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Sample records for length commercial laser

  1. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Crooker, P P; Armstead, R L; Blau, J

    2004-01-01

    Conventional free electron laser (FEL) oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. A new FEL interaction is described and analyzed with a Rayleigh length that is only one tenth the undulator length, or less. The effect of mirror vibration and positioning are more critical in the short Rayleigh length design, but we find that they are still within normal design tolerances.

  2. Short Rayleigh length free electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Colson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional free electron laser (FEL oscillators minimize the optical mode volume around the electron beam in the undulator by making the resonator Rayleigh length about one third to one half of the undulator length. This maximizes gain and beam-mode coupling. In compact configurations of high-power infrared FELs or moderate power UV FELs, the resulting optical intensity can damage the resonator mirrors. To increase the spot size and thereby reduce the optical intensity at the mirrors below the damage threshold, a shorter Rayleigh length can be used, but the FEL interaction is significantly altered. We model this interaction using a coordinate system that expands with the rapidly diffracting optical mode from the ends of the undulator to the mirrors. Simulations show that the interaction of the strongly focused optical mode with a narrow electron beam inside the undulator distorts the optical wave front so it is no longer in the fundamental Gaussian mode. The simulations are used to study how mode distortion affects the single-pass gain in weak fields, and the steady-state extraction in strong fields.

  3. Improving the laser brightness of a commercial laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Darryl; Litvin, Igor; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the selection of a flat-top beam and a Gaussian beam inside a laser cavity on opposing mirrors. The concept is tested external to the laser cavity in a single pass and double pass regime where the latter mimics a single round trip in the laser. We implement this intra-cavity selection through the use of two 16 level diffractive optical elements. We consider a solid-state diode side-pumped laser resonator in a typical commercial laser configuration that consists of two planar mirrors where the DOEs are positioned at the mirrors. We out couple the Gaussian and flat-top distributions and we show that we improve the brightness of the laser with active mode control. We also demonstrate that the quality of the beam transformations determine the brightness improvement.

  4. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ''document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.'' This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2's commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2's organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2's strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed

  5. Commercialization plan laser-based decoating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    F2 Associates Inc. (F2) is a small, high-technology firm focused on developing and commercializing environmentally friendly laser ablation systems for industrial-rate removal of surface coatings from metals, concrete, and delicate substrates such as composites. F2 has a contract with the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) to develop and test a laser-based technology for removing contaminated paint and other contaminants from concrete and metal surfaces. Task 4.1 in Phase 2 of the Statement of Work for this DOE contract requires that F2 ``document its plans for commercializing and marketing the stationary laser ablation system. This document shall include a discussion of prospects for commercial customers and partners and may require periodic update to reflect changing strategy. This document shall be submitted to the DOE for review.`` This report is being prepared and submitted in fulfillment of that requirement. This report describes the laser-based technology for cleaning and coatings removal, the types of laser-based systems that have been developed by F2 based on this technology, and the various markets that are emerging for this technology. F2`s commercialization and marketing plans are described, including how F2`s organization is structured to meet the needs of technology commercialization, F2`s strategy and marketing approach, and the necessary steps to receive certification for removing paint from aircraft and DOE certification for D and D applications. The future use of the equipment built for the DOE contract is also discussed.

  6. Laser Coating Technology; A Commercial Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Andrew G.; Mangaly, A. A.; Everett, M. A.; Hammeke, A. H.

    1988-10-01

    Commercial acceptance of laser coating technology suffered for many years due to questions about its economic viability. During this period, however, many companies, universities, and government research groups were busy developing the technology to overcome these questions. Today, laser coating technology is having a major impact as a high quality, economical method of hardfacing for wear and corrosion resistance in several key industries. This has occurred because of advances in five key areas: 1. High power laser design 2. Method of alloy deposition, and associated hardware 3. In-process feed back control system hardware/software development 4. Alloy systems 5. Marketing/sales sophistication High power lasers have improved in mode stability, power conversion efficiency, and optical flexibility (reflective vs. transmissive materials). This has enabled the process engineer to increase deposition efficiency, and maintain flexibility on the use of optics specifically designed for a user application. Improvements in the method of alloy deposition have led to developments such as the DPF system with specialized nozzles developed for specific user applications. Another effective technique includes the use of pre-fabricated cast alloy chips that are welded to the component surface on the specific area requiring protection. The development of feedback control systems that integrate process control software with hard tooling, the laser, and the alloy delivery system are greatly improving process reliability and product quality. Because of this, "in-process" quality control is becoming a viable alternative to traditional methods of quality control. Metallurgical evaluations of some of the most widely used hardfacing alloys and base materials have been investigated by numerous researchers. Analysis has confirmed that laser applied coatings are of high metallurgical quality, extremely low in dilution, and distort less due to low heat input. The technology can also be used to

  7. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 x 10 15 W cm -2 . The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO 2 producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n e = 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and temperatures of T e = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ∼1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length (∼2 mm). increasing to 12% for ∼7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths

  8. Progress in long scale length laser plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Arnold, P.; Bardsley, G.; Berger, R. L.; Bonanno, G.; Borger, T.; Bower, D. E.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S. C.; Campbell, K.; Chrisp, M. P.; Cohen, B. I.; Constantin, C.; Cooper, F.; Cox, J.; Dewald, E.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Duncan, J.; Eder, D.; Edwards, J.; Erbert, G.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Froula, D. H.; Gardner, S. D.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Gregori, G.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Hall, T.; Hammel, B. A.; Haynam, C.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M.; Hermes, G.; Hinkel, D.; Holder, J.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hsing, W.; Huber, S.; James, T.; Johnson, S.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kelleher, T.; Knight, J.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Labiak, W.; Landen, O. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lee, F. D.; Lund, D.; MacGowan, B.; Marshall, S.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K.; Marshall, C.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Meezan, N.; Miller, G.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E.; Munro, D.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Ng, E.; Niemann, C.; Nikitin, A.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rekow, V.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Rhodes, M.; Roberts, V.; Robey, H.; Ross, G.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, M. B.; Shiromizu, S.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Tietbohl, G.; Tobin, M.; Tuck, J.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Vidal, R.; Voloshin, D.; Wallace, R.; Wegner, P.; Whitman, P.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Young, B.; Young, P. E.; Zapata, P.; Bahr, R. E.; Seka, W.; Fernandez, J.; Montgomery, D.; Rose, H.

    2004-12-01

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3ω) with a total intensity of 2 × 1015 W cm-2. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO2 producing up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of ne = 6 × 1020 cm-3 and temperatures of Te = 2 keV. The high energy in an NIF quad of beams of 16 kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser-plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x-rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last ~1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 3% for the smallest length (~2 mm), increasing to 10-12% for ~7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modelling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  9. Effects of malicious ocular laser exposure in commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakkamanil, Mathew M; Fielden, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Intentional malicious laser strikes on commercial pilots are committed by individuals who target a laser into airplane cockpits during takeoff and landing. Because laser exposure to pilots is a relatively new but growing occurrence, our study investigates the ocular effect of this laser exposure in pilots. Retrospective chart review by a single ophthalmologist. All commercial airline pilots (58 male, 3 female) who experienced a laser strike while flying between April 2012 and November 2014 who presented to our clinic were included. A retrospective chart review was performed in a retinal specialist's practice. Ocular assessment was performed within 3 days of laser exposure. A complete ophthalmic evaluation was conducted, including Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, colour vision, visual fields, intraocular pressure, slit-lamp examination, dilated fundus examination, colour fundus photographs, and ocular coherence tomography. Sixty-four laser strike incidents involving commercial pilots were included. All pilots in the study experienced some degree of immediate ocular irritation or light sensitivity. No definite cases of ocular damage were attributed to laser strikes. No pilot had any functional ocular deficits. Our study revealed that laser strikes on aircraft did not result in permanent visual functional or structural deficits. However, laser strikes cause immediate visual effects, including glare, flash blindness, and ocular irritation that can interfere with a pilot's visual function. Given the widespread accessibility of high-power lasers and the rapid increase in incidents, laser strikes threaten to jeopardize aviation safety unless effective preventative measures are put in place. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Commercial mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Lin, Jipeng; Head, C. Robin; Hempler, Nils; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, M Squared Lasers have successfully commercialized a range of mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) operating between 920-1050nm and producing picosecond-range pulses with average powers above 1W at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 200MHz. These laser products offer a low-cost, easy-to-use and maintenance-free tool for the growing market of nonlinear microscopy. However, in order to present a credible alternative to ultrafast Ti-sapphire lasers, pulse durations below 200fs are required. In the last year, efforts have been directed to reduce the pulse duration of the Dragonfly laser system to below 200fs with a target average power above 1W at a PRF of 200MHz. This paper will describe and discuss the latest efforts undertaken to approach these targets in a laser system operating at 990nm. The relatively low PRF operation of Dragonfly lasers represents a challenging requirement for mode-locked VECSELs due to the very short upper state carrier lifetime, on the order of a few nanoseconds, which can lead to double pulsing behavior in longer cavities as the time between consecutive pulses is increased. Most notably, the design of the Dragonfly VECSEL cavity was considerably modified and the laser system extended with a nonlinear pulse stretcher and an additional compression stage. The improved Dragonfly laser system achieved pulse duration as short as 130fs with an average power of 0.85W.

  11. Stability of a short Rayleigh length laser resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Crooker

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the prospect of constructing a short Rayleigh length free-electron laser in a high-vibration environment, we demonstrate the use of a collection of rays to study the effect of mirror vibration and distortion on the behavior of the fundamental optical mode of a cold-cavity resonator. We find that the ray collection accurately describes both on-axis and off-axis optical beams. We show that a tilt or transverse shift of a mirror causes the optical mode to rock about the original resonator axis, while a longitudinal mirror shift or a change in the mirror’s radius of curvature causes the beam diameter at a mirror to successively dilate and contract on the mirror. Results are in excellent agreement with analytic calculations and wave front propagation simulations as long as the mirrors remain large with respect to the beam diameter.

  12. Short Rayleigh length free electron laser: Experiments and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Crooker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report experiments at Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab and computer simulations performed at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS designed to probe the small Rayleigh length regime. We compare the gain, power, and sensitivity to mirror and electron beam misalignments as a function of decreasing Rayleigh length. The agreement is quite good, with experiments and simulations showing comparable trends as the Rayleigh length is decreased. In particular, we find that the gain and power do not decrease substantially at short Rayleigh length, contrary to a common Gaussian-mode filling factor argument. Within currently achievable alignment tolerances, the gain and power are still acceptable for FEL operation.

  13. Efficient coupling of 527 nm laser beam power to a long scale-length plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.D.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S.H.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Kruer, W.L.; Meezan, N.B.; Suter, L.J.; Williams, E.A.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2006-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that application of laser smoothing schemes including smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) increases the intensity range for efficient coupling of frequency doubled (527 nm) laser light to a long scale-length plasma with n e /n cr equals 0.14 and T e equals 2 keV. (authors)

  14. Short Rayleigh Length Free Electron Laser Simulations in Expanding Coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Armstead, Robert L; Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    For compact short-Rayleigh length FELs, the area of the optical beam can be thousands of times greater at the mirrors than at the beam waist. A fixed numerical grid of sufficient resolution to represent the narrow mode at the waist and the broad mode at the mirrors would be prohibitively large. To accommodate this extreme change of scale with no loss of information, we employ a coordinate system that expands with the diffracting optical mode. The simulation using the new expanding coordinates has been validated by comparison to analytical cold-cavity theory, and is now used to simulate short-Rayleigh length FELs.

  15. Subpicometer Length Measurement Using Semiconductor Laser Tracking Frequency Gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Rajesh; Phillips, James D.; Rocco, Emanuele; Reasenburg, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated heretofore unattained distance precision of 0:14pm (2pm) incremental and 14nm (2.9 micrometers) absolute in a resonant (nonresonant) interferometer at an averaging time of 1 s, using inexpensive telecommunications diode lasers. We have controlled the main source of error, that due to spurious reflection and the resulting amplitude modulation. In the resonant interferometer, absolute distance precision is well under lambda/6. Therefore, after an interruption, an absolute distance measurement can be used to return to the same interferometer order.

  16. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in long-scale-length laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirokikh, A.; Seka, W.; Simon, A.; Craxton, R.S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1998-01-01

    Brillouin scattering from a preformed, inhomogeneous, expanding plasma has been investigated. Backscattered light near the incident laser wavelength (λ=1054 nm) from CH planar targets has been spectrally and temporally resolved. By varying the time delay of the interaction beam, the scattering was studied for different plasma conditions. The backscattered light is predominantly blue-shifted and appears before the peak of the laser pulse. The experimental time-integrated reflectivity of backscattered light is in the range of 1%endash 10% and decreases with the plasma density. The time-resolved spectra and total reflectivity were calculated using a theory of convective stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a flowing inhomogeneous plasma combined with a statistical hot spot model for the interaction beam. The plasma parameters for these calculations were provided by simulations using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code. The calculated SBS spectra are similar to the experimental observations. The time-integrated reflectivities agree well with the experimental results for the higher peak density interactions, but are below the observations by orders of magnitude for the lowest peak density cases. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  17. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Reduced 3d modeling on injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration at plasma scale lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Current modelling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) codes which are computationally demanding. In PIC simulations the laser wavelength λ0, in μm-range, has to be resolved over the acceleration lengths in meter-range. A promising approach is the ponderomotive guiding center solver (PGC) by only considering the laser envelope for laser pulse propagation. Therefore only the plasma skin depth λp has to be resolved, leading to speedups of (λp /λ0) 2. This allows to perform a wide-range of parameter studies and use it for λ0 Tecnologia (FCT), Portugal, through Grant No. PTDC/FIS-PLA/2940/2014 and PD/BD/105882/2014.

  19. Surface modification and laser pulse length effects on internal energy transfer in DIOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guanghong; Chen, Yong; Siuzdak, Gary; Vertes, Akos

    2005-12-29

    Benzyl-substituted benzylpyridinium (BP) chloride salts were used as a source of thermometer ions to probe the internal energy (IE) transfer in desorption/ionization on porous silicon (DIOS). To modify their wetting properties and the interaction energies with the thermometer ions, the DIOS surfaces were silylated to produce trimethylsilyl- (TMS), amine- (NH2), perfluoroalkyl- (PFA), and perfluorophenyl-derivatized (PFP) surfaces. Two laser sources--a nitrogen laser with pulse length of 4 ns and a mode locked 3 x omega Nd:YAG laser with a pulse length of 22 ps--were utilized to induce desorption/ionization and fragmentation at various laser fluence levels. The corresponding survival yields were determined as indicators of the IE transfer and the IE distributions were extracted. In most cases, with increasing the laser fluence in a broad range (approximately 20 mJ/cm2), no change in IE transfer was observed. For ns excitation, this was in remarkable contrast with MALDI, where increasing the laser fluence resulted in sharply (within approximately 5 mJ/cm2) declining survival yields. Derivatization of the porous silicon surface did not affect the survival yields significantly but had a discernible effect on the threshold fluence for ion production. The IE distributions determined for DIOS and MALDI from alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid reveal that the mean IE value is always lower for the latter. Using the ps laser, the IE distribution is always narrower for DIOS, whereas for ns laser excitation the width depends on surface modification. Most of the differences between MALDI and DIOS described here are compatible with the different dimensionality of the plume expansion and the differences in the activation energy of desorption due to surface modifications.

  20. Polarization gating enables sarcomere length measurements by laser diffraction in fibrotic muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin W.; Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Lieber, Richard L.

    2014-11-01

    Sarcomere length is a key parameter commonly measured in muscle physiology since it dictates striated muscle active force. Laser diffraction (LD)-based measurements of sarcomere length are time-efficient and sample a greater number of sarcomeres compared with traditional microscopy-based techniques. However, a limitation to LD techniques is that signal quality is severely degraded by scattering events as photons propagate through tissue. Consequently, sarcomere length measurements are unattainable when the number of scattering events is sufficiently large in muscle tissue with a high scattering probability. This occurs in fibrotic skeletal muscle seen in muscular dystrophies and secondary to tissue trauma, thus eliminating the use of LD to study these skeletal muscle ailments. Here, we utilize polarization gating to extract diffracted signals that are buried in noise created by scattering. Importantly, we demonstrate that polarization-gated laser diffraction (PGLD) enables sarcomere length measurements in muscles from chronically immobilized mice hind limbs; these muscles have a substantial increase of intramuscular connective tissue that scatter light and disable sarcomere length measurements by traditional LD. Further, we compare PGLD sarcomere lengths to those measured by bright field (BF) and confocal microscopy as positive controls and reveal a significant bias of BF but not of confocal microscopy.

  1. Conversion of Stability of Femtosecond Stabilized Mode-locked Laser to Optical Cavity Length

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Radek; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2010), s. 636-640 ISSN 0885-3010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/1276; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk 2C06012; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/127; GA MPO FT-TA3/133; GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA ČR GA102/07/1179 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : laser * Fabry-Perot * interferometer * length etalon Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.460, year: 2010

  2. Gain length fitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-charge effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Marcus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a power-fit formula, obtained from a variational analysis using three-dimensional free-electron laser theory, for the gain length of a high-gain free-electron laser’s fundamental mode in the presence of diffraction, uncorrelated energy spread, and longitudinal space-charge effects. The approach is inspired by the work of Xie [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 445, 59 (2000NIMAER0168-900210.1016/S0168-9002(0000114-5], and provides a useful shortcut for calculating the gain length of the fundamental Gaussian mode of a free-electron laser having strong space-charge effects in the 3D regime. The results derived from analytic theory are in good agreement with detailed numerical particle simulations that also include higher-order space-charge effects, supporting the assumptions made in the theoretical treatment and the variational solutions obtained in the single-mode limit.

  3. Short Rayleigh length free electron laser simulations in expanding coordinates / Proceedings of the 2004 FEL Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Armstead, R.L.; Colson, W.B.; Blau, J.

    2004-01-01

    For compact short-Rayleigh length free electron lasers (FELs), the area of the optical beam can be thousands of times greater at the mirrors than at the beam waist. A fixed numerical grid of sufficient resolution to represent the narrow mode at the waist and the broad mode at the mirrors would be prohibitively large. To accommodate this extreme change of scale with no loss of information, we employ a coordinate system that expands with the diffracting optical mode. The...

  4. A paired-laser photogrammetric method for in situ length measurement of benthic fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Austin A.; Welsh, Stuart A.; Thompson, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Photogrammetry, a technique to obtain measurements from photographs, may be a valid method for measuring lengths of rare, threatened, or endangered species. Photogrammetric methods of measurement are nonintrusive and reduce the possibility of physical damage or physiological stress associated with the capture and handling of individuals. We evaluated precision and accuracy of photogrammetric length measurements relative to board measurements of Greenside Darters Etheostoma blennioides and Variegate Darters E. variatum in an aquarium and applied photogrammetry in a field study of the Diamond Darter Crystallaria cincotta, a federally listed endangered species. Digital photographs were taken of each individual using a waterproof camera equipped with two parallel lasers. Photogrammetric length measurements were digitized with ImageJ software. Agreement between board and photogrammetric measurements were high for Greenside and Variegate darters. The magnitude of differences was small between direct and photogrammetric measurements, ranging from 0.6% to 3.1%, depending on the species measured and the type of measurement taken. These results support photogrammetry as a useful method for obtaining length measurements of benthic stream fishes. Photogrammetric methods allowed for length measurements and an assessment of length frequency of 199 Diamond Darters, informative data for management that could not be collected with conventional measuring-board methods.

  5. Accuracy of measurement by laser diffraction method of length of contracting muscle sarcomeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A.A.; Andreyev, O.A.

    The method of laser beam diffraction was used on striate muscle fibers to study changes in sarcomere length during contraction, as determined by the angular distance between (+1)-(left) and (-1)-(right) diffraction maximums. The course of force development was recorded simultaneously. The absolute margin of error in determining the mean length of sarcomeres did not exceed 0.05 ..mu..m in the range of 1.8 to 2.8 ..mu..m lengths, and 0.1 ..mu..m in the range of 2.8 to 3.3. Changes in mean length of sarcomeres were recorded with accuracy to 0.003 ..mu..m with concurrent monitoring of positions (+1) and (-1) maximums. It was demonstrated that during fiber contraction there is shifting not only of (+1) and (-1) maximums, but (0) maximum also, which is attributable to the effects of light refraction with change in shape of illuminated segment of fiber. This change can be caused by redistribution of sarcomere lengths along the axis of the fiber during contraction and, accordingly, local changes in fiber diameter.

  6. Laser surface alloying of commercially pure titanium with boron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, N.; Kulka, M.; Dziarski, P.; Przestacki, D.

    2014-06-01

    Laser surface alloying with boron and carbon was applied to produce the composite layers, reinforced by the hard ceramic phases (titanium borides and titanium carbides), on commercially pure titanium. The external cylindrical surface of substrate material was coated by paste containing boron, boron and graphite, or graphite. Then, the laser re-melting was carried out with using the continuous-wave CO2 laser. This enabled the formation of laser-borided, laser-borocarburized, and laser-carburized layers. The microstructure or the re-melted zone consisted of the hard ceramic phases (TiB+TiB2, TiB+TiB2+TiC, or TiC) located in the eutectic mixture of Tiα'-phase with borides, borides and carbides, or carbides, respectively. All the composite layers were characterized by the sufficient cohesion. The significant increase in microhardness and in wear resistance of all the laser-alloyed layers was observed in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The percentage of hard ceramic phases in more plastic eutectic mixture influenced the measured microhardness values. The dominant wear mechanism (abrasive or adhesive) depended on the method of laser alloying, and the type of test used. The wear tests for longer duration, without the change in the counter specimen, created the favourable conditions for adhesive wear, while during the shorter tests the abrasive wear dominated, as a rule.

  7. The Modernization of a Long-Focal Length Fringe-Type Laser Velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Fletcher, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    A long-focal length laser velocimeter constructed in the early 1980's was upgraded using current technology to improve usability, reliability and future serviceability. The original, free-space optics were replaced with a state-of-the-art fiber-optic subsystem which allowed most of the optics, including the laser, to be remote from the harsh tunnel environment. General purpose high-speed digitizers were incorporated in a standard modular data acquisition system, along with custom signal processing software executed on a desktop computer, served as the replacement for the signal processors. The resulting system increased optical sensitivity with real-time signal/data processing that produced measurement precisions exceeding those of the original system. Monte Carlo simulations, along with laboratory and wind tunnel investigations were used to determine system characteristics and measurement precision.

  8. CO2-laser ablation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide by millisecond pulse lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskoob, M.; Honda, T.; Safari, A.; Wachtman, J. B.; Danforth, S.; Wilkens, B. J.

    1990-03-01

    We have achieved ablation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide from single targets of superconducting pellets by CO2-laser pulses of l ms length to grow superconducting thin films. Upon annealing, the 6000-Å thin films have a Tc (onset) of 90 K and zero resistance at 78 K. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate the growth of single-phase thin films. This technique allows growth of uniform single-phase superconducting thin films of lateral area greater than 1 cm2.

  9. Evaluation of 4 Commercial Viewing Devices for Radiographic Perceptibility and Working Length Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Trent; Geist, James R; Yu, Qingzhao; Himel, Van T; Sabey, Kent

    2015-07-01

    This study compared images displayed on 1 desktop monitor, 1 laptop monitor, and 2 tablets for the detection of contrast and working length interpretation, with a null hypothesis of no differences between the devices. Three aluminum blocks, with milled circles of varying depth, were radiographed at various exposure levels to create 45 images of varying radiographic density. Six observers viewed the images on 4 devices: Lenovo M92z desktop (Lenovo, Beijing, China), Lenovo Z580 laptop (Lenovo), iPad 3 (Apple, Cupertino, CA), and iPad mini (Apple). Observers recorded the number of circles detected for each image, and a perceptibility curve was used to compare the devices. Additionally, 42 extracted teeth were imaged with working length files affixed at various levels (short, flush, and long) relative to the anatomic apex. Observers measured the distance from file tip to tooth apex on each device. The absolute mean measurement error was calculated for each image. Analysis of variance tests compared the devices. Observers repeated their sessions 1 month later to evaluate intraobserver reliability as measured with weighted kappa tests. Interclass correlation coefficients compared interobserver reliability. There was no significant difference in perceptibility detection between the Lenovo M92z desktop, iPad 3, and iPad mini. However, on average, all 3 were significantly better than the Lenovo Z580 laptop (P values ≤.015). No significant difference in the mean absolute error was noted for working length measurements among the 4 viewing devices (P = .3509). Although all 4 viewing devices seemed comparable with regard to working length evaluation, the laptop computer screen had lower overall ability to perceive contrast differences. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Qualification testing of fiber-based laser transmitters and on-orbit validation of a commercial laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M. W.; Wilkerson, M. W.; Tang, R. R.

    2017-11-01

    Qualification testing of fiber based laser transmitters is required for NASA's Deep Space Optical Communications program to mature the technology for space applications. In the absence of fully space qualified systems, commercial systems have been investigated in order to demonstrate the robustness of the technology. To this end, a 2.5 W fiber based laser source was developed as the transmitter for an optical communications experiment flown aboard the ISS as a part of a technology demonstration mission. The low cost system leveraged Mil Standard design principles and Telcordia certified components to the extent possible and was operated in a pressure vessel with active cooling. The laser was capable of high rate modulation but was limited by the mission requirements to 50 Mbps for downlinking stored video from the OPALS payload, externally mounted on the ISS. Environmental testing and space qualification of this unit will be discussed along with plans for a fully space qualified laser transmitter.

  11. Optimization of confocal laser induced fluorescence for long focal length applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemiolo, Andrew J.; Henriquez, Miguel F.; Thompson, Derek S.; Scime, Earl E.

    2017-10-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is a non-perturbative diagnostic for measuring ion and neutral particle velocities and temperatures in a plasma. The conventional method for single-photon LIF requires intersecting optical paths for light injection and collection. The multiple vacuum windows needed for such measurements are unavailable in many plasma experiments. Confocal LIF eliminates the need for perpendicular intersecting optical paths by using concentric injection and collection paths through a single window. One of the main challenges with using confocal LIF is achieving high resolution measurements at the longer focal lengths needed for many plasma experiments. We present confocal LIF measurements in HELIX, a helicon plasma experiment at West Virginia University, demonstrating spatial resolution dependence on focal length and spatial filtering. By combining aberration mitigating optics with spatial filtering, our results show high resolution measurements at focal lengths of 0.5 m, long enough to access the interiors of many laboratory plasma experiments. This work was supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1360278.

  12. Conceptual design of a hybrid KrF laser system for ICF commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Lowenthal, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    KrF lasers appear to be the most efficient lasers operating near the optimal wavelength for laser fusion. Most high-efficiency, low-cost KrF laser designs use large electron-beam-driven amplifiers and use pure angular multiplexing for the required pulse compression. A recent study carried out by Los Alamos National Lab. and Spectra Technology has defied a high-efficiency hybrid KrF laser system architecture that uses both angular multiplexing and Raman beam combination. The high overall system efficiency of this hybrid design, ∼ 12%, is achieved primarily through the use of electron-beam sustained discharge lasers (EBSDL), and by using the efficient forward rotational Raman process in hydrogen. The new system appears attractive as a commercial-applications driver because the calculated efficiency is higher than the usual large electron-beam-pumped (EBP) KrF laser/pure angular multiplexing approach. In this paper, the hybrid system architecture will be described, and the trade-offs with respect to the large EBP amplifier/angular multiplexed system will be discussed

  13. Conceptual design of a hybrid KrF laser system for ICF commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Lowenthal, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    KrF lasers appear to be the most efficient lasers operating near the optimal wavelength for laser fusion. Most high-efficiency, low-cost KrF laser designs use large electron-beam driven amplifiers and use pure angular multiplexing for the required pulse compression. A recent study carried out by Los Alamos and Spectra Technology has defined a high-efficiency hybrid KrF laser system architecture that uses both angular multiplexing and Raman beam combination. The high overall system efficiency of this hybrid design, approximately 12%, is achieved primarily through the use of e-beam sustained discharge lasers (EBSDL), and by using the efficient forward rotational Raman process in hydrogen. The new system appears attractive as a commercial-applications driver because the calculated efficiency is higher than the usual large e-beam pumped (EBP) KrF laser/pure angular multiplexing approach. In this paper, the hybrid system architecture is described, and the tradeoffs with respect to the large EBP amplifier/angular multiplexed system are discussed

  14. Method for single-shot measurement of picosecond laser pulse-lengths without electronic time dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrala, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-source shear pattern recording is proposed as a method for single-shot measurement of the pulse shape from nearly monochromatic sources whose pulse lengths are shorter than their coherence times. The basis of this method relies on the assertion that if two identical electromagnetic pulses are recombined with a time delay greater than the sum of their pulse widths, the recordable spatial pattern has no fringes in it. At an arbitrary delay, translated into an actual spatial recording position, the recorded modulated intensity will sample the corresponding laser intensity at that delay time, but with a modulation due to the coherence function of the electromagnetic pulse. Two arrangements are proposed for recording the pattern. The principles, the design parameters, and the methodologies of these arrangements are presented. Resolutions of the configurations and their limitations are given as well

  15. Hardness, microstructure and surface characterization of laser gas nitrided commercially pure titanium using high power CO{sub 2} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvan, J.S.; Subramanian, K. [Anna Univ., Chennai (India). Dept. of Physics; Nath, A.K. [Center for Advanced Technology, Madya Pradesh (India); Gogia, A.K. [DMRL, Hyderabad (India); Balamurugan, A.K.; Rajagopal, S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India). Materials Science Div.

    1998-10-01

    Surface nitriding of commercially pure (CP) titanium was carried out using high power CO{sub 2} laser at pure nitrogen and dilute nitrogen (N{sub 2} + Ar) environment. The hardness, microstructure, and melt pool configuration of the laser melted titanium in helium and argon atmosphere was compared with laser melting at pure and dilute nitrogen environment. The hardness of the nitrided layer was of the order of 1000 to 1600 HV. The hardness of the laser melted titanium in the argon and helium atmosphere was 500 to 1000 HV. Using x-ray analysis of the formation of TiN and Ti{sub 2}N phase was identified in the laser nitrided titanium. The presence of nitrogen in the nitrided zone was confirmed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. The microstructures revealed densely populated dendrites in the sample nitrided at 100% N{sub 2} environment and thinly populated dendrites in dilute environment. The crack intensity was large in the nitrided sample at pure nitrogen, and few cracks were observed in the 50% N{sub 2} + 50% Ar environment.

  16. Beam displacement as a function of temperature and turbulence length scale at two different laser radiation wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isterling, William M; Dally, Bassam B; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dubovinsky, Miro; Wright, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Narrow laser beams directed from aircraft may at times pass through the exhaust plume of the engines and potentially degrade some of the laser beam characteristics. This paper reports on controlled studies of laser beam deviation arising from propagation through turbulent hot gases, in a well-characterized laboratory burner, with conditions of relevance to aircraft engine exhaust plumes. The impact of the temperature, laser wavelength, and turbulence length scale on the beam deviation has been investigated. It was found that the laser beam displacement increases with the turbulent integral length scale. The effect of temperature on the laser beam angular deviation, σ, using two different laser wavelengths, namely 4.67 μm and 632.8 nm, was recorded. It was found that the beam deviation for both wavelengths may be semiempirically modeled using a single function of the form, σ=a(b+(1/T)(2))(-1), with two parameters only, a and b, where σ is in microradians and T is the temperature in °C. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  17. KrF laser cost/performance model for ICF commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Simple expressions suitable for use in commercial-applications plant parameter studies for the direct capital cost plus indirect field costs and for the efficiency as a function of repetition rate were developed for pure-optical-compression KrF laser fusion drivers. These simple expressions summarize estimates obtained from detailed cost-performance studies incorporating recent results of ongoing physics, design, and cost studies. Contributions of KrF laser capital charges and D and M costs to total levelized constant-dollar (1984) unit ICF power generation cost are estimated as a function of plant size and driver pulse energy using a published gain for short-wavelength lasers and representative values of plant parameters

  18. System simulation method for fiber-based homodyne multiple target interferometers using short coherence length laser sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Maik; Beuth, Thorsten; Streck, Andreas; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Homodyne laser interferometers for velocimetry are well-known optical systems used in many applications. While the detector power output signal of such a system, using a long coherence length laser and a single target, is easily modelled using the Doppler shift, scenarios with a short coherence length source, e.g. an unstabilized semiconductor laser, and multiple weak targets demand a more elaborated approach for simulation. Especially when using fiber components, the actual setup is an important factor for system performance as effects like return losses and multiple way propagation have to be taken into account. If the power received from the targets is in the same region as stray light created in the fiber setup, a complete system simulation becomes a necessity. In previous work, a phasor based signal simulation approach for interferometers based on short coherence length laser sources has been evaluated. To facilitate the use of the signal simulation, a fiber component ray tracer has since been developed that allows the creation of input files for the signal simulation environment. The software uses object oriented MATLAB code, simplifying the entry of different fiber setups and the extension of the ray tracer. Thus, a seamless way from a system description based on arbitrarily interconnected fiber components to a signal simulation for different target scenarios has been established. The ray tracer and signal simulation are being used for the evaluation of interferometer concepts incorporating delay lines to compensate for short coherence length.

  19. Diode-Pumped Long-Pulse-Length Ho:Tm:YLiF4 Laser at 10 Hz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Mahendra G.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Lockard, George E.

    1995-01-01

    An optical efficiency of 0.052 under normal mode operation for diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLiF4 at a pulse repetition frequency of 10 Hz has been achieved. Laser output energy of 30 mJ in single Q-switched pulses with 600-ns pulse length were obtained for an input energy of 3 J. A diffusion-bonded birefringent laser rod consisting of Ho:Tm-doped and undoped pieces of YLF was utilized for 10-Hz operation.

  20. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  1. Do future commercial broadband communication satellites really need laser-communication intersatellite links (ISLs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidell, James E.

    1997-04-01

    Large commercial satellite programs requiring ISLs are growing in number and maturing. An important segment of the commercial satellite market, and its ISL needs, is discussed in the paper. ISL value will increase as long-haul terrestrial backbones become increasingly congested. Providing interregional and intercontinental connectivity via ISL presents far lower cost and fewer problems than relying on terrestrial fiber-optic networks. To demonstrate this, a new metric is proposed which allows 'apples-to- apples' cost/performance comparisons between laser communications in GEO, LEO, and terrestrial fiber-optics. ISL requirements in to the next decade are predicted >= 50-100 Gb/s full duplex. Many attitudinal changes must be embraced among those who choose to focus on this new commercial business. Foremost among these is a preponderance to delivering fully acceptable hardware fast and at low cost, as opposed to merely designing such. Considerable attention must be given business considerations foreign to professionals who have spent time in the government or government contracting sectors. Successful ISL customers will come to recognize that ISLs are not commodity products. Failure to embrace these attitudes will nonetheless constitute decision to which the commercial market, and particularly the financial market, will appropriately respond.

  2. Why commercial broadband satellites absolutely must have laser intersatellite links (ISLs) and how the free-space laser communications community could let them down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidell, James E.

    1998-05-01

    Large commercial satellite programs needing high bandwidth inter-satellite links (ISLs) are growing rapidly in number. Precious few are visibly maturing. These commercial needs present greater customer diversity and opportunity for free- space laser communications application than the current plans of all the world's governments combined, multiplied manyfold. However, commercial customers generally do not have access to the independent, knowledgeable, but often heterogeneous laser communications expertise upon which government programs have historically relied. Moreover, commercial needs differ substantially from those of governments, particularly in the areas of price sensitivity and assured delivery on schedule and meeting all requirements. And the number of would-be laser ISL terminal suppliers also grows despite little verifiable expertise in actually delivering complete, working space-based laser ISL terminals, regardless of price or performance. Consequently, the opportunity for mistakes, disappointments, and outright failure is intensified. More 'red meatballs' are unfortunately on the horizon and neither customers nor suppliers recognize the warning signs. Is ignorance bliss? Virtually the entire space communications community appears oblivious to emerging terrestrial broadband communications projects which appear better backed with superior management far more attentive to time-to-market and other schedule and business considerations than any space venture. Space systems offer advantages through realizing global network operations not possible terrestrially, yet few promoters recogni the potential. Might these be omens worth capitalizing upon, or perhaps from which escape may be warranted? This paper provides a commercial market status update to that presented in preceding years' papers. Laser ISL applications are reviewed which enable commercial broadband satellite customer opportunities not yet recognized among most in the customer community, despite

  3. Long Coherence Length 193 nm Laser for High-Resolution Nano-Fabrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacob, James J

    2008-01-01

    Immersion lithography using available 193 nm optics and laser sources provides an attractive near-term path to reducing the printable feature sizes of integrated circuits by using a high-index fluid...

  4. COTS low-cost 622-Mb/s free-space laser communications link for short-distance commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kenneth A.

    2000-05-01

    The results from a low cost 622 Mb/s, free-space laser communication link operating at 850 nm for short distance commercial applications is presented. The test results demonstrate the use of a free-space laser communications transceiver for building to building applications such as LAN, WAN and ATM operations, etc. This illustrates the potential for wide-use commercial computer network applications. The transceiver is constructed of commercial off-the-shelf materials for the development of a low-cost laser communications data link. The test system configuration utilizes standard Personal Computers with network cards and signal conversion cards for the copper to optical medical conversion. These tests precede the development of an increased data rate device operating at 2.5 Gb/s.

  5. On the importance of cavity-length and heat dissipation in GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. J.; Hu, X. L.; Ying, L. Y.; Chen, S. Q.; Zhang, J. Y.; Akiyama, H.; Cai, Z. P.; Zhang, B. P.

    2015-04-01

    Cavity-length dependence of the property of optically pumped GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with two dielectric distributed Bragg reflectors was investigated. The cavity lengths were well controlled by employing etching with inductively coupled plasma and chemical mechanical polishing. It was found that the lasing characteristics including threshold, slope efficiency and spontaneous emission coupling factor were substantially improved with reducing the cavity length. In comparison with the device pumped by a 400 nm pulsed laser, the lasing spectrum was featured by a red shift and simultaneous broadening with increasing the pumping energy of a 355 nm pulsed laser. Moreover, the lasing threshold was much higher when pumped by a 355 nm pulsed laser. These were explained by taking into account of the significant heating effect under 355 nm pumping. Our results demonstrate that a short cavity length and good heat-dissipation are essential to GaN-based VCSELs.

  6. Effect of Laser Power and Scan Speed on Melt Pool Characteristics of Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Chandrakanth; Ahmed, Sazzad H.; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2017-07-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique that creates complex parts by selectively melting metal powder layer-by-layer using a laser. In SLM, the process parameters decide the quality of the fabricated component. In this study, single beads of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) were melted on a substrate of the same material using an in-house built SLM machine. Multiple combinations of laser power and scan speed were used for single bead fabrication, while the laser beam diameter and powder layer thickness were kept constant. This experimental study investigated the influence of laser power, scan speed, and laser energy density on the melt pool formation, surface morphology, geometry (width and height), and hardness of solidified beads. In addition, the observed unfavorable effect such as inconsistency in melt pool width formation is discussed. The results show that the quality, geometry, and hardness of solidified melt pool are significantly affected by laser power, scanning speed, and laser energy density.

