperation when they would in fact rapidly become ineffective with increasing group size. Here we review the literature on the evolution of helping behaviours (cooperation and altruism), and frame it using a simple synthetic model that allows us to delineate how the three main components of the selection pressure on helping must vary with increasing group size. The first component is the marginal benefit of helping to group members, which determines both direct fitness benefits to the actor and indirect fitness benefits to recipients. While this is often assumed to be independent of group size, marginal benefits are in practice likely to be maximal at intermediate group sizes for many types of collective action problems, and will eventually become very small in large groups due to the law of decreasing marginal returns. The second component is the response of social partners on the past play of an actor, which underlies conditional behaviour under repeated social interactions. We argue that under realistic conditions on the transmission of information in a population, this response on past play decreases rapidly with increasing group size so that reciprocity alone (whether direct, indirect, or generalised) cannot sustain cooperation in very large groups. The final component is the relatedness between actor and recipient, which, according to the rules of inheritance, again decreases rapidly with increasing group size. These results explain why helping behaviours in very large social groups are limited to cases where the number of reproducing individuals is small, as in social insects, or where

  15. Accounting for One-Group Clustering in Effect-Size Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citkowicz, Martyna; Hedges, Larry V.

    2013-01-01

    In some instances, intentionally or not, study designs are such that there is clustering in one group but not in the other. This paper describes methods for computing effect size estimates and their variances when there is clustering in only one group and the analysis has not taken that clustering into account. The authors provide the effect size…

  16. An integrated approach for determining the size of hardwood group-selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1999-01-01

    The use of group-selection methods is becoming more widespread as landowners and forest managers attempt to respond to public pressure to reduce the size of clearcut blocks. Several studies have shown that harvesting timber in smaller groups or clumps increases the cost of operations for both cable and ground-based logging systems. Recent regeneration studies have...

  17. Ecological correlates of group-size variation in a resource-defense ungulate, the sedentary guanaco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marino

    Full Text Available For large herbivores, predation-risk, habitat structure and population density are often reported as major determinants of group size variation within and between species. However, whether the underlying causes of these relationships imply an ecological adaptation or are the result of a purely mechanistic process in which fusion and fragmentation events only depend on the rate of group meeting, is still under debate. The aim of this study was to model guanaco family and bachelor group sizes in contrasting ecological settings in order to test hypotheses regarding the adaptive significance of group-size variation. We surveyed guanaco group sizes within three wildlife reserves located in eastern Patagonia where guanacos occupy a mosaic of grasslands and shrublands. Two of these reserves have been free from predators for decades while in the third, pumas often prey on guanacos. All locations have experienced important changes in guanaco abundance throughout the study offering the opportunity to test for density effects. We found that bachelor group size increased with increasing density, as expected by the mechanistic approach, but was independent of habitat structure or predation risk. In contrast, the smaller and territorial family groups were larger in the predator-exposed than in the predator-free locations, and were larger in open grasslands than in shrublands. However, the influence of population density on these social units was very weak. Therefore, family group data supported the adaptive significance of group-size variation but did not support the mechanistic idea. Yet, the magnitude of the effects was small and between-population variation in family group size after controlling for habitat and predation was negligible, suggesting that plasticity of these social units is considerably low. Our results showed that different social units might respond differentially to local ecological conditions, supporting two contrasting hypotheses in a

  18. A Life-Cycle Model of Human Social Groups Produces a U-Shaped Distribution in Group Size.

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    Gul Deniz Salali

    Full Text Available One of the central puzzles in the study of sociocultural evolution is how and why transitions from small-scale human groups to large-scale, hierarchically more complex ones occurred. Here we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model as a first step towards understanding the ecological dynamics of small and large-scale human groups. By analogy with the interactions between single-celled and multicellular organisms, we build a theory of group lifecycles as an emergent property of single cell demographic and expansion behaviours. We find that once the transition from small-scale to large-scale groups occurs, a few large-scale groups continue expanding while small-scale groups gradually become scarcer, and large-scale groups become larger in size and fewer in number over time. Demographic and expansion behaviours of groups are largely influenced by the distribution and availability of resources. Our results conform to a pattern of human political change in which religions and nation states come to be represented by a few large units and many smaller ones. Future enhancements of the model should include decision-making rules and probabilities of fragmentation for large-scale societies. We suggest that the synthesis of population ecology and social evolution will generate increasingly plausible models of human group dynamics.

  19. Correlation of automorphism group size and topological properties with program-size complexity evaluations of graphs and complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenil, Hector; Soler-Toscano, Fernando; Dingle, Kamaludin; Louis, Ard A.

    2014-06-01

    We show that numerical approximations of Kolmogorov complexity (K) of graphs and networks capture some group-theoretic and topological properties of empirical networks, ranging from metabolic to social networks, and of small synthetic networks that we have produced. That K and the size of the group of automorphisms of a graph are correlated opens up interesting connections to problems in computational geometry, and thus connects several measures and concepts from complexity science. We derive these results via two different Kolmogorov complexity approximation methods applied to the adjacency matrices of the graphs and networks. The methods used are the traditional lossless compression approach to Kolmogorov complexity, and a normalised version of a Block Decomposition Method (BDM) based on algorithmic probability theory.

  20. Brain size does not impact shoaling dynamics in unfamiliar groups of guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Szorkovszky, Alexander; Romenskyy, Maksym; Perna, Andrea; Buechel, Severine D; Zeng, Hong-Li; Pelckmans, Kristiaan; Sumpter, David; Kolm, Niclas

    2018-02-01

    Collective movement is achieved when individuals adopt local rules to interact with their neighbours. How the brain processes information about neighbours' positions and movements may affect how individuals interact in groups. As brain size can determine such information processing it should impact collective animal movement. Here we investigate whether brain size affects the structure and organisation of newly forming fish shoals by quantifying the collective movement of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from large- and small-brained selection lines, with known differences in learning and memory. We used automated tracking software to determine shoaling behaviour of single-sex groups of eight or two fish and found no evidence that brain size affected the speed, group size, or spatial and directional organisation of fish shoals. Our results suggest that brain size does not play an important role in how fish interact with each other in these types of moving groups of unfamiliar individuals. Based on these results, we propose that shoal dynamics are likely to be governed by relatively basic cognitive processes that do not differ in these brain size selected lines of guppies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. English Language Learners' Nonword Repetition Performance: The Influence of Age, L2 Vocabulary Size, Length of L2 Exposure, and L1 Phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Tamara Sorenson; Paradis, Johanne

    2016-02-01

    This study examined individual differences in English language learners' (ELLs) nonword repetition (NWR) accuracy, focusing on the effects of age, English vocabulary size, length of exposure to English, and first-language (L1) phonology. Participants were 75 typically developing ELLs (mean age 5;8 [years;months]) whose exposure to English began on average at age 4;4. Children spoke either a Chinese language or South Asian language as an L1 and were given English standardized tests for NWR and receptive vocabulary. Although the majority of ELLs scored within or above the monolingual normal range (71%), 29% scored below. Mixed logistic regression modeling revealed that a larger English vocabulary, longer English exposure, South Asian L1, and older age all had significant and positive effects on ELLs' NWR accuracy. Error analyses revealed the following L1 effect: onset consonants were produced more accurately than codas overall, but this effect was stronger for the Chinese group whose L1s have a more limited coda inventory compared with English. ELLs' NWR performance is influenced by a number of factors. Consideration of these factors is important in deciding whether monolingual norm referencing is appropriate for ELL children.

  2. Rheotaxis performance increases with group size in a coupled phase model with sensory noise. The effects of noise and group size on rheotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicoli, A.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many fish exhibit rheotaxis, a behavior in which fish orient themselves relative to flow. Rheotaxis confers many benefits, including energetic cost savings and interception of drifting prey. Despite the fact that most species of fish school during at least some portion of their life, little is known about the importance of rheotactic behavior to schooling fish and, conversely, how the presence of nearby conspecifics affects rheotactic behavior. Understanding how rheotaxis is modified by social factors is thus of ecological importance. Here we present a mathematical model in the form of an all-to-all, coupled-oscillator framework over the non-Euclidean space of fish orientations to model group rheotactic behavior. Individuals in the model measure the orientation of their neighbors and the flow direction relative to their own orientation. These measures are corrupted by sensory noise. We study the effect of sensory noise and group size on internal (i.e., within the school) and external (i.e., with the flow) disagreement in orientation. We find that under noisy environmental conditions, increased group size improves rheotaxis. Results of this study have implications for understanding animal behavior, as well as for potential applications in bio-inspired engineering.

  3. Producers and scroungers: feeding-type composition changes with group size in a socially foraging spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Marlis; Herberstein, Marie E; Schneider, Jutta M

    2016-04-13

    In groups of socially foraging animals, feeding behaviour may change with group size in response to varying cost-benefit trade-offs. Numerous studies have described group-size effects on group-average feeding behaviour, particularly emphasizing an increase in scrounging incidence for larger groups, where individuals (scroungers) feed from the food sources others (producers) discovered. However, individual variation in feeding behaviour remains unconsidered in the vast majority of these studies even though theoretical models predict individuals to specialize in feeding tactic and anticipate higher scrounger-type frequencies in larger groups. We combined group-level and individual-level analyses of group-size effects on social foraging in the subsocial spider Australomisidia ergandros Lending novel experimental support to model predictions, we found that individuals specialize in feeding tactic and that higher scrounging and lower producing incidence in larger groups were mediated through shifts in the ratio of feeding types. Further, feeding-type specialization was not explained by innate individual differences in hunting ability as all feeding types were equally efficient in prey capture when foraging alone. Context adaptivity of feeding behaviour might allow this subsocial species to succeed under varying socioecological conditions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Modeling group size and scalar stress by logistic regression from an archaeological perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Alberti

    Full Text Available Johnson's scalar stress theory, describing the mechanics of (and the remedies to the increase in in-group conflictuality that parallels the increase in groups' size, provides scholars with a useful theoretical framework for the understanding of different aspects of the material culture of past communities (i.e., social organization, communal food consumption, ceramic style, architecture and settlement layout. Due to its relevance in archaeology and anthropology, the article aims at proposing a predictive model of critical level of scalar stress on the basis of community size. Drawing upon Johnson's theory and on Dunbar's findings on the cognitive constrains to human group size, a model is built by means of Logistic Regression on the basis of the data on colony fissioning among the Hutterites of North America. On the grounds of the theoretical framework sketched in the first part of the article, the absence or presence of colony fissioning is considered expression of not critical vs. critical level of scalar stress for the sake of the model building. The model, which is also tested against a sample of archaeological and ethnographic cases: a confirms the existence of a significant relationship between critical scalar stress and group size, setting the issue on firmer statistical grounds; b allows calculating the intercept and slope of the logistic regression model, which can be used in any time to estimate the probability that a community experienced a critical level of scalar stress; c allows locating a critical scalar stress threshold at community size 127 (95% CI: 122-132, while the maximum probability of critical scale stress is predicted at size 158 (95% CI: 147-170. The model ultimately provides grounds to assess, for the sake of any further archaeological/anthropological interpretation, the probability that a group reached a hot spot of size development critical for its internal cohesion.

  5. The Influence of Social Comparison and Peer Group Size on Risky Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Zhu, Liping; Maguire, Phil; Liu, Yixin; Pang, Kaiyuan; Li, Zhenying; Hu, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the influence of different social reference points and different comparison group sizes on risky decision-making. Participants were presented with a scenario describing an exam, and presented with the opportunity of making a risky decision in the context of different information provided about the performance of their peers. We found that behavior was influenced, not only by comparison with peers, but also by the size of the comparison group. Specifically, the larger the reference group, the more polarized the behavior it prompted. In situations describing social loss, participants were led to make riskier decisions after comparing themselves against larger groups, while in situations describing social gain, they become more risk averse. These results indicate that decision making is influenced both by social comparison and the number of people making up the social reference group.

  6. Resolving Microzooplankton Functional Groups In A Size-Structured Planktonic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, D.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Follows, M. J.; Jahn, O.; Menden-Deuer, S.

    2016-02-01

    Microzooplankton are important marine grazers, often consuming a large fraction of primary productivity. They consist of a great diversity of organisms with different behaviors, characteristics, and rates. This functional diversity, and its consequences, are not currently reflected in large-scale ocean ecological simulations. How should these organisms be represented, and what are the implications for their biogeography? We develop a size-structured, trait-based model to characterize a diversity of microzooplankton functional groups. We compile and examine size-based laboratory data on the traits, revealing some patterns with size and functional group that we interpret with mechanistic theory. Fitting the model to the data provides parameterizations of key rates and properties, which we employ in a numerical ocean model. The diversity of grazing preference, rates, and trophic strategies enables the coexistence of different functional groups of micro-grazers under various environmental conditions, and the model produces testable predictions of the biogeography.

  7. Information-based sample size re-estimation in group sequential design for longitudinal trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Adewale, Adeniyi; Shentu, Yue; Liu, Jiajun; Anderson, Keaven

    2014-09-28

    Group sequential design has become more popular in clinical trials because it allows for trials to stop early for futility or efficacy to save time and resources. However, this approach is less well-known for longitudinal analysis. We have observed repeated cases of studies with longitudinal data where there is an interest in early stopping for a lack of treatment effect or in adapting sample size to correct for inappropriate variance assumptions. We propose an information-based group sequential design as a method to deal with both of these issues. Updating the sample size at each interim analysis makes it possible to maintain the target power while controlling the type I error rate. We will illustrate our strategy with examples and simulations and compare the results with those obtained using fixed design and group sequential design without sample size re-estimation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Estimation of Stature from Percutaneous Tibia Length of Indigenes of Bekwara Ethnic Group of Cross River State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugochukwu Godfrey Esomonu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimating stature by developing linear regression equations which incorporate the features of fragmented body parts or human skeletal remains has been employed by many forensic anthropologists to establish the identity of victims of mass disaster although all formulas are ethnic, age, and gender specific. The study is aimed at using the percutaneous tibia length (PCTL to deriving a specific regression equation formula which could be used to estimate the stature of adult indigenes of Bekwara ethnic group in Cross River State. A total number of 600 subjects within the age range of 21–45 years were recruited randomly for this research (300 males and 300 females. Observed height and PCTL were measured using the standard anthropometric technique, respectively. Stature was estimated from PCTL using simple regression analysis. On analysis of the data, the mean PCTL for male was found to be 43.60 ± 2.31 cm while that of female was 42.55 ± 2.83 cm. The observed height was 165.80 ± 6.88 cm and 156.70 ± 6.06 cm for male and female, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the male values of the measured parameters were significantly higher than the corresponding female values. The linear regression equations derived for male and female for the estimation of height using the PCTL was found to be 5.289 (PCTL + (−64.78 and 4.230 (TL + (−23.28, respectively. It was concluded that stature can be estimated using the length of an intact mutilated leg. Thus, the data of this study are recommended in anthropological studies for stature estimation among the ethnic group under study.

  9. Relative testis size and sperm morphometry across mammals: no evidence for an association between sperm competition and sperm length.

    OpenAIRE

    Gage, Matthew J G; Freckleton, Robert P

    2003-01-01

    Understanding why there is extensive variation in sperm form and function across taxa has been a challenge because sperm are specialized cells operating at a microscopic level in a complex environment. This comparative study collates published data to determine whether the evolution of sperm morphometry (sperm total length and separate component dimensions) is associated with sperm competition (when different males' sperm mix and compete for a female's ova) across 83 mammalian species. We use...

  10. Dolphin underwater bait-balling behaviors in relation to group and prey ball sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin L; Muzi, Elisa; Richardson, Jessica L; Fox, Gabriella J; Hansen, Lauren N; Salley, Alyce M; Dudzinski, Kathleen M; Würsig, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    We characterized dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) feeding behaviors recorded on underwater video, and related behaviors to variation in prey ball sizes, dolphin group sizes, and study site (Argentina versus New Zealand, NZ). Herding behaviors most often involved dolphins swimming around the side or under prey balls, but dolphins in Argentina more often swam under prey balls (48% of passes) than did dolphins in NZ (34% of passes). This result may have been due to differences in group sizes between sites, since groups are larger in Argentina. Additionally, in NZ, group size was positively correlated with proportion of passes that occurred under prey balls (pdolphins in Argentina more often swam through prey balls (8% of attempts) than did dolphins in NZ (4% of attempts). This result may have been due to differences in prey ball sizes between sites, since dolphins fed on larger prey balls in Argentina (>74m(2)) than in NZ (maximum 33m(2)). Additionally, in NZ, dolphins were more likely to swim through prey balls to capture fish when they fed on larger prey balls (p=0.025). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of Human-Like Social Grooming Strategies Regarding Richness and Group Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Takano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human social strategies have evolved as an adaption to behave in complex societies. In such societies, humans intensively tend to cooperate with their closer friends, because they have to distribute their limited resources through cooperation (e.g., time, food, etc.. It also makes the situation difficult to have uniform social relationships (social grooming with all friends. Thus, the social relationship strengths often show a much skewed distribution (a power law distribution. Here we aim to show adaptivity of such social grooming strategies in order to explore the evolution of human social intelligence. We use a model in the framework of evolutionary games where the social grooming strategies evolve via building social relationships with cooperators. Simulation results demonstrate four evolutionary trends. One of the trends is similar to the strategy that humans use. We find that these trends depend on three parameters; individuals' richness, group sizes, and the amount of social grooming. The human-like strategy evolves in large poor groups. Moreover, the increase of the amount of social grooming makes the group size larger. Conversely, this implies that the same strategy evolves when the amount of social grooming is properly adjusted even if the group sizes are different. Our results are important in the sense that, between human and non-human primates, the differences of the group size and the amount of social grooming are significant.

  12. Predator biomass, prey density, and species composition effects on group size in recruit coral reef fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Edward E.; Anderson, Todd W.; Friedlander, Alan M.; Beets, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Group incidence and size are described for recruit parrotfishes, wrasses, and damselfishes on Hawaiian reefs over 3 years (2006–2008) at sites spanning the archipelago (20–28°N, 155–177°W). Coral-poor and coral-rich areas were surveyed at sites with both low (Hawaii Island) and high (Midway Atoll) predator densities, facilitating examination of relations among predator and recruit densities, habitat, and group metrics. Predator and recruit densities varied spatially and temporally, with a sixfold range in total recruit densities among years. Group (≥2 recruits) metrics varied with time and tracked predator and recruit densities and the proportion of schooling species. Groups often included heterospecifics whose proportion increased with group size. A non-saturating relationship between group size and recruit density suggests that the anti-predator benefits of aggregation exceeded competitive costs. Grouping behavior may have overarching importance for recruit survival—even at high recruit densities—and merits further study on Hawaiian reefs and elsewhere.

  13. Sample size planning with the cost constraint for testing superiority and equivalence of two independent groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiin-Huarng; Chen, Hubert J; Luh, Wei-Ming

    2011-11-01

    The allocation of sufficient participants into different experimental groups for various research purposes under given constraints is an important practical problem faced by researchers. We address the problem of sample size determination between two independent groups for unequal and/or unknown variances when both the power and the differential cost are taken into consideration. We apply the well-known Welch approximate test to derive various sample size allocation ratios by minimizing the total cost or, equivalently, maximizing the statistical power. Two types of hypotheses including superiority/non-inferiority and equivalence of two means are each considered in the process of sample size planning. A simulation study is carried out and the proposed method is validated in terms of Type I error rate and statistical power. As a result, the simulation study reveals that the proposed sample size formulas are very satisfactory under various variances and sample size allocation ratios. Finally, a flowchart, tables, and figures of several sample size allocations are presented for practical reference. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Bayesian inference of genetic parameters on litter size and gestation length in Hungarian Landrace and Hungarian Large White pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Csörnyei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic parameters of number of piglets born alive (NBA and gestation length (GL were analyzed for 39798 Hungarian Landrace (HLA, 141397 records and 70356 Hungarian Large White (HLW, 246961 records sows. Bivariate repeatability animal models were used, applying a Bayesian statistics. Estimated and heritabilitie repeatabilities (within brackets, were low for NBA, 0.07 (0.14 for HLA and 0.08 (0.17 for HLW, but somewhat higher for GL, 0.18 (0.27 for HLA and 0.26 (0.35 for HLW. Estimated genetic correlations between NBA and GL were low, -0.08 for HLA and -0.05 for HLW.

  15. Effect of Group-Selection Opening Size on Breeding Bird Habitat Use in a Bottomland Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorman, C.E.; D.C. Guynn, Jr.

    2001-12-01

    Research on the effects of creating group-selection openings of various sizes on breeding birds habitat use in a bottomland hardwood forest of the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Creation of 0.5-ha group selection openings in southern bottomland forests should provide breeding habitat for some field-edge species in gaps and habitat for forest-interior species and canopy-dwelling forest-edge species between gaps provided that enough mature forest is made available.

  16. Relational diversity and neighbourhood cohesion. Unpacking variety, balance and in-group size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Ruud; Schaeffer, Merlin

    2015-09-01

    Ethnic diversity is typically measured by the well-known Hirschman-Herfindahl Index. This paper discusses the merits of an alternative approach, which is in our view better suited to tease out why and how ethnic diversity matters. The approach consists of two elements. First, all existing diversity indices are non-relational. From the viewpoint of theoretical accounts that attribute negative diversity effects to in-group favoritism and out-group threat, it should however matter whether, given a certain level of overall diversity, an individual belongs to a minority group or to the dominant majority. We therefore decompose diversity by distinguishing the in-group share from the diversity of ethnic out-groups. Second, we show how generalized entropy measures can be used to test which of diversity's two basic dimensions matters most: the variety of groups, or the unequal distribution (balance) of the population over groups. These measures allow us to test different theoretical explanations against each other, because they imply different expectations regarding the effects of in-group size, out-group variety, and out-group balance. We apply these ideas in an analysis of various social cohesion measures across 55 German localities and show that both in-group size and out-group diversity matter. For the native majority as well as for persons of immigration background, the variety component of diversity seems to be more decisive than has formerly been acknowledged. These findings provide little support for group threat and in-group favoritism as the decisive mechanisms behind negative diversity effects, and are most in line with the predictions of theories that emphasize coordination problems, asymmetric preferences, and network closure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nest Digging by Leaf-Cutting Ants: Effect of Group Size and Functional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto da Silva Camargo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-cutting ant workers dig underground chambers, for housing their symbiotic fungus, interconnected by a vast quantity of tunnels whose function is to permit the entrance of food (leaves, gaseous exchanges, and movement of workers, offspring, and the queen. Digging is a task executed by a group of workers, but little is known about the group effect and group-constructed functional structures. Thus, we analyzed the structures formed by worker groups (5, 10, 20, and 40 individuals of the leaf-cutting ant, Atta sexdens rubropilosa, for 2 days of excavation. The digging arena was the same for the 4 groups, with each group corresponding to a different density. Our results verified a pattern of tunneling by the workers, but no chamber was constructed. The group effect is well known, since the 40-worker group dug significantly more than the groups of 5, 10, and 20. These groups did not differ statistically from each other. Analysis of load/worker verified that workers of the smallest group carried the greatest load. Our paper demonstrates the group effect on the digging of nests, namely, that excavation is proportional to group size, but without emergence of a functional structure such as a chamber.

  18. Interteaching: The Effects of Discussion Group Size on Undergraduate Student Performance and Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Interteaching is a college teaching method grounded in the principles of applied behavior analysis. Research on interteaching demonstrates that it improves academic performance, and students report greater satisfaction with interteaching as compared to traditional teaching styles. The current study investigates whether discussion group size, a…

  19. Within-Group Effect-Size Benchmarks for Problem-Solving Therapy for Depression in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Allen; Yu, Miao

    2017-01-01

    This article provides benchmark data on within-group effect sizes from published randomized clinical trials that supported the efficacy of problem-solving therapy (PST) for depression among adults. Benchmarks are broken down by type of depression (major or minor), type of outcome measure (interview or self-report scale), whether PST was provided…

  20. Estimating group size and population density of Eurasian badgers Meles meles by quantifying latrine use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyttens, F.A.M.; Long, B.; Fawcett, T.W.; Skinner, A.; Brown, J.A.; Cheeseman, C.L.; Roddam, A.W.; MacDonald, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    1. Conservation issues and a potential role in disease transmission generate the continued need to census Eurasian badgers Meles metes, but direct counts and sett counts present difficulties. The feasibility of estimating social group size and population density of badgers by quantifying their use

  1. The Relationships among Group Size, Participation, and Performance of Programming Language Learning Supported with Online Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ruey-Shiang

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among group size, participation, and learning performance factors when learning a programming language in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) context. An online forum was used as the CSCL environment for learning the Microsoft ASP.NET programming language. The collaborative-learning experiment…

  2. Whistle rates of wild bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus): influences of group size and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Nicola J; Janik, Vincent M

    2008-08-01

    In large social groups acoustic communication signals are prone to signal masking by conspecific sounds. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) use highly distinctive signature whistles that counter masking effects. However, they can be found in very large groups where masking by conspecific sounds may become unavoidable. In this study we used passive acoustic localization to investigate how whistle rates of wild bottlenose dolphins change in relation to group size and behavioral context. We found that individual whistle rates decreased when group sizes got larger. Dolphins displayed higher whistle rates in contexts when group members were more dispersed as in socializing and in nonpolarized movement than during coordinated surface travel. Using acoustic localization showed that many whistles were produced by groups nearby and not by our focal group. Thus, previous studies based on single hydrophone recordings may have been overestimating whistle rates. Our results show that although bottlenose dolphins whistle more in social situations they also decrease vocal output in large groups where the potential for signal masking by other dolphin whistles increases.

  3. Habitat, density and group size of primates in a Brazilian tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, L P; Costa, C M; Strier, K B; da Fonseca, G A

    1993-01-01

    Habitats, population densities and group sizes of 5 primate species (Callithrix flaviceps, Callicebus personatus personatus, Cebus apella nigritus, Alouatta fusca clamitans, and Brachyteles arachnoides) were estimated, using the method of repeated transect sampling, in an area of montane pluvial forest in eastern Brazil (Atlantic forest). A. fusca and C. apella had the highest densities in terms of groups and individuals per square kilometer, respectively, while B. arachnoides was least abundant. The highest primate densities were observed in areas of secondary vegetation. Both group sizes and population densities for the 5 species were generally lower at the Reserva Biologica Augusto Ruschi than those reported in other areas of Atlantic forest. Hunting pressure and the different carrying capacity of the habitat are suggested as possible causes for the low number of sightings registered for these species.

  4. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice

  5. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  6. Male group size, female distribution and changes in sexual segregation by Roosevelt elk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Peterson

    Full Text Available Sexual segregation, or the differential use of space by males and females, is hypothesized to be a function of body size dimorphism. Sexual segregation can also manifest at small (social segregation and large (habitat segregation spatial scales for a variety of reasons. Furthermore, the connection between small- and large-scale sexual segregation has rarely been addressed. We studied a population of Roosevelt elk (Cervus elaphus roosevelti across 21 years in north coastal California, USA, to assess small- and large-scale sexual segregation in winter. We hypothesized that male group size would associate with small-scale segregation and that a change in female distribution would associate with large-scale segregation. Variation in forage biomass might also be coupled to small and large-scale sexual segregation. Our findings were consistent with male group size associating with small-scale segregation and a change in female distribution associating with large-scale segregation. Females appeared to avoid large groups comprised of socially dominant males. Males appeared to occupy a habitat vacated by females because of a wider forage niche, greater tolerance to lethal risks, and, perhaps, to reduce encounters with other elk. Sexual segregation at both spatial scales was a poor predictor of forage biomass. Size dimorphism was coupled to change in sexual segregation at small and large spatial scales. Small scale segregation can seemingly manifest when all forage habitat is occupied by females and large scale segregation might happen when some forage habitat is not occupied by females.

  7. Effect of SiO2 Particle Size and Length of Poly(Propylene Glycol Chain on Rheological Properties of Shear Thickening Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosik A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of shear thickening fluids based on silica powder of particles size in range 0.10 – 2.80 μm and poly(propylene glycol of 425, 1000, 2000 g/mol molar mass were investigated. The effect of particle size and the length of the polymeric chain was considered. The objective of this study was to understand basic trends of physicochemical properties of used materials on the onset and the maximum of shear thickening and dilatant effect. Outcome of the research suggested that an increase in the particle size caused a decrease in dilatant effect and shift towards higher shear rate values. Application of carrier fluid of higher molar mass allowed to increase dilatant effect but it resulted in the increase of the initial viscosity of the fluid.

  8. Integration of individual and social information for decision-making in groups of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongmin A; Goïame, Sidney; O'Connor, David A; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2017-06-01

    When making judgments in a group, individuals often revise their initial beliefs about the best judgment to make given what others believe. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, we know little about how the brain updates beliefs when integrating personal judgments (individual information) with those of others (social information). Here, we investigated the neurocomputational mechanisms of how we adapt our judgments to those made by groups of different sizes, in the context of jury decisions for a criminal. By testing different theoretical models, we showed that a social Bayesian inference model captured changes in judgments better than 2 other models. Our results showed that participants updated their beliefs by appropriately weighting individual and social sources of information according to their respective credibility. When investigating 2 fundamental computations of Bayesian inference, belief updates and credibility estimates of social information, we found that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) computed the level of belief updates, while the bilateral frontopolar cortex (FPC) was more engaged in individuals who assigned a greater credibility to the judgments of a larger group. Moreover, increased functional connectivity between these 2 brain regions reflected a greater influence of group size on the relative credibility of social information. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of the computational roles of the FPC-dACC network in steering judgment adaptation to a group's opinion. Taken together, these findings provide a computational account of how the human brain integrates individual and social information for decision-making in groups.

  9. Integration of individual and social information for decision-making in groups of different sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongmin A Park

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When making judgments in a group, individuals often revise their initial beliefs about the best judgment to make given what others believe. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, we know little about how the brain updates beliefs when integrating personal judgments (individual information with those of others (social information. Here, we investigated the neurocomputational mechanisms of how we adapt our judgments to those made by groups of different sizes, in the context of jury decisions for a criminal. By testing different theoretical models, we showed that a social Bayesian inference model captured changes in judgments better than 2 other models. Our results showed that participants updated their beliefs by appropriately weighting individual and social sources of information according to their respective credibility. When investigating 2 fundamental computations of Bayesian inference, belief updates and credibility estimates of social information, we found that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC computed the level of belief updates, while the bilateral frontopolar cortex (FPC was more engaged in individuals who assigned a greater credibility to the judgments of a larger group. Moreover, increased functional connectivity between these 2 brain regions reflected a greater influence of group size on the relative credibility of social information. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of the computational roles of the FPC-dACC network in steering judgment adaptation to a group's opinion. Taken together, these findings provide a computational account of how the human brain integrates individual and social information for decision-making in groups.

  10. Comparison of energy balance between two different-sized groups of Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Hanya, Goro

    2017-07-01

    Quantifying the energy balance is essential for testing socio-ecological models. To reveal costs and benefits of group living in Japanese macaques from the perspective of feeding competition, Kurihara and Hanya (Am J Primatol 77:986-1000, 2015) previously compared feeding behavior between two different-sized groups of macaques (larger group 30-35 individuals; smaller group 13-15 individuals) in the coastal forest of Yakushima, Japan. The results suggested that the larger group exhibited greater feeding effort because of intragroup scramble competition and that the smaller group suffered from higher travel costs, possibly owing to intergroup contest competition. However, it remained unclear whether the behavioral differences affected their energy budgets. The present study examined energetic consequences of the different feeding behaviors in the two groups. Using behavioral data from 10 to 13 adult females and nutritional composition of food items, we compared ingestion rates, energetic/nutritional content of diet, and energy budgets between the two groups. Ingestion rates and energetic/nutritional content of diet did not differ between the two groups. Despite the higher feeding effort of the larger group, energy intake did not differ between the two groups. Energy expenditure did not differ between the two groups because higher travel costs were negated by lower feeding effort in the smaller group. Consequently, the energy balance did not differ between the two groups. We demonstrated that the behavioral measures of feeding competition were not translated into their energetic condition; moreover, our findings re-emphasize the importance of quantifying behavioral and fitness measures for interpreting variation in feeding behavior properly.

  11. Influence of group size on the success of wolves hunting bison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, Daniel R; Tallian, Aimee; Stahler, Daniel R; Smith, Douglas W

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing aspect of social foraging behaviour is that large groups are often no better at capturing prey than are small groups, a pattern that has been attributed to diminished cooperation (i.e., free riding) in large groups. Although this suggests the formation of large groups is unrelated to prey capture, little is known about cooperation in large groups that hunt hard-to-catch prey. Here, we used direct observations of Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus) hunting their most formidable prey, bison (Bison bison), to test the hypothesis that large groups are more cooperative when hunting difficult prey. We quantified the relationship between capture success and wolf group size, and compared it to previously reported results for Yellowstone wolves hunting elk (Cervus elaphus), a prey that was, on average, 3 times easier to capture than bison. Whereas improvement in elk capture success levelled off at 2-6 wolves, bison capture success levelled off at 9-13 wolves with evidence that it continued to increase beyond 13 wolves. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that hunters in large groups are more cooperative when hunting more formidable prey. Improved ability to capture formidable prey could therefore promote the formation and maintenance of large predator groups, particularly among predators that specialize on such prey.

  12. Influence of group size on the success of wolves hunting bison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R MacNulty

    Full Text Available An intriguing aspect of social foraging behaviour is that large groups are often no better at capturing prey than are small groups, a pattern that has been attributed to diminished cooperation (i.e., free riding in large groups. Although this suggests the formation of large groups is unrelated to prey capture, little is known about cooperation in large groups that hunt hard-to-catch prey. Here, we used direct observations of Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus hunting their most formidable prey, bison (Bison bison, to test the hypothesis that large groups are more cooperative when hunting difficult prey. We quantified the relationship between capture success and wolf group size, and compared it to previously reported results for Yellowstone wolves hunting elk (Cervus elaphus, a prey that was, on average, 3 times easier to capture than bison. Whereas improvement in elk capture success levelled off at 2-6 wolves, bison capture success levelled off at 9-13 wolves with evidence that it continued to increase beyond 13 wolves. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that hunters in large groups are more cooperative when hunting more formidable prey. Improved ability to capture formidable prey could therefore promote the formation and maintenance of large predator groups, particularly among predators that specialize on such prey.

  13. Effect of field size and length of plantar spur on treatment outcome in radiation therapy of plantar fasciitis: the bigger the better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Size of government and entrepreneurship. Analysis of three groups of countries with different economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Díaz Casero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the impact of the "size of government" in entrepreneurial activity for countries with different levels of economical development. It has been used the variables "size of government" of the economic freedom indices released by the Economic Freedom Network (2000-2009 and by The Heritage Foundation (2000-2011, and the variables of "entrepreneurship" released by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. Furthermore, the same analysis has been carried out grouping the countries by development level, following the classification elaborated by the World Economic Forum. Statistical analyses of correlations have shown that the “size of government” is related to entrepreneurship. The variables "Size of Government: Expenditures, Taxes and Enterprises" and " Government Size” have revealed a positive correlation with the total, opportunity and necessity entrepreneurial activity indices for the economies based on efficiency and innovation, thus less taxes on income and lower government spending, increase the entrepreneurship of the country. In “factor driven economies”, there is no relationship between the size of government and entrepreneurship

  15. The effect of group size on the interplay between dominance and reproduction in Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsalem, Etya; Hefetz, Abraham

    2011-03-28

    Social insects provide good model systems for testing trade-offs in decision-making because of their marked reproductive skew and the dilemma workers face when to reproduce. Attaining reproductive skew requires energy investment in aggression or fertility signaling, creating a trade-off between reproduction and dominance. This may be density-dependent because the cost of achieving dominance may be higher in larger groups. We investigated the effect of group-size in B. terrestris queenless workers on two major reproduction-dominance correlates: between-worker aggression, and pheromone production, aiming at mimicking decision-making during the transition of worker behavior from cooperation and sterility to aggressive reproductive competition in whole colonies. Despite the competition, reproductive division of labor in colonies can be maintained even during this phase through the production of a sterility signal by sterile workers that has an appeasement effect on dominant nestmates. Worker-worker aggression, ovary activation, and production of sterility-appeasement signals may therefore constitute components of a trade-off affecting worker reproduction decisions. By constructing queenless groups of different size and measuring how this affected the parameters above, we found that in all groups aggression was not evenly distributed with the α-worker performing most of the aggressive acts. Moreover, aggression by the α-worker increased proportionally with group-size. However, while in small groups the α-worker monopolized reproduction, in larger groups several workers shared reproduction, creating two worker groups: reproductives and helpers. It appears that despite the increase of aggression, this was evidently not sufficient for the α-worker to monopolize reproduction. If we compare the α-worker to the queen in full-sized colonies it can be hypothesized that worker reproduction in B. terrestris colonies starts due to a gradual increase in the worker population

  16. The role of host traits, season and group size on parasite burdens in a cooperative mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermien Viljoen

    Full Text Available The distribution of parasites among hosts is often characterised by a high degree of heterogeneity with a small number of hosts harbouring the majority of parasites. Such patterns of aggregation have been linked to variation in host exposure and susceptibility as well as parasite traits and environmental factors. Host exposure and susceptibility may differ with sexes, reproductive effort and group size. Furthermore, environmental factors may affect both the host and parasite directly and contribute to temporal heterogeneities in parasite loads. We investigated the contributions of host and parasite traits as well as season on parasite loads in highveld mole-rats (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae. This cooperative breeder exhibits a reproductive division of labour and animals live in colonies of varying sizes that procreate seasonally. Mole-rats were parasitised by lice, mites, cestodes and nematodes with mites (Androlaelaps sp. and cestodes (Mathevotaenia sp. being the dominant ecto- and endoparasites, respectively. Sex and reproductive status contributed little to the observed parasite prevalence and abundances possibly as a result of the shared burrow system. Clear seasonal patterns of parasite prevalence and abundance emerged with peaks in summer for mites and in winter for cestodes. Group size correlated negatively with mite abundance while it had no effect on cestode burdens and group membership affected infestation with both parasites. We propose that the mode of transmission as well as social factors constrain parasite propagation generating parasite patterns deviating from those commonly predicted.

  17. Fewer but better: Proportionate size of the group affects evaluation of transgressive leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglino, Giovanni A; Abrams, Dominic; Randsley de Moura, Georgina; Yetkili, Orkun

    2016-06-01

    A group may be badly affected if its leader transgresses important rules. Nonetheless, an emerging body of evidence suggests that in intergroup contexts, group members apply a double standard when judging ingroup leaders - They respond less punitively to transgressions by their leader than by non-leaders. In this article, two experiments investigated how proportionate ingroup size affects reactions to transgressive ingroup leaders. We demonstrate that ingroup leaders from larger, but not smaller, groups benefit from the double standard. The experiments testing the effects of two different types of transgressions (nepotistic favouritism and corruption, respectively) show that transgressive leaders from larger groups are evaluated more positively than both comparable non-leaders and leaders from smaller groups. In contrast, transgressive leaders from smaller groups are evaluated similarly to comparable transgressive non-leaders. Experiment 2 investigated a potential explanation for this phenomenon. Faced with a transgressive leader, members of a smaller group report greater embarrassment than do members of larger groups in relation to the leaders' actions. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  18. M protein typing of Thai group A streptococcal isolates by PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Good Michael F

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group A streptococcal (GAS infections can lead to the development of severe post-infectious sequelae, such as rheumatic fever (RF and rheumatic heart disease (RHD. RF and RHD are a major health concern in developing countries, and in indigenous populations of developed nations. The majority of GAS isolates are M protein-nontypeable (MNT by standard serotyping. However, GAS typing is a necessary tool in the epidemiologically analysis of GAS and provides useful information for vaccine development. Although DNA sequencing is the most conclusive method for M protein typing, this is not a feasible approach especially in developing countries. To overcome this problem, we have developed a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP-based assay for molecular typing the M protein gene (emm of GAS. Results Using one pair of primers, 13 known GAS M types showed one to four bands of PCR products and after digestion with Alu I, they gave different RFLP patterns. Of 106 GAS isolates examined from the normal Thai population and from patients with GAS-associated complications including RHD, 95 isolates gave RFLP patterns that corresponded to the 13 known M types. Only 11 isolates gave RFLP patterns that differed from the 13 known M types. These were then analyzed by DNA sequencing and six additional M types were identified. In addition, we found that M93 GAS was the most common M type in the population studied, and is consistent with a previous study of Thai GAS isolates. Conclusion PCR-RFLP analysis has the potential for the rapid screening of different GAS M types and is therefore considerably advantageous as an alternative M typing approach in developing countries in which GAS is endemic.

  19. Cognitive performance is linked to group size and affects fitness in Australian magpies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Benjamin J; Ridley, Amanda R; Edwards, Emily K; Thornton, Alex

    2018-02-15

    The social intelligence hypothesis states that the demands of social life drive cognitive evolution. This idea receives support from comparative studies that link variation in group size or mating systems with cognitive and neuroanatomical differences across species, but findings are contradictory and contentious. To understand the cognitive consequences of sociality, it is also important to investigate social variation within species. Here we show that in wild, cooperatively breeding Australian magpies, individuals that live in large groups show increased cognitive performance, which is linked to increased reproductive success. Individual performance was highly correlated across four cognitive tasks, indicating a 'general intelligence factor' that underlies cognitive performance. Repeated cognitive testing of juveniles at different ages showed that the correlation between group size and cognition emerged in early life, suggesting that living in larger groups promotes cognitive development. Furthermore, we found a positive association between the task performance of females and three indicators of reproductive success, thus identifying a selective benefit of greater cognitive performance. Together, these results provide intraspecific evidence that sociality can shape cognitive development and evolution.

  20. Sample-size calculations for multi-group comparison in population pharmacokinetic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for calculating sample size for population pharmacokinetic experiments that involve hypothesis testing based on multi-group comparison detecting the difference in parameters between groups under mixed-effects modelling. This approach extends what has been described for generalized linear models and nonlinear population pharmacokinetic models that involve only binary covariates to more complex nonlinear population pharmacokinetic models. The structural nonlinear model is linearized around the random effects to obtain the marginal model and the hypothesis testing involving model parameters is based on Wald's test. This approach provides an efficient and fast method for calculating sample size for hypothesis testing in population pharmacokinetic models. The approach can also handle different design problems such as unequal allocation of subjects to groups and unbalanced sampling times between and within groups. The results obtained following application to a one compartment intravenous bolus dose model that involved three different hypotheses under different scenarios showed good agreement between the power obtained from NONMEM simulations and nominal power. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Unravelling the size distribution of social groups with information theory in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, A.; Villuendas, D.; Vesperinas, C.; Abad, M.; Plastino, A.

    2010-07-01

    The minimization of Fisher’s information (MFI) approach of Frieden et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 48 (1999)] is applied to the study of size distributions in social groups on the basis of a recently established analogy between scale invariant systems and classical gases [Phys. A 389, 490 (2010)]. Going beyond the ideal gas scenario is seen to be tantamount to simulating the interactions taking place, for a competitive cluster growth process, in a scale-free ideal network - a non-correlated network with a connection-degree’s distribution that mimics the scale-free ideal gas density distribution. We use a scaling rule that allows one to classify the final cluster-size distributions using only one parameter that we call the competitiveness, which can be seen as a measure of the strength of the interactions. We find that both empirical city-size distributions and electoral results can be thus reproduced and classified according to this competitiveness-parameter, that also allow us to infer the maximum number of stable social relationships that one person can maintain, known as the Dunbar number, together with its standard deviation. We discuss the importance of this number in connection with the empirical phenomenon known as “six-degrees of separation”. Finally, we show that scaled city-size distributions of large countries follow, in general, the same universal distribution.

  2. Micrometer-sized TPM emulsion droplets with surface-mobile binding groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; van de Stolpe, Guido L.; Verweij, Ruben W.; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids coated with lipid membranes have been widely employed for fundamental studies of lipid membrane processes, biotechnological applications such as drug delivery and biosensing, and more recently, for self-assembly. The latter has been made possible by inserting DNA oligomers with covalently linked hydrophobic anchors into the membrane. The lateral mobility of the DNA linkers on micrometer-sized droplets and solid particles has opened the door to creating structures with unprecedented structural flexibility. Here, we investigate micro-emulsions of TPM (3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate) as a platform for lipid monolayers and further functionalization with proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. TPM droplets can be produced with a narrow size distribution and are polymerizable, thus providing supports for model lipid membranes with controlled size and curvature. With fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we observed that droplet-attached lipids, NeutrAvidin proteins, as well as DNA oligonucleotides all show mobility on the surface. We explored the assembly of micron-sized particles on TPM-droplets by exploiting either avidin-biotin interactions or double-stranded DNA with complementary single-stranded end groups. While the single molecules are mobile, the particles that are attached to them are not. We propose that this is caused by the heterogeneous nature of emulsified TPM, which forms an oligomer network that limits the collective motion of linkers, but allows the surface mobility of individual molecules.

