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Sample records for lena delta siberia

  1. Transient modeling of the ground thermal conditions using satellite data in the Lena River delta, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Sebastian; Peter, Maria; Langer, Moritz; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Etzelmüller, Bernd; Boike, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Permafrost is a sensitive element of the cryosphere, but operational monitoring of the ground thermal conditions on large spatial scales is still lacking. Here, we demonstrate a remote-sensing-based scheme that is capable of estimating the transient evolution of ground temperatures and active layer thickness by means of the ground thermal model CryoGrid 2. The scheme is applied to an area of approximately 16 000 km2 in the Lena River delta (LRD) in NE Siberia for a period of 14 years. The forcing data sets at 1 km spatial and weekly temporal resolution are synthesized from satellite products and fields of meteorological variables from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. To assign spatially distributed ground thermal properties, a stratigraphic classification based on geomorphological observations and mapping is constructed, which accounts for the large-scale patterns of sediment types, ground ice and surface properties in the Lena River delta. A comparison of the model forcing to in situ measurements on Samoylov Island in the southern part of the study area yields an acceptable agreement for the purpose of ground thermal modeling, for surface temperature, snow depth, and timing of the onset and termination of the winter snow cover. The model results are compared to observations of ground temperatures and thaw depths at nine sites in the Lena River delta, suggesting that thaw depths are in most cases reproduced to within 0.1 m or less and multi-year averages of ground temperatures within 1-2 °C. Comparison of monthly average temperatures at depths of 2-3 m in five boreholes yielded an RMSE of 1.1 °C and a bias of -0.9 °C for the model results. The highest ground temperatures are calculated for grid cells close to the main river channels in the south as well as areas with sandy sediments and low organic and ice contents in the central delta, where also the largest thaw depths occur. On the other hand, the lowest temperatures are modeled for the eastern part, which is an

  2. Characterization of terrestrial organic matter transported through the Lena River Delta (NE Siberia) to its adjacent nearshore zone using lignin phenols, δ13C and Δ14C

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    Winterfeld, M.; Goni, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Han, P.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OMterr) from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Permafrost soils from its vast catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ13C and Δ14C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta. A simple linear mixing model based on the lignin phenol distributions indicates OM in TSM samples from the delta and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contains comparable contributions from gymnosperm sources, which are primarily from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small area covered by tundra (~12% of total catchment), the input of tundra-derived OM input is substantial and likely to increase in a warming Arctic. Radiocarbon compositions (Δ14C) of bulk OM in TSM samples varied from -55 to -391‰, i.e. 14C ages of 395 to 3920 yrs BP. Using δ13C compositions to estimate the fraction of phytoplankton-derived OM and assuming that this material has a modern 14C signature, we inferred the Δ14C compositions of OMterr in TSM exported by the Lena River to range between -190 and -700‰. Such variability in the ages of OMTERR (i.e. 1640 to 9720 14C yrs BP) reflects the heterogeneous composition and residence time of OM in the Lena River catchment soils (Holocene to Pleistocene ages). Lignin phenol and Δ14C compositions of surface sediments from the adjacent Buor Khaya Bay suggest that OMTERR deposited there is older and more degraded than materials present in river particles and catchment soils. Stronger

  3. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 2: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

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    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2015-04-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south-stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl : vanillyl (C / V) and syringyl : vanillyl (S / V) ratios are > 0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are > 0.16 and > 0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C / V and S / V ratios, and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (~ 12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad / AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (> 0.7 and > 0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (> 1.0 and > 0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River

  4. Characterization of particulate organic matter in the Lena River Delta and adjacent nearshore zone, NE Siberia - Part 1: Lignin-derived phenol compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goñi, M. A.; Just, J.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2014-10-01

    The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial organic matter (OM) from its vast catchment area to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The permafrost soils of its far south stretching catchment, which store huge amounts of OM, will most likely respond differently to climate warming and remobilize previously frozen OM with distinct properties specific for the source vegetation and soil. To characterize the material discharged by the Lena River, we analyzed the lignin phenol composition in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface water collected in spring and summer, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex), and plant samples. Our results show that lignin-derived cinnamyl:vanillyl (C/V) and syringyl:vanillyl (S/V) ratios are >0.14 and 0.25, respectively, in TSM and surface sediments, whereas in delta soils they are >0.16 and >0.51, respectively. These lignin compositions are consistent with significant inputs of organic matter from non-woody angiosperm sources mixed with organic matter derived from woody gymnosperm sources. We applied a simple linear mixing model based on the C/V and S/V ratios and the results indicate the organic matter in delta TSM samples and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments contain comparable contributions from gymnosperm material, which is primarily derived from the taiga forests south of the delta, and angiosperm material typical for tundra vegetation. Considering the small catchment area covered by tundra (∼12%), the input is substantial and tundra-derived OM input is likely to increase in a warming Arctic. The similar and high acid to aldehyde ratios of vanillyl and syringyl (Ad/AlV, S) in Lena Delta summer TSM (>0.7 and >0.5, respectively) and Buor Khaya Bay surface sediments (>1.0 and >0.9, respectively) suggest that the OM is highly degraded and Lena River summer TSM could

  5. The exchange of energy, water and carbon dioxide between wet arctic tundra and the atmosphere at the Lena River Delta, Northern Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutzbach, L.

    2006-07-01

    The ecosystem-scale exchange fluxes of energy, water and carbon dioxide between wet arctic tundra and the atmosphere were investigated by the micrometeorological eddy covariance method. The investigation site was the centre of the Lena River Delta in Northern Siberia characterised by a polar and distinctly continental climate, very cold and ice-rich permafrost and its position at the interface between the Eurasian continent and the Arctic Ocean. The measurements were performed on the surface of a Holocene river terrace characterised by wet polygonal tundra. The soils at the site are characterised by high organic matter content, low nutrient availability and pronounced water logging. The vegetation is dominated by sedges and mosses. The fluctuations of the H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations were measured with a closed-path infrared gas analyser. The fast-response eddy covariance measurements were supplemented by a set of slow-response meteorological and soil-meteorological measurements. The combined datasets of the two campaigns 2003 and 2004 were used to characterise the seasonal course of the energy, water and CO{sub 2} fluxes and the underlying processes for the synthetic measurement period May 28..October 21 2004/2003 including the period of snow and soil thawing as well as the beginning of refreezing. The synthetic measurement period 2004/2003 was characterised by a long snow ablation period and a late start of the growing season. On the other hand, the growing season ended also late due to high temperatures and snow-free conditions in September. The cumulative summer energy partitioning was characterised by low net radiation, large ground heat flux, low latent heat flux and very low sensible heat flux compared to other tundra sites. These findings point out the major importance of the very cold permafrost for the summer energy budget of the tundra in Northern Siberia. (orig./SR)

  6. Baseline characteristics of climate, permafrost and land cover from a new permafrost observatory in the Lena River Delta, Siberia (1998–2011

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    J. Boike

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Samoylov Island is centrally located within the Lena River Delta at 72° N, 126° E and lies within the Siberian zone of continuous permafrost. The landscape on Samoylov Island consists mainly of late Holocene river terraces with polygonal tundra, ponds and lakes, and an active floodplain. The island has been the focus of numerous multidisciplinary studies since 1993, which have focused on climate, land cover, ecology, hydrology, permafrost and limnology. This paper aims to provide a framework for future studies by describing the characteristics of the island's meteorological parameters (temperature, radiation and snow cover, soil temperature, and soil moisture. The land surface characteristics have been described using high resolution aerial images in combination with data from ground-based observations. Of note is that deeper permafrost temperatures have increased between 0.3 to 1.3 °C over the last five years. However, no clear warming of air and active layer temperatures is detected since 1998, though winter air temperatures during recent years have not been as cold as in earlier years. Data related to this article are archived under: http://doi. pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.806233 .

  7. Reconstructing the landscape structure of the Lena-Angara interfluve (south part of Eastern Siberia)

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    Atutova, Zhanna

    2015-04-01

    which were sown as a test and as frost/freeze protection for grain crops. The meadow complexes in this territory are the result of the economic activities; therefore, they were concentrated mainly nearby human residence. The banks of the Ilga river were populated by Tungus tribes, who were engaged in hunting, because they fell short of meadow spaces. The upper reaches of the Kulenga were the home for uluses (inhabited summer localities of the Buryats) with nearby utuks, a peculiar kind of artificial meadows where grasses were not sown but grew by themselves, without any human participation. The research done in this study forms part of the program focusing on the study into different-time characteristics of the landscape structure for the southern areas of the Angara-Lena interfluve. The findings will be compared with the contemporary landscape structure in order to determine the spatiotemporal specific character of variability in natural and transformed complexes. The reported study was partially supported by RFBR and Government of Irkutsk region, project No 14-45-04002 r_siberia_a.

  8. Going with the flow: Hydrologic response of middle Lena River (Siberia) to the climate variability and change

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    Gautier, Emmanuèle; Dépret, Thomas; Costard, François; Virmoux, Clément; Fedorov, Alexander; Grancher, Delphine; Konstantinov, Pavel; Brunstein, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Recent observations indicate that over the last decades, climate change has increasingly influenced the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme climatic and hydrologic events. The main aim of this study is to determine the hydrologic response, especially the flood evolution, of the Lena River in Eastern Siberia to ongoing climate change. Draining the coldest region of the Northern Hemisphere, the Lena River is impacted by global warming, which is particularly pronounced in periglacial areas characterized by deep and continuous permafrost. We document the hydrologic variability of the Middle Lena River, first by characterizing trend and stationarity of monthly discharges. Second, we analyze on the basis of the peak over threshold method (POT) the temporal evolution of intensity and duration of three discharge classes: bar-full discharge, bank-full discharge and large floods. Finally, we also determined the dates of the flood beginning and of the flood peak. Data on mean monthly discharge and flood peaks are available since 1936 and daily discharges since 1954. Our results provide evidence for a net hydrologic change with an increase in the intensity and duration of floods in the two decades ending in 2012. The frequency of high floods is unprecedented, and small floods no longer occur. The tail of the temporal distribution of the flood peak is also changing. More frequent early floods are occurring in spring with secondary flood peaks in summer, the latest probably represents the most striking change. Furthermore, the changes have been accelerating since 2004. Finally, two islands were instrumented (2008-2012) in order to study the flooding dynamics with a better precision.

  9. 137Cs distribution and geochemistry of Lena River (Siberia) drainage basin lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson-Pyrtle, A.; Scott, M.R.; Laing, T.E.; Smol, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The Lena River is the second largest river that discharges into the Arctic Ocean. It is therefore important to determine not only the direct impact its discharge has on the 137Cs concentration of the Arctic, but also the potential its drainage basin has as a 137Cs source. 137Cs surface sediment concentrations and inventory values, which range from 4.97 to 338 Bq kg -1 and 357 to 1732 Bq m -2 , respectively, were determined for the Lena River drainage basin lake samples, via gamma analysis. The average geochemical and mineralogical composition of a subset of samples was also determined using neutron activation analysis, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry techniques. Results of these geochemical analyses allowed for the identification of key geochemical factors that influence the distribution of 137Cs in the Lena River drainage basin. 137Cs profiles indicate that Lena River drainage basin lacustrine sediments serve as a record of 137Cs fallout. Based on the downcore 137Cs, %illite, %smectite, %Al and %Mn distribution patterns, it was concluded that a small fraction of non-selectively bound 137Cs was remobilized at depth in some cores. Inconsistencies between the actual 137Cs fallout record and the 137Cs profiles determined for the lake sediments were attributed to 137Cs remobilization in subsurface sediments. In addition to establishing the agreement between the global atmospheric fallout record and the downcore 137Cs distribution patterns determined for these sediments, results indicate that 137Cs deposited during periods of maximum atmospheric release was buried and is not susceptible to surface erosion processes. However, mean 137Cs concentrations of the lacustrine surface sediments (125 Bq kg -1 ) are still significantly higher than those of the nearby Lena River estuary (11.22 Bq kg -1 ) and Laptev Sea (6.00 Bq kg -1 ). Our study suggests that the Lena River drainage basin has the potential to serve as a source of 137Cs to the adjacent Arctic

  10. Distribution of methane in the Lena Delta and Buor-Khaya Bay, Russia

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    I. Bussmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Lena River is one of the largest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. The permafrost areas surrounding the Lena are predicted to thaw at increasing rates due to global temperature increases. With this thawing, large amounts of carbon – either organic or in the gaseous forms carbon dioxide and methane – will reach the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Buor-Khaya Bay (Laptev Sea. Methane concentrations and the isotopic signal of methane in the waters of the Lena Delta and estuary were monitored from 2008 to 2010. Creeks draining from permafrost soils produced hotspots for methane input into the river system (median concentration 1500 nM compared with concentrations of 30–85 nM observed in the main channels of the Lena. No microbial methane oxidation could be detected; thus diffusion is the main process of methane removal. We estimated that the riverine diffusive methane flux is 3–10 times higher than the flux from surrounding terrestrial environment. To maintain the observed methane concentrations in the river, additional methane sources are necessary. The methane-rich creeks could be responsible for this input. In the estuary of Buor-Khaya Bay, methane concentrations decreased to 26–33 nM. However, within the bay no consistent temporal and spatial pattern could be observed. The methane-rich waters of the river were not diluted with marine water because of a strong stratification of the water column. Thus, methane is released from the estuary and from the river mainly by diffusion into the atmosphere.

  11. Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013

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    Bussmann, Ingeborg; Hackbusch, Steffen; Schaal, Patrick; Wichels, Antje

    2017-11-01

    The Lena River is one of the largest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. The predicted increases in global temperatures are expected to cause the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta to melt at increasing rates. This melting will result in high amounts of methane reaching the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. The only biological sink that can lower methane concentrations within this system is methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River, due to its strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature, is a challenging environment for bacteria. We determined the activity and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria by a tracer method and by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We described the methanotrophic population with a molecular fingerprinting method (monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis), as well as the methane distribution (via a headspace method) and other abiotic parameters, in the Lena Delta in September 2013. The median methane concentrations were 22 nmol L-1 for riverine water (salinity (S) 20). The Lena River was not the source of methane in surface water, and the methane concentrations of the bottom water were mainly influenced by the methane concentration in surface sediments. However, the bacterial populations of the riverine and polar waters showed similar methane oxidation rates (0.419 and 0.400 nmol L-1 d-1), despite a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher estimated diversity in the riverine water than in the polar water. The methane turnover times ranged from 167 days in mixed water and 91 days in riverine water to only 36 days in polar water. The environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population also differed between the water masses. We postulate the presence of a riverine methanotrophic population that is limited by sub-optimal temperatures and substrate concentrations and a polar

  12. Spatial variation in concentration and sources of organic carbon in the Lena River, Siberia

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    Kutscher, Liselott; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Porcelli, Don; Hirst, Catherine; Maximov, Trofim C.; Petrov, Roman E.; Andersson, Per S.

    2017-08-01

    Global warming in permafrost areas is expected to change fluxes of riverine organic carbon (OC) to the Arctic Ocean. Here OC concentrations, stable carbon isotope signatures (δ13C), and carbon-nitrogen ratios (C/N) are presented from 22 sampling stations in the Lena River and 40 of its tributaries. Sampling was conducted during two expeditions: the first in July 2012 in the south and southeastern region and the second in June 2013 in the northern region of the Lena basin. The data showed significant spatial differences in concentrations and major sources of OC. Mean subcatchment slopes were correlated with OC concentrations, implying that mountainous areas in general had lower concentrations than lowland areas. δ13C and C/N data from tributaries originating in mountainous areas indicated that both dissolved and particulate OC (DOC and POC) were mainly derived from soil organic matter (SOM). In contrast, tributaries originating in lowland areas had larger contributions from fresh vegetation to DOC, while aquatically produced OC was the major source of POC. We suggest that these differences in dominant sources indicated differences in dominant flow pathways. Tributaries with larger influence of fresh vegetation probably had surficial flow pathways, while tributaries with more SOM influence had deeper water flow pathways. Thus, the future export of OC to the Arctic Ocean will likely be controlled by changes in spatial patterns in hydroclimatology and the depth of the active layers influencing the dominant water flow pathways in Arctic river basins.

  13. Carbon Stocks in Permafrost-Affected Soils of the Lena River Delta

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    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Grosse, G.; Desyatkin, A.; Pfeiffer, E.