  7. An evaluation of deep-sea benthic megafauna length measurements obtained with laser and stereo camera methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Katherine M.; Kuhnz, Linda A.; Ruhl, Henry A.; Huffard, Christine L.; Caress, David W.; Henthorn, Richard G.; Hobson, Brett W.; McGill, Paul; Smith, Kenneth L.

    2015-02-01

    The 25 year time-series collected at Station M, ~4000 m on the Monterey Deep-sea Fan, has substantially improved understanding of the role of the deep-ocean benthic environment in the global carbon cycle. However, the role of deep-ocean benthic megafauna in carbon bioturbation, remineralization and sequestration is relatively unknown. It is important to gather both accurate and precise measurements of megafaunal community abundance, size distribution and biomass to further define their role in deep-sea carbon cycling and possible sequestration. This study describes initial results from a stereo camera system attached to a remotely operated vehicle and analyzed using the EventMeasure photogrammetric measurement software to estimate the density, length and biomass of 10 species of mobile epibenthic megafauna. Stereo length estimates were compared to those from a single video camera system equipped with sizing lasers and analyzed using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's Video Annotation and Reference System. Both camera systems and software were capable of high measurement accuracy and precision (megafauna species studied. The stereo image analysis process took substantially longer than the video analysis and the value of the EventMeasure software tool would be improved with developments in analysis automation. The stereo system is less influenced by object orientation and height, and is potentially a useful tool to be mounted on an autonomous underwater vehicle and for measuring deep-sea pelagic animals where the use of lasers is not feasible.

  8. Retinal Oximetry and Vessel Diameter Measurements With a Commercially Available Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Norman P; Wanek, Justin; Felder, Anthony E; Joslin, Charlotte E; Kresovich, Jacob K; Lim, Jennifer I; Chau, Felix Y; Leiderman, Yannek; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2017-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that retinal vascular diameter and hemoglobin oxygen saturation alterations, according to stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR), are discernible with a commercially available scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). One hundred eighty-one subjects with no diabetes (No DM), diabetes with no DR (No DR), nonproliferative DR (NPDR), or proliferative DR (PDR, all had photocoagulation) underwent imaging with an SLO with dual lasers (532 nm and 633 nm). Customized image analysis software determined the diameters of retinal arteries and veins (DA and DV) and central retinal artery and vein equivalents (CRAE and CRVE). Oxygen saturations of hemoglobin in arteries and veins (SO2A and SO2V) were estimated from optical densities of vessels on images at the two wavelengths. Statistical models were generated by adjusting for effects of sex, race, age, eye, and fundus pigmentation. DA, CRAE, and CRVE were reduced in PDR compared to No DM (P ≤ 0.03). DV and CRVE were similar between No DM and No DR, but they were higher in NPDR than No DR (P ≤ 0.01). Effect of stage of disease on SO2A differed by race, being increased relative to No DM in NPDR and PDR in Hispanic participants only (P ≤ 0.02). Relative to No DM, SO2V was increased in NPDR and PDR (P ≤ 0.05). Alterations in retinal vascular diameters and SO2 by diabetic retinopathy stage can be detected with a widely available SLO, and covariates such as race can influence the results.

  9. Noise Suppression on the Tunable Laser for Precise Cavity Length Displacement Measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Hrabina, Jan; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 9 (2016), 1428:1-11 ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/12/P962; GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Fabry-Perot cavity * unbalance Michelson interferometer * noise suppression * heterodyne interferometry * displacement measurement Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2016

  10. The effects of TGG crystal length on output power and beam quality of a unidirectional ring Nd:YVO4 laser with and without second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A.; Avazpour, A.; Nadgaran, H.; Mousavi, M.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of terbium gallium garnet (TGG ) crystal length on 1064 and 532 nm output powers and beam quality of a unidirectional ring Nd:YVO4 laser is investigated. In the case of 1064 nm (without nonlinear crystal), the laser output power without considerating the effect of TGG crystal was computed theoretically. Then three TGG crystals with different lengths were placed in the laser setup one by one. A systematic decrease in output power was observed by increasing the TGG crystal length. The experiment was repeated in the case of 532 nm. It was found that in a 532 nm laser, higher laser efficiency and small beam quality degradation can be achieved by increasing the TGG crystal length leading to a 5.7 W green laser with 27 W pump power. The power stability and beam quality were 0.8% for 30 min and less than 1.3, respectively.

  11. Tm3+-doped barium gallo-germanate glass single-mode fiber with high gain per unit length for ultracompact 1.95 µm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guowu; Wen, Xin; Huang, Kaimin; Qian, Guoquan; Lin, Wei; Cheng, Huihui; Jiang, Licheng; Qian, Qi; Yang, Zhongmin

    2018-03-01

    Heavily Tm3+-doped barium gallo-germanate glass single-mode (SM) fibers were successfully drawn. A gain per unit length of 3.6 dB/cm at 1.95 µm was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest gain per unit length reported for Tm3+-doped germanate glass SM fibers. A single-frequency fiber laser operating at 1.95 µm has been built using a 1.5-cm-long active fiber pumped by a 1568 nm fiber laser. The direct output power from the ultracompact laser cavity is 227 mW. The results show that the fibers are highly promising for high-power and ultracompact single-frequency laser applications.

  12. Watt-level short-length holmium-doped ZBLAN fiber lasers at 1.2  μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiushan; Zong, Jie; Wiersma, Kort; Norwood, R A; Prasad, Narasimha S; Obland, Michael D; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Peyghambarian, N

    2014-03-15

    In-band core-pumped Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber lasers at the 1.2 μm region were investigated with different gain fiber lengths. A 2.4 W 1190 nm all-fiber laser with a slope efficiency of 42% was achieved by using a 10 cm long gain fiber pumped at a maximum available 1150 nm pump power of 5.9 W. A 1178 nm all-fiber laser was demonstrated with an output power of 350 mW and a slope efficiency of 6.5%. High Ho3+ doping in ZBLAN is shown to be effective in producing single-frequency fiber lasers and short-length fiber amplifiers immune from stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  13. Quantitative assessment of graded burn wounds using a commercial and research grade laser speckle imaging (LSI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticorvo, A.; Rowland, R.; Yang, B.; Lertsakdadet, B.; Crouzet, C.; Bernal, N.; Choi, B.; Durkin, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    Burn wounds are often characterized by injury depth, which then dictates wound management strategy. While most superficial burns and full thickness burns can be diagnosed through visual inspection, clinicians experience difficulty with accurate diagnosis of burns that fall between these extremes. Accurately diagnosing burn severity in a timely manner is critical for starting the appropriate treatment plan at the earliest time points to improve patient outcomes. To address this challenge, research groups have studied the use of commercial laser Doppler imaging (LDI) systems to provide objective characterization of burn-wound severity. Despite initial promising findings, LDI systems are not commonplace in part due to long acquisition times that can suffer from artifacts in moving patients. Commercial LDI systems are being phased out in favor of laser speckle imaging (LSI) systems that can provide similar information with faster acquisition speeds. To better understand the accuracy and usefulness of commercial LSI systems in burn-oriented research, we studied the performance of a commercial LSI system in three different sample systems and compared its results to a research-grade LSI system in the same environments. The first sample system involved laboratory measurements of intralipid (1%) flowing through a tissue simulating phantom, the second preclinical measurements in a controlled burn study in which wounds of graded severity were created on a Yorkshire pig, and the third clinical measurements involving a small sample of clinical patients. In addition to the commercial LSI system, a research grade LSI system that was designed and fabricated in our labs was used to quantitatively compare the performance of both systems and also to better understand the "Perfusion Unit" output of commercial systems.

  14. High average power, diode pumped petawatt laser systems: a new generation of lasers enabling precision science and commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, C. L.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S.; Bopp, R.; Buck, S.; Cupal, J.; Drouin, M.; Erlandson, A.; Horáček, J.; Horner, J.; Jarboe, J.; Kasl, K.; Kim, D.; Koh, E.; Koubíková, L.; Maranville, W.; Marshall, C.; Mason, D.; Menapace, J.; Miller, P.; Mazurek, P.; Naylon, A.; Novák, J.; Peceli, D.; Rosso, P.; Schaffers, K.; Sistrunk, E.; Smith, D.; Spinka, T.; Stanley, J.; Steele, R.; Stolz, C.; Suratwala, T.; Telford, S.; Thoma, J.; VanBlarcom, D.; Weiss, J.; Wegner, P.

    2017-05-01

    Large laser systems that deliver optical pulses with peak powers exceeding one Petawatt (PW) have been constructed at dozens of research facilities worldwide and have fostered research in High-Energy-Density (HED) Science, High-Field and nonlinear physics [1]. Furthermore, the high intensities exceeding 1018W/cm2 allow for efficiently driving secondary sources that inherit some of the properties of the laser pulse, e.g. pulse duration, spatial and/or divergence characteristics. In the intervening decades since that first PW laser, single-shot proof-of-principle experiments have been successful in demonstrating new high-intensity laser-matter interactions and subsequent secondary particle and photon sources. These secondary sources include generation and acceleration of charged-particle (electron, proton, ion) and neutron beams, and x-ray and gamma-ray sources, generation of radioisotopes for positron emission tomography (PET), targeted cancer therapy, medical imaging, and the transmutation of radioactive waste [2, 3]. Each of these promising applications requires lasers with peak power of hundreds of terawatt (TW) to petawatt (PW) and with average power of tens to hundreds of kW to achieve the required secondary source flux.

  15. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  16. Distribution of axial length and ocular biometry measured using partial coherence laser interferometry (IOL Master) in an older white population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotedar, Reena; Wang, Jie Jin; Burlutsky, George; Morgan, Ian G; Rose, Kathryn; Wong, Tien Y; Mitchell, Paul

    2010-03-01

    We aimed to describe norms for the distribution of axial length (AL) and other ocular biometric parameters in an older Caucasian population, measured using partial coherence laser interferometry (Zeiss IOL Master; Carl Zeiss AG, Oberkochen, Germany), a technique now routinely used in measuring AL before cataract surgery. We also aimed to assess age and gender relationships with these parameters and their correlations with spherical equivalent refraction (SER). Cross-sectional analysis of the Blue Mountains Eye Study (BMES) cohort at the examinations (10-year follow-up examination). From 2002 to 2004, 1952 persons (76% of surviving baseline BMES participants) aged 59 years or older had ocular biometry measured at the 10-year examinations. Spherical equivalent refraction was calculated as the sum of sphere +0.5 cylinder power, after protocol refraction. Measurements of AL, corneal curvature (K1), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and corneal diameter (WTW) were performed using the IOL Master. Only right phakic eyes (n = 1335) with biometry data were included. Axial length distribution. Mean AL was 23.44 mm (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.38-23.50) and was greater in men, 23.76 mm (CI, 23.68-23.84), than in women, 23.19 mm (CI, 23.11-23.27). The mean K1, ACD, and WTW were 43.42 diopters (D), 3.10 mm, and 12.06 mm, respectively. The AL and ACD distributions were both positively skewed and peaked, whereas the WTW and K1 distributions were near normal. From age 59 years or older, a mean reduction in AL with age was observed (P for trend = 0.005), 0.12 mm per decade (P = 0.0176) in women but only 0.02 mm per decade (P = 0.6319) in men. Mean SER was 0.58 D, and the distribution was peaked with a negative skew. The SER was negatively correlated with both AL (beta coefficient -0.688) and ACD (beta coefficient -0.222), but not with K1 or WTW. These data provide normative values in the older general population for AL measured using the IOL Master. Axial length distribution was

  17. Commercializing potassium terbium fluoride, KTF (KTb3F10) faraday crystals for high laser power optical isolator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Wolfgang; Stevens, Kevin; Foundos, Greg; Payne, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    Many scientific lasers and increasingly industrial laser systems operate in market with Terbium Gallium Garnet (TGG - Tb3Ga5O12) for many years. It is the most commonly used material for the 650-1100nm range and the key advantages for TGG include its cubic crystal structure for alignment free processing, little to no intrinsic birefringence, and ease of manufacture. However, for high-power laser applications TGG is limited by its absorption at 1064nm and its thermo-optic coefficient, dn/dT. Specifically, thermal lensing and depolarization effects become a limiting factor at high laser powers. While TGG absorption has improved significantly over the past few years, there is an intrinsic limit. Now, SYNOPTICS is commercializing the enhanced new crystal Potassium Terbium Fluoride KTF (KTb3F10) that exhibits much smaller nonlinear refractive index and thermo-optic coefficients, and still exhibits a Verdet constant near that of TGG. This cubic crystal has relatively low absorption and thermo-optic coefficients. It is now fully characterized and available for select production orders. At OPTIFAB in October 2017 we present recent results comparing the performance of KTF to TGG in optical isolators and show SYNOPTICS advances in large volume crystal growth and the production ramp up.

  18. 40 Gb/s Pulse Generation Using Gain Switching of a Commercially Available Laser Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Jesper; Hanberg, Jesper; Franck, Thorkild

    1999-01-01

    to ease RF connection. The laser die is connected to a gold plated AlN microwave substrate that also acts as a heat spreader. The microwave substrate contains an impedance matching resistor for the RF signal as well as a bias-T for the DC bias. 50 ohm Flexguide technology is used for the interconnection......The laser module contains a single-mode, distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode. The epi-structure of the laser diode is grown by MOCVD as a multiple quantum well heterostructure. The DFB grating is defined by holography, and the laser diode is designed with a co-planar contact metallization...... between the microwave substrate and the RF feed-through in the wall of the module. The module is build as a 14 pin butterfly package with the RF feed-through designed as a coplanar 50 ohm impedance port. Included in the module are a built-in optical isolator, a thermistor, a thermo-electric cooler...

  19. Optical mode engineering and high power density per facet length (>8.4 kW/cm) in tilted wave laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Maximov, M. V.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Kaluzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.

    2016-03-01

    Tilted Wave Lasers (TWLs) based on optically coupled thin active waveguide and thick passive waveguide offer an ultimate solution for thick-waveguide diode laser, preventing catastrophic optical mirror damage and thermal smile in laser bars, providing robust operation in external cavity modules thus enabling wavelength division multiplexing and further increase in brightness enabling direct applications of laser diodes in the mainstream material processing. We show that by proper engineering of the waveguide one can realize high performance laser diodes at different tilt angles of the vertical lobes. Two vertical lobes directed at various angles (namely, +/-27° or +/-9°) to the junction plane are experimentally realized by adjusting the compositions and the thicknesses of the active and the passive waveguide sections. The vertical far field of a TWL with the two +/-9° vertical beams allows above 95% of all the power to be concentrated within a vertical angle below 25°, the fact which is important for laser stack applications using conventional optical coupling schemes. The full width at half maximum of each beam of the value of 1.7° evidences diffraction- limited operation. The broad area (50 μm) TWL chips at the cavity length of 1.5 mm reveal a high differential efficiency ~90% and a current-source limited pulsed power >42W for as-cleaved TWL device. Thus the power per facet length in a laser bar in excess of 8.4 kW/cm can be realized. Further, an ultimate solution for the smallest tilt angle is that where the two vertical lobes merge forming a single lobe directed at the zero angle is proposed.

  20. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for measuring fast protein dynamics and concentrations with a commercial laser scanning confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C M; Dalal, R B; Hebert, B; Digman, M A; Horwitz, A R; Gratton, E

    2008-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) is a new and novel technique for measuring molecular dynamics and concentrations from fluorescence confocal images. The RICS technique extracts information about molecular dynamics and concentrations from images of living cells taken on commercial confocal systems. Here we develop guidelines for performing the RICS analysis on an analogue commercial laser scanning confocal microscope. Guidelines for typical instrument settings, image acquisition settings and analogue detector characterization are presented. Using appropriate instrument/acquisition parameters, diffusion coefficients and concentrations can be determined, even for highly dynamic dye molecules in solution. Standard curves presented herein demonstrate the ability to detect protein concentrations as low as approximately 2 nM. Additionally, cellular measurements give accurate values for the diffusion of paxillin-enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP), an adhesion adaptor molecule, in the cytosol of the cell and also show slower paxillin dynamics near adhesions where paxillin interacts with immobile adhesion components. Methods are presented to account for bright immobile structures within the cell that dominate spatial correlation functions; allowing the extraction of fast protein dynamics within and near these structures. A running average algorithm is also presented to address slow cellular movement or movement of cellular features such as adhesions. Finally, methods to determine protein concentration in the presence of immobile structures within the cell are presented. A table is presented giving guidelines for instrument and imaging setting when performing RICS on the Olympus FV300 confocal and these guidelines are a starting point for performing the analysis on other commercial confocal systems.

  1. Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Limpouch, J.; Renner, Oldřich; Krouský, Eduard; Uschmann, I.; Förster, E.; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 20, - (2002), s. 43-49 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0755 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * line X-ray emission * X-ray sources * X-ray spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.487, year: 2002

  2. Direct measuring of single-cycle mid-IR light bullets path length in LiF by the laser coloration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalin, Sergey; Kompanets, Victor; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Dormidonov, Alexander; Kandidov, Valerii

    2017-10-01

    A colour-centre structure formed in a LiF crystal under filamentation of a femtosecond mid-IR laser pulse with a power slightly exceeding the critical power for self-focusing has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A single-cycle light bullet was recorded for the first time by observation of strictly periodic oscillations for the density of the color centers induced in an isotropic LiF crystal under filamentation of a laser beam with a wavelength tuned in the range from 2600 to 3900 nm, which is due to the periodic change in the light field amplitude in the light bullet formed under filamentation under propagation in dispersive medium. The light bullet path length was not more than one millimeter.

  3. Direct measuring of single-cycle mid-IR light bullets path length in LiF by the laser coloration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A colour-centre structure formed in a LiF crystal under filamentation of a femtosecond mid-IR laser pulse with a power slightly exceeding the critical power for self-focusing has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A single-cycle light bullet was recorded for the first time by observation of strictly periodic oscillations for the density of the color centers induced in an isotropic LiF crystal under filamentation of a laser beam with a wavelength tuned in the range from 2600 to 3900 nm, which is due to the periodic change in the light field amplitude in the light bullet formed under filamentation under propagation in dispersive medium. The light bullet path length was not more than one millimeter.

  4. Intensity limits for propagation of 0.527 μm laser beams through large-scale-length plasmas for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, C.; Divol, L.; Froula, D.H.; Gregori, G.; Jones, O.; Kirkwood, R.K.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Meezan, N.B.; Moody, J.D.; Sorce, C.; Suter, L.J.; Glenzer, S.H.; Bahr, R.; Seka, W.

    2005-01-01

    We have established the intensity limits for propagation of a frequency-doubled (2ω, 527 nm) high intensity interaction beam through an underdense large-scale-length plasma. We observe good beam transmission at laser intensities at or below 2x10 14 W/cm 2 and a strong reduction at intensities up to 10 15 W/cm 2 due to the onset of parametric scattering instabilities. We show that temporal beam smoothing by spectral dispersion allows a factor of 2 higher intensities while keeping the beam spray constant, which establishes frequency-doubled light as an option for ignition and burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

  5. Intense Far-Infrared Free-Electron Laser-Pulses with a Length of 6 Optical Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; R F X A M Mols,; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    Second-order optical autocorrelation measurements are reported for a far-infrared free-electron laser. Second-harmonic generation in an 840-mu m-long CdTe crystal is used to provide the nonlinear autocorrelation signal. At wavelengths of 10.4 and 24.5 mu m, FWHM pulse durations of 220 and 500 fs,

  6. Estimation of vegetation water content at leaf and canopy level using dual-wavelength commercial terrestrial laser scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsherif, Ahmed; Gaulton, Rachel; Mills, Jon

    2018-04-06

    Vegetation water content, quantified as the leaf equivalent water thickness (EWT), can serve as an indicator of vegetation stress. The intensity data recorded by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) instruments, operating at shortwave infrared wavelengths, can be used to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of EWT, after a full and rigorous calibration for the range and incidence angle effects. However, TLS instruments do not record the incidence angles automatically, making calibration challenging. In this study, intensity data from two commercially available TLS instruments (Leica P40, 1550 nm shortwave infrared wavelength, and Leica P20, 808 nm near-infrared wavelength) were combined in a normalized difference index (NDI). The NDI was found to minimize the incidence angle effects with no need for further calibration. A dry-down experiment was conducted using deciduous and conifer canopies. The NDI was found to be highly correlated to EWT at leaf level ( R 2 of 0.91 and 0.74) and at canopy level ( R 2 of 0.89 and 0.74) for the deciduous and conifer canopies, respectively. Three-dimensional distributions of EWT at canopy level were generated, which revealed some vertical heterogeneity.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablated sub-10 nm silicon nanoparticles for improving photovoltaic conversion efficiency of commercial solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, H. R.; Ghobadi, A.; Ulusoy Ghobadi, T. G.; Ates, H.; Topalli, K.; Okyay, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the enhancement of photovoltaic (PV) solar cell efficiency using luminescent silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs). Sub-10 nm Si-NPs are synthesized via pulsed laser ablation technique. These ultra-small Si nanoparticles exhibit photoluminescence (PL) character tics at 425 and 517 nm upon excitation by ultra-violet (UV) light. Therefore, they can act as secondary light sources that convert high energetic photons to ones at visible range. This down-shifting property can be a promising approach to enhance PV performance of the solar cell, regardless of its type. As proof-of-concept, polycrystalline commercial solar cells with an efficiency of ca 10% are coated with these luminescent Si-NPs. The nanoparticle-decorated solar cells exhibit up to 1.64% increase in the external quantum efficiency with respect to the uncoated reference cells. According to spectral photo-responsivity characterizations, the efficiency enhancement is stronger in wavelengths below 550 nm. As expected, this is attributed to down-shifting via Si-NPs, which is verified by their PL characteristics. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced devices in a wide range of applications based on Si-NPs including PVs and LED applications.

  8. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm -1 ; P(14), 949.2 cm -1 ; and R(24), 978.5 cm -1 ] of the pulsed CO 2 laser (00 0 1--10 0 0 transition) by SiH 4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO 2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials

  9. Development of improved laser glasses which can be melted on a commercial scale. Annual progress report, September 15, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, C.F.; Huff, N.T.; Vergano, P.J.

    1978-04-01

    Large neodymium doped glass laser systems are presently being built for nuclear fusion research. However, the power which can be generated by these systems is generally limited by self focusing in the laser glass. This study was undertaken to develop laser glasses with a minimum nonlinear refractive index which would allow the generation of higher powers in these laser systems. Various fluorophosphate glass forming systems were investigated in order to develop laser glasses with ''optimum'' properties (low n/sub 2/, medium sigma, long tau, highly stable). In these fluorophosphate systems, the regions of glass formation were defined and glass composition-property correlation equations were derived which related the various properties (n/sub D/, n/sub 2/, sigma, the Nd/sup 3 +/ peak lambda, ..delta..lambda, effective ..delta..lambda, sigma and tau radiative) to the glass composition. Specific glass compositions were developed which had nonlinear refractive indices of about /sup 1///sub 3/ those of commercial silicate laser glasses but had comparable spectroscopic properties (i.e., sigma). These glasses were sufficiently stable to cast single pieces of glass weighing in excess of 50 lbs.

  10. 'Length'at Length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    He was interested to know how `large' is the set of numbers x for which the series is convergent. Here large refers to its length. But his set is not in the class ♢. Here is another problem discussed by Borel. Consider .... have an infinite collection of pairs of new shoes and want to choose one shoe from each pair. We have an ...

  11. Tri-length laser therapy associated to tecar therapy in the treatment of low-back pain in adults: a preliminary report of a prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Raffaella; Pari, Carlotta; Salvatori, Giada; Massari, Leo

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is very frequent, especially in active adult population. There are several different orthopaedic condition that can cause low-back pain, and the pain worsen the quality of life significantly. The treatments vary from drugs, physical therapies, kinesiology, local infiltrations, and so on. Laser therapy has an important role in the treatment of the inflammatory causes of pain, with several studies that demonstrate the efficacy of low and high energy laser therapy in the treatment of low-back pain. Sixty-six consecutive patients with low-back pain with or without leg pain were treated using a combination of Tri-length laser I-Triax® (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy) and Pharon® tecar therapy (Mectronic Medicale, Bergamo, Italy). The patients were treated three times a week, every other day, for a total of 10 sessions. Clinical results were evaluated using visual analogic scale for individual pain (0 to 10) and the Oswestry disability scale (ODS). Tests started before the beginning of therapies and 8 weeks after the end of the therapies. Visual analogic scale (VAS) score significantly improved from an average value of 8.1 ± 1.58 pre-treatment to an average value 8-weeks post-treatment of 2.63 ± 2.74 (P treatment average value of 53.0 ± 13.0 to a post-treatment average value of 23.5 ± 19.8 (P low-back pain and leg pain (respectively, VAS from 8.66 ± 1.58 to 2.86 ± 2.94 and ODS from 57.8 ± 15.5 to 23.7 ± 19.5). Low-back pain, associated or not with leg pain, is a very common clinical situation. The treatments of this condition are different, and an important role can be given to the laser therapy. The conclusion of this study is that the association between laser therapy iLux-Triax® and tecar therapy Pharon® in the treatment of low-back pain, with or without leg pain, can significantly reduce pain and improve the quality of life in patients with degenerative and inflammatory problems.

  12. Effect of conjugation length on nonlinear optical parameters of anthraquinone dyes investigated using He-Ne laser operating in CW mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report the studies on third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting of anthraquinone dyes. Z-scan technique was employed to evaluate the nonlinear parameters such as nonlinear absorption coefficient βeff and nonlinear index of refraction n2. Continuous wave He-Ne laser was used as the source of excitation. The estimated values of βeff, n2 and χ(3) are of the order of 10-3 cm/W, 10-5 esu and 10-7 esu respectively. The presence of donor and acceptor groups in the structure results in increase in conjugation length. This resulted in the enhancement of nonlinear optical parameters values of the dye. Multiple diffraction rings were observed when the samples were exposed to laser beam due to thermal lensing. Dyes exhibited good optical limiting behavior under the experimental conditions. The results indicate that the dyes investigated here are materialise as candidates for photonics device applications such as optical power limiters.

  13. On the texture, phase and tensile properties of commercially pure Ti produced via selective laser melting assisted by static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nan; Yuan, Hao; Coddet, Pierre; Ren, Zhongming; Bernage, Charles; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Tensile strength and ductility of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) processed commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti) were simultaneous enhanced by preforming the melting/solidification processes under Static Magnetic Field (SMF). The effects of SMF on microstructure and tensile properties were examined. The SMF-SLMed CP-Ti sample presents a microstructure of fine acicular martensitic α'-Ti and lath-shaped α-Ti. Meanwhile, the texture structure of SLMed CP-Ti was eliminated after adding a SMF. The SMF-SLM process offers new avenues to ameliorate the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of SLMed sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In-situ Crystallization of Highly Volatile Commercial Mold Flux Using an Isolated Observation System in the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ryu, Jae Wook; Sohn, Il

    2014-08-01

    The in situ crystallization behavior of highly volatile commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels was investigated using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) equipped with an optimized isolated observation system. The highly volatile compounds of the mold flux were suppressed during heating allowing direct observation in the CLSM. Cooling rates of 25, 50, 100, 400, and 800 K/min were incorporated and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of 4 different commercial mold fluxes for medium carbon steels were developed. Identification of the crystalline phase was conducted with XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. A cuspidine crystalline was observed in all samples at various cooling rates. With higher basicity, CaF2, and NaF, the crystallization of the fluxes was enhanced according to the CCT diagram. As the slag structure becomes depolymerized, the diffusion rate of the cathodic ions seems to increase.

  15. Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Passeron, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be succesfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-aulait macules should not b...

  16. Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Du, K.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser, consisting of a beam path multiple-folded by means of two cavity end mirrors and having at least one reflector folding the laser beam retroreflectively, the axis of which is arranged offset in parallel to the axis of a further reflector. So that the laser exhibits an improved beam quality while retaining its comparatively low adjustment sensitivity, the beam path is folded at least twice by means of the retoreflective reflector.

  17. Conceptual design of a large E-beam-pumped KrF laser for ICF commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Waganer, L.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.; Bowers, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of KrF lasers appear attractive as a driver for an ICF electric power plant. The original concept uses large electron-beam-pumped amplifiers and pure angular multiplexing to deliver short, shaped pulses to the target. A recently conceived alternate concept uses many small, long-pulse e-beam sustained discharge lasers which transfer their energy through the forward Raman process to a multiplexed set of beams to deliver the energy to target. Preliminary comparisons of the two systems indicate that the original concept has both a lower cost and a lower system efficiency, and both concepts appear to be nearly equally attractive as an ICF driver for an electric power plant. This paper examines a 4.8 MJ, 5 Hz KrF laser system designed using the original concept. The laser uses 24 main amplifiers arranged in eight sets of three amplifiers each. This layout optimizes both the optical system and the gas flow system, and uses a simple target illumination scheme that provides neutron shielding to allow hands-on maintenance in the laser hall

  18. Comparison of the Effect of Nd:YAG Laser and Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength of a Commercial Ni-Cr Alloy to Porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Moslehifard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Failures might occur at metal‒porcelain interfaces as a problem with metal‒ceramic restorations even with the application of airborne-particle abrasion technique. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Nd:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of porcelain fused to metal. Methods:  Twenty-four cylindrical specimens (4 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were made of a commercially available nickel‒chromium alloy by lost-wax technique. Half of the specimens were surface-treated by air-borne particles and the other half was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser beams (wavelength of 1064 nm, energy and frequency of 120 mJ and 10 Hz, respectively, and a power setting of 6 kW. All the specimens (air-abraded and laser-treated were covered with a 4-mm layer of opaque porcelain in two-stage baking and subjected to shear bond strength test (a 10-kgf at 1 mm/min until fracture occurred. A fractured specimen from each group was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. T-test was used for statistical analysis and statistical significance was set at P

  19. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research. The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i water vapour mixing ratio, (ii measurement stability, (iii uncertainties due to calibration and (iv response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric

  20. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. An externally heated copper vapour laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochefort, P.A.; Sopchyshyn, F.C.; Selkirk, E.B.; Green, L.W.

    1993-08-01

    A pulsed Copper Vapour Laser (CVL), with a nominal 6 kHz repetition rate, was designed, build, and commissioned at Chalk River laboratories. The laser was required for Resonant Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) experiments and for projects associated with Atomic Vapour laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) studies. For the laser to operate, copper coupons position along the length of a ceramic tube must be heated sufficiently to create an appropriate vapour pressure. The AECL CVL uses an external heater element with a unique design to raise the temperature of the tube. The Cylindrical graphite heating element is shaped to compensate for the large radiation end losses of the laser tube. The use of an external heater saves the expensive high-current-voltage switching device from heating the laser tube, as in most commercial lasers. This feature is especially important given the intermittent usage typical of experimental research. As well, the heater enables better parametric control of the laser output when studying the lasing of copper (or other) vapour. This report outlines the lasing process in copper vapour, describes in detail all three major laser sub-systems: the laser body; the laser tube heater; the high voltage pulsed discharge; and, reports parametric measurements of the individual sub-systems and the laser system as a whole. Also included are normal operating procedures to heat up, run and shut down the laser

  3. Primary length standard adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševčík, Robert; Guttenová, Jana

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with problems and techniques connected with primary length standard adjusting, which includes disassembling of the device and by use of the secondary laser with collimated beam and diffraction laws successively reassembling of the laser. In the reassembling process the device was enhanced with substituting the thermal grease cooling of cold finger by copper socket cooler. This improved external cooling system enables more effective cooling of molecular iodine in the cell, which allows better pressure stability of iodine vapor and easier readjustment of the system.

  4. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  5. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  6. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  7. Effects of two types of low-level laser wave lengths (850 and 630 nm) on the orthodontic tooth movements in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Massoud; Shafeei, Hasan Ali; Daneshdoost, Shahram; Mir, Maziar

    2007-11-01

    The effects of low-level lasers on bone cellular activity, bone structures, bone healing, fibroblasts activity and inflammation process have already been investigated. Considering orthodontic tooth movement, which is a complicated inflammatory process involving simultaneous bone apposition and resorption, the aim of this controlled study is to investigate the quantitative effects of a pulsed 850 nm laser (Optodan) and a continuous 630 nm laser (KLO3) on the orthodontic tooth movement in rabbits. This experimental study was conducted on 18 male albino rabbits divided into three equal groups of control, Optodan and KLO3. In all the groups, NiTi-closed coil springs were used on the first mandibular molars with 4-oz tension. The control group was not irradiated by laser, but the teeth in the laser groups were irradiated 9 days according to the periodontal therapeutic protocols. After 16 days, samples were sacrificed. The distance between the distal surface of the first molar and the mesial surface of the second molar was measured with 0.05-mm accuracy. The data were subjected to the statistical tests of Kolmogrov Smirnov and variance analysis. The mean orthodontic tooth movements of the first mandibular molars were 1.7 +/- 0.16 mm in control group, 0.69 +/- 0.16 mm in Optodan group and 0.86 +/- 0.13 mm in KLO3 group. There were statistically significant difference between the control and the two other laser-irradiated groups (P orthodontic tooth movement, after low-level laser therapy, are diminished. It could not be concluded that any low-level laser will reduce the speed of teeth movement in orthodontic treatments, and further studies with less or more energies may show different results.

  8. Commercial reference shape standards use in the study of particle shape effect on laser diffraction particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Richard N; Kazanjian, Jacqueline

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of LGC Promochem AEA 1001 to AEA 1003 monosized fiber-analog shape standards in the study of the effect of particle shape on laser diffraction (LD) particle size analysis (psa). The psa of the AEA standards was conducted using LD psa systems from Beckman Coulter, Horiba, and Malvern Instruments. Flow speed settings, sample refractive index values, and sample cell types were varied to examine the extent to which the shape effect on LD psa results is modified by these variables. The volume and number probability plots resulting from these measurements were each characterized by a spread in the particle size distribution that roughly extended from the breadth to the longest dimension of the particles. For most of the selected sample refractive index values, the volume probability plots were characterized by apparent bimodal distributions. The results, therefore, provide experimental verification of the conclusions from theoretical studies of LD psa system response to monosized elliptical particles in which this apparent bimodality was the predicted result in the case of flow-oriented particles. The data support the findings from previous studies conducted over the past 10 years that have called into question the verity of the tenets of, and therefore the value of the application of, the equivalent spherical volume diameter theory and the random particle orientation model to the interpretation of LD psa results from measurements made on nonspherical particles.

  9. LASER PARAMETER CONTROL: Oscillation spectra of Ar-Xe and He-Ar-Xe mixtures pumpbed by a radially converging electron beam with a pulse length ~ 0.1 ms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A. S.; Koval', N. N.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Fedenev, A. V.

    1992-11-01

    We have investigated lasers oscillating on atomic transitions of xenon and pumped by a radially converging electron beam with pulse lengths between 0.07 and 0.1 ms. We have determined experimentally the dependence of the threshold beam current density and the output spectrum on the Q-factor of the laser resonator. We have shown that for beam current densities smaller than 16 mA/cm2 and for a pulse length ~ 0.1 ms there is a quasisteady lasing at wavelengths λ = 1.73, 2.65, 2.03, and 2.63 μm if the resonator output mirror and the mixture composition are chosen appropriately. We have also observed simulatenous oscillation on the following pairs of lines: λ = 1.73 and 2.03 μm, 2.03 and 2.65 μm, and 2.65 and 2.63 μm. When the lattice supporting the foil covering the beam window was cooled with water, periodic-pulse operation at a repetition rate of 5 Hz was achieved in a laser with a pumped volume ~ 18 liters.

  10. Fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of fundamental length was first put forward by Heisenberg from purely dimensional reasons. From a study of the observed masses of the elementary particles known at that time, it is sumrised that this length should be of the order of magnitude 1 approximately 10 -13 cm. It was Heisenberg's belief that introduction of such a fundamental length would eliminate the divergence difficulties from relativistic quantum field theory by cutting off the high energy regions of the 'proper fields'. Since the divergence difficulties arise primarily due to infinite number of degrees of freedom, one simple remedy would be the introduction of a principle that limits these degrees of freedom by removing the effectiveness of the waves with a frequency exceeding a certain limit without destroying the relativistic invariance of the theory. The principle can be stated as follows: It is in principle impossible to invent an experiment of any kind that will permit a distintion between the positions of two particles at rest, the distance between which is below a certain limit. A more elegant way of introducing fundamental length into quantum theory is through commutation relations between two position operators. In quantum field theory such as quantum electrodynamics, it can be introduced through the commutation relation between two interpolating photon fields (vector potentials). (K.B.)

  11. Change in the collateral and accessory collateral ligament lengths of the proximal interphalangeal joint using cadaveric model three-dimensional laser scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, S S; Dreckmann, S; Binhammer, P A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the lengths of the index and middle finger proximal interphalangeal joint ligaments and determine the relative changes in the collateral and accessory collateral ligament lengths at 0°, 45° and 90° flexion. We generated three-dimensional scans of 16 finger (eight index and eight middle) proximal interphalangeal joints to assess relative changes in ligament length. Significant changes were found between 45°-90° and 0°-90° for the ulnar collateral ligament of the index finger and both collateral ligaments of the middle finger between 45°-90° and 0°-90°. No significant changes in length were found for the radial collateral ligament of the index finger or the accessory collateral ligaments of the index and middle fingers. Overall, it was found that the collateral ligament length changed significantly, but there was no significant change in the accessory collateral ligaments. Therapeutic IV. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. A Study on Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli through Commercial Broiler Production Chains in Thailand: Antimicrobial Resistance, the Characterization of DNA Gyrase Subunit A Mutation, and Genetic Diversity by Flagellin A Gene Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomrongsuwannakij, Thotsapol; Blackall, Patrick J; Chansiripornchai, Niwat

    2017-06-01

    Contaminated poultry meat is regarded as the main source of human campylobacteriosis. During September 2014 and February 2015, breeder flocks, hatcheries, and broiler farms from two chicken production chains were investigated chronologically. Five commercial breeder flocks (Breeder Flocks 1-5), two hatcheries (Hatcheries A and B), and five broiler flocks (Broiler Flocks 1-5) were sampled in this study. Campylobacter colonization of both breeder and broiler flocks was determined from cloacal swabs and environmental samples (pan feeders, footwear, darkling beetles, flies, feed, and water). The eggs from the breeder flocks were followed to hatcheries. At the hatcheries, early embryonic deaths, egg trays, eggshells, hatchers, and water were investigated. Cloacal swabs were taken from broilers at Days 1, 14, and 28 (all broiler flocks), and either 35 (Broiler Flocks 1 and 2) or 43 (Broiler Flocks 3-5). Thirty-six Campylobacter jejuni and 94 Campylobacter coli isolates collected through two broiler production chains were tested by twofold agar dilution for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. Most Campylobacter isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR), defined as being resistant to three or more antimicrobial classes ( C. jejuni : 100%; C. coli : 98.9%), and exhibited high resistance to enrofloxacin ( C. jejuni : 100%; C. coli : 98.9%). The vast majority of C. coli were resistant to tetracycline (97.9%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (81.9%), and doxycycline (79.8%), but only 55.6%, 36.1%, and 50% of C. jejuni isolates revealed resistance to these antimicrobial agents, respectively. A selected subset of 24 C. jejuni and 24 C. coli were characterized for their mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region of the DNA gyrase subunit A gene by nucleotide sequence analysis. The Thr-86-Ile substitution (ACA-ATA in C. jejuni or ACT-ATT in C. coli ) was found in all isolates. Moreover, a total of 130 Campylobacter isolates were typed with the use of polymerase

  13. Precision Laser Annealing of Focal Plane Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Daniel A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeRose, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Starbuck, Andrew Lea [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jenkins, Mark W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We present results from laser annealing experiments in Si using a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microlaser. Exposure with laser at fluence values above the damage threshold of commercially available photodiodes results in electrical damage (as measured by an increase in photodiode dark current). We show that increasing the laser fluence to values in excess of the damage threshold can result in annealing of a damage site and a reduction in detector dark current by as much as 100x in some cases. A still further increase in fluence results in irreparable damage. Thus we demonstrate the presence of a laser annealing window over which performance of damaged detectors can be at least partially reconstituted. Moreover dark current reduction is observed over the entire operating range of the diode indicating that device performance has been improved for all values of reverse bias voltage. Additionally, we will present results of laser annealing in Si waveguides. By exposing a small (<10 um) length of a Si waveguide to an annealing laser pulse, the longitudinal phase of light acquired in propagating through the waveguide can be modified with high precision, <15 milliradian per laser pulse. Phase tuning by 180 degrees is exhibited with multiple exposures to one arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer at fluence values below the morphological damage threshold of an etched Si waveguide. No reduction in optical transmission at 1550 nm was found after 220 annealing laser shots. Modeling results for laser annealing in Si are also presented.