  3. Synthesis of Ag Nanocubes 18–32 nm in Edge Length: The Effects of Polyol on Reduction Kinetics, Size Control, and Reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a robust method for the facile synthesis of small Ag nanocubes with edge lengths controlled in the range of 18–32 nm. The success of this new method relies on the substitution of ethylene glycol (EG) -- the solvent most commonly used in a polyol synthesis -- with diethylene glycol (DEG). Owing to the increase in hydrocarbon chain length, DEG possesses a higher viscosity and a lower reducing power relative to EG. As a result, we were able to achieve a nucleation burst in the early stage to generate a large number of seeds and a relatively slow growth rate thereafter; both factors were critical to the formation of Ag nanocubes with small sizes and in high purity (>95%). The edge length of the Ag nanocubes could be easily tailored in the range of 18–32 nm by quenching the reaction at different time points. For the first time, we were able to produce uniform sub-20 nm Ag nanocubes in a hydrophilic medium and on a scale of ~20 mg per batch. It is also worth pointing out that the present protocol was remarkably robust, showing good reproducibility between different batches and even for DEGs obtained from different vendors. Our results suggest that the high sensitivity of synthesis outcomes to the trace amounts of impurities in a polyol, a major issue for reproducibility and scale up synthesis, did not exist in the present system. PMID:23317148

  4. Synthesis of Ag nanocubes 18-32 nm in edge length: the effects of polyol on reduction kinetics, size control, and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Xia, Younan

    2013-02-06

    This article describes a robust method for the facile synthesis of small Ag nanocubes with edge lengths controlled in the range of 18-32 nm. The success of this new method relies on the substitution of ethylene glycol (EG)--the solvent most commonly used in a polyol synthesis--with diethylene glycol (DEG). Owing to the increase in hydrocarbon chain length, DEG possesses a higher viscosity and a lower reducing power relative to EG. As a result, we were able to achieve a nucleation burst in the early stage to generate a large number of seeds and a relatively slow growth rate thereafter; both factors were critical to the formation of Ag nanocubes with small sizes and in high purity (>95%). The edge length of the Ag nanocubes could be easily tailored in the range of 18-32 nm by quenching the reaction at different time points. For the first time, we were able to produce uniform sub-20 nm Ag nanocubes in a hydrophilic medium and on a scale of ∼20 mg per batch. It is also worth pointing out that the present protocol was remarkably robust, showing good reproducibility between different batches and even for DEGs obtained from different vendors. Our results suggest that the high sensitivity of synthesis outcomes to the trace amounts of impurities in a polyol, a major issue for reproducibility and scale up synthesis, did not exist in the present system.

  5. Differential colony size, cell length, and cellular proteome of Escherichia coli isolated from urine vs. stone nidus of kidney stone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Prasongwatana, Vitoon; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2017-03-01

    Escherichia coli is associated with kidney stone disease, as a cause or an effect (secondary or recurrent urinary tract infection, UTI). Defining phenotypic or functional differences between E. coli inside stone nidus (ECS, associated with infection-induced stone) and outside the stone (i.e. from urine) (ECU, represented secondary infection) would be helpful to better understand bacterial involvement in this disease. ECS and ECU were isolated from 100 stone formers and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility test, ERIC-PCR genotyping, determination of biofilm formation, bacterial colony size on agar plate and cell length in broth, 2-DE, nanoLC-MS/MS, protein network analysis, and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity assay. From 100 stone formers, 36 had positive bacterial culture, of which 5 pairs had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and comparable ERIC-PCR genotypes. ECS had smaller colony size and longer cell length than ECU. 2-DE proteomic analysis revealed significantly differential levels of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, and RNA/protein metabolism. Functional validation demonstrated lower PDH activity in ECS. All these differential phenotypic and cellular proteome findings might be adaptive response of E. coli from remote infection to survive within the stone matrix that subsequently caused recurrent UTI in kidney stone patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Size effects on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite-length carbon nanotube: An ab-initio electronic structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarighi Ahmadpour, Mahdi; Rostamnejadi, Ali [Electroceram Research Center, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemifar, S. Javad [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-07

    We use density functional computations to study the zero temperature structural, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite carbon nanotubes (FCNT), with length in the range of 4–44 Å. It is found that the structural and electronic properties of (5,0) FCNTs, in the ground state, converge at a length of about 30 Å, while the excited state properties exhibit long-range edge effects. We discuss that curvature effects enhance energy gap of FCNTs, in contrast to the known trend in the periodic limit. It is seen that compensation of curvature effects in two special small sizes may give rise to spontaneous magnetization. The obtained cohesive energies provide some insights into the effects of environment on the growth of FCNTs. The second-order difference of the total energies reveals an important magic size of about 15 Å. The optical and dynamical magnetic responses of the FCNTs to polarized electromagnetic pulses are studied by time dependent density functional theory. The results show that the static and dynamic magnetic properties mainly come from the edge carbon atoms. The optical absorption properties are described in terms of local field effects and characterized by Casida linear response method.

  7. Side-group size effects on interfaces and glass formation in supported polymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wenjie; Song, Jake; Hsu, David D.; Keten, Sinan

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies on glass-forming polymers near interfaces have emphasized the importance of molecular features such as chain stiffness, side-groups, molecular packing, and associated changes in fragility as key factors that govern the magnitude of Tg changes with respect to the bulk in polymer thin films. However, how such molecular features are coupled with substrate and free surface effects on Tg in thin films remains to be fully understood. Here, we employ a chemically specific coarse-grained polymer model for methacrylates to investigate the role of side-group volume on glass formation in bulk polymers and supported thin films. Our results show that bulkier side-groups lead to higher bulk Tg and fragility and are associated with a pronounced free surface effect on overall Tg depression. By probing local Tg within the films, however, we find that the polymers with bulkier side-groups experience a reduced confinement-induced increase in local Tg near a strongly interacting substrate. Further analyses indicate that this is due to the packing frustration of chains near the substrate interface, which lowers the attractive interactions with the substrate and thus lessens the surface-induced reduction in segmental mobility. Our results reveal that the size of the polymer side-group may be a design element that controls the confinement effects induced by the free surface and substrates in supported polymer thin films. Our analyses provide new insights into the factors governing polymer dynamics in bulk and confined environments.

  8. The ability to form full-length intron RNA circles is a general property of nuclear group I introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Fiskaa, Tonje; Birgisdottir, Asa Birna

    2003-01-01

    in which the intron terminal guanosine attacks the 5' splice site presented in a structure analogous to that of the first step of splicing. The products of the reactions are full-length circular intron and unligated exons. For this reason, the circularization reaction is to the benefit of the intron...

  9. Wormlike micelles in poly(oxyethylene) surfactant solution: Growth control through hydrophilic-group size variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Toufiq; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    Viscoelastic micellar solutions are formed in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(m), m=15, 30) aqueous solutions on addition of tri(ethyleneglycol) mono n-dodecyl ether (C(12)EO(3)). The steady-shear and dynamic rheological behavior of the systems is characteristic of wormlike micellar solution. In either system, the plateau modulus (G(0)) and relaxation time (tau) are found to increase with increasing cosurfactant mixing fractions. The plateau modulus of the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region is found to be higher than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system at the maximum viscosity region, whereas for the relaxation time the opposite relation is found. The maximum viscosities obtained in the two systems are of the same order of magnitude. In the ChEO(30)-C(12)EO(3) system, the maximum viscosity is obtained at a higher cosurfactant mixing fraction than that in the ChEO(15)-C(12)EO(3) system. It is concluded that decreasing the head-group size of the hydrophilic surfactant favors micellar growth. Monolaurin, another hydrophobic surfactant known to induce growth in some systems, is found to cause phase separation before significant micellar growth occurs in ChEO(m) solutions, although the effect of head-group size of ChEO(m) is found to be similar to the ChEO(m)-C(12)EO(3) systems.

  10. Development of an online database of typical food portion sizes in Irish population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jacqueline; Walton, Janette; Flynn, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The Irish Food Portion Sizes Database (available at www.iuna.net) describes typical portion weights for an extensive range of foods and beverages for Irish children, adolescents and adults. The present paper describes the methodologies used to develop the database and some key characteristics of the portion weight data contained therein. The data are derived from three large, cross-sectional food consumption surveys carried out in Ireland over the last decade: the National Children's Food Survey (2003-2004), National Teens' Food Survey (2005-2006) and National Adult Nutrition Survey (2008-2010). Median, 25th and 75th percentile portion weights are described for a total of 545 items across the three survey groups, split by age group or sex as appropriate. The typical (median) portion weights reported for adolescents and adults are similar for many foods, while those reported for children are notably smaller. Adolescent and adult males generally consume larger portions than their female counterparts, though similar portion weights may be consumed where foods are packaged in unit amounts (for example, pots of yoghurt). The inclusion of energy under-reporters makes little difference to the estimation of typical portion weights in adults. The data have wide-ranging applications in dietary assessment and food labelling, and will serve as a useful reference against which to compare future portion size data from the Irish population. The present paper provides a useful context for researchers and others wishing to use the Irish Food Portion Sizes Database, and may guide researchers in other countries in establishing similar databases of their own.

  11. Normal ventricular size and changes with age in pediatric groups on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Yoshitaka; Nose, Tadao; Enomoto, Takao; Maki, Yutaka

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine the normal value of the ventricular size on CT, snd analyze its changes with age in normal pediatric group. Materials and Methods: We searched through our 240 normal pediatric CT film files, aged 4 months to 14 years. Scans were performed on Hitachi CT-II scanner, using 10 mm collimation. Results: 1. The width of the third ventricle showed the same value in all pediatric groups, the mean value of its being 4.8 mm (SD 1.3 mm). 2. Bicaudate cerebroventricular indexes of the anterior horns of lateral ventricles (interecarlate distance/transverse diameter of the brain x100) were 15.3 in infants under one year, 13.8 in the age of one year and 12.7 in the children over two years. The indexes were almost the same in old age group over the age of three years. 3. The upper limit of the normal inverse cella media index (minium width of cella media/transverse diameter of the brain x100) was 31. Therefore the cases with the index above this range can be diagnosed as hydrocephalic. 4. The shape of the anterior horns of lateral ventricles was Y-shaped in infants under one year. II-shaped (paralied shaped) in the age of 1 - 12 years, and again it was Y-shaped in the group over 12 years. 5. In the age group under one year, the temporal horns of the lateral ventricles were visualized in about 60% cases, while the figure decreased to 20% in the older group. (author)

  12. Within-Group Effect-Size Benchmarks for Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Allen; Washburn, Micki; Schieszler, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides benchmark data on within-group effect sizes from published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) supporting the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) for traumatized children. Methods: Within-group effect-size benchmarks for symptoms of trauma, anxiety, and depression were calculated via the…

  13. Size variation and collapse of emphysema holes at inspiration and expiration CT scan: evaluation with modified length scale method and image co-registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh SY

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sang Young Oh,1,* Minho Lee,1,* Joon Beom Seo,1,* Namkug Kim,1,2,* Sang Min Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,3 Yeon Mok Oh3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Convergence Medicine, 3Department of Pulmonology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A novel approach of size-based emphysema clustering has been developed, and the size variation and collapse of holes in emphysema clusters are evaluated at inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT. Thirty patients were visually evaluated for the size-based emphysema clustering technique and a total of 72 patients were evaluated for analyzing collapse of the emphysema hole in this study. A new approach for the size differentiation of emphysema holes was developed using the length scale, Gaussian low-pass filtering, and iteration approach. Then, the volumetric CT results of the emphysema patients were analyzed using the new method, and deformable registration was carried out between inspiratory and expiratory CT. Blind visual evaluations of EI by two readers had significant correlations with the classification using the size-based emphysema clustering method (r-values of reader 1: 0.186, 0.890, 0.915, and 0.941; reader 2: 0.540, 0.667, 0.919, and 0.942. The results of collapse of emphysema holes using deformable registration were compared with the pulmonary function test (PFT parameters using the Pearson’s correlation test. The mean extents of low-attenuation area (LAA, E1 (<1.5 mm, E2 (<7 mm, E3 (<15 mm, and E4 (≥15 mm were 25.9%, 3.0%, 11.4%, 7.6%, and 3.9%, respectively, at the inspiratory CT, and 15.3%, 1.4%, 6.9%, 4.3%, and 2.6%, respectively at the expiratory CT. The extents of LAA, E2, E3, and E4 were found to be significantly correlated with the PFT ­parameters (r=−0.53, −0.43, −0.48, and −0.25, with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1; −0.81, −0.62, −0.75, and

  14. Non-stationary recruitment dynamics of rainbow smelt: the influence of environmental variables and variation in size structure and length-at-maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiner, Zachary S.; Bunnell, David B.; Hook, Tomas O.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Warner, David M.; Collingsworth, Paris D.

    2015-01-01

    Fish stock-recruitment dynamics may be difficult to elucidate because of nonstationary relationships resulting from shifting environmental conditions and fluctuations in important vital rates such as individual growth or maturation. The Great Lakes have experienced environmental stressors that may have changed population demographics and stock-recruitment relationships while causing the declines of several prey fish species, including rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax). We investigated changes in the size and maturation of rainbow smelt in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron and recruitment dynamics of the Lake Michigan stock over the past four decades. Mean lengths and length-at-maturation of rainbow smelt generally declined over time in both lakes. To evaluate recruitment, we used both a Ricker model and a Kalman filter-random walk (KF-RW) model which incorporated nonstationarity in stock productivity by allowing the productivity term to vary over time. The KF-RW model explained nearly four times more variation in recruitment than the Ricker model, indicating the productivity of the Lake Michigan stock has increased. By accounting for this nonstationarity, we were able identify significant variations in stock productivity, evaluate its importance to rainbow smelt recruitment, and speculate on potential environmental causes for the shift. Our results suggest that investigating mechanisms driving nonstationary shifts in stock-recruit relationships can provide valuable insights into temporal variation in fish population dynamics.

  15. Nighttime oxidation of surfactants at the air-water interface: effects of chain length, head group and saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Federica; Campbell, Richard A.; Rastogi, Kunal; Pfrang, Christian

    2018-03-01

    Reactions of the key atmospheric nighttime oxidant NO3 with organic monolayers at the air-water interface are used as proxies for the ageing of organic-coated aqueous aerosols. The surfactant molecules chosen for this study are oleic acid (OA), palmitoleic acid (POA), methyl oleate (MO) and stearic acid (SA) to investigate the effects of chain length, head group and degree of unsaturation on the reaction kinetics and products formed. Fully and partially deuterated surfactants were studied using neutron reflectometry (NR) to determine the reaction kinetics of organic monolayers with NO3 at the air-water interface for the first time. Kinetic modelling allowed us to determine the rate coefficients for the oxidation of OA, POA and MO monolayers to be (2.8±0.7) × 10-8, (2.4±0.5) × 10-8and (3.3±0.6) × 10-8 cm2 molecule-1 s-1 for fitted initial desorption lifetimes of NO3 at the closely packed organic monolayers, τd, NO3, 1, of 8.1±4.0, 16±4.0 and 8.1±3.0 ns, respectively. The approximately doubled desorption lifetime found in the best fit for POA compared to OA and MO is consistent with a more accessible double bond associated with the shorter alkyl chain of POA facilitating initial NO3 attack at the double bond in a closely packed monolayer. The corresponding uptake coefficients for OA, POA and MO were found to be (2.1±0.5) × 10-3, (1.7±0.3) × 10-3 and (2.1±0.4) × 10-3, respectively. For the much slower NO3-initiated oxidation of the saturated surfactant SA we estimated a loss rate of approximately (5±1) × 10-12 cm2 molecule-1 s-1, which we consider to be an upper limit for the reactive loss, and estimated an uptake coefficient of ca. (5±1) × 10-7. Our investigations demonstrate that NO3 will contribute substantially to the processing of unsaturated surfactants at the air-water interface during nighttime given its reactivity is ca. 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of O3. Furthermore, the relative contributions of NO3 and O3 to the oxidative

  16. Nighttime oxidation of surfactants at the air–water interface: effects of chain length, head group and saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sebastiani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactions of the key atmospheric nighttime oxidant NO3 with organic monolayers at the air–water interface are used as proxies for the ageing of organic-coated aqueous aerosols. The surfactant molecules chosen for this study are oleic acid (OA, palmitoleic acid (POA, methyl oleate (MO and stearic acid (SA to investigate the effects of chain length, head group and degree of unsaturation on the reaction kinetics and products formed. Fully and partially deuterated surfactants were studied using neutron reflectometry (NR to determine the reaction kinetics of organic monolayers with NO3 at the air–water interface for the first time. Kinetic modelling allowed us to determine the rate coefficients for the oxidation of OA, POA and MO monolayers to be (2.8±0.7 × 10−8, (2.4±0.5 × 10−8and (3.3±0.6 × 10−8 cm2 molecule−1 s−1 for fitted initial desorption lifetimes of NO3 at the closely packed organic monolayers, τd, NO3, 1, of 8.1±4.0, 16±4.0 and 8.1±3.0 ns, respectively. The approximately doubled desorption lifetime found in the best fit for POA compared to OA and MO is consistent with a more accessible double bond associated with the shorter alkyl chain of POA facilitating initial NO3 attack at the double bond in a closely packed monolayer. The corresponding uptake coefficients for OA, POA and MO were found to be (2.1±0.5 × 10−3, (1.7±0.3 × 10−3 and (2.1±0.4 × 10−3, respectively. For the much slower NO3-initiated oxidation of the saturated surfactant SA we estimated a loss rate of approximately (5±1 × 10−12 cm2 molecule−1 s−1, which we consider to be an upper limit for the reactive loss, and estimated an uptake coefficient of ca. (5±1 × 10−7. Our investigations demonstrate that NO3 will contribute substantially to the processing of unsaturated surfactants at the air–water interface during nighttime given its reactivity is ca. 2 orders of magnitude higher

  17. 'Length'at Length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    He was interested to know how `large' is the set of numbers x for which the series is convergent. Here large refers to its length. But his set is not in the class ♢. Here is another problem discussed by Borel. Consider .... have an infinite collection of pairs of new shoes and want to choose one shoe from each pair. We have an ...

  18. Determining the group velocity dispersion by field analysis for the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length: applications to step-index fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    By knowing the electric field distribution of a guided mode in an optical fiber, we are able to evaluate the group velocity dispersion in a weakly guiding step-index fiber for a pure mode in the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length. We demonstrate the method...

  19. Generalisations of Hamilton's Rule Applied to Non-Additive Public Goods Games with Random Group Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A R Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive fitness theory has been described as being limited to certain special cases of social evolution. In particular some authors argue that the theory can only be applied to social interactions having additive fitness effects, and involving only pairs of individuals. This article takes an elegant formulation of non-additive public goods games from the literature, and shows how the two main generalisations of Hamilton's rule can be applied to such games when group sizes are random. In doing so inclusive fitness theory is thus applied to a very general class of social dilemmas, thereby providing further evidence for its generality. Interestingly, one of the two predominant versions of Hamilton's rule is found to be mathematically easier to apply to the scenario considered, despite both necessarily giving equivalent predictions.

  20. Does intruder group size and orientation affect flight initiation distance in birds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geist, C.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildlife managers use flight initiation distance (FID, the distance animals flee an approaching predator, to determine set back distances to minimize human impacts on wildlife. FID is typically estimated by a single person; this study examined the effects of intruder number and orientation on FID. Three different group size treatments (solitary person, two people side-by-side, two people one-behind-the-other were applied to Pied Currawongs (Strepera graculina and to Crimson Rosellas (Platycerus elegans. Rosellas flushed at significantly greater distances when approached by two people compared to a single person. This effect was not seen in currawongs. Intruder orientation did not influence the FID of either species. Results suggest that intruder number should be better integrated into estimates of set back distance to manage human visitation around sensitive species.

  1. Genetic determination of telomere size in humans: A twin study of three age groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagboom, P.E.; Droog, S.; Boomsma, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    Reduction of telomere length has been postulated to be a causal factor in cellular aging. Human telomeres terminate in tandemly arranged repeat arrays consisting of the (TTAGGG) motif. The length of these arrays in cells from human mitotic tissues is inversely related to the age of the donor,

  2. Multiple micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy in low-income countries: a meta-analysis of effects on birth size and length of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Caroline H D; Fisher, David J; Osmond, Clive; Margetts, Barrie M

    2009-12-01

    Multiple micronutrient deficiencies are common among women in low-income countries and may adversely affect pregnancy outcomes. This meta-analysis reports the effects on newborn size and duration of gestation of multiple micronutrient supplementation mainly compared with iron plus folic acid during pregnancy in recent randomized, controlled trials. Original data from 12 randomized, controlled trials in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, China, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Mexico, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, and Zimbabwe, all providing approximately 1 recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of multiple micronutrients to presumed HIV-negative women, were included. Outcomes included birthweight, other birth measurements, gestation, and incidence of low birthweight (LBW) (birth (SGA, birthweight below the within-each-population 10th percentile), large-for-gestational age birth (LGA, birthweight above the within-each-population 90th percentile), and preterm delivery (supplementation (mainly with iron-folic acid), multiple micronutrient supplementation was associated with an increase in mean birthweight (pooled estimate: +22.4 g [95% CI, 8.3 to 36.4 g]; p = .002), a reduction in the prevalence of LBW (pooled OR = 0.89 [95% CI, 0.81 to 0.97]; p = .01) and SGA birth (pooled OR = 0.90 [95% CI, 0.82 to 0.99]; p = .03), and an increase in the prevalence of LGA birth (pooled OR = 1.13 [95% CI, 1.00 to 1.28]; p = .04). In most studies, the effects on birthweight were greater in mothers with higher body mass index (BMI). In the pooled analysis, the positive effect of multiple micronutrients on birthweight increased by 7.6 g (95% CI, 1.9 to 13.3 g) per unit increase in maternal BMI (p for interaction = .009). The intervention effect relative to the control group was + 39.0 g (95% CI, +22.0 to +56.1 g) in mothers with BMI of 20 kg/m2 or higher compared with -6.0 g (95% CI, -8.8 to +16.8 g) in mothers with BMI under 20 kg/m2. There were no significant effects of multiple micronutrient supplementation

  3. The oxidative costs of reproduction are group-size dependent in a wild cooperative breeder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Dominic L; Blount, Jonathan D; Young, Andrew J

    2015-11-22

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction entails a cost, and research on cooperatively breeding societies suggests that the cooperative sharing of workloads can reduce this cost. However, the physiological mechanisms that underpin both the costs of reproduction and the benefits of cooperation remain poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that reproductive costs may arise in part from oxidative stress, as reproductive investment may elevate exposure to reactive oxygen species, compromising survival and future reproduction and accelerating senescence. However, experimental evidence of oxidative costs of reproduction in the wild remains scarce. Here, we use a clutch-removal experiment to investigate the oxidative costs of reproduction in a wild cooperatively breeding bird, the white-browed sparrow weaver, Plocepasser mahali. Our results reveal costs of reproduction that are dependent on group size: relative to individuals in groups whose eggs were experimentally removed, individuals in groups that raised offspring experienced an associated cost (elevated oxidative damage and reduced body mass), but only if they were in small groups containing fewer or no helpers. Furthermore, during nestling provisioning, individuals that provisioned at higher rates showed greater within-individual declines in body mass and antioxidant protection. Our results provide rare experimental evidence that reproduction can negatively impact both oxidative status and body mass in the wild, and suggest that these costs can be mitigated in cooperative societies by the presence of additional helpers. These findings have implications for our understanding of the energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction, and the benefits of cooperation in animal societies. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Population is the main driver of war group size and conflict casualties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Rahul C; Kissel, Marc; Golitko, Mark; Sheridan, Susan Guise; Kim, Nam C; Fuentes, Agustín

    2017-12-26

    The proportions of individuals involved in intergroup coalitional conflict, measured by war group size (W), conflict casualties (C), and overall group conflict deaths (G), have declined with respect to growing populations, implying that states are less violent than small-scale societies. We argue that these trends are better explained by scaling laws shared by both past and contemporary societies regardless of social organization, where group population (P) directly determines W and indirectly determines C and G. W is shown to be a power law function of P with scaling exponent X [demographic conflict investment (DCI)]. C is shown to be a power law function of W with scaling exponent Y [conflict lethality (CL)]. G is shown to be a power law function of P with scaling exponent Z [group conflict mortality (GCM)]. Results show that, while W/P and G/P decrease as expected with increasing P, C/W increases with growing W. Small-scale societies show higher but more variance in DCI and CL than contemporary states. We find no significant differences in DCI or CL between small-scale societies and contemporary states undergoing drafts or conflict, after accounting for variance and scale. We calculate relative measures of DCI and CL applicable to all societies that can be tracked over time for one or multiple actors. In light of the recent global emergence of populist, nationalist, and sectarian violence, our comparison-focused approach to DCI and CL will enable better models and analysis of the landscapes of violence in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  5. Hyphal responses of Neurospora crassa to micron-sized beads with functional chemical surface groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marie; Edwards, Clive; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2011-02-01

    Filamentous fungi include serious plant and animal pathogens that explore their environment efficiently in order to penetrate the host. This environment is physically and chemically heterogeneous and the fungi rely on specific physical and chemical signals to find the optimal point/s of attack. This study presents a methodology to introduce distinct structures with dimensions similar to the hyphal diameter and specific chemical surface groups into a controllable environment in order to study the fungal response. We introduced 3.3 μm polystyrene beads covered with Epoxy surface groups into microfluidic channels made from PDMS by rapid replica molding. The experimental setup resulted in different areas with low and high densities of beads as well as densely packed patches. The observations of the fungus exploring the areas long-term showed that the growth parameters were altered significantly, compared with the values measured on agar. The fungus responded to both, the physical and chemical parameters of the beads, including temporary directional changes, increased branching angles, decreased branching distances, decreased apical extension velocities and occasional cell wall lysis. The wealth and magnitude of the observed responses indicates that the microfluidic structures provide a powerful platform for the investigation of micron-sized features on filamentous fungi.

  6. Effects of vitamin A and β-carotene supplementation on birth size and length of gestation in rural Bangladesh: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Parul; Klemm, Rolf; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Ali, Hasmot; Rashid, Mahbubur; Shaikh, Saijuddin; Wu, Lee; Mehra, Sucheta; Labrique, Alain; Katz, Joanne; West, Keith P

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies may be related to poor fetal growth and short gestation. Few studies have investigated the contribution of maternal vitamin A deficiency to these outcomes. In rural northwestern Bangladesh, we examined the effects of weekly antenatal vitamin A and β-carotene supplementation on birth weight, length, circumferential body measures, and length of gestation. With the use of a cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial design, pregnant women were enrolled in the first trimester and began receiving their allocated supplements (vitamin A, β-carotene, or placebo) weekly until 3 mo postpartum. Birth anthropometric measures were made at home. Of 13,709 newborns whose birth weight was measured within 72 h of birth, mean (±SD) weight was 2.44 ± 0.42 kg, the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) was 54.4%, and that of small-for-gestational age (SGA) was 70.5%. Birth weight, length, and chest, head, and arm circumferences did not differ between supplementation and placebo groups nor did rates of LBW and SGA. Mean gestational age at birth was 38.3 ± 2.9 wk, and 25.6% of births occurred before 37 wk. Neither gestational age nor preterm birth rate differed with vitamin A or β-carotene supplementation. In this rural South Asian population with a high burden of LBW and preterm birth but modest levels of maternal vitamin A deficiency, antenatal vitamin A or β-carotene supplementation did not benefit these birth outcomes. Other nutritional and nonnutritional interventions should be examined to reduce risks of these adverse outcomes in rural South Asia. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00198822.

  7. Studying Soft-matter and Biological Systems over a Wide Length-scale from Nanometer and Micrometer Sizes at the Small-angle Neutron Diffractometer KWS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Aurel; Szekely, Noemi Kinga; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Pipich, Vitaliy; Kohnke, Thomas; Ossovyi, Vladimir; Staringer, Simon; Schneider, Gerald J.; Amann, Matthias; Zhang-Haagen, Bo; Brandl, Georg; Drochner, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Hanslik, Romuald; Kemmerling, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The KWS-2 SANS diffractometer is dedicated to the investigation of soft matter and biophysical systems covering a wide length scale, from nm to µm. The instrument is optimized for the exploration of the wide momentum transfer Q range between 1x10-4 and 0.5 Å-1 by combining classical pinhole, focusing (with lenses), and time-of-flight (with chopper) methods, while simultaneously providing high-neutron intensities with an adjustable resolution. Because of its ability to adjust the intensity and the resolution within wide limits during the experiment, combined with the possibility to equip specific sample environments and ancillary devices, the KWS-2 shows a high versatility in addressing the broad range of structural and morphological studies in the field. Equilibrium structures can be studied in static measurements, while dynamic and kinetic processes can be investigated over time scales between minutes to tens of milliseconds with time-resolved approaches. Typical systems that are investigated with the KWS-2 cover the range from complex, hierarchical systems that exhibit multiple structural levels (e.g., gels, networks, or macro-aggregates) to small and poorly-scattering systems (e.g., single polymers or proteins in solution). The recent upgrade of the detection system, which enables the detection of count rates in the MHz range, opens new opportunities to study even very small biological morphologies in buffer solution with weak scattering signals close to the buffer scattering level at high Q. In this paper, we provide a protocol to investigate samples with characteristic size levels spanning a wide length scale and exhibiting ordering in the mesoscale structure using KWS-2. We present in detail how to use the multiple working modes that are offered by the instrument and the level of performance that is achieved. PMID:28060296

  8. Humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae (Cetartiodactyla: Balaenopteridae group sizes in line transect ship surveys: An evaluation of observer errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme A. Bortolotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Accurate estimates of group sizes through line transect sampling methods are important to correctly ascertain the abundance of animals that occur in groups. Since the average observed group size is a component of the distance sampling formula, bias in these data leads to biased abundance estimates. This study aimed to evaluate the potential errors in group size estimation during line transect ship surveys to estimate abundances of the humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski 1781. In a research cruise along the Brazilian coast, an experiment to collect group size information was conducted from two different sighting platforms on the same vessel. Group sizes were recorded by primary observers at first sighting (PO1 and, in some cases, after some time (PO2. A tracker (T was located on a higher platform to estimate the sizes of groups detected by the primary observers, but tracked one group at a time until it passed abeam. Thus, the dedicated effort to obtain multiple group counts (i.e. higher platform, more time and no responsibility for detecting new groups was expected to provide more accurate numbers. PO2 estimates were compared with PO1 estimates, and T estimates were compared with both PO1 and PO2. Additionally, ratios between T and both PO2 (R1 and PO1 (R2, and between PO2 and PO1 (R3 were calculated. To investigate a possible improvement in abundance estimates, a correction factor (CF was computed from the ratio of T and PO2 means. Primary observer self-correction (= 1.60, CV% = 70.3 was statistically similar to the correction for the tracker (= 1.62, CV% = 84.1. CF resulted in 1 and would not improve abundance estimates. This study supports that observers conducting line transect surveys on large whales have the potential to provide group size information that is as adequate as the correction procedure adopted.

  9. Effects of Group Size and Lack of Sphericity on the Recovery of Clusters in K-Means Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Craen, Saskia; Commandeur, Jacques J. F.; Frank, Laurence E.; Heiser, Willem J.

    2006-01-01

    K-means cluster analysis is known for its tendency to produce spherical and equally sized clusters. To assess the magnitude of these effects, a simulation study was conducted, in which populations were created with varying departures from sphericity and group sizes. An analysis of the recovery of clusters in the samples taken from these…

  10. Effect of alkyl chain length in the terminal ester group on mesomorphic properties of new chiral lactic acid derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohout, M.; Bubnov, Alexej; Šturala, J.; Novotná, Vladimíra; Svoboda, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2016), s. 1472-1485 ISSN 0267-8292 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chiral liquid crystal * lactic acid derivative * terminal ester group * mesomorphic properties * dielectric spectroscopy * layer shrinkage Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.661, year: 2016

  11. Analysis of participation and performance in athletes by age group in ultramarathons of more than 200 km in length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zingg MA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Zingg,1 Beat Knechtle,1,2 Christoph A Rüst,1 Thomas Rosemann,1 Romuald Lepers3 1Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3INSERM U1093, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France Background: Participation and performance trends for athletes by age group have been investigated for marathoners and ultramarathoners competing in races up to 161 km, but not for longer distances of more than 200 km. Methods: Participation and performance trends in athletes by age group in the Badwater (217 km and Spartathlon (246 km races were compared from 2000 to 2012. Results: The number of female and male finishers increased in both races across years (P 0.05. In Spartathlon, the age of the annual five fastest finishers was unchanged at 39.7 ± 2.4 years for men and 44.6 ± 3.2 years for women (P > 0.05. In Badwater, running speed increased in men from 7.9 ± 0.7 km/hour to 8.7 ± 0.6 km/hour (r2 = 0.51, P 0.05. In Badwater, the number of men in age groups 30–34 years (r2 = 0.37, P = 0.03 and 40–44 years (r2 = 0.75, P < 0.01 increased. In Spartathlon, the number of men increased in the age group 40–44 years (r2 = 0.33, P = 0.04. Men in age groups 30–34 (r2 = 0.64, P < 0.01, 35–39 (r2 = 0.33, P = 0.04, 40–44 (r2 = 0.34, P = 0.04, and 55–59 years (r2 = 0.40, P = 0.02 improved running speed in Badwater. In Spartathlon, no change in running speed was observed. Conclusion: The fastest finishers in ultramarathons more than 200 km in distance were 40–45 years old and have to be classified as “master runners” by definition. In contrast to reports of marathoners and ultramarathoners competing in races of 161 km in distance, the increase in participation and the improvement in performance by age group were less pronounced in ultramarathoners competing in races of more than 200 km. Keywords: ultra

  12. An SSR-based linkage map of yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Sesquipedalis Group) and QTL analysis of pod length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjaimun, Alisa; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Somta, Prakit; Shimizu, Takehiko; Shu, Yujian; Isemura, Takehisa; Vaughan, Duncan A; Srinives, Peerasak

    2012-02-01

    Yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Sesquipedalis Group) (2n = 2x = 22) is one of the most important vegetable legumes of Asia. The objectives of this study were to develop a genetic linkage map of yardlong bean using SSR makers from related Vigna species and to identify QTLs for pod length. The map was constructed from 226 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Unguiculata Group), azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi), and mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in a BC(1)F(1) ((JP81610 × TVnu457) × JP81610) population derived from the cross between yardlong bean accession JP81610 and wild cowpea (Vigna unguiculata subsp. unguiculata var. spontanea) accession TVnu457. The markers were clustered into 11 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 852.4 cM in total length with a mean distance between adjacent markers of 3.96 cM. All markers on LG11 showed segregation distortion towards the homozygous yardlong bean JP81610 genotype. The markers on LG11 were also distorted in the rice bean (Vigna umbellata (Thunb.) Ohwi & Ohashi) map, suggesting the presence of common segregation distortion factors in Vigna species on this LG. One major and six minor QTLs were identified for pod length variation between yardlong bean and wild cowpea. Using flanking markers, six of the seven QTLs were confirmed in an F(2) population of JP81610 × TVnu457. The molecular linkage map developed and markers linked to pod length QTLs would be potentially useful for yardlong bean and cowpea breeding.

  13. Effect of alkyl chains length on properties of ferroelectric liquid crystals with the keto group attached to the molecule core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubnov, Alexej; Novotná, Vladimíra; Pociecha, D.; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 10 (2012), s. 849-860 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0723 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101211; AV ČR(CZ) M100101204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferroelectric liquid crystal * keto group * lactic acid derivative * spontaneous quantities * SAXS * helix pitch Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.863, year: 2012 http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/01411594.asp

  14. From fused aromatics to graphene-like nanoribbons: The effects of multiple terminal groups, length and symmetric pathways on charge transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2011-11-17

    A class of molecular ribbons, with almost-ideal charge transmission, that is weakly dependent on the anchoring structure or electrode crystalline orientation and easy to synthesize has been identified. Charge transport through two sets of aromatic nanoribbons, based on the pyrene and perylene motifs, has been investigated using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. The effects of wire length and multiple terminal thiolate groups at the junction with gold leads have been examined. For the oligopyrene series, an exponential drop in the conductance with the increase of the wire length is found. In contrast, the oligoperylene series of nanoribbons, with dual thiolate groups, exhibits no visible length dependence, indicating that the contacts are the principal source of the resistance. Between the Au(001) leads, the transmission spectra of the oligoperylenes display a continuum of highly conducting channels and the resulting conductance is nearly independent of the bias. The predictions are robust against artefacts from the exchange-correlation potential, as evidenced from the self-interaction corrected calculations. Therefore, oligoperylene nanoribbons show the potential to be the almost-ideal wires for molecular circuitry. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  15. Differing Efficacies of Lead Group A Streptococcal Vaccine Candidates and Full-Length M Protein in Cutaneous and Invasive Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rivera-Hernandez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is an important human pathogen responsible for both superficial infections and invasive diseases. Autoimmune sequelae may occur upon repeated infection. For this reason, development of a vaccine against GAS represents a major challenge, since certain GAS components may trigger autoimmunity. We formulated three combination vaccines containing the following: (i streptolysin O (SLO, interleukin 8 (IL-8 protease (Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase [SpyCEP], group A streptococcal C5a peptidase (SCPA, arginine deiminase (ADI, and trigger factor (TF; (ii the conserved M-protein-derived J8 peptide conjugated to ADI; and (iii group A carbohydrate lacking the N-acetylglucosamine side chain conjugated to ADI. We compared these combination vaccines to a “gold standard” for immunogenicity, full-length M1 protein. Vaccines were adjuvanted with alum, and mice were immunized on days 0, 21, and 28. On day 42, mice were challenged via cutaneous or subcutaneous routes. High-titer antigen-specific antibody responses with bactericidal activity were detected in mouse serum samples for all vaccine candidates. In comparison with sham-immunized mice, all vaccines afforded protection against cutaneous challenge. However, only full-length M1 protein provided protection in the subcutaneous invasive disease model.

  16. The use of 65Zn for estimating group size of brown hyaenas Hyaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shy, elusive and nocturnal habits of brown hyaenas and the physiognomic characteristics ... animals in the group. The present paper evaluates the use of this technique and is based on material and information collected from a group of three hyaenas studied between October 1982 and October. 1983. This group's territory ...

  17. A behavioural Bayes approach to the determination of sample size for clinical trials considering efficacy and safety: imbalanced sample size in treatment groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Gittins, John

    2011-08-01

    The behavioural Bayes approach to sample size determination for clinical trials assumes that the number of subsequent patients switching to a new drug from the current drug depends on the strength of the evidence for efficacy and safety that was observed in the clinical trials. The optimal sample size is the one which maximises the expected net benefit of the trial. The approach has been developed in a series of papers by Pezeshk and the present authors (Gittins JC, Pezeshk H. A behavioral Bayes method for determining the size of a clinical trial. Drug Information Journal 2000; 34: 355-63; Gittins JC, Pezeshk H. How Large should a clinical trial be? The Statistician 2000; 49(2): 177-87; Gittins JC, Pezeshk H. A decision theoretic approach to sample size determination in clinical trials. Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics 2002; 12(4): 535-51; Gittins JC, Pezeshk H. A fully Bayesian approach to calculating sample sizes for clinical trials with binary responses. Drug Information Journal 2002; 36: 143-50; Kikuchi T, Pezeshk H, Gittins J. A Bayesian cost-benefit approach to the determination of sample size in clinical trials. Statistics in Medicine 2008; 27(1): 68-82; Kikuchi T, Gittins J. A behavioral Bayes method to determine the sample size of a clinical trial considering efficacy and safety. Statistics in Medicine 2009; 28(18): 2293-306; Kikuchi T, Gittins J. A Bayesian procedure for cost-benefit evaluation of a new drug in multi-national clinical trials. Statistics in Medicine 2009 (Submitted)). The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for experimental designs which allocate more patients to the new treatment than to the control group. The model uses a logistic weight function, including an interaction term linking efficacy and safety, which determines the number of patients choosing the new drug, and hence the resulting benefit. A Monte Carlo simulation is employed for the calculation. Having a larger group of patients on the new drug in general

  18. Optimizing trial design in pharmacogenetics research: comparing a fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection design on sample size requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessen, Ruud; van der Baan, Frederieke; Groenwold, Rolf; Egberts, Antoine; Klungel, Olaf; Grobbee, Diederick; Knol, Mirjam; Roes, Kit

    2013-01-01

    Two-stage clinical trial designs may be efficient in pharmacogenetics research when there is some but inconclusive evidence of effect modification by a genomic marker. Two-stage designs allow to stop early for efficacy or futility and can offer the additional opportunity to enrich the study population to a specific patient subgroup after an interim analysis. This study compared sample size requirements for fixed parallel group, group sequential, and adaptive selection designs with equal overall power and control of the family-wise type I error rate. The designs were evaluated across scenarios that defined the effect sizes in the marker positive and marker negative subgroups and the prevalence of marker positive patients in the overall study population. Effect sizes were chosen to reflect realistic planning scenarios, where at least some effect is present in the marker negative subgroup. In addition, scenarios were considered in which the assumed 'true' subgroup effects (i.e., the postulated effects) differed from those hypothesized at the planning stage. As expected, both two-stage designs generally required fewer patients than a fixed parallel group design, and the advantage increased as the difference between subgroups increased. The adaptive selection design added little further reduction in sample size, as compared with the group sequential design, when the postulated effect sizes were equal to those hypothesized at the planning stage. However, when the postulated effects deviated strongly in favor of enrichment, the comparative advantage of the adaptive selection design increased, which precisely reflects the adaptive nature of the design. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Reducing visitors' group size increases the number of birds during educational activities: Implications for management of nature-based recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Carolina; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Delgado, Juan Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Organized tours to watch wildlife are popular recreational and educational activities, in which the visitor expectative (to observe as many and as diverse animals as possible) runs parallel to conservation purposes. However, the presence of visitors may cause negative impacts on wildlife, which makes recreation difficult to manage. Thus, restricting visitor's load to minimize impacts on fauna may be advisable, but too much restriction may end up disappointing the public. We analysed how visitors' group size influences the number and variety of birds observed during an educational activity directed to scholars, in a forested area where public access is otherwise restricted. We observed fewer birds, but not fewer species, as the size of scholars' groups increased. Such effect was apparently mediated by a few species demonstrating reduced tolerance to increased group size. Our results support the idea that reducing the size of visitors' groups not only helps to minimize the negative impacts on wildlife derived from leisure activities, but also allows visitors to watch more wildlife. Therefore, organizing visitors in small numbers is recommended in the design of activities directed to groups of people visiting natural areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of prey dispersion on territory and group size of African lions: a test of the resource dispersion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeix, Marion; Loveridge, Andrew J; MacDonald, David W

    2012-11-01

    Empirical tests of the resource dispersion hypothesis (RDH), a theory to explain group living based on resource heterogeneity, have been complicated by the fact that resource patch dispersion and richness have proved difficult to define and measure in natural systems. Here, we studied the ecology of African lions Panthera leo in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, where waterholes are prey hotspots, and where dispersion of water sources and abundance of prey at these water sources are quantifiable. We combined a 10-year data set from GPS-collared lions for which information of group composition was available concurrently with data for herbivore abundance at waterholes. The distance between two neighboring waterholes was a strong determinant of lion home range size, which provides strong support for the RDH prediction that territory size increases as resource patches are more dispersed in the landscape. The mean number of herbivore herds using a waterhole, a good proxy of patch richness, determined the maximum lion group biomass an area can support. This finding suggests that patch richness sets a maximum ceiling on lion group size. This study demonstrates that landscape ecology is a major driver of ranging behavior and suggests that aspects of resource dispersion limit group sizes.

  1. How Many Focus Groups Are Enough? Building an Evidence Base for Nonprobability Sample Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Greg; Namey, Emily; McKenna, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Few empirical studies exist to guide researchers in determining the number of focus groups necessary for a research study. The analyses described here provide foundational evidence to help researchers in this regard. We conducted a thematic analysis of 40 focus groups on health-seeking behaviors of African American men in Durham, North Carolina.…

  2. The effects of group size on aggression when mixing unacquainted sows in outdoor paddocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggression is a challenge when pigs are kept in groups. Sows fight at mixing when space is limited but this project sought to determine the amount and type of aggression observed when unacquainted Berkshire sows were mixed in pairs or in two established sub-groups of three in outdoor paddocks. Treat...

  3. Ethnic categorization of immigrants : The role of prejudice, perceived acculturation strategies and group size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosica, Ankica; Phalet, Karen

    2006-01-01

    People usually perceive immigrants from different national origins as similar to each other, and thus as belonging to a limited number of ethnic out-groups [Sporer, S. L. (2001a). Recognizing faces of other ethnic groups: An integration of theories. Psychology, Public and Law, 7, 36–97, Sporer, S.

  4. Effects of group size and expectancy of reward on social loafing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... years (mean age = 14.53). Results indicated that performance was significantly poorer in the group condition than in the alone condition (p. <05); and reward significantly attenuated social loafing effect in the group condition (p. <05). These observations were discussed in relation to the prevailing challenge in team work.