    2012-12-01

    The soil organic carbon stock (SSOC) of soils in arctic permafrost regions is known to be significant but is insufficiently investigated so far. Previous SSOC studies report mainly the gravimetric carbon (C) contents and are limited to the active layer depth at the time of sampling. Since C deposits in permafrost regions are likely to become a future C source, more detailed investigations of the presently frozen likely carbon-rich sediment and soil layers are of importance. Our investigations were performed on Samoylov Island in the southern-central part of the Lena River Delta (32,000 km2) which is the largest arctic delta and the fifth largest delta worldwide. Samoylov Island is representative for the Lena River Delta's first terrace and the active floodplains. Within this study a new portable Snow-Ice-Permafrost-Research-Establishment (SIPRE) auger was used during a spring field session to obtain 1 m deep frozen soil cores (n = 29) distributed over all known soil and vegetation units. These cores are analyzed for bulk contents of nitrogen (N) and C, ice content and bulk density (BD) and to determine the SSOC including the rarely investigated currently permanently frozen layers up to 1 m depth on Samoylov Island. Our study provides evidence for high SSOC for a depth of 1 m for the investigated area ranging between 7 kg m-2 and 48 kg m-2. Considering the spatial extent of different soil units on the two geomorphological units of Samoylov Island, the area-weighted average SSOC were 29 kg m-2 (n = 22) for the first terrace and 14 kg m-2 (n = 7) for the active floodplain. For the correspondent soil units of Turbels and Orthels in circumpolar permafrost regions a mean SSOC of 27 kg m-2 (min: 0.1 kg m-2, max: 126 kg m-2) for a depth of 1 m was reported [1]. For up-scaling solely over the soil-covered areas of the Lena River Delta, we excluded all water bodies >3,600 m2 from the geomorphological units studied (first river terrace and the active floodplains) and

  14. Methane distribution and oxidation around the Lena Delta in summer 2013

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    I. Bussmann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Lena River is one of the largest Russian rivers draining into the Laptev Sea. The predicted increases in global temperatures are expected to cause the permafrost areas surrounding the Lena Delta to melt at increasing rates. This melting will result in high amounts of methane reaching the waters of the Lena and the adjacent Laptev Sea. The only biological sink that can lower methane concentrations within this system is methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. However, the polar estuary of the Lena River, due to its strong fluctuations in salinity and temperature, is a challenging environment for bacteria. We determined the activity and abundance of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria by a tracer method and by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We described the methanotrophic population with a molecular fingerprinting method (monooxygenase intergenic spacer analysis, as well as the methane distribution (via a headspace method and other abiotic parameters, in the Lena Delta in September 2013. The median methane concentrations were 22 nmol L−1 for riverine water (salinity (S  < 5, 19 nmol L−1 for mixed water (5 < S < 20 and 28 nmol L−1 for polar water (S > 20. The Lena River was not the source of methane in surface water, and the methane concentrations of the bottom water were mainly influenced by the methane concentration in surface sediments. However, the bacterial populations of the riverine and polar waters showed similar methane oxidation rates (0.419 and 0.400 nmol L−1 d−1, despite a higher relative abundance of methanotrophs and a higher estimated diversity in the riverine water than in the polar water. The methane turnover times ranged from 167 days in mixed water and 91 days in riverine water to only 36 days in polar water. The environmental parameters influencing the methane oxidation rate and the methanotrophic population also differed between the water masses. We

  15. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Arctic Deltaic Sediments: Investigations in the Lena River Delta.

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    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Desyatkin, A.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil organic carbon stock (SSOC) of deltaic sediments in arctic permafrost regions is known to be significant but is insufficiently investigated so far. Previous SSOC studies were conducted mainly in the comparatively well studied Mackenzie River Delta (area: 13,000 km2) in Canada. The few studies from other arctic delta regions report only the gravimetric carbon (C) contents and are limited to the active layer depth at the time of sampling. Since C deposits in permafrost regions are likely to become a future C source, more detailed investigations of the presently frozen likely carbon-rich sediment and soil layers in other arctic delta regions are of importance. Our investigations were performed on Samoylov Island in the southern-central part of the Lena River Delta (32,000 km2) which is the largest arctic delta and the fifth largest delta worldwide. Samoylov Island is representative for the Lena River Delta's first terrace and the active floodplains. Within this study a new portable Snow-Ice-Permafrost-Research-Establishment (SIPRE) auger was used during a spring field session to obtain 1 m deep frozen soil cores (n = 37) distributed over all known soil and vegetation units. These cores are analyzed for bulk contents of nitrogen (N) and C, ice content and bulk density (BD) and to determine the SSOC including the rarely investigated currently permanently frozen layers up to 1 m depth on Samoylov Island. Our study provides evidence for high SSOC for a depth of 1 m for the investigated area ranging between 6 kg m2 and 54 kg m2. Considering the spatial extent of different soil units on the two geomorphological units of Samoylov Island, the area-weighted average SSOC were 31 kg m2 (n = 31) for the first terrace and 15 kg m2 (n = 6) for the active floodplain. For the correspondent soil units of Turbels and Orthels in circumpolar permafrost regions, Tarnocai et al. 2009 reported a mean SSOC of 27 kg m2 (min: 0.1 kg m2, max: 126 kg m2) for a depth of 1 m. For up

  16. Seasonal changes in particulate and dissolved organic matter composition and quality in the Lena River Delta

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    Mollenhauer, G.; Winterfeld, M.; Hefter, J.; Bodenstab, L.; Morgenstern, A.; Eulenburg, A.; Heim, B.; Koch, B.; Schefuss, E.; Moerth, C. M.; Rethemeyer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Arctic rivers are known to export large quantities of carbon by discharge of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), and in a warming and progressively moister Arctic, these exports may increase resulting in a reduction of arctic continental carbon stocks. These rivers have highly variable discharge rates with a pronounced maximum during the spring freshet associated with highest concentrations of DOC and POC. Most studies investigating the isotopic composition and quality of carbon exported by Arctic rivers rely on samples taken in summer during base flow, which is due to the logistical challenges associated with sampling in the remote Arctic permafrost regions. Here we present a record of δ13C and Δ14C of DOC and POC collected between late May during the freshet and late August 2014 in the Lena River Delta. POC Δ14C shows an initial trend towards older values in the spring samples, which is reversed in summer, associated with a shift towards more depleted δ13C values. We interpret this aging trend as reflecting progressive thawing throughout the ice-free season, resulting in mobilization of progressively older carbon from deeper thawed layers. The summer reversal indicates admixture of aquatic organic matter. DOC Δ14C, in contrast, remains at relatively modern levels with rather constant δ13C values throughout the sampling period. We furthermore analysed the biomarker composition of Lena Delta particulate OM collected in spring and summer. From spring to summer, we observe trends in abundance of individual leaf-wax derived biomarkers indicating higher abundance of algal biomass in the summer particles. Trends in soil microbial biomarkers and compound-specific δD of leaf-wax lipids suggest a shift in sources towards higher contributions from the southern catchment in summer. DOC composition investigated with FT-ICR-MS changes from spring with higher abundances of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios to late summer, when fewer compounds

  17. Genesis and Diversity of Cryosols of the Northeast Siberian Lena River Delta

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    Zubrzycki, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Kutzbach, Lars

    2017-04-01

    The North-Siberian Lena River Delta (LRD) is the largest Arctic delta and an important interface between the Arctic Ocean in the North and the large Siberian land masses in the South. LRD consists not only of Holocene deltaic sediment deposits as a river terrace and the modern active floodplains but also of remnants of the former Pleistocene mainland including large islands of ice-complex sediments and the Arga-Muora-Sise Island, which is composed of pure sand sediments of still debated origin. The highly diverse landscape structure of LRD is reflected by a great variety of permafrost-affected soils (cryosols). This study aims at describing this great cryosol diversity and at analysing the dominant soil-forming processes in this comparatively scarcely studied soil region. The soil development in the investigated continuous permafrost region is limited by the short thawing period of around three months (June to September) and takes place in the shallow (below 1 m) seasonally thawed active layer. The geological parent material plays an important role for the development of soils in the LRD region. The distribution of the various soil types closely follows the pattern of the geomorphic units characterised by differing sedimentation conditions. The properties and genesis of the soils on the Holocene river terrace and the modern floodplains are strongly affected by the enormous amounts of fluvial sediments (about 12 x 106 tons per year) brought by the Lena River into its delta. The fluvial sedimentation together with the also pronounced aeolian sedimentation results in a fast vertical growth of soils. The upward rise of the soil surface leads to an upward movement of the permafrost table resulting in fast incorporation of soil material formed in the supra-permafrost zone into the permafrost. Due to the morphodynamics of ice-wedge polygons and resulting formation of patterned ground with elevated rims and depressed and water-saturated centres, the Holocene river terrace

  18. Landscape controls and vertical variability of soil organic carbon storage in permafrost-affected soils of the Lena River Delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewert, Matthias Benjamin; Hugelius, Gustaf; Heim, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To project the future development of the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in permafrost environments, the spatial and vertical distribution of key soil properties and their landscape controls needs to be understood. This article reports findings from the Arctic Lena River Delta where we sampled 50...... soil pedons. These were classified according to the U.S.D.A. Soil Taxonomy and fall mostly into the Gelisol soil order used for permafrost-affected soils. Soil profiles have been sampled for the active layer (mean depth 58 ± 10 cm) and the upper permafrost to one meter depth. We analyze SOC stocks...

  19. Monitoring Bedfast Ice and Ice Phenology in Lakes of the Lena River Delta Using TerraSAR-X Backscatter and Coherence Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Antonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst lakes and ponds are major elements of permafrost landscapes, occupying up to 40% of the land area in some Arctic regions. Shallow lakes freeze to the bed, thus preventing permafrost thaw underneath them and limiting the length of the period with greenhouse gas production in the unfrozen lake sediments. Radar remote sensing permits to distinguish lakes with bedfast ice due to the difference in backscatter intensities from bedfast and floating ice. This study investigates the potential of a unique time series of three-year repeat-pass TerraSAR-X (TSX imagery with high temporal (11 days and spatial (10 m resolution for monitoring bedfast ice as well as ice phenology of lakes in the zone of continuous permafrost in the Lena River Delta, Siberia. TSX backscatter intensity is shown to be an excellent tool for monitoring floating versus bedfast lake ice as well as ice phenology. TSX-derived timing of ice grounding and the ice growth model CLIMo are used to retrieve the ice thicknesses of the bedfast ice at points where in situ ice thickness measurements were available. Comparison shows good agreement in the year of field measurements. Additionally, for the first time, an 11-day sequential interferometric coherence time series is analyzed as a supplementary approach for the bedfast ice monitoring. The coherence time series detects most of the ice grounding as well as spring snow/ice melt onset. Overall, the results show the great value of TSX time series for monitoring Arctic lake ice and provide a basis for various applications: for instance, derivation of shallow lakes bathymetry, evaluation of winter water resources and locating fish winter habitat as well as estimation of taliks extent in permafrost.

  20. Cruising an archive: On the palaeoclimatic value of the Lena Delta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Büntgen, Ulf; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Hellmann, L.; Nikolaev, A. N.; Tegel, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2014), s. 627-630 ISSN 0959-6836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Keywords : arctic driftwood * dendroclimatology * eastern Siberia * high-resolution palaeoclimatology * proxy archives * subfossil wood Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.283, year: 2014

  1. Monitoring Inter- and Intra-Seasonal Dynamics of Rapidly Degrading Ice-Rich Permafrost Riverbanks in the Lena Delta with TerraSAR-X Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Stettner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arctic warming is leading to substantial changes to permafrost including rapid degradation of ice and ice-rich coasts and riverbanks. In this study, we present and evaluate a high spatiotemporal resolution three-year time series of X-Band microwave satellite data from the TerraSAR-X (TSX satellite to quantify cliff-top erosion (CTE of an ice-rich permafrost riverbank in the central Lena Delta. We apply a threshold on TSX backscatter images and automatically extract cliff-top lines to derive intra- and inter-annual CTE. In order to examine the drivers of erosion we statistically compare CTE with climatic baseline data using linear mixed models and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Our evaluation of TSX-derived CTE against annual optical-derived CTE and seasonal in situ measurements showed good agreement between all three datasets. We observed continuous erosion from June to September in 2014 and 2015 with no significant seasonality across the thawing season. We found the highest net annual cliff-top erosion of 6.9 m in 2014, in accordance with above-average mean temperatures and thawing degree days as well as low precipitation. We found high net annual erosion and erosion variability in 2015 associated with moderate mean temperatures but above average precipitation. According to linear mixed models, climate parameters alone could not explain intra-seasonal erosional patterns and additional factors such as ground ice content likely drive the observed erosion. Finally, mean backscatter intensity on the cliff surface decreased from −5.29 to −6.69 dB from 2013 to 2015, respectively, likely resulting from changes in surface geometry and properties that could be connected to partial slope stabilization. Overall, we conclude that X-Band backscatter time series can successfully be used to complement optical remote sensing and in situ monitoring of rapid tundra permafrost erosion at riverbanks and coasts by reliably providing information about intra

  2. Provenance trials of larch in Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyutin, L.I. [V.N. Sukachev Inst. of Forest SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Some results of provenance trials of larch in Siberia are given. These provenance trials were established in the last thirty years by efforts of V.N. Sukaczev Inst. of Forest. Provenances and species of larch were tested in some field trials distributed over Siberia between Lat. N 52 deg and 66 deg, Long. E 88 deg and 113 deg: near Krasnoyarsk, in Republic Khakasia (an altitudes of 800 and 1200 metres), in the Lower Yenisei near Turukhansk, in the west and south regions of Krasnoyarsk territory, in the Upper Lena, near Chita. 2 refs

  3. Studying neutrino properties in the future LENA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a next-generation neutrino detector based on 50 kt of liquid scintillator. The low detection threshold, the good energy resolution and the potent background discrimination inherent to liquid scintillator make LENA a versatile observatory for astrophysical and terrestrial neutrinos. The present contribution highlights LENA's capabilities for studying neutrino properties based on both natural and artificial sources

  4. Reconstruction of GeV Neutrino Events in LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellenberg, R.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hellgartner, D.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.; Peltoniemi, J.

    2011-01-01

    LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a proposed next generation liquid-scintillator detector with about 50 kt target mass. Besides the detection of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, supernova neutrinos and the search for the proton decay, LENA could also be used as the far detector of a next generation neutrino beam. The present contribution outlines the status of the Monte Carlo studies towards the reconstruction of GeV neutrinos in LENA. Both the tracking capabilities at a few hundred MeV, most interesting for a beta beam, and above 1 GeV for a superbeam experiment are presented.

  5. LENA Conversion Foils Using Single-Layer Graphene, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our key innovation will be the use of single-layer graphene as LENA conversion foils, with appropriate microgrids and nanogrids to support the foils. Phase I...

  6. Development of a low energy neutral analyzer (LENA). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, C.C.; Fan, C.Y.; Hsieh, K.C.; McCullen, J.D.

    1986-05-01

    A low energy neutral particle analyzer (LENA) has been developed at the University of Arizona to detect particles originating in the edge plasma of fusion reactors. LENA was designed to perform energy analysis and measure flux levels of neutrals having energies between 5 and 50 eV (with possible extension to 500 eV neutrals), and do this with 1 to 10 ms time resolution. The instrument uses hot filaments to produce a 10 mA diffusion electron beam which ionizes incoming neutrals in a nearly field free region so that their velocity distribution is nearly undisturbed. The resultant ions are energy analyzed in a hyperbolic electrostatic analyzer, and detected by an MCP detector. LENA has been installed and operated on the ALCATOR C tokamak at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center. Results to date are discussed. At present, the LENA exhibits excessive sensitivity to the extremely high ultraviolet photon flux emanating from the plasma. Measures to correct this are suggested

  7. A LENA Instrument onboard BepiColombo and Chandrayaan-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Yoichi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Asamura, Kazushi; Wurz, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Low-energy neutral atom (LENA) observations bring us important information on particle environments around planetary objects such as Mercury and the Moon. In this paper, we report on a new development of a LENA instrument of light weight (∼2 kg) for planetary explorations. The instrument is capable of energy and mass discrimination with a large sensitivity by utilizing surface ionization followed by an electrostatic analyzer and a time-of-flight velocity spectrometer. The performance of the instrument is investigated by numerical simulations. This enables us to obtain detailed performance characterization of LENA measurements by the instrument. We also made trajectory tracing of photons entering the instrument to examine photon rejection capability. The simulations show that the energy range is from ∼10 eV to >3.3 keV and the angular resolutions are 10 degx25 deg for 25-eV LENAs, which are sufficient for planetary LENA observations. Laboratory tests of a prototype model of the instruments developed with this study are now ongoing. According to the initial tests, the measurement principle of the instrument has been verified. This LENA instrument has been selected for both the Indian Moon exploration mission Chandrayaan-1 and the European-Japanese Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo.