  14. Laser direct writing and inkjet printing for a sub-2 μm channel length MoS2 transistor with high-resolution electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Chung, Seungjun; Jang, Jaewon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2016-10-07

    Patterns formed by the laser direct writing (LDW) lithography process are used either as channels or barriers for MoS2 transistors fabricated via inkjet printing. Silver (Ag) nanoparticle ink is printed over patterns formed on top of the MoS2 flakes in order to construct high-resolution source/drain (S/D) electrodes. When positive photoresist is used, the produced grooves are filled with inkjetted Ag ink by capillary forces. On the other hand, in the case of negative photoresist, convex barrier-like patterns are written on the MoS2 flakes and patterns, dividing the printed Ag ink into the S/D electrodes by self-alignment. LDW lithography combined with inkjet printing is applied to MoS2 thin-film transistors that exhibit moderate electrical performance such as mobility and subthreshold swing. However, especially in the linear operation regime, their features are limited by the contact effect. The Y-function method can exclude the contact effect and allow proper evaluation of the maximum available mobility and contact resistance. The presented fabrication methods may facilitate the development of cost-effective fabrication processes.

  15. Laser direct writing and inkjet printing for a sub-2 μm channel length MoS2 transistor with high-resolution electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Chung, Seungjun; Jang, Jaewon; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2016-10-01

    Patterns formed by the laser direct writing (LDW) lithography process are used either as channels or barriers for MoS2 transistors fabricated via inkjet printing. Silver (Ag) nanoparticle ink is printed over patterns formed on top of the MoS2 flakes in order to construct high-resolution source/drain (S/D) electrodes. When positive photoresist is used, the produced grooves are filled with inkjetted Ag ink by capillary forces. On the other hand, in the case of negative photoresist, convex barrier-like patterns are written on the MoS2 flakes and patterns, dividing the printed Ag ink into the S/D electrodes by self-alignment. LDW lithography combined with inkjet printing is applied to MoS2 thin-film transistors that exhibit moderate electrical performance such as mobility and subthreshold swing. However, especially in the linear operation regime, their features are limited by the contact effect. The Y-function method can exclude the contact effect and allow proper evaluation of the maximum available mobility and contact resistance. The presented fabrication methods may facilitate the development of cost-effective fabrication processes.

  16. Overview of bunch length measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of particle and photon beam bunch length measurements is presented in the context of free-electron laser (FEL) challenges. Particle-beam peak current is a critical factor in obtaining adequate FEL gain for both oscillators and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. Since measurement of charge is a standard measurement, the bunch length becomes the key issue for ultrashort bunches. Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques are presented in the context of using electromagnetic radiation over eight orders of magnitude in wavelength. In addition, the measurement of microbunching in a micropulse is addressed

  17. Pressure and gap length dependence of gap breakdown voltage and discharge current of discharge-pumped KrF excimer laser. Hoden reiki KrF laser no zetsuen hakai den prime atsu to reiki denryu no atsuryoku, gap cho izon sei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukimura, K.; Kawakami, H. (Doshisha Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Hitomi, K. (Kyoto Polytechnic College, Kyoto (Japan))

    1991-04-20

    On the gap destruction characteristics of UV-preionized discharge-pumped KrF excimer laser (charge transfer type) and the electric characteristics of the excited discharge, studies were made by changing the pressure (1.5-3 atm) and the discharge gap length (14-21 mm) of the discharge medium. (1) Gap breakdown voltage and the maximum current of the excited discharge give a similarity by a product of pressure and the gap length at the charge volatge. (2) Insulation breakdown of the gap occurs at the wave front of the applied voltage and the breakdown time gets delayed by the decreasing voltage applied. By setting the ionization index at constant value 20, the gap breakdown voltage is estimated at the error within 10%. (3) The relation between the maximum current, pressure and the gap length product changes the characteristics by the charge voltage of the primary condenser. With the result combined with the standardization of voltage/current of the excited discharge, the electric characteristics at the specific pressure and gap length can be readily known. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Full-length genome sequence analysis of an avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) as contaminant in live poultry vaccine: The commercial live vaccines might be a potential route for ALV-J transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Lin, L; Li, H; Shi, M; Gu, Z; Wei, P

    2018-02-25

    One avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) strain was isolated from 67 commercial live poultry vaccines produced by various manufacturers during 2013-2016 in China. The complete genomes of the isolate were sequenced and it was found that the genes gag and pol of the strain were relatively conservative, while the gp85 gene of the strain GX14YYA1 had the highest similarities with a field strain GX14ZS14, which was isolated from the chickens of a farm that had once used the same vaccine as the one found to be contaminated with the GX14YYA1. This is the first report of ALV-J contaminant in live poultry vaccine in China. Our finding demonstrates that vaccination of the commercial live vaccines might be a potential new route for ALV-J transmission in chickens and highlights the need for more extensive monitoring of the commercial live vaccines in China. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Guam Commercial Fisheries BioSampling (CFBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Guam Commercial Fisheries Biosampling program, which collects length and weight frequency data for whole commercial catches, and samples 4-8 species for in-depth...

  20. Emerging technologies for compact visible laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    A number of laser and non-linear optical technologies and converging on commercial designs. High power laser diodes and non-linear materials are being incorporated in prototype lasers, many of which will become commercially available products during the next 1-5 years. This paper reviews the output characteristics of such lasers. Lasers which are discussed include direct doubling of laser diodes based on proton exchanged lithium niobate, fiber lasers, frequency doubled diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers, and sum frequency mixed Nd:YAG lasers. Such lasers are capable of providing milliwatt output powers in the green and/or blue spectral regions

  1. Laser tissue interactions: an update for otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, Lou

    2000-05-01

    We review the laser, characteristics of laser light, the delivery of laser light, pulse lengths and laser tissue interactions. We review these parameters and how they have changed over the history of the laser and how we expect them to change in the future. This survey of laser use is targeted to the otolaryngologist. Very little background in lasers is necessary to follow the discussion. This is intended to introduce and reintroduce laser technology.

  2. Laser fabrication of beryllium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.; Ramos, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    Working with the beryllium industry on commercial applications and using prototype parts, the authors have found that the use of lasers provides a high-speed, low-cost method of cutting beryllium metal, beryllium alloys, and beryllium-beryllium oxide composites. In addition, they have developed laser welding processes for commercial structural grades of beryllium that do not need a filler metal; i.e., autogenous welds were made in commercial structural grades of beryllium by using lasers

  3. Commercial Toilets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whether you are looking to reduce water use in a new facility or replace old, inefficient toilets in commercial restrooms, a WaterSense labeled flushometer-valve toilet is a high-performance, water-efficient option worth considering.

  4. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments - conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S

    2015-04-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial.

  5. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  6. Measuring diffusion of lipid-like probes in artificial and natural membranes by raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS): use of a commercial laser-scanning microscope with analog detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Ellen; Smisdom, Nick; vandeVen, Martin; De Clercq, Ben; Gratton, Enrico; Digman, Michelle; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Hofkens, Johan; Engelborghs, Yves; Ameloot, Marcel

    2009-05-05

    The heterogeneity in composition and interaction within the cellular membrane translates into a wide range of diffusion coefficients of its constituents. Therefore, several complementary microfluorimetric techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and single-particle tracking (SPT) have to be applied to explore the dynamics of membrane components. The recently introduced raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) offers a much wider dynamic range than each of these methods separately and allows for spatial mapping of the dynamic properties. RICS is implemented on a confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), and the wide dynamic range is achieved by exploiting the inherent time information carried by the scanning laser beam in the generation of the confocal images. The original introduction of RICS used two-photon excitation and photon counting detection. However, most CLSM systems are based on one-photon excitation with analog detection. Here we report on the performance of such a commercial CLSM (Zeiss LSM 510 META) in the study of the diffusion of the fluorescent lipid analog 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-indodicarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI-C(18)(5)) both in giant unilamellar vesicles and in the plasma membrane of living oligodendrocytes, i.e., the myelin-producing cells of the central nervous system. It is shown that RICS on a commercial CLSM with analog detection allows for reliable results in the study of membrane diffusion by removal of unwanted correlations introduced by the analog detection system. The results obtained compare well with those collected by FRAP and FCS.

  7. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te). (TFD)

  8. Laser development for laser fusion applications research. Progress report, October 1977--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Research progress is reported on three laser programs being developed for the commercialization of laser-fusion energy. The lasers include iodine, hydrogen fluoride and Group VI atoms (e.g., O, S, Se, Te)

  9. Real-time single-shot electron bunch length measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, I; Gillespie, W A; Berden, G; Knippels, G M H; Meer, A F G

    2002-01-01

    Linear accelerators employed as drivers for X-ray free electron lasers (FELs) require relativistic electron bunch with sub-picosecond bunch length. Precise bunch length measurements are important for the tuning and operation of the FELs. Previously, we have demonstrated that electro-optic detection is a powerful technique for sub-picosecond electron bunch length measurements. In those experiments, the measured bunch length was the average of all electron bunches within a macropulse. Here, for the first time, we present the measurement of the length of individual electron bunches using a development of our previous technique. In this experiment, the longitudinal electron bunch shape is encoded electro-optically on to the frequency spectrum of a chirped laser pulse. Subsequently, the laser pulse is dispersed by a grating and the spectrum is imaged with a CCD camera. Single bunch measurements are achieved by using a nanosecond gated camera, and synchronizing the gate with both the electron bunch and the laser pu...

  10. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, W B

    2012-05-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460-700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Raster image correlation spectroscopy and Number & Brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D.J.; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb (Magde et al., 1972). Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope has been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) and Number & Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs). We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS and Number & Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters in order to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. PMID:20734406

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, raster image correlation spectroscopy, and number and brightness on a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope with analog detectors (Nikon C1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Pierre D J; Gratton, Enrico; Salvemini, Iyrri L

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was developed in 1972 by Magde, Elson and Webb. Photon counting detectors and avalanche photodiodes have become standards in FCS to the point that there is a widespread belief that these detectors are essential to perform FCS experiments, despite the fact that FCS was developed using analog detectors. Spatial and temporal intensity fluctuation correlations using analog detection on a commercial Olympus Fluoview 300 microscope have been reported by Brown et al. (2008). However, each analog instrument has its own idiosyncrasies that need to be understood before using the instrument for FCS. In this work, we explore the capabilities of the Nikon C1, a low-cost confocal microscope, to obtain single point FCS, Raster-scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), and Number and Brightness data both in solution and incorporated into the membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles. We show that it is possible to obtain dynamic information about fluorescent molecules from single point FCS, RICS, and Number and Brightness using the Nikon C1. We highlighted the fact that care should be taken in selecting the acquisition parameters to avoid possible artifacts due to the detector noise. However, due to relatively large errors in determining the distribution of digital levels for a given microscope setting, the system is probably only adequate for determining relative brightness within the same image. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Laser materials processing with diode lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lin; Lawrence, Jonathan; Spencer, Julian T.

    1996-01-01

    Laser materials processing is currently dominated by CO2, Nd-YAG and Excimer lasers. Continuous advances in semiconductor laser technology over the last decade have increased the average power output of the devices annualy by two fold, resulting in the commercial availability of the diode lasers today with delivery output powers in excess of 60W in CW mode and 5kW in qasi-CW mode. The advantages of compactness, high reliability, high efficiency and potential low cost, due to the mass producti...

  14. Quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zory, Jr, Peter S; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the information necessary for the reader to achieve a thorough understanding of all aspects of QW lasers - from the basic mechanism of optical gain, through the current technolgoical state of the art, to the future technologies of quantum wires and quantum dots. In view of the growing importance of QW lasers, this book should be read by all those with an active interest in laser science and technology, from the advanced student to the experienced laser scientist.* The first comprehensive book-length treatment of quantum well lasers* Provides a detailed treatment

  15. Review of soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1991-03-01

    The emerging technology of soft x-ray lasers is in a transition phase between the first laboratory demonstrations of gain and the acceptance of soft x-ray lasers as practical tools for novel applications. Current research is focused on several fronts. The operational wavelength range has been extended to the ''water window'', important for applications in the life sciences. Gain has also been generated with substantially simpler technology (such as a 6J laser) and this augurs well for the commercially availability in the near future of soft x-ray lasers for a variety of applications. Advanced soft x-ray laser concepts are being developed from investigations into ultra-high intensity laser/matter interactions. The first paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray microscopy and holography have begun. In this paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray laser development will be followed by a review of recent advances in recombination, collisional and photo-pumped systems and applications. A summary of current gain-length performance achieved in laboratories worldwide is presented. Near term prospects for applications to novel fields are discussed. 81 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  16. New laser research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    New types of lasers must be developed to provide the desired energy per pulse, pulse length, pulse shape, wavelength, and efficiency for laser-fusion applications. This advanced laser research has focused on rare-gas oxides and on Hg 2 excimers

  17. Commercial Fisheries Database Biological Sample (CFDBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Age and length frequency data for finfish and invertebrate species collected during commercial fishing vessels. Samples are collected by fisheries reporting...

  18. Bibliographic study of photophysical and photochemical properties of laser dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doizi, D.

    1986-06-01

    Laser isotope separation of uranium requires high power and precise wave length. This report is a bibliographic and experimental study of the photophysical and photochemical properties of seven commercial laser dyes which have an emission wavelength in the range 5500-6500 A: Rhodamine 110 or 560, rhodamine 6G or 590, rhodamine B or 610, rhodamine 101 or 640, sulforhodamine B or kiton red 620, sulforhodamine 101 or 640 and DCM or LC 6500. Absorption and emission cross section values, fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields in various solvents are indicated. For each dye, a non exhaustive list of laboratory experiments made with two types of pump sources: Nd YAG (532) and copper vapor laser is given. When it is known, the toxicity of the dyes is mentioned [fr

  19. Bulk measurement of copper and sodium content in CuIn(0.7)Ga(0.3)Se(2) (CIGS) solar cells with nanosecond pulse length laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalczyk, Jeremy M. D.; Perkins, Jeffrey J.; DeAngelis, Alexander; Kaneshiro, Jess; Mallory, Stewart A.; Chang, Yuancheng; Gaillard, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we show that laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with a nanosecond pulse laser can be used to measure the copper and sodium content of CuIn(0.7)Ga(0.3)Se(2) (CIGS) thin film solar cells on molybdenum. This method has four significant advantages over methods currently being employed: the method is inexpensive, measurements can be taken in times on the order of one second, without high vacuum, and at distances up to 5 meters or more. The final two points allow for in-line ...

  20. Commercial LANDSAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Private industry should assume responsibility either for the United States' land satellite (LANDSAT) system or for both the land and the weather satellite systems, recommends the Land Remote Sensing Satellite Advisory Committee. The committee (Eos, June 29, 1982, p. 553), composed of representatives from academia, industry, and government, has a working group that is evaluating the potential for commercialization of remote sensing satellites.The recommendations call for industry ownership or operation of either or both of the remote sensing systems, but only up to and including the holding of raw, unprocessed data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) currently operates LANDSAT but will be relinquishing its responsibility to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on January 31. NOAA already operates the U.S. civilian weather satellite service, which includes the NOAA-5, NOAA-6, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellites (Eos, June 2, 1981, p. 522).

  1. Telomere length analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andrés; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A

    2007-01-01

    Most somatic cells of long-lived species undergo telomere shortening throughout life. Critically short telomeres trigger loss of cell viability in tissues, which has been related to alteration of tissue function and loss of regenerative capabilities in aging and aging-related diseases. Hence, telomere length is an important biomarker for aging and can be used in the prognosis of aging diseases. These facts highlight the importance of developing methods for telomere length determination that can be employed to evaluate telomere length during the human aging process. Telomere length quantification methods have improved greatly in accuracy and sensitivity since the development of the conventional telomeric Southern blot. Here, we describe the different methodologies recently developed for telomere length quantification, as well as their potential applications for human aging studies.

  2. LaserFest Celebration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  3. Lasers in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.; Rockower, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    A status report on the uranium Laser Isotope Separation (LIS) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented. Prior to this status report, process economic analysis is presented so as to understand how the unique properties of laser photons can be best utilized in the production of materials and components despite the high cost of laser energy. The characteristics of potential applications that are necessary for success are identified, and those factors that have up to now frustrated attempts to find commercially viable laser induced chemical and physical process for the production of new or existing materials are pointed out

  4. Commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  5. Telomere length and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Rode, Line

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been cross-sectionally associated with short telomeres as a measure of biological age. However, the direction and nature of the association is currently unclear. AIMS: We examined whether short telomere length is associated with depression cross-sectionally as well...... as prospectively and genetically. METHOD: Telomere length and three polymorphisms, TERT, TERC and OBFC1, were measured in 67 306 individuals aged 20-100 years from the Danish general population and associated with register-based attendance at hospital for depression and purchase of antidepressant medication....... RESULTS: Attendance at hospital for depression was associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not prospectively. Further, purchase of antidepressant medication was not associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally or prospectively. Mean follow-up was 7.6 years (range 0...

  6. Myofilament length dependent activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C. (IIT); (Loyola)

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  7. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, sho...

  8. Commercial microwave space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siambis, J.; Gregorwich, W.; Walmsley, S.; Shockey, K.; Chang, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on central commercial space power, generating power via large scale solar arrays, and distributing power to satellites via docking, tethering or beamed power such as microwave or laser beams, that is being investigated as a potentially advantageous alternative to present day technology where each satellite carries its own power generating capability. The cost, size and weight for electrical power service, together with overall mission requirements and flexibility are the principal selection criteria, with the case of standard solar array panels based on the satellite, as the reference point. This paper presents and investigates a current technology design point for beamed microwave commercial space power. The design point requires that 25 kW be delivered to the user load with 30% overall system efficiency. The key elements of the design point are: An efficient rectenna at the user end; a high gain, low beam width, efficient antenna at the central space power station end, a reliable and efficient cw microwave tube. Design trades to optimize the proposed near term design point and to explore characteristics of future systems were performed. Future development for making the beamed microwave space power approach more competitive against docking and tethering are discussed

  9. Laser Technology in Peace and War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloembergen, N.

    Lasers emit light with a very high degree of monochromaticity, directionality and intensity. They can produce much higher intensities than incoherent light sources, such as incandescent lamps, fluorescent tubes and arcs. The first operating laser was realized in 1960, and much early research was funded by military agencies, but at the present time the commercial laser market is four times as large as the military market. Most applications of lasers are for peaceful purposes. Among the most important of these are fiber-optic communications and laser surgery. Other applications include laser printing, laser machining, construction alignment, and data storage on CD disks. Some military uses of lasers are also reviewed.

  10. Relativistic Length Agony Continued

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, D. V.

    2014-06-01

    We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redzic 2008b), we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the 'pole in a barn' paradox.

  11. Telomere Length and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimura, Masayuki; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Gardner, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length, representing the mean length of all telomeres in leukocytes, is ostensibly a bioindicator of human aging. The authors hypothesized that shorter telomeres might forecast imminent mortality in elderly people better than leukocyte telomere length. They performed mortality...... telomeres predicted the death of the first co-twin better than the mTRFL did (mTRFL: 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.63; mTRFL(50): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; mTRFL(25): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; MTRFL: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.67). The telomere-mortality association was stronger in years 3-4 than...

  12. Long axial imaging range using conventional swept source lasers in optical coherence tomography via re-circulation loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradu, Adrian; Jackson, David A.; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2018-03-01

    Typically, swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) imaging instruments are capable of a longer axial range than their camera based (CB) counterpart. However, there are still various applications that would take advantage for an extended axial range. In this paper, we propose an interferometer configuration that can be used to extend the axial range of the OCT instruments equipped with conventional swept-source lasers up to a few cm. In this configuration, the two arms of the interferometer are equipped with adjustable optical path length rings. The use of semiconductor optical amplifiers in the two rings allows for compensating optical losses hence, multiple paths depth reflectivity profiles (Ascans) can be combined axially. In this way, extremely long overall axial ranges are possible. The use of the recirculation loops produces an effect equivalent to that of extending the coherence length of the swept source laser. Using this approach, the achievable axial imaging range in SS-OCT can reach values well beyond the limit imposed by the coherence length of the laser, to exceed in principle many centimeters. In the present work, we demonstrate axial ranges exceeding 4 cm using a commercial swept source laser and reaching 6 cm using an "in-house" swept source laser. When used in a conventional set-up alone, both these lasers can provide less than a few mm axial range.

  13. Length-weight relationships, condition factors and relative weight of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to record the length-weight relationship parameters and condition factors for some commercially important fish of Bushehr coastal waters of Persian Gulf. The length-weight relationships were calculated for five species caught during fishing surveys using different types of fishing gears (trawls, pots ...

  14. Bombyx mori silk protein films microprocessing with a nanosecond ultraviolet laser and a femtosecond laser workstation: theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazare, S.; Sionkowska, A.; Zaborowicz, M.; Planecka, A.; Lopez, J.; Dijoux, M.; Louména, C.; Hernandez, M.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Laser microprocessing of several biopolymers from renewable resources is studied. Three proteinic materials were either extracted from the extracellular matrix like Silk Fibroin/Sericin and collagen, or coming from a commercial source like gelatin. All can find future applications in biomedical experimentation, in particular for cell scaffolding. Films of ˜hundred of microns thick were made by aqueous solution drying and laser irradiation. Attention is paid to the properties making them processable with two laser sources: the ultraviolet and nanosecond (ns) KrF (248 nm) excimer and the infrared and femtosecond (fs) Yb:KGW laser. The UV radiation is absorbed in a one-photon resonant process to yield ablation and the surface foaming characteristics of a laser-induced pressure wave. To the contrary, resonant absorption of the IR photons of the fs laser is not possible and does not take place. However, the high field of the intense I>˜1012 W/cm2 femtosecond laser pulse ionizes the film by the multiphoton absorption followed by the electron impact mechanism, yielding a dense plasma capable to further absorb the incident radiation of the end of the pulse. The theoretical model of this absorption is described in detail, and used to discuss the presented experimental effects (cutting, ablation and foaming) of the fs laser. The ultraviolet laser was used to perform simultaneous multiple spots experiments in which energetic foaming yields melt ejection and filament spinning. Airborne nanosize filaments "horizontally suspended by both ends" (0.25 μm diameter and 10 μm length) of silk biopolymer were observed upon irradiation with large fluences.

  15. Full Length Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Out of the 320 male sheep examined, 87(27.2%) were infected, while 9(19.1%) of the 47 females examined were infected (Table 2). Infection varied from one abattoir to another. Age related distribution of P. cervi is shown in Table 3. Out of 356 adult sheep (>2yrs) examined, 35. Full Length Research Article. 12 ...

  16. Note: Making tens of centimeter long uniform microfluidic channels using commercial glass pipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Neil; Lee, Huang-Ming; Wu, Jong-Ching

    2018-03-01

    Producing microchannels with diameters between 10 and 20 μm and with lengths in the tens of centimeters is reported. The method can be modified to obtain diameters as narrow as 350 nm. Length-to-diameter aspect ratios that surpass 104 can be produced for a fraction of current production costs. The controllable channel is produced by applying a flame to the narrow end of a commercial pipette that is made from a soda-lime silicate. In combination with a pulling mechanism, applying heat to the composite material lengthens the pipette in a highly uniform way. Given that the materials and methods in this research are cost-effective when compared to femtosecond laser micromachining on 2D silicon-based surfaces, further research into producing microchannels from soda-lime silicates may revolutionize access to 3D controllable microchannels.

  17. A simple method for boosting the beam quality of commercial DPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Yin; Jiao, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cai-Fan; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Chao-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Gu, Xue-Wen; Song, Feng

    2003-12-01

    A simple method for boosting the beam quality of a commercial laser diode pumped laser (DPL) is put forward. By keeping one of the mirrors unchanged and the moving the other mirror a proper distance away from the laser rod, high beam quality laser output is realized.

  18. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  19. Gap length distributions by PEPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warszawer, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions guaranteeing exponential gap length distributions are formulated and discussed. Exponential gap length distributions of bubble chamber tracks first obtained on a CRT device are presented. Distributions of resulting average gap lengths and their velocity dependence are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Length of excitable knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maucher, Fabian; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present extensive numerical simulations of an excitable medium to study the long-term dynamics of knotted vortex strings for all torus knots up to crossing number 11. We demonstrate that FitzHugh-Nagumo evolution preserves the knot topology for all the examples presented, thereby providing a field theory approach to the study of knots. Furthermore, the evolution yields a well-defined minimal length for each knot that is comparable to the ropelength of ideal knots. We highlight the role of the medium boundary in stabilizing the length of the knot and discuss the implications beyond torus knots. We also show that there is not a unique attractor within a given knot topology.

  1. Pion nucleus scattering lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.T.; Levinson, C.A.; Banerjee, M.K.

    1971-09-01

    Soft pion theory and the Fubini-Furlan mass dispersion relations have been used to analyze the pion nucleon scattering lengths and obtain a value for the sigma commutator term. With this value and using the same principles, scattering lengths have been predicted for nuclei with mass number ranging from 6 to 23. Agreement with experiment is very good. For those who believe in the Gell-Mann-Levy sigma model, the evaluation of the commutator yields the value 0.26(m/sub σ//m/sub π/) 2 for the sigma nucleon coupling constant. The large dispersive corrections for the isosymmetric case implies that the basic idea behind many of the soft pion calculations, namely, slow variation of matrix elements from the soft pion limit to the physical pion mass, is not correct. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  3. Length-weight and length-length relationships of freshwater wild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length-weight and length-length relationships of freshwater wild catfish Mystus bleekeri from Nala Daik, Sialkot, Pakistan. ... Linear regression analysis was used, first to compute the degree of relationship between length and weight and then among total (TL), standard (SL) and fork lengths (FL). LWR exhibited a highly ...

  4. Relativistic length agony continued

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redžić D.V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We made an attempt to remedy recent confusing treatments of some basic relativistic concepts and results. Following the argument presented in an earlier paper (Redžić 2008b, we discussed the misconceptions that are recurrent points in the literature devoted to teaching relativity such as: there is no change in the object in Special Relativity, illusory character of relativistic length contraction, stresses and strains induced by Lorentz contraction, and related issues. We gave several examples of the traps of everyday language that lurk in Special Relativity. To remove a possible conceptual and terminological muddle, we made a distinction between the relativistic length reduction and relativistic FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction, corresponding to a passive and an active aspect of length contraction, respectively; we pointed out that both aspects have fundamental dynamical contents. As an illustration of our considerations, we discussed briefly the Dewan-Beran-Bell spaceship paradox and the ‘pole in a barn’ paradox. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 171028

  5. Iodine laser program: SAIL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The iodine laser is the most highly developed near-infrared gas laser available for large-scale laser development. Its fast-repetition-rate potential and prospects for improvements in efficiency make it a primary laser candidate to meet mid-term laser-fusion requirements. It may have adequate efficiency for commercial laser-fusion applications in a hybrid fission/fusion reactor, for fusion-fuel breeding and for laser-fusion power generation using complex pellets. Research progress is reported on: (1) SAIL-1; (2) iodine laser-code development; (3) collision and radiation coupling for iodine atoms; (4) development of multilevel Block-Maxwell equations; (5) approximations for iodine amplifiers; and (6) studies based on the ISTAR code

  6. Ho:YLF pumped HBr laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, L R; Bollig, C; Esser, M J D; Campbell, R N; Jacobs, C; Preussler, D R

    2009-10-26

    A Ho:YLF laser pumped HBr molecular laser was developed that produced up to 2.5 mJ of energy in the 4 micron wavelength region. The Ho:YLF laser was fiber pumped using a commercial Tm:fibre laser. The Ho:YLF laser was operated in a single longitudinal mode via injection seeding with a narrow band diode laser which in turn was locked to one of the HBr transitions. The behavior of the HBr laser was described using a rate equation mathematical model and this was solved numerically. Good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively between the model and experimental results was obtained.

  7. Diode-pumped neodymium lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Since the invention of diode lasers in the early 1960's there had been continuous investigations in laser diode pumped solid state lasers as has been reviewed in detail by a number of papers ( see e.g. [1] ). There are two main advantages of using diode lasers instead of flashlaraps as a pump source for solid state lasers: First the emission of the diode lasers matches well with the absorption bands of several Rare Earth ions that are doped in laser crystals ( mainly Nd3+, but also Er3, Tm3, Dy3', and others ) . This summary will report only about diode lasers at a wavelength of around BlOnm, which fits to an absorptionband of Nd3t Second diode lasers provide the possibility of longitudinally pumped configurations and therefore an excellent mode matching with the solid state laser mode. For both reasons the efficiency of a diode laser puniped solid state laser is nuch higher than of a flashlamp pumped one. Since the early 1980's a much wider interest in diode laser pumped solid state lasers arose. It was stimulated by the improved performance of the new generation of diode lasers in terms of reliability , operational lifetime and output power [21. Two important steps in direction to the diode lasers at present time were the developments of double hetero (DH) structure- and graded index separate confinement hetero (GrInSCH) structurediode lasers. In the same way the development of new production techniques were necessary to ensure the reliability of the diode lasers. Starting with the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) the (GaAl)As structures are now grown by the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), mainly used for very high precision laboratory investigations, and metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), mainly used for commercial production. As a first commercial product SDL introduced a 100mW array in 1984. Since then the output power of the commercially available diode lasers increased by two orders of magnitude to lOW. These diode lasers are multi stripe bar arrays

  8. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...... and finally data analysis based on the ISO approach. The device was calibrated and tested on commercially available laser systems. It showed good reproducibility. It was the target to be able to measure CW lasers with a power up to 200 W, focused down to spot diameters in the range of 10µm. In order...

  9. Short cervical length dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2015-06-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. With research efforts, the rate of PTB decreased to 11.4% in 2013. Transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) cervical length (CL) screening predicts PTB. In asymptomatic singletons without prior spontaneous PTB (sPTB), TVU CL screening should be done. If the cervix is 20 mm or less, vaginal progesterone is indicated. In asymptomatic singletons with prior sPTB, serial CL screening is indicated. In multiple gestations, routine cervical screening is not indicated. In symptomatic women with preterm labor, TVU CL screening and fetal fibronectin testing is recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. discouraged by queue length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Parthasarathy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient solution is obtained analytically using continued fractions for a state-dependent birth-death queue in which potential customers are discouraged by the queue length. This queueing system is then compared with the well-known infinite server queueing system which has the same steady state solution as the model under consideration, whereas their transient solutions are different. A natural measure of speed of convergence of the mean number in the system to its stationarity is also computed.

  11. Assessment of the Effect of CO2 Laser Irradiation on the Reduction of Bacteria Seeded on Commercially Available Sandblasted Acid-Etched Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Babu, Jegdish; Migliorati, Erica Krohn Jany; Stein, Sydney; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the capability of carbon dioxide (CO₂) laser in reducing Escherichia coli on sandblasted acid-etched (SAE) titanium dental implants. SAE dental implants were contaminated with E coli, incubated in a sterile bacterial culture medium for 24 hours, and then exposed to CO₂ laser (10,600-nm wavelength) in superpulsed waves (SPW) at 1.5, 1.7, and 2 W at 100-Hz frequency and continuous wave (CW) at 1.5, 2, and 2.5 W. The presence of bacteria trapped in the implant surfaces after contamination and decontamination was verified using spectrophotometry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the topography of laser irradiation. After implant surface contamination was verified, implants were exposed to CO₂ laser irradiation, and bacterial growth was measured with spectrophotometry. The control implants showed the highest bacterial growth (100% growth). Implants exposed to laser showed progressive increase in the percentage of decontamination (DC%) corresponding to the higher wattage in the SPW and CW groups. The DC% were 20.4%, 49.6%, and 51.7% in the SPW group at 100 Hz, at 1.5, 1.7, and 2 W of power, respectively. In the CW group, the DC% were 34.3%, 69.9%, and 85.5% at 1.7, 2, and 2.5 W, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the groups (P laser wattage increased. CO₂ laser irradiation failed to completely decontaminate the implant surfaces. SEM analysis demonstrated damage to the top of the dental implant threads at all settings studied. Thus, CO₂ laser irradiation may not be the optimal method to decontaminate implants.

  12. Trends in laser micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, Frank; van Nunen, Joris; Held, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Laser Micromachining is well established in industry. Depending on the application lasers with pulse length from μseconds to femtoseconds and wavelengths from 1064nm and its harmonics up to 5μm or 10.6μm are used. Ultrafast laser machining using pulses with pico or femtosecond duration pulses is gaining traction, as it offers very precise processing of materials with low thermal impact. Large-scale industrial ultrafast laser applications show that the market can be divided into various sub segments. One set of applications demand low power around 10W, compact footprint and are extremely sensitive to the laser price whilst still demanding 10ps or shorter laser pulses. A second set of applications are very power hungry and only become economically feasible for large scale deployments at power levels in the 100+W class. There is also a growing demand for applications requiring fs-laser pulses. In our presentation we would like to describe these sub segments by using selected applications from the automotive and electronics industry e.g. drilling of gas/diesel injection nozzles, dicing of LED substrates. We close the presentation with an outlook to micromachining applications e.g. glass cutting and foil processing with unique new CO lasers emitting 5μm laser wavelength.

  13. Laser pumping in muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robiscoe, R.T.; Simonius, M.

    1981-01-01

    High intensity pulsed lasers are currently being used to study transitions between fine structure states in muonic atoms. We point out that pulse shaping, i.e. appropriate choice of laser intensity and pulse length, can significantly increase the final state signal strength. (orig.)

  14. Design of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model for erbium distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers is presented. The model is used to optimise the location of a discrete phase-shift to obtain maximum output power. For DFB fibre lasers of up to 10cm in length it is shown that the influence of Kerr nonlinearity with respect...

  15. Design of DFB fibre lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Vibeke Claudia; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard; Varming, Poul

    1998-01-01

    A numerical model for erbium distributed feedback (DFB) fibre lasers is presented. The model is used to optimise the location of a discrete phase-shift to obtain maximum output power. For DFB fibre lasers of up to 10cm in length it is shown that the influence of Kerr nonlinearity with respect to ...... to output power is negligible....

  16. Electra: durable repetitively pulsed angularly multiplexed KrF laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Matthew F.; Myers, Matthew C.; Giuliani, John L.; Sethian, John D.; Burns, Patrick M.; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-02-01

    Electra is a repetitively pulsed, electron beam pumped Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory that is developing the technologies that can meet the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) requirements for durability, efficiency, and cost. The technologies developed on Electra should be directly scalable to a full size fusion power plant beam line. As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system which, consists of a commercial discharge laser (LPX 305i, Lambda Physik), 175 keV electron beam pumped (40 ns flat-top) preamplifier, and 530 keV (100 ns flat-top) main amplifier. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Single shot yield of 452 J has been extracted from the initial shots of the Electra laser system using a relatively low energy preamplifier laser beam. In rep-rate burst of 5 Hz for durations of one second a total energy of 1.585 kJ (average 317 J/pulse) has been attained. Total energy of 2.5 kJ has been attained over a two second period. For comparison, the main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated at 2.5 Hz rep-rate average laser yield of 270 J over a 2 hour period.

  17. Length-scale dependent phonon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Gyaneshwar

    2014-01-01

    This book presents  a comprehensive description of phonons and their interactions in systems with different dimensions and length scales. Internationally-recognized leaders describe theories and measurements of phonon interactions  in relation to the design of materials with exotic properties such as metamaterials, nano-mechanical systems, next-generation electronic, photonic, and acoustic devices, energy harvesting, optical information storage, and applications of phonon lasers in a variety of fields. The emergence of techniques for control of semiconductor properties and geometry has enabled engineers to design structures in which functionality is derived from controlling electron behavior. As manufacturing techniques have greatly expanded the list of available materials and the range of attainable length scales, similar opportunities now exist for designing devices whose functionality is derived from controlling phonon behavior. However, progress in this area is hampered by gaps in our knowledge of phono...

  18. Laser machining wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir Barnekov; Henry A. Huber; Charles W. McMillin

    1989-01-01

    This practical, nonstatistical experiment using commercial equipment demonstrated that nominal 3/4-inch compositep anelsf or furniture consisting of a particleboard core,h igh density melamine crossbands, and walnut veneer face plies can be cut with a carbon dioxide/airjet-assisted laser to produce surfaces with minimal nonparallelism and char compared to previous...

  19. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  20. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1977-11-17

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. It was found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented.

  1. Civilian applications of laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.; Blink, J.; Buntzen, R.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.; Monsler, M.; Walker, P.

    1978-01-01

    The commercial aspects of laser fusion were evaluated in an attempt to relate the end products (neutrons and energy) to significant commercial applications. We have found that by far the largest markets and highest payoffs for laser fusion are associated with electric power production. Hence, much of this report evaluates the prospects of producing commercial electricity with laser fusion. To this end, we have described in detail a new and promising laser fusion concept--the liquid lithium waterfall reactor. In addition, we have taken the most attractive features from our laser fusion studies and used them to compare laser fusion to other long-range sources of energy (breeder reactors and solar energy). It is our contention that all three sources of electrical energy should be developed to the point where the final selections are primarily based on economic competitiveness. The other potential applications of laser fusion (fissile fuel production, synthetic fuel production, actinide burning, and propulsion) are also discussed, and our preliminary plan for the engineering development of laser fusion is presented

  2. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  3. All-Solid-State Drivers for High Power Excimer Lasers Used in Projection Gas Immersion Laser Doping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacob, Jonah

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this SBIR program is to develop all-solid-state pulsed modulators to drive the high power excimer lasers required to commercialize the Projection Gas Immersion Laser Doping (P-GILD) process...