  5. Relationship between group size and feeding success of cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis in the central Free State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Butler

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Regardless of habitat or time of day, cattle egrets feeding independently of hosts generally occurring larger groups than those feeding in close association with ungulates. The average group size of three individuals feeding in association with hosts stays remarkably constant with regard to divergent situations. Based on the type of habitat and the grazing speed of the host concerned, cattle egrets achieve the highest feeding success (number of prey items with the least energy inputs (number of paces in association with cattle, and to a lesser extent with the closely related buffalo. Compared to solitary birds, cattle egrets feeding in groups experience without exceptional higher feeding success. Results of feeding experiments, as well as the exceptional occurrence of so-called feeding lines, confirm the phenomenon that the feeding success of cattle egrets correlates closely with the size of the feeding group.

  6. Peer groups splitting in Croatian EQA scheme: a trade-off between homogeneity and sample size number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlašić Tanasković, Jelena; Coucke, Wim; Leniček Krleža, Jasna; Vuković Rodriguez, Jadranka

    2017-03-01

    Laboratory evaluation through external quality assessment (EQA) schemes is often performed as 'peer group' comparison under the assumption that matrix effects influence the comparisons between results of different methods, for analytes where no commutable materials with reference value assignment are available. With EQA schemes that are not large but have many available instruments and reagent options for same analyte, homogenous peer groups must be created with adequate number of results to enable satisfactory statistical evaluation. We proposed a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA)-based test to evaluate heterogeneity of peer groups within the Croatian EQA biochemistry scheme and identify groups where further splitting might improve laboratory evaluation. EQA biochemistry results were divided according to instruments used per analyte and the MANOVA test was used to verify statistically significant differences between subgroups. The number of samples was determined by sample size calculation ensuring a power of 90% and allowing the false flagging rate to increase not more than 5%. When statistically significant differences between subgroups were found, clear improvement of laboratory evaluation was assessed before splitting groups. After evaluating 29 peer groups, we found strong evidence for further splitting of six groups. Overall improvement of 6% reported results were observed, with the percentage being as high as 27.4% for one particular method. Defining maximal allowable differences between subgroups based on flagging rate change, followed by sample size planning and MANOVA, identifies heterogeneous peer groups where further splitting improves laboratory evaluation and enables continuous monitoring for peer group heterogeneity within EQA schemes.

  7. Beyond one-size-fits-all: Tailoring diversity approaches to the representation of social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfelbaum, Evan P; Stephens, Nicole M; Reagans, Ray E

    2016-10-01

    When and why do organizational diversity approaches that highlight the importance of social group differences (vs. equality) help stigmatized groups succeed? We theorize that social group members' numerical representation in an organization, compared with the majority group, influences concerns about their distinctiveness, and consequently, whether diversity approaches are effective. We combine laboratory and field methods to evaluate this theory in a professional setting, in which White women are moderately represented and Black individuals are represented in very small numbers. We expect that focusing on differences (vs. equality) will lead to greater performance and persistence among White women, yet less among Black individuals. First, we demonstrate that Black individuals report greater representation-based concerns than White women (Study 1). Next, we observe that tailoring diversity approaches to these concerns yields greater performance and persistence (Studies 2 and 3). We then manipulate social groups' perceived representation and find that highlighting differences (vs. equality) is more effective when groups' representation is moderate, but less effective when groups' representation is very low (Study 4). Finally, we content-code the diversity statements of 151 major U.S. law firms and find that firms that emphasize differences have lower attrition rates among White women, whereas firms that emphasize equality have lower attrition rates among racial minorities (Study 5). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Attitudes, Behaviors, and Effectiveness of Black and White Leaders of Simulated Problem Solving Groups of Varying Size and Racial Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Walter A.; Allen, William R.

    A field experiment was used to investigate the effects, if any, of changing group size and racial composition on the attitudes, behaviors, and effectiveness of black and white leaders. Subjects were 288 naval recruits, half black and half white, performing two tasks which were watched by a pair of racially mixed observers through a one-way mirror.…

  9. Group size effects on survivorship and adult development in the gregarious larvae of Euselasia chrysippe (Lepidoptera, Riodinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. E. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars living in aggregations may derive several benefits that outweigh the costs, including better survivorship and improved growth rates. I tested whether larval group size had an effect on these two vital rates in Euselasia chrysippe. These caterpillars feed gregariously during all instars and move in processionary form over the host plant...

  10. The Effect of Computer-Assisted Cooperative Learning Methods and Group Size on the EFL Learners' Achievement in Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, Ali Farhan

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effect of cooperative learning small group size and two different instructional modes (positive interdependence vs. individual accountability) on English as a Foreign Language (EFL) undergraduate learners' communication skills (speaking and writing) achievement in computer-based environments. The study also examined the…

  11. Scaling-Up Effective Language and Literacy Instruction: Evaluating the Importance of Scripting and Group Size Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bleses, Dorthe; Højen, Anders; Dale, Philip

    2018-01-01

    -class and small groups, respectively. In LEAP-OPEN, educators followed the scope and sequence but were allowed to determine the instructional activities for each of 40 lessons (i.e., they received no scripted lessons). A business-as-usual (BAU) condition served as the control. Overall, the largest effect sizes...

  12. Dietary assessment in minority ethnic groups: a systematic review of instruments for portion-size estimation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Aitken, Amanda; Galloway, Catherine; Ellahi, Basma

    2017-03-01

    Dietary assessment in minority ethnic groups is critical for surveillance programs and for implementing effective interventions. A major challenge is the accurate estimation of portion sizes for traditional foods and dishes. The aim of this systematic review was to assess records published up to 2014 describing a portion-size estimation element (PSEE) applicable to the dietary assessment of UK-residing ethnic minorities. Electronic databases, internet sites, and theses repositories were searched, generating 5683 titles, from which 57 eligible full-text records were reviewed. Forty-two publications about minority ethnic groups (n = 20) or autochthonous populations (n = 22) were included. The most common PSEEs (47%) were combination tools (eg, food models and portion-size lists), followed by portion-size lists in questionnaires/guides (19%) and image-based and volumetric tools (17% each). Only 17% of PSEEs had been validated against weighed data. When developing ethnic-specific dietary assessment tools, it is important to consider customary portion sizes by sex and age, traditional household utensil usage, and population literacy levels. Combining multiple PSEEs may increase accuracy, but such methods require validation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  13. Synthesis of Ag Nanocubes 18–32 nm in Edge Length: The Effects of Polyol on Reduction Kinetics, Size Control, and Reproducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a robust method for the facile synthesis of small Ag nanocubes with edge lengths controlled in the range of 18–32 nm. The success of this new method relies on the substitution of ethylene glycol (EG) -- the solvent most commonly used in a polyol synthesis -- with diethylene glycol (DEG). Owing to the increase in hydrocarbon chain length, DEG possesses a higher viscosity and a lower reducing power relative to EG. As a result, we were able to achieve a nucleation burst in...

  14. David against Goliath? Group size and bystander effects in virtual knowledge sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voelpel, S.C.; Eckhoff, R.A.; Förster, J.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge management has been identified as a key factor for sustaining a competitive advantage in today’s corporate world. A fundamental aspect of knowledge management in a global economy is the sharing of information in online groups. Most researchers and practitioners have so far assumed that a

  15. The effects of group size on aggression when mixing unacquainted sows in indoor pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the US swine industry moves towards group housing sows, it is important to increase our understanding of aggression. Sows fight at mixing and this project sought to determine the amount and type of aggression observed when unacquainted York × Landrace sows were mixed in pairs or in two establishe...

  16. Territory and group sizes in Eurasian beavers (Castor fiber): echoes of settlement and reproduction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, R.D.; Rosell, F.; Nolet, B.A.; Dijkstra, V.A.A.

    2005-01-01

    According to current theories of territoriality, an animal is expected to defend the smallest area that can provide resources for maximisation of reproduction, known as the economically defendable area. In group territorial species however, the strategies behind resource defence are likely to be

  17. Effect of Parasitoid: Host Ratio and Group Size on Fitness of Spathius galinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): Implications for Mass-Rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Timothy J; Duan, Jian J; Tallamy, Douglas W; Hough-Goldstein, Judith

    2015-06-01

    Producing insect natural enemies in laboratories or insectaries for biological pest control is often expensive, and developing cost-effective rearing techniques is a goal of many biological control programs. Spathius galinae Belokobylskij and Strazenac (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a newly described ectoparasitoid of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is currently being evaluated for environmental introduction in the United States to provide biological control of this invasive pest. To improve mass-rearing outcomes for S. galinae, we investigated the effects of parasitoid: host ratio and parasitoid and host group size (density) on parasitoid fitness. Our results showed that when 1 emerald ash borer larva was exposed to 1, 2, 4, or 8 female parasitoids, parasitism rate was positively associated with increasing parasitoid: host ratio, while brood size, sex ratio, and fitness estimates of progeny were not affected. When a constant 1:1 parasitoid: host ratio was used, but group size varied from 1 female parasitoid and 1 host, 5 parasitoids and 5 hosts, 10 of each, and 20 of each in same size rearing cages, parasitism rates were highest when at least 5 females were exposed to 5 host larvae. Moreover, the number of progeny produced per female parasitoid was greatest when group size was 10 parasitoids and 10 hosts. These findings demonstrate that S. galinae may be reared most efficiently in moderately high-density groups (10 parasitoids and hosts) and with a 1:1 parasitoid: host ratio. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effect of group size and health status on behavior and feed intake of multiparous dairy cows in early lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Margit Bak; Proudfoot, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    Dairy cows in early lactation are often housed in a large group, where they may have to compete for access to feed and space. However, a cow's ability to compete may be impaired due to production disease, and housing in a small group with minimal competition may be beneficial for cow welfare....... The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of group size and health on social and feeding behavior of cows during the first 3 d after introduction to a new group. Data included 54 multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows that were moved from an individual maternity pen and individually joined...... an existing group pen for 6 (N6) or 24 cows (N24) on d 4 after calving. Cows were considered sick if they were diagnosed with and treated for milk fever, mastitis, or retained placenta, diagnosed with subclinical ketosis or metritis within 3 d of calving, or were diagnosed and treated for any other infection...

  19. Formation of a metal-to-nitrogen bond of normal length by a neutral sufonamide group within a tridentate ligand. A new approach to radiopharmaceutical bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Theshini; Abhayawardhana, Pramuditha; Marzilli, Patricia A; Fronczek, Frank R; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2013-03-04

    We demonstrate that a tertiary sulfonamide group, N(SO2R)R'2, can rehybridize to form a M-N bond of normal length even when the group is in a linear tridentate ligand, such as in the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands derived from di-(2-picolyl)amine (N(H)dpa). N(SO2R)dpa ligands were used to prepare fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)](PF6 or BF4) complexes. Structural characterization of the new complexes established that the tertiary sulfonamide nitrogen atom binds to Re with concomitant sp(2)-to-sp(3) rehybridization, facilitating facial coordination. The new fac-[Re(CO)3(N(SO2R)dpa)]X structures provide the only examples for any metal with the sulfonamide as part of a noncyclic linear tridentate ligand and with a normal metal-to-nitrogen(tertiary sulfonamide) bond length. Rare previous examples of such normal M-N bonds have been found only in more constrained situations, such as with tripodal tetradentate ligands. Our long-term objectives for the new tridentate N(SO2R)dpa ligands are to develop the fundamental chemistry relevant to the eventual use of the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) core (M = (99m)Tc, (186/188)Re) in imaging and therapy. The sulfonamide group uniquely contributes to two of our goals: expanding ways to conjugate the fac-[M(I)(CO)3](+) core to biological molecules and also developing new symmetrical tridentate ligands that can coordinate facially to this core. Tests of our conjugation method, conducted by linking the fac-[Re(I)(CO)3](+) core to a new tetraarylporphyrin (T(N(SO2C6H4)dpa)P) as well as to a dansyl (5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl) group, demonstrate that large molecular fragments can be tethered via a coordinated tertiary sulfonamide linkage to this core.

  20. Seasonal Variation in Group Size Is Related to Seasonal Variation in Neuropeptide Receptor Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leah C; Goodson, James L; Kingsbury, Marcy A

    2016-01-01

    In many species, seasonal variation in grouping behavior is widespread, with shifts towards territoriality in the breeding season and grouping in the winter. Compared to the hormonal and neural mechanisms of seasonal territorial aggression, the mechanisms that promote seasonal grouping have received little attention. We collected brains in spring and winter from wild-caught males of two species of emberizid sparrows that seasonally flock (the field sparrow, Spizella pusilla, and the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis) and two species that do not seasonally flock (the song sparrow, Melospiza melodia, and the eastern towhee, Pipilo erythrophthalmus). We used receptor autoradiography to quantify seasonal plasticity in available binding sites for three neuropeptides known to influence social behavior. We examined binding sites for 125I-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), 125I-sauvagine (SG, a ligand for corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors) and 125I-ornithine vasotocin analog (OVTA, a ligand for the VT3 nonapeptide). For all species and ligands, brain areas that exhibited a seasonal pattern in binding density were characterized by a winter increase. Compared to nonflocking species, seasonally flocking species showed different binding patterns in multiple brain areas. Furthermore, we found that winter flocking was associated with elevated winter 125I-VIP binding density in the medial amygdala, as well as 125I-VIP and 125I-OVTA binding density in the rostral arcopallium. While the functional significance of the avian rostral arcopallium is unclear, it may incorporate parts of the pallial amygdala. Our results point to this previously undescribed area as a likely hot spot of social modulation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Group size effects in two repeated game models of a global climate agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helland, Leif

    2002-07-01

    What levels of total abatement can one hope for in a global climate agreement. Some potential answers to this question are provided by game theory. This working paper contains a critical discussion of two (prominent) game ,models that answer the question quite pessimistically. Both models take the n-person, infinitely repeated prisoner's dilemma game as their point of departure. The first model is a full information model and utilises the motion of a weakly re negotiation proof equilibrium. This results in the (maybe counterintuitive) prediction that an agreement that can provide high utility to the group will attract less total abatement than an agreement that can only provide low utility to the group. The second model assumes imperfect public information and utilises the notion of a trigger level equilibrium. This results in the (more intuitive) prediction that the level of total abatements will increase with improved verification techniques for a given player set. Still the level of total abatements decrease with an increasing player set for a given verification technique. Empirical implications of the two models are identified and it is argued that one should confront these with experimentally generated data in order to discriminate between the models. One reason for this is that historical data on abatement efforts in a global climate agreement do not exist since no such agreement has entered into force yet. (Author)

  2. Group size effects in two repeated game models of a global climate agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helland, Leif

    2002-01-01

    What levels of total abatement can one hope for in a global climate agreement. Some potential answers to this question are provided by game theory. This working paper contains a critical discussion of two (prominent) game ,models that answer the question quite pessimistically. Both models take the n-person, infinitely repeated prisoner's dilemma game as their point of departure. The first model is a full information model and utilises the motion of a weakly re negotiation proof equilibrium. This results in the (maybe counterintuitive) prediction that an agreement that can provide high utility to the group will attract less total abatement than an agreement that can only provide low utility to the group. The second model assumes imperfect public information and utilises the notion of a trigger level equilibrium. This results in the (more intuitive) prediction that the level of total abatements will increase with improved verification techniques for a given player set. Still the level of total abatements decrease with an increasing player set for a given verification technique. Empirical implications of the two models are identified and it is argued that one should confront these with experimentally generated data in order to discriminate between the models. One reason for this is that historical data on abatement efforts in a global climate agreement do not exist since no such agreement has entered into force yet. (Author)

  3. The impact of size of cooperative group on achievement, social support, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Andrea; Conte, Stella; Johnson, David W; Johnson, Roger T

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cooperative learning in pairs and groups of 4 and in individualistic learning were compared on achievement, social support, and self-esteem. Sixty-two Italian 7th-grade students with no previous experience with cooperative learning were assigned to conditions on a stratified random basis controlling for ability, gender, and self-esteem. Students participated in 1 instructional unit for 90 min for 6 instructional days during a period of about 6 weeks. The results indicate that cooperative learning in pairs and 4s promoted higher achievement and greater academic support from peers than did individualistic learning. Students working in pairs developed a higher level of social self-esteem than did students learning in the other conditions.

  4. Relating group size and posting activity of an online community of financial investors: Regularities and seasonal patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, P.; Casarin, R.; Dondio, P.; Squazzoni, F.

    2018-03-01

    Group size can potentially affect collective activity and individual propensity to contribute to collective goods. Mancur Olson, in his Logic of Collective Action, argued that individual contribution to a collective good tends to be lower in groups of large size. Today, online communication platforms represent an interesting ground to study such collaborative dynamics under possibly different conditions (e.g., lower costs related to gather and share information). This paper examines the relationship between group size and activity in an online financial forum, where users invest time in sharing news, analysis and comments with other investors. We looked at about 24 million messages shared in more than ten years in the finanzaonline.com online forum. We found that the relationship between the number of active users and the number of posts shared by those users is of the power type (with exponent α > 1) and is subject to periodic fluctuations, mostly driven by hour-of-the-day and day-of-the-week effects. The daily patterns of the exponent showed a divergence between working week and weekend days. In general, the exponent was lower before noon, where investors are typically interested in market news, higher in the late afternoon, where markets are closing and investors need better understanding of the situation. Further research is needed, especially at the micro level, to dissect the mechanisms behind these regularities.

  5. Novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay to determine internal transcribed spacer-2 group in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Richards

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma dimidiata is the most important Chagas disease insect vector in Central America as this species is primarily responsible for Trypanosoma cruzi transmission to humans, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. T. dimidiata sensu lato is a genetically diverse assemblage of taxa and effective vector control requires a clear understanding of the geographic distribution and epidemiological importance of its taxa. The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS-2 is frequently used to infer the systematics of triatomines. However, oftentimes amplification and sequencing of ITS-2 fails, likely due to both the large polymerase chain reaction (PCR product and polymerase slippage near the 5' end. To overcome these challenges we have designed new primers that amplify only the 3'-most 200 base pairs of ITS-2. This region distinguishes the ITS-2 group for 100% of known T. dimidiata haplotypes. Furthermore, we have developed a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP approach to determine the ITS-2 group, greatly reducing, but not eliminating, the number of amplified products that need to be sequenced. Although there are limitations with this new PCR-RFLP approach, its use will help with understanding the geographic distribution of T. dimidiata taxa and can facilitate other studies characterising the taxa, e.g. their ecology, evolution and epidemiological importance, thus improving vector control.

  6. One size fits all? Policy instruments should fit the segments of target groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egmond, Cees; Lulofs, Kris

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the Kyoto CO 2 reduction targets, technical innovations in the field of energy-efficiency must be diffused more rapidly and on a larger market scale. Markets develop gradually however, especially if innovations are involved. Diffusion starts with the innovators and early adopters (the early market), followed by the mainstream market (the early and late majority), and ends with the laggards. The actors in these markets differ in their willingness to adopt innovations: the early market actors have a visionary attitude, and the mainstream actors are more pragmatic. In order to choose policy instruments that will most effectively influence these two markets within the target group of housing association, we addressed the following two questions. (1) What are the differences between the early and mainstream markets actors from a behavioural change point of view, and (2) in what way do existing policy instruments differ in influencing the behaviour of these actors? We analysed early market and mainstream decision-making behaviour, and how the active ingredients in policy instruments specifically target the characteristics of the two markets. Mainstream instruments should intervene as early as possible in the decision-making process and emphasise communication about advantages such as comfort and quality in addition to money and energy savings, and present energy conservation as a solution to an actual problem. Instead of bureaucratic subsidy systems for the mainstream, the motto should be 'cash on the barrelhead'. Early market actors are highly internally motivated, implying that early market interventions have to be challenging and facilitating

  7. One size fits all? Policy instruments should fit the segments of target groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egmond, C.; Jonkers, R.; Kok, G.

    2006-01-01

    In order to meet the Kyoto CO 2 reduction targets, technical innovations in the field of energy-efficiency must diffuse more rapidly into a larger market. However, markets develop gradually, especially if innovations are involved. Diffusion starts with the early market (innovators and early adopters), followed by the mainstream market (the early and late majority), and ends with the laggards. The actors in these markets differ in their willingness to adopt innovations; the early market actors have a visionary attitude, and the mainstream market actors are more pragmatic. In order to choose policy instruments that will most effectively influence these two markets within the target group of housing association, we addressed the following two questions. (1) What are the differences between the early and mainstream market actors from a behavioural-change point of view? (2) In what way do existing policy instruments differ in influencing the behaviour of these actors? We analyzed early market and mainstream decision-making behaviours, and how the active ingredients in policy instruments specifically target the characteristics of the two markets. Mainstream instruments should intervene as early as possible in the decision-making process and emphasize communication about advantages such as comfort and quality in addition to money and energy savings. Furthermore, they should present energy conservation as a solution to an actual problem. Instead of bureaucratic subsidy systems for the mainstream, the motto should be 'cash on the barrel-head'. Early market actors are highly internally motivated, implying that early market interventions have to be challenging and facilitating

  8. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  9. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akihisa, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de; Tanaka, Motomu, E-mail: ayamamoto@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Abuillan, Wasim; Körner, Alexander [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Burk, Alexandra S. [Physical Chemistry of Biosystems, Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ries, Annika [Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Werz, Daniel B. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Technische Universität Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Demé, Bruno [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier “bent” Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter “bent” disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3.

  10. Ultrasound measurement of the size of the anterior tibial muscle group: the effect of exercise and leg dominance

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreesh, Karen

    2011-09-13

    Abstract Background Knowledge of normal muscle characteristics is crucial in planning rehabilitation programmes for injured athletes. There is a high incidence of ankle and anterior tibial symptoms in football players, however little is known about the effect of limb dominance on the anterior tibial muscle group (ATMG). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of limb dominance and sports-specific activity on ATMG thickness in Gaelic footballers and non-football playing controls using ultrasound measurements, and to compare results from transverse and longitudinal scans. Methods Bilateral ultrasound scans were taken to assess the ATMG size in 10 Gaelic footballers and 10 sedentary controls (age range 18-25 yrs), using a previously published protocol. Both transverse and longitudinal images were taken. Muscle thickness measurements were carried out blind to group and side of dominance, using the Image-J programme. Results Muscle thickness on the dominant leg was significantly greater than the non-dominant leg in the footballers with a mean difference of 7.3%, while there was no significant dominance effect in the controls (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the measurements from transverse or longitudinal scans. Conclusions A significant dominance effect exists in ATMG size in this group of Gaelic footballers, likely attributable to the kicking action involved in the sport. This should be taken into account when rehabilitating footballers with anterior tibial pathology. Ultrasound is a reliable tool to measure ATMG thickness, and measurement may be taken in transverse or longitudinal section.

  11. Influence of social mixing and group size on skin lesions and mounting in organic entire male pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rikke; Edwards, Sandra A; Rousing, Tine

    2016-01-01

    four batches in a 2×2 factorial design in order to test the influence of social mixing (presence or absence of social mixing at relocation) and group size (15 and 30 animals). Animals were able to socialise with piglets from other litters during the lactation period, and were all mixed across litters......Alternatives to surgical castration are needed, due to stress and pain caused by castration of male pigs. One alternative is production of entire male pigs. However, changed behaviour of entire males compared with castrated males might adversely affect the welfare of entire males and changes...... frequency (Panimals as compared...

  12. Unit-level voluntary turnover rates and customer service quality: implications of group cohesiveness, newcomer concentration, and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausknecht, John P; Trevor, Charlie O; Howard, Michael J

    2009-07-01

    Despite substantial growth in the service industry and emerging work on turnover consequences, little research examines how unit-level turnover rates affect essential customer-related outcomes. The authors propose an operational disruption framework to explain why voluntary turnover impairs customers' service quality perceptions. On the basis of a sample of 75 work units and data from 5,631 employee surveys, 59,602 customer surveys, and organizational records, results indicate that unit-level voluntary turnover rates are negatively related to service quality perceptions. The authors also examine potential boundary conditions related to the disruption framework. Of 3 moderators studied (group cohesiveness, group size, and newcomer concentration), results show that turnover's negative effects on service quality are more pronounced in larger units and in those with a greater concentration of newcomers.

  13. Occupational Safety and Health Conditions Aboard Small- and Medium-Size Fishing Vessels: Differences among Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zytoon, Mohamed A; Basahel, Abdulrahman M

    2017-02-24

    Although marine fishing is one of the most hazardous occupations, research on the occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions aboard marine fishing vessels is scarce. For instance, little is known about the working conditions of vulnerable groups such as young and aging fishermen. The objective of the current paper is to study the OSH conditions of young and aging fishermen compared to middle-aged fishermen in the small- and medium-size (SM) marine fishing sector. A cross-sectional study was designed, and 686 fishermen working aboard SM fishing vessels were interviewed to collect information about their safety and health. The associations of physical and psychosocial work conditions with safety and health outcomes, e.g., injuries, illnesses and job satisfaction, are presented. The results of the current study can be utilized in the design of effective accident prevention and OSH training programs for the three age groups and in the regulation of working conditions aboard fishing vessels.

  14. Queue Length and Server Content Distribution in an Infinite-Buffer Batch-Service Queue with Batch-Size-Dependent Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze an infinite-buffer batch-size-dependent batch-service queue with Poisson arrival and arbitrarily distributed service time. Using supplementary variable technique, we derive a bivariate probability generating function from which the joint distribution of queue and server content at departure epoch of a batch is extracted and presented in terms of roots of the characteristic equation. We also obtain the joint distribution of queue and server content at arbitrary epoch. Finally, the utility of analytical results is demonstrated by the inclusion of some numerical examples which also includes the investigation of multiple zeros.

  15. Fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of fundamental length was first put forward by Heisenberg from purely dimensional reasons. From a study of the observed masses of the elementary particles known at that time, it is sumrised that this length should be of the order of magnitude 1 approximately 10 -13 cm. It was Heisenberg's belief that introduction of such a fundamental length would eliminate the divergence difficulties from relativistic quantum field theory by cutting off the high energy regions of the 'proper fields'. Since the divergence difficulties arise primarily due to infinite number of degrees of freedom, one simple remedy would be the introduction of a principle that limits these degrees of freedom by removing the effectiveness of the waves with a frequency exceeding a certain limit without destroying the relativistic invariance of the theory. The principle can be stated as follows: It is in principle impossible to invent an experiment of any kind that will permit a distintion between the positions of two particles at rest, the distance between which is below a certain limit. A more elegant way of introducing fundamental length into quantum theory is through commutation relations between two position operators. In quantum field theory such as quantum electrodynamics, it can be introduced through the commutation relation between two interpolating photon fields (vector potentials). (K.B.)

  16. Does home range use explain the relationship between group size and parasitism? A test with two sympatric species of howler monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Milagros; Dias, Pedro Américo D; Romero-Salas, Dora; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo

    2011-07-01

    Group size is related to parasite infections in primates. This relationship probably reflects the fact that group size is associated with body contact between group members and with contact with contaminated items in the environment. The latter is highly associated with range use. In the present study we hypothesized that if infection by directly transmitted parasites (DTP) is mainly determined by the exposure of individuals to parasites that accumulate in the environment, and group size correlates negatively with the intensity of home range use, then smaller groups should be more infected by DTP. Additionally, groups that share a higher proportion of their home range with other groups should be more infected. To test our hypothesis we observed and collected fecal samples of two groups of Alouatta palliata (large group size) and two groups of A. pigra (small group size) that live sympatrically in a forest fragment located in Macuspana (Mexico). Group size was positively correlated with range area size and negatively correlated with the intensity of home range use. Range use variables were not related to either DTP prevalence or load. However, there were significant differences in DTP loads between groups, which were positively correlated with group size. Our results suggest that the intensity of home range use is a poor predictor of DTP infection parameters in groups with marked differences in size. Therefore, it is possible that the individual or combined effects of other ecological (e.g., microclimate), social (e.g., contact rate), or physiological (e.g., immune function) factors are more important in the dynamics of DTP in free-ranging primates.

  17. Evaluation of column length and particle size effect on the untargeted profiling of a phytochemical mixture by using UHPLC coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Ferraris, Francesca; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Laganà, Aldo

    2017-06-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry is the technique of choice for the untargeted profiling of food matrices. Despite the high potential of high-resolution mass spectrometry, when dealing with complex mixtures, an efficient separation technique is also needed. The novel core-shell chromatographic columns packed with sub-2 μm sized particles are claimed to show very good resolution. However, the analytes retention can be significantly altered when working under ultra-high performance chromatographic conditions. In this work, an evaluation of four chromatographic systems, with either a single or two in-series Kinetex™ C 18 columns, either packed with 2.6 or 1.7 μm particles, is presented for the targeted analysis of a standard mixture and the untargeted analysis of a strawberry extract. An ultra-high performance chromatographic system coupled via an electrospray source to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer was used. From the extensive comparison, a surprising result was obtained, namely, that the system identifying the largest number of features was the one with two in-series connected columns with the larger particle size. The inconsistency among the theoretical assumptions and the applicative findings points out the importance of an extensive chromatographic evaluation for the comprehensive untargeted profiling of complex real samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. [Elderly people, precariousness, social handicap and length of stay: pilot study at the Lariboisière-Fernand Widal Hospital Group in Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchat, Nathalie; Besnier, Magali; Vogel, Thomas; Berthel, Marc; Castiel, Didier; Labalette, Céline; Lonsdorfer, Jean; Mathieu-Grenouilleau, Marie-Christine; Rymer, Roland; Bréchat, Pierre-Henri

    2010-04-01

    To administer a social handicap questionnaire associated with French DRGs (PMSI) to determine the social handicaps of a population hospitalized in a public health establishment and to measure the cost implications for the establishment due to increased length of stay (DMS). A prospective pilot study has been carried out in the Lariboisière-Fernand Widal Hospital Group in Paris targeting users 50 or more years old hospitalized for short stays in medicine, surgery and obstetrics. Data of the PMSI and answers to the questionnaire for hospitalisations longer than 24 hours have been exploited. Two hundred twenty-two stays from 8 to 23 November 2005 have been analyzed: 140 pertained to patients aged 50-69 years (27.8%) and 82 to patients aged 70 or more years (16.3%). Three-fourths of the persons aged 50-69 and 70 or over presented a social handicap: 45% showed a strong handicap and a third an average handicap. The three indicators "renter/owner", "interior comfort" and "family relations" were the major determinants of social handicap for those aged 70 or more, 50-69 and 50 or more years. For the patients 70 years and over and those 50-69 years, with an average handicap, the indicator was "income" with the domain "patrimony." For strong handicaps, it was the indicator "scolarisation" for the 70 or more years and the indicator "income" for the 50-69 years old. When all classes and populations were pooled, the DMS was significantly lower than that of the ENC (phandicap remained hospitalized on average more than 2.5 days: 2.2 days for the 70 and over and 3.1 days for the 50-69 years group. In terms of hospital days that produces an increase of 18%, corresponding to a supplementary expenditure attributable to social handicap of approximately 5.9 million euros. This pilot study with a questionnaire disability social PMSI proposing specific aid, but also reducing the DMS, provides several promising information but also indicates the limits of our approach. Among these, we

  19. Size polymorphism of chicken major histocompatibility complex-encoded B-G molecules is due to length variation in the cytoplasmic heptad repeat region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1990-01-01

    B-G antigens are cell-surface molecules encoded by a highly polymorphic multigene family located in the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Rabbit antisera to B-G molecules immunoprecipitate 3-6 bands from iodinated erythrocytes by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels under reducing...... conditions. These are all B-G molecules because they all map to the B-G region of the chicken MHC in congenic and recombinant chickens, most are directly recognized by the antisera, most form disulfide-linked dimers, and none bear N-linked carbohydrate. Both apparent homodimers and heterodimers are found......, which bear intrachain disulfide bonds. All 3-6 bands have different mobilities in SDS gels between different haplotypes, ranging from 30 to 55 kDa. This size polymorphism is not affected by glycosidase treatment or addition of protease inhibitors. Partial proteolysis of cell surface-iodinated B-G...

  20. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  1. Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): effects of container size adjustments on estimates of alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Harris, T Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine discrepancies in alcohol consumption estimates between a self-reported standard quantity-frequency measure and an adjusted version based on respondents' typically used container size. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 Hispanic individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The survey-weighted response rate was 76%. Personal interviews lasting an average of 1 hour were conducted in respondents' homes in either English or Spanish. The overall effect of container adjustment was to increase estimates of ethanol consumption by 68% for women (range across Hispanic groups: 17%-99%) and 30% for men (range: 14%-42%). With the exception of female Cuban American, Mexican American, and South/Central American beer drinkers and male Cuban American wine drinkers, all percentage differences between unadjusted and container-adjusted estimates were positive. Second, container adjustments produced the largest change for volume of distilled spirits, followed by wine and beer. Container size adjustments generally produced larger percentage increases in consumption estimates for the higher volume drinkers, especially the upper tertile of female drinkers. Self-reported alcohol consumption based on standard drinks underreports consumption when compared with reports based on the amount of alcohol poured into commonly used containers.

  2. Third parties, violence, and conflict resolution: the role of group size and collective action in the microregulation of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark; Taylor, Paul J; Best, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Although researchers know much about the causes of aggression, they know surprisingly little about how aggression leads to violence or how violence is controlled. To explore the microregulation of violence, we conducted a systematic behavioral analysis of footage from closed-circuit television surveillance of public spaces. Using 42 incidents involving 312 people, we compared aggressive incidents that ended in violence with those that did not. Behaviors of antagonists and third parties were coded as either escalating or conciliatory acts. Results showed that third parties were more likely to take conciliatory actions than to escalate violence and that this tendency increased as group size increased. This analysis revealed a pattern of third-party behaviors that prevent aggression from becoming violent and showed that conciliatory behaviors are more successful when carried out by multiple third parties than when carried out by one person. We conclude by emphasizing the importance of collective third-party dynamics in understanding conflict resolution.

  3. Effective porosity and pore-throat sizes of Conasauga Group mudrock: Application, test and evaluation of petrophysical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsch, J.; Katsube, T.J.; Sanford, W.E.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, B.E.; Tourkow, L.M.

    1996-04-01

    Effective porosity (specifically referring to the interconnected pore space) was recently recognized as being essential in determining the effectiveness and extent of matrix diffusion as a transport mechanism within fractured low-permeability rock formations. The research presented in this report was performed to test the applicability of several petrophysical techniques for the determination of effective porosity of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. In addition, the aim was to gather quantitative data on the effective porosity of Conasauga Group mudrock from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The quantitative data reported here include not only effective porosities based on diverse measurement techniques, but also data on the sizes of pore throats and their distribution, and specimen bulk and grain densities. The petrophysical techniques employed include the immersion-saturation method, mercury and helium porosimetry, and the radial diffusion-cell method

  4. Endodontic Working Length Measurement Using Cone-beam Computed Tomographic Images Obtained at Different Voxel Sizes and Field of Views, Periapical Radiography, and Apex Locator: A Comparative Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Şenel, Buğra

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of working length determination by using an electronic apex locator, periapical radiography, and cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging obtained at different voxel sizes and field of views (FOVs) in extracted human teeth. Thirty extracted human mandibular premolar teeth were used. The electronic working length measurements were performed by using an electronic apex locator (Root ZX; J Morita Corp, Kyoto, Japan). Five different image sets were obtained as follows: (1) CBCT imaging: 40 × 40 mm FOV, 0.080 mm 3 (FOV 40 ); (2) CBCT imaging: 60 × 60 mm FOV, 0.125 mm 3 (FOV 60 ); (3) CBCT imaging: 80 × 80 mm FOV, 0.160 mm 3 (FOV 80 ); (4) CBCT imaging: 100 × 100 mm FOV, 0.250 mm 3 (FOV 100 ); and (5) periapical digital radiography. Direct measurements performed with an electronic digital caliper were considered as the gold standard and compared with the electronic apex locator, CBCT, and periapical image measurements. Data were analyzed using a 2-way analysis of variance test. Significance level was set at P  .05 and the Gage R&R value was 30%). There were significant differences in the methods in terms of mean differences from the gold standard (P < .05). This study showed that available CBCT scans with different FOVs can be used for working length measurement. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of peer-group size on the delivery of feedback in basic life support refresher training: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Roh, Hye Rin; Chang, Chulho; Kang, Hyunggoo; Lim, Taeho

    2016-07-04

    Students are largely providing feedback to one another when instructor facilitates peer feedback rather than teaching in group training. The number of students in a group affect the learning of students in the group training. We aimed to investigate whether a larger group size increases students' test scores on a post-training test with peer feedback facilitated by instructor after video-guided basic life support (BLS) refresher training. Students' one-rescuer adult BLS skills were assessed by a 2-min checklist-based test 1 year after the initial training. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of student number in a group on BLS refresher training. Participants included 115 final-year medical students undergoing their emergency medicine clerkship. The median number of students was 8 in the large groups and 4 in the standard group. The primary outcome was to examine group differences in post-training test scores after video-guided BLS training. Secondary outcomes included the feedback time, number of feedback topics, and results of end-of-training evaluation questionnaires. Scores on the post-training test increased over three consecutive tests with instructor-led peer feedback, but not differ between large and standard groups. The feedback time was longer and number of feedback topics generated by students were higher in standard groups compared to large groups on the first and second tests. The end-of-training questionnaire revealed that the students in large groups preferred the smaller group size compared to their actual group size. In this BLS refresher training, the instructor-led group feedback increased the test score after tutorial video-guided BLS learning, irrespective of the group size. A smaller group size allowed more participations in peer feedback.

  6. Effects of group-size-floor space allowance during the nursery phase of production on growth, physiology, and hematology in replacement gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, S R; Cross, A J; DeDecker, A E; Lindemann, M D; Estienne, M J

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to determine effects of nursery group-size-floor space allowance on growth, physiology, and hematology of replacement gilts. A 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments was used wherein gilts classified as large, medium, or small ( = 2537; BW = 5.6 ± 0.6 kg) from 13 groups of weaned pigs were placed in pens of 14, 11, or 8 pigs resulting in floor space allowances of 0.15, 0.19, or 0.27 m/pig, respectively. Pigs were weighed on d 0 (weaning) and d 46 (exit from nursery). The ADG was affected by group-size-floor space allowance × pig size ( = 0.04). Large- and medium-size gilts allowed the most floor space had greater ( gilts allowed the least floor space but for small size gilts there was no effect ( > 0.05) of group size-floor space allowance. Mortality in the nursery was not affected ( > 0.05) by treatment, size, or treatment × size and overall was approximately 2.1%. Complete blood counts and blood chemistry analyses were performed on samples collected at d 6 and 43 from a subsample of gilts ( = 18/group-size-floor space allowance) within a single group. The concentration ( gilts allowed 0.15 m floor space (effects of treatment). Blood calcium was affected by treatment ( = 0.02) and concentrations for gilts allowed the greatest and intermediate amounts of floor space were greater ( gilts allowed the least floor space. Serum concentrations of cortisol were not affected by treatment × day ( = 0.27). Cortisol concentrations increased from d 6 to d 43 in all groups and were affected by day ( gilts displaying increased ADG. Further study will determine if these effects influence lifetime reproductive capacity and sow longevity.

  7. 7 Length-weight relationship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Length-weight measurements were taken from well-preserved fish specimens from which stomachs were extracted for the analysis of the food contents, using frequency of occurrence, numerical and gravimetric methods, as well as index of relative importance. The length-frequency analysis showed a size distribution with a ...

  8. The distributions of the gladiator frogs (Hyla boans group in Colombia, with comments on size variations and sympatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch John Douglas

    2001-12-01

    valley as well as in the Maracaibo Basin and at a few cis-Andean sites, but always below 500 m. Sympatry is relatively common between H. boans and H. rosenbergi but, less common between H. boans and either "H. crepitans" or H. pugnax. Maximal sympatry results in sympatry of H. boans, H. pugnax, and H. rosenbergi - normally no more than two species are sympatric. Sexual dimorphism in size is evident in the smallest species ("H. crepitans " but not in the others. AHexhibit geographic variation in size, perhaps related to the combination ofsympatric species ofthe group.

  9. Markedly Increased High-Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in a Patient with Small-for-Size Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren G. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS occurs in the presence of insufficient liver mass to maintain normal function after liver transplantation. Murine mortality following 85% hepatectomy can be reduced by the use of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE to scavenge damage-associated molecular patterns and prevent their engagement with membrane-bound RAGE. Aims. To explore serum levels of sRAGE, high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 protein, and other soluble inflammatory mediators in a fatal case of SFSS. Methods. Serum levels of HMGB1, sRAGE, IL-18, and other inflammatory mediators were measured by ELISA in a case of SFSS, and the results were compared with 8 patients with paracetamol-induced acute liver failure (ALF and 6 healthy controls (HC. Results. HMGB1 levels were markedly higher in the SFSS patient (92.1 ng/mL compared with the ALF patients (median (IQR 11.4 (3.7–14.8 ng/mL and HC (1.42 (1.38–1.56 ng/mL. In contrast, sRAGE levels were lower in the SFSS patient (1.88 ng/mL compared with the ALF patients (3.53 (2.66–12.37 ng/mL and were similar to HC levels (1.40 (1.23–1.89 ng/mL. Conclusion. These results suggest an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory innate immune pathways in SFSS. Modulation of the HMGB1-RAGE axis may represent a future therapeutic avenue in this condition.

  10. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  11. Size-regulated group separation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles using centrifuge and their magnetic resonance contrast properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jongeun; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Young-Nam; Yeom, Areum; Jeong, Heejeong; Lim, Yong Taik; Hong, Kwan Soo

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) have been the subject of extensive research over recent decades. The particle size of MNPs varies widely and is known to influence their physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. There are two commonly used methods for synthesizing MNPs, organometallic and aqueous solution coprecipitation. The former has the advantage of being able to control the particle size more effectively; however, the resulting particles require a hydrophilic coating in order to be rendered water soluble. The MNPs produced using the latter method are intrinsically water soluble, but they have a relatively wide particle size distribution. Size-controlled water-soluble MNPs have great potential as MRI CAs and in cell sorting and labeling applications. In the present study, we synthesized CoFe2O4 MNPs using an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. The MNPs were subsequently separated into four groups depending on size, by the use of centrifugation at different speeds. The crystal shapes and size distributions of the particles in the four groups were measured and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using X-ray diffraction analysis, the MNPs were found to have an inverse spinel structure. Four MNP groups with well-selected semi-Gaussian-like diameter distributions were obtained, with measured T2 relaxivities ( r 2) at 4.7 T and room temperature in the range of 60 to 300 mM-1s-1, depending on the particle size. This size regulation method has great promise for applications that require homogeneous-sized MNPs made by an aqueous solution coprecipitation method. Any group of the CoFe2O4 MNPs could be used as initial base cores of MRI T2 CAs, with almost unique T2 relaxivity owing to size regulation. The methodology reported here opens up many possibilities for biosensing applications and disease diagnosis.

  12. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  13. Genetic analysis of autoimmune gld mice. I. Identification of a restriction fragment length polymorphism closely linked to the gld mutation within a conserved linkage group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A linkage map of distal mouse chromosome 1 was generated using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of DNA prepared from 95 [C3H-gld/gld X Mus spretus)F1 X C3H-gld/gld] backcross mice. The gene order was: (centromere) C4bp, Ren-1,2, Ly-5, [At-3/gld], Apoa-2/Ly-17, Spna-1 (telomere). All mice expressing the phenotype of gld homozygotes were homozygous for the At-3 RFLP characteristic of C3H mice and none of the mice heterozygous for At-3 RFLPs had characteristics of gld homozygotes, demonstrating close linkage between these genes. The identification of an RFLP closely linked to the gld gene provides a starting point for the identification of a genetic defect that results in abnormal T cells and autoimmune disease. PMID:2894402

  14. Depressive symptoms and gestational length among pregnant adolescents: Cluster randomized control trial of CenteringPregnancy® plus group prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jennifer N; Epel, Elissa; Lewis, Jessica B; Cunningham, Shayna D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Thomas, Melanie; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-06-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with preterm birth among adults. Pregnant adolescents have high rates of depressive symptoms and low rates of treatment; however, few interventions have targeted this vulnerable group. Objectives are to: (a) examine impact of CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care on perinatal depressive symptoms compared to individual prenatal care; and (b) determine effects of depressive symptoms on gestational age and preterm birth among pregnant adolescents. This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 community health centers and hospitals in New York City. Clinical sites were randomized to receive standard individual prenatal care (n = 7) or CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care (n = 7). Pregnant adolescents (ages 14-21, N = 1,135) completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale during pregnancy (second and third trimesters) and postpartum (6 and 12 months). Gestational age was obtained from medical records, based on ultrasound dating. Intention to treat analyses were used to examine objectives. Adolescents at clinical sites randomized to CenteringPregnancy® Plus experienced greater reductions in perinatal depressive symptoms compared to those at clinical sites randomized to individual care (p = .003). Increased depressive symptoms from second to third pregnancy trimester were associated with shorter gestational age at delivery and preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation). Third trimester depressive symptoms were also associated with shorter gestational age and preterm birth. All p < .05. Pregnant adolescents should be screened for depressive symptoms prior to third trimester. Group prenatal care may be an effective nonpharmacological option for reducing depressive symptoms among perinatal adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thicknesses in Three Different Optic Nerve Head Size Groups Measured by Cirrus Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirel Gür Güngör

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thicknesses in three different optic nerve head (ONH size groups measured by Cirrus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT. Materials and Methods: Between January and March 2013, 253 eyes of 253 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study (mean age: 42.7±7.4 years [28-62 years]; 121 men and 132 women. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to ONH size: 77 patients in the “small ONH” group (ONH area 1.97 mm2. Results: There were significant differences in superior (p=0.008, inferior (p=0.004 and average RNFL thickness (p=0.001 between the small, medium and large ONH groups. Positive correlations between ONH size and inferior/average RNFL thicknesses were significant but very weak (r=0.150, p=0.017 and r=0.157, p=0.013 respectively. Conclusion: RNFL thickness as measured by Cirrus OCT is positively correlated with ONH size and the differences in RNFL thickness were statistically significant between groups. This correlation and difference may be the result of a varying distance between the circular scan and the ONH margin.