  8. LenaWin 1.0, user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeverstam, U.

    1992-08-01

    Lena W in is a program for dispersion and dose calculations, mainly connected to accidents in nuclear facilities. Besides that, it may, however, also be used for other kinds of releases. It is designed to be used both for training purpose, and in real situations. Great care has therefore been taken to ensure a simple and quick handling of the program, also in difficult situations. The program is a true Windows application, and works with version 3.0 and higher of Microsoft Windows. It was developed at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) during 1991-1992, and is used by the institute in its regular work. Lena W in is part in a larger system to handle accidental situations. An important part of this system is a database and a database handler to manage all kinds of measured data after a release. Lena W in has functions to display data taken from this database on maps

  9. Sources of particulate organic matter discharged by the Lena River using lignin phenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Trojahn, S.; Hefter, J.; Pittauer, D.; Zubrzycki, S.; Han, P.; Rethemeyer, J.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2016-12-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) discharged by rivers and deposited offshore their mouths is generally assumed to record an integrated signal from the watershed and therefore provides an archive of past environmental changes. Yet, in large river systems the riverine POM might be trapped in flood plains and the lower reaches resulting in an inefficient transport of POM particularly from the distal parts of the watershed. Further, the POM likely undergoes degradation during transport from source to sink. The Lena River is one of these large river systems stretching from 53°N to 71°N in central Siberia. The watershed can be broadly divided into two different biomes, taiga in the south and tundra in the northernmost part. The relative contribution of these biomes to the POM load of the river and its discharge to the ocean as well as the changes it is undergoing during transport are not well understood. Here we present the lignin phenol composition of different grain size fractions (bulk, 2mm-63µm, gymnosperm-derived POM, particularly close to the river mouth and in the <63µm fraction. Because of the large heterogeneity of organic matter degradation in the soil samples and their grain size fractions, it is not quite clear to which degree the POM gets mineralized within the soils and during transport in the river compared to degradation occurring during cross shelf transport.

  10. Arctic Lena Trough -- NOT a Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Hellebrand, E.; Handt, A. V.; Nauret, F.; Gao, Y.; Feig, S.; Jovanovic, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The North American-Eurasian plate boundary traverses the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. Over most of that length, it is a Mid-Ocean Ridge that spreads between about 23 mm/yr (MAR) and 10 mm/yr (Gakkel Ridge) full rate. The northern MAR and the Gakkel ridge are connected by a deep linear feature called Lena Trough. Until about 10 million years ago, Lena Trough was not an oceanic domain at all, but a continental shear zone through a narrow isthmus of continental crust that connected the American and Eurasian plates. Its opening was, significantly, the most recent and final event in the separation of the North American from the Eurasian continent, and opened the gateway for deep water circulation between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans. Models for the tectonic configuration of Lena Trough have until now differed only in the number and length of fracture zones and spreading segments thought to be present. Lena Trough is a deep fault-bounded basin with depths of 3800-4200m, and irregular, steep valley sides that are oblique to the spreading direction. Basement horst structures outcrop as sigmoidal ridges with steeply dipping sides project out of the valley floor, but these are not traceable to any parallel structures on either side. Ridge-orthogonal topography is simply absent (ie no segments trending parallel nor fracture zones perpendicular to Gakkel Ridge). Most faults trend approximately SSE-NNW, an obliquity with respect to Gakkel Ridge (SW-NE) of about 55 degrees. The basement ridges are composed nearly entirely of mantle peridotite, as are the valley walls. Only at the northern and southern extremities of Lena Trough do basalts appear at all. The Northern basalts show strong chemical affinities to those of Gakkel Ridge, and can be considered a part of the Gakkel volcanic system. The rare southernmost basalts, however, are quite unique. They are alkali basalts with K2O up to 2 weight percent, highly incompaitble element enriched and occupy a corner of isotope

  11. A Concise Protocol for the Validation of Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) Conversational Turn Counts in Vietnamese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganek, Hillary V.; Eriks-Brophy, Alice

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a protocol for the validation of the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System's conversational turn count (CTC) for Vietnamese speakers. Ten families of children aged between 22 and 42 months, recruited near Ho Chi Minh City, participated in this project. Each child wore the LENA audio recorder for a full…

  12. IN WESTERN SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizhikov Il'ja Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    along the oil transportation route that connected three Salym oil fields in Western Siberia.

  13. Using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system in preschool classrooms with children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Jessica R; Sabatos-Devito, Maura G; Irvin, Dwight W; Boyd, Brian A; Hume, Kara A; Odom, Sam L

    2013-09-01

    This study describes the language environment of preschool programs serving children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and examines relationships between child characteristics and an automated measure of adult and child language in the classroom. The Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system was used with 40 children with ASD to collect data on adult and child language. Standardized assessments were administered to obtain language, cognitive, and autism severity scores for participants. With a mean of over 5 hours of recording across two days several months apart, there was a mean of 3.6 child vocalizations per minute, 1.0 conversational turns (in which either the adult or child respond to the other within 5 seconds) per minute, and 29.2 adult words per minute. Two of the three LENA variables were significantly correlated with language age-equivalents. Cognitive age-equivalents were also significantly correlated with two LENA variables. Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule severity scores and LENA variables were not significantly correlated. Implications for using the LENA system with children with ASD in the school environment are discussed.

  14. Climate History and Early Peopling of Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Chlachula, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Geological and palaeoecological evidence from Siberia shows patterned cyclic climatic changes during the Quaternary leading to establishment of the present natural conditions. The spatial and temporal distribution of the cultural records documents climatic instability over large parts of Siberia during the Quaternary Period. Increased continentality and gradual shifts towards cold and arid conditions accelerated adaptation of populations to harsh periglacial climates promoting progressive dev...

  15. Terrestrial organic matter sources and distribution along a land-ocean transect in Siberia derived from lignin phenol composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeld, M.; Goni, M.; Mollenhauer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid warming of the Arctic is very likely to result in increased permafrost thaw depth and accelerated coastal erosion both associated with enhanced organic matter (OM) export to the Arctic Ocean. Not only higher fluxes of terrestrial OM from land to ocean can be expected, but also a change in composition as previously freeze-locked OM pools become available for erosion, transport, and microbial degradation. To assess the present state of different terrestrial OM sources (e.g. tundra vs. taiga vegetation) contributing to OM fluxes along a Siberian land-ocean transect we analyzed the lignin phenol composition of different sample types. Holocene permafrost soil samples at several depths, surface water suspended matter (SPM) and surface sediments in the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay, NE Siberia were collected during field work in July/August 2009 and 2010. Additionally, samples representing the major vegetation constituents of NE Siberian taiga and tundra were collected in summer 2010 and 2011. The samples were analyzed using alkaline cuprous oxide oxidation (CuO) with a microwave digestion system, and different lignin phenols were identified and quantified with a GC-MS. Using the relative proportions of the main lignin phenol groups, i.e. Cinnamyl/Vanillyl ratio (C/V) vs. Syringyl/Vanillyl ratio (S/V), woody and non-woody tissues as well as between angiosperms and gymnosperms can be distinguished. Further, the acid to aldehyde ratio of Syringyl (Ad/AlS) and Vanillyl (Ad/AlV) serve as indicators for lignin degradation (higher ratios mean more advanced degradation). Along the sampled transect the Ad/Al ratios for Vanillyl and Syringyl varied from an average of 0.89 and 0.74 (different grain size fractions of permafrost soils, n=48) to 1.33 and 0.91 (SPM, n=15) to 1.24 and 1.09 respectively (Buor Khaya sediments, n=6) indicating that probably the main lignin degradation occurs within the soils and during transport to the marine sediments. The C/V and S

  16. Low energy neutrino astrophysics with the large liquid-scintillator detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodan; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Winter, J.

    2007-01-01

    The large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) will cover a broad field of physics. Apart from the detection of terrestrial and artificial neutrinos, and the search for proton decay, important contributions can be made to the astrophysics of stars by high-precision spectroscopy of low-energetic solar neutrinos and by the observation of neutrinos emitted by a galactic supernova. Moreover, the detection of the diffuse supernova neutrino background in LENA will offer the opportunity of studying both supernova core-collapse models and the supernova rate on cosmological timescales (z e events in an almost background-free energy window from ∼10 to 25 MeV. The search for such rare low-energetic events takes advantage of the high energy resolution and excellent background rejection possible in the LENA detector

  17. Simulations and developments of the Low Energy Neutron detector Array LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, C.; Algora, A.; Couture, A.; Csatlós, M.; Gulyás, J.; Heil, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Stuhl, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Tornyi, T.; Tovesson, F.

    2011-01-01

    Prototypes of the Low Energy Neutron detector Array (LENA) have been tested and compared with detailed GEANT simulations. LENA will consist of plastic scintillation bars with the dimensions 1000×45×10 mm 3 . The tests have been performed with γ-ray sources and neutrons originating from the neutron-induced fission of 235 U. The simulations agreed very well with the measured response and were therefore used to simulate the response to mono-energetic neutrons with different detection thresholds. LENA will be used to detect low-energy neutrons from (p,n)-type reactions with low momentum transfer foreseen at the R 3 B and EXL setups at FAIR, Darmstadt.

  18. Operating experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cingoli, F.; Altieri, S.; Lana, F.; Rosti, G.; Alloni, L.; Meloni, S.

    1988-01-01

    The last two years at the Trigs Mark II LENA plant were characterized by the running of the n-n-bar oscillation NADIR experiment. Consequently reactor operation was positively affected and the running hours rose again above 1000 hours per year. The LENA team was also deeply involved in the procedures for the renewal of the reactor operation license. The new requirements set by the Nuclear Energy Licensing Authority (ENEA for Italy) most of which concerning radiation protection and environmental impact, have been already fulfilled. In some cases the installation of new apparatus is underway

  19. Observation with the low energy neutral analyser (LENA) on ASDEX. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, H.

    1991-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the observation with the Low Energy Neutral Particle Analyzers (LENA) at ASDEX during Ohmic discharges. The dependence of the energy distributions, the integrated fluxes, and their mean energies on various plasma parameters is documented. Connections and correlations with other edge and divertor diagnostics are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Low energy neutrino astronomy with the large liquid-scintillation detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Feilitzsch, F von; Goeger-Neff, M; Hochmuth, K A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wurm, M

    2006-01-01

    The detection of low energy neutrinos in a large liquid scintillation detector may provide further important information on astrophysical processes as supernova physics, solar physics and elementary particle physics as well as geophysics. In this contribution, a new project for Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) consisting of a 50 kt scintillation detector is presented

  1. Integrated hydrological and water quality model for river management: A case study on Lena River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, André; Botelho, Cidália; Boaventura, Rui A.R.; Vilar, Vítor J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) model was used to assess the impact of wastewater discharges on the water quality of a Lis River tributary (Lena River), a 176 km 2 watershed in Leiria region, Portugal. The model parameters obtained in this study, could potentially serve as reference values for the calibration of other watersheds in the area or with similar climatic characteristics, which don't have enough data for calibration. Water quality constituents modeled in this study included temperature, fecal coliforms, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, nitrates, orthophosphates and pH. The results were found to be close to the average observed values for all parameters studied for both calibration and validation periods with percent bias values between − 26% and 23% for calibration and − 30% and 51% for validation for all parameters, with fecal coliforms showing the highest deviation. The model revealed a poor water quality in Lena River for the entire simulation period, according to the Council Directive concerning the surface water quality intended for drinking water abstraction in the Member States (75/440/EEC). Fecal coliforms, orthophosphates and nitrates were found to be 99, 82 and 46% above the limit established in the Directive. HSPF was used to predict the impact of point and nonpoint pollution sources on the water quality of Lena River. Winter and summer scenarios were also addressed to evaluate water quality in high and low flow conditions. A maximum daily load was calculated to determine the reduction needed to comply with the Council Directive 75/440/EEC. The study showed that Lena River is fairly polluted calling for awareness at behavioral change of waste management in order to prevent the escalation of these effects with especially attention to fecal coliforms. - Highlights: • An integrated hydrological and water quality model for river management is presented. • An insight into the pollution

  2. Integrated hydrological and water quality model for river management: A case study on Lena River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, André, E-mail: andrerd@gmail.com; Botelho, Cidália; Boaventura, Rui A.R.; Vilar, Vítor J.P., E-mail: vilar@fe.up.pt

    2014-07-01

    The Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) model was used to assess the impact of wastewater discharges on the water quality of a Lis River tributary (Lena River), a 176 km{sup 2} watershed in Leiria region, Portugal. The model parameters obtained in this study, could potentially serve as reference values for the calibration of other watersheds in the area or with similar climatic characteristics, which don't have enough data for calibration. Water quality constituents modeled in this study included temperature, fecal coliforms, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, nitrates, orthophosphates and pH. The results were found to be close to the average observed values for all parameters studied for both calibration and validation periods with percent bias values between − 26% and 23% for calibration and − 30% and 51% for validation for all parameters, with fecal coliforms showing the highest deviation. The model revealed a poor water quality in Lena River for the entire simulation period, according to the Council Directive concerning the surface water quality intended for drinking water abstraction in the Member States (75/440/EEC). Fecal coliforms, orthophosphates and nitrates were found to be 99, 82 and 46% above the limit established in the Directive. HSPF was used to predict the impact of point and nonpoint pollution sources on the water quality of Lena River. Winter and summer scenarios were also addressed to evaluate water quality in high and low flow conditions. A maximum daily load was calculated to determine the reduction needed to comply with the Council Directive 75/440/EEC. The study showed that Lena River is fairly polluted calling for awareness at behavioral change of waste management in order to prevent the escalation of these effects with especially attention to fecal coliforms. - Highlights: • An integrated hydrological and water quality model for river management is presented. • An insight into the

  3. Rare gases in lavas from the ultraslow spreading Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauret, F.; Moreira, M.; Snow, J. E.

    2010-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) from the Arctic Ocean have been much less studied than those from the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific due to the difficulty of access related to ice cover. In 2001 and 2004 the Arctic ridges (Gakkel Ridge and Lena Trough) were intensively sampled. In this study we present the first helium, neon, and argon concentrations and isotopic ratios in a suite of samples from the ultraslow spreading Lena Trough (˜0.75 cm/yr effective full rate). Central Lena Trough (CLT) lavas display 4He/3He between 89,710 and 97,530 (R/Ra between 7.4 and 8.1), similar to the mean MORB ratio of 90,000 ± 10,000 (R/Ra = 8 ± 1). In a three neon isotope diagram, the samples fall on the MORB line, without showing any excess of nucleogenic 21Ne. The 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from 349 to 6964. CLT samples have a typical MORB He and Ne isotopic composition. Rare gases do not indicate any mantle heterogeneities or contribution of subcontinental lithospheric mantle, although this has been suggested previously on the basis of the Sr-Nd and Pb isotopic systems. Based on noble gas systematics, a DUPAL-like anomaly is not observed in the Arctic Ocean. We propose two possible models which reconcile the rare gases with these previous studies. The first is that the Lena Trough mantle has a marble cake structure with small-scale heterogeneities (<1 km), allowing rapid diffusion and homogenization of rare gases compared to elements such as Sr, Nd, and Pb. The second model proposes that the recycled component identified by other isotopic systems was fully degassed at a recent date. It would therefore have a negligible mass budget of rare gases compared to other isotopic systems. This would suggest that the mantle enrichment beneath Lena Trough was generated by rift-forming processes and not by recycling.

  4. Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous oysters from Siberia: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor N. Kosenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study reviews the taxonomy of Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous oysters from the Northern and the Subpolar Urals (Western Siberia and northern East Siberia. Previous studies have documented 10 species from the genus Liostrea (L. delta, L. cucurbita, L. praeanabarensis, L. anabarensis, L. plastica, L. gibberosa, L. planoconvexa, L. siberica, L. uralensis, L. lyapinensis, and 3 species from the genus Gryphaea (G. borealis and 2 species in open nomenclature. Liostrea gibberosa, L. planoconvexa, L. uralensis, and L. cucurbita are transferred in this study to the genus Pernostrea. Furthermore, two new species of Pernostrea are described: P. mesezhnikovi sp. nov. and P.? robusta sp. nov. Liostrea siberica is transferred to the genus Praeexogyra. Liostrea praeanabarensis and L. anabarensis are attributed to the subgenus Boreiodeltoideum (genus Deltoideum as well as L. delta sensu Zakharov (1966 which is described here as new species Deltoideum (Boreiodeltoideum borealis sp. nov. The similar shell morphology of the genera Deltoideum and Pernostrea provides a basis to establish the new tribe Pernostreini trib. nov. in the subfamily Gryphaeinae. Three species are recorded for the first time from Siberia: Nanogyra? cf. thurmanni, “Ostrea” cf. moreana and Gryphaea (Gryphaea curva.

  5. A new handling tool for irradiated samples at the LENA plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloni, L.; Venturelli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The handling of neutron irradiated samples at the LENA plant has been so far carried out manually, thus exposing reactor and health physics operators and reactor users to radiation doses. It was then decided to develop an automatic system operated from the reactor console. The system was divided in two sections: one taking care of sample insertion and extraction and the other of the storage of irradiated samples. This paper describes the design and the installation of the storage section. It allows a fast removal of the irradiated samples from the reactor top and their storage in lead pits at the ground level. The extraction of irradiated samples comes out to be quite simplified and radiation doses to operators and users are strongly reduced. All work from design to construction has been carried out by the personnel of the electronic group of the LENA plant

  6. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL ATOMS AT 1 AU OBSERVED BY THE IMAGE/LENA IMAGER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Wurz, P.

    2009-01-01

    Observations from the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora: Global Exploration (IMAGE) Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager from 2005 are used to investigate characteristics of interstellar neutrals in the inner solar system. The LENA imager detected an interstellar neutral signal starting in 2004 December and extending to early 2005 April. Using the orientation of the field of view of the imager and the date of the loss of the interstellar neutral signal, it is concluded that the signal is consistent with a relatively compact (several degrees wide in ecliptic latitude and longitude) source of neutral helium and/or energetic (>150 eV) hydrogen originating from the solar apex direction. Observations later in 2005 are used to distinguish the composition and conclude that the relatively compact source likely contains some energetic hydrogen (in addition to the helium).