  4. Correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiziou, L.; Garbet, X.

    1995-01-01

    This document deals with correlation length of electrostatic turbulence. First, the model of drift waves turbulence is presented. Then, the radial correlation length is determined analytically with toroidal coupling and non linear coupling. (TEC). 5 refs

  5. Correlation lengths of electrostatic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiziou, L.; Garbet, X.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the radial correlation length of an electrostatic drift wave turbulence is analytically determined in various regimes. The analysis relies on the calculation of a range of mode non linear interaction, which is an instantaneous correlation length. The link with the usual correlation length has not been investigated yet. (TEC). 5 refs

  6. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  7. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  8. Study of gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on high order surface gain-coupled gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Qin, Li; Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Chen, Chao; Cheng, LiWen; Chen, Hong; Liang, Lei; Zeng, Yugang; Zhang, Xing; Wu, Hao; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2018-03-01

    Single-longitudinal-mode, gain-coupled distributed feedback (DFB) lasers based on high order surface gain-coupled gratings are achieved. Periodic surface metal p-contacts with insulated grooves realize gain-coupled mechanism. To enhance gain contrast in the quantum wells without the introduction of effective index-coupled effect, groove length and depth were well designed. Our devices provided a single longitudinal mode with the maximum CW output power up to 48.8 mW/facet at 971.31 nm at 250 mA without facet coating, 3dB linewidth (39 dB). Optical bistable characteristic was observed with a threshold current difference. Experimentally, devices with different cavity lengths were contrasted on power-current and spectrum characteristics. Due to easy fabrication technique and stable performance, it provides a method of fabricating practical gain-coupled distributed feedback lasers for commercial applications.

  9. Commercialization in Innovation Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sløk-Madsen, Stefan Kirkegaard; Ritter, Thomas; Sornn-Friese, Henrik

    For any firm, the ultimate purpose of new product development is the commercialization of the new offerings. Despite its regular use in the product innovation and general management science literature, commercialization is only loosely defined and applied. This lack of conceptual clarity about...... definitions and interpretations of commercialization. We offer a process-oriented definition of commercialization that is theoretically founded in the capability-based view of the firm. We also outline an agenda for future theoretical development and empirical research on commercialization aimed at advancing...

  10. Lasers for RF guns: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, laser driven RF guns have matured from a device under development to a proven source for high brightness and low emittance electron beams. The reliability of the electron beam from these sources is dictated by the laser system that drives it. In addition, capabilities of the laser systems play a vital role in the design of the electron source for future machines such as the TESLA and NLC. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for discussing the design criteria for the laser systems so that the reliability of the existing sources could be improved and the future machines could be serviced. The Workshop brought together experts in RF Guns, accelerators, and lasers, from both the commercial and academic community. Most of the presentations, discussions and conclusions at the workshop are included in these proceedings. The contents are divided into three sections, Section I contains the invited talks that outline the requirements of the RF Guns and the capabilities of the laser systems to meet these requirements. Section II includes most of the papers presented in the poster session. These papers describe various laser systems used with electron guns, schemes to modify the laser beam profile to optimize the electron bunch, and computer simulations of electron trajectories. Section III contains the summaries of the working groups. As the summary section indicates, with sufficient feed back systems, the electron gun could be made to operate reliably with minimum downtime, using commercial lasers currently available. The design of laser systems for future colliders depend critically on the choice of the cathode m the gun and its efficiency. Tentative designs of laser systems for the TESLA test facility and LCLS had been drawn assuming a copper cathode. Using a more efficient cathode will ease the energy requirement of the laser and simplify the design. The individual papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  11. Electrodeless excimer laser; Laser a eccimeri senza elettrodi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisi, N. [ENEA, Divisione Nuovi Materiali, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper it is proposed how to build an excimer laser based on an electrodeless discharge (or Dielectric Barrier Discharge). Such laser could operate with a low energy per pulse (<100 mJ) and a high repetition rate (<100 kHz). The most relevant advantage an electrodeless DBD laser is the much longer gas mixture lifetime. This feature could allow the operation of a sealed laser emitting higher average power with respect to commercially available excimer lasers. Such discharge scheme could be advantageous in order to excite the F{sub 2} excimer molecule, whose emission wavelength in the VUV range (157 nm) at high reprate is particularly interesting in the micro-lithography field. [Italian] In questo documento viene proposto come costruire un laser a eccimeri basato su una scarica priva di elettrodi, o Dielectric Barrier Discharge. Tale laser puo' funzionare con una bassa energia per impulso (<100 mJ) ad alta frequenza di ripetizione (<100 kHz). Il vantaggio fondamentale di un laser a DBD e quindi privo di elettrodi e' la vita media della miscela gassosa molto piu' alta che potrebbe permettere alla camera laser di operare sigillata ad una potenza media superiore a quella dei laser a eccimeri attuali. Tale schema di pompaggio potrebbe essere particolarmente vantaggioso per eccitare la molecola eccimero F{sub 2} la cui lunghezza di emissione nel VUV (157 nm) ad elevata frequenza di ripetizione presenta un notevole interesse nel campo della produzione di microcircuiti.

  12. Development of the Heated Length Correction Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ho-Young; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Nahm, Kee-Yil; Jung, Yil-Sup; Park, Eung-Jun

    2008-01-01

    The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on a nuclear fuel is defined by the function of flow channel geometry and flow condition. According to the selection of the explanatory variable, there are three hypotheses to explain CHF at uniformly heated vertical rod (inlet condition hypothesis, exit condition hypothesis, local condition hypothesis). For inlet condition hypothesis, CHF is characterized by function of system pressure, rod diameter, rod length, mass flow and inlet subcooling. For exit condition hypothesis, exit quality substitutes for inlet subcooling. Generally the heated length effect on CHF in exit condition hypothesis is smaller than that of other variables. Heated length is usually excluded in local condition hypothesis to describe the CHF with only local fluid conditions. Most of commercial plants currently use the empirical CHF correlation based on local condition hypothesis. Empirical CHF correlation is developed by the method of fitting the selected sensitive local variables to CHF test data using the multiple non-linear regression. Because this kind of method can not explain physical meaning, it is difficult to reflect the proper effect of complex geometry. So the recent CHF correlation development strategy of nuclear fuel vendor is making the basic CHF correlation which consists of basic flow variables (local fluid conditions) at first, and then the geometrical correction factors are compensated additionally. Because the functional forms of correction factors are determined from the independent test data which represent the corresponding geometry separately, it can be applied to other CHF correlation directly only with minor coefficient modification

  13. Advances in commercial ICF technology since 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the march toward commercial ICF fusion reactors has been uneven in the past few years. Considerable advances have been made in the area of light ion beam fusion through the development of rep ratable drivers (i.e., HERMES-III technology) and diodes (i.e., applied B configuration with renewable Li surfaces). Significant progress in the development of lasers to compress targets has also been made through the KrF Aurura program. The possibility of lowering the cost of glass in the advanced solid state lasers has been given serious consideration. The development of the Induced Spatial Incoherence (ISI) technique to improve the uniformity of the laser beam has allowed physicists and engineers to once again contemplate the use of symmetric illumination. This would reduce the driver energy required to achieve high gains but it also introduces difficulty in the reactor design. Relatively little progress in commercial heavy ion beam drivers has been made over the past few years aside from an indepth study (HIFSA) of the desirable operating regimes to be pursued. Other areas where little progress has been made are conceptual reactor studies, target declassification and specific experimental programs to address commercial ICF reactor technology needs

  14. The Commercialization of Youth: Channel One in Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartella, Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Places Channel One controversy in broader context of commercialization of youth culture during past 20 years. Changes in child-oriented TV market since mid-1970s include rise of independent stations and cable networks, introduction of program-length commercials, and proliferation of new products aimed at children. Targeting marketing to child…

  15. On the improvement of signal repeatability in laser-induced air plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Sheta, Sahar; Hou, Zong-Yu; Wang, Zhe

    2018-04-01

    The relatively low repeatability of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) severely hinders its wide commercialization. In the present work, we investigate the optimization of LIBS system for repeatability improvement for both signal generation (plasma evolution) and signal collection. Timeintegrated spectra and images were obtained under different laser energies and focal lengths to investigate the optimum configuration for stable plasmas and repeatable signals. Using our experimental setup, the optimum conditions were found to be a laser energy of 250 mJ and a focus length of 100 mm. A stable and homogeneous plasma with the largest hot core area in the optimum condition yielded the most stable LIBS signal. Time-resolved images showed that the rebounding processes through the air plasma evolution caused the relative standard deviation (RSD) to increase with laser energies of > 250 mJ. In addition, the emission collection was improved by using a concave spherical mirror. The line intensities doubled as their RSDs decreased by approximately 25%. When the signal generation and collection were optimized simultaneously, the pulse-to-pulse RSDs were reduced to approximately 3% for O(I), N(I), and H(I) lines, which are better than the RSDs reported for solid samples and showed great potential for LIBS quantitative analysis by gasifying the solid or liquid samples.

  16. Tunable Fiber Bragg Grating Ring Lasers using Macro Fiber Composite Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddis, Demetris L.; Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.

    2006-01-01

    The research reported herein includes the fabrication of a tunable optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fiber ring laser (FRL)1 from commercially available components as a high-speed alternative tunable laser source for NASA Langley s optical frequency domain reflectometer (OFDR) interrogator, which reads low reflectivity FBG sensors. A Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) actuator invented at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) was selected to tune the laser. MFC actuators use a piezoelectric sheet cut into uniaxially aligned rectangular piezo-fibers surrounded by a polymer matrix and incorporate interdigitated electrodes to deliver electric fields along the length of the piezo-fibers. This configuration enables MFC actuators to produce displacements larger than the original uncut piezoelectric sheet. The FBG filter was sandwiched between two MFC actuators, and when strained, produced approximately 3.62 nm of wavelength shift in the FRL when biasing the MFC actuators from 500 V to 2000 V. This tunability range is comparable to that of other tunable lasers and is adequate for interrogating FBG sensors using OFDR technology. Three different FRL configurations were studied. Configuration A examined the importance of erbium-doped fiber length and output coupling. Configuration B demonstrated the importance of the FBG filter. Configuration C added an output coupler to increase the output power and to isolate the filter. Only configuration C was tuned because it offered the best optical power output of the three configurations. Use of Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) FBG s holds promise for enhanced tunability in future research.

  17. The Newest Laser Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Baek Yeon

    2007-01-01

    This book mentions laser processing with laser principle, laser history, laser beam property, laser kinds, foundation of laser processing such as laser oscillation, characteristic of laser processing, laser for processing and its characteristic, processing of laser hole including conception of processing of laser hole and each material, and hole processing of metal material, cut of laser, reality of cut, laser welding, laser surface hardening, application case of special processing and safety measurement of laser.

  18. Photonic crystal distributed feedback fiber lasers with Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Two new types of optical fibers, where air-holes are running down their length, are considered for making fiber lasers with Bragg gratings. The mode areas for pump and signal in these fiber lasers may be either larger or smaller compared to the corresponding mode areas for fiber lasers based...... on standard step index fibers. This makes possible realization of fiber lasers with a low pump threshold (small mode area), and fiber lasers suitable for high-power applications (large mode area)...

  19. 7 Length-weight relationship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Length-weight measurements were taken from well-preserved fish specimens from which stomachs were extracted for the analysis of the food contents, using frequency of occurrence, numerical and gravimetric methods, as well as index of relative importance. The length-frequency analysis showed a size distribution with a ...

  20. Comparison of fiber length analyzers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don Guay; Nancy Ross Sutherland; Walter Rantanen; Nicole Malandri; Aimee Stephens; Kathleen Mattingly; Matt Schneider

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, several fiber new fiber length analyzers have been developed and brought to market. The new instruments provide faster measurements and the capability of both laboratory and on-line analysis. Do the various fiber analyzers provide the same length, coarseness, width, and fines measurements for a given fiber sample? This paper provides a comparison of...

  1. Laser modulator for LISA pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voland, C.; Lund, G.; Coppoolse, W.; Crosby, P.; Stadler, M.; Kudielka, K.; Özkan, C.

    2017-11-01

    LISA Pathfinder is an ESA experiment to demonstrate the key technologies needed for the LISA mission to detect gravitational waves in space. The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft represents one arm of the LISA interferometer, containing an optical metrology system and two proof masses as inertial references for the drag-free control system. The LISA Pathfinder payload consists of two drag-free floating test masses located in the inertial sensors with their control electronics and an optical metrology subsystem. The optical metrology subsystem monitors the movement of both test masses relative to each other and to the spacecraft with very high sensitivity and resolution. This is achieved with a heterodyne Mach- Zehnder interferometer. This interferometer requires as input two coherent laser beams with a heterodyne frequency difference of a few kHz. To generate the two laser beams with a heterodyne frequency difference a Nd:YAG laser is used together with the Laser Modulator. The Nd:YAG laser generates a single coherent laser signal at a wavelength of 1064nm which is fibre coupled to the Laser Modulator. The Laser Modulator then generates the two optical beams with the required heterodyne frequency offset. In addition, the Laser Modulator is required to perform laser amplitude stabilization and optical path difference control for the two optical signals. The Laser Modulator consists of an optical unit - the LMU - and RF synthesiser, power amplification and control electronics. These electronics are all housed in the Laser Modulator Electronics (LME). The LMU has four primary functions: • Splitting of the input laser beam into two paths for later superposition in the interferometer. • Applying different frequency shifts to each of the beams. • Providing amplitude modulation control to each of the beams. • Providing active control of the optical path length difference between the two optical paths. The present paper describes the design and performance of the LMU

  2. Analytical modeling of mid-infrared silicon Raman lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Fathpour, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonics has significantly matured in the near-infrared (telecommunication) wavelength range with several commercial products already in the market. More recently, the technology has been extended into the mid-infrared (mid- IR) regime with potential applications in biochemical sensing, tissue photoablation, environmental monitoring and freespace communications. The key advantage of silicon in the mid-IR, as compared with near-IR, is the absence of twophoton absorption (TPA) and free-carrier absorption (FCA). The absence of these nonlinear losses would potentially lead to high-performance nonlinear devices based on Raman and Kerr effects. Also, with the absence of TPA and FCA, the coupled-wave equations that are usually numerically solved to model these nonlinear devices lend themselves to analytical solutions in the mid-IR. In this paper, an analytical model for mid-IR silicon Raman lasers is developed. The validity of the model is confirmed by comparing it with numerical solutions of the coupled-wave equations. The developed model can be used as a versatile and efficient tool for analysis, design and optimization of mid-IR silicon Raman lasers, or to find good initial guesses for numerical methods. The effects of cavity parameters, such as cavity length and facet reflectivities, on the lasing threshold and input-output characteristics of the Raman laser are studied. For instance, for a propagation loss of 0.5 dB/cm, conversion efficiencies as high as 56% is predicted. The predicted optimum cavity (waveguide) length at 2.0 dB/cm propagation loss is { 3.4 mm. The results of this study predict strong prospects for mid-IR silicon Raman lasers for the mentioned applications.

  3. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Markus; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Sources of ultrashort laser pulses are nowadays commercially available and have entered many areas of research and development. This book gives an overview of biological and medical applications of these laser pulses. The briefness of these laser pulses permits the tracing of the fastest processes in photo-active bio-systems, which is one focus of the book. The other focus is applications that rely on the high peak intensity of ultrashort laser pulses. Examples covered span non-linear imaging techniques, optical tomography, and laser surgery.

  4. Laser Guiding of a 100 TW Laser Beam in a Capillary Discharge Waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Nagler, Bob; Esarey, Eric; Filip, Catalin; Geddes, Cameron G R; Gonsalves, Anthony J; Hooker, Simon; Leemans, Wim; Spence, D; Toth, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    Experiments are underway at LBNL on guiding high peak power (up to 100 TW), ultra-short (<50 fs) laser pulses using a preformed plasma channel created by an electrical discharge in a capillary. The laser beam is produced by the multi-beam l'OASIS Ti:sapphire laser system and is focused onto the entrance of the capillary using a 2 meter focal length off-axis parabola. The capillary has been developed at Oxford University and creates a fully ionized plasma channel with a radial density profile that is suitable for guiding over a length ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The laser beam is monitored using a CCD camera based mode profile diagnostic, an optical spectrometer and a pulse length diagnostic. Experimental results will be presented on the plasma channel characteristics and on laser guiding and its dependenceo n laser and channel parameters.

  5. Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour ofTe and ne along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  6. Theoretical model and simulations for a cw exciplex pumped alkali laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Tan, Rongqing; Li, Zhiyong; Lu, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-14

    The Exciplex Pumped Alkali Laser (XPAL) system, which is similar to DPAL (Diode Pumped Alkali vapor Laser), has been demonstrated in mixtures of Cs vapor, Ar, with and without ethane. Unlike DPAL, it uses the broadband absorption blue satellite of the alkali D2 line, created by naturally occuring collision pairs. For example, Cs-Ar collision pairs have an absorption width which is as wide as the one of commercial semiconductor diode lasers. A continuous wave XPAL four-level theoretical model is presented in this paper. More factors are considered, such as the spectral dependence of pumped laser absorption for broadband pumping and the longitudinal population variation. Some intra-cavity details, such as longitudinal distributions of pumped laser and alkali laser, can also be solved well. The predictions of optical-to-optical efficiency as a function of temperature and pumped laser intensity are presented. The model predicts that there is an optimum value of temperature or pumped laser intensity. The analysis of the influence of cell length on optical-to-optical efficiency shows that a better performance can be achieved when using longer cell. The prediction of influence of Ar concentration and reflectivity of output coupler shows that higher optical-to-optical efficiency could be achieved if lower reflectivity of output coupler and higher Ar concentration are used. The optical-to-optical efficiency as high as 84% achieved by optimizing configuration with the pumped intensity of 5 × 10⁷ W/cm² presented shows that broadband pumped four-level XPAL system has a potential of high optical-to-optical efficiency.

  7. Commercialism in Intercollegiate Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the history of intercollegiate athletics and the evolution of commercialization in college sports, particularly through television. Argues that few Division I programs could be self-sufficient; the issue is the degree to which sports are commercialized for revenue, and the challenge to balance schools' needs, private sector interests, and…

  8. Diffusion length in nanoporous TiO2 films under above-band-gap illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. D.; Son, B. H.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Sang Yong; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the carrier diffusion lengths in TiO 2 nanoporous layers of dye-sensitized solar cells by using scanning photocurrent microscopy using an ultraviolet laser. Here, we excited the carrier directly in the nanoporous layers where the diffusion lengths were found to 140 μm as compared to that of visible illumination measured at 90 μm. The diffusion length decreased with increasing laser modulation frequency, in which we determined the electron lifetimes and the diffusion coefficients for both visible and UV illuminations. The diffusion lengths have been studied in terms of the sintering temperatures for both cells with and without binding molecules. We found a strong correlation between the diffusion length and the overall light-to-current conversion efficiency, proving that improving the diffusion length and hence the interparticle connections, is key to improving cell efficiency

  9. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  10. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy using ultraviolet laser

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J M; Ko, D K; Park, H M; Rhee, Y J

    2002-01-01

    In this study, Ti:sapphire laser which is pumped by the enhanced Nd:YAG laser using laser diode, was designed and manufactured. The AO Q-switched CW Nd:YAG laser was converted into a high repetition plus-type laser using the AO Q-switch, and two heads were installed inside the cavity in order to improve the laser beam quality. The Nd:YAG laser enhancement was completed by optimization using a simulation for the cavity length, structure and thermal lens effect that greatly effected the laser beam output and quality. As the result of the enhancement, a 30W laser at 532nm and at 5k-Hz was successfully made. Also, the Ti:sapphire laser that will be used for atomic spectroscopy which is pumped by the Nd:YAG laser, was completely designed. As a basic experiment for laser oscillation. We measured the tunability of the laser, and it turned out that the wave tunability range was 730 850 nm. A self-seeding type tunable laser using grating for narrow line width, is planned to be designed due to the fact that the Ti:sapp...

  12. Safeguards implications of laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, T.F.; Taylor, K.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and emphasise the safeguards and relevant features of atomic vapour laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS), and to consider the issues that must be addressed before a safeguards approach at a commercial AVLIS or MLIS facility can be implemented. (Author)

  13. Laser phase noise rejection by two-wave mixing photorefractive interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, M.; Drake, T.E.

    2005-01-01

    Laser-ultrasound is a technique currently used for the ultrasonic inspection of composites during manufacturing of advanced jet fighters. This technique is based on a short-pulse laser to generate ultrasonic waves and a long-pulse laser coupled to an interferometer to detect the resulting displacements. In theory, the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal is proportional to the square root of the collected detection light power. In practice however, noise from the laser limits the signal-to-noise ratio above a certain collected power level. When using conventional Fabry-Perot interferometers to demodulate ultrasonic information, one type of noise, amplitude relaxation noise, can be rejected using a differential configuration based on two cavities stabilized on opposite sides of the resonance peak. Another type of laser noise, phase noise, cannot be rejected using Fabry-Perot interferometers and currently limits signal-to-noise ratio. A new type of interferometer based on a photorefractive crystal can be made almost completely insensitive by matching the optical path lengths of the pump and signal beams while still rejecting amplitude noise. In this paper, the phase noise rejection capability of a commercial two-wave mixing photorefractive interferometer is experimentally demonstrated. Results will be presented that demonstrate that speckle effect is not an issue for composite inspection using this interferometer and that it can operate in the photon statistics noise regime for higher collected light powers than conventional differential Fabry-Perot systems. (author)

  14. Electra: Repetitively Pulsed Angularly Multiplexed KrF Laser System Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Matthew; Myers, Matthew; Giuliani, John; Sethian, John; Burns, Patrick; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-11-01

    As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system. The multistage amplifier system consists of a commercial discharge laser and two doubled sided electron beam pumped amplifiers. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Two angularly multiplexed beams have extracted 30 J of KrF laser light with an aperture 8 x 10 cm^2, which is sufficient to extract over 500 J from the main amplifier and models agree. The main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated single shot and rep-rate laser energies exceeding 700 J with 100 ns pulsewidth at 248 nm with an aperture 29 x 29 cm^2. Continuous operation of the KrF electron beam pumped oscillator has lasted for more than 2.5 hours without failure at 1 Hz and 2.5 Hz. The measured intensity and pulse energy for durations greater than thousand shots are consistent at measurable rep-rates of 1 Hz, 2.5 Hz and 5 Hz.

  15. Development of solar concentrators for high-power solar-pumped lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, T H; Ohkubo, T; Yabe, T

    2014-04-20

    We have developed unique solar concentrators for solar-pumped solid-state lasers to improve both efficiency and laser output power. Natural sunlight is collected by a primary concentrator which is a 2  m×2  m Fresnel lens, and confined by a cone-shaped hybrid concentrator. Such solar power is coupled to a laser rod by a cylinder with coolant surrounding it that is called a liquid light-guide lens (LLGL). Performance of the cylindrical LLGL has been characterized analytically and experimentally. Since a 14 mm diameter LLGL generates efficient and uniform pumping along a Nd:YAG rod that is 6 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length, 120 W cw laser output is achieved with beam quality factor M2 of 137 and overall slope efficiency of 4.3%. The collection efficiency is 30.0  W/m2, which is 1.5 times larger than the previous record. The overall conversion efficiency is more than 3.2%, which can be comparable to a commercial lamp-pumped solid-state laser. The concept of the light-guide lens can be applied for concentrator photovoltaics or other solar energy optics.

  16. Laser cost experience and estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shofner, F.M.; Hoglund, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This report addresses the question of estimating the capital and operating costs for LIS (Laser Isotope Separation) lasers, which have performance requirements well beyond the state of mature art. This question is seen with different perspectives by political leaders, ERDA administrators, scientists, and engineers concerned with reducing LIS to economically successful commercial practice, on a timely basis. Accordingly, this report attempts to provide ''ballpark'' estimators for capital and operating costs and useful design and operating information for lasers based on mature technology, and their LIS analogs. It is written very basically and is intended to respond about equally to the perspectives of administrators, scientists, and engineers. Its major contributions are establishing the current, mature, industrialized laser track record (including capital and operating cost estimators, reliability, types of application, etc.) and, especially, evolution of generalized estimating procedures for capital and operating cost estimators for new laser design

  17. Phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, A. A.; Efimkov, V. F.; Zubarev, I. G.; Mikhailov, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    It is shown experimentally that phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation calls for a stable difference in arm lengths, as in a classical Michelson interferometer. A scheme with automatic compensation for fluctuations of interferometer arm lengths has been proposed and experimentally implemented. This scheme makes it possible to perform stable phasing of two laser channels under standard laboratory conditions.

  18. Packaging of high power semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xingsheng; Xiong, Lingling; Liu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces high power semiconductor laser packaging design. The characteristics and challenges of the design and various packaging, processing, and testing techniques are detailed by the authors. New technologies, in particular thermal technologies, current applications, and trends in high power semiconductor laser packaging are described at length and assessed.

  19. Recycling Sounds in Commercials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Charlotte Rørdam

    2012-01-01

    remained the same for 70 years. Together these identifiers make OMA an interesting Danish case to study. With reference to Ann Rigney’s memorial practices or mechanisms, the study aims to demonstrate how the auditory aspects of Danish margarine commercials for frying tend to be limited in variety......Commercials offer the opportunity for intergenerational memory and impinge on cultural memory. TV commercials for foodstuffs often make reference to past times as a way of authenticating products. This is frequently achieved using visual cues, but in this paper I would like to demonstrate how...

  20. Laser Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser Resurfacing Uses for Laser Resurfacing Learn more ...

  1. Novel oral laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-03-01

    In dental hard tissue ablation, ultra-short laser pulses have proven sufficiently their potential for material ablation with negligible collateral damage providing many advantages. The absence of micro-cracks and the possibility to avoid overheating of the pulp during dental cavity preparation may be among the most important issues, the latter opening up an avenue for potential painless treatment. Beside the evident short interaction time of laser radiation with the irradiated tissue, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of required quality and shape. Additionally, long-pulsed laser systems have demonstrated successfully their suitability for decontamination purposes. In this paper, an overview of different indications for laser application in dental therapies in both pulse regimes is presented. A special focus is set on the decontamination of dental implants in periimplantitis therapy. Having employed commercially available long pulse systems for dental applications and ultra-short 330 fs pulses, we present first results for temperature development and corresponding ablation thresholds for dental implants, as in the future more gentle implant cleaning by ultra-short laser pulses could become of interest.

  2. Industrial lasers in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karube, Norio

    1991-03-01

    I am to report on some aspects of industrial lasers in Japan. Mostly centering on the market. In Japan, the history of laser developnent is rather profound. And long. Ever since the first invention of the laser in this country in 1960. This is partly because of the fact that in Japan the spectroscopic studies of the ruby was very popular in the late 1950's. Ever since niost of the work has been done in the research laboratories of the industry, not in the universities or not in the governmental laboratories. And since that time our first activity was mainly centering on the basic research, but after that time we have the evolution of the technology. One of the features in Japan is that the activity of developement and research of laser technology from the very basic phase up to the present commercialization has been done by the same group of people, including ine. We had a national project which ended about six years ago which was sponsored by MITI. MITI is Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan. And because of this national project, the effect of this project had a very enlightening effect in Japan. And after that our Japanese laser market became very flourishing.

  3. Commercial Landing System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Fisheries Statistics Division of the NOAA Fisheries has automated data summary programs that anyone can use to rapidly and easily summarize U.S. commercial...

  4. Commercial Manure Applicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This layer represents the office location for Commercial Manure Services (CMS). They transport, handle, store or apply manure for a fee. The company must be licensed...

  5. NASA commercial programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Highlights of NASA-sponsored and assisted commercial space activities of 1989 are presented. Industrial R and D in space, centers for the commercial development of space, and new cooperative agreements are addressed in the U.S. private sector in space section. In the building U.S. competitiveness through technology section, the following topics are presented: (1) technology utilization as a national priority; (2) an exploration of benefits; and (3) honoring Apollo-Era spinoffs. International and domestic R and D trends, and the space sector are discussed in the section on selected economic indicators. Other subjects included in this report are: (1) small business innovation; (2) budget highlights and trends; (3) commercial programs management; and (4) the commercial programs advisory committee.

  6. Commercial and Institutional Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Commercial and institutional waste is primarily from retail (stores), hotels, restaurants, health care (except health risk waste), banks, insurance companies, education, retirement homes, public services and transport. Within some of these sectors, e.g. retail and restaurants, large variations...

  7. EFFECTS OF COMMERCIAL CONTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Ana-Maria Florea; Constantin Giurca

    2014-01-01

    The contract is a legal instrument used to organize economic and social life. International trade agreement has certain features in order to ensure the international exchange of goods and services between the Contracting Parties. In terms of commercial contract, there is a foreign origin element, that gives the parties the right to determine the law to govern the contract. A fundamental aspect of commercial contract, in addition to that of determining the law applicable to judicial report est...

  8. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  9. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatments, including port-wine stain and tattoo removal, diag- nostic measurements, lithotripsy, activation of photosensitive drugs for photodynamic therapy, etc. In the field of medical applications, dye lasers have potential advantages over other lasers. Dye lasers are unique sources of tunable coherent radiation, from the ...

  10. HF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Matae

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of the research and development of HF chemical laser and its related work. Many gaseous compounds are used as laser media successfully; reaction kinetics and technological problems are described. The hybrid chemical laser of HF-CO 2 system and the topics related to the isotope separation are also included. (auth.)

  11. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wavelength of operation thereby tuning the laser. Another way of ... of operation. Considering the crucial role of mirrors in a laser, the phrase 'mirrorless lasers' seems to be a paradoxical one. However, in what follows, we will see how one can indeed ..... A possible military application is to have a small area in a person's.

  12. Lasers (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1969-01-01

    A laser is an instrument that produces an enormously intense pencil-thin beam of light. In this booklet we shall learn what there is about the laser that gives it so much promise. We shall investigate what it is, how it works, and the different kinds of lasers there are.

  13. Microchip Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    USA E-mail: zayhowski@ll.mit.edu Abstract Microchip lasers are a rich family of solid-state lasers defined by their small size, robust integration...reliability, and potential for low-cost mass production. Continuous-wave microchip lasers cover a wide range of wavelengths, often operate single

  14. Full-length fuel rod behavior under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, N J; Lanning, D D; Panisko, F E [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This document presents an assessment of the severe accident phenomena observed from four Full-Length High-Temperature (FLHT) tests that were performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. These tests were conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Severe Accident Research Program. The objectives of the test were to simulate conditions and provide information on the behavior of full-length fuel rods during hypothetical, small-break, loss-of-coolant severe accidents, in commercial light water reactors.

  15. Full-length fuel rod behavior under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, N.J.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.

    1992-12-01

    This document presents an assessment of the severe accident phenomena observed from four Full-Length High-Temperature (FLHT) tests that were performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. These tests were conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Severe Accident Research Program. The objectives of the test were to simulate conditions and provide information on the behavior of full-length fuel rods during hypothetical, small-break, loss-of-coolant severe accidents, in commercial light water reactors

  16. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Olli

    2014-05-01

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  17. CEBAF Upgrade Bunch Length Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Many accelerators use short electron bunches and measuring the bunch length is important for efficient operations. CEBAF needs a suitable bunch length because bunches that are too long will result in beam interruption to the halls due to excessive energy spread and beam loss. In this work, bunch length is measured by invasive and non-invasive techniques at different beam energies. Two new measurement techniques have been commissioned; a harmonic cavity showed good results compared to expectations from simulation, and a real time interferometer is commissioned and first checkouts were performed. Three other techniques were used for measurements and comparison purposes without modifying the old procedures. Two of them can be used when the beam is not compressed longitudinally while the other one, the synchrotron light monitor, can be used with compressed or uncompressed beam.

  18. Continuously variable focal length lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Chollet, Matthieu C

    2013-12-17

    A material preferably in crystal form having a low atomic number such as beryllium (Z=4) provides for the focusing of x-rays in a continuously variable manner. The material is provided with plural spaced curvilinear, optically matched slots and/or recesses through which an x-ray beam is directed. The focal length of the material may be decreased or increased by increasing or decreasing, respectively, the number of slots (or recesses) through which the x-ray beam is directed, while fine tuning of the focal length is accomplished by rotation of the material so as to change the path length of the x-ray beam through the aligned cylindrical slows. X-ray analysis of a fixed point in a solid material may be performed by scanning the energy of the x-ray beam while rotating the material to maintain the beam's focal point at a fixed point in the specimen undergoing analysis.

  19. Kondo length in bosonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Sodano, Pasquale; Trombettoni, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the fact that the low-energy properties of the Kondo model can be effectively simulated in spin chains, we study the realization of the effect with bond impurities in ultracold bosonic lattices at half filling. After presenting a discussion of the effective theory and of the mapping of the bosonic chain onto a lattice spin Hamiltonian, we provide estimates for the Kondo length as a function of the parameters of the bosonic model. We point out that the Kondo length can be extracted from the integrated real-space correlation functions, which are experimentally accessible quantities in experiments with cold atoms.

  20. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  1. Frequency-doubled diode laser for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Unterhuber, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    A single-pass frequency doubled high-power tapered diode laser emitting nearly 1.3 W of green light suitable for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers generating ultrashort pulses is demonstrated. The pump efficiencies reached 75 % of the values achieved with a commercial solid-state pump laser....... However, the superior electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser improves the overall efficiency of the Ti:sapphire laser by a factor > 2. The optical spectrum emitted by the Ti:sapphire laser shows a spectral width of 112 nm (FWHM). Based on autocorrelation measurements, pulse widths of less than 20...... fs are measured. These results open the opportunity of establishing diode laser pumped Ti:sapphire lasers for e.g. biophotonic applications like retinal optical coherence tomography or pumping of photonic crystal fibers for CARS microscopy....

  2. Pulse position modulation for compact all-fiber vehicle laser rangefinder development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Cheng, Yongzhi; Xiong, Ying; Inoue, Daisuke; Kagami, Manabu

    2017-10-01

    We propose a method for developing small all-fiber vehicle laser rangefinders that is based on pulse position modulation (PPM) and data integration and present a theoretical study on its performance. Compared with spatial coupling, which is employed by most of the current commercial vehicle laser rangefinders, fiber coupling has the advantage that it can guide laser echoes into the interior of a car, so the electronic components following the photodiode can operate in a moderate-temperature environment. However, optical fibers have numerical apertures (NAs), which means that a laser beam from a receiving lens cannot be coupled into an optical fiber if its incident angle exceeds the critical value. Therefore, the effective size of the receiving lens is typically small since it is limited by its focal length and the NA of the fiber, causing the power of the laser echoes gathered by the receiving lens to be insufficient for performing target identification. Instead of increasing the peak transmitting laser power unrestrictedly, PPM and data integration effectively compensate for the low signal-to-noise ratio that results from the effective receiving lens size reduction. We validated the proposed method by conducting numerical simulations and performance analysis. Finally, we compared the proposed method with pseudorandom noise (PN) code modulation and found that, although the two methods perform equally well in single-target measurement scenarios, PPM is more effective than PN code modulation for multitarget measurement. In addition, PPM enables the transmission of laser beams with higher peak powers and requires less computation than PN code modulation does.

  3. Ex vivo evaluation of femtosecond pulse laser incision of urinary tract tissue in a liquid environment: implications for endoscopic treatment of benign ureteral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun-Hao; Kang, Jian; Pan, Yu-Long; Zhang, Liang; Qi, Jun

    2011-08-01

    The femtosecond (FS) pulse laser incises soft tissues with minimal peripheral damage and is a promising cutting tool for ureteroscopic endoureterotomy of benign ureteral strictures. To evaluate the feasibility of applying the FS laser to ureteroscopic endoureterotomy. A commercial Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier system (Coherent, RegA 9050, USA) was used in this study. Normal saline, 5% glucose solution, 4% mannitol solution, distilled water, and a 1% (v/v) suspension of whole blood with each of these solutions were tested for their attenuation rate (AR) of the FS laser's power. Bladder specimens from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used as a surrogate model. The laser incised slots of 2 mm in length at bladder samples using three power grades (5×, 10×, and 20× the threshold power) combined with five effective pulse rates (40, 20, 10, 5, and 2.5 kHz), both in air and in normal saline. After samples were processed with standard hematoxylin-eosin staining procedures, the incision depth and collateral damage range were determined microscopically. The ARs of blood suspensions with each of the three isosmotic solutions were significantly higher than the other five solutions (P laser's cutting depth and the collateral damage were increased with the laser power or power density but the collateral damages were less than 100 µm. Microbubble formation was detected in the liquid environments tested and influenced the effective laser power. Endoscopic application of the FS laser is feasible. Microbubble formation with the laser incision, however, may influence cutting effects. Proposed methods to address these issues include increasing the irrigation rate, using distilled water as irrigation or using gas insufflation instead of irrigation. It is necessary to evaluate these methods, as well as the long-term biologic response to laser incision, on living animal models in endoscopic settings before use on humans. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Laser photocoagulation - eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser coagulation; Laser eye surgery; Photocoagulation; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic eye disease; Laser photocoagulation - diabetic retinopathy; Focal photocoagulation; Scatter (or pan retinal) photocoagulation; Proliferative ...

  5. Waterjet-guided laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richerzhagen, Bernold; Kutsuna, Muneharu; Okada, Haruhiku; Ikeda, Takeshi

    2003-02-01

    The waterjet-guided laser processing is a thermal cutting process in which the laser beam is used as the machine tool for cutting and the fine waterjet plays a role as an optical waveguide. The laser beam is guided in the waterjet stream with the full reflection that takes place at the boundary between water and air, in a manner similar to glass fibers. The waterjet also has the function of waveguiding and removing the cut products. The diameter of the waterjet can be controled between 50 and 200 μm. The diameter of laser beam is completely utilised. The useful length of waterjet is usually approximately 50 to 100 mm. The type of laser used is a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The advantages of waterjet-guided laser processing are (1) no Z-axis control, (2) narrower cut widths down to 50 μm, (3) very small heat affected zone, (4) a little oxidation of the cut edges, and (5) no assist gas for cutting. A reseach was carried out for the new industrial application which is unsuitable by conventional laser cutting.

  6. Commercialization of animal biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, D C; Molina, J A; Ohlrichs, C L; Vander Zwaag, D F; Ferré, L B

    2003-01-01

    Commercialization of animal biotechnology is a wide-ranging topic for discussion. In this paper, we will attempt to review embryo transfer (ET) and related technologies that relate to food-producing mammals. A brief review of the history of advances in biotechnology will provide a glimpse to present and future applications. Commercialization of animal biotechnology is presently taking two pathways. The first application involves the use of animals for biomedical purposes. Very few companies have developed all of the core competencies and intellectual properties to complete the bridge from lab bench to product. The second pathway of application is for the production of animals used for food. Artificial insemination (AI), embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization (IVF), cloning, transgenics, and genomics all are components of the toolbox for present and future applications. Individually, these are powerful tools capable of providing significant improvements in productivity. Combinations of these technologies coupled with information systems and data analysis, will provide even more significant change in the next decade. Any strategies for the commercial application of animal biotechnology must include a careful review of regulatory and social concerns. Careful review of industry infrastructure is also important. Our colleagues in plant biotechnology have helped highlight some of these pitfalls and provide us with a retrospective review. In summary, today we have core competencies that provide a wealth of opportunities for the members of this society, commercial companies, producers, and the general population. Successful commercialization will benefit all of the above stakeholders. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  7. Cyclic codes of length 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    [X]/〈X2m. − 1〉 are given. Cyclic codes of length 2m over the finite field Fq, of odd characteristic, are defined in terms of their generator polynomials. The exact minimum distance and the dimension of the codes are obtained. Keywords.