  16. Population sizes and group characteristics of Siberian Crane (Leuco-geranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) in Poyang Lake Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ming-Qin; Guo, Hong; Jiang, Jian-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Both the Siberian Crane (Leucogeranus leucogeranus) and Hooded Crane (Grus monacha) have limited population sizes and are considered endangered by domestic Chinese and international agencies. To document the current size of their respective populations and characterize their groups, between October 2012 and April 2013 we undertook fieldwork at four nature reserve areas within the Poyang Lake wetlands. We divided Poyanghu National Nature Reserve (PYH) into the Wucheng (PWC) and Hengfeng areas (PHF), because each are each located in different counties. Our fieldwork showed that the Siberian Crane occurred mainly in PYH (364 in the PHF, 158 in the PWC) and the Nanjishan Wetland National Nature Reserve (NJS, with 200 individuals). The Hooded Crane was mainly distributed in PYH (302 in the PHF and 154 in the PWC). Family groups accounted for more than 50% of the total number of groups among both species, with Hooded Cranes forming more family groups than Siberian Cranes. Typically, these groups were formed of two adults with one offspring (Siberian Crane), and two adults with two offspring (Hooded Crane), with the mean family group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane being respectively 2.65 ± 0.53 (n=43) and 3.09 ± 0.86 (n=47) individuals per group. The mean collective group size of the Siberian Crane and Hooded Crane included 28.09 ± 24.94 (n=23) and 28.94 ± 27.97 (n=16) individuals per group, respectively, with the proportion of juveniles among Hooded Cranes being more than double that seen among the Siberian Cranes.

  17. Relative gut lengths of coral reef butterflyfishes (Pisces: Chaetodontidae)

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2011-06-17

    Variation in gut length of closely related animals is known to generally be a good predictor of dietary habits. We examined gut length in 28 species of butterflyfishes (Chaetodontidae), which encompass a wide range of dietary types (planktivores, omnivores, and corallivores). We found general dietary patterns to be a good predictor of relative gut length, although we found high variation among groups and covariance with body size. The longest gut lengths are found in species that exclusively feed on the living tissue of corals, while the shortest gut length is found in a planktivorous species. Although we tried to control for phylogeny, corallivory has arisen multiple times in this family, confounding our analyses. The butterflyfishes, a speciose family with a wide range of dietary habits, may nonetheless provide an ideal system for future work studying gut physiology associated with specialization and foraging behaviors. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  18. A review and re-interpretation of a group-sequential approach to sample size re-estimation in two-stage trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, J; Mander, A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we review the adaptive design methodology of Li et al. (Biostatistics 3:277-287) for two-stage trials with mid-trial sample size adjustment. We argue that it is closer in principle to a group sequential design, in spite of its obvious adaptive element. Several extensions are proposed that aim to make it even more attractive and transparent alternative to a standard (fixed sample size) trial for funding bodies to consider. These enable a cap to be put on the maximum sample size and for the trial data to be analysed using standard methods at its conclusion. The regulatory view of trials incorporating unblinded sample size re-estimation is also discussed. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmaceutical Statistics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Evidence from a Large Sample on the Effects of Group Size and Decision-Making Time on Performance in a Marketing Simulation Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treen, Emily; Atanasova, Christina; Pitt, Leyland; Johnson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Marketing instructors using simulation games as a way of inducing some realism into a marketing course are faced with many dilemmas. Two important quandaries are the optimal size of groups and how much of the students' time should ideally be devoted to the game. Using evidence from a very large sample of teams playing a simulation game, the study…

  20. Rapid changes in the size of different functional organ and muscle groups during refueling in a long-distance migrating shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, GA; Lilliendahl, K; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur A.

    1999-01-01

    The adaptive value of size changes in different organ and muscle groups was studied in red knots (Calidris canutus islandica) in relation to their migration. Birds were sampled on five occasions: at arrival in Iceland in May 1994, two times during subsequent refueling, at departure toward, and on

  1. Influence of food availability on the diet and activity budget of two western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) groups of differing size in the Dzanga-Ndoki National Park, Central African Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Neba, Terence Fuh; Donati, Giuseppe; Todd, Angelique; Masi, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    Variation in food availability, body size and group size are known to influence primate diet and activity budgets. Here we report how seasonal food availability shapes the diet and activity patterns of two habituated western lowland gorilla (WLG) groups of differing size. WLGs are ripe fruit opportunists, showing dietary flexibility when preferred foods are scarce. However, as fruit can be rare/ patchily distributed, as intra-group feeding competition increases with group size, access to indi...

  2. Probing the effects of the ester functional group, alkyl side chain length and anions on the bulk nanostructure of ionic liquids: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraee, Mostafa; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-14

    The effects of ester addition on nanostructural properties of biodegradable ILs composed of 1-alkoxycarbonyl-3-alkyl-imidazolium cations ([C1COOCnC1im](+), n = 1, 2, 4) combined with [Br](-), [NO3](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [TfO](-), and [Tf2N](-) were explored by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis at 400 K. Various thermodynamic properties of these ILs were extensively computed in our earlier work (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 2015, 54, 11678-11700). Nano-scale segregation analysis demonstrates the formation of a small spherical island-like hydrocarbon within the continuous ionic domain for ILs with short alkyl side chain ([C1COOC1C1im]), and a sponge-like nanostructure for the compound with long alkyl side chain ([C1COOC4C1im]). Ester-functionalized ILs with ethyl side chain ([C1COOC2C1im]) are the turning point between two different morphologies. Non-polar channels were observed for [C1COOC4C1im] ILs composed of smaller anions such as [Br] and [NO3], whereas clustering organization was found for the other anions. Formation of the spherical micelle-like nanostructure was seen for lengthened cations. Finally, the incorporation of an ester group into the alkyl side chain of the cation leads to stronger segregation between charged and uncharged networks, which consequently increased the possibility of self-assembly and micelle formation.

  3. Group size and composition of Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) (Van Bénèden, 1864) in the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M C O; Oshima, J E F; Pacífico, E S; Silva, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the characteristics of Guiana dolphins (S. guianensis) group size and composition in the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (25 degrees 15'-25 degrees 36' S and 48 degrees 02'-48 degrees 45' W), Paraná State, as well as to verify the existence of relationships between a given environmental variable (water depth, salinity, transparency and temperature) and group size. An area of around 124 km(2) was surveyed by boat from April 2006 to February 2008 in the following subsets of the estuary: Canal do Superagui (approximately 28 km(2)), Pinheiros bay (approximately 34 km(2)), part of Laranjeiras bay, which included the Guaraqueçaba sub-estuary (approximately 38 km(2)), and part of the Mixture Section of the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (approximately 24 km(2)). In 45 survey days, a total of 147 hours were spent observing 286 groups of S. guianensis. Groups varied from two individuals to aggregations of up to 90 individuals (mean +/- SD: 11.5 +/- 14.4 individuals). Solitary individuals were seen only on five occasions (1.7% of all observations). Groups with calves (n = 247) represented 86.4% overall and were more common in all sub-areas when compared to groups without calves. Groups without calves were found in all sub-areas and were usually smaller and composed of up to 12 individuals. A usual group composition of 70% of adults and 30% of calves was observed considering all sub-areas and seasons. No correlations were found between group size and water temperature (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.0059, p = 0.9338), transparency (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.0597, p = 0.9333), depth (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.1421, p = 0.4698), and salinity (Spearman's rank test, r = -0.1938, p = 0.0665). While Guiana dolphin groups were seen in the entire surveyed area, group size varied significantly among the three main surveyed sub-areas (Kruskal Wallis, H2,196 = 29.85, p = 0.0000). Groups were larger in Laranjeiras bay and smaller in Canal do

  4. Group size and composition of Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis (Van Bénèden, 1864 in the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MCO. Santos

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe the characteristics of Guiana dolphins (S. guianensis group size and composition in the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (25° 15' -25° 36' S and 48° 02'-48° 45' W, Paraná State, as well as to verify the existence of relationships between a given environmental variable (water depth, salinity, transparency and temperature and group size. An area of around 124 km² was surveyed by boat from April 2006 to February 2008 in the following subsets of the estuary: Canal do Superagui (~28 km², Pinheiros bay (~34 km², part of Laranjeiras bay, which included the Guaraqueçaba sub-estuary (~38 km², and part of the Mixture Section of the Paranaguá Estuarine Complex (~24 km². In 45 survey days, a total of 147 hours were spent observing 286 groups of S. guianensis. Groups varied from two individuals to aggregations of up to 90 individuals (mean ± SD: 11.5 ± 14.4 individuals. Solitary individuals were seen only on five occasions (1.7% of all observations. Groups with calves (n = 247 represented 86.4% overall and were more common in all sub-areas when compared to groups without calves. Groups without calves were found in all sub-areas and were usually smaller and composed of up to 12 individuals. A usual group composition of 70% of adults and 30% of calves was observed considering all sub-areas and seasons. No correlations were found between group size and water temperature (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.0059, p = 0.9338, transparency (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.0597, p = 0.9333, depth (Spearman's rank test, r = 0.1421, p = 0.4698, and salinity (Spearman's rank test, r = -0.1938, p = 0.0665. While Guiana dolphin groups were seen in the entire surveyed area, group size varied significantly among the three main surveyed sub-areas (Kruskal Wallis, H2,196 = 29.85, p = 0.0000. Groups were larger in Laranjeiras bay and smaller in Canal do Superagui. The physical environment, risk of predation, seasonal distribution

  5. One size does not fit all: HIV testing preferences differ among high-risk groups in Northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Jan; Njau, Bernard; Mtuy, Tara; Brown, Derek S; Mühlbacher, Axel; Thielman, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximize the effectiveness of "Seek, Test, and Treat" strategies for curbing the HIV epidemic, new approaches are needed to increase the uptake of HIV testing services, particularly among high-risk groups. Low HIV testing rates among such groups suggest that current testing services may not align well with the testing preferences of these populations. Female bar workers and male mountain porters have been identified as two important high-risk groups in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania. We used conventional survey methods and a discrete choice experiment (DCE), a preference elicitation method increasingly applied by economists and policy-makers to inform health policy and services, to analyze trade-offs made by individuals and quantify preferences for HIV testing services. Bivariate descriptive statistics were used to analyze differences in survey responses across groups. Compared to 486 randomly selected community members, 162 female bar workers and 194 male Kilimanjaro porters reported 2-3 times as many lifetime sexual partners (p porters preferred testing in venues where antiretroviral therapy was readily available. Both high-risk groups were less averse to traveling longer distances to test compared to their community counterparts. These results expose systematic differences in HIV testing preferences across high-risk populations compared to their community peers. Tailoring testing options to the preferences of high-risk populations should be evaluated as a means of improving uptake of testing in these populations.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of wormlike micelles in poly(oxyethylene) surfactant solution: importance of hydrophilic-group size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Toufiq; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the temperature sensitivity of the rheology of the wormlike micellar solutions formed in poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO(m), m=15 and 30) upon addition of tri(ethyleneglycol) mono n-dodecyl ether (C(12)EO(3)) and monolaurin. We have found that increasing the poly(oxyethylene) chain length of ChEO(m) greatly reduces the temperature-sensitivity of the viscosity of the solution. In the viscous region small changes in the cosurfactant composition can subtly change the temperature sensitivity depending on the temperature range and type of cosurfactant. For, C(12)EO(3), which is a poly(oxyethylene) surfactant, the temperature sensitivity is lower at lower temperatures and higher at higher temperatures if the cosurfactant mixing fraction is high and vice versa if the mixing fraction is low. For monolaurin, the temperature sensitivity increases with cosurfactant mixing fraction in the viscous region. In the ChEO(30)-monolaurin system viscous solutions are not formed at any temperature that we studied. We have discussed these results in terms of the reduction of the average curvature of micellar interface with temperature due to dehydration of the poly(oxyethylene) chain and formation of branches in long micelles. We indicate the scientific and technical significance of our findings.

  7. Cliff´s Delta Calculator: A non-parametric effect size program for two groups of observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cliff´s Delta statistic is an effect size measure that quantifies the amount of difference between two non-parametric variables beyond p-values interpretation. This measure can be understood as a useful complementary analysis for the corresponding hypothesis testing. During the last two decades the use of effect size measures has been strongly encouraged by methodologists and leading institutions of behavioral sciences. The aim of this contribution is to introduce the Cliff´s Delta Calculator software that performs such analysis and offers some interpretation tips. Differences and similarities with the parametric case are analysed and illustrated. The implementation of this free program is fully described and compared with other calculators. Alternative algorithmic approaches are mathematically analysed and a basic linear algebra proof of its equivalence is formally presented. Two worked examples in cognitive psychology are commented. A visual interpretation of Cliff´s Delta is suggested. Availability, installation and applications of the program are presented and discussed.

  8. Effect of group size and health status on behavior and feed intake of multiparous dairy cows in early lactation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Margit Bak; Proudfoot, Kathryn L.

    2017-01-01

    an existing group pen for 6 (N6) or 24 cows (N24) on d 4 after calving. Cows were considered sick if they were diagnosed with and treated for milk fever, mastitis, or retained placenta, diagnosed with subclinical ketosis or metritis within 3 d of calving, or were diagnosed and treated for any other infection...

  9. Medium-dependent zone size discrepancies associated with susceptibility testing of group D streptococci against various cephalosporins.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahm, D F; Baker, C N; Jones, R N; Thornsberry, C

    1983-01-01

    Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar media from various commercial sources, either supplemented or not supplemented with 5% sheep blood, were studied to determine their effect on disk diffusion susceptibility testing results obtained with 90 strains of group D streptococci and four cephalosporins. The cephalosporins investigated included cephalothin, cefamandole, moxalactam, and cefotaxime. Results showed that a number of Streptococcus faecalis and Streptococcus faecium strains were susceptible to cephal...

  10. Micrometer- and nanometer-sized platinum group nuggets in micrometeorites from deep-sea sediments of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; Parashar, K.; ShyamPrasad, M.

    released in the troposphere could contain fractionated PGNs in large numbers. Keywords: cosmic spherules, platinum group element, nuggets, parent body, chondrites, impact craters 2    INTRODUCTION Micrometeorite flux on the Earth is estimated... of the parent body, angle of entry, entry velocity, and the physical properties of the incoming particle (Brownlee 1985). Three broad micrometeorite types have been recognized: S-type, I-type and the G-type. All the three could have the same parent body - a...

  11. Measurement of blood pressure for the diagnosis and management of hypertension in different ethnic groups: one size fits all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Paramjit; Haque, M Sayeed; Martin, Una; Mant, Jonathan; Mohammed, Mohammed A; Heer, Gurdip; Johal, Amanpreet; Kaur, Ramandeep; Schwartz, Claire; Wood, Sally; Greenfield, Sheila M; McManus, Richard J

    2017-02-08

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and prevalence varies by ethnic group. The diagnosis and management of blood pressure are informed by guidelines largely based on data from white populations. This study addressed whether accuracy of blood pressure measurement in terms of diagnosis of hypertension varies by ethnicity by comparing two measurement modalities (clinic blood pressure and home monitoring) with a reference standard of ambulatory BP monitoring in three ethnic groups. Cross-sectional population study (June 2010 - December 2012) with patients (40-75 years) of white British, South Asian and African Caribbean background with and without a previous diagnosis of hypertension recruited from 28 primary care practices. The study compared the test performance of clinic BP (using various protocols) and home-monitoring (1 week) with a reference standard of mean daytime ambulatory measurements using a threshold of 140/90 mmHg for clinic and 135/85 mmHg for out of office measurement. A total of 551 participants had complete data of whom 246 were white British, 147 South Asian and 158 African Caribbean. No consistent difference in accuracy of methods of blood pressure measurement was observed between ethnic groups with or without a prior diagnosis of hypertension: for people without hypertension, clinic measurement using three different methodologies had high specificity (75-97%) but variable sensitivity (33-65%) whereas home monitoring had sensitivity of 68-88% and specificity of 64-80%. For people with hypertension, detection of a raised blood pressure using clinic measurements had sensitivities of 34-69% with specificity of 73-92% and home monitoring had sensitivity (81-88%) and specificity (55-65%). For people without hypertension, ABPM remains the choice for diagnosing hypertension compared to the other modes of BP measurement regardless of ethnicity. Differences in accuracy of home monitoring and clinic monitoring (higher sensitivity

  12. The effects of chain length, embedded polar groups, pressure, and pore shape on structure and retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography: molecular-level insights from Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2009-03-20

    Particle-based simulations using the configurational-bias and Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo techniques are carried out to probe the effects of various chromatographic parameters on bonded-phase chain conformation, solvent penetration, and retention in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). Specifically, we investigate the effects due to the length of the bonded-phase chains (C(18), C(8), and C(1)), the inclusion of embedded polar groups (amide and ether) near the base of the bonded-phase chains, the column pressure (1, 400, and 1000 atm), and the pore shape (planar slit pore versus cylindrical pore with a 60A diameter). These simulations utilize a bonded-phase coverage of 2.9 micromol/m(2)and a mobile phase containing methanol at a molfraction of 33% (about 50% by volume). The simulations show that chain length, embedded polar groups, and pore shape significantly alter structural and retentive properties of the model RPLC system, whereas the column pressure has a relatively small effect. The simulation results are extensively compared to retention measurements. A molecular view of the RPLC retention mechanism emerges that is more complex than can be inferred from thermodynamic measurements.

  13. Medium-sized Universities Connect to Their Libraries: Links on University Home Pages and User Group Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Harpel-Burk

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available From major tasks—such as recruitment of new students and staff—to the more mundane but equally important tasks—such as providing directions to campus—college and university Web sites perform a wide range of tasks for a varied assortment of users. Overlapping functions and user needs meld to create the need for a Web site with three major functions: promotion and marketing, access to online services, and providing a means of communication between individuals and groups. In turn, college and university Web sites that provide links to their library home page can be valuable assets for recruitment, public relations, and for helping users locate online services.

  14. Effect of shape and size of amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent on the recovery of uranium from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, H.; Kataki, A.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.; Katoh, S.; Sakane, K.; Sugasaka, K.; Itagaki, T.

    1987-01-01

    An amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent for the recovery of uranium from sea water was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polypropylene fiber of round and cross-shaped sections. The tensile strength and elongation of the synthesized adsorbent, both of which were one-half those of the raw material, were not affected by the shape of the fiber. The deterioration of the adsorption ability induced by immersing the adsorbent in HCl was negligible because of the short immersion time required for the desorption with HCl. The concentration factors for uranium and transition metals in 28 days were in the order of 10 5 , while those for alkali metals and alkaline earth metals were in the order 10 -1 -10 1 . The recovery of uranium with the cross-shaped adsorbent was superior to that of the round-shaped one. XMA line profiles show that the distribution of uranium is much restricted to the surface layer when compared with that of alkaline earth metals. Diminishing the diameter or increasing the surface area was effective for increasing the adsorption of uranium

  15. Prediction of the mesiodistal size of unerupted canines and premolars for a group of Romanian children: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Gheorghe BOITOR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of the present study was to develop an optimization method of multiple linear regression equation (MLRE, using a genetic algorithm to determine a set of coefficients that minimize the prediction error for the sum of permanent premolars and canine dimensions in a group of young people from a central area of Romania represented by a city called Sibiu. Material and Methods To test the proposed method, we used a multiple linear regression equation derived from the estimation method proposed by Mojers, to which we adjusted regression coefficients using the Breeder genetic algorithm. A total of 92 children were selected with complete permanent teeth with no clinically visible dental caries, proximal restorations or orthodontic treatment. A hard dental stone was made for each of these models, which was then measured with a digital calliper. The Dahlberg analyses of variance had been performed to determine the error of method, then the Correlation t Test was applied, and finally the MLRE equations were obtained using the version 16 for Windows of the SPSS program. Results The correlation coefficient of MLRE was between 51-67% and the significance level was set at α=0.05. Comparing predictions provided by the new and respectively old method, we can conclude that the Breeder genetic algorithm is capable of providing the best values for parameters of multiple linear regression equations, and thus our equations are optimized for the best performance. Conclusion The prediction error rates of the optimized equations using the Breeder genetic algorithm are smaller than those provided by the multiple linear regression equations proposed in the recent study.

  16. Group-specific amplification of HLA-DQA1 revealed a number of genomic full-length sequences including the novel HLA alleles DQA1*01:10 and DQA1*01:11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, K; Halliwell, J A; Mautner, J; Jolesch, A; von Welser, G; Rampp, I; Spannagl, M; Kauke, T; Dick, A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a subgroup-specific amplification assay for HLA-DQA1 that encompasses the whole coding region and allows us to sequence full-length HLA-DQA1 genes. We introduce the novel alleles HLA-DQA1*01:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:11. Moreover, we were able to confirm the full-length genomic sequence data of the alleles HLA-DQA1*01:07, HLA-DQA1*03:01:01, HLA-DQA1*03:02, HLA-DQA1*04:01:02, HLA-DQA1*04:02, HLA-DQA1*05:03, HLA-DQA1*05:05:01:02 and HLA-DQA1*06:01:01. A complete genomic overview of all six HLA-DQA1 allele groups is now available from the submission of our data to the IMGT/HLA database. Because our approach facilitates the analysis of all HLA-DQA1 allele sequences, HLA-DQA1 may become the first HLA locus from which all subgroup members will be known in detail in the near future. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Position, swimming direction and group size of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus in the presence of a fast-ferry in the Bay of Biscay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S. Aniceto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze group size, swimming direction and the orientation of fin whales relative to a fast ferry in the Bay of Biscay. Fin whale groups (≥3 individuals were on average closer to the vessel than single individuals and pairs (F1,114 = 4.94, p = 0.028 and were more often observed within a high-risk angle ahead of the ferry (binomial probability: p = 7.60 × 10−11. Also, small groups tend to swim in the opposite direction (heading of 180° of the ferry at the starboard side (binomial test: p = 6.86 × 10−5 and at the portside (binomial test: p = 0.0156. These findings provide valuable information to improve shipping management procedures in areas at high risk for collisions.

  18. Rapid changes in the size of different functional organ and muscle groups during refueling in a long-distance migrating shorebird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersma, T; Gudmundsson, G A; Lilliendahl, K

    1999-01-01

    The adaptive value of size changes in different organ and muscle groups was studied in red knots (Calidris canutus islandica) in relation to their migration. Birds were sampled on five occasions: at arrival in Iceland in May 1994, two times during subsequent refueling, at departure toward, and on return from, the high arctic breeding grounds. During their 24-d stopover in May, body mass increased from 144.3 to 214.5 g. Mass gains were lowest over the first week (0.85 g/d, only fat-free tissue deposited). Over the subsequent 10 d, average mass increased by 5.0 g/d (fat contributing 78%), and over the last week before takeoff, it increased by 2.0 g/d (fat contributing over 100% because of loss of lean components). There were no sex differences in body and fat mass gains. Over the first interval, lean masses of heart, stomach, and liver increased. During the middle 10 d, sizes of leg muscle, intestine, liver, and kidneys increased. Stomach mass decreased over the same interval. In the last interval before takeoff, the stomach atrophied further and the intestine, leg muscles, and liver became smaller too, but pectoral muscles and heart increased in size. Sizes of "exercise organs" such as pectoral muscle and heart were best correlated with body mass, whereas sizes of organs used during foraging (leg muscles) and nutrient extraction (intestine, liver) were best correlated with rate of mass gain. Kidneys changed little before takeoff, which suggests that they are needed as much during flight as during refueling.

  19. Ricinus communis agglutinin-mediated agglutination and fusion of glycolipid-containing phospholipid vesicles: effect of carbohydrate head group size, calcium ions, and spermine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, D; Düzgüneş, N

    1986-03-25

    The glycolipids galactosylcerebroside (GalCer), lactosylceramide (LacCer), and trihexosylceramide (Gb3) were inserted into phospholipid vesicles, consisting of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid. The extent to which their carbohydrate head groups protruded beyond the vesicle surface and their interference with membrane approach were examined by determining vesicle susceptibility toward type I Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1) induced agglutination and Ca2+- and spermine-induced aggregation and fusion either in the presence or in the absence of the lectin. The initial agglutination rates increased in the order GalCer much less than LacCer less than Gb3, while a reversed order was obtained for Ca2+- and spermine-induced aggregation and fusion, indicating an enhanced steric interference on close approach of bilayers with increasing head group size. The lectin-mediated agglutination rates for LacCer- and Gb3-containing vesicles increased by an order of magnitude when Ca2+ was also included in the medium, at a concentration that did not induce aggregation per se. Charge neutralization could not account for this observation as the polyvalent cation spermine did not display this synergistic effect with RCA1. Addition of Ca2+ to preagglutinated vesicles substantially reduced the threshold cation concentration for fusion (micromolar vs. millimolar). Quantitatively, this concentration decreased with decreasing carbohydrate head group size, indicating that the head group protrusion determined the interbilayer distance within the vesicle aggregate. The distinct behavior of Ca2+ vs. spermine on RCA1-induced agglutination on the one hand and fusion on the other indicated that Ca2+ regulates the steric orientation of the carbohydrate head group, which appears to be related to its ability to dehydrate the bilayer. As a result, lectin agglutinability becomes enhanced while fusion will be interrupted as the interbilayer distance increases, the threshold head group size

  20. Reduction of mercury(II) by tropical river humic substances (Rio Negro)-Part II. Influence of structural features (molecular size, aromaticity, phenolic groups, organically bound sulfur).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Julio Cesar; Sargentini, Ezio; Zara, Luiz Fabricio; Rosa, André Henrique; Dos Santos, Ademir; Burba, Peter

    2003-12-04

    The influence of structural features of tropical river humic substances (HS) on their capability to reduce mercury(II) in aqueous solutions was studied. The HS investigated were conventionally isolated from Rio Negro water-Amazonas State/Brazil by means of the collector XAD 8. In addition, the isolated HS were on-line fractionated by tangential-flow multistage ultrafiltration (nominal molecular-weight cut-offs: 100, 50, 30, 10, 5 kDa) and characterized by potentiometry and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The reduction of Hg(II) ions to elemental Hg by size-fractions of Rio Negro HS was assessed by cold-vapor AAS (CVAAS). UV/VIS spectrometry revealed that the fractions of high molecular-size (F(1)>100 kDa and F(2): 50-100 kDa) have a higher aromaticity compared to the fractions of small molecular-size (F(5): 5-10 kDa, F(6): F(2)>F(1)>F(3)>F(4)>F(6)). Accordingly, Hg(II) ions were preferably reduced by HS molecules having a relatively high ratio of phenolic/carboxylic groups and a small concentration of sulfur. From these results a complex 'competition' between reduction and complexation of mercury(II) by aquatic HS occurring in tropical rivers such as the Rio Negro can be suggested.

  1. Use of care management practices in small- and medium-sized physician groups: do public reporting of physician quality and financial incentives matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Maeng, Daniel; Casalino, Lawrence P; Rittenhouse, Diane

    2013-04-01

    To examine the effect of public reporting (PR) and financial incentives tied to quality performance on the use of care management practices (CMPs) among small- and medium-sized physician groups. Survey data from The National Study of Small and Medium-sized Physician Practices were used. Primary data collection was also conducted to assess community-level PR activities. The final sample included 643 practices engaged in quality reporting; about half of these practices were subject to PR. We used a treatment effects model. The instrumental variables were the community-level variables that capture the level of PR activity in each community in which the practices operate. (1) PR is associated with increased use of CMPs, but the estimate is not statistically significant; (2) financial incentives are associated with greater use of CMPs; (3) practices' awareness/sensitivity to quality reports is positively related to their use of CMPs; and (4) combined PR and financial incentives jointly affect CMP use to a greater degree than either of these factors alone. Small- to medium-sized practices appear to respond to PR and financial incentives by greater use of CMPs. Future research needs to investigate the appropriate mix and type of incentive arrangements and quality reporting. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Sample size and classification error for Bayesian change-point models with unlabelled sub-groups and incomplete follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon R; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Matthews, Fiona E

    2018-05-01

    Many medical (and ecological) processes involve the change of shape, whereby one trajectory changes into another trajectory at a specific time point. There has been little investigation into the study design needed to investigate these models. We consider the class of fixed effect change-point models with an underlying shape comprised two joined linear segments, also known as broken-stick models. We extend this model to include two sub-groups with different trajectories at the change-point, a change and no change class, and also include a missingness model to account for individuals with incomplete follow-up. Through a simulation study, we consider the relationship of sample size to the estimates of the underlying shape, the existence of a change-point, and the classification-error of sub-group labels. We use a Bayesian framework to account for the missing labels, and the analysis of each simulation is performed using standard Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Our simulation study is inspired by cognitive decline as measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination, where our extended model is appropriate due to the commonly observed mixture of individuals within studies who do or do not exhibit accelerated decline. We find that even for studies of modest size ( n = 500, with 50 individuals observed past the change-point) in the fixed effect setting, a change-point can be detected and reliably estimated across a range of observation-errors.

  3. Influence of control group on effect size in trials of acupuncture for chronic pain: a secondary analysis of an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh MacPherson

    Full Text Available In a recent individual patient data meta-analysis, acupuncture was found to be superior to both sham and non-sham controls in patients with chronic pain. In this paper we identify variations in types of sham and non-sham controls used and analyze their impact on the effect size of acupuncture.Based on literature searches of acupuncture trials involving patients with headache and migraine, osteoarthritis, and back, neck and shoulder pain, 29 trials met inclusion criteria, 20 involving sham controls (n = 5,230 and 18 non-sham controls (n = 14,597. For sham controls, we analysed non-needle sham, penetrating sham needles and non-penetrating sham needles. For non-sham controls, we analysed non-specified routine care and protocol-guided care. Using meta-regression we explored impact of choice of control on effect of acupuncture.Acupuncture was significantly superior to all categories of control group. For trials that used penetrating needles for sham control, acupuncture had smaller effect sizes than for trials with non-penetrating sham or sham control without needles. The difference in effect size was -0.45 (95% C.I. -0.78, -0.12; p = 0.007, or -0.19 (95% C.I. -0.39, 0.01; p = 0.058 after exclusion of outlying studies showing very large effects of acupuncture. In trials with non-sham controls, larger effect sizes associated with acupuncture vs. non-specified routine care than vs. protocol-guided care. Although the difference in effect size was large (0.26, it was not significant with a wide confidence interval (95% C.I. -0.05, 0.57, p = 0.1.Acupuncture is significantly superior to control irrespective of the subtype of control. While the choice of control should be driven by the study question, our findings can help inform study design in acupuncture, particularly with respect to sample size. Penetrating needles appear to have important physiologic activity. We recommend that this type of sham be avoided.

  4. The Effects of Anchor Length, Test Difficulty, Population Ability Differences, Mixture of Populations and Sample Size on the Psychometric Properties of Levine Observed Score Linear Equating Method for Different Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Espinoza, Jorge E.

    2011-01-01

    The Non-Equivalent groups with Anchor Test equating (NEAT) design is a widely used equating design in large scale testing that involves two groups that do not have to be of equal ability. One group P gets form X and a group of items A and the other group Q gets form Y and the same group of items A. One of the most commonly used equating methods in…

  5. Natural endocrine profiles of the group-living skunk anemonefish Amphiprion akallopisos in relation to their size-based dominance hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, S C; O'Donnell, J L; Bernardi, G; Beldade, R

    2018-03-01

    Group-living animals commonly display differences in behaviour, physiology and endocrine profiles between conspecifics within the group, which are tightly linked to reproduction. Teleosts exhibit a variety of social systems, where social status, as well as sex, has been linked to different androgen and oestrogen profiles. Levels of gonadal androgen and oestrogen were investigated as a function of sex and position in a social hierarchy in free-living individuals of the skunk anemonefish Amphiprion akallopisos, a protandrous pomacentrid fish with a size-based dominance hierarchical social system. Plasma levels of 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), testosterone (T) and 17β-oestradiol (E 2 ), as well as conversion ratios from T, were measured by ELISA from 111 individuals along a linear hierarchy from 38 social groups in the wild. Blood plasma levels of 11-KT and E 2 showed sex differences, being higher in males and females respectively as expected based on their role as the major androgen and oestrogen in fish reproduction. However, no sex differences were found for T, which may represent its role in territorial defence or simply as a precursor for the synthesis of 11-KT and E 2 . In terms of the hierarchical social system within males, 11-KT levels decline as the hierarchy is descended, which may represent their decreasing reproductive opportunity, as well as the decreasing levels of aggression towards males lower in the hierarchy. In summary, the size-based dominance hierarchy is associated with distinct steroid levels of 11-KT and E 2 between individual free-living A. akallopisos that closely resemble those of species in which breeding individuals suppress reproduction of conspecifics lower in the hierarchy. © 2018 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Local density and group size interacts with age and sex to determine direction and rate of social dispersal in a polygynous mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjamäki, Paula H; Contasti, Adrienne L; Coulson, Tim N; McLoughlin, Philip D

    2013-09-01

    Movement away from an area or social group in response to increasing density (density-dependent dispersal) is known for most species; why it evolves is fundamental to our understanding of ecology and evolution. However, we have yet to fully appreciate how individuals of varying conditions (e.g., age and sex) might differently consider effects of density (quorum) when deciding to disperse or not, and scale dependence in their sense of quorum. We tracked movements of all individuals of a naturalized population of feral horses (Equus ferus caballus; Sable Island National Park Reserve, Nova Scotia, Canada) during a period of rapid population growth (N increased from 375 to 484 horses from 2008 to 2010). Permanent dispersal from breeding groups (bands) was positively density dependent for all age and sex categories with respect to local density (horses/km(2), bounded by the 99th percentile of individual movements [8000 m]), but was negatively and positively density dependent for males and females, respectively, in relation to group (band) size. Dispersal was generally female biased, with the exception of foals which moved with their mothers (no sex effect), and for yearlings and subadults when band sizes were smaller than average, in which case males dispersed at higher rates than females. Dispersal distance was positively related to local density. We conclude that dispersal rate can be both positively and negatively density dependent for feral horses, contingent on the state of individuals and the scale at which quorum with respect to choosing to disperse or not is assessed. Scale effects and interactions of density-dependent and sex- and age-biased dispersal may have both ecological and evolutionary consequences through effects on resource and mate competition.

  7. Local Control for Intermediate-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: Results From D9803 According to Histology, Group, Site, and Size: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lyden, Elizabeth R. [Department of Preventive and Societal Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Arndt, Carola A. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Anderson, James R. [Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina (United States); Morris, Carol D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine local control according to clinical variables for patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated on Children's Oncology Group protocol D9803. Patients and Methods: Of 702 patients enrolled, we analyzed 423 patients with central pathology–confirmed group III embryonal (n=280) or alveolar (group III, n=102; group I-II, n=41) RMS. Median age was 5 years. Patients received 42 weeks of VAC (vincristine, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide) or VAC alternating with VTC (T = topotecan). Local therapy with 50.4 Gy radiation therapy with or without delayed primary excision began at week 12 for group III patients. Patients with group I/II alveolar RMS received 36-41.4 Gy. Local failure (LF) was defined as local progression as a first event with or without concurrent regional or distant failure. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.6 years, patients with clinical group I/II alveolar RMS had a 5-year event-free survival rate of 69% and LF of 10%. Among patients with group III RMS, 5-year event-free survival and LF rates were 70% and 19%, respectively. Local failure rates did not differ by histology, nodal status, or primary site, though there was a trend for increased LF for retroperitoneal (RP) tumors (P=.12). Tumors ≥5 cm were more likely to fail locally than tumors <5 cm (25% vs 10%, P=.0004). Almost all (98%) RP tumors were ≥5 cm, with no difference in LF by site when the analysis was restricted to tumors ≥5 cm (P=.86). Conclusion: Local control was excellent for clinical group I/II alveolar RMS. Local failure constituted 63% of initial events in clinical group III patients and did not vary by histology or nodal status. The trend for higher LF in RP tumors was related to tumor size. There has been no clear change in local control over RMS studies, including IRS-III and IRS-IV. Novel approaches are warranted for larger tumors (≥5 cm).

  8. Agrupamento de colheitas de tomate e estimativas do tamanho de parcela em cultivo protegido Grouping in tomato harvests and estimates of the plot size in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Dal'Col Lúcio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Para verificar qual a interferência da variabilidade das estimativas dos valores usados para determinação do tamanho de parcela com simulações de diferentes números de plantas por parcela e agrupamentos de colheitas, realizou-se um trabalho com três experimentos de tomate no Departamento de Fitotecnia da UFSM. Em dois experimentos foram utilizados túneis plásticos, com irrigação por gotejamento, camalhões com mulching preto de PEDB, três linhas de cultivo, 24 plantas por linha, espaçamento entre plantas 0,8 m e entre filas 1,2 m e uma estufa plástica no terceiro, essa com dimensões de 24 m de comprimento por 10 m de largura em oito linhas de cultivo. Todos os tratos culturais foram realizados com base na recomendação para a cultura (Filgueira, 2000, sendo aplicados concomitantemente nos três experimentos. A seqüência de duas, três e quatro plantas na linha de cultivo formou as parcelas de duas, três e quatro unidades básicas de tamanho. Foram realizadas análises considerando-se apenas colheitas individuais e colheitas agrupadas. Foram estimados a variância, o coeficiente de variação e o índice de informação relativa. Aplicou-se o teste de Bartlett entre as variâncias das colheitas individuais e agrupadas em cada tamanho de parcela simulado para verificar sua homogeneidade. As variâncias, entre as colheitas agrupadas, são homogêneas a partir do agrupamento de seis colheitas. Há acréscimos nas estimativas da variância da fitomassa de frutos com o aumento do tamanho da parcela e/ou o número de colheitas agrupadas. Parcelas de quatro plantas na linha de cultivo, combinados com agrupamento de seis em seis colheitas reduzem a variabilidade.The variability interference was verified on the estimates of the values used to determine the plot size with simulations of different numbers of plants per plot and groupings of harvests. Three experiments were performed with the tomato crop in the winter/spring of 2007

  9. Context matters: volunteer bias, small sample size, and the value of comparison groups in the assessment of research-based undergraduate introductory biology lab courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Kloser, Matthew J; Fukami, Tadashi; Shavelson, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The shift from cookbook to authentic research-based lab courses in undergraduate biology necessitates the need for evaluation and assessment of these novel courses. Although the biology education community has made progress in this area, it is important that we interpret the effectiveness of these courses with caution and remain mindful of inherent limitations to our study designs that may impact internal and external validity. The specific context of a research study can have a dramatic impact on the conclusions. We present a case study of our own three-year investigation of the impact of a research-based introductory lab course, highlighting how volunteer students, a lack of a comparison group, and small sample sizes can be limitations of a study design that can affect the interpretation of the effectiveness of a course.

  10. Dive Distribution and Group Size Parameters for Marine Species Occurring in the U.S. Navy’s Atlantic and Hawaii-Southern California Training and Testing Study Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    Blue whales track the diel vertical migration of their prey and feed almost exclusively on euphausiids, Marine Species Dive Distribution and Group ...Size Information 3.1 Introduction Many marine mammals are known to travel and feed in groups . The NAEMO accounts for this behavior by...Marine Species Dive Distribution and Group Size Parameters Technical Report 9 June 2017 NUWC-NPT Technical Report 12,243 9 June 2017 Dive

  11. Telomere length analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andrés; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A

    2007-01-01

    Most somatic cells of long-lived species undergo telomere shortening throughout life. Critically short telomeres trigger loss of cell viability in tissues, which has been related to alteration of tissue function and loss of regenerative capabilities in aging and aging-related diseases. Hence, telomere length is an important biomarker for aging and can be used in the prognosis of aging diseases. These facts highlight the importance of developing methods for telomere length determination that can be employed to evaluate telomere length during the human aging process. Telomere length quantification methods have improved greatly in accuracy and sensitivity since the development of the conventional telomeric Southern blot. Here, we describe the different methodologies recently developed for telomere length quantification, as well as their potential applications for human aging studies.

  12. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  13. The effect of social group size on feather corticosterone in the co-operatively breeding Smooth-billed Ani (Crotophaga ani: An assay validation and analysis of extreme social living.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K Robertson

    Full Text Available Living closely with others can provide a myriad of fitness benefits, from shared territory defense to co-operative resource acquisition. Costs of social aggregation are not absent, however, and likely influence optimal and observed groups' sizes in a social species. Here, we explored optimal group size in a joint-nesting cuckoo species (the Smooth-billed Ani, Crotophaga ani using endocrine markers of stress physiology (corticosterone, or CORT. Smooth-billed Anis exhibit intense reproductive competition that is exacerbated in atypically large groups. We therefore hypothesized that intra-group competition (measured by social group size mediates the desirability and physiological cost of social group membership in this species. To test this hypothesis, we captured 47 adult Smooth-billed Anis (31 males, 16 females during the breeding seasons of 2012-2014 in south-western Puerto Rico, and documented social group sizes. Tail feathers were sampled and used to quantify CORT (pg/mg in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs (n = 50. Our analyses show significant differences in feather-CORT of adults between categorical group sizes, with individuals from atypically large social groups (≥ x + 1SD having highest mean concentrations (33.319 pg/mg, and individuals from atypically small social groups (≤ x - 1SD having lowest mean concentrations (8.969 pg/mg. Whether reproductive competition or effort is responsible for elevated CORT in atypically large social groups, however, remains unclear. Our results suggest that living in atypically large groups is physiologically expensive and may represent an evolutionarily unstable strategy. To our knowledge, this is the first study to explore a correlation between stress physiology and group size in a joint-nesting species.

  14. CAREGIVER-CHILD INTERACTION, CAREGIVER TRANSITIONS, AND GROUP SIZE AS MEDIATORS BETWEEN INTERVENTION CONDITION AND ATTACHMENT AND PHYSICAL GROWTH OUTCOMES IN INSTITUTIONALIZED CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Hilary A; McCall, Robert B; Groark, Christina J; Kim, Kevin H; Muhamedrahimov, Rifkat J; Palmov, Oleg I; Nikiforova, Natalia V

    2017-09-01

    This report describes a secondary analysis of data from a comprehensive intervention project which included training and structural changes in three Baby Homes in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation. Multiple mediator models were tested according to the R.M. Baron and D.A. Kenny () causal-steps approach to examine whether caregiver-child interaction quality, number of caregiver transitions, and group size mediated the effects of the intervention on children's attachment behaviors and physical growth. The study utilized a subsample of 163 children from the original Russian Baby Home project, who were between 11 and 19 months at the time of assessment. Results from comparisons of the training and structural changes versus no intervention conditions are presented. Caregiver-child interaction quality and number of caregiver transitions fully mediated the association between intervention condition and attachment behavior. No other mediation was found. Results suggest that the quality of interaction between caregivers and children in institutional care is of primary importance to children's development, but relationship context may play a less direct mediational role, supporting caregiver-child interactions. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Calculating and reporting effect sizes on scientific papers (1: p < 0.05 limitations in the analysis of mean differences of two groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Espirito Santo

    2015-02-01

    Since p-values from the results of the statistical tests do not indicate the magnitude or importance of a difference, then effect sizes (ES should reported. In fact, ES give meaning to statistical tests; emphasize the power of statistical tests; reduce the risk of interpret mere sampling variation as real relationship; can increase the reporting of “non-significant"results, and allow the accumulation of knowledge from several studies using meta-analysis. Thus, the objectives of this paper are to present the limits of the significance level; describe the foundations of presentation of ES of statistical tests to analyze differences between two groups; present the formulas to calculate directly ES, providing examples of our own previous studies; show how to calculate confidence intervals; provide the conversion formulas for the review of the literature; indicate how to interpret the ES; and show that, although interpretable, the meaning (small, medium or large effect for an arbitrary metric could be inaccurate, requiring that interpretation should be made in the context of the research area and in the context of real world variables.