  7. The low energy neutral particle analyzer (LENA) at W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, H.; Schiavi, A.

    1994-10-01

    A detailed documentation of the experimental arrangement of the Low Energy Neutral particle Analyzer (LENA) at W7-AS is given. The diagnostic was routinely measuring CX-fluxes and energy distributions during the period from 1992 to 94. Some typical results are reported and a phenomenological discussion of the reaction of the CX-fluxes and spectra to the variation of various plasma parameters is presented. The comparison with H α -signals indicate whether variations of the CX-fluxes are due to changes of the wall recycling or due to alterations of the plasma profiles. T i profiles near the edge can be determined from the LENA-spectra when the neutral atom density is simulated by the EIRENE code. For the latter to the thesis of Heinrich (1994) is referred. (orig.)

  8. Integrated hydrological and water quality model for river management: a case study on Lena River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, André; Botelho, Cidália; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2014-07-01

    The Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) model was used to assess the impact of wastewater discharges on the water quality of a Lis River tributary (Lena River), a 176 km(2) watershed in Leiria region, Portugal. The model parameters obtained in this study, could potentially serve as reference values for the calibration of other watersheds in the area or with similar climatic characteristics, which don't have enough data for calibration. Water quality constituents modeled in this study included temperature, fecal coliforms, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, nitrates, orthophosphates and pH. The results were found to be close to the average observed values for all parameters studied for both calibration and validation periods with percent bias values between -26% and 23% for calibration and -30% and 51% for validation for all parameters, with fecal coliforms showing the highest deviation. The model revealed a poor water quality in Lena River for the entire simulation period, according to the Council Directive concerning the surface water quality intended for drinking water abstraction in the Member States (75/440/EEC). Fecal coliforms, orthophosphates and nitrates were found to be 99, 82 and 46% above the limit established in the Directive. HSPF was used to predict the impact of point and nonpoint pollution sources on the water quality of Lena River. Winter and summer scenarios were also addressed to evaluate water quality in high and low flow conditions. A maximum daily load was calculated to determine the reduction needed to comply with the Council Directive 75/440/EEC. The study showed that Lena River is fairly polluted calling for awareness at behavioral change of waste management in order to prevent the escalation of these effects with especially attention to fecal coliforms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterisation of Fe-bearing particles and colloids in the Lena River basin, NE Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Catherine; Andersson, Per S.; Shaw, Samuel; Burke, Ian T.; Kutscher, Liselott; Murphy, Melissa J.; Maximov, Trofim; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Porcelli, Don

    2017-09-01

    Rivers are significant contributors of Fe to the ocean. However, the characteristics of chemically reactive Fe remain poorly constrained, especially in large Arctic rivers, which drain landscapes highly susceptible to climate change and carbon cycle alteration. The aim of this study was a detailed characterisation (size, mineralogy, and speciation) of riverine Fe-bearing particles (>0.22 μm) and colloids (1 kDa-0.22 μm) and their association with organic carbon (OC), in the Lena River and tributaries, which drain a catchment almost entirely underlain by permafrost. Samples from the main channel and tributaries representing watersheds that span a wide range in topography and lithology were taken after the spring flood in June 2013 and summer baseflow in July 2012. Fe-bearing particles were identified, using Transmission Electron Microscopy, as large (200 nm-1 μm) aggregates of smaller (20-30 nm) spherical colloids of chemically-reactive ferrihydrite. In contrast, there were also large (500 nm-1 μm) aggregates of clay (illite) particles and smaller (100-200 nm) iron oxide particles (dominantly hematite) that contain poorly reactive Fe. TEM imaging and Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) indicated that the ferrihydrite is present as discrete particles within networks of amorphous particulate organic carbon (POC) and attached to the surface of primary produced organic matter and clay particles. Together, these larger particles act as the main carriers of nanoscale ferrihydrite in the Lena River basin. The chemically reactive ferrihydrite accounts for on average 70 ± 15% of the total suspended Fe in the Lena River and tributaries. These observations place important constraints on Fe and OC cycling in the Lena River catchment area and Fe-bearing particle transport to the Arctic Ocean.

  10. Lena Trough MORB: Trace Element and Isotopic Composition of a Very Slow Spreading Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauret, F.; Weis, D.; Snow, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    Extreme non-hotspot MORB compositions are less straightforward to explain than comparable OIB's, where all manner of enriched components may be derived from plume material. Here we report a new isotope and trace element study of dredged samples from the ultra-slow (7.5 mm/yr effective full-rate) Lena Trough rift in the Arctic Ocean and the western end of Gakkel Ridge (13mm/yr full rate). The few basalts found in Lena Trough are alkali-MORB with an extreme enrichment of incompatible trace elements, particularly alkalies and Ba (Ba/Th=350±50, Ba/Nb=17±1, Nb/U=69±, (La/Sm)PM=1.39±0.25) and by a garnet-source signature with (Dy/Yb)PM=1.22±0.06. The range of radiogenic isotopic ratios is 87Sr/86Sr=0.7036-0.7044, 143Nd/144Nd=0.51277-0.51230, 206Pb/204Pb=17.75-17.99, 207Pb/204Pb=15.41-15.44 and 208Pb/204Pb=37.54-37.79. In comparison, Western Gakkel Ridge MORB compositions are similar to N-MORB (Ba/Th=143±60, Ba/Nb=11±3, Nb/U=45±6, 87Sr/86Sr=0.7029-0.7030, 143Nd/144Nd=0.51307-0.51310, 206Pb/204Pb=17.97-18.08, 207Pb/204Pb=15.43-15.44, and 208Pb/204Pb=37.73-37.81). The Lena Trough high-precision MC-ICP-MS Pb data define linear Pb-Pb arrays extending to quite unradiogenic values. These arrays extend towards the more radiogenic values of some Gakkel MORBs, which show very limited variations on their own. Together with negative linear correlations between trace element ratios and Nd-Pb isotope systematics, we interpret these Pb linear arrays as reflecting mixing between a DMM component (similar to Gakkel Ridge MORB source) and a highly enriched component, with radiogenic Sr isotopes but low Nd and Pb isotopic ratios. The Lena Trough source contains residual garnet and is preferentially sampled by low degree partial melting. The source of the enriched component of the Lena Trough alkali MORB is interpreted to be olivine-free pyroxenite, taking into account the shallow pressure of partial melting, indicated by major elements. This is a clear indication of a "mantle vein

  11. Oedipus in Brooklyn: reading Freud on women, watching Lena Dunham's girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchberg, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Through an examination of Freud's Lecture 33, "Femininity" (1933), and "Mourning and Melancholia" (1917), the author proposes a reading of Freud's description of the girl becoming a woman. Female development is retold as a melancholic narrative-one in which the girl's entrance into the positive Oedipus is founded on unconscious grievance and unmourned loss of the early relationship with her mother. Castration and penis envy are reconceived as melancholic markers-the manifest content of the subjectivity of refusal, loss, and imagined repair of the early maternal relationship. Lena Dunham's HBO television series Girls is analyzed as an illustration of these theoretical understandings. © 2014 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  12. Roads and Roadlessness: Driving Trucks in Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Argounova-Low

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article relates to the studies of roads and engages with the experience of driving in Sakha (Yakutiia, Siberia. The article intends to contribute to the broad corpus of literature on mobility and argues that an alternative perspective on roads and road-users from a geographical area beyond the West might better inform and add another dimension to our notions of roads and our movement along them. The article examines the fluid nature of roads in Siberia and the social significance the roads carry by focussing on truck-drivers and their perception and engagement with the so-called winter roads through their sensory experiences. The article analyses narratives of the truckers who frame their experiences of the road with close reference to time and money and where notions of agency of the road become prominent.

  13. Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy in the future large-volume liquid-scintillator detector LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, Michael; Feilitzsch, F V; Goeger-Neff, M; Lewke, T; Undagoitia, T Marrodan; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Todor, S; Winter, J

    2008-01-01

    The recent successes in neutrino physics prove that liquid-scintillator detectors allow to combine high energy resolution, efficient means of background reduction, and a large detection volume. In the planned LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy) experiment, a target mass of 50 kt will enable the investigation of a variety of terrestrial and astrophysical neutrino sources. The high-statistics spectroscopy of geoneutrinos, solar neutrinos and supernova neutrinos will provide new insights in the heat production processes of Earth and Sun, and the workings of a gravitational collapse. The same measurements will as well investigate neutrino properties as oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy. A first spectroscopic measurement of the low flux of diffuse supernova neutrino background is within the sensitivity of the LENA detector. Finally, a life-time limit of several 1034 years can be set to the proton decay into proton and anti-neutrino, testing the predictions of SUSY theory. The present contribution includes a review of the scientific studies that were performed in the last years as well as a report on currently on-going R and D activities.

  14. Microdosimetric measurements in the thermal neutron irradiation facility of LENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colautti, P.; Moro, D.; Chiriotti, S.; Conte, V.; Evangelista, L.; Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Postuma, I.

    2014-01-01

    A twin TEPC with electric-field guard tubes has been constructed to be used to characterize the BNCT field of the irradiation facility of LENA reactor. One of the two mini TEPC was doped with 50 ppm of 10 B in order to simulate the BNC events occurring in BNCT. By properly processing the two microdosimetric spectra, the gamma, neutron and BNC spectral components can be derived with good precision (∼6%). However, direct measurements of 10 B in some doped plastic samples, which were used for constructing the cathode walls, point out the scarce accuracy of the nominal 10 B concentration value. The influence of the Boral ® door, which closes the irradiation channel, has been measured. The gamma dose increases significantly (+51%) when the Boral ® door is closed. The crypt-cell-regeneration weighting function has been used to measure the quality, namely the RBE µ value, of the radiation field in different conditions. The measured RBE µ values are only partially consistent with the RBE values of other BNCT facilities. - Highlights: • A counter with two mini TEPCs, both equipped with electrical-field guard tubes, has been constructed. • The microdosimetric spectrum of the LENA-reactor irradiation vane has been studied. • The radiation-field quality (RBE) assessment confirms that the D n /D tot ratio is not an accurate parameter to characterize the BNCT radiation field

  15. Delta Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette

    A warming climate affects the entire planet, but the Arctic experience a warming that is faster than elsewhere in the world. This influences several processes affecting the evolution of the Arctic coast, and increasing erosion rates are detected throughout large parts of these high-latitude coasts...... to sandy beaches, marshes and deltas. This PhD thesis investigates coastal evolution with a special focus on changes in deltaic environments both during the Holocene and in a modern changing climate. The first part of the thesis (Paper 1 and 2) focus on detailed processes affecting delta evolution...... of a fjord and the second type is a wider fan-shaped open delta. Most deltas are directly coupled to the Greenland Ice Sheet or local icecaps and are highly influenced by the dynamics in the catchments. It is demonstrated how a modern changing climate directly affects delta dynamics, and that Greenlandic...

  16. High H2O/Ce of K-rich MORB from Lena Trough and Gakkel Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. E.; Feig, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Lena Trough in the Arctic ocean is the oblique spreading continuation of Gakkel Ridge through the Fram Strait (eg Snow et al. 2011). Extreme trace element and isotopic compositions seen in Lena Trough basalt appear to be the enriched end member dominating the geochemistry of the Western Volcanic Zone of the Western Gakkel Ridge as traced by Pb isotopes, K2O/TiO2, Ba/Nb and other isotopic, major and trace element indicators of mixing (Nauret et al., 2011). This is in contrast to neighboring Gakkel Ridge which has been spreading for 50-60 million years. Basalts from Lena Trough also show a pure MORB noble gas signature (Nauret et al., 2010) and peridotites show no evidence of ancient components in their Os isotopes (Lassiter, et al., in press). The major and trace element compositions of the basalts, however are very distinct from MORB, being far more potassic than all but a single locality on the SW Indian Ridge. We determined H2O and trace element composiitions of a suite of 17 basalt glasses from the Central Lena Trough (CLT) and the Gakkel Western Volcanic Zone, including many of those previously analyzed by Nauret et al. (2012). The Western Gakkel glasses have high H2O/Ce for MORB (>300) suggesting a water rich source consistent with the idea that the northernmost Atlantic mantle is enriched in water (Michael et al., 1995). They are within the range of Eastern Gakkel host glasses determined by Wanless et al, 2013. The Lena Trough (CLT) glasses are very rich in water for MORB (>1% H2O) and are among the highest H2O/Ce (>400) ever measured in MORB aside from melt inclusions in olivine. Mantle melting dynamics and melt evolution cannot account for the H2O/Ce variations in MORB, as these elements have similar behavior during melting and crustal evolution. Interestingly, the H2O/K2O ratios in the basalts are only around 1. This is because the K2O levels in the CLT glasses are very high as well relative to REE. The absolutely linear relationship between H2O and K2O

  17. Hydrosweep Measurements During the Expedition ARK XX-2 to Lena Trough and Western Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, S.; Kohls, T.; Roeber, S.; Snow, J.

    2004-12-01

    The region of Lena Trough and Western Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean was the object of an expedition in the summer of 2004. This region is of particular geoscientific interest because of its extremely slow spreading rates and the variety of morphologic forms that are produced in this tectonic environment. Therefore, the multibeam measurement system was of particular importance to the scientific goals of the cruise. The main characteristic of the Hydrosweep DS-2 deep-water sounding system aboard RV Polarstern is the 90° or 120° coverage angle in which the seafloor is depicted with 59 specific values for water depths perpendicular to the ship's long axis. The accuracy of the measurement is approx. 1% of water depth, the frequency of the acoustic signal is 15.5 kHz. The refraction of the sonar beams was corrected by automatic crossfan calibration. By regular transmission and measurement of a sweep profile in the ship's longitudinal direction and comparison of the slant beams with the vertical beam, the mean sound velocity over the vertical water column is determined and is used for the depth computation. The data collected include depth, sidescan (2048 values per scan), and backscatter information on each of the 59 beams. During this cruise, the Lena Trough was surveyed systematically for the first time by a multibeam sonar system. The recorded area has an expanse of approx. 100000 km2 and connects previously mapped areas of the Eurasian - North-American plate boundary between Fram Strait and Gakkel Ridge. The region of Western Gakkel Ridge, mapped in 2001 (AMOR-Expedition) by RV Polarstern and USCGC Healy (USA), was extended by two more profiles (each 220 km long) along the ridge. In order to produce working maps for the expedition, the multibeam sonar data were gridded with a spacing of 50 m, producing plots with various contour line intervals. For further morphological interpretation of Lena Trough and Gakkel Ridge slope magnitude maps, slope direction maps and

  18. Detection of supernova neutrinos in the liquid-scintillator experiment LENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Jurgen Michael Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The LENA project (Low-Energy Neutrino Astronomy) is a planned large-volume liquid-scintillator detector. The good energy resolution, low-energy threshold, and its large mass allow to perform real-time spectroscopy of low-energy neutrinos with high statistics. This is especially beneficial for the observation of rare events such as a galactic core-collapse supernova. In a liquid scintillator, interactions by different particle types cause different scintillation light pulse shapes. They can be used to identify proton recoils induced by neutrino-proton scattering from supernova neutrinos or by cosmogenic knock-out neutrons. In order to evaluate the performance of the detector, a precise characterization of the liquid scintillator is necessary. In the course of this work, an experiment has been set up at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium in Garching in order to determine the pulse shape of proton and electron recoils in different liquid-scintillator mixtures. Neutrons produced via 11 B(p,n) 11 C or an americiumberyllium source were used to induce proton recoils. Compton scattering of simultaneously emitted γs provided information on the electron recoils. A time-of-flight measurement allows for an easy identification of neutron and γ induced events and thus effective background reduction. The tail-to-total and the Gatti method are used in order to determine the energy-dependent discrimination power of proton and electron recoils in liquid scintillator. Combining both methods, a proton recoil identification efficiency of (99.70±0.05)% can be achieved between 1-1.5 MeV, while suppressing 99% of the γ induced recoils for the probable liquid scintillator mixture for LENA, linear alkylbenzene (LAB) as solvent and 3 g/l 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 20mg/l 1,4-bis-(o-methylstyryl)-benzole (bisMSB) as fluors. Moreover, the decay constants τ i and the respective amplitudes n i are determined for various liquid scintillator mixtures. It can be observed that the decay times

  19. Active spreading processes at ultraslow mid-ocean ridges: Unusual seismicity at the amagmatic Lena Trough, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Läderach, Christine; Schlindwein, Vera; Riedel, Carsten