  8. Diet, nutrition and telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ligi

    2011-10-01

    The ends of human chromosomes are protected by DNA-protein complexes termed telomeres, which prevent the chromosomes from fusing with each other and from being recognized as a double-strand break by DNA repair proteins. Due to the incomplete replication of linear chromosomes by DNA polymerase, telomeric DNA shortens with repeated cell divisions until the telomeres reach a critical length, at which point the cells enter senescence. Telomere length is an indicator of biological aging, and dysfunction of telomeres is linked to age-related pathologies like cardiovascular disease, Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease and cancer. Telomere length has been shown to be positively associated with nutritional status in human and animal studies. Various nutrients influence telomere length potentially through mechanisms that reflect their role in cellular functions including inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA integrity, DNA methylation and activity of telomerase, the enzyme that adds the telomeric repeats to the ends of the newly synthesized DNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fractional baud-length coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for modulating radar transmissions in order to improve target range and Doppler estimation accuracy. This is achieved by using non-uniform baud lengths. With this method it is possible to increase sub-baud range-resolution of phase coded radar measurements while maintaining a narrow transmission bandwidth. We first derive target backscatter amplitude estimation error covariance matrix for arbitrary targets when estimating backscatter in amplitude domain. We define target optimality and discuss different search strategies that can be used to find well performing transmission envelopes. We give several simulated examples of the method showing that fractional baud-length coding results in smaller estimation errors than conventional uniform baud length transmission codes when estimating the target backscatter amplitude at sub-baud range resolution. We also demonstrate the method in practice by analyzing the range resolved power of a low-altitude meteor trail echo that was measured using a fractional baud-length experiment with the EISCAT UHF system.

  10. Femur length and biparietal diameter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... Shipp TD, Bromley B, Mascola M, Benacerraf B. Variation in fetal femur length with respect to maternal race. J Ultrasound Med 2001;20:141‑4. 25. Deter RL, Harrist RB, Birnholz JC, Hadlock FP. Quantitative Obstetrical. Ultrasonography. New York: Wiley; 1986. 26. Yeh MN, Bracero L, Reilly KB, Murtha L, ...

  11. Shadowgraphic imaging of metal drilling with a long pulse excimer laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderbeek, A.; Biesheuvel, C.A.; Hofstra, R.M.; Boller, Klaus J.; Meijer, J.; Miyamoto, Isamu; Ostendorf, Andreas; Sugioka, Koji; Helvajian, Henry

    2003-01-01

    A shadowgraphic imaging technique is used for studying the interaction between the laser beam and the material during laser drilling. The used laser is a XeCl excimer laser with a nearly diffraction limited beam and 175 ns pulse length. We studied how and when the material is removed. Holes are

  12. Commercial Conspiracy Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eFurnham

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs.The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed.

  13. Multitube coaxial closed cycle gas laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Walch, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    A gas laser design capable of long term reliable operation in a commercial environment is disclosed. Various construction details which insulate the laser optics from mechanical distortions and vibrations inevitably present in the environment are developed. Also, a versatile optical cavity made up of modular units which render the basic laser configuration adaptable to alternate designs with different output capabilities is shown in detail. The system built around a convection laser operated in a closed cycle and the working medium is a gas which is excited by direct current electric discharges. (auth)

  14. Commercial incineration demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated by nuclear utilities presently are shipped to commercial burial grounds for disposal. Increasing transportation and disposal costs have caused industry to consider incineration as a cost-effective means of volume reduction of combustible LLW. Repeated inquiries from the nuclear industry regarding the applicability of the Los Alamos controlled air incineration (CAI) design led the DOE to initiate a commercial demonstration program in FY-1980. Development studies and results in support of this program involving ion exchange resin incineration and fission/activation product distributions within the Los Alamos CAI are described

  15. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  16. Comparison of CO2 Laser Cutting with Different Laser Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketting, Hans-Ole; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    This paper contains CO2 laser cutting results in mild and stainless steel with different laser sources. The main factors which affect the cutting speed and quality are the power, the cutting gas and focal point conditions. Keeping the power and cutting gas constant, the focal point conditions have...... is proven at least for oxyfuel cutting of mild steel, whereas fusion cutting of stainless steel is more complicated.Cutting results from 7 different indus-trial laser sources connected to different moving systems, were used to get information about the importance of the Beam Quality Number K and focal spot...... size,for the maximum cutting speed. One of the 7 laser sources with different focal length and thus different minimum spot size, was then used to investigate more in details the importance of the focal spot size cutting stainless steel with high pressure nitrogen. It looks as if there is a strong...

  17. Prediction and Control of Selective Laser Melting Product Microstructure, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Despite the rapid commercialization of additive manufacturing technology such as selective laser melting, SLM, there are gaps in models for material microstructure...

  18. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  19. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  20. Commercial Crew Medical Ops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbaugh, Randall; Cole, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Provide commercial partners with: center insight into NASA spaceflight medical experience center; information relative to both nominal and emergency care of the astronaut crew at landing site center; a basis for developing and sharing expertise in space medical factors associated with returning crew.

  1. Commercial Baking. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Nancy

    A project filmed three commercial baking videotapes for use by secondary and adult students in food service programs. The three topics were basic dinner rolls, bread making, and hard breads and rolls. Quick-rise dough recipes were developed, written down, and explained for use with the videotapes. A pretest, posttest, and student guide were…

  2. Automatic Commercial Permit Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grana, Paul [Folsom Labs, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Final report for Folsom Labs’ Solar Permit Generator project, which has successfully completed, resulting in the development and commercialization of a software toolkit within the cloud-based HelioScope software environment that enables solar engineers to automatically generate and manage draft documents for permit submission.

  3. Commercial applications of telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natiello, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    Telemedicine Systems Corporation was established in 1976 and is a private commercial supplier of telemedicine systems. These systems are various combinations of communications and diagnostic technology, designed to allow the delivery of health care services to remote facilities. The technology and the health care services are paid for by the remote facilities, such as prisons.

  4. Length of a Hanging Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Costello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shape of a cable hanging under its own weight and uniform horizontal tension between two power poles is a catenary. The catenary is a curve which has an equation defined by a hyperbolic cosine function and a scaling factor. The scaling factor for power cables hanging under their own weight is equal to the horizontal tension on the cable divided by the weight of the cable. Both of these values are unknown for this problem. Newton's method was used to approximate the scaling factor and the arc length function to determine the length of the cable. A script was written using the Python programming language in order to quickly perform several iterations of Newton's method to get a good approximation for the scaling factor.

  5. Keeping disease at arm's length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2015-01-01

    and physical activities at the activity centre. In this way, keeping disease at arm’s length is analysed as an ambiguous health strategy. The article shows the importance of looking into how active ageing is practised, as active ageing seems to work well in the everyday life of the older people by not giving......Many older people live with a range of chronic diseases. However, these diseases do not necessarily impede an active lifestyle. In this article the author analyses the relation between the active ageing discourse and the way older people at two Danish activity centres handle disease. How does...... active ageing change everyday life with chronic disease, and how do older people combine an active life with a range of chronic diseases? The participants in the study use activities to keep their diseases at arm’s length, and this distancing of disease at the same time enables them to engage in social...

  6. [Pigmentary lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, Thierry; Toubel, Gérard

    2009-10-01

    The pigmentary disorders are a very heterogeneous group with a high therapeutic demand from the patients. The lasers have provided a major advance in the treatment of some pigmentary lesions. The indication and the optimal parameters are actually quite well defined. However, pigmentary lasers have limits and some dermatosis can even be worsened after laser treatment. Those limitations as well as the potential side effects have to clearly be explained to the patients that often seek for a miracle cure.

  7. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  8. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  9. Lunar Commercial Mining Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob; Taylor, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Innovative commercial logistics is required for supporting lunar resource recovery operations and assisting larger consortiums in lunar mining, base operations, camp consumables and the future commercial sales of propellant over the next 50 years. To assist in lowering overall development costs, ``reuse'' innovation is suggested in reusing modified LTS in-space hardware for use on the moon's surface, developing product lines for recovered gases, regolith construction materials, surface logistics services, and other services as they evolve, (Kistler, Citron and Taylor, 2005) Surface logistics architecture is designed to have sustainable growth over 50 years, financed by private sector partners and capable of cargo transportation in both directions in support of lunar development and resource recovery development. The author's perspective on the importance of logistics is based on five years experience at remote sites on Earth, where remote base supply chain logistics didn't always work, (Taylor, 1975a). The planning and control of the flow of goods and materials to and from the moon's surface may be the most complicated logistics challenges yet to be attempted. Affordability is tied to the innovation and ingenuity used to keep the transportation and surface operations costs as low as practical. Eleven innovations are proposed and discussed by an entrepreneurial commercial space startup team that has had success in introducing commercial space innovation and reducing the cost of space operations in the past. This logistics architecture offers NASA and other exploring nations a commercial alternative for non-essential cargo. Five transportation technologies and eleven surface innovations create the logistics transportation system discussed.

  10. 2.5 Gb/s laser-driver GaAS IC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishøj, Jesper

    1993-01-01

    A laser-diode driver GaAs IC incorporating an optional NRZ/RZ (non-return-to-zero/return-to-zero) conversion facility, having ECL (emitter-coupled logic) and SCFL (source-coupled FET logic)-compatible inputs and providing a 0-60-mA adjustable output current into a 50-Ω/5-V termination at bit rates...... obtained. To verify laser driving performance a back-to-back optical-fiber transmission experiment was performed, giving good optical eye diagrams at 2.5 Gb/s. The electrooptical interplay between laser-diode driver and laser-diode has been demonstrated using SPICE simulations...... up to 2 Gb/s NRZ and maintaining a clear eye opening of 50 mA at 2.5 Gb/s NRZ bit rate has been designed, using a commercial 1-μm gate-length (Fτ=12 GHz) GaAs MESFET foundry service. The high maximum output current is obtained by implementing the output driver as a cascode differential amplifier...

  11. Development of longer Nd:LGGG crystal for high power laser application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanru; Tian, Hanlin; Zhang, Jian; Mu, Wenxiang; Zhang, Baitao; Jia, Zhitai; He, Jingliang; Tao, Xutang

    2017-11-01

    In order to further improve the Nd3+:(LuxGd1-x)3Ga5O12 (Nd:LGGG) crystal performance in high power laser field, a long Nd:LGGG crystal with dimensions of Φ 23 × 112 mm3 has been grown successfully by the Czochralski (Cz) method for laser rod fabrication. Compared with the normal size LGGG crystals (like 30-50 mm in length), we overcame several difficulties in the growth of longer ones, including crystal cracking by a large longitudinal temperature gradient, spiral growth by a small radial temperature gradient, and growth instability and even constitutional super cooling by Ga2O3 volatilizing continuously. The doping concentrations of Nd3+ and Lu3+ in the as-grown crystal and the crystal optical quality have been measured. The performance of diode-side-pumped Nd:LGGG rod laser has been preliminarily tested for the first time, simply by replacing the Nd:YAG crystal rod inside a commercial laser module. Under an incident pump power of 160 W, the maximum continuous wave output power of 38 W has been obtained, corresponding to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 23.8% and a slope efficiency of 40.8%, respectively.

  12. Laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.

    1982-02-01

    In this paper, the physics of laser fusion is described on an elementary level. The irradiated matter consists of a dense inner core surrounded by a less dense plasma corona. The laser radiation is mainly absorbed in the outer periphery of the plasma. The absorbed energy is transported inward to the ablation surface where plasma flow is created. Due to this plasma flow, a sequence of inward going shock waves and heat waves are created, resulting in the compression and heating of the core to high density and temperature. The interaction physics between laser and matter leading to thermonuclear burn is summarized by the following sequence of events: Laser absorption → Energy transport → Compression → Nuclear Fusion. This scenario is shown in particular for a Nd:laser with a wavelength of 1 μm. The wavelength scaling of the physical processes is also discussed. In addition to the laser-plasma physics, the Nd high power pulsed laser is described. We give a very brief description of the oscillator, the amplifiers, the spatial filters, the isolators and the diagnostics involved. Last, but not least, the concept of reactors for laser fusion and the necessary laser system are discussed. (author)

  13. Biocavity Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  14. Picosecond lasers: the next generation of short-pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joshua R; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrea I; Green, Jeremy B

    2014-12-01

    Selective photothermolysis, first discussed in the context of targeted microsurgery in 1983, proposed that the optimal parameters for specific thermal damage rely critically on the duration over which energy is delivered to the tissue. At that time, nonspecific thermal damage had been an intrinsic limitation of all commercially available lasers, despite efforts to mitigate this by a variety of compensatory cooling mechanisms. Fifteen years later, experimental picosecond lasers were first reported in the dermatological literature to demonstrate greater efficacy over their nanosecond predecessors in the context of targeted destruction of tattoo ink. Within the last 4 years, more than a decade after those experiments, the first commercially available cutaneous picosecond laser unit became available (Cynosure, Westford, Massachusetts), and several pilot studies have demonstrated its utility in tattoo removal. An experimental picosecond infrared laser has also recently demonstrated a nonthermal tissue ablative capability in soft tissue, bone, and dentin. In this article, we review the published data pertaining to dermatology on picosecond lasers from their initial reports to the present as well as discuss forthcoming technology.

  15. Orange fiber laser for ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M.; Kojima, K.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-02-01

    For the light source of photocoagulators for ophthalmology, orange laser is more suitable than green laser because of low scattering loss by the crystalline lens, and low absorption by xanthophylls in the retina. We developed two orange fiber lasers (580 nm and 590 nm) to investigate the effect depending on the difference in the range of orange. The 580nm laser is composed of a 1160 nm fiber laser and a Periodically Polled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) crystal for second harmonic generation. The 1160 nm fiber laser beam is focused into the MgO-doped PPLN crystal whose length is 30 mm with 3-pass configuration. Continuous-wave 1.3 W output power of 580 nm was obtained with 5.8 W input power of 1160nm for the first time. The conversion efficiency was 22%. The band width of the second harmonic was 0.006 nm (FWHM). The 590 nm laser is almost the same as 580 nm laser source. In this case we used a Raman shift fiber to generate 1180 nm, and the output power of 590 nm was 1.4 W. We developed an evaluation model of photocoagulator system using these two laser sources. A 700 mW coagulation output power was obtained with this orange fiber laser photocoagulator system. This is enough power for the eye surgery. We have the prospect of the maintenance-free, long-life system that is completely air-cooled. We are planning to evaluate this photocoagulator system in order to investigate the difference between the two wavelengths at the field test.

  16. High power lasers & systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert; Birch, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Some laser history;\\ud Airborne Laser Testbed & Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL);\\ud Laser modes and beam propagation;\\ud Fibre lasers and applications;\\ud US Navy Laser system – NRL 33kW fibre laser;\\ud Lockheed Martin 30kW fibre laser;\\ud Conclusions

  17. Integrated tunable CMOS laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creazzo, Timothy; Marchena, Elton; Krasulick, Stephen B; Yu, Paul K L; Van Orden, Derek; Spann, John Y; Blivin, Christopher C; He, Lina; Cai, Hong; Dallesasse, John M; Stone, Robert J; Mizrahi, Amit

    2013-11-18

    An integrated tunable CMOS laser for silicon photonics, operating at the C-band, and fabricated in a commercial CMOS foundry is presented. The III-V gain medium section is embedded in the silicon chip, and is hermetically sealed. The gain section is metal bonded to the silicon substrate creating low thermal resistance into the substrate and avoiding lattice mismatch problems. Optical characterization shows high performance in terms of side mode suppression ratio, relative intensity noise, and linewidth that is narrow enough for coherent communications.

  18. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Todor; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry. (paper)

  19. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  20. Countering laser pointer threats to road safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Sören; Björkert, Stefan; Kariis, Hans; Lopes, Cesar

    2006-09-01

    The market demand for bright laser pointers has led to the development of readily available devices that can pose a threat to road safety. Laser pointers can be involved in accidents caused by laser users who do not realise the dangers involved, but laser pointers can also enable deliberate criminal activity. There are technologies available that can counter the threat in different ways. A number of protective principles are outlined below. Some technologies built upon Liquid Crystal Devices are described in greater detail. Without any knowledge of what laser pointers a potential aggressor has access to, a frequency agile filter seems to be the most promising way to avoid the most severe consequences of dazzle from laser pointers. Protective systems incorporating suitable glasses or visors holding frequency agile filters of this kind however, are not commercially available today.

  1. Methanol commercial aviation fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.O.

    1992-01-01

    Southern California's heavy reliance on petroleum-fueled transportation has resulted in significant air pollution problems within the south Coast Air Basin (Basin) which stem directly from this near total dependence on fossil fuels. To deal with this pressing issue, recently enacted state legislation has proposed mandatory introduction of clean alternative fuels into ground transportation fleets operating within this area. The commercial air transportation sector, however, also exerts a significant impact on regional air quality which may exceed emission gains achieved in the ground transportation sector. This paper addresses the potential, through the implementation of methanol as a commercial aviation fuel, to improve regional air quality within the Basin and the need to flight test and demonstrate methanol as an environmentally preferable fuel in aircraft turbine engines

  2. Commercial incineration demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Neuls, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated by nuclear utilities presently are shipped to commercial burial grounds for disposal. Substantially increasing shipping and disposal charges have sparked renewed industry interest in incineration and other advanced volume reduction techniques as potential cost-saving measures. Repeated inquiries from industry sources regarding LLW applicability of the Los Alamos controlled-air incineration (CAI) design led DOE to initiate this commercial demonstration program in FY-1980. The selected program approach to achieving CAI demonstration at a utility site is a DOE sponsored joint effort involving Los Alamos, a nuclear utility, and a liaison subcontractor. Required development tasks and responsibilities of the particpants are described. Target date for project completion is the end of FY-1985

  3. Comparative spectral analysis of commercial fuel-ethanol blends using a low-cost prototype FT-Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Clavero, Valentin; Weber, Andreas; Schröder, Werner; Meyrueis, Patrick; Javahiraly, Nicolas

    2012-06-01

    The use of bio-fuels and fuel blends, specially in automotive industry, has been increasing substantially in recent years due to market prices and trends on sustainable development policies. Different spectral analysis techniques for quality control, production, purity, and counterfeit detection have been reported as non-invasive, fast, and price accessible. Raman spectra from three different commercial binary E10 fuel-ethanol blends has been obtained by using a low-cost Fourier-Transform Raman spectrometer (FT-Raman). Qualitative comparison between the commercial fuel blends and a laboratory-prepared fuel blend have been performed. The characteristic Raman lines from some additives contained in the commercial gasoline have been also observed. The spectral information is presented in the range of 0 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1 with a resolution of 1.66 cm-1. These Raman spectra shows reduced frequency deviation (less than 0.4 cm-1 when compared to standard Raman spectra from cyclohexane and toluene without compensation for instrumental response). Higher resolution values are possible, since the greater optical path lengths of the FT-Raman are achievable before the instrumental physical effects appear. The robust and highly flexible FT-Raman prototype proposed for the spectral analysis, consisting mainly of a Michelson interferometer and a self-designed photon counter, is able to deliver high resolution and precise Raman spectra with no additional complex hardware or software control. The mechanical and thermal disturbances affecting the FT-Raman system are mathematically compensated by extracting the optical path information from the generated interference pattern of a λ=632.8 nm Helium-Neon laser (HeNe laser), which is used at the spectrum evaluation.

  4. Commercial Jet Transport Crashworthiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    symmetrically or asymetrically located and may be applied to landing gear, engi e as, wings, and fuselage separately or in combination. BASIC...crashworthiness in general. Specific application of the guidelines to commercial aircraft has been asses3ed. Appendix D presents a detailed synthesis ...synthesized across the five volumes to integrate the information into one single abstract summary. This summary is a synthesis and critique of the U.S

  5. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  7. International Commercial Arbitration

    OpenAIRE

    Hlušička, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of my thesis is to analyse one of the most used type of extrajudicial procedures, the International commercial arbitration. The reason for my research is the progress and elevation of use of the arbitration and not only on international field. The thesis is composed of six chapters, each of them dealing with different aspects of Arbitration. Chapter One is introductory and defines basic terminology used in the thesis. The chapter is subdivided into two parts. Part One describes in...

  8. Commercializing Academic Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge produced by academic scientists has been identified as a potential key driver of technological progress. Recent policies in Europe aim at increasing commercially orientated activities in academe. Based on a sample of German scientists across all fields of science, we investigate the......, a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the abolishment of the “professor privilege” (the German counterpart of the US Bayh-Dole Act) reveals that this legal disposition led to an acceleration of this apparent decline....

  9. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conventional laser, the random laser had one partially reflecting mirror for providing an output port, and a surface or volume scatterer at the other end to provide non-resonant feedback. The volume scatterer was a suspension of chalk particles (about 20 microns di- ameter), in water and surface scatterer was a plate with a ...

  10. excimer laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-07

    Jan 7, 2014 ... is necessary to deposit one order higher input electric power into gas medium than those required for XeCl and KrF lasers. ... neon/helium at a pressure of a few bars was excited by transverse electric discharge. The. Figure 6. Laser pulse ... and also to drive discharge rapidly. The discharge chamber was ...

  11. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental degradation of surfaces. Pulsed lasers are generally used for ... sorb contamination very strongly while the underlying substrate is left untouched thus rendering the process self-limiting. ... contaminated with two different encrustations, using short free running Nd:YAG and long Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ...

  12. Commercialization of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, David W

    2009-01-01

    The emerging and potential commercial applications of nanotechnologies clearly have great potential to significantly advance and even potentially revolutionize various aspects of medical practice and medical product development. Nanotechnology is already touching upon many aspects of medicine, including drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, clinical diagnostics, nanomedicines, and the use of nanomaterials in medical devices. This technology is already having an impact; many products are on the market and a growing number is in the pipeline. Momentum is steadily building for the successful development of additional nanotech products to diagnose and treat disease; the most active areas of product development are drug delivery and in vivo imaging. Nanotechnology is also addressing many unmet needs in the pharmaceutical industry, including the reformulation of drugs to improve their bioavailability or toxicity profiles. The advancement of medical nanotechnology is expected to advance over at least three different generations or phases, beginning with the introduction of simple nanoparticulate and nanostructural improvements to current product and process types, then eventually moving on to nanoproducts and nanodevices that are limited only by the imagination and limits of the technology itself. This review looks at some recent developments in the commercialization of nanotechnology for various medical applications as well as general trends in the industry, and explores the nanotechnology industry that is involved in developing medical products and procedures with a view toward technology commercialization. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. The search for solid state fusion lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research puts severe demands on the laser driver. In recent years large, multibeam Nd:glass lasers have provided a flexible experimental tool for exploring fusion target physics because of their high powers, variable pulse length and shape, wavelength flexibility using harmonic generation, and adjustable that Nd:glass lasers can be scaled up to provide a single-phase, multi-megajoule, high-gain laboratory microfusion facility, and gas-cooled slab amplifiers with laser diode pump sources are viable candidates for an efficient, high repetition rate, megawatt driver for an ICF reactor. In both applications requirements for energy storage and energy extraction drastically limit the choice of lasing media. Nonlinear optical effects and optical damage are additional design constraints. New laser architectures applicable to ICF drivers and possible laser materials, both crystals and glasses, are surveyed. 20 refs., 2 figs

  14. The use of laser in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of laser technology has become more common in operative gynaecology in Norway. The first modality to be introduced was the CO 2 laser used together with the colposcope for the treatment of cervical intraepithelial dysplasia and condylomata. The same laser has also been employed through laparoscopic technique with the aid of modern microvideofacilities. Finally, using the hysteroscopic technique, the Nd-YAG laser has been introduced for treating intrauterine conditions. The use of laser in operative gynaecology makes it necessary to change the attitude towards indications for operation. The possibilities are challenging, and the effect on the length of postoperative convalescene is especially rewarding. The introduction of lasers in gynaecology could have far-reaching consequences for efficient use of hospital resources. 31 refs., 5 figs

  15. The influence of the excitation pulse length on ultrafast magnetization dynamics in nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fognini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced demagnetization of a ferromagnet is caused by the temperature of the electron gas as well as the lattice temperature. For long excitation pulses, the two reservoirs are in thermal equilibrium. In contrast to a picosecond laser pulse, a femtosecond pulse causes a non-equilibrium between the electron gas and the lattice. By pump pulse length dependent optical measurements, we find that the magnetodynamics in Ni caused by a picosecond laser pulse can be reconstructed from the response to a femtosecond pulse. The mechanism responsible for demagnetization on the picosecond time scale is therefore contained in the femtosecond demagnetization experiment.

  16. All fiber thulium-doped fiber laser pumped Q-switched Ho:YAP laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Ye, Xisheng; Yang, Zhongguo; Chen, Xiaolong; Xia, Wenbin; Zhang, Jiayang; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jianyu; Si, Jiliang; Chen, Weibiao

    2017-05-01

    The high power infrared 2μm lasers have been extensively investigated for a number of commercial, scientific and engineering applications, such as remote chemical sensing, medical diagnostics, eye-safe laser radar, and environmental monitoring. Furthermore, high-power 2μm lasers are effective pump sources of optical parametrical oscillators and optical parametrical amplifications to generate mid-infrared 3-5μm laser. In recent years, Ho:YAlO3(Ho:YAP) crystal has drawn great attention as a promising efficient laser material for its long emission wavelength at 2118nm. An acoustic-optical Q-switched Ho:YAP laser pumped by an all fiber thulium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated. The all fiber thulium-doped fiber laser can emit 80W output power, and the output laser wavelength is 1915nm. By using this 1915nm laser to end pump the AO Q-switched Ho:YAP laser system, 2118nm laser with 30W average power and 45ns pulse width at 20kHz repetition rates was obtained.

  17. Diode lasers optimized in brightness for fiber laser pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, M.; Gilly, J.; Friedmann, P.; Hilzensauer, S.; Ogrodowski, L.; Kissel, H.; Biesenbach, J.

    2018-02-01

    In diode laser applications for fiber laser pumping and fiber-coupled direct diode laser systems high brightness becomes essential in the last years. Fiber coupled modules benefit from continuous improvements of high-power diode lasers on chip level regarding output power, efficiency and beam characteristics resulting in record highbrightness values and increased pump power. To gain high brightness not only output power must be increased, but also near field widths and far field angles have to be below a certain value for higher power levels because brightness is proportional to output power divided by beam quality. While fast axis far fields typically show a current independent behaviour, for broadarea lasers far-fields in the slow axis suffer from a strong current and temperature dependence, limiting the brightness and therefore their use in fibre coupled modules. These limitations can be overcome by carefully optimizing chip temperature, thermal lensing and lateral mode structure by epitaxial and lateral resonator designs and processing. We present our latest results for InGaAs/AlGaAs broad-area single emitters with resonator lengths of 4mm emitting at 976nm and illustrate the improvements in beam quality over the last years. By optimizing the diode laser design a record value of the brightness for broad-area lasers with 4mm resonator length of 126 MW/cm2sr has been demonstrated with a maximum wall-plug efficiency of more than 70%. From these design also pump modules based on 9 mini-bars consisting of 5 emitters each have been realized with 360W pump power.

  18. Characteristics of a laser beam produced by using thermal lensing effect compensation in a fiber-coupled laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Duck-Lae; Kim, Byung-Tai

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of a laser beam produced by using thermal lensing effect compensation in a fiber-coupled laser-diode Nd:YAG ceramic laser were investigated. The thermal lensing effect was compensated for by using a compensator, which was 25 mm away from the laser rod, with a focal length of 30 mm and an effective clear aperture of 22 mm. Using a compensator, the divergence and the beam propagation factor M 2 of the output beam were 5.5 mrad and 2.4, respectively, under a pump power of 12W. The high-frequency components in the compensated laser beam were removed.

  19. Laser treatment of radish seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartalov, P.; Nidal, T.

    1987-01-01

    Trials were conducted in unheated plastic greenhouses in 1985-1986 to test the effect of laser treatment on radish seed. Seed of cv Saxia was irradiated with helio-neon laser of 632.8 Nm wave length at: 2-, 4- and 6-fold irradiation. Results showed that plants of all variants emerged almost simultaneously. The root mass was greatest for plants obtained from 4-fold irradiated seed. Treatment enhanced root production in 1985, and in 1986 4-fold irradiation boosted yield by 15%

  20. Green lasers are beyond power limits mandated by safety standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M H; Fox, K; Goldwasser, S; Lau, D W M; Aliahmad, B; Sarossy, M

    2016-08-01

    There has been an increasing number of reports of people losing vision from laser exposure from pocket laser pointers despite the safety limit of 1 milliwatt (1mW) imposed by the Australian government. We hypothesize that this is because commercially available red and green laser pointers are exceeding their labeled power outputs. We tested the power outputs of 4 red and 4 green lasers which were purchased for less than AUD$30 each. The average of 10 measurements was recorded for each laser. We found that 3 out of 4 red lasers conformed to the 1mW safety standard; in contrast, all of the green lasers exceeded this limit, with one of the lasers recording an output of 127.9 mW. This contrast in compliance is explained by the construction of these lasers - green lasers are typically Diode Pumped Solid State (DPSS) lasers that can emit excessive infrared (IR) radiation with poor workmanship or inconsistent adherence to practices of safe design and quality control; red lasers are diode lasers which have limited power outputs due to `Catastrophic Optical Damage' (COD). Relevant professional bodies ought to advocate more strongly for stringent testing, quality control and licensing of DPSS lasers with a view towards government intervention to banning green laser pointer use.

  1. Diode-pumped fiber lasers: a new clinical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stuart D; Lauto, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Diode-pumped fiber lasers are a compact and an efficient source of high power laser radiation. These laser systems have found wide recognition in the area of lasers as a result of these very practical characteristics and are now becoming important tools for a large number of applications. In this review, we outline the basic physics of fiber lasers and illustrate how a number of clinical procedures would benefit from their employment. The pump mechanisms, the relevant pump and laser transitions between the energy levels, and the main properties of the output from fiber lasers will be briefly reviewed. The main types of high power fiber lasers that have been demonstrated will be examined along with some recent medical applications that have used these lasers. We will also provide a general review of some important medical specialties, highlighting why these fields would gain from the introduction of the fiber laser. It is established that while the fiber laser is still a new form of laser device and hence not commercially available in a wide sense, a number of important medical procedures will benefit from its general introduction into medicine. With the number of medical and surgical applications requiring high power laser radiation steadily increasing, the demand for more efficient and compact laser systems providing this capacity will grow commensurately. The high power fiber laser is one system that looks like a promising modality to meet this need. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Laser mode complexity analysis in infrared waveguide free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Prazeres

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze an optical phenomenon taking place in waveguide free-electron lasers, which disturbs, or forbids, operation in far infrared range. Waveguides in the optical cavity are used in far-infrared and THz ranges in order to avoid diffraction optical losses, and a hole coupling on output mirror is used for laser extraction. We show that, when the length of the waveguide exceeds a given limit, a phenomenon of “mode disorder” appears in the cavity, which makes the laser difficult, or impossible, to work properly. This phenomenon is even more important when the waveguide covers the whole length of the cavity. A numerical simulation describes this effect, which creates discontinuities of the laser power in the spectral domain. We show an example with an existing infrared Free-Electron Laser, which exhibits such discontinuities of the power, and where no convincing explanation was proposed until now.

  3. A compact and low-cost laser induced fluorescence detector with silicon based photodetector assembly for capillary flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xuhui; Shi, Meng; Ning, Haijing; Feng, Chunbo; Guan, Yafeng

    2018-05-15

    A compact and low-cost laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detector based on confocal structure for capillary flow systems was developed and applied for analysis of Her2 protein on single Hela cells. A low-power and low-cost 450 nm laser diode (LD) instead of a high quality laser was used as excitation light source. A compact optical design together with shortened optical path length improved the optical efficiency and detection sensitivity. A superior silicon based photodetector assembly was used for fluorescence detection instead of a photomultiplier (PMT). The limit of detection (LOD) for fluorescein sodium was 3 × 10 -12 M or 165 fluorescein molecules in detection volume measured on a homemade capillary electroosmotic driven (EOD)-LIF system, which was similar to commercial LIFs. Compared to commercial LIFs, the whole volume of our LIF was reduced to 1/2-1/3, and the cost was less than 1/3 of them. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Theory of Random Laser Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xunya [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Studies of random laser systems are a new direction with promising potential applications and theoretical interest. The research is based on the theories of localization and laser physics. So far, the research shows that there are random lasing modes inside the systems which is quite different from the common laser systems. From the properties of the random lasing modes, they can understand the phenomena observed in the experiments, such as multi-peak and anisotropic spectrum, lasing mode number saturation, mode competition and dynamic processes, etc. To summarize, this dissertation has contributed the following in the study of random laser systems: (1) by comparing the Lamb theory with the Letokhov theory, the general formulas of the threshold length or gain of random laser systems were obtained; (2) they pointed out the vital weakness of previous time-independent methods in random laser research; (3) a new model which includes the FDTD method and the semi-classical laser theory. The solutions of this model provided an explanation of the experimental results of multi-peak and anisotropic emission spectra, predicted the saturation of lasing modes number and the length of localized lasing modes; (4) theoretical (Lamb theory) and numerical (FDTD and transfer-matrix calculation) studies of the origin of localized lasing modes in the random laser systems; and (5) proposal of using random lasing modes as a new path to study wave localization in random systems and prediction of the lasing threshold discontinuity at mobility edge.

  5. The Theory of Random Laser Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xunya Jiang

    2002-01-01

    Studies of random laser systems are a new direction with promising potential applications and theoretical interest. The research is based on the theories of localization and laser physics. So far, the research shows that there are random lasing modes inside the systems which is quite different from the common laser systems. From the properties of the random lasing modes, they can understand the phenomena observed in the experiments, such as multi-peak and anisotropic spectrum, lasing mode number saturation, mode competition and dynamic processes, etc. To summarize, this dissertation has contributed the following in the study of random laser systems: (1) by comparing the Lamb theory with the Letokhov theory, the general formulas of the threshold length or gain of random laser systems were obtained; (2) they pointed out the vital weakness of previous time-independent methods in random laser research; (3) a new model which includes the FDTD method and the semi-classical laser theory. The solutions of this model provided an explanation of the experimental results of multi-peak and anisotropic emission spectra, predicted the saturation of lasing modes number and the length of localized lasing modes; (4) theoretical (Lamb theory) and numerical (FDTD and transfer-matrix calculation) studies of the origin of localized lasing modes in the random laser systems; and (5) proposal of using random lasing modes as a new path to study wave localization in random systems and prediction of the lasing threshold discontinuity at mobility edge

  6. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  7. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  8. Assessment of Multiple Scattering Errors of Laser Diffraction Instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strakey, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of two commercial laser diffraction instruments was compared under conditions of multiple scattering designed to simulate the high droplet number densities encountered in liquid propellant rocket combustors...

  9. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-01-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10 11 , which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator

  10. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  11. Phase tuning by length contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Warren; Polcawich, Ronald G; Morton, Paul A; Bowers, John E

    2018-02-05

    Typical integrated optical phase tuners alter the effective index. In this paper, we explore tuning by geometric deformation. We show that tuning efficiency, Vπ L, improves as the device size shrinks down to the optimal bend radius, contrary to conventional index-shift based approaches where Vπ L remains constant. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of ultra-low power tuning across a full FSR in a low-confinement silicon nitride based ring resonator of 580 μm radius. We demonstrate record performance with V FSR = 16 V, Vπ L = 3.6 V dB, Vπ Lα = 1.1 V dB, tuning current below 10 nA, and unattenuated tuning response up to 1 MHz. We also present optimized designs for high confinement silicon nitride and silicon based platforms with radius down to 80 μm and 45 μm, respectively, with performance well beyond current state-of-the-art. Applications include narrow-linewidth tunable diode lasers for spectroscopy and non-linear optics, optical phased array beamforming networks for RF antennas and LIDAR, and optical filters for WDM telecommunication links.

  12. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  13. Aerocapacitor commercialization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-12

    The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

  14. Laser Refractography

    CERN Document Server

    Rinkevichyus, B.S; Raskovskaya, I.L

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the basic principles of laser refractography, a flexible new diagnostic tool for measuring optically inhomogeneous media and flows. Laser refractography is based on digital imaging and computer processing of structured laser beam refraction (SLR) in inhomogeneous transparent media. Laser refractograms provide both qualitative and quantitative measurements and can be used for the study of fast and transient processes. In this book, the theoretical basis of refractography is explored in some detail, and experimental setups are described for measurement of transparent media using either 2D (passed radiation) or 3D (scattered radiation) refractograms. Specific examples and applications are discussed, including visualization of the boundary layer near a hot or cold metallic ball in water, and observation of edge effects and microlayers in liquids and gases. As the first book to describe this new and exciting technique, this monograph has broad cross-disciplinary appeal and will be of interest t...

  15. Laser Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects Temporomandibular Joint Disorder ... speed up tooth whitening procedures. What are the benefits of using dental lasers? There are several advantages. ...

  16. Laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A brief discussion is given on the feasibility of using lasers to accelerate particle beams. A rough theory of operation is developed, and numerical results are obtained for an example equivalent to the Fermilab Accelerator

  17. Laser endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvein, R B

    1981-11-01

    A carbon dioxide laser operating in the invisible infrared range (10.6 mu) generates a beam of energy that is almost completely absorbed by biological tissue with release of intense heat and rapid destruction. A laser attached to a rigid bronchoscope has been used in 18 patients ranging in age from 21 to 62 years to treat a variety of causes of airway obstruction. These include tracheal stenosis and granulation tissue (6 patients), adenoma (1), web (2), and carcinoma (9). The results were good in 15 and poor in 3 patients. However, all patients had an improved airway after laser treatment with the best results occurring in patients with benign, inflammatory disease. The advantages of the laser are a lack of bleeding, minimal edema after treatment, and minimal scar formation. The disadvantages are the expense of the machine, and the need for general anesthesia and direct visualization of the lesion.

  18. Il laser

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, William V

    1974-01-01

    Verso il 1960, il laser era ancora "una soluzione alla ricerca di un problema", ma fin dagli anni immediatamente successivi si è rivelato uno strumento insostituibile per le applicazioni più svariate.

  19. Comparison of the properties of segmented copolyetheresteramids with commercial segmented copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, M.C.E.J.; Gaymans, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The thermal (using differential scanning calorimetry), dynamic mechanical (using a dynamic mechanical analyzer), and mechanical properties of segmented copolyetheresteramides with aramid units of uniform length (TT) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO) segments were compared to those of commercial

  20. Laser bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, D R; Harrell, J H

    2001-11-01

    Because the lung cancer epidemic shows no signs of abating, little doubt exists that the need for interventional bronchoscopists will persist for many years to come. The Nd:YAG laser and the rigid bronchoscope remain crucial weapons in the fight against lung cancer. With more than 4000 published interventions pertaining to it, this combination is ideal for treating central airways obstruction. The safety and efficacy of laser bronchoscopy has been well established, and the reported incidence of complications is impressively low. If complications were to arise, a skilled bronchoscopist can manage them easily by using the beneficial attributes of the rigid bronchoscope. Many complications can be avoided by implementing the established safety procedures and techniques. A solid understanding of laser physics and tissue interactions is a necessity to anyone performing laser surgery. The team approach, relying on communication among the bronchoscopist, anesthesiologist, laser technician, and nurses, leads to a safer and more successful procedure. It is important to remember, however, that this is typically a palliative procedure, and therefore the focus should be on alleviating symptoms and improving quality of life. Unfortunately, because not every patient is a candidate for laser bronchoscopy, there are specific characteristics of endobronchial lesions that make them more or less amenable to resection. Each year a promising new technology is being developed, such as argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and endobronchial electrosurgery. Although it is unclear what role these technologies will have, prospective controlled studies must be done to help clarify this question. The future may lay in combining these various technologies along with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy to maximize the therapeutic, palliative, and possibly even curative effect. As the experience of the medical community with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy continues to grow and as more health-care professionals

  1. Green lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2010-01-01

    Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range......Well over a dozen papers at this year's Photonics West meeting in San Francisco boasted improvements in harmonic generation to produce visible laser beams, most of them in the green spectral range...