  16. Effects of isometric quadriceps strength training at different muscle lengths on dynamic torque production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorkõiv, Marika; Nosaka, Kazunori; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to (1) determine whether isometric training at a short vs. long quadriceps muscle length affects concentric torque production; (2) examine the relationship between muscle hypertrophy and concentric torque; and (3) determine whether changes in fascicle length are associated with changes in concentric torque. Sixteen men performed isometric training at a short (SL, n = 8) or a long muscle length (LL, n = 8). Changes in maximal concentric torque were measured at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 and 300 rad · s(-1). The relationships between the changes in concentric torque, cross-sectional area, volume and fascicle length were tested. Concentric torque increased significantly after training only in LL and at angular velocities of 30 and 120 rad · s(-1) by 12-13% (P Muscle size increased in LL only, the changes were correlated (r = 0.73-0.93, P torque. Vastus lateralis (VL) fascicle length increased in both groups (5.4 ± 4.9%, P = 0.001) but the change was not correlated with changes in concentric torque in either group. Isometric training-induced increases in muscle size and concentric torque were best elicited by training at long muscle lengths. These results highlight a clear muscle length dependence of isometric training on dynamic torque production.

  17. Cohesion in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Gary M; McClendon, Debra Theobald; Alonso, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Cohesion is the most popular of several relationship constructs in the clinical and empirical group therapy literature. This article reviews the most frequently cited definitions and studied measures of group cohesion. We briefly introduce a new measure, the Group Questionnaire, which elucidates group relationships by suggesting two latent factors of cohesion-relationship quality (positive bond, positive work, and negative relationship) and structure factors (member-leader and member-member). To further understand the literature, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between cohesion and treatment outcome in 40 studies. Results indicate cohesion that the weighted aggregate correlation was statistically significant with outcome r = .25, k (40), N (3,323), z = 6.54 (p cohesion outcome correlation (age, theoretical orientation, length, and size of group, as well as interventions intended to enhance cohesion). Consideration of measures and practices to improve treatment outcome are highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Telomere length and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Rode, Line

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been cross-sectionally associated with short telomeres as a measure of biological age. However, the direction and nature of the association is currently unclear. AIMS: We examined whether short telomere length is associated with depression cross-sectionally as well...... as prospectively and genetically. METHOD: Telomere length and three polymorphisms, TERT, TERC and OBFC1, were measured in 67 306 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Danish general population and associated with register-based attendance at hospital for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication....... RESULTS: Attendance at hospital for depression was associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not prospectively. Further, purchase of antidepressant medication was not associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally or prospectively. Mean follow-up was 7.6 years (range 0...

  19. Myofilament length dependent activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C. (IIT); (Loyola)

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  20. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, sho...

  1. HAMSTRING ARCHITECTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ADAPTATIONS FOLLOWING LONG VS. SHORT MUSCLE LENGTH ECCENTRIC TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Guex

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most common preventive eccentric-based exercises, such as Nordic hamstring do not include any hip flexion. So, the elongation stress reached is lower than during the late swing phase of sprinting. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of hamstring architectural (fascicle length and pennation angle and functional (concentric and eccentric optimum angles and concentric and eccentric peak torques parameters following a 3-week eccentric resistance program performed at long (LML versus short muscle length (SML. Both groups performed eight sessions of 3-5x8 slow maximal eccentric knee extensions on an isokinetic dynamometer: the SML group at 0° and the LML group at 80° of hip flexion. Architectural parameters were measured using ultrasound imaging and functional parameters using the isokinetic dynamometer. The fascicle length increased by 4.9% (p<0.01, medium effect size in the SML and by 9.3% (p<0.001, large effect size in the LML group. The pennation angle did not change (p=0.83 in the SML and tended to decrease by 0.7° (p=0.09, small effect size in the LML group. The concentric optimum angle tended to decrease by 8.8° (p=0.09, medium effect size in the SML and by 17.3° (p<0.01, large effect size in the LML group. The eccentric optimum angle did not change (p=0.19, small effect size in the SML and tended to decrease by 10.7° (p=0.06, medium effect size in the LML group. The concentric peak torque did not change in the SML (p=0.37 and the LML (p=0.23 groups, whereas eccentric peak torque increased by 12.9% (p<0.01, small effect size and 17.9% (p<0.001, small effect size in the SML and the LML group, respectively. No group-by-time interaction was found for any parameters. A correlation was found between the training-induced change in fascicle length and the change in concentric optimum angle (r=-0.57, p<0.01. These results suggest that performing eccentric exercises lead to several architectural and functional adaptations. However

  2. On the Impact of Sample Size on LC50Estimation in Acute Fish Toxicity Testing: Is N = 7/Group Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Greg J; Bailer, A John; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E

    2018-01-19

    The fish acute toxicity test method is foundational to aquatic toxicity testing strategies, yet the literature lacks a concise sample size assessment. While various sources address sample size, historical precedent seems to play a larger role than objective measures. Here, a novel and comprehensive quantification of the effect of sample size on estimation of the LC 50 is presented, covering a wide range of scenarios. The results put into perspective the practical differences across a range of sample sizes, from N = 5/concentration up to N = 23/concentration. This work provides a framework for setting sample size guidance. It illustrates ways to quantify the performance of LC 50 estimation, which can be used to set sample size guidance given reasonably difficult, or worst-case scenarios. There is a clear benefit to larger sample size studies: they reduce error in the determination of LC 50 s, and lead to more robust safe environmental concentration determinations, particularly in cases likely to be called worst-case (shallow slope and true LC 50 near the edges of the concentration range). Given that the use of well-justified sample sizes is crucial to reducing uncertainty in toxicity estimates, these results lead us to recommend a reconsideration of the current de minimis 7/concentration sample size for critical studies (e.g., studies needed for a chemical registration, which are being tested for the first time, or involving difficult test substances). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  4. Telomere Length and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimura, Masayuki; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Gardner, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length, representing the mean length of all telomeres in leukocytes, is ostensibly a bioindicator of human aging. The authors hypothesized that shorter telomeres might forecast imminent mortality in elderly people better than leukocyte telomere length. They performed mortality...... telomeres predicted the death of the first co-twin better than the mTRFL did (mTRFL: 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.63; mTRFL(50): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; mTRFL(25): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; MTRFL: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.67). The telomere-mortality association was stronger in years 3-4 than...

  5. Effect of preharvest understory treatment and group opening size on four-year survival of advance reproduction in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin A. Spetich; David L. Graney

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine survival of regeneration in small openings. Six forest stands were located in 1990 and three understory treatments were applied to each in early 1991. In each stand, six sizes of openings were created in 1992 ranging in size from 0.025 ac to 0.50 ac. Understory treatments consisted of: 1) no control of competing regeneration, 2...

  6. Sonographic Measurement of Normal Splenic Length in Korean Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Bum; Cheon, Byung Kook; Kim, Jong Min; Oh, Kyung Seoung; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To establish upper limit of normal splenic length of Korean adults on ultrasonography and to determice the degree of interobserver and intraobserver variation. Ultrasonographic scans were performed to measure the maximum length of spleen in 105 of 150 adults selected by convenience sampling. Remained 45 cases with any conditions that could alter splenic size were excluded from this study. The maximum length of spleen was measured and correlated with body surface area, patient height, weight, age and sex. In 31 of the 105 adults we evaluated the interobserver and intraobserver variations in sonographic measurements of splenic length obtained by three radiologists in blind fashion. The mean splenic length in 105 adults was 8.56cm ({+-} 0.95). The splenic length positively correlated with body surface area, patient height and weight (P <0.001), and negatively correlated with patient age (P < 0.01). Male spleen (8.87 cm {+-} 1.07) was longer than female spleen (8.35 cm {+-} 0.81) (P < 0.05). The following guidelines are proposed for the upper limit of normal splenic length at different groups of body surface area: no longer than 10 cm at 1.20{approx}1.59 m{sup 2}, 11 cm at1.60{approx}1.79 m{sup 2}, and 12 cm at 1.80{approx}1.99 m{sup 2}. The mean interobserver variation between any two radiologists ranged from 0.32 cm ({+-} 0.29) to 0.39 cm ({+-} 0.33) and interobserver variations were within 1 cm in 96%. The mean intraobserver variations were within 0.5 cm in 91%. The splenic length closely correlated with body surface area, patient height, weight and age. Particularly the upper limit of normal splenic length changed according to body surface area. Interobserver variation about 1 cm and intraobserver variation about 0.5 cm should be considered in the measurement of the splenic length on ultrasonography

  7. Full Length Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Out of the 320 male sheep examined, 87(27.2%) were infected, while 9(19.1%) of the 47 females examined were infected (Table 2). Infection varied from one abattoir to another. Age related distribution of P. cervi is shown in Table 3. Out of 356 adult sheep (>2yrs) examined, 35. Full Length Research Article. 12 ...

  8. IMPACT OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ON OPERATING COST FOR SMALL AND MEDIUM - SIZED BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS AFFILIATED TO A PURCHASING GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Zimon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to ask one question. How the implementation of the requirements of ISO 9001 system affects the costs of running the business? Design/methodology/approach - The research covered time from 2006 to 2011 and was an attempt to assess the impact of the maintenance of the ISO 9001 Quality Management System on the costs of small and medium sized business organizations. The main objective was the selection of right research subjects that would allow the formulation of the most reliable and statistically valid conclusions. For this purpose we obtained permissions to conduct research in organizations characterized by comparable futures such as size, industry, type of business and strategy. Findings - The study shows that the costs associated with the implementation and maintenance of the Quality Management System standard is still too high, and effectively discourages representatives of small and medium-sized commercial organizations from implementing ISO 9001 system.

  9. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. Gap length distributions by PEPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warszawer, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions guaranteeing exponential gap length distributions are formulated and discussed. Exponential gap length distributions of bubble chamber tracks first obtained on a CRT device are presented. Distributions of resulting average gap lengths and their velocity dependence are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Length of excitable knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present extensive numerical simulations of an excitable medium to study the long-term dynamics of knotted vortex strings for all torus knots up to crossing number 11. We demonstrate that FitzHugh-Nagumo evolution preserves the knot topology for all the examples presented, thereby providing a field theory approach to the study of knots. Furthermore, the evolution yields a well-defined minimal length for each knot that is comparable to the ropelength of ideal knots. We highlight the role of the medium boundary in stabilizing the length of the knot and discuss the implications beyond torus knots. We also show that there is not a unique attractor within a given knot topology.

  12. Pion nucleus scattering lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.T.; Levinson, C.A.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1971-09-01

    Soft pion theory and the Fubini-Furlan mass dispersion relations have been used to analyze the pion nucleon scattering lengths and obtain a value for the sigma commutator term. With this value and using the same principles, scattering lengths have been predicted for nuclei with mass number ranging from 6 to 23. Agreement with experiment is very good. For those who believe in the Gell-Mann-Levy sigma model, the evaluation of the commutator yields the value 0.26(m/sub σ//m/sub π/) 2 for the sigma nucleon coupling constant. The large dispersive corrections for the isosymmetric case implies that the basic idea behind many of the soft pion calculations, namely, slow variation of matrix elements from the soft pion limit to the physical pion mass, is not correct. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  13. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, J.; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 10 (2015), s. 958-966 ISSN 1552-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/1320 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67179843 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : flow cytometry * genome size * hyporeduplication Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q); EH - Ecology, Behaviour (UEK-B) Impact factor: 3.181, year: 2015

  14. Length-weight and length-length relationships of freshwater wild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length-weight and length-length relationships of freshwater wild catfish Mystus bleekeri from Nala Daik, Sialkot, Pakistan. ... Linear regression analysis was used, first to compute the degree of relationship between length and weight and then among total (TL), standard (SL) and fork lengths (FL). LWR exhibited a highly ...

  15. Relativistic length agony continued

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redžić D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redžić 2008b, we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the ‘pole in a barn’ paradox. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171028

  16. Leg length change after opening wedge and closing wedge high tibial osteotomy: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical considerations suggest that leg length increases after opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) and decreases after closing wedge HTO; however, in vivo studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis therefore assessed changes in leg length after opening wedge and closing wedge HTO. All studies comparing pre- and postoperative leg length in patients who underwent opening and/or closing wedge HTO were included. Two reviewers independently recorded data from each study in terms of sample size as well as preoperative and postoperative leg length of open wedge and/or closed wedge HTO groups. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis. Although pooled results showed leg length changes from before to after surgery were -6.93 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: -17.53 to 3.67 mm; P = 0.20) in opening wedge HTO and 1.97 mm (95% CI: -7.13 to 11.07 mm; P = 0.67) in closing wedge HTO, respectively, these values were statistically not significant. However, the difference in the pooled mean leg length change from before to after surgery between opening wedge and closing wedge HTO was 8 mm, a difference that was significant (95% CI: 6.53 to 9.46 mm; Pleg length was not statistically significant for either opening or closing wedge HTO. However, leg length change from before to after surgery was 8 mm greater for opening wedge HTO than for closing wedge HTO.

  17. Artificial selection on male genitalia length alters female brain size

    OpenAIRE

    Buechel, Séverine D; Booksmythe, Isobel; Kotrschal, Alexander; Jennions, Michael D; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-01-01

    Male harassment is a classic example of how sexual conflict over mating leads to sex-specific behavioural adaptations. Females often suffer significant costs from males attempting forced copulations, and the sexes can be in an arms race over male coercion. Yet, despite recent recognition that divergent sex-specific interests in reproduction can affect brain evolution, sexual conflict has not been addressed in this context. Here, we investigate whether artificial selection on a correlate of ma...

  18. Cutting Whole Length or Partial Length of Internal Anal Sphincter in Managementof Fissure in Ano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furat Shani Aoda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A chronic anal fissure is a common painful perianal condition.The main operative procedure to treat this painful condition is a lateral internal sphincteretomy (LIS.The aim of study is to compare the outcome and complications of closed LIS up to the dentate line (whole length of internal sphincter or up to the fissure apex (partial length of internal sphincter in the treatment of anal fissure.It is a prospective comparativestudy including 100 patients with chronic fissure in ano. All patients assigned to undergo closed LIS. Those patients were randomly divided into two groups: 50 patients underwent LIS to the level of dentate line (whole length and other 50 patients underwent LIS to the level of fissure apex (partial length. Patients were followed up weekly in the 1st month, twice monthly in the second month then monthly   for next 2 months and finally after 1 year. There was satisfactory relief of pain in all patients in both groups & complete healing of the fissure occurred. Regarding post operative incontinence no major degree of incontinence occur in both group but minor degree of incontinence persists In 7 patients after whole length LIS after one year. In conclusion, both whole length & partial length LIS associated with improvement of pain, good chance of healing but whole length LIS associated with more chance of long term  flatus incontinence. Hence,we recommend partial length LIS as treatment forchronic anal fissure.

  19. Short cervical length dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. With research efforts, the rate of PTB decreased to 11.4% in 2013. Transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) cervical length (CL) screening predicts PTB. In asymptomatic singletons without prior spontaneous PTB (sPTB), TVU CL screening should be done. If the cervix is 20 mm or less, vaginal progesterone is indicated. In asymptomatic singletons with prior sPTB, serial CL screening is indicated. In multiple gestations, routine cervical screening is not indicated. In symptomatic women with preterm labor, TVU CL screening and fetal fibronectin testing is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. discouraged by queue length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Parthasarathy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient solution is obtained analytically using continued fractions for a state-dependent birth-death queue in which potential customers are discouraged by the queue length. This queueing system is then compared with the well-known infinite server queueing system which has the same steady state solution as the model under consideration, whereas their transient solutions are different. A natural measure of speed of convergence of the mean number in the system to its stationarity is also computed.

  1. Primary length standard adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševčík, Robert; Guttenová, Jana

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with problems and techniques connected with primary length standard adjusting, which includes disassembling of the device and by use of the secondary laser with collimated beam and diffraction laws successively reassembling of the laser. In the reassembling process the device was enhanced with substituting the thermal grease cooling of cold finger by copper socket cooler. This improved external cooling system enables more effective cooling of molecular iodine in the cell, which allows better pressure stability of iodine vapor and easier readjustment of the system.

  2. Estimation of ocular volume from axial length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagra, Manbir; Gilmartin, Bernard; Logan, Nicola S

    2014-12-01

    To determine which biometric parameters provide optimum predictive power for ocular volume. Sixty-seven adult subjects were scanned with a Siemens 3-T MRI scanner. Mean spherical error (MSE) (D) was measured with a Shin-Nippon autorefractor and a Zeiss IOLMaster used to measure (mm) axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and corneal radius (CR). Total ocular volume (TOV) was calculated from T2-weighted MRIs (voxel size 1.0 mm(3)) using an automatic voxel counting and shading algorithm. Each MR slice was subsequently edited manually in the axial, sagittal and coronal plane, the latter enabling location of the posterior pole of the crystalline lens and partitioning of TOV into anterior (AV) and posterior volume (PV) regions. Mean values (±SD) for MSE (D), AL (mm), ACD (mm) and CR (mm) were -2.62±3.83, 24.51±1.47, 3.55±0.34 and 7.75±0.28, respectively. Mean values (±SD) for TOV, AV and PV (mm(3)) were 8168.21±1141.86, 1099.40±139.24 and 7068.82±1134.05, respectively. TOV showed significant correlation with MSE, AL, PV (all p<0.001), CR (p=0.043) and ACD (p=0.024). Bar CR, the correlations were shown to be wholly attributable to variation in PV. Multiple linear regression indicated that the combination of AL and CR provided optimum R(2) values of 79.4% for TOV. Clinically useful estimations of ocular volume can be obtained from measurement of AL and CR. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  4. "I Would Rather Be Size 10 Than Have Straight A's": A Focus Study Group of Adolescent Girls' Wish To Be Thinner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; Gardiner, Maria; Slater, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the body concerns of adolescent girls (N=67), together with the underlying motivations for wishes to be thinner. Results of focus group studies reveal that sociocultural influences exerted the strongest pressures to be thin. The girls displayed an unexpected sophistication in their conceptualization of the role of both media effects…

  5. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with hummus. To control your portion sizes when eating out, try these tips: Order the small size. Instead of a medium or large, ask for the smallest size. By eating a small hamburger instead of a large, you ...

  6. Structural features and electronic properties of group-III-, group-IV-, and group-V-doped Si nanocrystallites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, L E; Degoli, Elena; Cantele, G; Ossicini, Stefano; Ninno, D; Furthmueller, J; Bechstedt, F

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the incorporation of group-III (B and Al), group-IV (C and Ge), and group-V (N and P) impurities in Si nanocrystallites. The structural features and electronic properties of doped Si nanocrystallites, which are faceted or spherical-like, are studied by means of an ab initio pseudopotential method including spin polarization. Jahn-Teller distortions occur in the neighborhood of the impurity sites and the bond lengths show a dependence on size and shape of the nanocrystallites. We find that the acceptor (group-III) and donor (group-V) levels become deep as the nanocrystallites become small. The energy difference between the spin-up and spin-down levels of group-III and group-V impurities decreases as the size of the Si nanocrystallite increases and tends to the value calculated for Si bulk. Doping with carbon introduces an impurity-related level in the energy gap of the Si nanocrystallites

  7. development of oscillating classifiers for forage chop length ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1987-09-01

    Sep 1, 1987 ... size is defined. The size of the particles are reported in terms of geometric mean length and geometric standard deviation by weight. The particle size determined is used to evaluate forage harvesting machine and to define forage characteristics with regards to animal feeding trials. 1. INTRODUCTION.

  8. Influência da granulometria, do diâmetro e do comprimento de amostras de grãos triturados de soja na determinação de coeficientes simultâneos de transferência Influence of soybean grain sizing and sample diameter and length on the determination of simultaneous transfer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil Jin Park

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo verificar a influência da granulometria de grãos de soja triturados, assim como do diâmetro e do comprimento do corpo-de-prova na determinação de coeficientes simultâneos de transferência de calor e massa. Utilizando-se equipamentos de coluna fechada e de coluna aberta, foram testadas três granulometrias, dois comprimentos e três diâmetros diferentes para as amostras, totalizando dezoito condições experimentais. Nos experimentos com o equipamento de coluna fechada, a maior influência na avaliação da condutividade térmica foi devida aos valores de fluxo de calor obtidos. Tanto nos experimentos de coluna fechada quanto de coluna aberta, a contribuição dos fenômenos simultâneos deve ser considerada. O comprimento e a granulometria têm influência na determinação da condutividade térmica e na difusividade mássica, ao passo que o diâmetro só interfere na obtenção do valor da difusividade mássica.The main goal of this work was to verify the influence of triturated soybean grain sizing, their sample diameters and lengths, on the determination of simultaneous heat and mass transfer rates. Using equipment with open and closed columns, three different grain sizings were tested, totalling eighteen different test conditions. For experiments with the closed column, the greater influence on the evaluation of the thermal conductivity was due to the heat flow rates. On experiments with the closed column as well as on those with the open column, the contribution of the simultaneous phenomena must be acknowledged. The sample length and the grain sizing can influence both heat conductivity and mass diffusivity, while the sample diameter interferes only with mass diffusivity rates.

  9. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  10. Small-Magnitude Effect Sizes in Epigenetic End Points are Important in Children's Environmental Health Studies: The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center's Epigenetics Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Carrie V; Marsit, Carmen J; Faustman, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari; Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Dolinoy, Dana C; Herbstman, Julie; Holland, Nina; LaSalle, Janine M; Schmidt, Rebecca; Yousefi, Paul; Perera, Frederica; Joubert, Bonnie R; Wiemels, Joseph; Taylor, Michele; Yang, Ivana V; Chen, Rui; Hew, Kinjal M; Freeland, Deborah M Hussey; Miller, Rachel; Murphy, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of the epigenome is a primary interest for children's environmental health researchers studying the environmental influences on human populations, particularly those studying the role of pregnancy and early-life exposures on later-in-life health outcomes. Our objective was to consider the state of the science in environmental epigenetics research and to focus on DNA methylation and the collective observations of many studies being conducted within the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers, as they relate to the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis. We address the current laboratory and statistical tools available for epigenetic analyses, discuss methods for validation and interpretation of findings, particularly when magnitudes of effect are small, question the functional relevance of findings, and discuss the future for environmental epigenetics research. A common finding in environmental epigenetic studies is the small-magnitude epigenetic effect sizes that result from such exposures. Although it is reasonable and necessary that we question the relevance of such small effects, we present examples in which small effects persist and have been replicated across populations and across time. We encourage a critical discourse on the interpretation of such small changes and further research on their functional relevance for children's health. The dynamic nature of the epigenome will require an emphasis on future longitudinal studies in which the epigenome is profiled over time, over changing environmental exposures, and over generations to better understand the multiple ways in which the epigenome may respond to environmental stimuli.

  11. Inflatable penile prosthesis implant length with baseline characteristic correlations: preliminary analysis of the PROPPER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nelson; Henry, Gerard; Karpman, Edward; Brant, William; Jones, LeRoy; Khera, Mohit; Kohler, Tobias; Christine, Brian; Rhee, Eugene; Kansas, Bryan; Bella, Anthony J

    2017-12-01

    "Prospective Registry of Outcomes with Penile Prosthesis for Erectile Restoration" (PROPPER) is a large, multi-institutional, prospective clinical study to collect, analyze, and report real-world outcomes for men implanted with penile prosthetic devices. We prospectively correlated co-morbid conditions and demographic data with implanted penile prosthesis size to enable clinicians to better predict implanted penis size following penile implantation. We present many new data points for the first time in the literature and postulate that radical prostatectomy (RP) is negatively correlated with penile corporal length. Patient demographics, medical history, baseline characteristics and surgical details were compiled prospectively. Pearson correlation coefficient was generated for the correlation between demographic, etiology of ED, duration of ED, co-morbid conditions, pre-operative penile length (flaccid and stretched) and length of implanted penile prosthesis. Multivariate analysis was performed to define predictors of implanted prosthesis length. From June 2011 to June 2017, 1,135 men underwent primary implantation of penile prosthesis at a total of 11 study sites. Malleable (Spectra), 2-piece Ambicor, and 3-piece AMS 700 CX/LGX were included in the analysis. The most common patient comorbidities were CV disease (26.1%), DM (11.1%), and PD (12.4%). Primary etiology of ED: RP (27.4%), DM (20.3%), CVD (18.0%), PD (10.3%), and Priapism (1.4%), others (22.6%). Mean duration of ED is 6.2¡À4.1 years. Implant length was weakly negatively correlated with White/Caucasian (r=-0.18; Pprosthesis length is negatively correlated with some ethnic groups, prostatectomy, and incontinence. Positive correlates include CV disease, preoperative stretched penile length, and flaccid penile length.

  12. Adaptive treatment-length optimization in spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdari, Ali; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2018-04-01

    Recent theoretical research on spatiobiologically integrated radiotherapy has focused on optimization models that adapt fluence-maps to the evolution of tumor state, for example, cell densities, as observed in quantitative functional images acquired over the treatment course. We propose an optimization model that adapts the length of the treatment course as well as the fluence-maps to such imaged tumor state. Specifically, after observing the tumor cell densities at the beginning of a session, the treatment planner solves a group of convex optimization problems to determine an optimal number of remaining treatment sessions, and a corresponding optimal fluence-map for each of these sessions. The objective is to minimize the total number of tumor cells remaining (TNTCR) at the end of this proposed treatment course, subject to upper limits on the biologically effective dose delivered to the organs-at-risk. This fluence-map is administered in future sessions until the next image is available, and then the number of sessions and the fluence-map are re-optimized based on the latest cell density information. We demonstrate via computer simulations on five head-and-neck test cases that such adaptive treatment-length and fluence-map planning reduces the TNTCR and increases the biological effect on the tumor while employing shorter treatment courses, as compared to only adapting fluence-maps and using a pre-determined treatment course length based on one-size-fits-all guidelines.

  13. Correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiziou, L.; Garbet, X.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with correlation length of electrostatic turbulence. First, the model of drift waves turbulence is presented. Then, the radial correlation length is determined analytically with toroidal coupling and non linear coupling. (TEC). 5 refs

  14. Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In One; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Hong Dae; Sim, Jung Suk

    2010-01-01

    Renal length offers important information to detect or follow-up various renal diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the kidney length of normal Korean children in relation to age, height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI). Children between 1 month and 15 years of age without urological abnormality were recruited. Children below 3rd percentile and over 97th percentile for height or weight were excluded. Both renal lengths were measured in the prone position three times and then averaged by experienced radiologists. The mean length and standard deviation for each age group was obtained, and regression equation was calculated between renal length and age, weight, height, BSA, and BMI, respectively. Renal length was measured in 550 children. Renal length grows rapidly until 24 month, while the growth rate is reduced thereafter. The regression equation for age is: renal length (mm) = 45.953 + 1.064 x age (month, ≤ 24 months) (R2 = 0.720) or 62.173 + 0.203 x age (months, > 24 months) (R2 = 0.711). The regression equation for height is: renal length (mm) = 24.494 + 0.457 x height (cm) (R2 = 0.894). The regression equation for weight is: renal length (mm) = 38.342 + 2.117 x weight (kg, ≤18 kg) (R2 = 0.852) or 64.498 + 0.646 x weight (kg, > 18 kg) (R2 = 0.651). The regression equation for BSA is: renal length (mm) = 31.622 + 61.363 x BSA (m2, ≤ 0.7) (R2 = 0.857) or 52.717 + 29.959 x BSA (m2, > 0.7) (R2 = 0.715). The regression equation for BMI is: renal length (mm) = 44.474 + 1.163 x BMI (R2 = 0.079). This study provides data on the normal renal length and its association with age, weight, height, BSA and BMI. The results of this study will guide the detection and follow-up of renal diseases in Korean children

  15. Sperm length evolution in the fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, B.; Dijkstra, M. B.; Mueller, U. G.

    2009-01-01

    Eusocial insects offer special opportunities for the comparative study of sperm traits because sperm competition is absent (in species with obligatory monandry) or constrained (in lineages where queens mate multiply but never remate later in life). We measured sperm length in 19 species of fungus......-growing ants, representing 9 of the 12 recognized genera, and mapped these onto the ant phylogeny. We show that average sperm length across species is highly variable and decreases with mature colony size in basal genera with singly mated queens, suggesting that sperm production or storage constraints affect...... the evolution of sperm length. Sperm length does not decrease further in multiply mating leaf-cutting ants, despite substantial further increases in colony size. In a combined analysis, sexual dimorphism explained 63.1% of the variance in sperm length between species. As colony size was not a significant...

  16. Correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiziou, L.; Garbet, X.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the radial correlation length of an electrostatic drift wave turbulence is analytically determined in various regimes. The analysis relies on the calculation of a range of mode non linear interaction, which is an instantaneous correlation length. The link with the usual correlation length has not been investigated yet. (TEC). 5 refs

  17. Length-Weight Relationship and Condition Factor of Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length – weight relationship of Clarias anguillaris (Fam: Claridae) in Kontagora Reservoir, Niger State, Nigeria, was studied from January, 2007 - December, 2007. The fish species was obtained using a fleet of graded gill nets comprising of nine multi filament gill nets mesh sizes. The parameters a and b of the Length ...

  18. Length-Weight Relationships and Food Preference of Two Coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length-weight measurements were taken from well-preserved fish specimens from which stomachs were extracted for the analysis of the food contents, using frequency of occurrence, numerical and gravimetric methods, as well as index of relative importance. The length-frequency analysis showed a size distribution with a ...

  19. Length-Weight Relationship And Condition Factor Of The Elephant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 791 elephant fish, Mormyrus rume specimens of various sizes were sampled from River Ose, southwestern Ngera. Length-weight relationship and condition factor of the M rume specimens were studied. Their standard lengths ranged from 15.0 to 45.0 cm. Mean standard lengthfor males, females and combined sex ...

  20. Length Frequency Distribution And Sex Ratio Of Macrobrachium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length frequency distribution and sex ratio of Macrobrachium macrobrachion sampled by cane traps in the Lagos –Lekki lagoon system were estimated from May 2002 to April 2004. The total number of size classes for the first and second year for both male and female ranged from 10 – 12. The length range was 3 to 14cm ...

  1. The Alkali/Surfactant/ Polymer Process: Effects of Slug Size, Core Length and a Chase Polymer Le procédé alkali/surfactant/polymère : effets de la taille du bouchon, de la longueur de la carotte et d'un polymère de déplacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green K. A.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to examine the effects of slug size, core length, and a chase polymer on the effectiveness of the alkali/surfactant/polymer (A/S/P process in recovering waterflood residual oil. Core flood experiments were conducted with unfired linear Berea sandstone cores. The tertiary oil recovery, oil cut, pressure drop, and chemical propagation were measured for each flood. Tertiary oil recovery significantly increased with the slug size up to 0. 5 of a pore volume. Increasing the slug size further resulted in a smaller incremental increase in oil recovery. A slight increase in tertiary oil recovery was obtained when small size A/S/P slugs were followed with achase polymer having a viscosity higher than the slug. The lack of oil recovery with small A/S/P slugs was due to the consumption and dilution of the injected chemicals, especially the synthetic surfactant, due to adsorption and dispersion. Increasing the core length by a factor of 4. 5 (from 9 to 40. 6 cm had no significant effect on tertiary oil recovery. Chemical propagation was found to be a function of core length (i. e. , core Peclet number and the size of the chase polymer slug. Increasing core length and employing a chase polymer maintained the integrity of the A/S/P slug by decreasing the effect of dispersion and minimizing the influence of viscous fingering at the tail of the A/S/P slug. Une étude expérimentale a été effectuée pour examiner les effets de la taille du bouchon, de la longueur de la carotte et de l'emploi d'un polymère de déplacement sur l'efficacité du procédé A/S/P (alkali/surfactant/polymère dans la récupération d'huile résiduelle par injection d'eau. Les expériences d'injection ont été faites avec des carottes rectilignes en grès de Berea vert. La récupération tertiaire du pétrole, la présence d'eau, la perte de charge et la propagation chimique ont été mesurées pour chaque injection. La récupération tertiaire du

  2. Reestablishment of radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzer dogs

    OpenAIRE

    SOHN, Jungmin; YUN, Sookyung; LEE, Jeosoon; CHANG, Dongwoo; CHOI, Mincheol; YOON, Junghee

    2016-01-01

    Kidney size may be altered in renal diseases, and the detection of kidney size alteration has diagnostic and prognostic values. We hypothesized that radiographic kidney size, the kidney length to the second lumbar vertebra (L2) length ratio, in normal Miniature Schnauzer dogs may be overestimated due to their shorter vertebral length. This study was conducted to evaluate radiographic and ultrasonographic kidney size and L2 length in clinically normal Miniature Schnauzers and other dog breeds ...

  3. Towards a highly-efficient fuel-cell catalyst: optimization of Pt particle size, supports and surface-oxygen group concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Navaneethan; de la Fuente, Jose Luis Gomez; Ochal, Piotr; Giri, Rajiv; Raaen, Steinar; Sunde, Svein; Rønning, Magnus; Chen, De

    2013-03-21

    In the present work, methanol oxidation reaction was investigated on Pt particles of various diameters on carbon-nanofibers and carbon-black supports with different surface-oxygen concentrations, aiming for a better understanding of the relationship between the catalyst properties and the electrochemical performance. The pre-synthesized Pt nanoparticles in ethylene glycol, prepared by the polyol method without using any capping agents, were deposited on different carbon supports. Removal of oxygen-groups from the carbon supports had profound positive effects on not only the Pt dispersion but also the specific activity. The edge structures on the stacked graphene sheets in the platelet carbon-nanofibers provided a strong interaction with the Pt particles, significantly reconstructing them in the process. Such reconstruction resulted in the formation of more plated Pt particles on the CNF than on the carbon-black and exposure of more Pt atoms with relatively high co-ordination numbers, and thereby higher specific activity. Owing to the combined advantages of optimum Pt particle diameter, an oxygen-free surface and the unique properties of CNFs, Pt supported on heat-treated CNFs exhibited a higher mass activity twice of that of its commercial counterpart.

  4. Measuring specific, rather than generalized, cognitive deficits and maximizing between-group effect size in studies of cognition and cognitive change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Steven M

    2008-07-01

    While cognitive impairment in schizophrenia is easy to demonstrate, it has been much more difficult to measure a specific cognitive process unconfounded by the influence of other cognitive processes and noncognitive factors (eg, sedation, low motivation) that affect test scores. With the recent interest in the identification of neurophysiology-linked cognitive probes for clinical trials, the issue of isolating specific cognitive processes has taken on increased importance. Recent advances in research design and psychometric theory regarding cognition research in schizophrenia demonstrate the importance of (1) maximizing between-group differences via reduction of measurement error during both test development and subsequent research and (2) the development and use of process-specific tasks in which theory-driven performance indices are derived across multiple conditions. Use of these 2 strategies can significantly advance both our understanding of schizophrenia and measurement sensitivity for clinical trials. Novel data-analytic strategies for analyzing change across multiple conditions and/or multiple time points also allow for increased reliability and greater measurement sensitivity than traditional strategies. Following discussion of these issues, trade-offs inherent to attempts to address psychometric issues in schizophrenia research are reviewed. Finally, additional considerations for maximizing sensitivity and real-world significance in clinical trials are discussed.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group simulations of SU(N ) Heisenberg chains using standard Young tableaus: Fundamental representation and comparison with a finite-size Bethe ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, Pierre; Mila, Frédéric

    2018-04-01

    We develop an efficient method to perform density matrix renormalization group simulations of the SU(N ) Heisenberg chain with open boundary conditions taking full advantage of the SU(N ) symmetry of the problem. This method is an extension of the method previously developed for exact diagonalizations and relies on a systematic use of the basis of standard Young tableaux. Concentrating on the model with the fundamental representation at each site (i.e., one particle per site in the fermionic formulation), we have benchmarked our results for the ground-state energy up to N =8 and up to 420 sites by comparing them with Bethe ansatz results on open chains, for which we have derived and solved the Bethe ansatz equations. The agreement for the ground-state energy is excellent for SU(3) (12 digits). It decreases with N , but it is still satisfactory for N =8 (six digits). Central charges c are also extracted from the entanglement entropy using the Calabrese-Cardy formula and agree with the theoretical values expected from the SU (N) 1 Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theories.

  6. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants.

  7. Correlated evolution of sternal keel length and ilium length in birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between the pectoral module (the pectoral girdle and limbs and the pelvic module (the pelvic girdle and limbs plays a key role in shaping avian evolution, but prior empirical studies on trait covariation between the two modules are limited. Here we empirically test whether (size-corrected sternal keel length and ilium length are correlated during avian evolution using phylogenetic comparative methods. Our analyses on extant birds and Mesozoic birds both recover a significantly positive correlation. The results provide new evidence regarding the integration between the pelvic and pectoral modules. The correlated evolution of sternal keel length and ilium length may serve as a mechanism to cope with the effect on performance caused by a tradeoff in muscle mass between the pectoral and pelvic modules, via changing moment arms of muscles that function in flight and in terrestrial locomotion.

  8. Particle size and shape of calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; D'souza, Rena N; Dechow, Paul C; Safavi, Kamran E; Spångberg, Larz S W

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the particle length, width, perimeter, and aspect ratio of calcium hydroxide powder using a flow particle image analyzer (FPIA). Five sample groups each with 10 mg of calcium hydroxide were mixed with 15 mL of alcohol and sonicated. Digital images of the particle samples were taken using the FPIA and analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance. The overall averages +/- standard deviation among the five groups for particle length (microm), width (microm), perimeter (microm), and aspect ratio were 2.255 +/- 1.994, 1.620 +/- 1.464, 6.699 +/- 5.598, and 0.737 +/- 0.149, respectively. No statistical significance was observed among the groups for all parameters. When the total of 46,818 particles from all five groups were classified into the five length categories of 0.5-microm increments, there were significant differences in width, perimeter, and aspect ratio (all p values particles have a size and shape that may allow direct penetration into open dentin tubules.

  9. Telomere length in interstitial lung diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snetselaar, Reinier; Van Moorsel, Coline H M; Kazemier, Karin M.; Van Der Vis, Joanne J.; Zanen, Pieter; Van Oosterhout, Matthijs F M; Grutters, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a heterogeneous group of rare diseases that primarily affect the pulmonary interstitium. Studies have implicated a role for telomere length (TL) maintenance in ILD, particularly in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Here, we measure TL in a wide

  10. Correcting length-frequency distributions for imperfect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, André R.; Hawkins, John A.; Winkelman, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Sampling gear selects for specific sizes of fish, which may bias length-frequency distributions that are commonly used to assess population size structure, recruitment patterns, growth, and survival. To properly correct for sampling biases caused by gear and other sources, length-frequency distributions need to be corrected for imperfect detection. We describe a method for adjusting length-frequency distributions when capture and recapture probabilities are a function of fish length, temporal variation, and capture history. The method is applied to a study involving the removal of Smallmouth Bass Micropterus dolomieu by boat electrofishing from a 38.6-km reach on the Yampa River, Colorado. Smallmouth Bass longer than 100 mm were marked and released alive from 2005 to 2010 on one or more electrofishing passes and removed on all other passes from the population. Using the Huggins mark–recapture model, we detected a significant effect of fish total length, previous capture history (behavior), year, pass, year×behavior, and year×pass on capture and recapture probabilities. We demonstrate how to partition the Huggins estimate of abundance into length frequencies to correct for these effects. Uncorrected length frequencies of fish removed from Little Yampa Canyon were negatively biased in every year by as much as 88% relative to mark–recapture estimates for the smallest length-class in our analysis (100–110 mm). Bias declined but remained high even for adult length-classes (≥200 mm). The pattern of bias across length-classes was variable across years. The percentage of unadjusted counts that were below the lower 95% confidence interval from our adjusted length-frequency estimates were 95, 89, 84, 78, 81, and 92% from 2005 to 2010, respectively. Length-frequency distributions are widely used in fisheries science and management. Our simple method for correcting length-frequency estimates for imperfect detection could be widely applied when mark–recapture data

  11. group sizes of oribis in different habitats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-07-05

    Jul 5, 1991 ... (Cnidaria: Limnomedusae) from southern Africa. Nancy A. Rayner * and C.C. Appleton. Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of Natal,. P.O. Box 375, Pietermaritzburg, 3200 Republic of South. Africa. Received 27 January 1992; accepted 9 March 1992. The northern hemisphere Craspedacusta ...

  12. Generation and Analysis of Full-length cDNA Sequences from Elephant Shark (Callorhinchus milii)

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2009-03-17

    Cartilaginous fishes are the oldest living group of jawed vertebrates and therefore is an important group for understanding the evolution of vertebrate genomes including the human genome. Our laboratory has proposed elephant shark (C. milii) as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its relatively small genome size (910 Mb). The whole genome of C. milii is being sequenced (first cartilaginous fish genome to be sequenced completely). To characterize the transcriptome of C. milii and to assist in annotating exon-intron boundaries, transcriptional start sites and alternatively spliced transcripts, we are generating full-length cDNA sequences from C. milii.

  13. Comparison of fiber length analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Guay; Nancy Ross Sutherland; Walter Rantanen; Nicole Malandri; Aimee Stephens; Kathleen Mattingly; Matt Schneider

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several fiber new fiber length analyzers have been developed and brought to market. The new instruments provide faster measurements and the capability of both laboratory and on-line analysis. Do the various fiber analyzers provide the same length, coarseness, width, and fines measurements for a given fiber sample? This paper provides a comparison of...

  14. Direct digital radiography versus conventional radiography - assessment of visibility of file length placed in the root canal: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaiyapuri Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: To compare conventional and direct digital radiography (DDR in working length measurement of the root canal and to assess the significance of the different enhancement modes provided by the software to visualize the file length. Materials and Methods: Access cavities were prepared in 30 extracted maxillary central incisors. Size 15 k-file was introduced into the canal till it was flush with the apical foramen. The working length was calculated as 0.5 mm less than the vernier caliper measured length of each file. The files were then sealed with resin at their respective lengths. Intraoral periapical radiographs and direct digital radiographs were taken. Vernier caliper was used to measure the file length in the periapical radiographs, and standard, positive conversion, and colorize modes were used with the CDR system. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to give an accurate analysis between the actual file length and the different groups. Results: There was no statistical significance between the different groups tested. The multiple regression analysis test showed that the positive and colorize modes more accurately corresponded to the actual file length. Conclusion: Both conventional radiography and DDR can be reliably used for working length determination. The positive and colorize modes enhancement features of DDR greatly improve the visual perception, leading to more accurate measurements.

  15. Direct digital radiography versus conventional radiography - assessment of visibility of file length placed in the root canal: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Vaiyapuri; Lipee, Priyadarshini; Rao, Canagapalli Venkat Nakabushan; Lakshmikanthan, Lakshminarayanan

    2012-08-01

    To compare conventional and direct digital radiography (DDR) in working length measurement of the root canal and to assess the significance of the different enhancement modes provided by the software to visualize the file length. Access cavities were prepared in 30 extracted maxillary central incisors. Size 15 k-file was introduced into the canal till it was flush with the apical foramen. The working length was calculated as 0.5 mm less than the vernier caliper measured length of each file. The files were then sealed with resin at their respective lengths. Intraoral periapical radiographs and direct digital radiographs were taken. Vernier caliper was used to measure the file length in the periapical radiographs, and standard, positive conversion, and colorize modes were used with the CDR system. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to give an accurate analysis between the actual file length and the different groups. There was no statistical significance between the different groups tested. The multiple regression analysis test showed that the positive and colorize modes more accurately corresponded to the actual file length. Both conventional radiography and DDR can be reliably used for working length determination. The positive and colorize modes enhancement features of DDR greatly improve the visual perception, leading to more accurate measurements.

  16. Determinants of gap length in esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula and the impact of gap length on outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muffazzal Rassiwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed at identifying factors which may affect the gap length in cases of esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF and whether gap length plays any role in determining the outcome. Materials and Methods: All consecutive cases of EA-TEF were included and different patient parameters were recorded. Plain radiographs with a nasogastric tube in the upper esophagus were taken. Patients were grouped into T1-T2; T2-T3; T3-T4; and T4 depending on the thoracic vertebral level of the arrest of the tube. During surgery, the gap length between the pouches was measured using a Vernier caliper and the patients were grouped into A, B, and C (gap length >2.1 cm; >1-≤2 cm and ≤1 cm. The operative gap groups were compared with the radiography groups and the other recorded parameters. Results: Total numbers of cases were 69. Birth weight was found to be significantly lower in Group A (mean = 2.14 kg as compared to Group B (mean = 2.38 kg and Group C patients (mean = 2.49 kg (P = 0.016. The radiographic groups compared favorably with the intraoperative gap length groups (P < 0.001. The need for postoperative ventilation (70.83% in Group A vs. 36.84% in Group C, P = 0.032 and mortality (62.5%, 26.9% and 15.8% in Group A, B, and C, respectively, P = 0.003 co-related significantly with the gap length. Conclusion: Birth weight had a direct reciprocal relationship with the gap length. Radiographic assessment correlated with intraoperative gap length. Higher gap length was associated with increased need for postoperative ventilation and poor outcome.