    2010-05-01

    Lena Trough is the southern continuation of the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel Ridge and with its position in the Fram Strait between Greenland and Spitsbergen it is the only deep-sea gateway to the Arctic Ocean. DFG funded Emmy Noether group 'Mid-Ocean Volcanoes and Earthquakes' located at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is focusing on the seismicity of ultraslow spreading ridges and is especially interested in Lena Trough as an ultraslow spreading ridge in a developing stage. The southern Lena Trough shows similarities to the northern Red Sea spreading centre which is in the early stage of development from continental to oceanic rift. Cochran postulated in 2003 that the continental crust within the water-covered Red Sea is less than 10 km thick and that the northern part of the Red Sea rift spreads ultraslow as well. At Lena Trough an actively spreading mid-ocean ridge with a narrow rift valley has already developed but continental crust lies within a short distance. Lena Trough is extending from 83°N/5°W to 80.3°N/2°W where it passes into the transform fault of the Spitsbergen Fracture Zone. The geometry of Lena Trough and certain asymmetric structures in the rift valley indicate oblique spreading and mostly tectonic and amagmatic rifting. There are several topographic highs west of the ridge axis which could be bounded by deep faults with normal faulting or detachment character exposing mantle material at the surface. Seismicity at the Lena Trough shows apparently the same asymmetric character with epicenters of teleseismically recorded earthquakes concentrating predominantly west of the ridge axis. The most frequent focal mechanism of the earthquakes within the rift valley is normal faulting, whereas strike-slip faults occur in the Spitsbergen Fracture Zone. We relocalized teleseismic earthquakes recorded from May 1973 to April 2009 in the region using a refined localization algorithm and could confirm systematic asymmetry in the

  20. Interannual variations in soil moisture and productivity of boreal forest in Eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, A.; Tei, S.; Ohte, N.; Osaka, K.; Naito, D.; Maximov, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Interannual variations in soil moisture and vegetation parameters were observed for 9 years in a larch forest near Yakutsk, Russia in Eastern Siberia, to investigate the response of the ecosystem. Soil moisture varied depending on both the amount of summer rainfall in the year and soil moisture at the end of the previous summer carried over as ice. The annual water budget of soil moisture (dQs) from the previous August to the current year primarily corresponds to precipitation, with a deviations caused by runoff (decrease in dQs), limited transpiration and/or upward transport of ice meltwater from the bottom of the active layer (increase in dQs). The source of water for transpiration was inferred from sap water delta18O. Snow meltwater with low delta18O preset in spring was used in early summer (June) every year, while, summer precipitation with high delta18O was transpired in a wet summer and ice meltwater with low delta18O was a major contributor to transpiration during droughts. Tree growth (GBH increment) correlated with soil moisture in August of the same year, and there was no correlation observed with the date of snow thaw. Larch needle delta13C showed negative correlation with soil moisture in the previous August, indicating lowering of stomatal conductance during a drought and carrying over of carbon until the following year. Litter fall production seems to increase with a two-year time lag behind the increase in soil moisture due to carrying over of soil moisture and response of vegetation. Larch needle delta15N (-1.3?n on average) negatively correlated with C/N ratio, possibly caused by water and nutrient availability.

  1. Geology and assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Lena-Vilyui Basin Province, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, Timothy; Pitman, Janet K.; Moore, T.E.; Gautier, D.L.

    2017-11-22

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Lena-Vilyui Basin Province, north of the Arctic Circle, as part of the Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province is in the Russian Federation and is situated between the Verkhoyansk fold-and-thrust belt and the Siberian craton. The one assessment unit (AU) defined for this study—the Northern Priverkhoyansk Foredeep AU—was assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources. The estimated mean volumes of undiscovered resources for the Northern Priverkhoyansk Foredeep in the Lena-Vilyui Basin Province are ~400 million barrels of crude oil, 1.3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 40 million barrels of natural-gas liquids, practically all (99.49 percent) of which is north of the Arctic Circle.

  2. Teleseismic receiver functions imaging of Siberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina

    2014-01-01

    We map the lithosphere in Siberia by using the available broadband seismic data for calculation of Ps- and Sp-wave receiver functions (RF). RFs show converted waves from discontinuities in the vicinity of the seismic stations. The main objective is to image the Moho and upper mantle discontinuities......, including the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the study area. We construct the RF using the LQT method (Vinnik, 1977; Kind et al. 1995) in the version by Yuan et al. (1997). Rotation of ray coordinates uses the incidence angles predicted by the AK135 velocity model. This decomposes the wave...... by high-frequency S-RFs. Teleseismic converted Ps waves have higher frequency content (0.5–2 Hz) than Sp, which have an upper frequency of 0.1–0.2 Hz, and therefore Ps have about an order of magnitude better resolving power than Sp. The converted Sp-wave rarely resolve intracrustal structure, but can...

  3. Ground water investigations in connection with planned energy wells in the Lena area, Melhus centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storroe, Gaute

    2000-01-01

    In March 2000 the Norwegian Geologic Survey (NGU) was requested to carry out ground water investigations in the Lena area at Melhus centre by the firms E-Tek AS and Statoil. The background for the investigations was the plans of exploiting ground heat connected to a housing project lead by Selmer Bolig AS. The aim of the project was to document the possibilities for extracting ground heat from loose soil well(s) in the selected construction area. The needed amount of water is in the size of 50 m 3 /hour (14l/s). In addition the conditions of currents, ground water quality and possibilities for refiltering of the ground water was to be mapped. In conclusion it may be said that it most likely will be possible to meet the stipulated water requirements (50 m 3 /hour) by establishing a full scale production well within the construction area. The ground water currents in the Lena area run from north to south. The ground water surface is relatively flat with an incline of 0.1 - 0.2 % (1-2 mm/m). The possibilities for refiltering pumped water seem to be good. The conditions should be mapped more closely through refiltering tests. All of the collected ground water samples exceed the limiting values stipulated by the drinking water regulations as to alkalinity, sulphate, calcium, potassium and manganese. The tests from Obs2 and from the ''municipal well'' exceed the limits for chloride and sodium as well. This indicates that unwanted precipitations of both chalk and manganese may occur. Large quantities of sea salts (chloride and sodium) may also have a corrosive effect. Through calculations using the Ryznar's Stability Index (RSI) it is evident that the tests from Obs1 and Obs2 are in the limiting area between ''problem free water'' and ''corrosive water'', while the water from the municipal well must be characterised as very corrosive. According to information from the managing personnel there have not been registered problems with precipitations or corrosion in heat

  4. Origin and character of loesslike silt in unglaciated south-central Yakutia, Siberia, U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewe, Troy Lewis; Journaux, Andre

    1983-01-01

    Loesslike silt mantles upland terraces and low plateaus throughout unglaciated south-central Yakutia but is thickest along the south side of the lower Aldan River valley and the east side of the Lena River valley. The silt is probably loess deposited during glacial advances by winds blowing southward from the Verkhoyansk Range and eastward across the broad vegetation-free flood plain of the braided Lena River. The well-sorted uniform tan silt is well displayed along the Aldan and Lena Rivers; the thickest exposure measured, more than 60 m, is on the Tyungyulyu Terrace on the east side of the Lena River. On the west side of the valley, it is 10-25 m thick but thins rapidly to a featheredge west of Yakutsk. Almost all scarps along the south side of the Aldan River are capped by 10-35 m of silt. The texture and mineral composition of the loess like silt are uniform throughout south-central Yakutia, whether it overlies limestone, poorly consolidated sandstone, alluvium, and glacial outwash. All silt samples examined contained a high percentage of quartz and feldspar. The silt stands in sheer cliffs and is massive, with little or no stratification. The origin of the loesslike silt has been ascribed to disintegration in place of country rock by a marine, estuarine, lacustrine, fluvial, residual, or eolian source, or to a combination of these processes. The marine and estuarine hypotheses have never had strong support, but the lacustrine, fluvial, and residual hypotheses have been advanced by many Soviet workers. The most widely accepted explanation of the origin of the upland silt is that it is a combination of lacustrine and alluvial deposits formed on great flood plains and marshy plains. This origin is unlikely, however, because there are no shorelines, wave-cut beaches, deltas, mudcracks, or ripple marks. Neither distinct stratification nor an appreciable amount of clay exists in the silt. Moreover, there is no definite upper boundary to the deposits, as would be

  5. Research in the fields of radiochemistry and activation analysis using the LENA TRIGA nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxia, V.; Meloni, S.; Stella, R.; Brandone, A.

    1972-01-01

    In the past two years most of the research effort at the Radiochemistry Laboratory and National Research Council Centre for Radiochemistry and Activation Analysis has been devoted to research and development of activation analysis using the TRIGA Mark II LENA reactor of the University of Pavia. Pile neutrons have been used both in steady state and pulse mode, in the determination of oxygen in non ferrous materials. Neutron activation has been applied to the determination of some atmospheric particulate pollutants. Another field, in which activation analysis has been applied, is forensic research. Methods have been developed for the determination of antimony, barium and copper in gunpowder residues. By using inorganic materials such as molybdenum dibromide, zinc ferrocyanide and cadmium metal in granular form it was possible to set up simple chemical procedures in the activation analysis of trace amounts of noble metals in metallic matrices (high purity nickel and copper), geochemical materials (rocks and meteorites) and biological materials (orchard leaves). Neutron activation analysis was also used to investigate on the extraction of the platinum group metals from iodide and thiocyanate solutions at low concentrations

  6. Delta Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Herder, Justus Laurens; van der Wijk, V.

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a delta robot comprising a stationary base (2) and a movable platform (3) that is connected to the base with three chains of links (4,5,6), and comprising a balancing system incorporating at least one pantograph (7) for balancing the robot's center of mass, wherein the at least one pantograph has a first free extremity (10) at which it supports a countermass (13) which is arranged to balance the center of mass of the robot.

  7. Numerical modelling of channel processes and analysis of possible channel improvement measures on the Lena River near city Yakutsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylenko, Inna; Belikov, Vitaly; Zavadskii, Aleksander; Borisova, Natalya; Golovlyov, Pavel; Rumyantsev, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    City Yakutsk (administrative, culture and industrial center of the North East of Russia) situated on the left bank of large Russian river Lena last decades has faced with many problems, concerning intensive channel processes. Most dramatic among them are sediment accumulation near main water intake structure, supplying city Yakutsk by the drinking water, and deterioration in conditions of the navigation roots to the main city ports. Hydrodynamic modelling has been chosen as the main tool for analyses of the modern tendencies in channel processes and for the evaluation of possible channel improvement measures efficiency. STREAM_2D program complex (authors V. Belikov et al.), which is based on the numerical solution of two-dimensional Saint-Venant equations on a hybrid curvilinear quadrangular and rectangular mesh and take into account sediment transport, was used for the simulations. Detailed field data about water regime of the Lena river, bathymetry of the channels and topography of the floodplains was collected for model developing. Model area has covered 75 km of the Lena river valley including branched channels and wide floodplain from Tabaga to Kangalassy gauge cites. Data of these stations were used for model boundary conditions assigning. Data of gauge station city Yakutsk as well as measured during field campaign water levels and flow velocities was taken into account for model calibration and validation. Results of modelling has demonstrated close correspondence with observed water levels and discharges distribution between channel branches for different hydrological situations. Different combinations of hydrographs of 1, 10, 50% exceedance probability was used as input for modelling of channel deformations. Simulation results has shown that in future 10 years aligning of water discharges distribution between main Lena river branches near Yakutsk is possible, that is a positive tendency from the point of view of water supply of the city. More than 15

  8. Industrial Development of Siberia and the Soviet Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    21 (This argument is perhaps unintentionally fed by the central leadership’s emphasis on investing in renovation and technical reequipment of...Malov, "Po programme ’ energia ’," Pravda, May 12, 1982, p. 2. " M. Matafonov, "Open up Siberia’s Treasure Houses," Sotsialisticheskaia industriia

  9. Operation experience and maintenance at the TRIGA Mark II L.E.N.A. reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gngoli, F.; Berzero, A.; Lana, F.; Rosti, G.; Meloni, S.

    2008-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Pavia was operated in the last two years on a routine basis, mostly for neutron activation analysis purposes. Moreover the reactor was completely shutdown in the first six months of this year to allow the dismantling of the NADIR experimental setup. The paper presents: - Reactor operation from July 1990 to June 1992; - Reactor users in the time period January 1990 - December 1991; - Specific activities of some radionuclides in the filling materials; - Specific activity of some radionuclides in thermal column materials. Operations related to dismantling of NADIR experimental facility are described. Finally the new thermal column configuration is presented. Starting from the end inside the reactor tank, a graphite layer (35 cm thick) was positioned, followed by a bismuth layer (10 cm thick) to reduce gamma-ray intensity. The old graphite rods were then positioned leaving in the central part, on the equatorial plane of the thermal column, a cavity whose vertical section has 40 cm width and 20 cm height. The bottom of the cavity, towards to the reactor tank, has been lined with additional layers of graphite (10 cm), bismuth (10 cm) and again graphite (1 cm). The new configuration allowed new experiments to be performed. The cavity in the central part has been created to allow the irradiation of large biological samples such as experimental animal and human livers. This is a peculiar step in a neutron capture boron therapy project to be carried out at the University of Pavia. In order to avoid an implemented 41 Ar production in the void space between shutters and the thermal column outer end, the external surface of the thermal column has been coated with boral sheets. The neutron flux profile, both thermal and epithermal, and cadmium ratio for gold are shown. The flux distribution appears to be adequate to proceed with the neutron capture boron therapy experiment. The LENA Health Physics Service has checked all phases of

  10. Reanalysis Data Evaluation to Study Temperature Extremes in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulgina, T. M.; Gordov, E. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes are strongly pronounced in Siberia by significant warming in the 2nd half of 20th century and recent extreme events such as 2010 heat wave and 2013 flood in Russia's Far East. To improve our understanding of observed climate extremes and to provide to regional decision makers the reliable scientifically based information with high special and temporal resolution on climate state, we need to operate with accurate meteorological data in our study. However, from available 231 stations across Siberia only 130 of them present the homogeneous daily temperature time series. Sparse, station network, especially in high latitudes, force us to use simulated reanalysis data. However those might differ from observations. To obtain reliable information on temperature extreme "hot spots" in Siberia we have compared daily temperatures form ERA-40, ERA Interim, JRA-25, JRA-55, NCEP/DOE, MERRA Reanalysis, HadEX2 and GHCNDEX gridded datasets with observations from RIHMI-WDC/CDIAC dataset for overlap period 1981-2000. Data agreement was estimated at station coordinates to which reanalysis data were interpolated using modified Shepard method. Comparison of averaged over 20 year annual mean temperatures shows general agreement for Siberia excepting Baikal region, where reanalyses significantly underestimate observed temperature behavior. The annual temperatures closest to observed one were obtained from ERA-40 and ERA Interim. Furthermore, t-test results show homogeneity of these datasets, which allows one to combine them for long term time series analysis. In particular, we compared the combined data with observations for percentile-based extreme indices. In Western Siberia reanalysis and gridded data accurately reproduce observed daily max/min temperatures. For East Siberia, Lake Baikal area, ERA Interim data slightly underestimates TN90p and TX90p values. Results obtained allows regional decision-makers to get required high spatial resolution (0,25°×0

  11. Vocalization patterns in young children with Down syndrome: Utilizing the language environment analysis (LENA) to inform behavioral phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Chandni; Mastergeorge, Ann M

    2017-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at higher risk for both delayed expressive language and poor speech intelligibility. The current study utilized the quantitative automated language environment analysis (LENA) to depict mother and child vocalizations and conversational patterns in the home of 43 children with DS, chronologically aged 24-64 months. Children with DS displayed fewer utterances than typically developing children; however, there was wide variability. Furthermore, children with DS did not show increased vocalization counts across their chronological ages. In contrast to previous findings, this study found that the mothers of children with DS had a reduced number of vocalizations. However, the vocalizations increased with age in comparison to mothers of typically developing children. Implications for targeted interventions that facilitate learning opportunities in bidirectional contexts for children with DS and their parents are discussed, with particular attention to quantify behavioral phenotypes utilizing a novel expressive language assessment tool.

  12. Gravity Variation in Siberia: GRACE Observation and Possible Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Fong Chao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the finding, from the GRACE observation, of an increasing trend in the gravity anomaly in Siberia at the rate of up to 0.5 ugal yr-1 during 2003/1 - 2009/12, in the backdrop of a negative anomaly of magnitude on the order of ~-10 mgal. In consideration of the non-uniqueness of the gravitational inverse problem, we examine in some detail the various possible geophysical causes to explain the increasing gravity signal. We find two geophysical mechanisms being the most plausible, namely the melting of permafrost and the GIA post-glacial rebound. We conclude that these two mechanisms cannot be ruled out as causes for the regional gravity increase in Siberia, based on gravity data and in want of ancillary geophysical data in the region. More definitive identification of the contributions of the various causes awaits further studies.