  2. A Laser Spark Plug Ignition System for a Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, D. L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2007-05-01

    ), and hence the engine load, was varied between 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0. The test laser was constructed with a 30% output coupler, 32% Q-switch initial transmission, and a 0.5% Nd concentration rod all pumped by approximately 1000 Watts of optical power. The test laser single mode output pulse had an energy of approximately 23 mJ, with a pulsewidth of approximately 10 ns, and an M2 value of 6.55. This output produced focal intensity of approximately 270 GW/cm2 with the modified on-engine optical arrangement. The commercial laser had similar output parameters and both laser systems operated the engine with similar results. Due to the shortening of the focal length of the on-engine optical setup both laser systems produced a spark well within the optical transfer cavity of the laser optics to spark plug adaptor. This shrouded spark led to a very long ignition delay and retarded combustion timing for all three values of equivalence ratio. This was evidenced by the in-cylinder pressure traces and the HRR waveforms. The emissions data indicate that both lasers produced very similar combustion. The ignition delay caused by the shrouded spark cause most of the combustion to happen after TDC which lead to poor combustion that produced high levels of CO and THC. The novelty of this work lies in the combination of the laser parameters to create a single high peak power laser output pulse for use as a spark ignition source. Similar configurations have been investigated in the literature but for different applications such as multiple output pulse trains for various industrial and communications applications. Another point of novelty is the investigation of the laser medium concentration on the output characteristics of a passively Q-switched laser system. This work has shown that lowering the Neodymium concentration in the active media within a passively Q-switched laser produces higher output energy values. This is significant because an actively Q-switched laser shows the

  3. Polarization-free Cubic Phase GaN Ultraviolet Laser Diodes for Space-based Light Interferometry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser diodes have many advantages over other forms of lasers: extremely compact (<1cm in length), inexpensive and simple designs that can achieve high power, high...

  4. Practical internal combustion engine laser spark plug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Guo, Baoping; Yang, Chengxin; Hardy, Christopher R.

    2007-09-01

    Fundamental studies on laser ignition have been performed by the US Department of Energy under ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engines Systems) and by the California Energy Commission under ARICE (Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine). These and other works have reported considerable increases in fuel efficiencies along with substantial reductions in green-house gas emissions when employing laser spark ignition. Practical commercial applications of this technology require low cost high peak power lasers. The lasers must be small, rugged and able to provide stable laser beam output operation under adverse mechanical and environmental conditions. New DPSS (Diode Pumped Solid State) lasers appear to meet these requirements. In this work we provide an evaluation of HESP (High Efficiency Side Pumped) DPSS laser design and performance with regard to its application as a practical laser spark plug for use in internal combustion engines.

  5. Laser antisepsis of Phorphyromonas gingivalis in vitro with dental lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.

    2004-05-01

    It has been shown that both pulsed Nd:YAG (1064nm) and continuous diode (810nm) dental lasers kill pathogenic bacteria (laser antisepsis), but a quantitative method for determining clinical dosimetry does not exist. The purpose of this study was to develop a method to quantify the efficacy of ablation of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) in vitro for two different lasers. The ablation thresholds for the two lasers were compared in the following manner. The energy density was measured as a function of distance from the output of the fiber-optic delivery system. Pg cultures were grown on blood agar plates under standard anaerobic conditions. Blood agar provides an approximation of gingival tissue for the wavelengths tested in having hemoglobin as a primary absorber. Single pulses (Nd:YAG: 100- Œs diode: 100-msec) of laser energy were delivered to Pg colonies and the energy density was increased until the appearance of a small plume was observed coincident with a laser pulse. The energy density at this point defines the ablation threshold. Ablation thresholds to a single pulse were determined for both Pg and for blood agar alone. The large difference in ablation thresholds between the pigmented pathogen and the host matrix for pulsed-Nd:YAG represented a significant therapeutic ratio and Pg was ablated without visible effect on the blood agar. Near threshold the 810-nm diode laser destroyed both the pathogen and the gel. Clinically, the pulsed Nd:YAG may selectively destroy pigmented pathogens leaving the surrounding tissue intact. The 810-nm diode laser may not demonstrate this selectivity due to its longer pulse length and greater absorption by hemoglobin.

  6. Research on the measurement technology of effective arm length of swing arm profilometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Hongwei; Wei, Zhongwei; Li, Jie; Cao, Xuedong

    2014-09-01

    When the swing arm profilometer(SAP) measuring the mirror, the effective arm length of SAP which haves an obvious influence on the measurement results of the mirror surface shape needs to be measured accurately. It requires the measurement uncertainty of the effective arm length to reach 10μm in order to meet the measurement requirements, in this paper, we present a kind of technology based on laser tracker to measure the effective arm length of SAP. When the swing arm rotates around the shaft axis of swing arm rotary stage, the probe and two laser tracker balls form three sections of circular arc around the shaft axis of swing arm rotary stage in space. Laser tracker tracks and measures the circular arcs of two laser tracker balls, the center coordinates of the circular plane of circular arc can be calculated by data processing. The linear equation that passes through the two center coordinates is the equation of the shaft axis of rotary stage, the vertical distance from the probe to the shaft axis of rotary stage which can be calculated refer to the equation from the point to the line is the effective arm length. After Matlab simulation, this measurement method can meet the measurement accuracy.

  7. LCLS Laser (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The most powerful now in the world, American X-ray laser LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), has been working as a research and user facility since 2009. It is further developed to LCLSII machine at the Stanford National Accelerator Laboratory SLAC in Menlo Park CA. In a certain sense, LCLS is a response to the EXFEL machine and a logical extension of LCLS. All these machines are light sources of the fifth generation. EXFELis expected to open user facility in 2016, at a cost of over 1 bil Euro. LCLS II, which design started in 2010, will be operational in 2017. The lasers LCLS, LCLS II and EXFEL use SASE and SEED methods to generate light and are powered by electron liniacs, LCLS by a wrm one, and EXFEL by a cold one. The liniacs have energies approaching 20 GeV, and are around 2 - 3 km in length. EXFEL liniac uses SRF TESLA cavity technology at 1,3GHz. A prototype of EXFEL was FLASH laser. SLAC Laboratory uses effectively over 50 years experience in research, building and exploitation of linear electron acce...

  8. Chinese marketplace of lasers and laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huanan

    1992-05-01

    Today I want to introduce the subject of laser materials in China. I will discuss the general background of lasers and laser materials in China. Second, I want to show you some recent rapid development of lasers and laser materials in China. Third, I want to give you an overview of key R&D centers and manufacturers of lasers and laser materials. Fourth, I want to analyze some important export trends from China. Finally, I want to say something about the active international cooperation in the field of lasers and laser materials.

  9. ESTIMATION OF BIOMASS COMMERCIAL SPROUTS OF Ilex paraguariensis A.ST.-HIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Vuaden

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at developing some models that allow estimating the biomass of commercial green shoots of Ilex paraguariensis after pruning, at 10 years-old. In September 2007, 40 Ilex paraguariensis were pruned. One year after the first pruning, in 2008, they were evaluated dendrometrically and their biomass was determined from the commercial harvest of 16 individuals. To the others, the commercial biomass was estimated by the sum of the biomass of shoots.  The result obtained is that the biomass of commercial sprouts can be estimated as a function of the length of the rolls sprouting, with specific models for sprouts short, simple and compound average sprouts and long sprouts compounds. The models used to estimate the biomass of commercial sprouts using the length sum rolls and rolls of the length as independent variables underestimate the values of biomass with a margin of error of only 2.6%.

  10. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  11. Flash scanning the CO2 laser: a revival of the CO2 laser in plastic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Elliot

    1994-09-01

    The CO2 laser has broad clinical application yet also presents a number of practical disadvantages. These drawbacks have limited the success and utilization of this laser in plastic surgery. Flashscanner technology has recently been used for char-free CO2 laser surgery of the oropharynx, the external female genital tract, and perirectal mucosa. A commercially available optomechanical flashscanner unit `Swiftlase,' was adapted to a CO2 laser and used for treatment in numerous plastic surgical applications. Conditions and situations that were treated in this study included generalized neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, rhinophyma, viral warts, breast reconstruction, and deepithelialization prior to microsurgery or local flap transfer and/or skin graft placement. There were no significant wound healing complications. Some patients previously sustained undue scarring from conventional CO2 laser surgery. Conservative, primarily ablative CO2 laser surgery with the Swiftlase has usefulness for treatment of patients in plastic surgery including those that were previously unsuccessfully treated.

  12. Laser processing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, G.L.; Kumar, Dilip; Roy, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser, due to its high degree of coherence can produce powder density in the range of 10 3 -10 11 W/mm 2 . This high power density of the laser beam enables it to be utilized for many industrial applications, e.g. welding, cutting, drilling, surface treatment, etc. Laser processing of materials has many advantages, e.g. good quality product at high processing speed, least heat affected zone, minimum distortion, etc. In addition, the same laser system can be utilized for different applications, a very cost effective factor for any industry. Therefore laser has been adopted for processing of different materials for a wide range of applications and is now replacing conventional materials processing techniques on commercial merits with several economic and metallurgical advantages. Applications of laser to process materials of different thicknesses varying from 0.1 mm to 100 mm have demonstrat ed its capability as an important manufacturing tool for engineering industries. While lasers have most widely been utilized in welding, cutting and drilling they have also found applications in surface treatment of metals and alloys, e.g. transfor mation hardening and annealing. More recently, there has been significant amount of research being undertaken in laser glazing, laser surface alloying and laser cladding for obtaining improved surface properties. This report reviews the stat us of laser processing of metals and alloys emphasising its metallurgical aspects a nd deals with the different laser processes like welding, cutting, drilling and surface treatment highlighting the types and choice of laser and its interaction with metals and alloys and the applications of these processes. (author). 93 refs., 32 figs., 7 tables

  13. Year 2000 commercial issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, M.P.J.; Booth, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation focused on commercial aspects of the Y2K including: (1) special communication issues, (2) outsourcing transactions, (3) joint ventures and the significance for the oil and gas industry, and (4) contingency planning. Communication issues involve interaction with suppliers and vendors of critical systems, liability for Y2K communications (misrepresentation, defamation, promissory estoppel, statutory liability), securities disclosure (Canadian and US SEC requirements), protected communications, protection for Year 2000 statements. Outsourcing problems highlighted include resistance of suppliers to assume responsibility for Y2K problem remediation, factors which support and negate supplier responsibility, scope of suppliers' obligation, and warranties in respect of third party software. Regarding joint ventures, questions concerning limitations on liability, supply warranties, stand-by arrangements, stockpiling inventory, indemnities, confidentiality, operator compensation versus operator risk, and insurance were raised and addressed. Among contingency planning issues the questions of Y2K legal audit, and disclosure aspects of contingency planning were the featured concerns. figs

  14. Commercial Alcohols Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, M.

    1998-01-01

    The production of ethanol from corn, and the growth of ethanol production in Canada were discussed, along with the environmental advantages and the role it plays in supporting the rural economy. Commercial Alcohols Inc. is the largest ethanol producer in Canada. Its plant in Chatham, Ontario, which opened in December 1997, is one of the largest in the world. Since 1990, sales of ethanol have increased ten fold. Total sales exceed $100 million. The company has five plants in Canada which produce ethanol fuel, industrial alcohol, grain neutral spirits, packaged alcohol, distillers grains, and carbon dioxide for use in carbonization of beverages. Plans are underway for construction of a new plant in Varennes, Quebec. The company is also working with the Ukraine for development of an ethanol facility in that country. 3 figs

  15. Nanovate commercializing disruptive nanotechnologies

    CERN Document Server

    Anis, Mohab; Sarhan, Wesam; Elsemary, Mona

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces readers from diverse backgrounds to the principles underlying nanotechnology, from devices to systems, while also describing in detail how businesses can use nanotechnology to redesign their products and processes, in order to have a clear edge over their competition. The authors include 75 case studies, describing in a highly-accessible manner, real nanotechnology innovations from 15 different industrial sectors. For each case study, the technology or business challenges faced by the company are highlighted, the type of nanotechnology adopted is defined, and the eventual economic and social impact is described. Introduces fundamentals of nanotechnology and its applications in a highly-accessible manner Includes 75 case studies of commercializing nanotechnology from 15 industrial sectors, including Automotive, Consumer Electronics, and Renewable Energy Enables nanotechnology experts to learn simple and important business concepts to facilitate the transfer of science to the market Introdu...

  16. Precision machining commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    To accelerate precision machining development so as to realize more of the potential savings within the next few years of known Department of Defense (DOD) part procurement, the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) is sponsoring the Precision Machining Commercialization Project (PMC). PMC is part of the Tri-Service Precision Machine Tool Program of the DOD Manufacturing Technology Five-Year Plan. The technical resources supporting PMC are provided under sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of PMC is to minimize precision machining development time and cost risk for interested vendors. PMC will do this by making available the high precision machining technology as developed in two DOE contractor facilities, the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California and the Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Y-12 Plant, at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  17. Genetic characterization of commercial honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) populations in the United States by using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. A. Delaney; M.D. Meixner; N.M. Schiff; W.S. Sheppard

    2009-01-01

    Genetic diversity levels within and between the two commercial breeding areas in theUnited States were analyzed using the DraI restriction fragment length polymorphism of the COICOII mitochondrial region and 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The western commercial breeding population (WCBP) and the southeastern commercial...

  18. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  19. Channeling and stability of laser pulses in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Krall, J.; Esarey, E.

    1995-01-01

    A laser pulse propagating in a plasma is found to undergo a combination of hose and modulation instabilities. The coupled equations for the laser beam envelope and centroid are derived and solved for a laser pulse of finite length propagating through either a uniform plasma or preformed plasma density channel. The laser envelope equation describes the pulse self-focusing and optical guiding in plasmas and is used to analyze the self-modulation instability. The laser centroid equation describes the transverse motion of the laser pulse (hosing) in plasmas. Significant coupling between the centroid and envelope motion as well as harmonic generation in the envelope can occur. In addition, the transverse profile of the generated wake field is strongly affected by the laser hose instability. Methods to reduce the laser hose instability are demonstrated. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. A novel method for length of chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenwei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Taolin

    2018-03-01

    Length of chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor is very important for detonation velocity. Different from other ways, we proposed a novel method based on the optical frequency domain reflection theory to measure the length of chirped fiber grating sensor in non-contact condition. This method adopts a tunable laser source to provide wavelength scanning laser, which covers the Full Width at Half Maximum of spectrum of the chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor. A Michelson interferometer is used to produce optical interference signal. Finally, the grating's length is attainable by distance domain signal. In theory, length resolution of chirped fiber Bragg grating sensor could be 0.02 mm. We perform a series of length measurement experiments for chirped fiber grating sensor, including comparison experiments with hot-tip method. And the experiment results show that the novel method could accurately measure the length of chirped fiber Bragg grating sensors, and the length differences between the optical frequency domain reflection method and the hot-tip probe method are very small.

  1. On-chip integrated lasers for biophotonic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mappes, Timo; Wienhold, Tobias; Bog, Uwe

    Meeting the need of biomedical users, we develop disposable Lab-on-a-Chip systems based on commercially available polymers. We are combining passive microfluidics with active optical elements on-chip by integrating multiple solid-state and liquid-core lasers. While covering a wide range of laser ...

  2. Isotope separation of uranium by laser: tuning and frequency instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broglia, M.; Massimi, M.; Spoglia, U.; Zampetti, P.

    1983-01-01

    Intensity measurements of laser induced fluorescence in an uranium atomic beam are affected by the axial mode structure of the commercial pulsed dye laser used and by its strong frequency instability. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on the possible causes of frequency instability are reported

  3. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  4. Phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, A A; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    It is shown experimentally that phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation calls for a stable difference in arm lengths, as in a classical Michelson interferometer. A scheme with automatic compensation for fluctuations of interferometer arm lengths has been proposed and experimentally implemented. This scheme makes it possible to perform stable phasing of two laser channels under standard laboratory conditions. (control of radiation parameters)

  5. String matching with variable length gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    2012-01-01

    We consider string matching with variable length gaps. Given a string T and a pattern P consisting of strings separated by variable length gaps (arbitrary strings of length in a specified range), the problem is to find all ending positions of substrings in T that match P. This problem is a basic...

  6. Commercializing ALURTRONs electron beam irradiation services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Aiasah Hashim; Mohd Sidek Othman; Shari Jahar; Sarada Idris; Naurah Mohd Isa; Muhamad Zahidee Taat

    2010-01-01

    ALURTRON has been the nation's sole electron irradiation service provider for research sectors. The main irradiation is done by utilising the EPS 3000 Cockcroft-Walton type 3.0 MeV, 90 k Watts electron beam machine (EBM). With more than 15 years experience in the operation and maintenance of the EPS, the challenge is now to commercialize the service at a larger and profitable scale. Medical products sterilization at commercial level has been ruled out since the energy is insufficient to penetrate dense and non-homogenous items. Recently, the demand for irradiation of wire and heat shrinkable tubes is showing bigger commercial potential. Therefore, prudent planning considerations need to be taken to ensure profitable return to the agency. Calculations were made to estimate ALURTRON service capacity, based on the existing EBM and its auxiliary systems. Details of the calculation including all the variables are presented. Results indicated that Alurtron should be able to process a minimum of 1000 km of small wires per month, running at 150 m/ min, working in two shifts, 5 days a week. The projected revenue is dependent on the charges imposed on the basis of total length delivered. (author)

  7. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  8. X-ray laser research at Palaiseau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegle, P.; Jamelot, G.; Carillon, A.; Klisnick, A.; Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay

    1986-01-01

    We present the soft X-ray laser experiments performed at Greco ''Interaction Laser-Matiere'' (Palaiseau). They are mainly concerned with lithium-like ions of aluminium in plasmas produced by 1.06 μ Nd-laser. We describe the experimental set-up which performs time-dependent gain measurements. We report results showing a gain-length product of 2 - 2.5 for the 3d - 5f line at 105.7 A. Comparison is made between experiment and computational model. The possible limiting role of radiation trapping for long plasma column is discussed. We present the future projects regarding larger gains and new wavelengths

  9. Laser material processing

    CERN Document Server

    Steen, William

    2010-01-01

    This text moves from the basics of laser physics to detailed treatments of all major materials processing techniques for which lasers are now essential. New chapters cover laser physics, drilling, micro- and nanomanufacturing and biomedical laser processing.

  10. Diode laser-based detection in liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mank, A.J.G.; Lingeman, H.; Gooijer, C.

    1996-01-01

    Detection techniques involving diode lasers are increasingly of interest in separation science, Diode lasers are small and inexpensive and have a very stable output. However, diode lasers emitting at wavelengths shorter than 635 nm are not commercially available. This seriously limits the

  11. Laser-Vorrichtung

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, J.

    1992-01-01

    The laser device has a laser oscillator and a downstream laser amplifier which has an entry zone for the laser beam, which comes from the laser oscillator before it is amplified, and an exit for the amplified laser beam. The laser amplifier also has a convolutional mirror which is opposite the entry zone for the laser beam to be amplified. The laser device is designed so that the amplifying medium in the laser amplifier can be optimally utilized if the laser device has a compact design. To th...

  12. Picosecond laser ablation of porcine sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góra, Wojciech S.; Harvey, Eleanor M.; Dhillon, Baljean; Parson, Simon H.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Lasers have been shown to be successful in certain medical procedures and they have been identified as potentially making a major contribution to the development of minimally invasive procedures. However, the uptake is not as widespread and there is scope for many other applications where laser devices may offer a significant advantage in comparison to the traditional surgical tools. The purpose of this research is to assess the potential of using a picosecond laser for minimally invasive laser sclerostomy. Experiments were carried out on porcine scleral samples due to the comparable properties to human tissue. Samples were prepared with a 5mm diameter trephine and were stored in lactated Ringer's solution. After laser machining, the samples were fixed in 3% glutaraldehyde, then dried and investigated under SEM. The laser used in the experiments is an industrial picosecond TRUMPF TruMicro laser operating at a wavelength of 1030nm, pulse length of 6ps, repetition rate of 1 kHz and a focused spot diameter of 30μm. The laser beam was scanned across the samples with the use of a galvanometer scan head and various ablation patterns were investigated. Processing parameters (pulse energy, spot and line separation) which allow for the most efficient laser ablation of scleral tissue without introducing any collateral damage were investigated. The potential to create various shapes, such as linear incisions, square cavities and circular cavities was demonstrated.

  13. Laser glass marking: influence of pulse characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolo, Ana; Coelho, João; Pires, Margarida

    2005-09-01

    Laser glass marking is currently used in several glass materials for different purposes, such as bar codes for product tracking, brand logos or just decoration. Systems with a variety of different laser sources, with inherent power ranges, wavelengths and pulse regimes have been used, namely CO2, Nd:YAG, Excimer, Ti-Sapphire lasers. CO2 Lasers systems, although being a reliable tool for materials processing, and very compact in the case of sealed low power lasers, are usually associated with a localized thermal loading on the material, causing brittle materials like glass to crack around the irradiated area. In this experimental study a pulsed CO2 laser was used to direct marking the glass surface. The temporal characteristics of the laser pulse--pulse length, period and duty cycle were varied, and glass materials with different thermal properties were used in order to correlate the marking process--cracking or softening with or without material removal with the laser and material characteristics. Glass materials with major industrial application, such as soda-lima, borosilicate (PYREX) glasses and crystal have been investigated. Laser marked areas have been characterized in terms of surface optical properties, like diffuse and direct reflectance and transmittance for white light, directly related with marked surface quality.

  14. Power balance on a multibeam laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, S.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; Rigatti, A. L.; Kwiatkowski, J.; Donaldson, W. R.; Romanofsky, M. H.; Waxer, L. J.; Dean, R.; Moshier, R.

    2018-02-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cryogenic experiments on the 60-beam OMEGA laser have strict requirements for the laser energy delivered on target to be power balanced in order to maximize target-irradiation uniformity. For OMEGA, this quantity (power balance) is inferred from measurements of the time-integrated energy and time-resolved, spatially integrated temporal profile of each of the 60 beams at the output of the laser. The work presented here proposes a general definition of power balance as measured at the laser output and discusses the conditions that are fundamental to achieving laser power balance. Power balance necessitates equal gain across all stages of amplification, equal net losses across each amplifier stage, equal frequency conversion (from 1053 nm to 351 nm) of all 60 beams, and equal beam path lengths (beam timing). Typical OMEGA ICF laser pulse shapes consist of one or more short (100-ps) "pickets" followed by a shaped "drive" pulse of 1 to 2 ns. For these experiments, power balance is assessed for the pickets and the drive independently, with the ultimate goal of achieving root-mean-square (rms) imbalance across all 60 beams of less than 2% rms on both. This work presents a comprehensive summary of laser shot campaigns conducted to significantly improve laser power balance from typical rms values of 4.7% and 5.2%, respectively, to the 3% level for both features along with a discussion of future work required to further reduce the rms power imbalance of the laser system.

  15. Measurement of product of solid state laser materials by an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this method a microchip laser is formed by keeping a small piece of the sample in plane–plane resonator and a diode laser (808 nm) is used for pumping. The pump power induced thermal lensing effect is used to make the cavity stable. The cavity mode area is estimated by measuring the thermal lens focal length at the ...

  16. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pre-formed (by first laser) coronal plasma by inverse Bremsstrahlung process, which were ... This process starts as the plasma scale length becomes greater than the laser wavelength. This study further indicated the suitability of this technique in the ..... constructive comments regarding the improvement of this manuscript.

  17. A chirp-compensated, injection-seeded alexandrite laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakule, P; Baird, PEG; Boshier, MG; Cornish, SL; Heller, DF; Jungmann, K; Lane, IC; Meyer, Franc; Sandars, PHG; Toner, WT; Towrie, M; Walling, JC

    A Q-switched alexandrite laser suitable for high-resolution spectroscopy is described which produces pulses of 35 mJ energy in a 10 MHz bandwidth, with a high-purity TEM00 mode. The laser can be synchronised to external event to within 100 ns. The output pulse length is 120 ns and the repetition

  18. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  19. Vibration reduction for commercial optical intersatellite communication links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Davis, L. Porter

    1998-07-01

    The increasing demand for global communications and limitations on RF communication bandwidth has driven several corporations to baseline optical intersatellite communication links in their constellations. The use of laser communications over a long distance dictates the need for accurate pointing and jitter suppression in order to maintain signal. Vibrations on a satellite cause excessive line-of-sight jitter for optical performance. The solution to these vibration sources is a systems problem involving optical control of coarse and fine steering, vibration isolation of the optical payload, or reduction of the spacecraft disturbances. This paper explains the basics of tracking control of a laser communication package and details the systems trades for vibration isolation. Simulation results based on a vibration isolation and precision pointing of a hypothetical commercial LEO to LEO 4 Gbit/sec laser cross-link system are presented.

  20. Transient processes in high-power gas laser amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakanina, L.P.; Belonuchkin, V.E.; Kozel, S.M.; Kuznetsov, E.P.; Lokshin, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    A system of equations is derived which describes the laser onset process in a high-gain gas laser amplifier. The intrinsic, amplified spontaneous emission plays the determinate role in the transient processes. The transient processes for a HeFe (3.39 micrometers) laser amplifier are calculated on a computer for three amplifier lengths (40, 80 and 200 centimeters) with the instantaneous onset of inversion.

  1. ETHICS AND COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviu MEGHIŞAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern economic science was built around the concept of efficiency. In economy the notion of equality is strongly correlated with the notion of balance, such as the market balance when the demand equals the offer. In a broader view, the economy cannot contribute to a reflection on equity unless it re-became a moral and political science or even a philosophical economy. At present, when there is an effervescence of international transactions, we all adulate the need for morality. Everyday, all around the world, regular people are affected by the costs of ethical issues. The profit and social responsibility do not exclude reciprocally. The social value of a company is given by the well-being and the work-places generated, by the products and services offered to the consumers at a fair price in correlation with the quality. The sentimental value represents the value that a person is giving to a good, based on feelings and emotions and not on monetary values. In many cases the passions and the interests are more powerful than the moral value that animates us. A lot of commercials, if they are to say the truth, would recognize that, for them, not the clients are important but the profits.

  2. Near infrared lasers in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G

    2015-07-01

    Technology development in flow cytometry has closely tracked laser technology, the light source that flow cytometers almost exclusively use to excite fluorescent probes. The original flow cytometers from the 1970s and 1980s used large water-cooled lasers to produce only one or two laser lines at a time. Modern cytometers can take advantage of the revolution in solid state laser technology to use almost any laser wavelength ranging from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. Commercial cytometers can now be equipped with many small solid state lasers, providing almost any wavelength needed for cellular analysis. Flow cytometers are now equipped to analyze 20 or more fluorescent probes simultaneously, requiring multiple laser wavelengths. Instrument developers are now trying to increase this number by designing fluorescent probes that can be excited by laser wavelength at the "edges" of the visible light range, in the near ultraviolet and near-infrared region. A variety of fluorescent probes have been developed that excite with violet and long wavelength ultraviolet light; however, the near-infrared range (660-800 nm) has yet seen only exploitation in flow cytometry. Fortunately, near-infrared laser diodes and other solid state laser technologies appropriate for flow cytometry have been in existence for some time, and can be readily incorporated into flow cytometers to accelerate fluorescent probe development. The near infrared region represents one of the last "frontiers" to maximize the number of fluorescent probes that can be analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, near infrared fluorescent probes used in biomedical tracking and imaging could also be employed for flow cytometry with the correct laser wavelengths. This review describes the available technology, including lasers, fluorescent probes and detector technology optimal for near infrared signal detection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  4. State of and prospects for XeF(C-A) optically pumped lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, F.A.; Mitko, S.; Ochkin, V.N.; Witteman, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on an XeF(C−A) blue-green laser driven by 5-kJ energy. The laser was pumped by a ferrite-induced discharge of 90 cm in length. The output energy of 0.22 J was obtained with a plane-parallel resonator. A program to simulate laser operation has been

  5. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with multiple laser tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser system that was constituted of two or three laser tubes and a single driving circuit. The multiple laser tubes simultaneously produced almost the same short laser pulses with a spike pulse width of about 164 ns and a pulse tail length of about 74 μs with a single driving circuit. The double-tube system was constituted of two 30 cm-long laser tubes with inner diameters of 13 mm and 16 mm and a single driving circuit with an input energy of 2.18 J. The output energy of the 13 mm-tube was 23.3 mJ, and that of the 16 mm-tube was 21.9 mJ at a gas pressure of 4.2 kPa (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2). The triple-tube system was constituted of three 30 cm-long laser tubes with inner diameters of 9 mm, 13 mm, and 16 mm and a single driving circuit with an input energy of 2.18 J. The output energy of the 9 mm tube was 15.9 mJ, that of the 13 mm tube was 24.1 mJ, and that of the 16 mm tube was 19.2 mJ at a gas pressure of 4.2 kPa. With the same driving circuit and the same input energy, the total output energies of the multitube laser systems were higher than the output energy of a single-tube system.

  6. Laser Heterodyning

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Laser heterodyning is now a widespread optical technique, based on interference of two waves with slightly different frequencies within the sensitive area of a photo-detector. Its unique feature – preserving phase information about optical wave in the electrical signal of the photo-detector – finds numerous applications in various domains of applied optics and optoelectronics: in spectroscopy, polarimetry, radiometry, laser radars and Lidars, microscopy and other areas. The reader may be surprised by a variety of disciplines that this book covers and satisfied by detailed explanation of the phenomena. Very well illustrated, this book will be helpful for researches, postgraduates and students, working in applied optics.

  7. Large scale Tesla coil guided discharges initiated by femtosecond laser filamentation in air

    OpenAIRE

    Arantchouk, Leonid; Point, Guillaume; Brelet, Yohann; Prade, Bernard; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André; Houard, Aurélien

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The guiding of meter scale electric discharges produced in air by a Tesla coil is realized in laboratory using a focused terawatt laser pulse undergoing filamentation. The influence of the focus position, the laser arrival time or the gap length is studied to determine the best conditions for efficient laser guiding. Discharge parameters such as delay, jitter and resistance are characterized. An increase of the discharge length by a factor 5 has been achieved with the ...

  8. Stroke in Commercial Flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Velasco, Rodrigo; Masjuan, Jaime; DeFelipe, Alicia; Corral, Iñigo; Estévez-Fraga, Carlos; Crespo, Leticia; Alonso-Cánovas, Araceli

    2016-04-01

    Stroke on board aircraft has been reported in retrospective case series, mainly focusing on economy class stroke syndrome. Data on the actual incidence, pathogenesis, and prognosis of stroke in commercial flights are lacking. A prospective registry was designed to include all consecutive patients referred from an international airport (40 million passengers a year) to our hospital with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and onset of symptoms during a flight or immediately after landing. Forty-four patients (32 ischemic strokes and 12 transient ischemic attacks) were included over a 76-month period (January 2008 to April 2014). The estimated incidence of stroke was 1 stroke in 35 000 flights. Pathogeneses of stroke or transient ischemic attack were atherothrombotic in 16 (36%), economy class stroke syndrome in 8 (18%), cardioembolic in 7 (16%), arterial dissection in 4 (9%), lacunar stroke in 4 (9%), and undetermined in 5 (12%) patients. Carotid stenosis >70% was found in 12 (27%) of the patients. Overall prognosis was good, and thrombolysis was applied in 44% of the cases. The most common reason for not treating patients who had experienced stroke onset midflight was the delay in reaching the hospital. Only 1 patient with symptom onset during the flight prompted a flight diversion. We found a low incidence of stroke in the setting of air travel. Economy class stroke syndrome and arterial dissection were well represented in our sample. However, the main pathogenesis was atherothrombosis with a high proportion of patients with high carotid stenosis. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Laser Dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 9. Laser Dyes. G S Shankarling K J Jarag. General Article Volume 15 Issue 9 September ... Author Affiliations. G S Shankarling1 K J Jarag1. Dyestuff Technology, Department Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga Mumbai 400 019, India.

  10. Laser heterodyning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Protopopov, V. V

    2009-01-01

    ..., radiometry, laser radars and lidars, microscopy and other areas. Therefore, it is remarkable that such a widely used optical phenomenon has never before been comprehensively reviewed in a single work, as has been done many times for other subjects such as interferometry. I think there are several possible reasons for this. Perhap...

  11. Laser yellowing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. M B Sai Prasad1 Salvatore Siano2. Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; CNR-IFAC, Polo Scientifico di Sesto Fiorentino, Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Sesto Fiorentino (FI)-50019, Italy ...

  12. Laser device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source for light circuits on a silicon platform. A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region arranged between a first mirror structure and a second mirror structure, both acting as mirrors, by forming a grating region including an active material...

  13. Mirrorless lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Experimental realization of mirrorless lasers in the last decade have resulted in hectic activity in this field, due to their novelty, simplicity and ruggedness and their great potential for application. In this article, I will review the various developments in this field in roughly chronological order, and discuss some possible ...

  14. The Effect of Laser Treatment as a Weed Control Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Christensen, Svend

    2006-01-01

    was related to wavelength, exposure time, spot size and laser power. The efficacy also varied between the weed species. The results indicate that the efficacy of laser treatments can be improved by a more precise pointing of the laser beam towards the apical meristems and optimisation of the energy density......A laser beam directed towards weeds can be an efficient weed control method as an alternative to herbicides. Lasers may deliver high-density energy to selected plant material, raising the temperature of the water in the plant cells and thereby stop or delay the growth. A commercial use of lasers...... (exposure time and spot size of the laser beam). The experiment also showed a significant difference between two wavelengths. In order to improve the performance and to validate the efficacy on a broader spectrum of weed species, further research and development is needed....

  15. Jupiter Laser Facility - COMET Laser

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — COMET has 4 beam configurations with uncompressed pulse lengths from 500 ps to 6 ns, compressed pulses to 0.5 ps, and beam energies up to 20 J. COMET can fire every...

  16. Optimal Commercial Satellite Leasing Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattock, Michael

    2002-01-01

    .... Military communications planners are faced with the difficult task of choosing the appropriate amount of communications capacity to lease, and the appropriate length of the lease, given uncertainty...

  17. Prospects of Mid Infrared Silicon Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Bahram

    2006-03-01

    Mid wave infrared (MWIR) lasers in the wavelength range of 2-5μm form an important tool for free space communications, bio-chemical detection and certain medical applications. Most organic chemicals and biological agents have unique signatures in the MWIR and can be detected using these lasers. The strong water absorption peak at 2.9μm renders such a laser attractive for surgery and dentistry. Solid state lasers comprising OPO-based nonlinear frequency converters and Raman lasers have been the popular choice for these applications. However, the low damage threshold, poor thermal conductivity and high cost limit the commercial availability of these sources. The recent demonstration of the first silicon Raman laser in 2004 combined with excellent transmission of silicon in the mid-IR suggests that silicon should be considered as a MWIR Raman crystal. In the near IR, where current silicon Raman lasers operate, free carriers that are generated by two photon absorption (TPA) create severe losses. TPA vanishes in the MWIR regime (λ > 2.25μm), hence eliminating the main problem with silicon Raman lasers. This combined with (i) the unsurpassed quality of commercial silicon crystals, (ii) the low cost and wide availability of the material, (iii) extremely high optical damage threshold of 1-4 GW/cm2 (depending on the crystal resistivity), and (iv) excellent thermal conductivity renders silicon a very attractive Raman crystal. Moreover, integrated waveguide and resonator technologies can lead to device miniaturization. This talk discusses the MWIR silicon laser and its applications.

  18. Length-weight relationships for 13 fish species from the Gulf of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Length-weight relationships (LWR) were estimated for 13 fish species which are of economic relevance in the commercial fisheries of the Gulf of Gabes (southern Tunisia). A total of 2403 fish specimens were sampled with several fishing gears from October 2008 to September 2009. The sample size ranged from 65 ...

  19. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  20. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    OpenAIRE

    Osama S Alothmani; Lara T Friedlander; Nicholas P Chandler

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected ...

  1. Electromagnetic radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a laser wakefield accelerator is calculated based on Lienard-Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically lies in the infrared

  2. Information, polarization and term length in democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    accountable, but the re-election incentive leads to policy-distortion as the government seeks to manipulate swing voters' beliefs to make its ideology more popular. This creates a trade-off: A short term length improves accountability but gives distortions. A short term length is best for swing voters when......This paper considers term lengths in a representative democracy where the political issue divides the population on the left-right scale. Parties are ideologically different and better informed about the consequences of policies than voters are. A short term length makes the government more...

  3. Filtering of higher-order laser modes using plasma structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Blagoje; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2017-10-01

    Plasma structures based on leaky channels are proposed to filter higher-order laser mode content. The evolution and propagation of non-Gaussian laser pulses in leaky channels is studied, and it is shown that, for appropriate laser-plasma parameters, the higher-order laser mode content may be removed while the fundamental mode remains well-guided. The behavior of the multi-mode laser pulse is described analytically, including the derivation of the leakage coefficients, and compared to numerical calculations. Gaussian laser pulse propagation, without higher-order mode content, improves guiding in parabolic plasma channels, enabling extended interaction lengths for laser-plasma accelerator applications. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. Transnational Litigation and Commercial Arbitration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph; Hertz, Ketilbjørn

    Transnational Litigation and Commercial Arbitration is a case-oriented study of the key rules and procedures which regulate the resolution of commercial disputes arising in a transnational context. The study explains and compares European and American rules of private international and procedural...

  5. Commercially available video motion detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A market survey of commercially available video motion detection systems was conducted by the Intrusion Detection Systems Technology Division of Sandia Laboratories. The information obtained from this survey is summarized in this report. The cutoff date for this information is May 1978. A list of commercially available video motion detection systems is appended.

  6. Commercially available video motion detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A market survey of commercially available video motion detection systems was conducted by the Intrusion Detection Systems Technology Division of Sandia Laboratories. The information obtained from this survey is summarized in this report. The cutoff date for this information is May 1978. A list of commercially available video motion detection systems is appended

  7. Commercialization of fuel-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O' Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

    1995-03-01

    This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  8. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C; Liu, Perng-Ru

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm 3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  9. Excimer Laser Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Basting, Dirk

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive survey on Excimer Lasers investigates the current range of the technology, applications and devices of this commonly used laser source, as well as the future of new technologies, such as F2 laser technology. Additional chapters on optics, devices and laser systems complete this compact handbook. A must read for laser technology students, process application researchers, engineers or anyone interested in excimer laser technology. An effective and understandable introduction to the current and future status of excimer laser technology.