  17. Ultrasonographic differentiation of biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis: Reestablishment of size criteria of the gallbladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Sun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Koh, Young Hwan; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine and Institude of Radiation Medicion, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-15

    To reestablish the size criterion of the gallbladder on ultrasonography (US) for the differentiation diagnosis of biliary atresia from neonatal hepatitis. Abdominal US ws performed in 201 patients with jaundice and 40 patients without evidence of jaundice or hepatobiliary illness (all with the age less than 4 months). US was performed in fasting (fasting for at least 4 hours) to measure the length of the gallbladder and calculated the area of the gallbladder lumen. The morphology of the gallbladder was classified into three types: normal, elongated and atretic. To evaluate the contractibility of the gallbladder, the length of the gallbladder and area of the gallbladder lumen was again measured 1 hour after feeding. The final diagnosis included biliary atresia in 79 patients and neonatal hepatitis in 83 patients. Differences in the length, area, and morphology of the gallbladder were statistically significant among three groups, the normal group, neonatal hepatitis group and biliary atresia group (length and area of gallbladder; normal group>neonatal hepatitis>biliary atresia). The differences in the length and area of gallbladder between pre- and postmeal state were statistically significant in the normal and neonatal hepatitis groups whereas those of biliary atresia were not significant (p=0.85). When the empirical size criterion of the gallbladder (<15 mm in length) was applied, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy for the differential diagnosis of biliary atresia from hepatitis were 52%, 82%, and 67%, respectively. Meanwhile, if the area criterion(<30 mm{sup 2} in area) was applied, the sensitivity, the specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 67%, 85%, and 75%, respectively. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the morphology as well as size of the gallbladder are helpful in the differential diagnosis of biliary atresia from neonatal hepatitis. Therefore, since the measurement of the area of gallbladder lumen on US reflect both size and morphology of

  18. Crack Length Detection by Digital Image Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbye, Janus; Brincker, Rune

    1990-01-01

    It is described how digital image processing is used for measuring the length of fatigue cracks. The system is installed in a Personal Computer equipped with image processing hardware and performs automated measuring on plane metal specimens used in fatigue testing. Normally one can not achieve...... a resolution better then that of the image processing equipment. To overcome this problem an extrapolation technique is used resulting in a better resolution. The system was tested on a specimen loaded with different loads. The error σa was less than 0.031 mm, which is of the same size as human measuring...

  19. Self-imposed length limits in recreational fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Dustin R.; Hurley, Keith L.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    A primary motivating factor on the decision to harvest a fish among consumptive-orientated anglers is the size of the fish. There is likely a cost-benefit trade-off for harvest of individual fish that is size and species dependent, which should produce a logistic-type response of fish fate (release or harvest) as a function of fish size and species. We define the self-imposed length limit as the length at which a captured fish had a 50% probability of being harvested, which was selected because it marks the length of the fish where the probability of harvest becomes greater than the probability of release. We assessed the influences of fish size, catch per unit effort, size distribution of caught fish, and creel limit on the self-imposed length limits for bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie Pomoxis annularis combined, white bass Morone chrysops, and yellow perch Perca flavescens at six lakes in Nebraska, USA. As we predicted, the probability of harvest increased with increasing size for all species harvested, which supported the concept of a size-dependent trade-off in costs and benefits of harvesting individual fish. It was also clear that probability of harvest was not simply defined by fish length, but rather was likely influenced to various degrees by interactions between species, catch rate, size distribution, creel-limit regulation and fish size. A greater understanding of harvest decisions within the context of perceived likelihood that a creel limit will be realized by a given angler party, which is a function of fish availability, harvest regulation and angler skill and orientation, is needed to predict the influence that anglers have on fish communities and to allow managers to sustainable manage exploited fish populations in recreational fisheries.

  20. Gestational diabetes and offspring birth size at elevated environmental pollutant exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valvi, Damaskini; Oulhote, Youssef; Weihe, Pal

    2017-01-01

    examined whether GDM may mediate or modify the associations between maternal environmental pollutant exposures and offspring birth size measures. METHODS: We analyzed 604 Faroese pregnant women and their offsprings born in 1997-2000. Maternal pregnancy serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds (OCs...... circumference in boys, and positive or null associations in girls. None of the environmental pollutants was associated with offspring length. GDM neither modified nor mediated the associations with birth size measures. CONCLUSIONS: We found associations with GDM and offspring birth size to be specific...... to the environmental pollutant or pollutant group. Associations with birth size measures appear to be independent of GDM occurrence....

  1. The size of the nucleosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    The structural origin of the size of the 11 nm nucleosomal disc is addressed. On the nanometer length-scale the organization of DNA as chromatin in the chromosomes involves a coiling of DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome. We suggest that the size of the nucleosome core particle......-pairs of the linker-DNA is included the estimate of the size of an ideal nucleosome is in close agreement with the experimental numbers. Interestingly, the size of the nucleosome is shown to be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the DNA double helix....

  2. Ovarian dynamics and estrous cycle length in the donkey (Equus asinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Duran, Maricruz; Zarco, Luis; Boeta, Ana Myriam

    2017-11-01

    Nine jennies were monitored daily by ultrasonography during three complete ovarian cycles in order to evaluate if the timing of luteolysis and the growth pattern of the ovulatory follicle (OVF) before, during and after luteolysis are related to the length of the interovulatory interval (IOI). Blood samples for progesterone determination were obtained daily during one of the cycles of each jenny. The cycles were classified according to the length of the IOI into three groups: Short IOI (21.2 ± 0.3 d, n = 10), medium IOI (23.9 ± 0.4 d, n = 7), and long IOI (26.2 ± 0.3 d, n = 10). Neither the time of luteolysis onset nor the time of luteolysis completion were significantly different between groups. The length of the IOI was mainly determined by the duration of the follicular phase, as the intervals from luteolysis onset to ovulation and from luteolysis completion to ovulation were directly correlated with the length of the IOI (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01 respectively). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the length of the IOI was negatively correlated with the size of the OVF at day 13 (p < 0.01), with its growth rate from day 13 to day 15 (p < 0.05) and with its growth rate from day 15 to day 18 (p < 0.01), and positively correlated with the final diameter of the OVF (p < 0.01). The correlation between the observed IOIs and those predicted by the multiple regression equation was highly significant (r = 0.91, p < 0.001), but the predictive ability of a simplified equation using only the diameter of the OVF at day 18 was almost as good (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Estrus signs lasted longer and were more intense as the length of the IOI increased, and this was associated with a longer period of low progesterone concentrations during the follicular phase of jennies with longer cycles. It is concluded that the length of the luteal phase in jennies is relatively constant, and that most of the variation in the length of the IOI is

  3. Determining multiple length scales in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi-Qiao; Ryu, Seungoh; Sen, Pabitra N.

    2000-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East are believed to contain about half of the world's oil. The processes of sedimentation and diagenesis produce in carbonate rocks microporous grains and a wide range of pore sizes, resulting in a complex spatial distribution of pores and pore connectivity. This heterogeneity makes it difficult to determine by conventional techniques the characteristic pore-length scales, which control fluid transport properties. Here we present a bulk-measurement technique that is non-destructive and capable of extracting multiple length scales from carbonate rocks. The technique uses nuclear magnetic resonance to exploit the spatially varying magnetic field inside the pore space itself-a `fingerprint' of the pore structure. We found three primary length scales (1-100µm) in the Middle-East carbonate rocks and determined that the pores are well connected and spatially mixed. Such information is critical for reliably estimating the amount of capillary-bound water in the rock, which is important for efficient oil production. This method might also be used to complement other techniques for the study of shaly sand reservoirs and compartmentalization in cells and tissues.

  4. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  5. Ontogenetic prey size selection in snakes: predator size and functional limitations to handling minimum prey sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Paul M

    2018-02-01

    As body size increases, some predators eliminate small prey from their diet exhibiting an ontogenetic shift toward larger prey. In contrast, some predators show a telescoping pattern of prey size in which both large and small prey are consumed with increasing predator size. To explore a functional explanation for the two feeding patterns, I examined feeding effort as both handling time and number of upper jaw movements during ingestion of fish of consistent size. I used a range of body sizes from two snake species that exhibit ontogenetic shifts in prey size (Nerodia fasciata and N. rhombifer) and a species that exhibits telescoping prey size with increased body size (Thamnophis proximus). For the two Nerodia species, individuals with small or large heads exhibited greater difficulty in feeding effort compared to snakes of intermediate size. However, for T. proximus measures of feeding effort were negatively correlated with head length and snout-vent length (SVL). These data indicate that ontogenetic shifters of prey size develop trophic morphology large enough that feeding effort increases for disproportionately small prey. I also compared changes in body size among the two diet strategies for active foraging snake species using data gleaned from the literature to determine if increased change in body size and thereby feeding morphology is observable in snakes regardless of prey type or foraging habitat. Of the 30 species sampled from literature, snakes that exhibit ontogenetic shifts in prey size have a greater magnitude of change in SVL than species that have telescoping prey size patterns. Based upon the results of the two data sets above, I conclude that ontogenetic shifts away from small prey occur in snakes due, in part, to growth of body size and feeding structures beyond what is efficient for handling small prey. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Metal-insulator transition: the Mott criterion and coherence length

    CERN Document Server

    Pergament, A

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of the Mott criterion for metal-insulator transition (MIT), an expression for the correlation length, identical to that for the coherence length in the theory of superconductivity, is obtained. This correlation length characterizes the size of an electron-hole pair (in an excitonic insulator) or the effective Bohr radius (as, e.g., in doped semiconductors). The relation obtained is used for calculation of the coherence length in vanadium dioxide. The presence of two characteristic coherence lengths (xi sub 1 approx 20 A and xi sub 2 approx 2 A) is found. This is associated with the specific features of the transition mechanism in VO sub 2 : this mechanism represents a combination of the purely electronic Mott-Hubbard contribution and the structural (Peierls-like) one. It is shown, however, that the driving force of the MIT in VO sub 2 is the electron-correlation Mott-Hubbard transition.

  7. Sustainable Sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, Kathleen M; Veitch, Daisy

    2016-08-01

    To provide a review of sustainable sizing practices that reduce waste, increase sales, and simultaneously produce safer, better fitting, accommodating products. Sustainable sizing involves a set of methods good for both the environment (sustainable environment) and business (sustainable business). Sustainable sizing methods reduce (1) materials used, (2) the number of sizes or adjustments, and (3) the amount of product unsold or marked down for sale. This reduces waste and cost. The methods can also increase sales by fitting more people in the target market and produce happier, loyal customers with better fitting products. This is a mini-review of methods that result in more sustainable sizing practices. It also reviews and contrasts current statistical and modeling practices that lead to poor fit and sizing. Fit-mapping and the use of cases are two excellent methods suited for creating sustainable sizing, when real people (vs. virtual people) are used. These methods are described and reviewed. Evidence presented supports the view that virtual fitting with simulated people and products is not yet effective. Fit-mapping and cases with real people and actual products result in good design and products that are fit for person, fit for purpose, with good accommodation and comfortable, optimized sizing. While virtual models have been shown to be ineffective for predicting or representing fit, there is an opportunity to improve them by adding fit-mapping data to the models. This will require saving fit data, product data, anthropometry, and demographics in a standardized manner. For this success to extend to the wider design community, the development of a standardized method of data collection for fit-mapping with a globally shared fit-map database is needed. It will enable the world community to build knowledge of fit and accommodation and generate effective virtual fitting for the future. A standardized method of data collection that tests products' fit methodically

  8. Models for growth, decline and regrowth of the dendrites of rat Purkinje cells induced from magnitude and link-length analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldenberg, M J; O'Neill, M P; Quackenbush, L J; Pentney, R J

    1993-06-21

    This study examines Purkinje neurons of rats aged 1, 10, 18 and 28 months to investigate growth and decline in the magnitude of the dendritic tree, i.e. the number of exterior links (terminal segments) per cell. Growth in the mean number of exterior links was observed from 1 to 10 months, decline at 18 months and regrowth at 28 months. At 10, 28, and especially at 18 months, the cell size frequency distribution indicates two groups of cells, one of small and the other of large sized cells. The study also examines the relationship of age to lengths of topologically defined links of various types. For each age group we find that exterior links are longer than interior links (non-terminal or intermediate segments). Analysis of the geometric mean lengths of subtypes of exterior and interior links at maturity (10 months) indicates that they follow a Fibonacci series of link lengths, such that mean lengths of topologically defined types of mean exterior links are either about 13 or 8 microns long, while interior links are about 5 microns long. A sequential growth model for adding exterior links is suggested to illustrate a style of growth which could account for the various mean link lengths and the Fibonacci ratio (1.618) between their lengths. Interior link lengths are also dependent on the generation of exterior links from the sides of pre-existing interior links. If the Strahler branching ratio, Rb, should increase owing to growth of terminals from interior links, then mean interior link length would decline. During a period of regression, mean exterior link lengths become shorter and mean interior link lengths become longer. Changes in mean interior link length are much less affected by changes in Rb during regression than is the situation during growth. Finally, the changes in link lengths dictate that the ratio of mean exterior to mean interior link length increases during growth phases from 1 to 10 and 18 to 28 months, and declines during regression from 10 to 28

  9. CEBAF Upgrade Bunch Length Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Many accelerators use short electron bunches and measuring the bunch length is important for efficient operations. CEBAF needs a suitable bunch length because bunches that are too long will result in beam interruption to the halls due to excessive energy spread and beam loss. In this work, bunch length is measured by invasive and non-invasive techniques at different beam energies. Two new measurement techniques have been commissioned; a harmonic cavity showed good results compared to expectations from simulation, and a real time interferometer is commissioned and first checkouts were performed. Three other techniques were used for measurements and comparison purposes without modifying the old procedures. Two of them can be used when the beam is not compressed longitudinally while the other one, the synchrotron light monitor, can be used with compressed or uncompressed beam.

  10. Continuously variable focal length lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  11. Exploring Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  12. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers....

  13. Silver Nanoparticles Stabilised by Cationic Gemini Surfactants with Variable Spacer Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pisárčik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the synthesis and investigation of the physicochemical and biological properties of silver nanoparticles stabilized with a series of cationic gemini surfactants having a polymethylene spacer of variable length. UV-VIS spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements were applied to provide physicochemical characterization of the silver nanoparticles. The mean size values of the nanoparticles were found to be in the 50 to 115 nm range. From the nanoparticle size distributions and scanning electron microscopy images it results that a population of small nanoparticles with the size of several nanometers was confirmed if the nanoparticles were stabilized with gemini molecules with either a short methylene spacer (two or four −CH2− groups or a long spacer (12 −CH2− groups. The average zeta potential value for silver nanoparticles stabilized with gemini molecules is roughly independent of gemini surfactant spacer length and is approx. +58 mV. An interaction model between silver nanoparticles and gemini molecules which reflects the gained experimental data, is suggested. Microbicidal activity determinations revealed that the silver nanoparticles stabilized with gemini surfactants are more efficient against Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts, which has a direct relation to the interaction mechanism of nanoparticles with the bacterial cell membrane and its structural composition.

  14. Overview of bunch length measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed

  15. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  16. Comparison of penile length at 6–24 months between children with unilateral cryptorchidism and a healthy normal cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Soo Ryu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Urologic diseases affected by testosterone can be associated with smaller penis size compared to the normal population. We sought to compare penile length in children with unilateral cryptorchidism and normative data from a cohort of healthy Korean boys. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in 259 Korean boys (212, normal cohort; 47, cryptorchidism aged 6–24 months, each of whom had been brought to an outpatient clinic at one of five tertiary hospitals (Gyeongsangnam-do Province between April 2014 and June 2015. Penile length was measured via stretched penile length (SPL and testicular size was measured using orchidometry (mL. Results: SPL in children with cryptorchidism was significantly shorter compared to a cohort of healthy Korean boys aged 6–24 months (3.7±0.5 cm and 4.3±0.8 cm, p<0.001, although there were no differences with regard to height, body weight and contralateral testicular size between the two groups. According to the stratified ages (6–12, 12–18, and 18–24 months, SPL in children with cryptorchidism was persistently shorter at their ages than those without. Conclusions: It might be that the penile length aged 6–24 months of children with unilateral cryptorchidism is shorter than that of a cohort of healthy Korean boys.

  17. Effect of repetitive pecking at working length for glide path preparation using G-file

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hong Ha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Glide path preparation is recommended to reduce torsional failure of nickel-titanium (NiTi rotary instruments and to prevent root canal transportation. This study evaluated whether the repetitive insertions of G-files to the working length maintain the apical size as well as provide sufficient lumen as a glide path for subsequent instrumentation. Materials and Methods The G-file system (Micro-Mega composed of G1 and G2 files for glide path preparation was used with the J-shaped, simulated resin canals. After inserting a G1 file twice, a G2 file was inserted to the working length 1, 4, 7, or 10 times for four each experimental group, respectively (n = 10. Then the canals were cleaned by copious irrigation, and lubricated with a separating gel medium. Canal replicas were made using silicone impression material, and the diameter of the replicas was measured at working length (D0 and 1 mm level (D1 under a scanning electron microscope. Data was analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p = 0.05. Results The diameter at D0 level did not show any significant difference between the 1, 2, 4, and 10 times of repetitive pecking insertions of G2 files at working length. However, 10 times of pecking motion with G2 file resulted in significantly larger canal diameter at D1 (p < 0.05. Conclusions Under the limitations of this study, the repetitive insertion of a G2 file up to 10 times at working length created an adequate lumen for subsequent apical shaping with other rotary files bigger than International Organization for Standardization (ISO size 20, without apical transportation at D0 level.

  18. Cyclic codes of length 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    [X]/〈X2m. − 1〉 are given. Cyclic codes of length 2m over the finite field Fq, of odd characteristic, are defined in terms of their generator polynomials. The exact minimum distance and the dimension of the codes are obtained. Keywords.

  19. Diet, nutrition and telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ligi

    2011-10-01

    The ends of human chromosomes are protected by DNA-protein complexes termed telomeres, which prevent the chromosomes from fusing with each other and from being recognized as a double-strand break by DNA repair proteins. Due to the incomplete replication of linear chromosomes by DNA polymerase, telomeric DNA shortens with repeated cell divisions until the telomeres reach a critical length, at which point the cells enter senescence. Telomere length is an indicator of biological aging, and dysfunction of telomeres is linked to age-related pathologies like cardiovascular disease, Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease and cancer. Telomere length has been shown to be positively associated with nutritional status in human and animal studies. Various nutrients influence telomere length potentially through mechanisms that reflect their role in cellular functions including inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA integrity, DNA methylation and activity of telomerase, the enzyme that adds the telomeric repeats to the ends of the newly synthesized DNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fractional baud-length coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for modulating radar transmissions in order to improve target range and Doppler estimation accuracy. This is achieved by using non-uniform baud lengths. With this method it is possible to increase sub-baud range-resolution of phase coded radar measurements while maintaining a narrow transmission bandwidth. We first derive target backscatter amplitude estimation error covariance matrix for arbitrary targets when estimating backscatter in amplitude domain. We define target optimality and discuss different search strategies that can be used to find well performing transmission envelopes. We give several simulated examples of the method showing that fractional baud-length coding results in smaller estimation errors than conventional uniform baud length transmission codes when estimating the target backscatter amplitude at sub-baud range resolution. We also demonstrate the method in practice by analyzing the range resolved power of a low-altitude meteor trail echo that was measured using a fractional baud-length experiment with the EISCAT UHF system.

  1. Femur length and biparietal diameter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... Shipp TD, Bromley B, Mascola M, Benacerraf B. Variation in fetal femur length with respect to maternal race. J Ultrasound Med 2001;20:141‑4. 25. Deter RL, Harrist RB, Birnholz JC, Hadlock FP. Quantitative Obstetrical. Ultrasonography. New York: Wiley; 1986. 26. Yeh MN, Bracero L, Reilly KB, Murtha L, ...

  2. Preoperative CT planning of screw length in arthroscopic Latarjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Alexandre; Gerometta, Antoine; Granger, Benjamin; Massein, Audrey; Casabianca, Laurent; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    The Latarjet procedure has shown its efficiency for the treatment of anterior shoulder dislocation. The success of this technique depends on the correct positioning and fusion of the bone block. The length of the screws that fix the bone block can be a problem. They can increase the risk of non-union if too short or be the cause of nerve lesion or soft tissue discomfort if too long. Suprascapular nerve injuries have been reported during shoulder stabilisation surgery up to 6 % of the case. Bone block non-union depending on the series is found around 20 % of the cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of this CT preoperative planning to predict optimal screws length. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the efficiency of CT planning to predict screw length. Inclusion criteria were patients with chronic anterior instability of the shoulder with an ISIS superior to 4. Exclusion criteria were patients with multidirectional instability or any previous surgery on this shoulder. Thirty patients were included prospectively, 11 of them went threw a CT planning, before their arthroscopic Latarjet. Optimal length of both screws was calculated, adding the size of the coracoid at 5 and 15 mm from the tip to the glenoid. Thirty-two-mm screws were used for patients without planning. On a post-operative CT scan with 3D reconstruction, the distance between the screw tip and the posterior cortex was measured. A one-sample Wilcoxon test was used to compare the distance from the tip of the screw to an acceptable positioning of ±2 mm from the posterior cortex. In the group without planning, screw 1 tended to differ from the acceptable positioning: mean 3.44 mm ± 3.13, med 2.9 mm, q1; q3 [0.6; 4.75] p = 0.1118, and screw 2 differed significantly from the acceptable position: mean 4.83 mm ± 4.11, med 3.7 mm, q1; q3 [1.7; 5.45] p = 0.0045. In the group with planning, position of

  3. The association of calcaneal spur length and clinical and functional parameters in plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyucu, Ersin; Koçyiğit, Figen; Erdil, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PF)is the most common cause of plantar heel pain. Despite many treatment alternatives for heel spur, the association of calcaneal spur size with clinical and functional parameters is inconclusive. The objective of this study to investigate the correlation of calcaneal spur length with clinical findings and functional status documented with Foot Function Index in patients with plantar fasciitis. We performed power analysis for the sample size estimation. 87 patients with PF were scrutinized to reach the estimated patient number 75. Computer-aided linear measurements were done for spur length from tip to base in milimeters. Perceived pain intensity was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS). Patients were asked to rate the pain experienced on a 10-cm VAS. Foot function index was applied to the patients to evaluate pain, disability and activity limitation of the patients. Of the 75 participants, 24 were males (32%) and 51 were females (68%). The mean age was 47 ± 10 years (range 30-65 years). The mean calcaneal spur length was 3.86 ± 3.36 mm (range between 0 and 12.2). Calcaneal spur length was significantly correlated with age (p = 0.003), BMI (p = 0.029), symptom duration, (p = 0.001) VAS (p = 0.003), and FFI total score (p calcaneal spur is significantly correlated with age, BMI, symptom duration, perceived pain, FFI pain and disability subscores, and FFI total scores. The size of the calcaneal spur is an important parameter correlated with pain and functional scores in PF. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of apically extruded debris associated with several nickel-titanium systems after determining working length by apex locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Ersan; Akkocan, Oguzhan; Furuncuoglu, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: To compare apically extruded debris using ProTaper Universal (PTU), ProTaper Next (PTN), WaveOne (WO), Twisted File (TF), M-Two (MT), and Revo-S (RS) after determining the working length (WL) with root ZX. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two teeth were selected. The WL determination was performed with root ZX. The teeth were divided into six experimental groups, randomly. In groups, root canals were prepared with PTU to size F4/0.06, with PTN to size X4/0.06, with WO to size 40/0.08, with TF to size 40/0.04, with MT to size 40/0.06, and with RS to size AS40/0.06. After preparations were completed, final irrigation was performed with 2 mL distilled water, and a total of 10 mL of distilled water was used in each tooth. Tubes were stored in an incubator at 68°C for 5 days to evaporate the distilled water before weighing the dry debris. Data were analyzed by the Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: The RS group led to the highest amount of extruded debris, however, WO led to the least amount of extruded debris. There was no statistically difference among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The authors conclude that the results obtained might depend on the apex locator used to determine the WL. PMID:26957797

  5. Internal Length Gradient (ILG) Material Mechanics Across Scales & Disciplines

    OpenAIRE

    Aifantis, Elias C.

    2016-01-01

    A combined theoretical/numerical/experimental program is outlined for extending the ILG approach to consider time lags, stochasticity and multiphysics couplings. Through this extension it is possible to discuss the interplay between deformation internal lengths (ILs) and ILs induced by thermal, diffusion or electric field gradients. Size-dependent multiphysics stability diagrams are obtained, and size-dependent serrated stress-strain curves are interpreted through combined gradient-stochastic...

  6. Liposomes coated with hydrophobically modified hydroxyethyl cellulose: Influence of hydrophobic chain length and degree of modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smistad, Gro; Nyström, Bo; Zhu, Kaizheng; Grønvold, Marthe Karoline; Røv-Johnsen, Anne; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    Nanoparticulate systems with an uncharged hydrophilic surface may have a great potential in mucosal drug delivery. In the present study liposomes were coated with hydrophobically modified hydroxyethyl cellulose (HM-HEC) to create a sterically stabilized liposomal system with an uncharged surface. The aim was to clarify the influence of the amount of hydrophobic modification of HEC and the length of the hydrophobic moiety, on the stability of the system and on the release properties. HM-HEC with different degrees of hydrophobic modification (1 and 2mol%) and hydrophobic groups with different chain lengths (C8, C12, C16) were included in the study, as well as fluid phase and gel phase liposomes. Both types of liposomes were successfully coated with HM-HEC containing 1mol% of hydrophobic groups, while 2mol% did not work for the intended pharmaceutical applications. The polymer coated gel phase liposomes were stable (size, zeta potential, leakage) for 24 weeks at 4°C, with no differences between the C8 and C16 HM-HEC coating. For the fluid phase liposomes a size increase was observed after 24 weeks at 4°C for all formulations; the C8 HM-HEC coated liposomes increased the most. No differences in the leakage during storage at 4°C or in the release at 35°C were observed between the fluid phase formulations. To conclude; HM-HEC with a shorter hydrophobic chain length resulted in a less stable product for the fluid phase liposomes, while no influence of the chain length was observed for the gel phase liposomes (1mol% HM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship Between Short Umbilical Cord Length and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru; Oba, Mari S; Seki, Kazuo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how umbilical cord length relates to pregnancy outcomes, we retrospectively analyzed data from 89,042 deliveries recorded in the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology Successive Pregnancy Birth Registry System. We included term deliveries in which vaginal birth was attempted. Umbilical cord length was categorized into four groups: less than the first percentile, from the first percentile to less than the 10th percentile, from the 10th percentile to less than 25th percentile, and from the 25th percentile to less than the 75th percentile, which constituted the control group. Cord lengths of 33, 43, 48, 63 cm corresponded to the first, 10th, 25th, and 75th percentile values of the cord length distribution, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed in the rate of unplanned cesarean delivery for all three short cord groups compared to control. There was a higher odds ratio for unplanned cesarean delivery as the umbilical cord became shorter.

  8. Does hair coat length affect flea infestation in naturally infested dogs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Araujo Collares da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract The Siphonaptera are parasitic insects of endothermic animals and Ctenocephalides felis and Pulex irritans are important parasites of dogs. This study evaluated the effect of hair coat length and time of year on the population size of C. felis and P. irritans in naturally infested dogs. Fleas were collected from 14 dogs on a monthly basis for a year (February 2015 to January 2016 at a rural property in Bagé, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The dogs were divided into two groups based on hair coat length: short coat (coat length 5.0 cm, n= 7. In total, 2057 fleas were collected, 1541 of which were C. felis (74.91% and 516 were P. irritans (25.08%. The number of C. felis and P. irritans individuals was significantly affected by hair coat length and time of year. The variation in flea numbers over the study months was higher in long-coated than in short-coated dogs for the two flea species and flea numbers increased with increasing mean monthly temperatures. The results provide a better understanding of behavioral aspects of flea communities in dogs and may help develop control strategies targeting these parasites.

  9. Fluctuations in email size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Musashi, Yasuo

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain fluctuations in email size. We have previously investigated the long-term correlations between email send requests and data flow in the system log of the primary staff email server at a university campus, finding that email size frequency follows a power-law distribution with two inflection points, and that the power-law property weakens the correlation of the data flow. However, the mechanism underlying this fluctuation is not completely understood. We collected new log data from both staff and students over six academic years and analyzed the frequency distribution thereof, focusing on the type of content contained in the emails. Furthermore, we obtained permission to collect "Content-Type" log data from the email headers. We therefore collected the staff log data from May 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015, creating two subdistributions. In this paper, we propose a model to explain these subdistributions, which follow log-normal-like distributions. In the log-normal-like model, email senders -consciously or unconsciously- regulate the size of new email sentences according to a normal distribution. The fitting of the model is acceptable for these subdistributions, and the model demonstrates power-law properties for large email sizes. An analysis of the length of new email sentences would be required for further discussion of our model; however, to protect user privacy at the participating organization, we left this analysis for future work. This study provides new knowledge on the properties of email sizes, and our model is expected to contribute to the decision on whether to establish upper size limits in the design of email services.

  10. A Motor-Driven Mechanism for Cell-Length Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Rishal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Size homeostasis is fundamental in cell biology, but it is not clear how large cells such as neurons can assess their own size or length. We examined a role for molecular motors in intracellular length sensing. Computational simulations suggest that spatial information can be encoded by the frequency of an oscillating retrograde signal arising from a composite negative feedback loop between bidirectional motor-dependent signals. The model predicts that decreasing either or both anterograde or retrograde signals should increase cell length, and this prediction was confirmed upon application of siRNAs for specific kinesin and/or dynein heavy chains in adult sensory neurons. Heterozygous dynein heavy chain 1 mutant sensory neurons also exhibited increased lengths both in vitro and during embryonic development. Moreover, similar length increases were observed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts upon partial downregulation of dynein heavy chain 1. Thus, molecular motors critically influence cell-length sensing and growth control.

  11. Length of a Hanging Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Costello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shape of a cable hanging under its own weight and uniform horizontal tension between two power poles is a catenary. The catenary is a curve which has an equation defined by a hyperbolic cosine function and a scaling factor. The scaling factor for power cables hanging under their own weight is equal to the horizontal tension on the cable divided by the weight of the cable. Both of these values are unknown for this problem. Newton's method was used to approximate the scaling factor and the arc length function to determine the length of the cable. A script was written using the Python programming language in order to quickly perform several iterations of Newton's method to get a good approximation for the scaling factor.

  12. Keeping disease at arm's length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2015-01-01

    and physical activities at the activity centre. In this way, keeping disease at arm’s length is analysed as an ambiguous health strategy. The article shows the importance of looking into how active ageing is practised, as active ageing seems to work well in the everyday life of the older people by not giving......Many older people live with a range of chronic diseases. However, these diseases do not necessarily impede an active lifestyle. In this article the author analyses the relation between the active ageing discourse and the way older people at two Danish activity centres handle disease. How does...... active ageing change everyday life with chronic disease, and how do older people combine an active life with a range of chronic diseases? The participants in the study use activities to keep their diseases at arm’s length, and this distancing of disease at the same time enables them to engage in social...

  13. Correlation of Sonographically Determined Renal Sizes with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSA): renal length = 0.8839BSA+ 8.6260, p< 0.001. Thus, patient average renal lengths increased by 0.24cm for each cm of height and 0.88cm for each unit of BSA. This study shows the values of renal sizes in Nigerians, which may be helpful in ...

  14. Predicting length of stay in specialist neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, Whitney; Wressle, Alexandra; Bradley, Lloyd

    2018-03-01

    A retrospective case series was performed to determine which measures of complexity, dependency and function most accurately predict inpatient neurorehabilitation length of stay for individuals with post-acute neurological disorders. Sociodemographic, medical and functional variables were extracted from data submitted to the UK Rehabilitation Outcomes Collaborative. Length of stay was calculated as the total number of inpatient days, functional status was measured using Barthel Index, rehabilitation complexity was measured using Extended Rehabilitation Complexity Scale, and nursing dependency was measured using the Northwick Park Dependency Scale. The mean rehabilitation length of stay was 70.9 days, with length of stay being 35.1 days higher in inpatients with acquired brain injury than inpatients with spinal cord injury. Diagnostic category, Barthel Index scores, Extended Rehabilitation Complexity Scale scores and Northwick Park Dependency Scale scores at admission independently predicted length of stay. Multiple regressions including diagnostic group, Barthel Index, Extended Rehabilitation Complexity Scale and Northwick Park Dependency Scale statistically significantly predicted 37.9% of the variability in length of stay (p Scale on admission was most closely correlated with inpatient length of stay. In conclusion, inpatient length of stay is predicted by diagnostic category, Extended Rehabilitation Complexity Scale, Northwick Park Dependency Scale and Barthel Index. The most influential predictor of rehabilitation length of stay was Northwick Park Dependency Scale score at admission. These results may help facilitate rehabilitation resource planning and implementation of effective commissioning plans. Implications for Rehabilitation The most accurate predicting variable for length of stay in inpatient neurological rehabilitation was nursing need as measured by the Northwick Park Dependency Scale score on admission. Service users and commissioners can be

  15. Effect of chain length and electrical charge on properties of ammonium-bearing bisphosphonate-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: formulation and physicochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Ali [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France); Denizot, Benoit, E-mail: BDenizot@chi-annemasse-bonneville.f [Centre Hospitalier Annemasse-Bonneville (France); Hindre, Francois [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France); Filmon, Robert [Universite d' Angers, Service Commun d' Imagerie et d' Analyses Microscopiques (France); Greneche, Jean-Marc [Universite du Mans, Laboratoire de Physique de I' Etat Condense UMR 6087 (France); Laurent, Sophie [NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, University of Mons-Hainaut, Department of General, Organic and Biochemical Chemistry (Belgium); Daou, T. Jean [UMR CNRS-ULP 7504, Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [Universite de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire de Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, UMR CNRS 7016 (France); Jeune, Jean-Jacques Le [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France)

    2010-05-15

    Bisphosphonates BP molecules have shown to be efficient for coating superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. In order to clarify the respective roles of electrical charge and the length of the molecules, bisphosphonates with one or two ammonium moieties with an intermediate aliphatic group of 3, 5 or 7 carbons were synthesized and iron oxide nanoparticles coated. The evaluation on their iron core properties was made by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles and Moessbauer spectra. The core size is close to 5 nm, with a global superparamagnetic behaviour modified by a paramagnetic Fe-based layer, probably due to surface crystal alteration. The hydrodynamic sizes increase slightly with aliphatic chain length (from 9.8 to 18.6 nm). The presence of one or two ammonium group(s) lowers the negative electrophoretic mobility up to bear zero values but reduces their colloidal stability. These BP-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents.

  16. Live Weight Estimation by Chest Girth, Body Length and Body Volume Formula in Minahasa Local Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Takaendengan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Study was conducted in the regency of Minahasa to estimate horse live weight using its chest girth, body length and body volume formula (cylinder volume formula represented by animal chest girth and body length dimensions, particularly focused in Minahasa local horses. Data on animal live weight (LW, body length (BL, chest girth (CG and body volume were collected from 221 stallions kept by traditional household farmers. Animal body volume was calculated using cylinder volume formula with CG and BL as the components of its formula. Regression analysis was carried out for LW with all the linear body measurements. The data were classified on the basis of age. Age significantly (P0.05. Animal live weight was predicted by simple regression models using dependent variable (Y of the animal live weight and independent variable (X of the animal body measurement, either body length, chest girth, or body volume. The correlations between all pairs of measurements were highly significant (P<0.01 for all age groups. Regression analysis showed that live weight could be predicted accurately from body volume (R2= 0.92 and chest girth (R2= 0.90. Simple regression model that can be recommended to predict horse live weight based on body volume with their age groups ranging from 3 to ≥10 years old was as follow: Live weight (kg= 5.044 + 1.87088 body volume (liters. The analyses of data on horse chest girth, body length and body volume formula provided quantitative measure of body size and shape that were desirable, as they enable genetic parameters for these traits to be estimated and also included in breeding programs.

  17. Genomic regions and genes related to inter-population differences in body size in the ground beetle Carabus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komurai, Ryohei; Fujisawa, Tomochika; Okuzaki, Yutaka; Sota, Teiji

    2017-08-10

    Body size is a key trait in diversification among animal species, and revealing the gene regions responsible for body size diversification among populations or related species is important in evolutionary biology. We explored the genomic regions associated with body size differences in Carabus japonicus ground beetle populations by quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of F 2 hybrids from differently sized parents from two populations using restriction site-associated DNA sequencing and de novo assembly of the beetle whole genome. The assembled genome had a total length of 191 Mb with a scaffold N50 of 0.73 Mb; 14,929 protein-coding genes were predicted. Three QTLs on different linkage groups had major effects on the overall size, which is composed chiefly of elytral length. In addition, we found QTLs on autosomal and X chromosomal linkage groups that affected head length and width, thoracic width, and elytral width. We determined the gene loci potentially related to control of body size in scaffolds of the genome sequence, which contained the QTL regions. The genetic basis of body size variation based on a small number of major loci would promote differentiation in body size in response to selection pressures related to variations in environmental conditions and inter-specific interactions.

  18. Evolution of extreme proboscis lengths in Neotropical Hesperiidae (Lepidoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, J. A.-S.; Warren, A. D.; Krenn, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated morphologies have evolved in insects as adaptations to nectar feeding by natural selection. For example, the suctorial mouthparts of butterflies enable these insects to gain access to floral nectar concealed inside deep floral tubes. Proboscis length in Lepidoptera is known to scale with body size, but whether extreme absolute proboscis lengths of nectar feeding butterflies result from a proportional or disproportional increase with body size that differs between phylogenetic lineages remains unknown. We surveyed the range of variation that occurs in scaling relationships between proboscis length and body size against a phylogenetic background among Costa Rican Hesperiidae. We obtained a new record holder for the longest proboscis in butterflies and showed that extremely long proboscides evolved at least three times independently within Neotropical Hesperiidae. We conclude that the evolution of extremely long proboscides results from allometric scaling with body size, as demonstrated in hawk moths. We hypothesize that constraints on the evolution of increasingly long butterfly proboscides may come from (1) the underlying scaling relationships, i.e., relative proboscis length, combined with the butterfly’s flight style and flower-visiting behaviour and/or (2) developmental constraints during the pupal phase. Lastly, we discuss why butterflies did not evolve similar scaling relationships as hawk moths. PMID:25937673

  19. Can anchovy age structure be estimated from length distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The analysis provides a new time-series of proportions-at-age 1, together with associated standard errors, for input into assessments of the resource. The results also caution against the danger of scientists reading more information into data than is really there. Keywords: anchovy, effective sample size, length distribution, ...

  20. 6. Length-Weight Relationships, Condition Factor and Fecundity of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    No relationship between egg size and carapace length was found. There was no significant difference (P > 0.01) in condition factors between the sexes. Introduction. Crab culture is yet to be developed in. Nigeria, with the vast number of crabs present in both marine and freshwater bodies (Bello-Olusoji et al., 2006).

  1. Concept of formation length in radiation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, V.N.; Katkov, V.M.

    2005-01-01

    The features of electromagnetic processes are considered which connected with finite size of space region in which final particles (photon, electron-positron pair) are formed. The longitudinal dimension of the region is known as the formation length. If some external agent is acting on an electron while traveling this distance the emission process can be disrupted. There are different agents: multiple scattering of projectile, polarization of a medium, action of external fields, etc. The theory of radiation under influence of the multiple scattering, the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect, is presented. The probability of radiation is calculated with an accuracy up to 'next to leading logarithm' and with the Coulomb corrections taken into account. The integral characteristics of bremsstrahlung are given, it is shown that the effective radiation length increases due to the LPM effect at high energy. The LPM effect for pair creation is also presented. The multiple scattering influences also on radiative corrections in a medium (and an external field too) including the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron and the polarization tensor as well as coherent scattering of a photon in a Coulomb field. The polarization of a medium alters the radiation probability in soft part of spectrum. Specific features of radiation from a target of finite thickness include: the boundary photon emission, interference effects for thin target, multi-photon radiation. The theory predictions are compared with experimental data obtained at SLAC and CERN SPS. For electron-positron colliding beams following items are discussed: the separation of coherent and incoherent mechanisms of radiation, the beam-size effect in bremsstrahlung, coherent radiation and mechanisms of electron-positron creation

  2. Length of urethra in the Indian adult male population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Krishnamoorthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The urethral length has not been measured in the Indian population. Even the international literature in this arena is very sparse. This paper is an attempt to develop a simple anatomical database for urethral length. Materials and Methods: Between January 2010 and April 2011, the urethral lengths of 422 adult male patients who required catheterization as part of regular treatment at our hospital, were recorded after obtaining consent from the patients and from the scientific and ethics review boards of the institution. Patients with history of prostatic or urethral abnormalities were excluded. The balloon of a sterile Foley′s catheter was inflated using 10 cc of saline. The length from the junction of the balloon to the ′Y′ junction of the Foley was measured. The catheter was then passed into the bladder and re-inflated to same volume. The penis was gently straightened and the length of the catheter outside the penis was measured till the premarked point at the ′Y′ junction. Subtracting this from the original length gave the length of the urethra. Results: The mean length of the urethra was 17.55 + 1.42 cm with a range between 14 and 22.5 cm. Conclusions: Literature in which the length of the normal adult male urethra is recorded for a significant sample size is very scarce. Our data adds to basic anatomic information of the male urethra specific to the Indian population. Statistical Methods: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. The non-linear regression analysis was employed to find the normative values of urethral length according to age class.

  3. Rhizosphere size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Razavi, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of the soil volume affected by roots - the rhizosphere - is crucial to assess the effects of plants on properties and processes in soils and dynamics of nutrients, water, microorganisms and soil organic matter. The challenges to assess the rhizosphere size are: 1) the continuum of properties between the root surface and root-free soil, 2) differences in the distributions of various properties (carbon, microorganisms and their activities, various nutrients, enzymes, etc.) along and across the roots, 3) temporal changes of properties and processes. Thus, to describe the rhizosphere size and root effects, a holistic approach is necessary. We collected literature and own data on the rhizosphere gradients of a broad range of physico-chemical and biological properties: pH, CO2, oxygen, redox potential, water uptake, various nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe), organic compounds (glucose, carboxylic acids, amino acids), activities of enzymes of C, N, P and S cycles. The collected data were obtained based on the destructive approaches (thin layer slicing), rhizotron studies and in situ visualization techniques: optodes, zymography, sensitive gels, 14C and neutron imaging. The root effects were pronounced from less than 0.5 mm (nutrients with slow diffusion) up to more than 50 mm (for gases). However, the most common effects were between 1 - 10 mm. Sharp gradients (e.g. for P, carboxylic acids, enzyme activities) allowed to calculate clear rhizosphere boundaries and so, the soil volume affected by roots. The first analyses were done to assess the effects of soil texture and moisture as well as root system and age on these gradients. The most properties can be described by two curve types: exponential saturation and S curve, each with increasing and decreasing concentration profiles from the root surface. The gradient based distribution functions were calculated and used to extrapolate on the whole soil depending on the root density and rooting intensity. We

  4. Selecting cryptographic key sizes

    OpenAIRE

    Verheul, E. R.; Lenstra, Arjen K.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we offer guidelines for the determination of key sizes for symmetric cryptosystems, RSA, and discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems both over finite fields and over groups of elliptic curves over prime fields. Our recommendations are based on a set of explicitly formulated parameter settings, combined with existing data points about the cryptosystems.

  5. Influence of Age, Maturity, and Body Size on the Spatiotemporal Determinants of Maximal Sprint Speed in Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Robert W; Oliver, Jon L; Hughes, Michael G; Lloyd, Rhodri S; Cronin, John B

    2017-04-01

    Meyers, RW, Oliver, JL, Hughes, MG, Lloyd, RS, and Cronin, JB. Influence of age, maturity, and body size on the spatiotemporal determinants of maximal sprint speed in boys. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1009-1016, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of age, maturity, and body size on the spatiotemporal determinants of maximal sprint speed in boys. Three-hundred and seventy-five boys (age: 13.0 ± 1.3 years) completed a 30-m sprint test, during which maximal speed, step length, step frequency, contact time, and flight time were recorded using an optical measurement system. Body mass, height, leg length, and a maturity offset represented somatic variables. Step frequency accounted for the highest proportion of variance in speed (∼58%) in the pre-peak height velocity (pre-PHV) group, whereas step length explained the majority of the variance in speed (∼54%) in the post-PHV group. In the pre-PHV group, mass was negatively related to speed, step length, step frequency, and contact time; however, measures of stature had a positive influence on speed and step length yet a negative influence on step frequency. Speed and step length were also negatively influence by mass in the post-PHV group, whereas leg length continued to positively influence step length. The results highlighted that pre-PHV boys may be deemed step frequency reliant, whereas those post-PHV boys may be marginally step length reliant. Furthermore, the negative influence of body mass, both pre-PHV and post-PHV, suggests that training to optimize sprint performance in youth should include methods such as plyometric and strength training, where a high neuromuscular focus and the development force production relative to body weight are key foci.