  13. The American Expeditionary Force Siberia: A Case Study of Operational Art with Ambiguous Strategic Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    Siberia (AEF-S) with around 8,000 soldiers was the larger of the two American forces. They saw duty in the Eastern region of the Russian Empire primarily...Allies feared that Germany would capture the strategic northern Russia ports of Murmansk and Archangel along with vast stores of military supplies...in Siberia. The deplorable conditions in Siberia allowed guerilla bands on both sides to proliferate throughout the region . The Bolsheviks viewed the

  14. Medium-term erosion simulation of an abandoned mine site using the SIBERIA landscape evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, G.R.; Willgoose, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    This study forms part of a collaborative project designed to validate the long-term erosion predictions of the SIBERIA landform evolution model on rehabilitated mine sites. The SIBERIA catchment evolution model can simulate the evolution of landforms resulting from runoff and erosion over many years. SIBERIA needs to be calibrated before evaluating whether it correctly models the observed evolution of rehabilitated mine landforms. A field study to collect data to calibrate SIBERIA was conducted at the abandoned Scinto 6 uranium mine located in the Kakadu Region, Northern Territory, Australia. The data were used to fit parameter values to a sediment loss model and a rainfall-runoff model. The derived runoff and erosion model parameter values were used in SIBERIA to simulate 50 years of erosion by concentrated flow on the batters of the abandoned site. The SIBERIA runs correctly simulated the geomorphic development of the gullies on the man-made batters of the waste rock dump. The observed gully position, depth, volume, and morphology on the waste rock dump were quantitatively compared with the SIBERIA simulations. The close similarities between the observed and simulated gully features indicate that SIBERIA can accurately predict the rate of gully development on a man-made post-mining landscape over periods of up to 50 years. SIBERIA is an appropriate model for assessment of erosional stability of rehabilitated mine sites over time spans of around 50 years. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  15. Snowchange Oral History - Work Among the Kolyma River Indigenous Societies in Siberia, Russia, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes oral history accounts from Indigenous people participating in the Snowchange project in Siberia, Russia. It provides geographic and...

  16. Delta Plaza kohvik = Delta Plaza cafe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Tiiu Truusi tähtsamate tööde loetelu. Büroohoone Delta Plaza arhitektid Marika Lõoke ja Jüri Okas (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke)

  17. Topological track reconstruction in liquid scintillator and LENA as a far-detector in an LBNO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Unsegmented liquid scintillator (LSc) neutrino detectors have proven to be successful instruments of neutrino physics. They usually measure terrestrial and astrophysical low-energy (LE) neutrinos and antineutrinos with energies up to some tens of MeV. Designs for next-generation detectors based on this technology intend to use several tens of kilotons of LSc. Two examples are the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) project with 50 kt considered in Europe and the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with 20 kt already under construction in China. A key factor to reach the scientific goals of these projects, e.g., the determination of the neutrino mass ordering (MO) in the case of JUNO, will be the efficient rejection of background from radioisotopes produced by cosmogenic muons. This requires accurate reconstructions of extended muon event topologies in the LSc volume.The first part of this work is about the implementation of a novel, iterative track reconstruction procedure for unsegmented LSc detectors and a basic evaluation of its performance with the LENA detector simulation. The ultimate goal of the new method is to reconstruct the spatial number density distribution of optical photon emissions. This will give access to a charged particle's differential energy loss dE/dx in LSc and resolve details of an event's topology, e.g., induced particle showers. Visual comparisons of reconstruction outcomes with Monte Carlo (MC) truths already provide evidence for this capability. First quantitative results were extracted from the 3D reconstruction data of fully-contained muons in the kinetic energy range from 1 to 10 GeV: Despite some well understood systematic effects in the current method to find start and end point of a track, resolutions

  18. Multilingual Education in South Siberia: National Schools in the Republics of Altai and Tyva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Joan F.

    2012-01-01

    Subtractive bilingualism is widespread throughout Siberia, with indigenous youth often more proficient in Russian than in their non-Russian local languages. Siberia's national schools, which are secondary schools offering instruction in local languages of Russia, provide critical institutional support for minority languages. The goal of this…

  19. Delta 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skott, Jeppe; Skott, Charlotte Krog; Jess, Kristine

    DELTA 2.0 er en ny og helt opdateret udgave af Delta, der i ti år været brugt i matematiklærernes grund-, efter- og videreuddannelse. DELTA 2.0 er seriens almene fagdidaktik. Der er også fagdidaktiske overvejelser i de øvrige bøger i serien, men de er knyttet til specifikt matematisk indhold. DEL...

  20. Continuous measurements of methane from a tower network over Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasakawa, M.; Machida, T.; Saeki, T.; Koyama, Y.; Maksyutov, S. (Center for Global Environmental Research, National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Shimoyama, K. (Inst. of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido Univ., Hokkaido (Japan)); Tsuda, N. (Global Environmental Forum, Tokyo (Japan)); Suto, H. (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)); Arshinov, M.; Davydov, D.; Fofonov, A.; Krasnov, O. (Inst. of Atmospheric Optics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation))

    2010-11-15

    We have been conducting continuous measurements of Methane (CH{sub 4}) concentration from an expanding network of towers (JR-STATION: Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network) located in taiga, steppe and wetland biomes of Siberia since 2004. High daytime means (>2000 ppb) observed simultaneously at several towers during winter, together with in situ weather data and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, indicate that high pressure systems caused CH{sub 4} accumulation at subcontinental scale due to the widespread formation of an inversion layer. Daytime means sometimes exceeded 2000 ppb, particularly in the summer of 2007 when temperature and precipitation rates were anomalously high over West Siberia, which implies that CH{sub 4} emission from wetlands were exceptionally high in 2007. Many hot spots detected by MODIS in the summer of 2007 illustrate that the contribution of biomass burning also cannot be neglected. Daytime mean CH{sub 4} concentrations from the Siberian tower sites were generally higher than CH{sub 4} values reported at NOAA coastal sites in the same latitudinal zone, and the difference in concentrations between two sets of sites was reproduced with a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport model. Simulations of emissions from different CH{sub 4} sources suggested that the major contributor to variation switched from wetlands during summer to fossil fuel during winter.

  1. Regional methane emission from West Siberia mire landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glagolev, M; Kleptsova, I; Filippov, I; Maksyutov, S; Machida, T

    2011-01-01

    Methane emissions from mires in all climate–vegetation zones of West Siberia (forest steppe, subtaiga, south taiga, middle taiga, north taiga, forest tundra and tundra) were measured using a static chamber method. The observed fluxes varied considerably from small negative values in forested bogs and palsa to hundreds of mgC m −2 h −1 in ponds and wet hollows. Observed data were consolidated in the form of the empirical model of methane emissions designated as the 'standard model'. The model is based on medians of CH 4 flux distributions of eight different micro-landscape types depending on their location and estimated duration of methane emission period within the climate–vegetation zone. The current version (Bc8) of the 'standard model' estimates methane flux from West Siberia mires at 2.93 ± 0.97 TgC CH 4 yr −1 that accounts for about 2.4% of the total methane emission from all mires or 0.7% of global methane emission from all sources.

  2. Delta hedging strategies comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Giovanni, Domenico; Ortobelli, S.; Rachev, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we implement dynamic delta hedging strategies based on several option pricing models. We analyze different subordinated option pricing models and we examine delta hedging costs using ex-post daily prices of S&P 500. Furthermore, we compare the performance of each subordinated model...

  3. Research activities in the fields of radiochemistry and neutron activation analysis using the LENA nuclear plant in Pavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, L.; Genova, N.; DiCasa, M.; Carmella-Crespi, V.

    1978-01-01

    In the past two years the activity of the Radiochemistry Laboratory and CNR Centre of Radiochemistry and Activation Analysis was mainly devoted to studies of nuclear activation analysis applied to different fields using the LENA reactor. Three NBS vegetable reference standards, Orchard Leaves, Tomato Leaves and Pine Needles, were analyzed for their halogen content. Halogen determination in foodstuff, vegetables and organic tissues gives valuable information on metabolic, nutritional, pollution and epidemiological fields. A detailed study on macro- and micro-elements content in Sardinian coal and its ashes was performed, in order to assess the possibility of using it as a fuel in electric power generating plants. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used for the determination of Al, Si, Mn, Mg, Na, V, CI, Ce, Yb, Th, Cr, Hf, Cs, Se, Rb, Fe, Co, Ta, Eu, K, La and Sb. A multielement trace analysis of rock samples was developed in cooperation with scientists from other Universities; the determination of R.E., U, Th, Zr, Cs, Ba, Ni, Sc, Ta, Hf, Sr, and Cr by instrumental neutron activation analysis was carried out in connection with orogenetic studies of African Rocks. In the archaeological field ancient artefacts recently discovered during a digging campaign at Monza's Cathedral (Italy) were analyzed with the aim to trace their origin and compare their composition with similar samples whose dating is certain. As a contribute to the international program of certifying NBS reference standard materials, chromium in the Brewer's Yeast, recently proposed as a new SRM, was determined by both instrumental and destructive neutron activation analysis. In the study of the role and behaviour of trace elements in human physiology, vanadium was investigated in human blood, as a trace element of increasing interest in connection with its origin from pollutants. Nuclear activation analysis was also applied to marine organism samples under a contract for oceanographic research

  4. Structure of the Crust and the Lithosperic Mantle in Siberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia

    the development of a new regional crustal model, SibCrust, that is a digital crustal model for both the Siberian Craton and the West Siberian Basin. The SibCrust model, constrained by digitizing of all available seismic profiles and crustal velocity models across the Siberia, also includes a critical quality...... assessment of regional seismic data and crustal regionalization based on seismic structure of the crust. The second part of the study included the development of the SibDensity model that is the density model of the lithospheric mantle calculated by the mass balance method. Mantle density modeling involved...... in the lithospheric mantle density, are interpreted in terms of regional tectonic evolution, namely the mechanism by which the Paleozoic intracontinental basin has been formed and the tectono-magmatic processes by which the Archean-Proterozoic craton has been modified as reflected in the composition of its mantle....

  5. A new species of Stamnaria (Leotiomycetes, Helotiales from Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Haelewaters

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Stamnaria is described based on morphology and molecular data from a collection made in West Siberia. Stamnaria yugrana is differentiated by lanceolate, strongly protruding paraphyses and comparatively narrow, fusoid-clavate ascospores. The apothecia are urn-shaped due to a prominent and even collar as in S. persoonii. The species grows on fallen side branches of Equisetum sylvaticum, a rarely recorded host for Stamnaria. The authors formally describe the new species and provide colour illustrations. In addition, the literature is reviewed on previously described species of Stamnaria. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Stamnaria lineage, based on the ITS ribosomal DNA, strongly supports the three currently recognised species: S. americana, S. persoonii and S. yugrana.

  6. Holocene Faunal Trends in West Siberia and Their Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashev, S. N.; Aleshina, A. O.; Zuban, I. A.; Lupinos, M. Y.; Mardonova, L. B.; Mitropolskiy, M. G.; Selyukov, A. G.; Sorokina, N. V.; Stolbov, V. A.; Shapovalov, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    Based on an analysis of the transformation of vertebrate and invertebrate fauna of West Siberia in the Holocene, the classification and periodization of the main faunal trends are presented. Against the background of changing environmental conditions, the key regularities of the faunal dynamics, and the ways some species penetrate into the territory of the region and others disappear from the beginning of the Holocene to the present time have been indicated. Three global and four fluctuating trends are identified. The anthropogenic trend is ascertained separately. A conclusion is made about the prevailing causes of these changes, associated primarily with periodic climatic processes of different levels, determined by planetary geological and cosmic cycles. It is emphasized that, in the historical period, anthropogenic factors play a significant role in the regional faunal dynamics.

  7. Identification of electrofacies on the basis of well logging to determine sedimentation environment of horizon JK2 in Em-Egovskoe field (Western Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashova, L.; Belozerov, V.; Pushtakov, E.

    2015-11-01

    Well logging results are one of the ways to study the buried terrigenous rocks genesis. To ensure the most objective characterization of the rock and identification of electrofacies it is necessary to use a complex geological and geophysical survey. The comprehensive investigations of environmental conditions based on well logging have been performed for the horizon JK2 of Tumenskoe formation in Em-Egovskoe area, Krasnoleninskoe field (Western Siberia). The defined electrofacies were compared with the results of earlier conducted granulometric and mineralogical analyses. The totality of research provided for a conclusion that the investigated sediments of horizon JK2 had been formed within the destructive tidal delta. Thus, objective facies prediction can only be ensured by analyzing core and well logging data comprehensively.

  8. Human evolution in Siberia: from frozen bodies to ancient DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouakaze Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Yakuts contrast strikingly with other populations from Siberia due to their cattle- and horse-breeding economy as well as their Turkic language. On the basis of ethnological and linguistic criteria as well as population genetic studies, it has been assumed that they originated from South Siberian populations. However, many questions regarding the origins of this intriguing population still need to be clarified (e.g. the precise origin of paternal lineages and the admixture rate with indigenous populations. This study attempts to better understand the origins of the Yakuts by performing genetic analyses on 58 mummified frozen bodies dated from the 15th to the 19th century, excavated from Yakutia (Eastern Siberia. Results High quality data were obtained for the autosomal STRs, Y-chromosomal STRs and SNPs and mtDNA due to exceptional sample preservation. A comparison with the same markers on seven museum specimens excavated 3 to 15 years ago showed significant differences in DNA quantity and quality. Direct access to ancient genetic data from these molecular markers combined with the archaeological evidence, demographical studies and comparisons with 166 contemporary individuals from the same location as the frozen bodies helped us to clarify the microevolution of this intriguing population. Conclusion We were able to trace the origins of the male lineages to a small group of horse-riders from the Cis-Baïkal area. Furthermore, mtDNA data showed that intermarriages between the first settlers with Evenks women led to the establishment of genetic characteristics during the 15th century that are still observed today.

  9. The Technologies of Lie in Local Cultures of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A. Naumenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the political phenomenon – "technology of lie" that emerged of Jesuit and quasi-Catholic culture of Europe at the Middle Ages. The article also considers penetration of this phenomenon into Western Siberia through representatives of exile. According to author, the technologies of lie were created as a result of distortion of Catholicism, departure from a true spiritual component. This policy was considered by its carriers as a competition form. The author considers that misstatement of Orthodoxy was possible to a lesser extent because of its traditional dogmatism; the Russian imperial power did not use technologies of lie at the wide nation-wide and geopolitical level. The phenomenon existed only in local cultures. In article the social and economic and political reasons of forming of these technologies in the Russian Empire and Western Siberia, their manifestations and a consequence are analyzed. As examples cases of anti-Semitic "bloody slanders" are given in the European Russia and a defiant line item of the Jesuit organization in a Siberian exile. The author notes that the considered tactics has been directed to some religious groups and to certain representatives of society and the government. As a rule, none of the victims were ready to "information attacks" and lost them, losing not only property and positions, but also life sometimes. The author emphasizes that this practice has been adopted by part of the Russian revolutionary atheists. There is approved action of these technologies in terms of the Siberian penal servitude and the exile. Later the experience gained by them has formed the basis of fabricated political processes in case of the Stalin the regime.

  10. Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Epilepsy in Children in the North of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Bogdanov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology and risk factors of epilepsy, based on the follow-up of 549 children, residing in the north of Western Siberia over the course of 1995–2010 was studied. Morbidity was determined.

  11. The effects of climate, permafrost and fire on vegetation change in Siberia in a changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchebakova, N M; Parfenova, E; Soja, A J

    2009-01-01

    Observations and general circulation model projections suggest significant temperature increases in Siberia this century that are expected to have profound effects on Siberian vegetation. Potential vegetation change across Siberia was modeled, coupling our Siberian BioClimatic Model with several Hadley Centre climate change scenarios for 2020, 2050 and 2080, with explicit consideration of permafrost and fire activity. In the warmer and drier climate projected by these scenarios, Siberian forests are predicted to decrease and shift northwards and forest-steppe and steppe ecosystems are predicted to dominate over half of Siberia due to the dryer climate by 2080. Despite the large predicted increases in warming, permafrost is not predicted to thaw deep enough to sustain dark (Pinus sibirica, Abies sibirica, and Picea obovata) taiga. Over eastern Siberia, larch (Larix dahurica) taiga is predicted to continue to be the dominant zonobiome because of its ability to withstand continuous permafrost. The model also predicts new temperate broadleaf forest and forest-steppe habitats by 2080. Potential fire danger evaluated with the annual number of high fire danger days (Nesterov index is 4000-10 000) is predicted to increase by 2080, especially in southern Siberia and central Yakutia. In a warming climate, fuel load accumulated due to replacement of forest by steppe together with frequent fire weather promotes high risks of large fires in southern Siberia and central Yakutia, where wild fires would create habitats for grasslands because the drier climate would no longer be suitable for forests.

  12. Hepatitis D (Delta agent)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complications may include: Chronic active hepatitis Acute liver failure ... Landaverde C, Perrillo R. Hepatitis D. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, ... 81. Thio CL, Hawkins C. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis delta ...

  13. Man made deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  14. Man made deltas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, V.; Trincardi, F.