  10. The picosecond laser for tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vincent M; Aldahan, Adam S; Mlacker, Stephanie; Shah, Vidhi V; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of tattoos continues to grow as modern society's stigma towards this form of body art shifts towards greater acceptance. Approximately one third of Americans aged 18-25 and 40 % of Americans aged 26-40 are tattooed. As tattoos continue to rise in popularity, so has the demand for an effective method of tattoo removal such as lasers. The various colors of tattoo inks render them ideal targets for specific lasers using the principle of selective photothermolysis. Traditional laser modalities employed for tattoo removal operate on pulse durations in the nanosecond domain. However, this pulse duration range is still too long to effectively break ink into small enough particles. Picosecond (10 -12 ) lasers have emerged at the forefront of laser tattoo removal due to their shorter pulse lengths, leading to quicker heating of the target chromophores, and consequently, more effective tattoo clearance. Recent studies have cited more effective treatment outcomes using picosecond lasers. Future comparative studies between picosecond lasers of various settings are necessary to determine optimal laser parameters for tattoo clearance.

  11. NASA's approach to space commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Isaac T., IV

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Office of Commercial Programs fosters private participation in commercially oriented space projects. Five Centers for the Commercial Development of Space encourage new ideas and perform research which may yield commercial processes and products for space ventures. Joint agreements allow companies who present ideas to NASA and provide flight hardware access to a free launch and return from orbit. The experimenters furnish NASA with sufficient data to demonstrate the significance of the results. Ground-based tests are arranged for smaller companies to test the feasibility of concepts before committing to the costs of developing hardware. Joint studies of mutual interest are performed by NASA and private sector researchers, and two companies have signed agreements for a series of flights in which launch costs are stretched out to meet projected income. Although Shuttle flights went on hold following the Challenger disaster, extensive work continues on the preparation of commercial research payloads that will fly when Shuttle flights resume.

  12. Commercialization of sustainable energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandra, P.; Kristle Nathan, Hippu Salk; Reddy, B. Sudhakara

    2010-01-01

    Commercialization efforts to diffuse sustainable energy technologies (SETs) have so far remained as the biggest challenge in the field of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Limited success of diffusion through government driven pathways urges the need for market based approaches. This paper reviews the existing state of commercialization of SETs in the backdrop of the basic theory of technology diffusion. The different SETs in India are positioned in the technology diffusion map to reflect their slow state of commercialization. The dynamics of SET market is analysed to identify the issues, barriers and stakeholders in the process of SET commercialization. By upgrading the 'potential adopters' to 'techno-entrepreneurs', the study presents the mechanisms for adopting a private sector driven 'business model' approach for successful diffusion of SETs. This is expected to integrate the processes of market transformation and entrepreneurship development with innovative regulatory, marketing, financing, incentive and delivery mechanisms leading to SET commercialization. (author)

  13. Laser optical equipment; Le Ottiche per i laser: un mercato difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emiliani, G.

    1992-12-31

    The Italian laser optics market is currently experiencing difficulties in providing a satisfactory response to demand by national industry and research institutes for unconventional laser optical equipment, e.g., high reflectance metallic mirrors for CO/sub 2/ lasers, and optics for laser cavities. This paper analyzes the underlying reasons for this situation, examines the industry`s requirements for improved products (e.g., greater flexibility on the part of equipment designers, designer skills up-grading, advanced materials research, new laboratories, etc.), offers some suggestions with regard to R&D investment planning in this sector, and outlines the role to be played by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in laser optics equipment commercialization.

  14. HF-laser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The HF laser is an attractive candidate driver for a large-system ICF scientific demonstration facility, for an ICF experimental power reactor and for a commercial laser--fusion power reactor. Previous accomplishments of the program have included demonstrations of high efficiency and high energy capability, efficient energy extraction from HF amplifiers, good beam quality and focusability, and short-pulse generation and amplification. In the reporting period, beam quality has been determined to be near-diffraction limited for a short pulsewidth (6 ns to 25 ns) oscillator-amplifier chain, suppression of amplified spontaneous emission has been demonstrated on an individual spectral line, high-pressure characteristics have been determined for the Phoenix I amplifier, and detailed comparisions between the kinetic code and experiments have been made. Details of two major upcoming experiments are also included. The first is energy extraction and beam quality measurements on the Phoenix I amplifier operating under saturated output power conditions. The second experiment, using a newly designed amplifier (Phoenix II), is designed to demonstrate the concept of angular-multiplexing: a pulse width-compression scheme

  15. Revival of femtosecond laser plasma filaments in air by a nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing; Akturk, Selcuk; Prade, Bernard; André, Yves-Bernard; Houard, Aurélien; Liu, Yi; Franco, Michel; D'Amico, Ciro; Salmon, Estelle; Hao, Zuo-Qiang; Lascoux, Noelle; Mysyrowicz, André

    2009-07-06

    Short lived plasma channels generated through filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in air can be revived after several milliseconds by a delayed nanosecond pulse. Electrons initially ionized from oxygen molecules and subsequently captured by neutral oxygen molecules provide the long-lived reservoir of low affinity allowing this process. A Bessel-like nanosecond-duration laser beam can easily detach these weakly bound electrons and multiply them in an avalanche process. We have experimentally demonstrated such revivals over a channel length of 50 cm by focusing the nanosecond laser with an axicon.

  16. Splash plasma channels produced by picosecond laser pulses in argon gas for laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mizuta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Short-lived, ∼10  ps, deep plasma channels, with their lengths of ∼1  mm and diameters of ∼20  μm, are observed and characterized in Ar gas jets irradiated by moderate intensity, ∼10^{15–16}  W/cm^{2}, laser pulses with a duration from subpicosecond to several picoseconds. The channels, upon 2D particle-in-cell simulations including ionization, fit well in the guiding of high intensity femtosecond laser pulses and, therefore, in laser wakefield acceleration with a controllable electron self-injection.

  17. The Drive Laser System for DC-SC Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Kui

    2004-01-01

    PKU-SCAF has developed a photoinjector which adopt a 1+1/2 cell super conducting cavity and DC electron gun. We also developed a low cost drive laser system for the photocathode DC gun to provide high average beam current. This laser system include a commercial high repetition rate, ps, all solid-state laser, the home made SHG and FHG, Fourier relay optics and the uniform illumination optics. The test results shows the output power at 266 nm of the laser system is more than 1.2W and got more than 500 A beam current from CsTe cathode from the DC gun.

  18. Femtosecond two-wavelength laser ranging to the ground target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamal, K.; Prochazka, I.; Jelinkova, H.; Babushkin, A.V.; Lozovoi, V.I.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Two-wavelength laser ranging experiments with subpicosecond temporal resolution are described. To provide these experiments a reliable passively mode-locked Nd:YAP laser with two saturable dyes in the same laser cavity have been designed. For the laser pulses recording the commercial anglo-soviet Imacon 500 streak camera fitted with the PV-001 tube and matched with SIT-vidicon and computer data handling system were employed. The possibilities for further increasing of resolution and other recording characteristics of the developed installation are briefly discussed

  19. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Medryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  20. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available

  1. On-chip integrated lasers for biophotonic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mappes, Timo; Wienhold, Tobias; Bog, Uwe

    Meeting the need of biomedical users, we develop disposable Lab-on-a-Chip systems based on commercially available polymers. We are combining passive microfluidics with active optical elements on-chip by integrating multiple solid-state and liquid-core lasers. While covering a wide range of laser...... emission wavelengths, the chips have the size of microscope cover slips and use optical and fluidic interconnects only. Here, we present our latest realizations of integrated optofluidic lasers using whispering gallery mode or distributed feedback laser cavities....

  2. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Th?berge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-Fran?ois; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Fran?ois; Ch?teauneuf?, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electr...

  3. Simulation of intense laser-dense matter interactions. X-ray production and laser absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueshima, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Tajima, Toshiki

    1998-03-01

    The development of short-pulse ultra high intensity lasers will enable us to generate short-pulse intense soft and hard X-rays. Acceleration of an electron in laser field generates intense illuminated located radiation, Larmor radiation, around KeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with 100 TW and 1 {mu}m wave length laser. The Coulomb interaction between rest ions and relativistic electron generates broad energy radiation, bremsstrahlung emission, over MeV at 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} with the same condition. These intense radiations come in short pulses of the same order as that of the irradiated laser. The generated intense X-rays, Larmor and bremsstrahlung radiation, can be applied to sources of short pulse X-ray, excitation source of inner-shell X-ray laser, position production and nuclear excitation, etc. (author)

  4. Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser pumped by a single laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, D. A.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kuritsyn, I. I.; Mavritskiy, A. O.; Perminov, B. E.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Murzina, T. V.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The performance of a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a single 461 nm laser diode is presented for both the continuous-wave and the mode-locked regimes of operation. We introduce a simple astigmatism correction scheme for the laser diode beam consisting of two cylindrical lenses affecting the pump beam along the fast axis of the laser diode, which provides the mode-matching between the nearly square-shaped pump beam and the cavity mode. The resulting efficiency of the suggested Ti:Sapphire oscillator pumped by such a laser diode is analyzed for the Ti:sapphire crystals of 3 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm in length. We demonstrate that such a system provides the generation of ultrashort pulses up to 15 fs in duration with the repetition rate of 87 MHz, the average power being 170 mW.

  5. 7 CFR 29.3037 - Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.3037 Section 29.3037 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing.... Length, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of quality.) [24...

  6. 7 CFR 29.6024 - Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Length. 29.6024 Section 29.6024 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6024 Length. The linear measurement of cured tobacco leaves from the...

  7. Local gauge invariant QED with fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadyshevsky, V.G.; Mateev, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    A local gauge theory of electromagnetic interactions with the fundamental length l as a new universal scale is worked out. The Lagrangian contains new extra terms in which the coupling constant is proportional to the fundamental length. The theory has an elegant geometrical basis: in momentum representation one faces de Sitter momentum space with curvature radius 1/l [ru

  8. Analysis of ureteral length in adult cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. F. Novaes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In some occasions, correlations between human structures can help planning surgical intra-abdominal interventions. The previous determination of ureteral length helps pre-operatory planning of surgeries, reduces costs of auxiliary exams, the correct choice of double-J catheter with low morbidity and fewer symptoms, and an adequate adhesion to treatment. Objective To evaluate ureteral length in adult cadavers and to analyze its correlation with anthropometric measures. Materials and Methods: From April 2009 to January 2012 we determined ureteral length of adult cadavers submitted to necropsy and obtained the following measures: height, distance from shoulder to wrist, elbow-wrist, xiphoid appendix-umbilicus, umbilicus-pubis, xiphoid appendix-pubis and between iliac spines. We analyzed the correlations between ureteral length and those anthropometric measures. Results We dissected 115 ureters from 115 adult corpses from April 2009 to January 2012. Median ureteral length didn't vary between sexes or according to height. It was observed no correlation among ureteral length and all considered anthropometric measures in all analyzed subgroups and in general population. There were no significant differences between right and left ureteral measures. Conclusions There is no difference of ureteral length in relation to height or gender (male or female. There is no significant correlation among ureteral length and the considered anthropometric measures.

  9. The length of the male urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias. S. Kohler

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Catheter-based medical devices are an important component of the urologic armamentarium. To our knowledge, there is no population-based data regarding normal male urethral length. We evaluated the length of the urethra in men with normal genitourinary anatomy undergoing either Foley catheter removal or standard cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male urethral length was obtained in 109 men. After study permission was obtained, the subject's penis was placed on a gentle stretch and the catheter was marked at the tip of the penis. The catheter was then removed and the distance from the mark to the beginning of the re-inflated balloon was measured. Alternatively, urethral length was measured at the time of cystoscopy, on removal of the cystoscope. Data on age, weight, and height was obtained in patients when possible. RESULTS: The mean urethral length was 22.3 cm with a standard deviation of 2.4 cm. Urethral length varied between 15 cm and 29 cm. No statistically significant correlation was found between urethral length and height, weight, body mass index (BMI, or age. CONCLUSIONS: Literature documenting the length of the normal male adult urethra is scarce. Our data adds to basic anatomic information of the male urethra and may be used to optimize genitourinary device design.

  10. On the homology length spectrum of surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Massart, Daniel; Parlier, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    On a surface with a Finsler metric, we investigate the asymptotic growth of the number of closed geodesics of length less than L which minimize length among all geodesic multicurves in the same homology class. An important class of surfaces which are of interest to us are hyperbolic surfaces.

  11. Paternal age and telomere length in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob B; Dalgård, Christine; Mangino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length, a highly heritable trait, is longer in offspring of older fathers. This perplexing feature has been attributed to the longer telomeres in sperm of older men and it might be an 'epigenetic' mechanism through which paternal age plays a role in telomere length regulation in humans...

  12. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Hof, AL; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women

  13. IL 2 Laser Accelerated Protons and Electrons in Medical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccotti, T.; Martin, Ph.; Giulietti, A.

    2010-01-01

    protons for PBT is about 200 to 250 MeV corresponding to a range of 25 to 30 cm in a human body. Standard cyclotrons and synchrotrons able to get such energies are commercially available but their cost and their overall dimensions still restrains a large scale distribution of this kind of devices. The use of lasers should considerably reduce the size of such devices partly due to the fact that a local rather than generalized radio shielding is needed. In addition, lasers able to produce energetic ions are more and more compact, as the technology increase their capability. In order to evaluate the feasibility of a compact laser driven proton therapy facility compatible with the medical demands, an heterogeneous team, gathering top level competences from all the concerned research domains, has been constituted around the project SAPHIR. Our group shares this project with the ENSTA-LOA, the CEA-DAM, Amplitude Technologies, the Gustave Roussy Institute, the Curie Institute, the Centre de Protontherapie d'Orsay, Propulse s.a.s, Imagine Optic and Dosisoft. Laser-based Proton sources are usually obtained through the interaction of the intense laser field with a solid target. We will discuss recent encouraging results obtained in Saclay using a 'small' 100 TW, 25 fs laser, and novel acceleration mechanisms based on the ultra-high contrast interaction regime. Indeed, the complex motion of highly excited electrons builds-up an electrostatic field which accelerates ions to a few MeV energies at the plasma-vacuum interface. The hints to increase the maximum proton energies will be presented as well as the tailoring of their spectral distribution. IORT practice starts in the early 70's and is now currently employed in several hospitals worldwide with a growing interest. Whereas PBT directly acts on a well delimited cancer from outside the patient body, IORT applies after the cancer has been surgically removed. Tissues around the removed cancer location are

  14. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  15. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama S Alothmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected by the location of the apical foramen, tooth type, canal curvature and superimposition of surrounding structures. Variations among observers by virtue of training and experience may also influence the accuracy of the procedure. The interpretation of radiographs could be affected by film speed and viewing conditions, with the superiority of digital imaging over conventional radiography for working length determination remaining debatable. The combination of several methods is recommended for acquiring the most accurate working length.

  16. Economic issues of broiler production length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szőllősi László

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The length of broiler production cycle is also an important factor when profitability is measured. This paper is to determine the effects of different market ages and down-time period, overall broiler production cycle length on performance and economic parameters based on Hungarian production and financial circumstances. A deterministic model was constructed to manage the function-like correlations of age-related daily weight gain, daily feed intake and daily mortality data. The results show that broiler production cycle length has a significant effect on production and economic performance. Cycle length is determined by the length of down-time and grow-out periods. If down-time period is reduced by one day, an average net income of EUR 0.55 per m2 is realizable. However, the production period is not directly proportional either with emerging costs or obtainable revenues. Profit maximization is attainable if the production period is 41-42 days.

  17. Screening length in dusty plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V S; Timofeev, A V

    2016-01-01

    Particles interaction and value of the screening length in dusty plasma systems are of great interest in dusty plasma area. Three inter-particle potentials (Debye potential, Gurevich potential and interaction potential in the weakly collisional regime) are used to solve equilibrium equations for two dusty particles suspended in a parabolic trap. The inter-particle distance dependence on screening length, trap parameter and particle charge is obtained. The functional form of inter-particle distance dependence on ion temperature is investigated and compared with experimental data at 200-300 K in order to test used potentials applicability to dusty plasma systems at room temperatures. The preference is given to the Yukawa-type potential including effective values of particle charge and screening length. The estimated effective value of the screening length is 5-15 times larger than the Debye length. (paper)

  18. Campylobacter jejuni in commercial eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Belchiolina Beatriz; Beletti, Marcelo Emílio; de Melo, Roberta Torres; Mendonça, Eliane Pereira; Coelho, Letícia Ríspoli; Nalevaiko, Priscila Christen; Rossi, Daise Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of Campylobacter jejuni to penetrate through the pores of the shells of commercial eggs and colonize the interior of these eggs, which may become a risk factor for human infection. Furthermore, this study assessed the survival and viability of the bacteria in commercial eggs. The eggs were placed in contact with wood shavings infected with C. jejuni to check the passage of the bacteria. In parallel, the bacteria were inoculated directly into the air chamber to assess the viability in the egg yolk. To determine whether the albumen and egg fertility interferes with the entry and survival of bacteria, we used varying concentrations of albumen and SPF and commercial eggs. C. jejuni was recovered in SPF eggs (fertile) after three hours in contact with contaminated wood shavings but not in infertile commercial eggs. The colonies isolated in the SPF eggs were identified by multiplex PCR and the similarity between strains verified by RAPD-PCR. The bacteria grew in different concentrations of albumen in commercial and SPF eggs. We did not find C. jejuni in commercial eggs inoculated directly into the air chamber, but the bacteria were viable during all periods tested in the wood shavings. This study shows that consumption of commercial eggs infected with C. jejuni does not represent a potential risk to human health.

  19. Campylobacter jejuni in commercial eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belchiolina Beatriz Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability of Campylobacter jejuni to penetrate through the pores of the shells of commercial eggs and colonize the interior of these eggs, which may become a risk factor for human infection. Furthermore, this study assessed the survival and viability of the bacteria in commercial eggs. The eggs were placed in contact with wood shavings infected with C. jejuni to check the passage of the bacteria. In parallel, the bacteria were inoculated directly into the air chamber to assess the viability in the egg yolk. To determine whether the albumen and egg fertility interferes with the entry and survival of bacteria, we used varying concentrations of albumen and SPF and commercial eggs. C. jejuni was recovered in SPF eggs (fertile after three hours in contact with contaminated wood shavings but not in infertile commercial eggs. The colonies isolated in the SPF eggs were identified by multiplex PCR and the similarity between strains verified by RAPD-PCR. The bacteria grew in different concentrations of albumen in commercial and SPF eggs. We did not find C. jejuni in commercial eggs inoculated directly into the air chamber, but the bacteria were viable during all periods tested in the wood shavings. This study shows that consumption of commercial eggs infected with C. jejuni does not represent a potential risk to human health.

  20. Laser Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Photocathode emitters eject electrons from the cathode by the photoelectric effect. A drive laser source shines light energy onto a metal or...synchronized so that the electrons ejected via the photoelectric effect are properly accelerated. 15 Figure 2.4: Cross-section of a triple spoke cavity, from...2.3: Available Pulsed Magnets at PFF LANL. SP = Short Pulse. MP = Mid-Pulse, after [19] Cell No. Magnet Pulse Duration (ms) Bore (mm) 1 50 T SP 25 24

  1. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampel, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, Smith-Purcell radiation has been studied as a candidate for laser-type radiation production in the submillimeter regime. With appropriate choices of beam energy, impact parameter, and grating spacing, there is good coupling to strongly polarized, forward directed radiation. Another regime of possible interest is to use Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic for medium to high energy electron beams of extremely short pulse duration, on the order of tens of femtoseconds to 1000 fs. Strongly in favor of development of such a diagnostic is its relatively non-destructive nature. With the electron beam passing near, but not through, a metal grating, reaction of the beam distribution itself to the production of the radiation is reduced relative to the much stronger scattering induced by passage through a foil. By careful choice of parameters usable diagnostic radiation ought to be produced with acceptably small emittance growth for an on-line beam monitor, even for the extremely bright electron beams proposed for X-ray FELs, Compton backscatter X-ray sources, or laser/plasma accelerator schemes. In this paper coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation is examined for reasonable operating parameters of the SATURNUS system at UCLA, with comparisons with results reported from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. (orig.)

  2. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental...... results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced...

  3. Hose-Modulation Instability of Laser Pulses in Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Krall, J.; Esarey, E.

    1994-01-01

    A laser pulse propagating in a uniform plasma or a preformed plasma density channel is found to undergo a combination of hose and modulation instabilities, provided the pulse centroid has an initial tilt. Coupled equations for the laser centroid and envelope are derived and solved for a finite-length laser pulse. Significant coupling between the centroid and the envelope, harmonic generation in the envelope, and strong modification of the wake field can occur. Methods to reduce the growth rate of the laser hose instability are demonstrated

  4. Project LASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA formally launched Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering and Research) in March 1990, a program designed to help teachers improve science and mathematics education and to provide 'hands on' experiences. It featured the first LASER Mobile Teacher Resource Center (MTRC), is designed to reach educators all over the nation. NASA hopes to operate several MTRCs with funds provided by private industry. The mobile unit is a 22-ton tractor-trailer stocked with NASA educational publications and outfitted with six work stations. Each work station, which can accommodate two teachers at a time, has a computer providing access to NASA Spacelink. Each also has video recorders and photocopy/photographic equipment for the teacher's use. MTRC is only one of the five major elements within LASER. The others are: a Space Technology Course, to promote integration of space science studies with traditional courses; the Volunteer Databank, in which NASA employees are encouraged to volunteer as tutors, instructors, etc; Mobile Discovery Laboratories that will carry simple laboratory equipment and computers to provide hands-on activities for students and demonstrations of classroom activities for teachers; and the Public Library Science Program which will present library based science and math programs.

  5. Kidney Length in Normal Korean Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In One; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Hong Dae; Sim, Jung Suk

    2010-01-01

    Renal length offers important information to detect or follow-up various renal diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the kidney length of normal Korean children in relation to age, height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI). Children between 1 month and 15 years of age without urological abnormality were recruited. Children below 3rd percentile and over 97th percentile for height or weight were excluded. Both renal lengths were measured in the prone position three times and then averaged by experienced radiologists. The mean length and standard deviation for each age group was obtained, and regression equation was calculated between renal length and age, weight, height, BSA, and BMI, respectively. Renal length was measured in 550 children. Renal length grows rapidly until 24 month, while the growth rate is reduced thereafter. The regression equation for age is: renal length (mm) = 45.953 + 1.064 x age (month, ≤ 24 months) (R2 = 0.720) or 62.173 + 0.203 x age (months, > 24 months) (R2 = 0.711). The regression equation for height is: renal length (mm) = 24.494 + 0.457 x height (cm) (R2 = 0.894). The regression equation for weight is: renal length (mm) = 38.342 + 2.117 x weight (kg, ≤18 kg) (R2 = 0.852) or 64.498 + 0.646 x weight (kg, > 18 kg) (R2 = 0.651). The regression equation for BSA is: renal length (mm) = 31.622 + 61.363 x BSA (m2, ≤ 0.7) (R2 = 0.857) or 52.717 + 29.959 x BSA (m2, > 0.7) (R2 = 0.715). The regression equation for BMI is: renal length (mm) = 44.474 + 1.163 x BMI (R2 = 0.079). This study provides data on the normal renal length and its association with age, weight, height, BSA and BMI. The results of this study will guide the detection and follow-up of renal diseases in Korean children

  6. Laser plasmatron for diamond coating deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glova, A. F., E-mail: afglova@triniti.ru; Lysikov, A. Yu.; Malyuta, D. D.; Nelyubin, S. S.; Peretyatko, P. I.; Ryzhkov, Yu. F. [JSC State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    An experimental installation with a laser plasmatron based on a continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser with a radiation power of up to 3.5 kW has been created. The plasmatron design makes it possible to bring out the plasma jet into atmospheric air both along and across the laser beam direction. The spatial temperature distributions on the metal substrate surface heated by the plasma jet are measured. The threshold power for optical discharge maintenance as a function of the gas flow rate and the focal length of the focusing lens are obtained for an Ar and Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixture under atmospheric pressure; the radiation spectrum of the discharge plasma is measured. A one-dimensional model of the discharge for estimation of its geometrical parameters in a convergent laser beam with consideration of radiation refraction on the discharge is given.

  7. System for automatic gauge block length measurement optimized for secondary length metrology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchta, Zdeněk; Šarbort, Martin; Čížek, Martin; Hucl, Václav; Řeřucha, Šimon; Pikálek, Tomáš; Dvořáčková, Š.; Dvořáček, F.; Kůr, J.; Konečný, P.; Weigl, M.; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, JULY (2017), s. 322-331 ISSN 0141-6359 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010663; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low-coherence interferometry * laser interferometry * Gauge block * metrology Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.237, year: 2016

  8. Measuring the attenuation length of water in the CHIPS-M water Cherenkov detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amat, F.; Bizouard, P. [Aix Marseille University Saint-Jerome, 13013 Marseille (France); Bryant, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Carroll, T.J.; Rijck, S. De [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Germani, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Joyce, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kriesten, B. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Marshak, M.; Meier, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nelson, J.K. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Perch, A.J.; Pfützner, M.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Salazar, R. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Thomas, J., E-mail: jennifer.thomas@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Trokan-Tenorio, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Vahle, P. [Department of Physics, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Wade, R. [Avenir Consulting, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Wendt, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Whitehead, L.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-02-01

    The water at the proposed site of the CHIPS water Cherenkov detector has been studied to measure its attenuation length for Cherenkov light as a function of filtering time. A scaled model of the CHIPS detector filled with water from the Wentworth 2W pit, proposed site of the CHIPS deployment, in conjunction with a 3.2 m vertical column filled with this water, was used to study the transmission of 405 nm laser light. Results consistent with attenuation lengths of up to 100 m were observed for this wavelength with filtration and UV sterilization alone.

  9. Zero-point length from string fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanini, Michele; Spallucci, Euro; Padmanabhan, T.

    2006-01-01

    One of the leading candidates for quantum gravity, viz. string theory, has the following features incorporated in it. (i) The full spacetime is higher-dimensional, with (possibly) compact extra-dimensions; (ii) there is a natural minimal length below which the concept of continuum spacetime needs to be modified by some deeper concept. On the other hand, the existence of a minimal length (zero-point length) in four-dimensional spacetime, with obvious implications as UV regulator, has been often conjectured as a natural aftermath of any correct quantum theory of gravity. We show that one can incorporate the apparently unrelated pieces of information-zero-point length, extra-dimensions, string T-duality-in a consistent framework. This is done in terms of a modified Kaluza-Klein theory that interpolates between (high-energy) string theory and (low-energy) quantum field theory. In this model, the zero-point length in four dimensions is a 'virtual memory' of the length scale of compact extra-dimensions. Such a scale turns out to be determined by T-duality inherited from the underlying fundamental string theory. From a low energy perspective short distance infinities are cutoff by a minimal length which is proportional to the square root of the string slope, i.e., α ' . Thus, we bridge the gap between the string theory domain and the low energy arena of point-particle quantum field theory

  10. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Boilers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Boilers that are effective as of...

  11. Intitutional constraints to fusion commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The major thrust of this report is that the long time frame associated with the development of commercial fusion systems in the context of the commercialization and institutional history of an allied technology, fission-power, suggests that fusion commercialization will not occur without active and broad-based support on the part of the Nation's political leaders. Its key recommendation is that DOE fusion planners devote considerable resources to analytical efforts aimed at determining the need for fusion and the timing of that need, in order to convince policymakers that they need do more than preserve fusion as an option for application at some indefinite point in the future. It is the thesis of the report that, in fact, an act of political vision on the part of the Nation's leaders will be required to accomplish fusion commercialization

  12. Allegheny County Commercial Vehicle Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset lists the locations and results of all commercial vehicle inspections performed by the Allegheny County Police Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program...

  13. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Dishwashers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Dishwashers that are effective as of...

  14. ENERGY STAR Certified Commercial Griddles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 1.2 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Commercial Griddles that are effective as of May...

  15. SHORT ANALYSIS OF COMMERCIAL ADVERTISING

    OpenAIRE

    VIRGIL - ION POPOVICI

    2015-01-01

    In DEX, commercial advertising is defined as the (commercial) activity which aimes by advertising (by prints, radio, television, movies, etc.), to point out public interest on certain goods, books, show, the use of services etc. A famous, advertised product remains in our memory. Many of us ask somehow annoyed: How some of the brands remain in our memory, although we believe that we are not strongly influenced by advertisements? Interest publicity led to the creation of specialize...

  16. Laser power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, D.

    1975-01-01

    The laser power supply includes a regulator which has a high voltage control loop based on a linear approximation of a laser tube negative resistance characteristic. The regulator has independent control loops for laser current and power supply high voltage

  17. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yag lasers. These lasers are used to treat cancer of the uterus, colon, and esophagus. The laser-emitting fibers are put inside a tumor to heat up and damage the cancer cells. This treatment has been used to shrink ...

  18. Laser fusion: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, K.

    1975-01-01

    The laser fusion concept is described along with developments in neodymium and carbon dioxide lasers. Fuel design and fabrication are reviewed. Some spin-offs of the laser fusion program are discussed. (U.S.)

  19. Laser therapy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laser is used for many medical purposes. Because the laser beam is so small and precise, it enables ... without injuring surrounding tissue. Some uses of the laser are retinal surgery, excision of lesions, and cauterization ...

  20. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  1. Bunch Length Measurements in SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, W.J.; Fisher, A.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; Sebek, J.; /SLAC; Lumpkin, A.; /Argonne; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Mok, W.; /Unlisted

    2007-11-28

    A series of bunch length measurements were made in SPEAR3 for two different machine optics. In the achromatic optics the bunch length increases from the low-current value of 16.6ps rms to about 30ps at 25ma/bunch yielding an inductive impedance of -0.17{Omega}. Reducing the momentum compaction factor by a factor of {approx}60 [1] yields a low-current bunch length of {approx}4ps rms. In this paper we review the experimental setup and results.

  2. Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment

  3. Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

    1994-08-06

    The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

  4. Industry's Commercial Initiatives on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, C. E.; Kessler, C.; Lavitola, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    For more than ten years, private industry has worked to develop a commercial human space market and to create a sustainable ISS commercial utilization customer base. Before ISS assembly was underway - and long before NASA and the international space agencies began to craft ISS commercial business terms and conditions - industry planted and nurtured the seeds of interest in exploiting human space utilization for commerce. These early initiatives have yielded the impetus and framework for industry approaches to ISS commercial utilization today and for NASA's and the International Partners' planned accommodation of private sector interests and desires on the ISS. This paper chronicles major industry initiatives for commercial ISS utilization, emphasizing successful marketing and business approaches and why these approaches have a higher likelihood of success than others. It provides an overview of individual companies' initiatives, as well as collaborative efforts that cross company lines and country borders; and it assesses the relative success of each. Rather than emphasize negative issues and barriers, this paper characterizes and prioritizes actionable success factors for industry and government to make ISS commercial utilization a sustainable reality.

  5. Laser safety at high profile laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Laser safety has been an active concern of laser users since the invention of the laser. Formal standards were developed in the early 1970's and still continue to be developed and refined. The goal of these standards is to give users guidance on the use of laser and consistent safety guidance and requirements for laser manufacturers. Laser safety in the typical research setting (government laboratory or university) is the greatest challenge to the laser user and laser safety officer. This is due to two factors. First, the very nature of research can put the user at risk; consider active manipulation of laser optics and beam paths, and user work with energized systems. Second, a laser safety culture that seems to accept laser injuries as part of the graduate student educational process. The fact is, laser safety at research settings, laboratories and universities still has long way to go. Major laser facilities have taken a more rigid and serious view of laser safety, its controls and procedures. Part of the rationale for this is that these facilities draw users from all around the world presenting the facility with a work force of users coming from a wide mix of laser safety cultures. Another factor is funding sources do not like bad publicity which can come from laser accidents and a poor safety record. The fact is that injuries, equipment damage and lost staff time slow down progress. Hence high profile/large laser projects need to adapt a higher safety regimen both from an engineering and administrative point of view. This presentation will discuss all these points and present examples. Acknowledgement. This work has been supported by the University of California, Director, Office of Science.

  6. Commercial books under Turkish commercial laws concerning accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batuhan Güvemli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La modernización de las leyes comerciales de Turquía tiene una historia de 160 años (1850-2010. Los movimientos de occidentalización (Imperial Edicto de 1839 dentro del Imperio Otomano trajeron consigo la creación de la primera ley comercial, Kanunname-i Ticaret (1850 a 1926. Desde 1926 otras tres leyes comerciales fueron promulgadas. En este estudio, examinamos los libros de comercio dentro de esas cuatro leyes comerciales en el ámbito de la contabilidad. Nuestro objetivo es entender los efectos de los cambios de reglamentación comercial sobre la evolución de la cultura turca de contabilidad. Los resultados indican que debido a la ley islámica (Sharia, la aplicación de la ley comercial de 1850 no se había extendido. Las disposiciones legales que entraron en vigor con el establecimiento de la República en 1923 han hecho posible la promulgación de nuevas leyes comerciales. Así, el estudio también se ocupa del proyecto de ley de Derecho Mercantil de Turquía de 2005.The modernization of the Turkish commercial laws has a history of 160 years (1850-2010. The westernization movements (Imperial Edict of 1839 within the Ottoman Empire effected the establishment of the first commercial law, Kanunname-i Ticaret (1850-1926. Since 1926, three other commercial laws were enacted. In this study, we examine the commercial books within those four commercial laws under the scope of accounting. Our aim is to understand the effects of the commercial regulatory changes on the evolution of the Turkish accounting culture. Findings indicate that due to the Islamic law (Sharia, the application the commercial law of 1850 was not widespread. The legal regulations which were put into force with the establishment of the Republic in 1923 have made the enactment of new commercial laws possible. Thus, the study also addresses to the bill of Turkish Commercial Law dated 2005.

  7. Lasers with intra-cavity phase elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulses, A. Alkan; Kurtz, Russell; Islas, Gabriel; Anisimov, Igor

    2018-02-01

    Conventional laser resonators yield multimodal output, especially at high powers and short cavity lengths. Since highorder modes exhibit large divergence, it is desirable to suppress them to improve laser quality. Traditionally, such modal discriminations can be achieved by simple apertures that provide absorptive loss for large diameter modes, while allowing the lower orders, such as the fundamental Gaussian, to pass through. However, modal discrimination may not be sufficient for short-cavity lasers, resulting in multimodal operation as well as power loss and overheating in the absorptive part of the aperture. In research to improve laser mode control with minimal energy loss, systematic experiments have been executed using phase-only elements. These were composed of an intra-cavity step function and a diffractive out-coupler made of a computer-generated hologram. The platform was a 15-cm long solid-state laser that employs a neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate crystal rod, producing 1064 nm multimodal laser output. The intra-cavity phase elements (PEs) were shown to be highly effective in obtaining beams with reduced M-squared values and increased output powers, yielding improved values of radiance. The utilization of more sophisticated diffractive elements is promising for more difficult laser systems.

  8. Status of thermoelectronic laser energy conversion, TELEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A concept known as a thermo-electronic laser energy converter (TELEC), was studied as a method of converting a 10.6 micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. The calculated characteristics of a TELEC seem to be well matched to the requirements of a spacecraft laser energy conversion system. The TELEC is a high power density plasma device which absorbs an intense laser beam by inverse bremsstrahlung with the plasma electrons. In the TELEC process, electromagnetic radiation is absorbed directly in the plasma electrons producing a high electron temperature. The energetic electrons diffuse out of the plasma striking two electrodes which are in contact with the plasma at the boundaries. These two electrodes have different areas: the larger one is designated as the collector, the smaller one is designated as the emitter. The smaller electrode functions as an electron emitter provide continuity of the current. Waste heat is rejected from the collector electrode. An experiment was carried out with a high power laser using a cesium vapor TELEC cell with 30 cm active length. Laser supported plasma were produced in the TELEC device during a number of laser runs over a period of several days. Electric power from the TELEC was observed with currents in the range of several amperes and output potentials of less than 1 volt.

  9. Laser satellite power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  10. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  11. Laser Protection TIL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Protection TIL conducts research and analysis of laser protection materials along with integration schemes. The lab's objectives are to limit energy coming...

  12. Commercializing fuel cells: managing risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Peter B.

    Commercialization of fuel cells, like any other product, entails both financial and technical risks. Most of the fuel cell literature has focussed upon technical risks, however, the most significant risks during commercialization may well be associated with the financial funding requirements of this process. Successful commercialization requires an integrated management of these risks. Like any developing technology, fuel cells face the typical 'Catch-22' of commercialization: "to enter the market, the production costs must come down, however, to lower these costs, the cumulative production must be greatly increased, i.e. significant market penetration must occur". Unless explicit steps are taken to address this dilemma, fuel cell commercialization will remain slow and require large subsidies for market entry. To successfully address this commercialization dilemma, it is necessary to follow a market-driven commercialization strategy that identifies high-value entry markets while minimizing the financial and technical risks of market entry. The financial and technical risks of fuel cell commercialization are minimized, both for vendors and end-users, with the initial market entry of small-scale systems into high-value stationary applications. Small-scale systems, in the order of 1-40 kW, benefit from economies of production — as opposed to economies to scale — to attain rapid cost reductions from production learning and continuous technological innovation. These capital costs reductions will accelerate their commercialization through market pull as the fuel cell systems become progressively more viable, starting with various high-value stationary and, eventually, for high-volume mobile applications. To facilitate market penetration via market pull, fuel cell systems must meet market-derived economic and technical specifications and be compatible with existing market and fuels infrastructures. Compatibility with the fuels infrastructure is facilitated by a

  13. Beam uniformity of flat top lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Cramer, Larry; Danielson, Don; Norby, James

    2015-03-01

    Many beams that output from standard commercial lasers are multi-mode, with each mode having a different shape and width. They show an overall non-homogeneous energy distribution across the spot size. There may be satellite structures, halos and other deviations from beam uniformity. However, many scientific, industrial and medical applications require flat top spatial energy distribution, high uniformity in the plateau region, and complete absence of hot spots. Reliable standard methods for the evaluation of beam quality are of great importance. Standard methods are required for correct characterization of the laser for its intended application and for tight quality control in laser manufacturing. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published standard procedures and definitions for this purpose. These procedures have not been widely adopted by commercial laser manufacturers. This is due to the fact that they are unreliable because an unrepresentative single-pixel value can seriously distort the result. We hereby propose a metric of beam uniformity, a way of beam profile visualization, procedures to automatically detect hot spots and beam structures, and application examples in our high energy laser production.

  14. Impedance of finite length resistive cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krinsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor of radius a, length g, and conductivity σ attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency (k≫1/a. In the equilibrium regime, ka^{2}≪g, the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity σ. In the transient regime, ka^{2}≫g, where the contribution of transition radiation arising from the discontinuity in conductivity is important, we derive an analytic expression for the impedance and compute the short-range wakefield. The analytic results are shown to agree with numerical evaluation of the impedance.

  15. FULL LENGTH RESEARCH ARTICLE Adamu & Babatunde (2008 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Ahmed

    FULL LENGTH RESEARCH ARTICLE. Adamu & Babatunde (2008) SWJ:21-25. Comparative Studies On the Dying rate Migration. COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON DYEING RATE MIGRATION AND WASH FASTNESS PROPERTIES OF AZO DYES. DERIVED FROM 2-AMINOTHIAZOLE DERIVATIVES ON ACETATE FABRICS.

  16. Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragments linked to soybean mosaic virus resistance gene in Glycine soja and conversion to a sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid selection.

  17. Martian Length of Day Measurements from Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks, T. M.; Bills, B.

    2012-06-01

    Changes in the Martian Length of Day (LOD) can be determined at a scientifically use level by a combination of regular (but not necessarily frequent) range and Doppler measurements from Earth and dead reckoning in a Kalman filter.