  6. Effect of various digital processing algorithms on the measurement accuracy of endodontic file length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Betül Ilhan; Baksi, B Güniz; Dündar, Nesrin; Sen, Bilge Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of endodontic file lengths after application of various image enhancement modalities. Endodontic files of three different ISO sizes were inserted in 20 single-rooted extracted permanent mandibular premolar teeth and standardized images were obtained. Original digital images were then enhanced using five processing algorithms. Six evaluators measured the length of each file on each image. The measurements from each processing algorithm and each file size were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (P = 0.05). Paired t test was performed to compare the measurements with the true lengths of the files (P = 0.05). All of the processing algorithms provided significantly shorter measurements than the true length of each file size (P 0.05). Decrease in mean error value was observed with increasing file size (P file length measurements when utilizing storage phosphor plates.

  7. Normal standards for kidney length as measured with US in premature infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, A.E.; Hedlund, G.L.; Pierson, W.P.; Null, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to develop normal standards for kidney length in premature infants, the authors measured kidney length by US imaging in 39 (to date) premature infants less than 72 hours old and without known renal disease. Kidney length was compared with four different parameters of body size, including gestational age, birth weight, birth length, and body surface area. Similar standards have been generated previously for normal renal length as measured by US imaging in full-term infants and older children. These standards have proven utility in cases of congenital and acquired disorders that abnormally increase or decrease renal size. Scatter plots of kidney length versus body weight and kidney length versus body surface area conformed well to a logarithmic distribution, with a high correlation coefficient and close-fitting 95% confidence limits (SEE = 2.05)

  8. Measurement and Estimation of Renal Size by Computed Tomography in Korean Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Won; Yu, Nali; Yun, Sin Weon; Chae, Soo Ahn; Lee, Na Mi; Yi, Dae Yong; Choi, Young Bae; Lim, In Seok

    2017-03-01

    Adequate organ growth is an important aspect of growth evaluation in children. Renal size is an important indicator of adequate renal growth; computed tomography (CT) can closely estimate actual kidney size. However, insufficient data are available on normal renal size as measured by CT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships of anthropometric indices with renal length and volume measured by CT in Korean pediatric patients. Renal length and volume were measured using CT images in 272 pediatric patients (age renal disease. Data for anthropometric indices-including height, weight, and body surface area (BSA)-were obtained using medical records. Using the equation for an ellipsoid, renal volume was calculated in cubic centimeters. Height showed greatest correlation with renal length on stepwise multiple linear regression analysis; BSA showed the strongest significant correlation with renal volume. The mean renal size for each age group and height group was determined; it showed a tendency to increase with age and height. This is the first Korean study to report the relationship between body indices and renal size measured by CT. These results can serve as normative standards for assessing adequate renal growth.

  9. Symmetric bends how to join two lengths of cord

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Roger E

    1995-01-01

    A bend is a knot securely joining together two lengths of cord (or string or rope), thereby yielding a single longer length. There are many possible different bends, and a natural question that has probably occurred to many is: "Is there a 'best' bend and, if so, what is it?"Most of the well-known bends happen to be symmetric - that is, the two constituent cords within the bend have the same geometric shape and size, and interrelationship with the other. Such 'symmetric bends' have great beauty, especially when the two cords bear different colours. Moreover, they have the practical advantage o

  10. Critical length scales for flow phenomena in liquid metal batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas; Weier, Tom

    2017-11-01

    Liquid metal batteries, a new technology for grid-scale energy storage, are composed of three liquid layers and therefore subject to a wide variety of fluid dynamical phenomena, both beneficial and detrimental. Some, like thermal convection and electrovortex flow, drive finite flow regardless of the size, current density, and temperature of the battery. Others, like the Tayler instability and the metal pad instability, occur only in certain parameter regimes - almost always dependent on length scale. I will discuss critical length scales, considering implications for battery design in light of fundamental fluid dynamics. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number CBET-1552182.

  11. [Comparison between the tooth length measured by cone-beam CT and the tooth length measured with vernier caliper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-qiang; Mi, Zhen-lin; Ge, Zhen-lin

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of cone-bean CT (CBCT) on the measurement of the tooth length. One hundred and sixty single root premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected. The tooth length was measured with vernier caliper. The premolars were divided into 10 groups randomly, 16 premolars in each group.In each group, the teeth were lined in molar area, premolar area, canine area and anterior tooth area in maxilla and mandible. Then CBCT was taken, and the tooth length was measured using the software supplied by the manufacturer in coronal and sagittal plane. Accuracy was compared between vernier caliper measurement and CBCT measurement. The tooth length measured by CBCT was smaller than that measured with the vernier caliper. Significant differences were found in six areas, except the maxillary and mandibular premolar areas. With the increase of mesial-distal inclination or buccolingual torque angle, the difference between tooth length measured by CBCT and that measured with vernier caliper increased. The correlation between buccolingual torque angle (∠X1) and the coronal view of CBCT radiology tooth length (Spearmen index was 7.00, P caliper.

  12. Relationships of body lengths with mouth opening and prey length of nemipterid fishes (Regan, 1913 in the Gulf of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Paul

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationship among total length (TL of fish with mouth opening namely horizontal opening (MH, vertical opening (VH, mouth area (MA and fork length (FL of seven sympatric nemipterid fish species and to know the relationship between total length and consumed prey length of five sympatric species sampled from the Gulf of Thailand in 2015. A total 883 fish were investigated collected from both cruise surveys and fishing port survey. TL was linearly and log-linearly related with both MV and MH for three and four species, respectively. MA’s were always the log linear relation of TL and shapes were nearly oval for all species. FL in all TL-FL relationships were proportional to the TL’s in all species (r2 = 0.94, P  .5 and in invertebrate prey items for N. tambuloides (P > .5. So, this study clearly confirms that nemipterid fishes of different sizes feed on all different specific prey items according to its own body size and feed according to size class for prey items available nearby.

  13. Sonographic Growth Charts for Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children: a Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Min-Su; Hwang, Geol; Han, Sanghoon; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Young Don; Kang, Ki-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Sook; Choi, Guk Myung; Han, Kyoung Hee

    2016-07-01

    Kidney length is the most useful parameter for clinical measurement of kidney size, and is useful to distinguish acute kidney injury from chronic kidney disease. In this prospective observational study of 437 normal children aged between 0 and kidney length was measured using sonography. There were good correlations between kidney length and somatic values, including age, weight, height, and body surface area. The rapid growth of height during the first 2 years of life was intimately associated with a similar increase in kidney length, suggesting that height should be considered an important factor correlating with kidney length. Based on our findings, the following regression equation for the reference values of bilateral kidney length for Korean children was obtained: kidney length of the right kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.102; kidney length of the left kidney (cm) = 0.051 × height (cm) + 2.280. This equation may aid in the diagnosis of various kidney disorders.

  14. Size Matters: Observed and Modeled Camouflage Response of European Cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) to Different Substrate Patch Sizes during Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josef, Noam; Berenshtein, Igal; Rousseau, Meghan; Scata, Gabriella; Fiorito, Graziano; Shashar, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    Camouflage is common throughout the phylogenetic tree and is largely used to minimize detection by predator or prey. Cephalopods, and in particular Sepia officinalis cuttlefish, are common models for camouflage studies. Predator avoidance behavior is particularly important in this group of soft-bodied animals that lack significant physical defenses. While previous studies have suggested that immobile cephalopods selectively camouflage to objects in their immediate surroundings, the camouflage characteristics of cuttlefish during movement are largely unknown. In a heterogenic environment, the visual background and substrate feature changes quickly as the animal swim across it, wherein substrate patch is a distinctive and high contrast patch of substrate in the animal's trajectory. In the current study, we examine the effect of substrate patch size on cuttlefish camouflage, and specifically the minimal size of an object for eliciting intensity matching response while moving. Our results indicated that substrate patch size has a positive effect on animal's reflectance change, and that the threshold patch size resulting in camouflage response falls between 10 and 19 cm (width). These observations suggest that the animal's length (7.2-12.3 cm mantle length in our case) serves as a possible threshold filter below which objects are considered irrelevant for camouflage, reducing the frequency of reflectance changes-which may lead to detection. Accordingly, we have constructed a computational model capturing the main features of the observed camouflaging behavior, provided for cephalopod camouflage during movement.

  15. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B King

    Full Text Available Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females. We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631-820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835-1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further

  16. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  17. Influence of implant number, length, and tilting degree on stress distribution in atrophic maxilla: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümrükçü, Zeynep; Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga

    2017-11-09

    This study aims to evaluate the stress values, created in peri-implant region as a consequence of loading on fixed hybrid dentures that was planned with different implant numbers, lengths, or tilting angulations. Thirteen three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis models were generated with four, five, or seven implants (group A, B, and C). Except the distal implants, all implants were modeled at 4.1 mm (diameter) and 11.5 mm (length) in size. Distal implants were configured to be in five different lengths (6, 8, 11.5, 13, and 16 mm) and three different implant inclination degrees (0°, 30°, and 45°). A 150-N load was applied vertically on prosthesis. Released stresses were evaluated comparatively. The lowest von Mises stress values were found in group C, in the 11.5-mm implant model. Tilting the distal implants 30° caused higher stress values. In 45°-tilting implant models, lower stress values were recorded according to the 30°-tilting models. The ideal implant number is seven for an edentulous maxilla. Tilting the implants causes higher stress values. A 45° inclination of implant causes lower stress values according to the 30° models due to a shorter cantilever. The ideal implant length is 11.5 mm.

  18. Influence of recording length on reporting status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Fagt, Sisse

    2009-01-01

    : To investigate the impact of recording length on reporting status, expressed as the ratio between energy intake and calculated basal metabolic rate (EI/BMR), the percentage of consumers of selected food items and the number reported food items per meal and eating occasions per day. Methods: Data from two...... increased with the number of recording days and was minimum 10 % higher for 7 days compared to 4 days. The number of eating occasions per day and the number of reported food items per meal did not differ between 4 and 7 recording days. Conclusion: Reducing the recording period from 7 to 4 consecutive days...... did not change EI/BMR at group level. Still a study effect seemed to occur in the two population samples resulting in lower estimates of EI/BMR day 1-2. The proportion of consumers was higher with a 7-day recording. These results support a reporting period from 4-7 days....

  19. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section 648... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is 4.75 inches (12.065 cm). (b) Determination of compliance. No more than 50...

  20. Body-size evolution on islands: are adult size variations in tiger snakes a nonadaptive consequence of selection on birth size?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Fabien

    2012-06-01

    Mean adult size has been used as the traditional measure of body size to explain trends of insular gigantism and dwarfism in a wide array of taxa. However, patterns of variation in body size at birth have received surprisingly little attention, leaving open the possibility that adult body-size differences are nonadaptive consequences of selection acting on neonate body size. Here I used an empirical and correlative approach to test this hypothesis in a mosaic of 12 island and mainland snake populations in Australia. Data collected on 597 adult and 1,084 neonate tiger snakes showed that (1) both adult and neonate mean body sizes varied strongly across populations; (2) prey diversity and size convincingly explained birth-size variations: birth size-notably, gape size-correlated with prey size; (3) neonate snout-vent length was significantly correlated with neonate gape size; and (4) neonate snout-vent length was significantly correlated with adult snout-vent length. Postnatal growth rates recorded under common-garden conditions differed across populations and were correlated with mean prey size. These data collectively suggest that (1) prey size is the main driver for the evolution of body size at birth in gape-limited predators, (2) adult size variations may reflect selective forces acting on earlier life stages, and (3) adult size variations may also reflect resource availability during ontogeny (notably, prey diversity).

  1. Burnout among physiotherapists and length of service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Śliwiński

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify factors that contribute to the development of burnout among physiotherapists with different length of service in physiotherapy. Material and Methods: The following research tools were used to study burnout: the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LSQ, based on FLZ (Fragebogen zur Lebenszufriedenheit by Frahrenberg, Myrtek, Schumacher, and Brähler; the Burnout Scale Inventory (BSI by Steuden and Okła; and an ad hoc questionnaire to collect socio-demographic data. The survey was anonymous and voluntary and involved a group of 200 active physiotherapists working in Poland. Results: A statistical analysis revealed significant differences in overall life satisfaction between length-of-service groups (p = 0.03. Physiotherapists with more than 15 years of service reported greater satisfaction than those with less than 5 years and between 5 and 15 years of service. The results suggest that burnout in those with 5-15 years of service is higher in physiotherapists working in health care centers and increases with age and greater financial satisfaction, while it decreases with greater satisfaction with friend and family relations and greater satisfaction with one's work and profession. In those with more than 15 years of service, burnout increases in the case of working in a setting other than a health care or educational center and decreases with greater satisfaction with one's work and profession. Conclusions: Job satisfaction and a satisfying family life prevent burnout among physiotherapists with 5-15 years of service in the profession. Financial satisfaction, age and being employed in health care may cause burnout among physiotherapists with 5-15 years of service. Physiotherapists with more than 15 years of service experience more burnout if they work in a setting other than a health care or educational center and less burnout if they are satisfied with their profession.

  2. Foraminifera size evolution through the Phanerozoic (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, K.; Tachiki, N.; Cummins, R.; Jost, A. B.; Payne, J.

    2009-12-01

    In this research project we wanted to find out how the body size of Foraminifera, small unicellular protists which most frequently live in marine environments, changed through the Phanerozoic Eon (the past 543 million years). We measured maximum test length in 2,637 different Foraminifera genera catalogued by Loeblich and Tappan (1988), and used those data to determine how their body size has evolved. We learned that Foraminiferan size correlates closely with mass extinction and major ocean anoxic events, test composition does not correlate well with body size, and that Berner’s (2006) Phanerozoic atmospheric oxygen concentration curve strongly correlates with mean test size.

  3. THE EVOLUTION OF SPERM SIZE IN BIRDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskie, James V; Montgomerie, Robert; Birkhead, Tim R

    1997-06-01

    Sperm size varies enormously among species, but the reasons for this variation remain obscure. Since it has been suggested that swimming velocity increases with sperm length, earlier studies proposed longer (and therefore faster) sperm are advantageous under conditions of intense sperm competition. Nonetheless, previous work has been equivocal, perhaps because the intensity of sperm competition was measured indirectly. DNA profiling now provides a more direct measure of the number of offspring sired by extrapair males, and thus a more direct method of assessing the potential for sperm competition. Using a sample of 21 species of passerine birds for which DNA profiling data were available, we found a positive relation between sperm length and the degree of extrapair paternity. A path analysis, however, revealed that this relationship arises only indirectly through the positive relationship between the rate of extrapair paternity and length of sperm storage tubules (SSTs) in the female. As sperm length is correlated positively with SST length, an increase in the intensity of sperm competition leads to an increase in sperm length only through its effect on SST length. Why females vary SST length with the intensity of sperm competition is not clear, but one possibility is that it increases female control over how sperm are used in fertilization. Males, in turn, may respond on an evolutionary time scale to changes in SST size by increasing sperm length to prevent displacement from rival sperm. Previous theoretical analyses predicting that sperm size should decrease as sperm competition becomes more intense were not supported by our findings. We suggest that future models of sperm-size evolution consider not only the role of sperm competition, but also how female control and manipulation of ejaculates after insemination selects for different sperm morphologies. © 1997 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Correlation Between Echinoidea Size and Threat Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, S.; Lee, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2017-12-01

    Echinoidea (or sea urchins), are small, spiny, globular, animals that populate the seafloors of nearly the entire planet. Echinoidea have existed on Earth since the Ordovician period, and from their archaic origin there is much to be learned about the relationship between Echinoidea body size and how it affects the survivability of the individual. The goal of this project is to determine how Echinoidea dimensions such as body volume, area, and length compare across extinct and extant species by plotting Echinoidea data in R. We will use stratigraphic data as a source to find which species of sea urchin from our data is extinct. We will then create three sets of three histograms of the size data for each type of measurement. One set will include histograms for sea urchin length, area, and volume. The other set will include histograms for extinct sea urchin length, area, and volume. The last set will include histograms for extant sea urchin length, area, and volume. Our data showed that extant sea urchins had a larger size, and extinct sea urchins were smaller. Our length data showed that the average length of all sea urchins were 54.95791 mm, the average length of extinct sea urchins were 51.0337 mm, and the average length of extant sea urchins were 66.12774 mm. There is a generally increasing trend of size over time, except for a small outlier about 350 million years ago, where echinoderm extinction selected towards larger species and biovolume was abnormally high. Our data also showed that over the past 200 million years, echinoderm extinction selectivity drove slightly smaller sea urchins towards extinction, further supporting the idea that a larger size was and still is advantageous for echinoderms.

  5. Tongue piercing: impact of time and barbell stem length on lingual gingival recession and tooth chipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Allison; Moore, Alisa; Williams, Elly; Stephens, Joni; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2002-03-01

    The increasing popularity of tongue piercing has prompted several case reports documenting oral complications of this practice. However, there are no studies assessing potentially significant parameters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of time (years of wear) and tongue barbell size (stem length) on gingival recession and tooth chipping. Fifty-two adults (mean age 22) with tongue piercings were examined for gingival recession on the lingual aspect of the 12 anterior teeth and for tooth chipping anywhere in the mouth. Subjects were grouped according to years of wear (0 to 2, 2 to 4, and 4+ years) and barbell stem length (long > or =1.59 cm, or short barbells for 2 or more years. Tooth chipping was found on molars and premolars in 47% of subjects with a tongue piercing for 4+ years. Tongue piercing is associated with lingual recession of mandibular anterior teeth and chipping of posterior teeth. Long-term use of a tongue barbell increases the prevalence of these complications. Barbell stem length appears to differentially affect prevalence of recession and chipping. Since the overwhelming majority of subjects with tongue piercings are young adults, cessation efforts are needed to target this population.

  6. Peyronie's Reconstruction for Maximum Length and Girth Gain: Geometrical Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. Egydio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peyronie's disease has been associated with penile shortening and some degree of erectile dysfunction. Surgical reconstruction should be based on giving a functional penis, that is, rectifying the penis with rigidity enough to make the sexual intercourse. The procedure should be discussed preoperatively in terms of length and girth reconstruction in order to improve patient satisfaction. The tunical reconstruction for maximum penile length and girth restoration should be based on the maximum length of the dissected neurovascular bundle possible and the application of geometrical principles to define the precise site and size of tunical incision and grafting procedure. As penile rectification and rigidity are required to achieve complete functional restoration of the penis and 20 to 54% of patients experience associated erectile dysfunction, penile straightening alone may not be enough to provide complete functional restoration. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, self-injection, or penile prosthesis may need to be added in some cases.

  7. Otolith Length-Fish Length Relationships of Eleven US Arctic Fish Species and Their Application to Ice Seal Diet Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. L.; Norcross, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Arctic ecosystem has moved into the spotlight of scientific research in recent years due to increased climate change and oil and gas exploration. Arctic fishes and Arctic marine mammals represent key parts of this ecosystem, with fish being a common part of ice seal diets in the Arctic. Determining sizes of fish consumed by ice seals is difficult because otoliths are often the only part left of the fish after digestion. Otolith length is known to be positively related to fish length. By developing species-specific otolith-body morphometric relationships for Arctic marine fishes, fish length can be determined for fish prey found in seal stomachs. Fish were collected during ice free months in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas 2009 - 2014, and the most prevalent species captured were chosen for analysis. Otoliths from eleven fish species from seven families were measured. All species had strong linear relationships between otolith length and fish total length. Nine species had coefficient of determination values over 0.75, indicating that most of the variability in the otolith to fish length relationship was explained by the linear regression. These relationships will be applied to otoliths found in stomachs of three species of ice seals (spotted Phoca largha, ringed Pusa hispida, and bearded Erignathus barbatus) and used to estimate fish total length at time of consumption. Fish lengths can in turn be used to calculate fish weight, enabling further investigation into ice seal energetic demands. This application will aid in understanding how ice seals interact with fish communities in the US Arctic and directly contribute to diet comparisons among and within ice seal species. A better understanding of predator-prey interactions in the US Arctic will aid in predicting how ice seal and fish species will adapt to a changing Arctic.

  8. Sperm length, sperm storage and mating system characteristics in bumblebees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Boris; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    Multiple insemination induces sperm competition and may select for longer, faster moving sperm in species where sperm is short-lived and egg fertilization takes place almost immediately after ejaculation. Here we report the first detailed analysis of sperm length in social insects with long......-term storage of sperm, using three bumblebee species with different mating systems as models. We show that individual males produce only one size-class of sperm, but that sperm length is highly variable among brothers, among unrelated conspecific males, and among males of different species. Males of Bombus...... hypnorum, a species with multiple-mating queens, have longer sperm than males of B. terrestris and B. lucorum whose queens are single mated. Although the sample size on the species level was too small to perform a phylogenetic analysis, this finding supports the hypothesis that, all other things being...

  9. String matching with variable length gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    2012-01-01

    We consider string matching with variable length gaps. Given a string T and a pattern P consisting of strings separated by variable length gaps (arbitrary strings of length in a specified range), the problem is to find all ending positions of substrings in T that match P. This problem is a basic...

  10. Hierarchy length in orphaned colonies of the ant Temnothorax nylanderi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, J.

    2008-08-01

    Workers of the ant Temnothorax nylanderi form dominance orders in orphaned colonies in which only one or a few top-ranking workers begin to produce males from unfertilized eggs. Between one and 11 individuals initiated 80% of all aggression in 14 queenless colonies. As predicted from inclusive fitness models (Molet M, van Baalen M, Monnin T, Insectes Soc 52:247 256, 2005), hierarchy length was found to first increase with colony size and then to level off at larger worker numbers. The frequency and skew of aggression decreased with increasing size, indicating that rank orders are less pronounced in larger colonies.

  11. Sonographic Growth Charts for Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children: a Prospective Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Min-su; Hwang, Geol; Han, Sanghoon; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Young Don; Kang, Ki-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Sue; Lee, Mu Sook; Choi, Guk Myung; Han, Kyoung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Kidney length is the most useful parameter for clinical measurement of kidney size, and is useful to distinguish acute kidney injury from chronic kidney disease. In this prospective observational study of 437 normal children aged between 0 and < 13 years, kidney length was measured using sonography. There were good correlations between kidney length and somatic values, including age, weight, height, and body surface area. The rapid growth of height during the first 2 years of life was intimat...

  12. Enumeration of pyramids of one-dimensional pieces of arbitrary fixed integer length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Bergfinnur; Eilers, Søren

    We consider pyramids made of one-dimensional pieces of fixed integer length a and which may have pairwise overlaps of integer length from 1 to a. We prove that the number of pyramids of size m, i.e. consisting of m pieces, equals (am-1,m-1) for each a >= 2. This generalises a well known result...

  13. Telomere Length, Proviral Load and Neurologic Impairment in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2-Infected Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Usadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Short or damaged telomeres have been implicated in degenerative conditions. We hypothesized that analysis of telomere length (TL in human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV infection and HTLV-associated neuropathy might provide clues to the etiology of HTLV-associated disease and viral dynamics. A subset of 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2, and 45 seronegative subjects was selected from the larger HTLV Outcomes Study (HOST cohort, matched on age, sex and race/ethnicity. Telomere-to-single-copy gene (T/S ratio (a measure of TL and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral loads were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using quantitative PCR (qPCR. Vibration sensation measured by tuning fork during neurologic examinations performed as part of the HOST study allowed for an assessment of peripheral neuropathy. TL was compared between groups using t-tests, linear and logistic regression. Mean T/S ratio was 1.02 ± 0.16 in HTLV-1, 1.03 ± 0.17 in HTLV-2 and 0.99 ± 0.18 in HTLV seronegative subjects (p = 0.322. TL was not associated with HTLV-1 or -2 proviral load. Shorter TL was significantly associated with impaired vibration sense in the HTLV-2 positive group only. Overall, we found no evidence that telomere length was affected by chronic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection. That TL was only associated with peripheral neuropathy in the HTLV-2-positive group is intriguing, but should be interpreted cautiously. Studies with larger sample size and telomere length measurement in lymphocyte subsets may clarify the relationship between TL and HTLV-infection.

  14. Need for a nomogram of renal sizes in the Indian population- findings from a single centre sonographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Muthusami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Renal size is an important parameter used in the diagnosis and follow up of renal diseases. However, while making decisions, clinicians must be aware of the dependence of these dimensions on the ethnicity of the individual, independent of anthropometric indices. There is no established nomogram for renal sizes in the Indian population. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of oft-quoted ranges of normal renal sizes in our population. Methods: Renal dimensions including length, width and parenchymal thickness were sonographically measured in 140 individuals with no renal disease. Analysis was done for differences due to age, gender and laterality. The correlation of renal dimensions with anthropometric parameters like weight, height, body mass index (BMI and body surface area (BSA was analyzed. Results: The means of length, width and parenchymal thickness of all 280 kidneys of 140 patients were 9.65 ± 0.63, 4.5 ± 0.42 and 2.04 ± 0.2 cm, respectively. There was a significant difference in parenchymal thickness between the right and left kidneys, while there was no significant right-left difference in length or width. Gender-wise analysis showed significant differences between male and female renal breadths but not length and parenchymal thickness. Age group-wise analysis showed significant decrease in renal length and parenchymal thickness beyond the seventh decade. There was a moderate positive correlation of bilateral renal length with body weight and BSA, and a weak positive correlation with body height and BMI. Interpretation & conclusions: Renal sizes in our population are in contrast to commonly quoted normal values in literature. Conclusions about renal sizes need to be made with reference to nomograms and should not be based upon data from other populations. We also present formulae whereby to derive renal sizes from anthropometric indices in our population.

  15. Cephalometric assessment of maxillary length in Serbian children with skeletal class III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Zdenka; Nikolić, Predrag; Nikodijević, Angelina; Milić, Jasmina; Stojanović, Branislav

    2013-07-01

    Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex irregularity of sagittal inter-jaw relationship, which is due to irregularities of sagittal position of one or both of the jaw bones, which is often associated with disproportionate ratio of their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether the length of the jaw of children with skeletal class III in the period of mixed dentition was changed. Fifty children with skeletal class III and the same number of those with skeletal class I, of both sexes, have been selected on the basis of cephalometric analysis of profile tele-x-ray of the head. All the children aged 6-12 had mixed dentition, and were divided according to sex and age into three subgroups within each group. The length of maxilla, mandible and cranial base were measured. Proportions among the lengths measured within each group were found and difference significance in the measured lengths and their proportions among groups and subgroups were evaluated. The children with skeletal class III, compared with the findings in the control group, had significantly lower values of maxillary length, total maxillary length, as well as lower values of their lengths in proportion to lengths of the front or the total length of cranial base and in proportion to mandibular lengths (p children with skeletal class III have significantly shorter maxilla than those with skeletal class I.

  16. Measurement of endodontic file lengths: calibrated versus uncalibrated digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loushine, R J; Weller, R N; Kimbrough, W F; Potter, B J

    2001-12-01

    This in vitro study compared the accuracy of file length measurements made on calibrated and uncalibrated direct digital images. Endodontic files of known lengths and ISO sizes were used in 10 single-rooted, relatively straight teeth within cadaver specimens. The crowns of the teeth were ground flat and an orthodontic wire of known length was secured to the coronal surface. This wire was placed mesiodistally and perpendicular to the root and served as the reference point for the file measurement and as a calibration reference length. A #20 file was hand-measured to a length that reached the apical third of each tooth. It was inserted and a radiographic image was secured. The instrument was remeasured three additional times at different lengths on the same tooth and reinserted before each image acquisition. Thus 40 digital images were acquired using a GE X-ray unit and a Schick Computed Dental Radiography (CDR) #2 sensor. These images were placed in random order, and an independent, blinded investigator determined the file lengths using on-screen calibrated and uncalibrated measurement of the CDR image with a straight-line and multiple-line measuring technique. The experimental measurements were compared with each other and with the known clinical measurements. A two-way analysis of variance indicated that there was a statistically significant difference showing that the calibrated measurements were more accurate than the uncalibrated measurements (p = 0.0001), and there was no significant difference between the straight-line and multiple-line measuring techniques (p = 0.14).

  17. [Myopia: frequency of lattice degeneration and axial length].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Sánchez, M D; Roldán Pallarés, M

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between lattice retinal degeneration and axial length of the eye in different grades of myopia. A sample of 200 eyes from 124 myopic patients was collected by chance. The average age was 34.8 years (20-50 years) and the myopia was between 0.5 and 20 diopters (D). The eyes were grouped according to the degree of refraction defect, the mean axial length of each group (Scan A) and the frequency of lattice retinal degeneration and the relationship between these variables was studied. The possible influence of age on our results was also considered. For the statistical analysis, the SAS 6.07 program with the variance analysis for quantitative variables, and chi(2) test for qualitative variables with a 5% significance were used. A multivariable linear regression model was also adjusted. The highest frequency of lattice retinal degeneration occurred in those myopia patients having more than 15 D, and also in the group of myopia patients between 3 and 6 D, but this did not show statistical significance when compared with the other myopic groups. If the axial length is assessed, a greater frequency of lattice retinal degeneration is also found when the axial length is 25-27 mm and 29-30 mm, which correspond, respectively, to myopias between 3-10 D and more than 15 D. When the multivariable linear regression model was adjusted, the axial length showed the existence of lattice retinal degeneration (beta 0.41 mm; p=0.08) adjusted by the number of diopters (beta 0.38 mm; plattice retinal degeneration was found for myopias with axial eye length between 29-30 mm (more than 15 D), and 25-27 mm (between 3-10 D).

  18. Media Criticism Group Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To integrate speaking practice with rhetorical theory. Type of speech: Persuasive. Point value: 100 points (i.e., 30 points based on peer evaluations, 30 points based on individual performance, 40 points based on the group presentation), which is 25% of course grade. Requirements: (a) References: 7-10; (b) Length: 20-30 minutes; (c)…

  19. Fine mapping of a QTL for ear size on porcine chromosome 5 and identification of high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2 as a positional candidate gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pinghua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ear size and shape are distinct conformation characteristics of pig breeds. Previously, we identified a significant quantitative trait locus (QTL influencing ear surface on pig chromosome 5 in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 resource population. This QTL explained more than 17% of the phenotypic variance. Methods Four new markers on pig chromosome 5 were genotyped across this F2 population. RT-PCR was performed to obtain expression profiles of different candidate genes in ear tissue. Standard association test, marker-assisted association test and F-drop test were applied to determine the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on ear size. Three synthetic commercial lines were also used for the association test. Results We refined the QTL to an 8.7-cM interval and identified three positional candidate genes i.e. HMGA2, SOX5 and PTHLH that are expressed in ear tissue. Seven SNP within these three candidate genes were selected and genotyped in the F2 population. Of the seven SNP, HMGA2 SNP (JF748727: g.2836 A > G showed the strongest association with ear size in the standard association test and marker-assisted association test. With the F-drop test, F value decreased by more than 97% only when the genotypes of HMGA2 g.2836 A > G were included as a fixed effect. Furthermore, the significant association between g.2836 A > G and ear size was also demonstrated in the synthetic commercial Sutai pig line. The haplotype-based association test showed that the phenotypic variance explained by HMGA2 was similar to that explained by the QTL and at a much higher level than by SOX5. More interestingly, HMGA2 is also located within the dog orthologous chromosome region, which has been shown to be associated with ear type and size. Conclusions HMGA2 was the closest gene with a potential functional effect to the QTL or marker for ear size on chromosome 5. This study will contribute to identify the causative gene and mutation underlying

  20. Audience design through social interaction during group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Shane L; Fay, Nicolas; Maybery, Murray

    2013-01-01

    This paper contrasts two accounts of audience design during multiparty communication: audience design as a strategic individual-level message adjustment or as a non-strategic interaction-level message adjustment. Using a non-interactive communication task, Experiment 1 showed that people distinguish between messages designed for oneself and messages designed for another person; consistent with strategic message design, messages designed for another person/s were longer (number of words) than those designed for oneself. However, audience size did not affect message length (messages designed for different sized audiences were similar in length). Using an interactive communication task Experiment 2 showed that as group size increased so too did communicative effort (number of words exchanged between interlocutors). Consistent with a non-strategic account, as group members were added more social interaction was necessary to coordinate the group's collective situation model. Experiment 3 validates and extends the production measures used in Experiment 1 and 2 using a comprehension task. Taken together, our results indicate that audience design arises as a non-strategic outcome of social interaction during group discussion.

  1. Phase tuning by length contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Warren; Polcawich, Ronald G; Morton, Paul A; Bowers, John E

    2018-02-05

    Typical integrated optical phase tuners alter the effective index. In this paper, we explore tuning by geometric deformation. We show that tuning efficiency, Vπ L, improves as the device size shrinks down to the optimal bend radius, contrary to conventional index-shift based approaches where Vπ L remains constant. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of ultra-low power tuning across a full FSR in a low-confinement silicon nitride based ring resonator of 580 μm radius. We demonstrate record performance with V FSR = 16 V, Vπ L = 3.6 V dB, Vπ Lα = 1.1 V dB, tuning current below 10 nA, and unattenuated tuning response up to 1 MHz. We also present optimized designs for high confinement silicon nitride and silicon based platforms with radius down to 80 μm and 45 μm, respectively, with performance well beyond current state-of-the-art. Applications include narrow-linewidth tunable diode lasers for spectroscopy and non-linear optics, optical phased array beamforming networks for RF antennas and LIDAR, and optical filters for WDM telecommunication links.

  2. Television Watching and Telomere Length Among Adults in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hong-Mei; Liu, Qian-Qian; Tian, Guo; Quan, Li-Ming; Zhao, Yong; Cheng, Guo

    2017-09-01

    To explore the independent associations of sedentary behavior and physical activity with telomere length among Chinese adults. Data on total time of sedentary behavior, screen-based sedentary behavior (including television watching and computer or phone use), moderate to vigorous physical activity, and dietary intake of 518 adults in Chengdu, Guizhou, and Xiamen in China (54.25% women) aged 20 to 70 years were obtained between 2013 and 2015 through questionnaires. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured to calculate body mass index and percentage of body fat. Telomere length was measured through Southern blot technique. Television watching was inversely related to adjusted telomere length (-71.75 base pair; SE = 34.40; P  = .04). Furthermore, a similar trend between telomere length and television watching was found in the group aged 20 to 40 years after adjusting for all covariates. Adults aged 20 to 40 years in the highest tertile of daily time spent on watching television had 4.0% shorter telomere length than adults in the lowest tertile (P = .03). Although the association is modest, television watching is inversely related to telomere length among Chinese adults, warranting further investigation in large prospective studies.

  3. The relationships between renal compensatory hypertrophy etiologic factors and anthropometric development in the pediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaygut, Demet; Soylu, Alper; Kasap, Belde; Türkmen, Mehmet; Cakmakcı, Handan; Kavukcu, Salih

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the factors associated with compensatory hypertrophy in the functional kidneys of children. The medical files of patients with a solitary functional kidney were reviewed retrospectively. Data regarding anthropometric measurements, functional renal length, functional renal length of standard deviation score (SDS) of functional kidney at diagnosis, and end of follow-up were obtained. Patients were divided into 2 groups, those with a unilateral kidney function of atrophy, group 1) and those with a solitary kidney (agenesis, and multicystic dysplastic kidney, group 2). A total of 126 patients (70 boys) were evaluated. Both the sizes of the functional kidney and functional kidney SDS values at diagnosis were greater in group 1 relative to group 2. At the end of the follow-up period, anthropometric values including functional kidney size were higher in group 2. Functional kidney size of 2 SDS above the normal was mostly predictive at age 17.5 months (odds ratio [OR] 5.06) and at a body height of 82 cm (OR 5.57). The most determining factors for renal length SDS values were age and height. Solitary kidneys complete compensatory hypertrophy by 17.5 months of age, and after that their growth continues in parallel to normal growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Map and Electrophoretic Karyotype of the Fungal Maize Pathogen Cochliobolus Heterostrophus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, T. H.; Lyngholm, L. K.; Ford, C. F.; Bronson, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) map has been constructed of the nuclear genome of the plant pathogenic ascomycete Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The segregation of 128 RFLP and 4 phenotypic markers was analyzed among 91 random progeny of a single cross; linkages were detected among 126 of the markers. The intact chromosomal DNAs of the parents and certain progeny were separated using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and hybridized with probes used to detect the RFLPs. In this way, 125 markers were assigned to specific chromosomes and linkages among 120 of the markers were confirmed. These linkages totalled 941 centimorgans (cM). Several RFLPs and a reciprocal translocation were identified tightly linked to Tox1, a locus controlling host-specific virulence. Other differences in chromosome arrangement between the parents were also detected. Fourteen gaps of at least 40 cM were identified between linkage groups on the same chromosomes; the total map length was therefore estimated to be, at a minimum, 1501 cM. Fifteen A chromosomes ranging from about 1.3 megabases (Mb) to about 3.7 Mb were identified; one of the strains also has an apparent B chromosome. This chromosome appears to be completely dispensable; in some progeny, all of 15 markers that mapped to this chromosome were absent. The total genome size was estimated to be roughly 35 Mb. Based on these estimates of map length and physical genome size, the average kb/cM ratio in this cross was calculated to be approximately 23. This low ratio of physical to map distance should make this RFLP map a useful tool for cloning genes. PMID:1346261

  5. Au70S20(PPh3)12: an intermediate sized metalloid gold cluster stabilized by the Au4S4 ring motif and Au-PPh3 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzler, Sebastian; Schrenk, Claudio; Frojd, Andrew R; Häkkinen, Hannu; Clayborne, Andre Z; Schnepf, Andreas

    2018-01-02

    Reducing (Ph 3 P)AuSC(SiMe 3 ) 3 with l-Selectride® gives the medium-sized metalloid gold cluster Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 . Computational studies show that the phosphine bound Au-atoms not only stabilize the electronic structure of Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 , but also behave as electron acceptors leading to auride-like gold atoms on the exterior.

  6. Patient length of stay and mortality prediction: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Aya; Bader-El-Den, Mohamed; McNicholas, James

    2017-05-01

    Over the past few years, there has been increased interest in data mining and machine learning methods to improve hospital performance, in particular hospitals want to improve their intensive care unit statistics by reducing the number of patients dying inside the intensive care unit. Research has focused on prediction of measurable outcomes, including risk of complications, mortality and length of hospital stay. The length of stay is an important metric both for healthcare providers and patients, influenced by numerous factors. In particular, the length of stay in critical care is of great significance, both to patient experience and the cost of care, and is influenced by factors specific to the highly complex environment of the intensive care unit. The length of stay is often used as a surrogate for other outcomes, where those outcomes cannot be measured; for example as a surrogate for hospital or intensive care unit mortality. The length of stay is also a parameter, which has been used to identify the severity of illnesses and healthcare resource utilisation. This paper examines a range of length of stay and mortality prediction applications in acute medicine and the critical care unit. It also focuses on the methods of analysing length of stay and mortality prediction. Moreover, the paper provides a classification and evaluation for the analytical methods of the length of stay and mortality prediction associated with a grouping of relevant research papers published in the years 1984 to 2016 related to the domain of survival analysis. In addition, the paper highlights some of the gaps and challenges of the domain.

  7. Prenatal food supplementation fortified with multiple micronutrients increases birth length: a randomized controlled trial in rural Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybregts, Lieven; Roberfroid, Dominique; Lanou, Hermann; Menten, Joris; Meda, Nicolas; Van Camp, John; Kolsteren, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal multiple micronutrient (MMN) or balanced energy and protein supplementation has a limited effect on birth size of the offspring. The objective was to determine whether a prenatal MMN-fortified food supplement (FFS) improves anthropometric measures at birth compared with supplementation with an MMN pill alone. We conducted a nonblinded, individually randomized controlled trial in 1296 pregnant women in 2 villages in rural Burkina Faso. Supplements were provided on a daily basis, and compliance was closely verified by using a community-based network of home visitors. Anthropometric measures at birth were available for analysis for 87% of the 1175 live singleton deliveries enrolled. After adjustment for gestational age at birth, the FFS group had a significantly higher birth length (+4.6 mm; P = 0.001). FFS supplementation resulted in a modestly higher birth weight (+31 g; P = 0.197). Subgroup analyses showed clinically important treatment effects on birth length (+12.0 mm; P = 0.005) and on birth weight (+111 g; P = 0.133) for underweight [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) birth to longer newborns (+7.3 mm; P = 0.002) than did those who received MMN supplementation. The provision of FFS to pregnant women resulted in higher birth length than did MMN supplementation. For women with a suboptimal prepregnancy nutritional status, MMN supplementation should be complemented with a balanced energy and protein supplement to produce a clinical effect on birth size. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00909974.

  8. Queen Size Variation in the Ponerine Ant Ponera coarctata (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liebig

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Queens of Ponera coarctata show a pronounced variation in size as measured by ommatidia number and Weber's alitrunk length. Isometric size variation and the normal distribution of size categories indicate that, despite these differences, only one queen morph exists. Queen size varies less within colonies than between colonies, and thus appears to be colony specific. Ovary length apparently varies with queen size. Similar size variations as in queens also occured in males, but not in workers.

  9. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 . The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO 2 producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n e = 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and temperatures of T e = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ∼1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length (∼2 mm). increasing to 12% for ∼7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths

  10. Progress in long scale length laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Arnold, P.; Bardsley, G.; Berger, R. L.; Bonanno, G.; Borger, T.; Bower, D. E.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S. C.; Campbell, K.; Chrisp, M. P.; Cohen, B. I.; Constantin, C.; Cooper, F.; Cox, J.; Dewald, E.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Duncan, J.; Eder, D.; Edwards, J.; Erbert, G.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Froula, D. H.; Gardner, S. D.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Gregori, G.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Hall, T.; Hammel, B. A.; Haynam, C.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Hermes, G.; Hinkel, D.; Holder, J.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hsing, W.; Huber, S.; James, T.; Johnson, S.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kelleher, T.; Knight, J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Labiak, W.; Landen, O. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lee, F. D.; Lund, D.; MacGowan, B.; Marshall, S.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Meezan, N.; Miller, G.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E.; Munro, D.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Ng, E.; Niemann, C.; Nikitin, A.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rekow, V.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Rhodes, M.; Roberts, V.; Robey, H.; Ross, G.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, M. B.; Shiromizu, S.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Tietbohl, G.; Tobin, M.; Tuck, J.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Vidal, R.; Voloshin, D.; Wallace, R.; Wegner, P.; Whitman, P.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Young, B.; Young, P. E.; Zapata, P.; Bahr, R. E.; Seka, W.; Fernandez, J.; Montgomery, D.; Rose, H.

    2004-12-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 × 1015 W cm-2. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO2 producing up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of ne = 6 × 1020 cm-3 and temperatures of Te = 2 keV. The high energy in an NIF quad of beams of 16 kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser-plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x-rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ~1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 3% for the smallest length (~2 mm), increasing to 10-12% for ~7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modelling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  11. Estimating Length of Stay by Patient Type in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Henry C; Bennett, Mihoko V; Schulman, Joseph; Gould, Jeffrey B; Profit, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    Objective Develop length of stay prediction models for neonatal intensive care unit patients. Study Design We used data from 2008 to 2010 to construct length of stay models for neonates admitted within 1 day of age to neonatal intensive care units and surviving to discharge home. Results Our sample included 23,551 patients. Median length of stay was 79 days when birth weight was g. Risk factors for longer length of stay varied by weight. Units with shorter length of stay for one weight group had shorter lengths of stay for other groups. Conclusion Risk models for comparative assessments of length of stay need to appropriately account for weight, particularly considering the cutoff of 1,500 g. Refining prediction may benefit counseling of families and health care systems to efficiently allocate resources. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Determination of Flaw Size from Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of delaminations tend to overestimate the size of the flaw. Since the heat diffuses in the plane parallel to the surface, the resulting temperature profile over the flaw is larger than the flaw. A variational method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the flaw that is much closer to the true size of the flaw. The size is determined from the spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above the flaw and a constraint on the length of the contour surrounding the flaw. The technique is applied to experimental data acquired on a flat bottom hole composite specimen.

  13. Development of a new cluster size selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Kiyoto; Dake, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2005-01-01

    A new cluster size selector is being developed to realize low-damage nano-processing applied gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology. The selector consists of several pairs of deflection electrodes and high-frequency deflection biases are applied. Depending on the velocity of a cluster ion, a desired size of cluster can pass through the selector. It can select any target cluster sizes without changing the structure. The length of this device is about 200 mm and it is much smaller than that of traditional mass spectrometers, because of its simple structure. Preliminary experiments showed a good mass resolution and high transmittance for a cluster size selector with this device

  14. Variability in human body size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The range of variability found among homogeneous groups is described and illustrated. Those trends that show significantly marked differences between sexes and among a number of racial/ethnic groups are also presented. Causes of human-body size variability discussed include genetic endowment, aging, nutrition, protective garments, and occupation. The information is presented to aid design engineers of space flight hardware and equipment.