    2014-12-01

    During the last few millennia, southern European fluvio-deltaic systems have evolved in response to changes in the hydrological cycle, mostly driven by high-frequency climate oscillations and increasing anthropic pressure on natural landscapes. The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the bulk of the four largest northern Mediterranean and Black Sea deltas (Ebro, Rhone, Po and Danube) formed during two short and synchronous intervals during which anthropogenic land cover change was the main driver for enhanced sediment production. These two major growth phases occurred under contrasting climatic regimes and were both followed by generalized delta retreat, supporting the hypothesis of human-driven delta progradation. Delta retreat, in particular, was the consequence of reduced soil erosion for renewed afforestation after the fall of the Roman Empire, and of river dams construction that overkilled the still increasing sediment production in catchment basins since the Industrial Era. In this second case, in particular, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding.

  15. A Case Study: Implementation of a Management System for the TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Energy (LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. Annex I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This annex provides an example for the implementation of a management system for operating organizations of research reactors, based on a case study in which the implementation of such a system has been completed. The case study relates the experience of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (hereafter referred to as LENA) of the University of Pavia, Italy. This example is used because of the recent completion of the implementation of an integrated management system, and also because of the specific characteristics of the organization (such as the limited number of staff, limited financial resources, etc.), which are often typical for organizations that operate smaller research reactors. Section I-1 gives a brief presentation of the organization, including the scope of work, the main activities performed, the organizational structure, the identification of interested parties and the applicable requirements and standards. Section I-2 describes the LENA Management System, the reasons for its implementation, the stages of its development and the processes involved. Some practical examples related to the development of the LENA Management System are discussed in Section I-3, indicating the choices made by the organization. In particular, Section I-3.12 shows the correlation between the LENA Management System processes and the processes considered in the main body of this publication.

  16. Influence of logging on the effects of wildfire in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavskaya, E. A.; Buryak, L. V.; Ivanova, G. A.; Conard, S. G.; Kalenskaya, O. P.; Zhila, S. V.; McRae, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Russian boreal zone supports a huge terrestrial carbon pool. Moreover, it is a tremendous reservoir of wood products concentrated mainly in Siberia. The main natural disturbance in these forests is wildfire, which modifies the carbon budget and has potentially important climate feedbacks. In addition, both legal and illegal logging increase landscape complexity and affect burning conditions and fuel consumption. We investigated 100 individual sites with different histories of logging and fire on a total of 23 study areas in three different regions of Siberia to evaluate the impacts of fire and logging on fuel loads, carbon emissions, and tree regeneration in pine and larch forests. We found large variations of fire and logging effects among regions depending on growing conditions and type of logging activity. Logged areas in the Angara region had the highest surface and ground fuel loads (up to 135 t ha-1), mainly due to logging debris. This resulted in high carbon emissions where fires occurred on logged sites (up to 41 tC ha-1). The Shushenskoe/Minusinsk and Zabaikal regions are characterized by better slash removal and a smaller amount of carbon emitted to the atmosphere during fires. Illegal logging, which is widespread in the Zabaikal region, resulted in an increase in fire hazard and higher carbon emissions than legal logging. The highest fuel loads (on average 108 t ha-1) and carbon emissions (18-28 tC ha-1) in the Zabaikal region are on repeatedly burned unlogged sites where trees fell on the ground following the first fire event. Partial logging in the Shushenskoe/Minusinsk region has insufficient impact on stand density, tree mortality, and other forest conditions to substantially increase fire hazard or affect carbon stocks. Repeated fires on logged sites resulted in insufficient tree regeneration and transformation of forest to grasslands. We conclude that negative impacts of fire and logging on air quality, the carbon cycle, and ecosystem

  17. Comparison of CO2 fluxes in a larch forest on permafrost and a pine forest on non-permafrost soils in Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyryanov, V.; Tchebakova, N. M.; Nakai, Y.; Zyryanova, O.; Parfenova, E. I.; Matsuura, Y.; Vygodskaya, N.

    2013-12-01

    -245 gC/m2season. Our maximal net CO2 uptake was close to that of a Gmelin larch forest on the continuous permafrost in eastern Siberia characterized by 6 μmol/m2s in the mid-summer. Compared to a L. cajanderi forest on sandy soil within a wide flooded valley of Lena River characterised by the flux of (-10-18) μmol/m2s, our fluxes were 3 times less. Seasonal carbon dioxide exchange in our Gmelin larch ecosystem appeared to be the weakest among Siberian and other boreal ecosystems studied worldwide we found in literature.

  18. Communities of larger fungi of ombrotrophic bogs in West Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Filippova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bogs are common ecosystems in the Taiga of West Siberia. Little is known about mycological diversity in these important ecosystems. This article summarises the results of a two-year study of the macrofungi in two bogs near the town of Khanty-Mansiysk. Sporocarps were collected in 20 plots (about 300 m2 established in Mukhrino Bog as well as during random walks in Mukhrino Bog and Chistoe Bog in the late summer–autumn of 2012 and 2013. The plots were established in two common bog habitats representing the Ledo-Sphagnetum fusci (LS and Scheuchzerio palustris-Sphagnetum cuspidati (SS plant community associations. A total of 59 distinct fungal taxa were collected from the two bogs, with the LS association having a higher species richness and diversity than the SS association (50 taxa vs. 16 taxa and 30–40 taxa per 1000 m2 vs. 6–10 taxa per 1000 m2, respectively. Each of the two plant community associations has its own characteristic fungal taxa, with the LS association having 13 characteristic taxa and the SS association having five. Nearly two thirds of the fungal taxa are saprotrophic, mainly of Sphagnum spp., while others are mycorrhizal, mainly with Pinus spp. Most taxa were collected fewer than ten times during the study period and, hence, are considered rare and may need to be recognised for conservation programmes in this region.

  19. Early Cambrian palaeogeography and the probable Iberia Siberia connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubanov, Alexander P.

    2002-07-01

    The end of the Proterozoic-beginning of the Cambrian is marked by some of the most dramatic events in the history of Earth. The fall of the Ediacaran biota, followed by the Cambrian Explosion of skeletonised bilaterians, a pronounced shift in oceanic and atmospheric chemistry and rapid climatic change from 'snowball earth' to 'greenhouse' conditions all happened within a rather geologically short period of time. These events took place against a background of the rearrangement of the prevailing supercontinent; some authors view this as a sequence of individual supercontinents such as Mesoproterozoic Midgardia, Neoproterozoic Rodinia and Early Cambrian Pannotia. Assembled in the Mesoproterozoic, this supercontinent appears to have existed through the Neoproterozoic into the Early Cambrian with periodic changes in configuration. The final rearrangement took place during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition with the Cadomian and related phases of the Pan-African orogeny. The distribution of Early Cambrian molluscs and other small shelly fossils (SSF) across all continents indicates a close geographic proximity of all major cratonic basins that is consistent with the continued existence of the supercontinent at that time. Subsequently, Rodinia experienced breakup that led to the amalgamation of Gondwana, separation of Laurentia, Baltica, Siberia and some small terranes and the emergence of oceanic basins between them. Spreading oceanic basins caused a gradual geographic isolation of the faunal assemblages that were united during the Vendian-Early Cambrian.

  20. Landscape fire in East Siberia: medical, ecological and economic aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, N. V.; Rukavishnikov, V. S.; Zabuga, G. A.; Elfimova, T. A.

    2018-01-01

    More than 40 % of the forests in Siberia region are known to have a fire danger of high classes and high burning degrees. This paper describes air pollutants emission (PM10, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and others) in East Siberian region during a 10-year period in the forests fires focus. A total of 500 to 2000 fires occurred in Irkutsk oblast during the last ten years. At an average annual forest fires cover an area of 1 109 hectares on the model territory (Bratsk city). The plane pollutant emission source with a high productivity is formed on the significant forest fire area occurred in a relatively short-term time periods. The increase in hazard ratios was registered for the ingredients of emission-specific industrial enterprises and capable of accumulating in vegetation: carbon disulphide 1.9 times, fluorine-containing substances 1.8 times during the fire. The economic loss of energy resources resulting from reduced production of firewood was estimated at 56.6 million in Irkutsk oblast. The potential risk of negative effects for the respiratory system and cardiovascular system stipulated for the acute inhalation exposure was found to increase on the days, of the fires, as evidenced by the growth of the daily mortality and morbidity rates among the population.

  1. Some features of the Holocene insect faunas of northeastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmina, Svetlana; Sher, Andrei

    2006-08-01

    The composition of fossil insect faunas from northeastern Siberia changed significantly during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition. The Late Pleistocene insect fauna reflects tundra-steppe environments, and was dominated by xerophilic species. This fauna persisted regionally until ca 12,000 yr BP. A radical transformation of the environment occurred between 12,000 and 10,000 yr BP, marked by the permafrost degradation and invasion of tall shrubs and later trees into the higher latitudes. The early Holocene insect assemblages are dominated by mesophilic tundra species, but also include small number of more thermophilic species, which are currently restricted to the taiga zone. Tree-dependent species, however, were virtually absent. This early Holocene fauna has no modern analogue. The faunal assemblages indicate that the early Holocene climate was more humid than that of the Late Pleistocene, and warmer than today. Post-glacial sea level rise was in progress at that time, but the shoreline was still much further north, and the New Siberian Islands were still a part of the mainland. During the second-half of the Holocene, sea level continued to rise, and trees and tall shrubs retreated to the south. Regional ecosystems, including insect faunas, approached their modern compositions and boundaries.

  2. Surface ultraviolet radiation over east Siberia: seasonal variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhalev

    Full Text Available The results of spectral measurements of the daily near-noon surface direct solar ultraviolet radiation in the wavelength range of 295–345 nm obtained in Irkutsk (East Siberia for the time interval of 1998–2000 are presented. For the period under consideration, the seasonal UV radiation variations are analysed that are associated with the total ozone dynamics, the transition of cyclonic and anticyclonic (Siberian anticyclone periods, the presence of snow cover, and other factors. The analysis reveals an asymmetric behaviour of the seasonal course in ground-level UV radiation around the time of the summer solstice, with seasonal variation dependence on the wavelength. We have determined the irregular variations of surface UV radiation that is typical for the region, with their properties dependent on the season and on the spectral range analysed. The similarity of the above noted features from year to year was revealed.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (Transmission and scattering of radiation; instruments and techniques – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  3. HISTORY OF THE LEGENDARY AIRWAY “ALASKA-SIBERIA-FRONT”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В А Борисов

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the construction of the Alaskan-Siberian Railway by the USSR during the Second World War and its role in the delivery of aviation equipment from the USA factories in Fairbanks (Alaska for the subsequent ferrying to the Soviet Union. In this regard, the author explores the little known facts of the development of the complex airway “Alaska-Siberia-front”, which played the crucial role in the history of the Great Patriotic War and enabled the Russian and American aviators to hasten the victory over Nazi Germany. The article also reveals the specific decisions of the Party and the Soviet government on coordinating efforts between Great Britain and the United States to supply combat aircraft under the Lend-Lease. On the basis of specific historical facts the author considers selfless and heroic efforts of Soviet pilots, engineers, technicians, junior aviation specialists in the preparation of mobile airfields and sites for aircrafts intermediate landing in the harsh Siberian climate.

  4. Bazhen Fm matured reservoir evaluation (West Siberia, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnachev, S.; Skripkin, A.; Baranov, V.; Zakharov, S.

    2015-02-01

    The depletion of the traditional sources of hydrocarbons leads to the situation when the biggest players of the oil and gas production market turn to unconventional reserves. Commercial shale oil and gas production levels in the USA have largely determined world prospects for oil and gas industry development. Russia takes one of the leading place in the world in terms of shale oil resources. The main source rock of the West Siberia, the biggest oil and gas basin in Russia under development, the Bazhen Fm and its stratigraphic and lithologic analogs, is located in the territory of over 1,000,000 square kilometers. Provided it has similar key properties (organic carbon content, porosity, permeability) with the deposits of the Bakken Fm and Green River Fm, USA, it is still extremely poorly described with laboratory methods. We have performed the laboratory analysis of core samples from a well drilled in Bazhen Fm deposits with matured organic matter (Tmax>435 °C). It was demonstrated the applicability of the improved steady-state gas flow method to evaluate the permeability of nanopermeable rocks. The role of natural fracturing in forming voids was determided that allows regarding potential Bazhen Fm reservoirs as systems with dual porosity and dual permeability.

  5. Bazhen Fm matured reservoir evaluation (West Siberia, Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parnachev, S; Skripkin, A; Baranov, V; Zakharov, S

    2015-01-01

    The depletion of the traditional sources of hydrocarbons leads to the situation when the biggest players of the oil and gas production market turn to unconventional reserves. Commercial shale oil and gas production levels in the USA have largely determined world prospects for oil and gas industry development. Russia takes one of the leading place in the world in terms of shale oil resources. The main source rock of the West Siberia, the biggest oil and gas basin in Russia under development, the Bazhen Fm and its stratigraphic and lithologic analogs, is located in the territory of over 1,000,000 square kilometers. Provided it has similar key properties (organic carbon content, porosity, permeability) with the deposits of the Bakken Fm and Green River Fm, USA, it is still extremely poorly described with laboratory methods. We have performed the laboratory analysis of core samples from a well drilled in Bazhen Fm deposits with matured organic matter (T max >435 °C). It was demonstrated the applicability of the improved steady-state gas flow method to evaluate the permeability of nanopermeable rocks. The role of natural fracturing in forming voids was determided that allows regarding potential Bazhen Fm reservoirs as systems with dual porosity and dual permeability

  6. Ganges River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The Ganges River forms an extensive delta where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest known as the Sunderbans, which is home to the Royal Bengal Tiger. It is also home to most of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries. Roughly 120 million people live on the Ganges Delta under threat of repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, and due to the intense rainfall during the monsoon season. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on February 28, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using green, infrared, and blue wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  7. Radial growth and percent of latewood in Scots pine provenance trials in Western and Central Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Kuzmin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Percent of latewood of Boguchany and Suzun Scots pine climatypes has been studied in two provenance trials (place of origin and trial place. For Boguchany climatype the place of origin is south taiga of Central Siberia (Krasnoyarsk Krai, the place of trial is forest-steppe zone of Western Siberia (Novosibirsk Oblast and vice versa for Suzun climatype – forest-steppe zone of Western Siberia is the place of origin, south taiga is the place of trial. Comparison of annual average values of latewood percent of Boguchany climatype in south taiga and forest-steppe revealed the same numbers – 19 %. Annual variability of this trait in south taiga is distinctly lower and equal to 17 %, in forest-steppe – 35 %. Average annual values of latewood percent of Suzun climatype in the place of origin and trial place are close (20 and 21 %. Variability of this trait for Suzun climatype is higher than for Boguchany and equal to 23 % in south taiga and 42 % in forest-steppe. Climatic conditions in southern taiga in Central Siberia in comparison with forest-steppe in Western Siberia make differences between climatypes stronger. Differences between climatypes are expressed in different age of maximal increments of diameter, different tree ring width and latewood percent values and in different latewood reaction to weather conditions.

  8. The Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2009-05-26

    May 26, 2009 ... which Britain won her Nigerian empire--based its activities in the Delta and the Niger valley. British ascendancy in this important trading area justified her claim to supremacy in the Niger territories during the Berlin West African Conference of 1885.” Clearly, petroleum mining is only the latest in a long series ...

  9. Women of Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religion Dept

    Nigeria as a member of the Africa Union (AU),. NEPAD. and ECOWAS, plays a prominent role as a peace keeper in West. African sub-region. Ironically, in the Niger Delta, Nigeria has not been able to maintain peace. The area has not known peace but chaos, abduction, killing, armed robbery, prostitution and kidnapping.

  10. western niger delta, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2015-07-21

    Jul 21, 2015 ... Palynomorph species comprising 53 pollen, 7 spores, 2 algae and 6 dinoflagellate cysts were recovered from a section of well 'Y' located in the offshore western Niger Delta and were used for paleoclimatic deductions of the sediments. There was a dominance of the fresh water swamp species over the ...

  11. about the Dirac Delta Function(?)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    we enter "delta function" in quotes. This produces a less stupendous 58,600 references. As even this is too much, we try Dirac delta function, to get ... this down to 872, while "the delta function of Dirac" yields a comfortable (but not uniformly helpful) 19 ref- erences. Motivated by a desire to include some interesting histor-.