  18. Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP-cDNA) analysis of differential gene expression from the xerophyte Ammopiptanthus mongolicus in response to cold, drought and cold together with drought.

  19. Relationship between morphological and amplified fragment length ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship between morphological and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) marker based genetic distance with heterosis in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SL Krishnamurthy, A Mohan Rao, K Madhavi Reddy, S Ramesh, Shailaja Hittalmani, Rao M. Gopinath ...

  20. Chord length distribution for a compound capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitřík, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Chord length distribution is a factor important in the calculation of ionisation chamber responses. This article describes Monte Carlo calculations of the chord length distribution for a non-convex compound capsule. A Monte Carlo code was set up for generation of random chords and calculation of their lengths based on the input number of generations and cavity dimensions. The code was written in JavaScript and can be executed in the majority of HTML viewers. The plot of occurrence of cords of different lengths has 3 peaks. It was found that the compound capsule cavity cannot be simply replaced with a spherical cavity of a triangular design. Furthermore, the compound capsule cavity is directionally dependent, which must be taken into account in calculations involving non-isotropic fields of primary particles in the beam, unless equilibrium of the secondary charged particles is attained. (orig.)

  1. Mixing lengths scaling in a gravity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rivera, Micheal [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Jun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model [1]: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadraticatly with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing length, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show in this paper how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow {radical}({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}).

  2. CPS Trawl Life History Length Frequency Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Length distribution of a subset of individuals from a species (mainly non-target) caught during SWFSC-FRD fishery independent trawl surveys of coastal pelagic...

  3. 36 CFR 5.6 - Commercial vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commercial vehicles. 5.6... COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.6 Commercial vehicles. (a) The term “Commercial vehicle” as used in... used in connection with any business. (b) The use of government roads within park areas by commercial...

  4. Process for fabricating continuous lengths of superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Donald M.; List, III, Frederick A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for manufacturing a superconductor. The process is accomplished by depositing a superconductor precursor powder on a continuous length of a first substrate ribbon, overlaying a continuous length of a second substrate ribbon on said first substrate ribbon, and applying sufficient pressure to form a bound layered superconductor precursor between said first substrate ribbon and said second substrates ribbon. The layered superconductor precursor is then heat treated to form a super conductor layer.

  5. Length and coverage of inhibitory decision rules

    KAUST Repository

    Alsolami, Fawaz

    2012-01-01

    Authors present algorithms for optimization of inhibitory rules relative to the length and coverage. Inhibitory rules have a relation "attribute ≠ value" on the right-hand side. The considered algorithms are based on extensions of dynamic programming. Paper contains also comparison of length and coverage of inhibitory rules constructed by a greedy algorithm and by the dynamic programming algorithm. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Derived length for arbitrary topological spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Jayanthan

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of derived length is as old as that of ordinal numbers itself. It is also known as the Cantor-Bendixon length. It is defined only for dispersed (that is scattered spaces. In this paper this notion has been extended in a natural way for all topological spaces such that all its pleasing properties are retained. In this process we solve a problem posed by V. Kannan. ([1] Page 158.

  7. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H.L.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2017-12-15

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory. (orig.)

  8. Tourism and fashion: factors affecting trip length

    OpenAIRE

    Calderón García, María Haydeé; G. Gallarza, Martina; Fayos Gardó, Teresa; O'Sullivan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tourism and shopping are closely related, and the influence of fashion shopping on a tourist's decision to travel is especially significant. The concept of cognitive and hedonic involvement enables us to relate the importance given to shopping by consumers of fashion products and of tourism services. This research analyses whether tourist involvement in fashion shopping has an impact on the length of their stay in a destination. In addition, it examines whether trip length is conditioned by t...

  9. Airborne laser swath mapping: results from project laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, William E.; Shrestha, Ramesh L.

    1998-09-01

    During October 1996, the University of Florida, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the Florida Department of Transportation and the United States Geological Survey-Center for Coastal Geology and Regional Marine Studies jointly conducted a demonstration/test project of airborne laser swath mapping. Project Laser Swath-mapping Evaluation and Resurvey, included mapping of more than three hundred kilometers of beaches, stretching from Mexico Beach, just east of Panama City, Florida, to the western tip of Perdido Key, Alabama. The observations collected along the beaches included returns from the water surface at a number of inlets and from near short portions of the Gulf. The typical flying altitude during the tests was 350 meters above the surface, with an airspeed of 75 meters per second. The laser swatch mapping system operated at 5000 pulses per second, and scanned in a saw tooth pattern with a scan angle of plus and minus 15 degrees and a scan rate of 25 Hz. More than 50 million data points were collected in about three hours of operations, spread over three days. Proprietary computer software was used by the vendor to combine aircraft orientation (roll, pitch and yaw) values from an inertial navigation unit in the laser scanning unit, the angular orientation of the scanner mirror, and the range data to compute vectors from the aircraft to the reflecting surface. These vectors were added to the location of the aircraft, determined by phase difference kinematic Global Positioning System observations to compute the coordinates of the reflecting surface at each measurement epoch, expressed in UTM Northings and Eastings and ellipsoid heights. Commercial software was then used to create a variety of products, including 3D shaded relief `snapshots,' contour maps, false colored maps, cross sections and profiles. Repeat coverage was used to estimate the short term repeatability of the measurements and comparisons with cross sections from classical

  10. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  11. A linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized dye laser for application in laser cooling of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D P; Xia, Y; Yin, Y N; Yang, X X; Fang, Y F; Li, X J; Yin, J P

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a robust and versatile solution for locking the continuous-wave dye laser for applications in laser cooling of molecules which need linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized lasers. The dye laser is first stabilized with respect to a reference cavity by Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique which results in a single frequency with the linewidth 200 kHz and short-term stabilization, by stabilizing the length of the reference cavity to a stabilized helium-neon laser we simultaneously transfer the ± 2 MHz absolute frequency stability of the helium-neon laser to the dye laser with long-term stabilization. This allows the dye laser to be frequency chirped with the maximum 60 GHz scan range while its frequency remains locked. It also offers the advantages of locking at arbitrary dye laser frequencies, having a larger locking capture range and frequency scanning range to be implemented via software. This laser has been developed for the purpose of laser cooling a molecular magnesium fluoride beam.

  12. Effect of laser power and specimen temperature on atom probe analyses of magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh-ishi, K.; Mendis, C.L.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of laser power, wave length, and specimen temperature on laser assisted atom probe analyses for Mg alloys was investigated. Higher laser power and lower specimen temperature led to improved mass and spatial resolutions. Background noise and mass resolutions were degraded with lower laser power and higher specimen temperature. By adjusting the conditions for laser assisted atom probe analyses, atom probe results with atomic layer resolutions were obtained from all the Mg alloys so far investigated. Laser assisted atom probe investigations revealed detailed chemical information on Guinier-Preston zones in Mg alloys. -- Research highlights: → We study performance of UV laser assisted atom probe analysis for Mg alloys. → There is an optimized range of laser power and specimen temperature. → Optimized UV laser enables atom probe data of Mg alloys with high special resolution.

  13. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    by Chen et al where the driver, instead of being a laser, is a whistler wave known as the magnetowave plasma accelerator. The application to electron--positron plasmas that are found around pulsars is studied in the paper by Shukla, and to muon acceleration by Peano et al. Electron wakefield experiments are now concentrating on control and optimisation of high-quality beams that can be used as drivers for novel radiation sources. Studies by Thomas et al show that filamentation has a deleterious effect on the production of high quality mono-energetic electron beams and is caused by non-optimal choice of focusing geometry and/or electron density. It is crucial to match the focusing with the right plasma parameters and new types of plasma channels are being developed, such as the magnetically controlled plasma waveguide reported by Froula et al. The magnetic field provides a pressure profile shaping the channel to match the guiding conditions of the incident laser, resulting in predicted electron energies of 3GeV. In the forced laser-wakefield experiment Fang et al show that pump depletion reduces or inhibits the acceleration of electrons. One of the earlier laser acceleration concepts known as the beat wave may be revived due to the work by Kalmykov et al who report on all-optical control of nonlinear focusing of laser beams, allowing for stable propagation over several Rayleigh lengths with pre-injected electrons accelerated beyond 100 MeV. With the increasing number of petawatt lasers, attention is being focused on different acceleration regimes such as stochastic acceleration by counterpropagating laser pulses, the relativistic mirror, or the snow-plough effect leading to single-step acceleration reported by Mendonca. During wakefield acceleration the leading edge of the pulse undergoes frequency downshifting and head erosion as the laser energy is transferred to the wake while the trailing edge of the laser pulse undergoes frequency up-shift. This is commonly known

  14. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.A.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding

  15. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Mark Alan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  16. Laser-driven acceleration with Bessel and Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizi, B.; Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing the energy gain in laser-driven accelerators by using Bessel laser beams is examined. Scaling laws are derived for the propagation length, acceleration gradient, and energy gain in various accelerators for both Gaussian and Bessel beam drivers. For equal beam powers, the energy gain can be increased by a factor of N 1/2 by utilizing a Bessel beam with N lobes, provided that the acceleration gradient is linearly proportional to the laser field. This is the case in the inverse free electron laser and the inverse Cherenkov accelerators. If the acceleration gradient is proportional to the square of the laser field (e.g., the laser wakefield, plasma beat wave, and vacuum beat wave accelerators), the energy gain is comparable with either beam profile. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. No effect of embryo culture media on birthweight and length of newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shengli; Li, Ming; Lian, Ying; Chen, Lixue; Liu, Ping

    2013-07-01

    Does the type of media used to culture embryos for IVF influence the birthweight and length of neonates? No significant differences were observed in birthweight and length among the three embryo culture media used for in vitro embryo culture. Since the establishment of IVF as an assisted reproductive technology (ART), many different culture systems have been used for the development of human embryos. Some studies have shown that the types of culture media influence the newborn birthweight; however, other studies have shown no effect. To further explore this contradictory issue, we compared the birthweight and length of neonates born after the transfer of embryos cultured in one of three commercially available media. This retrospective analysis of birthweight and length of newborns included 1201 women who delivered singletons and 445 women who delivered twins. The following three commercially available culture media were used: G5™, Global and Quinn's advantage media. Women who underwent IVF-ET cycles between 2008 and 2010 were analyzed. Patients younger than 40 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) culture medium. Inter-twin mean birthweight and length disparities were analyzed, but were not shown to be significantly different. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that maternal weight, maternal height, gestational age and infant gender were significantly related to birthweight, and paternal height, gestational age and newborn complications were significantly associated with birth length. The current study showed that birthweight and length of newborns were not associated with the embryo culture medium. More research needs to be performed to analyze the effects of other culture medium formulations and to evaluate the long-term effects of embryo culture medium on the health of children conceived through ART. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THESE FINDINGS: Our retrospective study suggests that embryo culture medium does not influence neonatal birthweight and length

  18. Laser technology (selected articles)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-09

    This paper presents high-energy CW HF/DF chemical lasers developed under the U.S. Navy Sealite program and the Alpha program of the DARPA Triad program, and a brief account of Soviet chemical lasers. Continuous wave HF/DF chemical lasers were developed starting in the late sixties as high-power lasers of consistent interest to military circles. These are lasers that have the most matured technology among present-day high-energy lasers. It is hoped that in the near future CW HF/DF chemical lasers can be developed into a space laser weapon to deal with ICBMs. CW HF/DF chemical lasers are an integration of technologies in gas dynamics, chemistry, fluid chemistry, optics, and lasers. By using the branching chain reaction of heat liberation, inversion of the population ratio is generated to obtain lasers.

  19. Filamented plasmas in laser ablation of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. R.; Fajardo, M.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Polan, J.; Rus, B.

    2009-03-01

    We report results from laser-solid experiments at PALS using an x-ray laser probe with a pulse length of 0.1 ns and a wavelength of 21.2 nm. A laser with a pulse length of 0.3 ns, a peak intensity of up to 5 × 1013 W cm-2 and a wavelength of 1.3 µm was focused to a 0.15 mm wide line on 3 mm long zinc and 1 mm long iron targets and the probe was passed along the length of the plasma formed. The results show plasma 'hairs', or filaments, appearing only below the critical density, 0.1 ns before the peak of the laser pulse. The plasma around the critical density was clearly imaged and remained uniform. Magneto-hydrodynamic modelling indicates that this is caused by a magnetic field that diffuses from the critical surface, where it is generated, leading to a magnetic pressure comparable to the plasma pressure below the critical density. A dispersion relation is derived for density perturbations perpendicular to a temperature gradient in the presence of an existing magnetic field, which shows that such perturbations always grow, with the growth rate being the greatest for small wavelength perturbations and at low densities. These results indicate that the hair-like structures should be a typical feature of laser ablated plasmas below the critical density following significant plasma expansion, in agreement with numerous experimental results. The implications for x-ray lasers and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion are discussed.

  20. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  1. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  2. Health Care Expenditures and Length of Disability Across Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Catherine S; Ethiraj, Rajesh K; Berenji, Manijeh; Gaspar, Fraser W

    2018-02-19

    To describe the relationship between the length of short-term disability (STD) and health care spending. Medical claims for insured US employees on STD were evaluated to describe the distribution of disability durations and health expenditures across major diagnostic categories and common medical conditions. Correlations between health expenditures and disability durations were examined. The most expensive 10% of cases accounted for more than half of total health spending. The longest 10% of cases accounted for more than one-third of total disability time. Only one-third of the most expensive cases were also among the longest in duration. Disability durations were moderately correlated with medical spending and this relationship was modified by comorbid conditions and age. Psychosocial barriers, in addition to biomedical factors, should be considered to achieve optimal functional outcomes and well-being of patients.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.

  3. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, R. S.; Dallas, J. L.; Yu, A. W.; Mamakos, W. A.; Lukemire, A.; Schroeder, B.; Malak, A.

    2000-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), scheduled to launch in 2001, is a laser altimeter and lidar for tile Earth Observing System's (EOS) ICESat mission. The laser transmitter requirements, design and qualification test results for this space- based remote sensing instrument are presented.

  4. Benchmarking Commercial Conformer Ensemble Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Nils-Ole; de Bruyn Kops, Christina; Flachsenberg, Florian; Sommer, Kai; Rarey, Matthias; Kirchmair, Johannes

    2017-11-27

    We assess and compare the performance of eight commercial conformer ensemble generators (ConfGen, ConfGenX, cxcalc, iCon, MOE LowModeMD, MOE Stochastic, MOE Conformation Import, and OMEGA) and one leading free algorithm, the distance geometry algorithm implemented in RDKit. The comparative study is based on a new version of the Platinum Diverse Dataset, a high-quality benchmarking dataset of 2859 protein-bound ligand conformations extracted from the PDB. Differences in the performance of commercial algorithms are much smaller than those observed for free algorithms in our previous study (J. Chem. Inf. 2017, 57, 529-539). For commercial algorithms, the median minimum root-mean-square deviations measured between protein-bound ligand conformations and ensembles of a maximum of 250 conformers are between 0.46 and 0.61 Å. Commercial conformer ensemble generators are characterized by their high robustness, with at least 99% of all input molecules successfully processed and few or even no substantial geometrical errors detectable in their output conformations. The RDKit distance geometry algorithm (with minimization enabled) appears to be a good free alternative since its performance is comparable to that of the midranked commercial algorithms. Based on a statistical analysis, we elaborate on which algorithms to use and how to parametrize them for best performance in different application scenarios.

  5. Commission of the commercial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author analyses the commercial agent's commission as the most important type of remuneration for commercial agency. In the European Union the issue of commercial agent's commission is regulated in the Directive 86/653/EEC on self-employed commercial agents, whereas the Serbian Law on Obligations has still not been harmonised with those rules. Such state of law would change if and when the new Serbian Civil Code is enacted, since its latest Draft contains numerous new solutions, which were inspired by the Directive. The first part of the paper is dedicated to defining the term 'commission' and its distinguishing from the wider term 'remuneration'. Thereafter, the main types of commission are explained. The following part investigates whether the commission or its specific type constitutes essentialia or naturalia negotii of the contract on commercial agency. Finally, the last part of the paper deals with the amount and the extent of covering costs by the commission, in the absence of any agreement on that matter.

  6. Group Velocity Measurements in Laser-Heated Capillary Discharge Waveguides for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieronek, C. V.; Daniels, J.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Benedetti, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-10-01

    To date, the most energetic electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators have been produced using gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides, which increase the acceleration length by mitigating diffraction of the driving laser pulse. To reach higher electron beam energies, lower plasma density is required to reduce bunch dephasing. However, confinement of the driver is reduced for lower plasma density, reducing the acceleration length. A laser-heated capillary discharge waveguide, where the discharge is heated by a coaxial laser pulse, was proposed to create a steeper density gradient at lower density. Here the first measurements of group velocity in laser-heated capillary discharges, obtained via spectral interferometry, are presented. Increase of the driver group velocity and reduction in on-axis plasma density by laser-heating are shown. Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Additional support by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1415596.

  7. The Extent of Tissue Damage in the Epidural Space by Ho / YAG Laser During Epiduroscopic Laser Neural Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Daehyun; Lee, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Lasers have recently become very useful for epiduroscopy. As the use of lasers increases, the potential for unwanted complications with direct application of laser energy to nerve tissue has also increased. Even using the lowest laser power to test for nerve stimulation, there are still risks of laser ablation. However, there are no studies investigating tissue damage from laser procedures in the epidural space. This is a study on the risks of Ho/YAG laser usage during epiduroscopy. Observatory cadaver study. Department of anatomy and clinical research institute at the University Hospital. We used 5 cadavers for this study. After removing the dura and nerve root from the spinal column, laser energy from a Ho/YAG laser was applied directly to the dura and nerve root as well as in the virtual epidural space, which mimicked the conditions of epiduroscopy with the dura folded. Tissue destruction at all laser ablation sites was observed with the naked eye as well as with a microscope. Specimens were collected from each site of laser exposure, fixed in 10% neutral formalin, and dyed with H/E staining. Tissue destruction was observed in all laser ablation sites, regardless of the length of exposure and the power of the laser beam. A cadaver is not exactly the same as a living human because dura characteristics change and tissue damage can be influenced by dura thickness according to the spinal level. Even with low power and short duration, a laser can destroy tissue if the laser beam makes direct contact with the tissue.

  8. Extended-length fiber optic carbon dioxide monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Alonso, Jesus; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of fiber optic distributed intrinsic sensors for dissolved carbon dioxide, based on the use optical fibers fabricated so that their entire lengths are chemically sensitive. These fibers use a polymer-clad, silica-core structure where the cladding undergoes a large, reversible, change in optical absorbance in the presence of CO2. The local "cladding loss" induced by this change is thus a direct indication of the carbon dioxide concentration in any section of the fiber. To create these fibers, have developed a carbon dioxide-permeable polymer material that adheres well to glass, is physically robust, has a refractive index lower than fused silica, and acts as excellent hosts for a unique colorimetric indicator system that respond to CO2. We have used this proprietary material to produce carbon-dioxide sensitive fibers up to 50 meters long, using commercial optical fiber fabrication techniques. The sensors have shown a measurement range of dissolved CO2 of 0 to 1,450 mg/l (0 to 100% CO2 saturation), limit of detection of 0.3 mg/l and precision of 1.0 mg/l in the 0 to 50 mg/l dissolved CO2 range, when a 5 meter-long sensor fiber segment is used. Maximum fiber length, minimum detectable concentration, and spatial resolution can be adjusted by adjusting indicator concentration and fiber design.

  9. Generation of 70-fs pulses at 286 μm from a mid-infrared fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Hudson, D. D.; Fuerbach, A.; Jackson, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple route to few-optical-cycle pulse generation from a mid-infrared fiber laser through nonlinear compression of pulses from a holmium-doped fiber oscillator using a short length of chalcogenide fiber and a grating pair. Pulses from the oscillator with 265-fs duration at 2.86 {\\mu}m are spectrally broadened through self-phase modulation in step-index As2S3 fiber to 141-nm bandwidth and then re-compressed to 70 fs (7.3 optical cycles). These are the shortest pulses from a mid-infrared fiber system to date, and we note that our system is compact, robust, and uses only commercially available components. The scalability of this approach is also discussed, supported by numerical modeling.

  10. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  11. Laser wafering for silicon solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-01-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W p (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs (∼20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions (∼50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 (micro)m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  12. Aerodynamic window for a laser fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Wataru

    1983-01-01

    Since the window of a laser system absorbs a part of the laser energy, the output power is determined by the characteristics of the window. The use of an aerodynamic window has been studied. The required characteristics are to keep the large pressure difference. An equation of motion of a vortex was presented and analyzed. The operation power of the system was studied. A multi-stage aerodynamic window was proposed to reduce the power. When the jet flow of 0.3 of the Mach number is used, the operation power will be several Megawatt, and the length of an optical path will be about 100 m. (Kato, T.)

  13. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G; Subach, Fedor V; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2009-05-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (approximately 480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting "fine-tuning" of excitation wavelength to particular probes. (c) 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  14. A Computer-Controlled Laser Bore Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Charles C.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the design and engineering of a laser scanning system for production applications. The laser scanning techniques, the timing control, the logic design of the pattern recognition subsystem, the digital computer servo control for the loading and un-loading of parts, and the laser probe rotation and its synchronization will be discussed. The laser inspection machine is designed to automatically inspect the surface of precision-bored holes, such as those in automobile master cylinders, without contacting the machined surface. Although the controls are relatively sophisticated, operation of the laser inspection machine is simple. A laser light beam from a commercially available gas laser, directed through a probe, scans the entire surface of the bore. Reflected light, picked up through optics by photoelectric sensors, generates signals that are fed to a mini-computer for processing. A pattern recognition techniques program in the computer determines acceptance or rejection of the part being inspected. The system's acceptance specifications are adjustable and are set to the user's established tolerances. However, the computer-controlled laser system is capable of defining from 10 to 75 rms surface finish, and voids or flaws from 0.0005 to 0.020 inch. Following the successful demonstration with an engineering prototype, the described laser machine has proved its capability to consistently ensure high-quality master brake cylinders. It thus provides a safety improvement for the automotive braking system. Flawless, smooth cylinder bores eliminate premature wearing of the rubber seals, resulting in a longer-lasting master brake cylinder and a safer and more reliable automobile. The results obtained from use of this system, which has been in operation about a year for replacement of a tedious, manual operation on one of the high-volume lines at the Bendix Hydraulics Division, have been very satisfactory.

  15. Commercial formalin substitutes for histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentø, P; Lyon, H

    1997-01-01

    We compared the performance of six commercial fixatives proposed to be formalin substitutes with the performance of buffered formalin, Clarke's ethanol-acetic acid, and ethanol, using rat liver, small intestine, and kidney. We investigated the rate of penetration, mode of fixation, extent...... performed equally well on all tissues tested. While several of the commercial fixatives appeared to preserve liver tissue at 200x, the preservation of kidney, intestinal villi, and smooth muscle was unacceptable. Histological distortion, cell shrinkage and vacuolization were prominent when the substitutes...... was obtained by combining formalin fixation with antigen retrieval. We conclude that none of the proposed commercial substitutes for buffered formalin are adequate for critical histology or histopathology....

  16. New Phenomenon of Commercial Corruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Nowakowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about increase corruption in private sector as commercial corruption. This establishes a wide understanding of that phenomenon in social science and law. Corruption and bribery are types of fraud and are linked with the private sector too. Although certain types of corruption will decline as the private sector grows and consolidates, other new types involving private sector firms may increase. The commercial corruption can be described as relation inside of an organization and as relation between firms. Corruption in private sector in Poland is connected with social distrust and specific organizational culture, too. Commercial corruption is a familiar feature of their societies and has been the focus of law enforcement and institutional reform. Many others problems do not change the fact that such corruption is a new important problem and causes lost of competitiveness and creates a substitute for fair market and competition in Polish economy and abroad.

  17. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p<1.1×10-5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  18. Commercialization project of Ulchin vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Cheon-Woo; Hwang, Tae-Won

    2011-01-01

    The Ulchin Vitrification Facility (UVF), to be used for the vitirification of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs), is the world's first commercial facility using Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology. The construction of the facility was begun in 2005 and was completed in 2007. From December 2007 to September 2009, all key performance tests, such as the system functional test, the cold test, the hot test, and the real waste test, were successfully carried out. The UVF commenced commercial operation in October 2009 for the vitrification of radioactive waste. (author)

  19. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  20. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welt, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent positive developments in regulatory matters involving food irradiation appear to be opening the door to commercial implementation of the technology. Experience gained over five years in operating multi-purpose food irradiation facilities in the United States have demonstrated the technical and economic feasibility of the radiation preservation of food for a wide variety of purposes. Public education regarding food irradiation has been intensified especially with the growing favorable involvement of food trade associations, the USDA, and the American Medical Association. After 41 years of development effort, food irradiation will become a commercial reality in 1985. (author)

  1. Commercial applications of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchings, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The fact that industry is now willing to pay the full commercial cost for certain neutron scattering experiments aimed at solving its urgent materials - related problems is a true testimony to the usefulness of neutrons as microscopic probes. This paper gives examples of such use of three techniques drawn mainly from our experience at AEA Technology Harwell Laboratory. These are diffraction to measure residual stress, small angle neutron scattering to examine hardening precipitates in ferritic steels brought about by irradiation, and reflectivity to study amorphous diamond layers deposited on silicon. In most cases it is the penetrative power of the neutron which proves to be its best asset for commercial industrial applicaitons. (author)

  2. Transnational Litigation and Commercial Arbitration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lookofsky, Joseph; Hertz, Ketilbjørn

    Transnational Litigation and Commercial Arbitration is a case-oriented study of the key rules and procedures which regulate the resolution of commercial disputes arising in a transnational context. The study explains and compares European and American rules of private international and procedural...... law. Each case is introduced both by a paradigm model, emphasizing and simplifying the key operative facts, as well as by a doctrinal presentation of the main issues and sources of American, European, or international law concerned. The court decisions themselves are all extensively edited...

  3. COMMERCIAL FUND, RECOGNITION AND ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIOREL TRIF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the immaterial investments within companies nowadays urges the specialists in accounting to find the ways to present more in the elements. In their studies researchers face the controversy reinvestments, as an asset in the balance sheet or an expense in the profit or loss account. The main goal of this paper is to analyze the difficulties in commercial fund. In the first part we will analyze various definitions of the problems concerning the commercial fund’s recognition and assessment. The paper also suggests that investments are really social and economic problems.

  4. Ultrasound Assessment of Cervical Length in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shine Chao

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical length in high-risk women for preterm birth has to be identified before early second trimester. Sequential evaluations lead to high predictive significance. The mean cervical length at 24 weeks is about 35 mm when measured by transvaginal ultrasound. A short cervix is defined as a cervix that is less than 25 mm and funneling, i.e. ballooning of the membranes into a dilated internal os, but with a closed external os. Factors such as short cervical length, uterine anomaly, previous cervical surgery, multiple gestation and positive fetal fibronectin results are associated with preterm delivery. Serial transvaginal ultrasound examinations during the early second trimester would provide longitudinal changes in the cervical length. The use of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate and cerclage has shown to be beneficial in preventing preterm delivery. When combined with other predictors such as occiput position, parity, maternal age and body mass index, cervical length is a useful parameter for predicting the feasibility of labor induction and successful delivery.

  5. Length expectation values in quantum Regge calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsymovsky, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Regge calculus configuration superspace can be embedded into a more general superspace where the length of any edge is defined ambiguously depending on the 4-tetrahedron containing the edge. Moreover, the latter superspace can be extended further so that even edge lengths in each the 4-tetrahedron are not defined, only area tensors of the 2-faces in it are. We make use of our previous result concerning quantization of the area tensor Regge calculus which gives finite expectation values for areas. Also our result is used showing that quantum measure in the Regge calculus can be uniquely fixed once we know quantum measure on (the space of the functionals on) the superspace of the theory with ambiguously defined edge lengths. We find that in this framework quantization of the usual Regge calculus is defined up to a parameter. The theory may possess nonzero (of the order of Planck scale) or zero length expectation values depending on whether this parameter is larger or smaller than a certain value. Vanishing length expectation values means that the theory is becoming continuous, here dynamically in the originally discrete framework

  6. Functional scoliosis caused by leg length discrepancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniszewska, Barbara; Zolynski, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Leg length discrepancy (LLD) causes pelvic obliquity in the frontal plane and lumbar scoliosis with convexity towards the shorter extremity. Leg length discrepancy is observed in 3-15% of the population. Unequalized lower limb length discrepancy leads to posture deformation, gait asymmetry, low back pain and discopathy. Material and methods In the years 1998-2006, 369 children, aged 5 to 17 years (209 girls, 160 boys) with LLD-related functional scoliosis were treated. An external or internal shoe lift was applied. Results Among 369 children the discrepancy of 0.5 cm was observed in 27, 1 cm in 329, 1.5 cm in 9 and 2 cm in 4 children. During the first follow-up examination, within 2 weeks, the adjustment of the spine to new static conditions was noted and correction of the curve in 316 examined children (83.7%). In 53 children (14.7%) the correction was observed later and was accompanied by slight low back pain. The time needed for real equalization of limbs was 3 to 24 months. The time needed for real equalization of the discrepancy was 11.3 months. Conclusions Leg length discrepancy equalization results in elimination of scoliosis. Leg length discrepancy < 2 cm is a static disorder; that is why measurements should be performed in a standing position using blocks of adequate thickness and the position of the posterior superior iliac spine should be estimated. PMID:22371777

  7. LLL Laser-Fusion-Program overview and future directions in laser fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The primary goal of the inertial-fusion program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is to demonstrate the scientific feasibility of the inertial-fusion concept using high-power glass: Nd lasers. The authors anticipate achieving a most important milestone-ignition-with the full (300kJ) Nova facility in the mid to late 1980s. Confidence in reaching this goal is based on the significant progress we have made in the state-of-the-art high power glass: Nd laser technology, in diagnosing and executing laser fusion and laser-plasma interaction experiments, and in theoretical and analytical computer codes which reliably model experimental results. Looking ahead to eventual civilian application, LLL is also making excellent progress in the areas of commercial reactor design, advanced target design and fabrication, and the advanced drivers required

  8. Laser trabeculoplasty.

    OpenAIRE

    Coakes, R

    1992-01-01

    Using the now well established technique ALT is a safe and effective means of lowering IOP in eyes with POAG, pigmentary glaucoma, and exfoliative glaucoma though the effect diminishes with time. Pressure reduction with ALT is seldom greater than 30% and eyes with an IOP of more than 28 mm Hg are unlikely to be controlled for any length of time without additional treatment. ALT is probably most suitable either for older patients whose glaucoma is not well controlled on medical treatment, or f...

  9. Laser safety and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, K.S.

    1995-01-01

    Lasers are finding increasing routine applications in many areas of science, medicine and industry. Though laser radiation is non-ionizing in nature, the usage of high power lasers requires specific safety procedures. This paper briefly outlines the properties of laser beams and various safety procedures necessary in their handling and usage. (author)

  10. Visible Solid State Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikmet, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Diode lasers can be found in various applications most notably in optical communication and optical storage. Visible lasers were until recently were all based on IR diode lasers. Using GaN, directly blue and violet emitting lasers have also been introduced to the market mainly in the area of optical

  11. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  12. High brightness diode lasers controlled by volume Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glebov, Leonid

    2017-02-01

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass are holographic optical elements that are effective spectral and angular filters withstanding high power laser radiation. Reflecting VBGs are narrow-band spectral filters while transmitting VBGs are narrow-band angular filters. The use of these optical elements in external resonators of semiconductor lasers enables extremely resonant feedback that provides dramatic spectral and angular narrowing of laser diodes radiation without significant power and efficiency penalty. Spectral narrowing of laser diodes by reflecting VBGs demonstrated in wide spectral region from near UV to 3 μm. Commercially available VBGs have spectral width ranged from few nanometers to few tens of picometers. Efficient spectral locking was demonstrated for edge emitters (single diodes, bars, modules, and stacks), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), grating coupled surface emitting lasers (GCSELs), and interband cascade lasers (ICLs). The use of multiplexed VBGs provides multiwavelength emission from a single emitter. Spectrally locked semiconductor lasers demonstrated CW power from milliwatts to a kilowatt. Angular narrowing by transmitting VBGs enables single transverse mode emission from wide aperture diode lasers having resonators with great Fresnel numbers. This feature provides close to diffraction limit divergence along a slow axis of wide stripe edge emitters. Radiation exchange between lasers by means of spatially profiled or multiplexed VBGs enables coherent combining of diode lasers. Sequence of VBGs or multiplexed VBGs enable spectral combining of spectrally narrowed diode lasers or laser modules. Thus the use of VBGs for diode lasers beam control provides dramatic increase of brightness.

  13. Determination of two-dimensional correlation lengths in an anisotropic two-component flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, O.

    1994-05-01

    Former studies have shown that correlation methods can be used for determination of various two-component flow parameters, among these the correlation length. In cases where the flow can be described as a mixture, in which the minority component forms spatially limited perturbations within the majority component, this parameter gives a good indication of the maximum extension of these perturbations. In the former studies, spherical symmetry of the perturbations has been assumed, and the correlation length has been measured in the direction of the flow (axially) only. However, if the flow structure is anisotropic, the correlation length will be different in different directions. In the present study, the method has been developed further, allowing also measurements perpendicular to the flow direction (radially). The measurements were carried out using laser beams and the two-component flows consisted of either glass beads and air or air and water. In order to make local measurements of both the axial and radial correlation length simultaneously, it is necessary to use 3 laser beams and to form the triple cross-covariance. This lead to some unforeseen complications, due to the character of this function. The experimental results are generally positive and size determinations with an accuracy of better than 10% have been achieved in most cases. Less accurate results appeared only for difficult conditions (symmetrical signals), when 3 beams were used. 5 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Laser Texturing of Magnetic Recording Media Final Report CRADA No. TSV-1298-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackel, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marshall, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    The Commercial Laser Systems Group at LLNL developed a concept for patterning of computer magnetic recording discs. Magnetic recording media require texturing over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate was polished to a specular finish then a mechanical means was used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. In a previous patent (US Patent 5,062,021) it was proposed that the focused output of a low power laser with short pulse length could be used to generate the textured pattern. However, the patterned area typically required 75,000 textured spots that needed to be rapidly (less than 10 seconds) printed with good uniformity. A means to achieve the accurate placement and uniform profile, as well as a meaningfully rapid process time, was not discussed in the referenced patent. The LLNL team devised a system that could rapidly and inexpensively accomplish the texturing.

  15. Thermal Analysis of InAs/AlSb Short Wavelength Mid-IR Quantum Cascade Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wei; Ai-Zhen, Li; Gang-Yi, Xu

    2009-01-01

    We present the effects of hetero-interfaces and major key parameters on the thermal behaviors and performance of short wavelength mid-IR InAs/AlSb quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). We use a finite element method (FEM) with commercial software, ANSYS, to simulate the heat dissipation in QCLs in cw operation mode with an epilayer-down mounting package. The thermal performance is characterized by the temperature increase ΔT (self-heating effect) between the active region of QCLs and the heatsink. Results show that (1) the self-heating effects of InAs/AlSb QCLs are much less than those in AlInAs/GaInAs QCLs, (2) narrower ridges lead to significantly cooler active regions of InAs/AlSb QCLs due to poor heat transport in the cross-plane direction (across interfaces) and that most of the heat flows out of the active region in the lateral direction, and (3) the cavity length of the laser has little influence on the self-heating effect of the device, but the long cavity reduces mirror loss and threshold current density. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  16. Laser EXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Schwenzel, R.E.; Campbell, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus for obtaining EXAFS data of a material, comprising means for directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target in such manner as to produce X-rays at the target of a selected spectrum and intensity, suitable for obtaining the EXAFS spectrum of the material, means for directing X-rays from the target onto spectral dispersive means so located as to direct the spectrally resolved X-rays therefrom onto recording means, and means for positioning a sample of material in the optical path of the X-rays, the recording means providing a reference spectrum of X-rays not affected by the sample and absorption spectrum of X-rays modified by transmission through the sample

  17. Laser Microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Andra R; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Siegal, Gene P; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Tangrea, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Laser microdissection (LM) offers a relatively rapid and precise method of isolating and removing specified cells from complex tissues for subsequent analysis of their RNA, DNA, protein or metabolite content, thereby allowing assessment of the role of different cell types in the normal physiological or disease processes being studied. In this unit, protocols for the preparation of mammalian frozen tissues, fixed tissues, and cytologic specimens for LM, including tissue freezing, tissue processing and paraffin embedding, histologic sectioning, cell processing, hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry, and image-guided cell targeting are presented. Also provided are recipes for generating lysis buffers for the recovery of nucleic acids and proteins. The Commentary section addresses the types of specimens that can be utilized for LM and approaches to staining of specimens for cell visualization. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of tissue or cytologic specimens as this is critical to effective LM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Diode lasers for interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschter, Rolf; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Anson, K.; Jahnen, P.; Vargas Stuve, Juan C.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Sroka, Ronald; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Vaughan, Darracott E., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The concept of interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) of the prostate is the generation of intraprostatic lesions of large volumes, which secondarily are resorbed. In previously published experimental and clinical studies Nd:YAG lasers in combination with specially designed light guides were used. The aim of this study was to examine the suitability of diode lasers to be used in ILC. Diode lasers of various wavelengths (805 nm, 830 nm, 950 nm and 980 nm) with different interstitial applicators (predominantly diffusor tips) were tested in vitro (potatoes, turkey muscle, porcine liver) and in vivo (canine prostate). In vitro experiments were done with various powers and radiation times in order to evaluate the maximum lesion size achievable without tissue carbonization. This depended on the length of the applicator and could measure more than 20 mm. To get large lesion volumes with short radiation times, but to avoid charring, in vivo graded powers were favorable. These were optimized for some systems. In the canine prostate, lesion diameters of up to 15 mm were achieved. For clinical use, interstitial applicators were inserted into the bulky BPH transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision, either directly or aided by an introducer system. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland and varied between 3 and 16. With the 980 nm diode laser and an applicator with conical beam pattern, irradiation was performed for 3 minutes per fiber placement using stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s and 7 W for 90 s). With the 830 nm diode laser and diffusor tip, the initial power of 10 W was reduced to 5 W within 4 minutes total radiation time. From 1993, 19 patients were treated with diode lasers (830 and 980 nm). Three months follow-up in 15 patients treated with 830 nm showed an AUA-score change from 18.9 to 5.9 and a peak flow rate change from 7.8 to 15.2 ml/s.

  19. Current military laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flinchbaugh, D.E.

    1975-08-01

    Several important military applications with the predominant laser type used are reviewed. Most of these lasers are infrared lasers of one sort or another. Airborne tactical programs utilizing laser designator/illuminators are pictorially summarized, including range finding, target seeking, designation, tracking, reconnaissance, and surveillance. A typical designator optical system configuration is presented and discussed. Examples of operational laser systems are given. It is seen that many of the laser applications in the civilian community have either direct or indirect analogs in the military field. A self-contained HF/DF chemical laser weapon that recirculates its by-products is examined.

  20. 19 CFR 113.67 - Commercial gauger and commercial laboratory bond conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial gauger and commercial laboratory bond... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Customs Bond Conditions § 113.67 Commercial gauger and commercial laboratory bond conditions. Commercial Gauger Bond Conditions (a) Commercial gauger bond...