  15. Association among Maternal Obesity, Cervical Length, and Preterm Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik, Anna; Miller, Emily S; Son, Moeun; Kominiarek, Michelle A

    2017-04-01

    Objective  The objective of this study was to determine if mid-trimester cervical length is associated with the inverse relationship between maternal body mass index (BMI) at delivery and spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB). Materials and Methods  This was a retrospective cohort of women with a singleton pregnancy without prior SPTB who underwent routine transvaginal cervical length assessment between 18 and 24 weeks. Women were categorized into four BMI groups: (1) 18.5 to 24.9, (2) 25 to 29.9, (3) 30 to 34.9, and (4) ≥ 35 kg/m 2 . Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted to determine whether BMI group was associated with SPTB at < 37, 34, or 32 weeks independent of the cervical length. Results  Of the 18,100 women in this analysis, 43.5% had a BMI ≥ 30. In univariable analysis, increasing BMI group was associated with longer cervical length but not with cervical length < 10th percentile. SPTB at < 37, 35, and 32 weeks was less common among women with higher BMI. In multivariable regression, a higher BMI group was associated with a lower frequency of SPTB at 37 weeks (adjusted odds ratios [aORs] of 0.64, 0.68, and 0.51), at 34 weeks (aORs of 0.53, 0.54, and 0.31) and at 32 weeks (aORs of 0.47, 0.60, and 0.27) for BMI groups 2 to 4, respectively. This association persisted even when cervical length was entered into the model as a covariate. Conclusion  Women with a higher BMI group had longer mid-trimester cervical length, and correspondingly reduced SPTB. However, the decreased risk of SPTB was not associated with cervical length. The reason for the potential protective effect from prematurity is unknown and its mechanisms require further investigation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Estimation of gestational age from gall-bladder length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaykumar, K; Udaykumar, Padmaja; Nagesh, K R

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a precise duration of gestation is vital in situations such as infanticide and criminal abortions. The present study attempted to estimate the gestational age of the foetus from gall-bladder length. Foetuses of various gestational age groups were dissected, and the length of the gall bladder was measured. The results were analysed, and a substantial degree of correlation was statistically confirmed. This novel method is helpful when the foetus is fragmented, putrefied or eviscerated, where this method can be used as an additional parameter to improve the accuracy of foetal age estimation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    OpenAIRE

    Osama S Alothmani; Lara T Friedlander; Nicholas P Chandler

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected ...

  18. Information, polarization and term length in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    accountable, but the re-election incentive leads to policy-distortion as the government seeks to manipulate swing voters' beliefs to make its ideology more popular. This creates a trade-off: A short term length improves accountability but gives distortions. A short term length is best for swing voters when......This paper considers term lengths in a representative democracy where the political issue divides the population on the left-right scale. Parties are ideologically different and better informed about the consequences of policies than voters are. A short term length makes the government more...

  19. Stress management and mind-body medicine: a randomized controlled longitudinal evaluation of students' health and effects of a behavioral group intervention at a middle-size German university (SM-MESH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Tobias; Sonntag, Ulrike; Esch, Sonja Maren; Thees, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Student life can be stressful. Hence, we started a regular mind-body medical stress management program in 2006. By today, more than 500 students took part and evaluations showed significant results, especially with regard to a reduction of stress warning signals. For further analysis, we now decided to run a randomized controlled longitudinal trial. Participating students at Coburg University were randomized into an intervention (n = 24) or a waitlist control group (n = 19). The intervention group completed 3 sets (pre/post/follow-up) and the control group 2 sets (pre/post) of self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaires included: SF-12 Health Survey, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sense of Coherence (SOC-L9), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) concerning stress, and the Stress Warning Signs (SWS) scale. Randomly selected participants of the intervention group were also queried in qualitative interviews. The intervention consisted of an 8 week stress management group program (mind-body medical stress reduction - MBMSR). Follow-up measures were taken after 6 months. Virtually, no drop-out occurred. Our study showed significant effects in the intervention group concerning SF-12 Mental Component Scale (p = 0.05), SF-12 Physical Component Scale (p = 0.001), VAS (in general, p = 0.001) and SWS (emotional reactions, p students could be demonstrated. Findings suggest that stress management might be given importance at universities that care for the performance, the quality of life, and stress-health status of their students, acknowledging and accounting for the challenging circumstances of university life, as well as the specific needs of the modern student population. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. A meta-analysis of the relationship between anxiety and telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M; Schutte, Nicola S

    2017-05-01

    Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, and shorter telomeres are associated with poor physical health. The present study set out to consolidate the varying effect sizes found so far in studies of anxiety and telomere length. A meta-analytic investigation of the relationship between anxiety and telomere length used information from 17 different samples comprising a total of 19,424 participants. The results showed a small but significant association, r = -.06, between higher anxiety and shorter telomeres. Studies comparing individuals diagnosed with an anxiety disorder with other individuals had a significant effect size, and studies that did not use this comparison threshold did not have a significant effect size. Anxiety is associated with an important biomarker related to health. Future experimental studies that examine the impact of interventions intended to reduce anxiety in conjunction with measurement of telomere length can further clarify the impact of anxiety on telomere length.

  1. Effect of acid Lugol solution as preservative on two representative chitineous and gelatinous zooplankton groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaspers, Cornelia; Carstensen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The estimation of biomass from body lengths to carbon regressions is a common approach in plankton research. Several different chemicals for sample preservation are in use, and conversion factors to account for shrinkage effects exist, but to our knowledge the consequences of using potassium......-iodide and iodine (Lugol solution) as preservative on body sizes of different mesozooplankton groups have not been investigated. We tested the effect of 2% acidified Lugol solution on body sizes over time on two major marine mesozooplankton groups, namely larvaceans and copepods, which are representatives...

  2. Intron size and genome size in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Wendel; R. Cronn; I. Alvarez; B. Liu; R. Small; D. Senchina

    2002-01-01

    It has long been known that genomes vary over a remarkable range of sizes in both plants (Bennett, Cox, and Leitch 1997) and animals (Gregory 2001). It also has become evident that across the broad phylogenetic sweep, genome size may be correlated with intron size (Deutsch and Long 1999; Vinogradov 1999; McLysaght et al. 2000), suggesting that some component of genome...

  3. Full length prototype SSC dipole test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from tests of the first full length prototype SSC dipole magnet. The cryogenic behavior of the magnet during a slow cooldown to 4.5K and a slow warmup to room temperature has been measured. Magnetic field quality was measured at currents up to 2000 A. Averaged over the body field all harmonics with the exception of b 2 and b 8 are at or within the tolerances specified by the SSC Central Design Group. (The values of b 2 and b 8 result from known design and construction defects which will be be corrected in later magnets.) Using an NMR probe the average body field strength is measured to be 10.283 G/A with point to point variations on the order of one part in 1000. Data are presented on quench behavior of the magnet up to 3500 A (approximately 55% of full field) including longitudinal and transverse velocities for the first 250 msec of the quench

  4. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Chris L; Brusatte, Stephen L; Stein, Koen

    2009-12-22

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77-2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97-2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05-5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group.

  5. Differentiation of Candida glabrata, C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis based on fragment length polymorphism of ITS1 and ITS2 and restriction fragment length polymorphism of ITS and D1/D2 regions in rDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirhendi, H; Bruun, B; Schønheyder, H C

    2011-01-01

    Different molecular methods for the discrimination of Candida glabrata, C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis were evaluated and the prevalence of these species among Danish blood isolates investigated. Control strains were used to determine fragment length polymorphism in the ITS1, ITS2, ITS1-5.8S...... enzymes were suitable for RFLP differentiation of the species. Enzymatic digestion of the D1/D2 domain with TatI produced unique band sizes for each of the three species. PCR-RFLP and PNA-FISH were in agreement for all of the isolates tested. None of the 133 Danish blood isolates were C. nivariensis or C....... bracarensis. Fragment size polymorphism of ITS1 and RFLP of the D1/D2 domain or the ITS region are useful methods for the differentiation of the species within the C. glabrata group. C. bracarensis and C. nivariensis are rare among Danish C. glabrata blood isolates....

  6. “Oversized” Penile Length In The Black People; Myth Or Reality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: There is the possibility of racial differences in penile sizes, but there is no convincing scientific background to support the ascription of bigger penile dimensions to people of the Black race. Keywords: Penile Length, Black Race, Penile Size Tropical Journal of Medical Research Vol. 11 (1) 2007: pp. 16-18 ...

  7. Axial Lengths in Children with Recessive Cornea Plana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hazimi, Amro; Khan, Arif O

    2015-06-01

    While flat keratometry contributes to the hyperopia and associated refractive accommodative esotropia that is part of recessive cornea plana, whether or not axial lengths are abnormally short in the disease is unclear. In this study we assess this possibility. Prospective (2010-2012) axial length measurement (IOLmaster; Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) of affected right eyes and comparison to right eyes with refractive accommodative esotropia only. Keratometry and refraction were also performed. For eight affected right eyes (age 10-12 years; seven families) axial length ranged from 21.46-24.80 mm (mean 23.34). Best corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/25 to 20/50, keratometry from 25.33-39.80 diopters (D) [mean 31.80], and refraction from +2.00 to +14.00 D (mean +7.22). For 50 control right eyes (age 4-12 years), axial length ranged from 19.87-23.66 mm (mean 21.6). Best-corrected visual acuity was 20/25 or better, keratometry ranged from 39.81-46.25 D (mean 42.42), and refraction from +2.25 to +8.00 D (mean 4.71). Axial lengths were longer in the affected group (2-tailed unpaired t-test p value 0.000005) despite greater hyperopia (2-tailed unpaired t-test p value 0.001). Despite greater hyperopia, axial lengths were longer in eyes with recessive cornea plana, evidence that axial lengths are not shortened by the disease. Keratometry in children with cornea plana was below the range of controls and was the major factor underlying the phenotype's hyperopia.

  8. Sexual dimorphism of root length on a Greek population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, E; Vanna, V; Moraitis, K

    2014-04-01

    Sexual dimorphism in teeth has been an area of research for osteoarchaeologists and forensic anthropologists studying human skeletal remains. As most studies have been based on the mesiodistal and buccolingual crown measurements, sexual dimorphism from root length dimensions remains "neglected" by comparison to crown dimensions. The aim of the present study was to test the existence of sexual dimorphism in the root length of single-rooted teeth with the purpose of investigating whether maximum root length can be reliably used to determine sex. A total of 774 permanent teeth in 102 individuals (58 males and 44 females) from the Athens Collection were examined. The maximum root length of each tooth was measured on the mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual side. Almost all teeth presented a high degree of sexual dimorphism with males showing numerically higher values in root length than females. The most dimorphic teeth were the maxillary second incisors followed by maxillary canines. The percentage of sexual dimorphism reached 16.56%, with maxillary teeth showing the highest degree of dimorphism. The classification results show that the overall correctly specified group percentage ranged from 58.6% to 90.0%. The data generated from this study suggest that root length measurements offer a reliable method for determining sex and are therefore useful in osteoarchaeological studies, particularly in cases of fragmented or cremated material, but also in forensic contexts. Moreover, root length can be used to separate the remains of female and male subadult individuals with a high level of accuracy thus addressing one of the most problematic issues in human osteoarchaeology and anthropology as immature skeletons are the most difficult to sex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Independent student study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Graham D; Hyde, Sarah J; Davy, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Teachers and students regulate learning to varying degrees in educational programmes in higher education. We present evidence that students in a student-centred medical programme self- and co-regulate their learning in independently formed study groups. We describe the perceived benefits of study groups and the effect of study group membership on student achievement. Years 1-2 of a 4-year, graduate-entry problem-based medical programme. We surveyed 233 year 2 students about features of their study groups and their study group membership in years 1-2. We compared study group membership with students' scores on a written summative assessment held at the end of their second year. For students who joined 1 study group, the length of time their group stayed together was positively related to achievement in the written summative assessment. There were no differences in summative assessment results between students who had been in a study group and students who had not been in a study group. Effective study groups are supportive, socially cohesive groups who generate mutual trust and loyalty, and self- and co-regulate their learning by giving and receiving explanations and summaries and motivating individual study. Teachers can support the formation of study groups by using small-group teaching/learning activities, providing clear learning outcomes and assessment criteria, minimising competition for grades and allocating room space.

  10. Effect of Fiber Length on Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manke, Amruta; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Dong, Chenbo; Wang, Liying; He, Xiaoqing; Battelli, Lori; Derk, Raymond; Stueckle, Todd A.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina; Gou, Honglei; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Wu, Nianqiang; Mercer, Robert R.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Given their extremely small size and light weight, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be readily inhaled by human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, particularly fibrosis. Although the fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established, there is a lack of consensus regarding the contribution of physicochemical attributes of CNTs on the underlying fibrotic outcome. We designed an experimentally validated in vitro fibroblast culture model aimed at investigating the effect of fiber length on single-walled CNT (SWCNT)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The fibrogenic response to short and long SWCNTs was assessed via oxidative stress generation, collagen expression and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) production as potential fibrosis biomarkers. Long SWCNTs were significantly more potent than short SWCNTs in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) response, collagen production and TGF-β release. Furthermore, our finding on the length-dependent in vitro fibrogenic response was validated by the in vivo lung fibrosis outcome, thus supporting the predictive value of the in vitro model. Our results also demonstrated the key role of ROS in SWCNT-induced collagen expression and TGF-β activation, indicating the potential mechanisms of length-dependent SWCNT-induced fibrosis. Together, our study provides new evidence for the role of fiber length in SWCNT-induced lung fibrosis and offers a rapid cell-based assay for fibrogenicity testing of nanomaterials with the ability to predict pulmonary fibrogenic response in vivo. PMID:24786100

  11. Effect of Fiber Length on Carbon Nanotube-Induced Fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Manke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given their extremely small size and light weight, carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be readily inhaled by human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, particularly fibrosis. Although the fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established, there is a lack of consensus regarding the contribution of physicochemical attributes of CNTs on the underlying fibrotic outcome. We designed an experimentally validated in vitro fibroblast culture model aimed at investigating the effect of fiber length on single-walled CNT (SWCNT-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The fibrogenic response to short and long SWCNTs was assessed via oxidative stress generation, collagen expression and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β production as potential fibrosis biomarkers. Long SWCNTs were significantly more potent than short SWCNTs in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS response, collagen production and TGF-β release. Furthermore, our finding on the length-dependent in vitro fibrogenic response was validated by the in vivo lung fibrosis outcome, thus supporting the predictive value of the in vitro model. Our results also demonstrated the key role of ROS in SWCNT-induced collagen expression and TGF-β activation, indicating the potential mechanisms of length-dependent SWCNT-induced fibrosis. Together, our study provides new evidence for the role of fiber length in SWCNT-induced lung fibrosis and offers a rapid cell-based assay for fibrogenicity testing of nanomaterials with the ability to predict pulmonary fibrogenic response in vivo.

  12. Effect of Amphiphilic Alkyl Chain Length Upon Purified LATEX Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amira Amir Hassan; Amir Hashim Mohd Yatim

    2015-01-01

    Rubber particles in purified latex (PL) are stabilized by a film of protein and fatty acid soap (surfactant). Saturated straight-chain fatty acid soaps can assist an enhancement of latex stability. However, whether the alkyl chain length plays an important role in increasing the stability is still an issue. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of alkyl chain length of anionic surfactant on the stability of purified latex. The fatty acid soap of decanoate (9), laurate (11), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) (12) and palmitate (15) were used. The numbers in parentheses indicating the number of carbon present in alkyl chain of the soap. The results showed that the impact of alkyl chain length on the stability of latex is in the order of laurate > decanoate > SDS > palmitate > purified latex accordingly. The alkyl chain length does giving a significant effect on latex stability after longer stirring time. The particle size of latex with the presence of surfactant is greater compare to a single particle itself due to extension of particles diameter. Thus suitable interaction of the nonpolar tail of surfactant with the hydrophobic regions of latex surface played a major role in maintaining a stable latex system. (author)

  13. Nonmonotonic DNA-length-dependent mobility in pluronic gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Seungyong; Wei, Ling; Shanbhag, Sachin; Van Winkle, David H.

    2017-04-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the mobility of DNA fragments in micellar gels of pluronic F127 (E O100P O70E O100 ) and pluronic P123 (E O20P O70E O20 ) . The 20-3500 base pair DNA fragments were separated by size first in agarose gels, and then in pluronic gels at room temperature. In agarose gels, the DNA mobility decreases monotonically with increasing DNA length. In pluronic gels, however, the mobility varies nonmonotonically according to fragment lengths that are strongly correlated with the diameter of the spherical micelles. Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations with short-ranged intra-DNA hydrodynamic interactions were performed to numerically calculate the length-dependent mobility in pluronic lattices. The rising and falling trends, as well as the oscillations of mobility, were captured by the coarse-grained BD simulations. Molecular dynamics simulations in pluronic F127, with explicitly modeled micelle coronas, justified that the hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the complex fluid of hydrated poly(ethylene oxide) are a possible reason for the initial rise of mobility with DNA length.

  14. Sexual size and shape dimorphism in Salamandra salamandra (Amphibia, Caudata, Salamandridae from the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labus N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual size dimorphism is one of the key evolutionary features that has been studied in many organisms. On the other hand, sexual shape dimorphism has not been examined as well despite being as important as size dimorphism. Therefore, we analyzed the sexual size and shape dimorphism (SSSD of Salamandra salamandra from the territory of the central Balkans. In addition, we wanted to reconsider if there is some regularity in the geographical distribution of SSSD in the investigated area. Significant differences in size and shape between the sexes were found for the whole sample and among the analyzed groups. Females were larger than males and had bigger heads, interlimb distances and a parotid gland, while males had bigger tails, forelimbs, hindlimbs, and forefoot and hindfoot length. Our results reveal a strong effect of locality on trait variation. This variation from the general pattern of SSSD is not substantial but still has to be considered.

  15. Geometrical constraints in the scaling relationships between genome size, cell size and cell cycle length in herbaceous plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, I.; Herben, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 279, č. 1730 (2012), s. 861-875 ISSN 0962-8452 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : nuclear DNA content * growtht-rate * metabolic-rate Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.683, year: 2012

  16. Reestablishment of radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jungmin; Yun, Sookyung; Lee, Jeosoon; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2017-01-10

    Kidney size may be altered in renal diseases, and the detection of kidney size alteration has diagnostic and prognostic values. We hypothesized that radiographic kidney size, the kidney length to the second lumbar vertebra (L2) length ratio, in normal Miniature Schnauzer dogs may be overestimated due to their shorter vertebral length. This study was conducted to evaluate radiographic and ultrasonographic kidney size and L2 length in clinically normal Miniature Schnauzers and other dog breeds to evaluate the effect of vertebral length on radiographic kidney size and to reestablish radiographic kidney size in normal Miniature Schnauzers. Abdominal radiographs and ultrasonograms from 49 Miniature Schnauzers and 54 other breeds without clinical evidence of renal disease and lumbar vertebral abnormality were retrospectively evaluated. Radiographic kidney size, in the Miniature Schnauzer (3.31 ± 0.26) was significantly larger than that in other breeds (2.94 ± 0.27). Relative L2 length, the L2 length to width ratio, in the Miniature Schnauzer (1.11 ± 0.06) was significantly shorter than that in other breeds (1.21 ± 0.09). However, ultrasonographic kidney sizes, kidney length to aorta diameter ratios, were within or very close to normal range both in the Miniature Schnauzer (6.75 ± 0.67) and other breeds (7.16 ± 1.01). Thus, Miniature Schnauzer dogs have breed-specific short vertebrae and consequently a larger radiographic kidney size, which was greater than standard reference in normal adult dogs. Care should be taken when evaluating radiographic kidney size in Miniature Schnauzers to prevent falsely diagnosed renomegaly.

  17. 7 CFR 29.3037 - Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.3037 Section 29.3037 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing.... Length, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of quality.) [24...

  18. 7 CFR 29.6024 - Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.6024 Section 29.6024 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6024 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the...

  19. Local gauge invariant QED with fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyshevsky, V.G.; Mateev, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    A local gauge theory of electromagnetic interactions with the fundamental length l as a new universal scale is worked out. The Lagrangian contains new extra terms in which the coupling constant is proportional to the fundamental length. The theory has an elegant geometrical basis: in momentum representation one faces de Sitter momentum space with curvature radius 1/l [ru

  20. Analysis of ureteral length in adult cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. F. Novaes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In some occasions, correlations between human structures can help planning surgical intra-abdominal interventions. The previous determination of ureteral length helps pre-operatory planning of surgeries, reduces costs of auxiliary exams, the correct choice of double-J catheter with low morbidity and fewer symptoms, and an adequate adhesion to treatment. Objective To evaluate ureteral length in adult cadavers and to analyze its correlation with anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to January 2012 we determined ureteral length of adult cadavers submitted to necropsy and obtained the following measures: height, distance from shoulder to wrist, elbow-wrist, xiphoid appendix-umbilicus, umbilicus-pubis, xiphoid appendix-pubis and between iliac spines. We analyzed the correlations between ureteral length and those anthropometric measures. Results We dissected 115 ureters from 115 adult corpses from April 2009 to January 2012. Median ureteral length didn't vary between sexes or according to height. It was observed no correlation among ureteral length and all considered anthropometric measures in all analyzed subgroups and in general population. There were no significant differences between right and left ureteral measures. Conclusions There is no difference of ureteral length in relation to height or gender (male or female. There is no significant correlation among ureteral length and the considered anthropometric measures.

  1. The length of the male urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias. S. Kohler

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Catheter-based medical devices are an important component of the urologic armamentarium. To our knowledge, there is no population-based data regarding normal male urethral length. We evaluated the length of the urethra in men with normal genitourinary anatomy undergoing either Foley catheter removal or standard cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male urethral length was obtained in 109 men. After study permission was obtained, the subject's penis was placed on a gentle stretch and the catheter was marked at the tip of the penis. The catheter was then removed and the distance from the mark to the beginning of the re-inflated balloon was measured. Alternatively, urethral length was measured at the time of cystoscopy, on removal of the cystoscope. Data on age, weight, and height was obtained in patients when possible. RESULTS: The mean urethral length was 22.3 cm with a standard deviation of 2.4 cm. Urethral length varied between 15 cm and 29 cm. No statistically significant correlation was found between urethral length and height, weight, body mass index (BMI, or age. CONCLUSIONS: Literature documenting the length of the normal male adult urethra is scarce. Our data adds to basic anatomic information of the male urethra and may be used to optimize genitourinary device design.

  2. On the homology length spectrum of surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Massart, Daniel; Parlier, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    On a surface with a Finsler metric, we investigate the asymptotic growth of the number of closed geodesics of length less than L which minimize length among all geodesic multicurves in the same homology class. An important class of surfaces which are of interest to us are hyperbolic surfaces.

  3. Paternal age and telomere length in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob B; Dalgård, Christine; Mangino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length, a highly heritable trait, is longer in offspring of older fathers. This perplexing feature has been attributed to the longer telomeres in sperm of older men and it might be an 'epigenetic' mechanism through which paternal age plays a role in telomere length regulation in humans...

  4. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Hof, AL; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women

  5. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama S Alothmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected by the location of the apical foramen, tooth type, canal curvature and superimposition of surrounding structures. Variations among observers by virtue of training and experience may also influence the accuracy of the procedure. The interpretation of radiographs could be affected by film speed and viewing conditions, with the superiority of digital imaging over conventional radiography for working length determination remaining debatable. The combination of several methods is recommended for acquiring the most accurate working length.

  6. Economic issues of broiler production length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szőllősi László

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The length of broiler production cycle is also an important factor when profitability is measured. This paper is to determine the effects of different market ages and down-time period, overall broiler production cycle length on performance and economic parameters based on Hungarian production and financial circumstances. A deterministic model was constructed to manage the function-like correlations of age-related daily weight gain, daily feed intake and daily mortality data. The results show that broiler production cycle length has a significant effect on production and economic performance. Cycle length is determined by the length of down-time and grow-out periods. If down-time period is reduced by one day, an average net income of EUR 0.55 per m2 is realizable. However, the production period is not directly proportional either with emerging costs or obtainable revenues. Profit maximization is attainable if the production period is 41-42 days.

  7. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V S; Timofeev, A V

    2016-01-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length. (paper)

  8. Does one size really fit all? The effectiveness of a non-diagnosis-specific integrated mental health care program in Germany in a prospective, parallel-group controlled multi-centre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Stierlin, Annabel Sandra; Helmbrecht, Marina Julia; Herder, Katrin; Prinz, Stefanie; Rosenfeld, Nadine; Walendzik, Julia; Holzmann, Marco; Dinc, Uemmueguelsuem; Schützwohl, Matthias; Becker, Thomas; Kilian, Reinhold

    2017-08-01

    The Network for Mental Health (NWpG-IC) is an integrated mental health care program implemented in 2009 by cooperation between health insurance companies and community mental health providers in Germany. Meanwhile about 10,000 patients have been enrolled. This is the first study evaluating the effectiveness of the program in comparison to standard mental health care in Germany. In a parallel-group controlled trial over 18 months conducted in five regions across Germany, a total of 260 patients enrolled in NWpG-IC and 251 patients in standard mental health care (TAU) were recruited between August 2013 and November 2014. The NWpG-IC patients had access to special services such as community-based multi-professional teams, case management, crisis intervention and family-oriented psychoeducation in addition to standard mental health care. The primary outcome empowerment (EPAS) and the secondary outcomes quality of life (WHO-QoL-BREF), satisfaction with psychiatric treatment (CSQ-8), psychosocial and clinical impairment (HoNOS) and information about mental health service needs (CAN) were measured four times at 6-month intervals. Linear mixed-effect regression models were used to estimate the main effects and interaction effects of treatment, time and primary diagnosis. Due to the non-randomised group assignment, propensity score adjustment was used to control the selection bias. NWpG-IC and TAU groups did not differ with respect to most primary and secondary outcomes in our participating patients who showed a broad spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses and illness severities. However, a significant improvement in terms of patients' satisfaction with psychiatric care and their perception of treatment participation in favour of the NWpG-IC group was found. Providing integrated mental health care for unspecific mentally ill target groups increases treatment participation and service satisfaction but seems not suitable to enhance the overall outcomes of mental health care in

  9. Making Cooperative Learning Groups Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, James; De Jong, Cherie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative-learning groups with middle school students. Describes cooperative-learning techniques, including group roles, peer evaluation, and observation and monitoring. Considers grouping options, including group size and configuration, dyads, the think-pair-share lecture, student teams achievement divisions, jigsaw groups,…

  10. Cephalometric assessment of maxillary length in Serbian children with skeletal class III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex irregularity of sagittal inter-jaw relationship, which is due to irregularities of sagittal position of one or both of the jaw bones, which is often associated with disproportionate ratio of their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether the length of the jaw of children with skeletal class III in the period of mixed dentition was changed. Methods. Fifty children with skeletal class III and the same number of those with skeletal class I, of both sexes, have been selected on the basis of cephalometric analysis of profile tele-x-ray of the head. All the children aged 6-12 had mixed dentition, and were divided according to sex and age into three subgroups within each group. The length of maxilla, mandible and cranial base were measured. Proportions among the lengths measured within each group were found and difference significance in the measured lengths and their proportions among groups and subgroups were evaluated. Results. The children with skeletal class III, compared with the findings in the control group, had significantly lower values of maxillary length, total maxillary length, as well as lower values of their lengths in proportion to lengths of the front or the total length of cranial base and in proportion to mandibular lengths (p < 0.05. Among the patients of different sexes, both in the test and the control group, a significant difference in the values of the measured lengths was found. Conclusion. The children with skeletal class III have significantly shorter maxilla than those with skeletal class I.

  11. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  12. Recording length criteria as applied in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.; Kroening, M.; Schober, H.; Fischdick, H.

    1983-01-01

    An appreciable method used to assess the quality and integrity of safety-related components in light water reactors is the ultrasonic examination, in which case great importance is attributed to the criteria pertaining to recording length and permissible defect size. The development of the recording length criteria as applied when employing this method of examination is portrayed, the latter being based on the criteria which have proven themselves throughout long years of practice in the examination of conventional components. When taking these criteria into account the application of conventional ultrasonic techniques often leads to problems in the case of thick-walled components the reason being that indications are overrated. Taking the design of reactor components as the basic point of consideration, modified criteria are derived particularly when the size of discontinuities calculated by fracture mechanics analyses is taken into account. The introduction of new ultrasonic examination techniques such as, for example, focussed probes revealed that a considerably more realistic assessment is possible and consequently results in a reduction of unnecessary repairs. A comparison of the size of indications determined using conventional and analytical technqiues renders possible the anchoring of an intermediate stage in the evaluation of indications which is encompassed in the consideration of the bundle divergence. Thus a new concept is realized for the evaluation of ultrasonic indications detected in reactor components, which in the meantime has found its way into the associated regulatory guides. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of base of middle phalanx size using anatomical landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Stein J; Teunis, Teun; ter Meulen, Dirk P; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether there is a measurable and reproducible relationship between the articular surface size of the middle phalanx base and the size of the middle phalanx head and proximal phalanx length of the same finger. Size of the articular surface of the middle phalanx base, size of the middle phalanx head, and proximal phalanx length were measured in 84 lateral radiographs by 3 observers. The ratio of articular surface size of the middle phalanx base to the proximal phalanx length of the same finger was 0.17. The ratio of articular surface size of the middle phalanx base to the size of the middle phalanx head of the same finger was 1.34. The intraclass correlation (ICC) among 3 raters was 0.99 for proximal phalanx length and 0.88 for size of the middle phalanx head. Knowledge of this relationship and ratios allow for accurate estimation of the percentage of articular surface involvement in a fracture of the middle phalanx base. The ICC was highest for measuring proximal phalanx length, making it the most reliable measurement for estimation of the articular surface size. This quantitative estimate may be useful for clinical research and is applicable to patient care. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. All rights reserved.

  14. String Theory: Big Problem for Small Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.

    2009-01-01

    String theory is the most promising candidate theory for a unified description of all the fundamental forces that exist in nature. It provides a mathematical framework that combines quantum theory with Einstein's general theory of relativity. The typical size of a string is of the order of 10[superscript -33] cm, called the Planck length. But due…

  15. Zero-point length from string fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanini, Michele; Spallucci, Euro; Padmanabhan, T.

    2006-01-01

    One of the leading candidates for quantum gravity, viz. string theory, has the following features incorporated in it. (i) The full spacetime is higher-dimensional, with (possibly) compact extra-dimensions; (ii) there is a natural minimal length below which the concept of continuum spacetime needs to be modified by some deeper concept. On the other hand, the existence of a minimal length (zero-point length) in four-dimensional spacetime, with obvious implications as UV regulator, has been often conjectured as a natural aftermath of any correct quantum theory of gravity. We show that one can incorporate the apparently unrelated pieces of information-zero-point length, extra-dimensions, string T-duality-in a consistent framework. This is done in terms of a modified Kaluza-Klein theory that interpolates between (high-energy) string theory and (low-energy) quantum field theory. In this model, the zero-point length in four dimensions is a 'virtual memory' of the length scale of compact extra-dimensions. Such a scale turns out to be determined by T-duality inherited from the underlying fundamental string theory. From a low energy perspective short distance infinities are cutoff by a minimal length which is proportional to the square root of the string slope, i.e., α ' . Thus, we bridge the gap between the string theory domain and the low energy arena of point-particle quantum field theory

  16. Relation of Stump Length with Various Gait Parameters in Trans-tibial Amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyel Majumdar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is evaluating the impact of stump length of unilateral below knee amputees (BKA on different gait parameters. Nine unilateral BKA were chosen and divided into three groups comprising patients with short, medium, and long stump length. Each of them underwent gait analysis test by Computer Dynography (CDG system to measure the gait parameters. It was found that the ground reaction force is higher in the patients with medium stump length whereas the velocity, step length both for the prosthetic and sound limb and cadence were high in longer stump length. Statistical analysis shows a significant difference (p<0.05 between the gait parameters of BKA with medium and longer stump length. The patients with longer stump length were more efficient than medium and short stump patients as they consumed comparatively lesser energy while walking with self-selected velocity and conventional (Solid ankle cushioned heel SACH foot.

  17. Comparison of Dolphins' Body and Brain Measurements with Four Other Groups of Cetaceans Reveals Great Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Sam H; Carlin, Kevin P; Van Alstyne, Kaitlin R; Hanson, Alicia C; Tarpley, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    We compared mature dolphins with 4 other groupings of mature cetaceans. With a large data set, we found great brain diversity among 5 different taxonomic groupings. The dolphins in our data set ranged in body mass from about 40 to 6,750 kg and in brain mass from 0.4 to 9.3 kg. Dolphin body length ranged from 1.3 to 7.6 m. In our combined data set from the 4 other groups of cetaceans, body mass ranged from about 20 to 120,000 kg and brain mass from about 0.2 to 9.2 kg, while body length varied from 1.21 to 26.8 m. Not all cetaceans have large brains relative to their body size. A few dolphins near human body size have human-sized brains. On the other hand, the absolute brain mass of some other cetaceans is only one-sixth as large. We found that brain volume relative to body mass decreases from Delphinidae to a group of Phocoenidae and Monodontidae, to a group of other odontocetes, to Balaenopteroidea, and finally to Balaenidae. We also found the same general trend when we compared brain volume relative to body length, except that the Delphinidae and Phocoenidae-Monodontidae groups do not differ significantly. The Balaenidae have the smallest relative brain mass and the lowest cerebral cortex surface area. Brain parts also vary. Relative to body mass and to body length, dolphins also have the largest cerebellums. Cortex surface area is isometric with brain size when we exclude the Balaenidae. Our data show that the brains of Balaenidae are less convoluted than those of the other cetaceans measured. Large vascular networks inside the cranial vault may help to maintain brain temperature, and these nonbrain tissues increase in volume with body mass and with body length ranging from 8 to 65% of the endocranial volume. Because endocranial vascular networks and other adnexa, such as the tentorium cerebelli, vary so much in different species, brain size measures from endocasts of some extinct cetaceans may be overestimates. Our regression of body length on endocranial

  18. Bunch Length Measurements in SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, W.J.; Fisher, A.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; Sebek, J.; /SLAC; Lumpkin, A.; /Argonne; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Mok, W.; /Unlisted

    2007-11-28

    A series of bunch length measurements were made in SPEAR3 for two different machine optics. In the achromatic optics the bunch length increases from the low-current value of 16.6ps rms to about 30ps at 25ma/bunch yielding an inductive impedance of -0.17{Omega}. Reducing the momentum compaction factor by a factor of {approx}60 [1] yields a low-current bunch length of {approx}4ps rms. In this paper we review the experimental setup and results.

  19. Amplified-fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting of Mycoplasma species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Friis, N.F.; Jensen, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) is a whole-genome fingerprinting method based on selective amplification of restriction fragments. The potential of the method for the characterization of mycoplasmas was investigated in a total of 50 strains of human and animal origin, including......I restriction endonucleases and subsequent ligation of corresponding site-specific adapters. The amplification of AFLP templates with a single set of nonselective primers resulted in reproducible fingerprints of approximately 60 to 80 fragments in the size range of 50 to 500 bp, The method was able...

  20. Length of stay is associated with incidence of in-hospital malnutrition in a group of low-income Brazilian children El periodo de hospitalización está asociado con la incidencia de desnutrición en un grupo de niños brasileños de bajo nivel socioeconómico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Kac

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that increased length of stay and anthropometric status at admission are significant factors associated with in-hospital malnutrition (IHM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective study with two weight (admission and discharge and one height (admission measurements per child at the Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira (IPPMG, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The study included 456 children of low socioeconomic status under 10 years of age admitted to the IPPMG during 1997. Statistical analysis involved calculation of in-hospital malnutrition (IHM prevalence by covariates. The length of hospital stay varied from 1 to 69 days. Association of IHM with gender, age category, length of stay, presence of wasting, and stunting, was tested by calculating odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Logistic regression showed that after adjusting for gender, age category, and presence of stunting at admission, presence of wasting at admission (OR= 0.07, CI 95% 0.01 - 0.55 and length of stay from 17 to 69 days (OR= 4.68, CI 95% 2.00 - 10.95, were statistically associated with IHM in the final model. CONCLUSIONS: As intervention measures, the authors suggest implementation of an early identification system for children at risk of developing IHM, along with a review and implementation of in-hospital feeding protocols.OBJETIVO: Verificar la hipótesis de que un periodo de hospitalización prolongado y el estado nutricional al ingreso son factores significativamente asociados con la desnutrición durante la hospitalización. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudio prospectivo con dos mediciones de peso (al ingreso y al alta y una medición de estatura (al ingreso por niño, realizado en el Instituto de Puericultura y Pediatría Martagão Gesteira (IPPMG, Río de Janeiro, Brasil. El estudio incluyó 456 niños de bajo nivel socioeconómico menores de 10 años de edad, admitidos en el IPPMG durante 1997. El an

  1. Clinical features and glaucoma according to optic disc size in a South Korean population: the Namil study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Na Hee; Jun, Roo Min; Choi, Kyu-Ryong

    2014-03-01

    To assess the proportion of glaucomatous eyes based on the association between optic disc (OD) size and its clinical determinants in the resident population of Namil-myon, Central South Korea. Of the 1,532 participants in the Namil study, we included 1,410 Koreans (2,734 eyes) with legible fundus photographs in this study. Following the estimation of OD size on the photographs using Image J software, we corrected for image magnification. Associations between the clinical features, such as age, sex, axial length (AL), spherical equivalent (SE), and central corneal thickness, and the estimated OD size were assessed for individual eyes. After adjusting for the influencing factors, the proportion of glaucoma was compared among three categories of measured OD size (small, medium, and large OD groups). After adjusting for the potential confounders using a linear mixed model, age, sex, AL, and SE were correlated with the OD size estimates (P = 0.003, P = 0.029, P population.

  2. Automated measurement of diatom size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Jewson, David H.; Bixby, Rebecca J.; Nelson, Harry; McKnight, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Size analysis of diatom populations has not been widely considered, but it is a potentially powerful tool for understanding diatom life histories, population dynamics, and phylogenetic relationships. However, measuring cell dimensions on a light microscope is a time-consuming process. An alternative technique has been developed using digital flow cytometry on a FlowCAM® (Fluid Imaging Technologies) to capture hundreds, or even thousands, of images of a chosen taxon from a single sample in a matter of minutes. Up to 30 morphological measures may be quantified through post-processing of the high resolution images. We evaluated FlowCAM size measurements, comparing them against measurements from a light microscope. We found good agreement between measurement of apical cell length in species with elongated, straight valves, including small Achnanthidium minutissimum (11-21 µm) and largeDidymosphenia geminata (87–137 µm) forms. However, a taxon with curved cells, Hannaea baicalensis (37–96 µm), showed differences of ~ 4 µm between the two methods. Discrepancies appear to be influenced by the choice of feret or geodesic measurement for asymmetric cells. We describe the operating conditions necessary for analysis of size distributions and present suggestions for optimal instrument conditions for size analysis of diatom samples using the FlowCAM. The increased speed of data acquisition through use of imaging flow cytometers like the FlowCAM is an essential step for advancing studies of diatom populations.

  3. Childhood adversity, social support, and telomere length among perinatal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda M; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; Epel, Elissa S; Lin, Jue; Christian, Lisa M

    2018-01-01

    Adverse perinatal health outcomes are heightened among women with psychosocial risk factors, including childhood adversity and a lack of social support. Biological aging could be one pathway by which such outcomes occur. However, data examining links between psychosocial factors and indicators of biological aging among perinatal women are limited. The current study examined the associations of childhood socioeconomic status (SES), childhood trauma, and current social support with telomere length in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a sample of 81 women assessed in early, mid, and late pregnancy as well as 7-11 weeks postpartum. Childhood SES was defined as perceived childhood social class and parental educational attainment. Measures included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and average telomere length in PBMCs. Per a linear mixed model, telomere length did not change across pregnancy and postpartum visits; thus, subsequent analyses defined telomere length as the average across all available timepoints. ANCOVAs showed group differences by perceived childhood social class, maternal and paternal educational attainment, and current family social support, with lower values corresponding with shorter telomeres, after adjustment for possible confounds. No effects of childhood trauma or social support from significant others or friends on telomere length were observed. Findings demonstrate that while current SES was not related to telomeres, low childhood SES, independent of current SES, and low family social support were distinct risk factors for cellular aging in women. These data have relevance for understanding potential mechanisms by which early life deprivation of socioeconomic and relationship resources affect maternal health. In turn, this has potential significance for intergenerational transmission of telomere length. The predictive value of

  4. MODICO, 1-D Time-Dependent 1 Group, 2 Group Neutron Diffusion with Delayed Neutron Precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camiciola, P.; Cundari, D.; Montagnini, B.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The program solves the 1-D time-dependent one and two group coarse-mesh neutron diffusion equations, coupled with the equations for the delayed-neutron precursor, in plane geometry. 2 - Method of solution: The program is based on a simple coarse-mesh cubic approximation formula for the spatial behaviour of the flux inside each interval. An implicit scheme (the time-integrated method) is used for the advancement of the solution. The resulting (block three-diagonal) matrix is inverted at each time step by Thomas' method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Number of coarse- mesh intervals LE 80; number of material regions LE 10; number of delayed-neutron precursor groups LE 10. Typical mesh sizes range from 5 cm to 20 cm; typical step length (non-prompt critical transients) ranges from 0.005 to 0.1 seconds

  5. Impedance of finite length resistive cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krinsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor of radius a, length g, and conductivity σ attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency (k≫1/a. In the equilibrium regime, ka^{2}≪g, the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity σ. In the transient regime, ka^{2}≫g, where the contribution of transition radiation arising from the discontinuity in conductivity is important, we derive an analytic expression for the impedance and compute the short-range wakefield. The analytic results are shown to agree with numerical evaluation of the impedance.

  6. FULL LENGTH RESEARCH ARTICLE Adamu & Babatunde (2008 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Ahmed

    FULL LENGTH RESEARCH ARTICLE. Adamu & Babatunde (2008) SWJ:21-25. Comparative Studies On the Dying rate Migration. COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON DYEING RATE MIGRATION AND WASH FASTNESS PROPERTIES OF AZO DYES. DERIVED FROM 2-AMINOTHIAZOLE DERIVATIVES ON ACETATE FABRICS.

  7. Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragments linked to soybean mosaic virus resistance gene in Glycine soja and conversion to a sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid selection.

  8. Martian Length of Day Measurements from Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Bills, B.

    2012-06-01

    Changes in the Martian Length of Day (LOD) can be determined at a scientifically use level by a combination of regular (but not necessarily frequent) range and Doppler measurements from Earth and dead reckoning in a Kalman filter.

  9. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP-cDNA) analysis of differential gene expression from the xerophyte Ammopiptanthus mongolicus in response to cold, drought and cold together with drought.

  10. Relationship between morphological and amplified fragment length ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between morphological and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) marker based genetic distance with heterosis in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SL Krishnamurthy, A Mohan Rao, K Madhavi Reddy, S Ramesh, Shailaja Hittalmani, Rao M. Gopinath ...

  11. Chord length distribution for a compound capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitřík, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Chord length distribution is a factor important in the calculation of ionisation chamber responses. This article describes Monte Carlo calculations of the chord length distribution for a non-convex compound capsule. A Monte Carlo code was set up for generation of random chords and calculation of their lengths based on the input number of generations and cavity dimensions. The code was written in JavaScript and can be executed in the majority of HTML viewers. The plot of occurrence of cords of different lengths has 3 peaks. It was found that the compound capsule cavity cannot be simply replaced with a spherical cavity of a triangular design. Furthermore, the compound capsule cavity is directionally dependent, which must be taken into account in calculations involving non-isotropic fields of primary particles in the beam, unless equilibrium of the secondary charged particles is attained. (orig.)

  12. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Micheal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Jun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).

  13. CPS Trawl Life History Length Frequency Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Length distribution of a subset of individuals from a species (mainly non-target) caught during SWFSC-FRD fishery independent trawl surveys of coastal pelagic...

  14. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  15. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Derived length for arbitrary topological spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Jayanthan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of derived length is as old as that of ordinal numbers itself. It is also known as the Cantor-Bendixon length. It is defined only for dispersed (that is scattered spaces. In this paper this notion has been extended in a natural way for all topological spaces such that all its pleasing properties are retained. In this process we solve a problem posed by V. Kannan. ([1] Page 158.

  17. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H.L.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2017-12-15

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory. (orig.)

  18. Tourism and fashion: factors affecting trip length

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón García, María Haydeé; G. Gallarza, Martina; Fayos Gardó, Teresa; O'Sullivan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tourism and shopping are closely related, and the influence of fashion shopping on a tourist's decision to travel is especially significant. The concept of cognitive and hedonic involvement enables us to relate the importance given to shopping by consumers of fashion products and of tourism services. This research analyses whether tourist involvement in fashion shopping has an impact on the length of their stay in a destination. In addition, it examines whether trip length is conditioned by t...

  19. Relative brain size and morphology of some South African bats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measures of relative brain size and brain macromorphology are described for four species of Microchiroptera, two from the Vespertilionidae and two from the Rhinolophidae, and two species from the Pteropodidae (Megachiroptera). Four brain parameters (brain length, hemisphere length, brain width and brain height) were ...

  20. Relative brain size and morphology of some South African bats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-04-03

    Apr 3, 1987 ... Measures of relative brain size and brain macromorphology are described for four species of Microchiroptera, two from the Vespertilionidae and two from the Rhinolophidae, and two species from the pteropodidae. (Megachiroptera). Four brain parameters (brain length, hemisphere length, brain width and ...