  12. Terreneuvian stratigraphy and faunas from the Anabar Uplift, Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Kouchinsky

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Assemblages of mineralized skeletal fossils are described from limestone rocks of the lower Cambrian Nemakit-Daldyn, Medvezhya, Kugda-Yuryakh, Manykay, and lower Emyaksin formations exposed on the western and eastern flanks of the Anabar Uplift of the northern Siberian Platform. The skeletal fossil assemblages consist mainly of anabaritids, molluscs, and hyoliths, and also contain other taxa such as Blastulospongia, Chancelloria, Fomitchella, Hyolithellus, Platysolenites, Protohertzina, and Tianzhushanella. The first tianzhushanellids from Siberia, including Tianzhushanella tolli sp. nov., are described. The morphological variation of Protohertzina anabarica and Anabarites trisulcatus from their type locality is documented. Prominent longitudinal keels in the anabaritid Selindeochrea tripartita are demonstrated. Among the earliest molluscs from the Nemakit-Daldyn Formation, Purella and Yunnanopleura are interpreted as shelly parts of the same species. Fibrous microstructure of the outer layer and a wrinkled inner layer of mineralised cuticle in the organophosphatic sclerites of Fomitchella are reported. A siliceous composition of the globular fossil Blastulospongia is reported herein and a possible protistan affinity similar to Platysolenites is discussed. New carbon isotope data facilitate correlation both across the Anabar Uplift and with the Terreneuvian Series of the IUGS chronostratigraphical scheme for the Cambrian System. The base of Cambrian Stage 2 is provisionally placed herein within the Fortunian‒Cambrian Stage 2 transitional interval bracketed by the lowest appearance of Watsonella crosbyi and by a slightly higher horizon at the peak of carbon isotope excursion Iʹ from western flank of the Anabar Uplift. Correlation across the Siberian Platform of the fossiliferous Medvezhya and lower Emyaksin formations showing δ13Ccarb excursion Iʹ with the upper Sukharikha Formation containing excursion 5p and upper Ust’-Yudoma Formation

  13. Nitrogen dynamics in Turbic Cryosols from Siberia and Greenland☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Bárta, Jiří; Čapek, Petr; Guggenberger, Georg; Hofhansl, Florian; Kaiser, Christina; Lashchinsky, Nikolaj; Mikutta, Robert; Mooshammer, Maria; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Urich, Tim; Zimov, Sergey A.; Richter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Turbic Cryosols (permafrost soils characterized by cryoturbation, i.e., by mixing of soil layers due to freezing and thawing) are widespread across the Arctic, and contain large amounts of poorly decomposed organic material buried in the subsoil. This cryoturbated organic matter exhibits retarded decomposition compared to organic material in the topsoil. Since soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is known to be tightly linked to N availability, we investigated N transformation rates in different soil horizons of three tundra sites in north-eastern Siberia and Greenland. We measured gross rates of protein depolymerization, N mineralization (ammonification) and nitrification, as well as microbial uptake of amino acids and NH4+ using an array of 15N pool dilution approaches. We found that all sites and horizons were characterized by low N availability, as indicated by low N mineralization compared to protein depolymerization rates (with gross N mineralization accounting on average for 14% of gross protein depolymerization). The proportion of organic N mineralized was significantly higher at the Greenland than at the Siberian sites, suggesting differences in N limitation. The proportion of organic N mineralized, however, did not differ significantly between soil horizons, pointing to a similar N demand of the microbial community of each horizon. In contrast, absolute N transformation rates were significantly lower in cryoturbated than in organic horizons, with cryoturbated horizons reaching not more than 32% of the transformation rates in organic horizons. Our results thus indicate a deceleration of the entire N cycle in cryoturbated soil horizons, especially strongly reduced rates of protein depolymerization (16% of organic horizons) which is considered the rate-limiting step in soil N cycling. PMID:24302785

  14. Nitrogen dynamics in Turbic Cryosols from Siberia and Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Bárta, Jiří; Capek, Petr; Guggenberger, Georg; Hofhansl, Florian; Kaiser, Christina; Lashchinsky, Nikolaj; Mikutta, Robert; Mooshammer, Maria; Santrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Urich, Tim; Zimov, Sergey A; Richter, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Turbic Cryosols (permafrost soils characterized by cryoturbation, i.e., by mixing of soil layers due to freezing and thawing) are widespread across the Arctic, and contain large amounts of poorly decomposed organic material buried in the subsoil. This cryoturbated organic matter exhibits retarded decomposition compared to organic material in the topsoil. Since soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is known to be tightly linked to N availability, we investigated N transformation rates in different soil horizons of three tundra sites in north-eastern Siberia and Greenland. We measured gross rates of protein depolymerization, N mineralization (ammonification) and nitrification, as well as microbial uptake of amino acids and NH 4 + using an array of 15 N pool dilution approaches. We found that all sites and horizons were characterized by low N availability, as indicated by low N mineralization compared to protein depolymerization rates (with gross N mineralization accounting on average for 14% of gross protein depolymerization). The proportion of organic N mineralized was significantly higher at the Greenland than at the Siberian sites, suggesting differences in N limitation. The proportion of organic N mineralized, however, did not differ significantly between soil horizons, pointing to a similar N demand of the microbial community of each horizon. In contrast, absolute N transformation rates were significantly lower in cryoturbated than in organic horizons, with cryoturbated horizons reaching not more than 32% of the transformation rates in organic horizons. Our results thus indicate a deceleration of the entire N cycle in cryoturbated soil horizons, especially strongly reduced rates of protein depolymerization (16% of organic horizons) which is considered the rate-limiting step in soil N cycling.

  15. Taxonomic composition of phytoplankton in the Vakh River (Western Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobogatova, O. N.

    2018-03-01

    This paper provides data on the hydrological and hydrochemical parameters of the Vakh River in the Middle Ob region. In 2005-2008 we have identified 404 taxonomic units represented by 463 species, types and forms of algae, belonging to 140 genera, 52 families, 13 classes and 7 divisions. 386 species were identified for the first time, 141 taxa were identified as rare and 22 taxa as new for Western Siberia. Leading divisions, Bacillariophyta and Chlorophyta, make up for 78.9% of total phytoplankton diversity. Cyanobacteria, Chrysophyta and Euglenophyta form a community of 88 taxonomic units having a rank lower than genus level, and represent 19.0% of the total number. The floral role of Xanthophyta and Dinophyta is insignificant (2.1%). The main structure-forming species are 14: vegetating throughout the year (Aulacoseira italica, Asterionella formosa), summer taxa (Microcystis aeruginosa, Melosira varians, Aulacoseira granulata, Pandorina morum, Pediastrum boryanum, P. duplex, Lacunastrum gracillimum, Scenedesmus quadricauda) and summer-autumn (Microcystis pulverea, Tabellaria fenestrata, T. flocculosa, Mucidosphaerium pulchellum). The Vakh River demonstrates specific characteristics of boreal flowing waterways. The northern composition is represented in a big rate of families (44.2%) and genera (109 77.9) with one to three species. The richest genera Closterium (31 taxa), Eunotia (27 taxa), Pinnularia (22 taxa), Desmidium (11 taxa) and the family Desmidiaceae (45 taxa) ensure diversity of phytoplankton. Ecological and geographical analysis demonstrates predominance of cosmopolitan algae (56.6%). Plankton represents 44.7% of all algae, oligogalobs - 78.8% and indifferent algae – 36.7%. Water meets the requirements for β-mezosaprobian pollution zone, class of satisfactory purity (III class).

  16. Agroclimatic potential in central Siberia in an altered 21st century climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A.; Tchebakova, N.; Parfenova, E.; Lysanova, G.

    2012-04-01

    The largest temperature increases are currently found in Northern Hemishpere upper latitudes, and this is where temperature increases from climate change are predicted to be the greatest in the future. Alteration of boreal and Arctic landscapes is already apparent, particularly in Siberia. In this work, we will explore the current spatial and temporal patterns of agriculture potential in Siberia and then investigate potential future agriculture dynamics. Humans have traditionally cultivated steppe and forest-steppe on fertile soils for agriculture. It is predicted that forests will move northwards in a warmer climate and be replaced by forest-steppe and steppe ecosystems. Climate change impacts on agriculture in south-central Siberia are analyzed based on the hypothesis that agriculture in traditionally cold Siberia may benefit from warming. Simple models are used to determine crop range and regression models are constructed to determine crop yield, and these are applied to climate change scenarios for various time frames: pre-1960, 1960-1990, 1990-2010 using historic data and for 2020 and 2080 using HadCM3 B1 and A2 projections. From 50 to 85% of central Siberia is predicted to be climatically suitable for agriculture by the end of the century, and only soil potential would limit crop advance and expansion to the north. Crop production could increase twofold. Future climatic resources in Siberia would provide potential growth for a variety of crops that previously did not exist on these lands. Traditional Siberian crops could gradually shift as far as 500 km northwards (about 50-70 km per decade) within suitable soil conditions, and new crops, nonexistent today, may be introduced in the dry south that would necessitate irrigation. Agriculture in central Siberia would likely benefit from climate warming but would also result in different feedbacks to the atmosphere and climate systems, in terms of an altered landscape albedo, substantially modified hydrological

  17. Forms of Wages for Miners of Siberia in the Late XIX – Early XX Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy P. Zinovyev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the question of forms of wages paid to workers in the mining industry of Siberia in the late XIX – early XX centuries. Of the two main forms of labor compensation – hourly rate and piecework pay, the latter was more corresponding to the spirit of capitalism, and it was most widespread in the mining enterprises of Siberia. The piecework pay was also the main instrument for intensifying labor productivity. This episode in the history of labor is studied on the basis of paperwork materials of mining companies and reporting documents of the mining inspectorate.

  18. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  19. Crustal and upper mantle structure of Siberia from teleseismic receiver functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    . The current results of RF analysis of the crustal and mantle structure will help to build a model for tectonic and geodynamic evolution of different provinces of Siberia. We compare our results to the recent detailed models of crustal structure in the area and with seismic models for similar geodynamic...

  20. Soil carbon inventories and carbon-13 on a latitude transect in Siberia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bird, M. I.; Šantrůčková, Hana; Arneth, A.; Grigoriev, S.; Gleixner, G.; Kalaschnikov, Y. N.; Lloyd, J.; Schulze, E. D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 5, 54B (2002), s. 631-641 ISSN 0280-6509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : soil carbon inventories * carbon-13 * Siberia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2002

  1. Multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosol in the South of West Siberia

    CERN Document Server

    Koutsenogii, K P; Smirnova, A I; Makarov, V I; Kirov, E I

    2000-01-01

    The data on the multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosols for the typical landscapes of Novosibirsk region have been obtained using SR XRF. The peculiarities of seasonal variations in the multielemental composition of atmospheric aerosols in the South of West Siberia have been analyzed.

  2. Effectiveness of forest management strategies to mitigate effects of global change in south-central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Gustafson; Anatoly Z. Shvidenko; Robert M. Scheller

    2011-01-01

    We investigated questions about the ability of broad silvicultural strategies to achieve multiple objectives (reduce disturbance losses, maintain the abundance of preferred species, mitigate fragmentation and loss of age-class diversity, and sequester aboveground carbon) under future climate conditions in Siberia. We conducted a factorial experiment using the LANDIS-II...

  3. Effectiveness of forest management strategies to mitigate effects of global change in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Gustafson; Anatoly Shvidenko; Robert Scheller; Brian. Sturtevant

    2011-01-01

    Siberian forest ecosystems are experiencing multiple global changes. Climate change produces direct (temperature and precipitation) and indirect (altered fire regimes and increase in cold-limited insect outbreaks) effects. Although much of Siberia has not yet been subject to timber harvest, the frontier of timber cutting is advancing steadily across the region. We...

  4. Droughts and Excessive Moisture Events in Southern Siberia in the Late XXth - Early XXIst Centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazanova, A. A.; Voropay, N. N.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years much research has been devoted to global and regional climate changes. Special attention was paid to climate extremes, such as droughts and excessive moisture events. In this study the moisture and aridity of Southern Siberia are estimated using web-GIS called “CLIMATE”. The system “CLIMATE” is part of a hardware and software cloud storage complex for data analysis of various climatic data sets, with algorithms for searching, extracting, processing, and visualizing the data. The ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data for Southern Siberia (50-65°N, 60-120°E) from 1979 to 2010 with a grid cell of 0.75×0.75° is used. Some hydrothermal conditions are estimated using the so-called Ped index (Si), which is a normalized indicator of the ratio of air temperature to precipitation. The mountain regions of Eastern Siberia are becoming more and more arid each month during the last 30 years. In Western Siberia, aridity increases in May and decreases in June, in the other months positive and negative trends are found. The greatest differences between the trends of the aridity index (Si), air temperature, and precipitation are observed in July.

  5. Growth of Little Stint Calidris minuta chicks on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schekkerman, H; Nehls, G; Hotker, H; Tomkovich, PS; Kania, W; Chylarecki, P; Soloviev, M; Van Roomen, M

    Growth of mass and linear body dimensions (bill, tarsus and wing length) was studied in the Little Stint Calidris minuta at several locations on the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberia (73 degrees-76 degrees N) in 1983-94. Little Stints fledged at near-adult body mass, at 15 days of age. Growth followed an

  6. Results of the CERPOLEX/Mammuthus expeditions on the Taimyr peninsula, Arctic Siberia, Russian federation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, D; Tikhonov, A; van der Plicht, J; Kahlke, RD; Debruyne, R; van Geel, B; van Reenen, G; Pals, JP; de Marliave, C; Reumer, JWF; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Pals, Jan Peter; Reumer, Jelle W.F.

    During a series of expeditions organized by CERPOLEX/Mammuthus to the Taimyr region in northern Siberia several mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) carcasses were discovered and subsequently excavated and studied. The oldest specimen is the Arilakh Mammoth (ca. 55,800 BP). Much younger are the Jarkov

  7. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia

  8. Thermostatted delta f

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The delta f simulation method is revisited. Statistical coarse-graining is used to rigorously derive the equation for the fluctuation delta f in the particle distribution. It is argued that completely collisionless simulation is incompatible with the achievement of true statistically steady states with nonzero turbulent fluxes because the variance of the particle weights w grows with time. To ensure such steady states, it is shown that for dynamically collisionless situations a generalized thermostat or W-stat may be used in lieu of a full collision operator to absorb the flow of entropy to unresolved fine scales in velocity space. The simplest W-stat can be implemented as a self-consistently determined, time-dependent damping applied to w. A precise kinematic analogy to thermostatted nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) is pointed out, and the justification of W-stats for simulations of turbulence is discussed. An extrapolation procedure is proposed such that the long-time, steady-state, collisionless flux can be deduced from several short W-statted runs with large effective collisionality, and a numerical demonstration is given

  9. Vertical stratification of physical, chemical and biological components in two saline lakes Shira and Shunet (South Siberia, Russia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degermendzhy, A.G.; Zadereev, E.S.; Rogozin, D.Y.; Prokopkin, I.; Barkhatov, Y.V.; Tolomeev, A.; Khromechek, E.B.; Janse, J.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Gulati, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A feature of meromictic lakes is that several physicochemical and biological gradients affect the vertical distribution of different organisms. The vertical stratification of physical, chemical and biological components in saline, fishless meromictic lakes Shira and Shunet (Siberia, Russia) is quite

  10. Preface to the Special Issue on Geodynamic and Climate-Change Processes over Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Cheinway Hwang; Benjamin Fong Chao; Jeffrey T. Freymueller; Wenbin Shen; C. K. Shum

    2011-01-01

    Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia (TibXS) are regions with active plate tectonics. Evidence from satellite gravimetry and altimetry shows the hydrological evolutions over these regions are sensitive to global climate change. For example, inter-annual lake level changes over Tibet and Xinjiang from satellite altimetry are found to be connected to the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Lakes in central Asia, Xinjiang and Siberia show sharp changes in lake levels that can be explained by climate cha...

  11. New and rare findings of lignicolous lichen species for the Southern Siberia from the Baikal nature reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Urbanavichene

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on field trips between 2009–2014, rare and noteworthy lichens from the Baikal Nature Reserve (Baikal nature reserve, Khamar-Daban ridge are described. These are mostly lignicolous lichens growing on wood and bark of Abies sibirica and Pinus sibirica, such as Absconditella lignicola, Strangospora moriformis, Trapeliopsis gelatinosa, T. viridescens. Trapeliopsis pseudogranulosa is new for Siberia, Lepraria jackii – new for South Siberia.

  12. Ecological aspects of Microsporidia parasitizing in natural populations of the Aedes (Diptera: Culicidae) blood-suking mosquitoes in Western Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    SIMAKOVA ANASTASIA V.; PANKOVA TAMARA F.; ISSI IRMA V.; ANDREEVA YULIA V.

    2016-01-01

    We examined microsporidia (1976-2014) in natural populations of blood-sucking Aedes mosquitoes of Western Siberia with the focus on their biodiversity and ecology. In total, we recorded 3' species of Culicidae family mosquitoes in Western Siberia; 22 species of them belong to the univoltine genus Aedes, producing one generation per year (spring). As it has been shown, microsporidians infect '3 mosquito species. In this study, we isolated 26 microsporidian species representing five genera (Amb...

  13. Mida pakub Delta? / Teele Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Teele

    2011-01-01

    Politsei- ja Piirivalveamet võtab kasutusele ühise Siseministeeriumi infotehnoloogia- ja arenduskeskuse ning Webmedia AS koostööna loodud dokumendihaldussüsteemi Delta. Kust sai Delta oma nime? Projekti "Dokumendihaldussüsteemi juurutamine Siseministeeriumi haldusalas" eesmärgid

  14. Challenges from the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... diverse ethnic groups under what came to be known as Nigeria. The ethnic communities that ... Bolade and Adelemo. National Security and Sustainable Development in Nigeria: Challenges from the Niger Delta ... recommended the creation of the Niger Delta Development Board. Azaiki. (2003:48) states ...

  15. DELTA beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinker, S.; Heisterhagen, R.; Wille, K.

    1991-01-01

    For the electron storage ring DELTA (Dortmund ELectron Test Accelerator) a beam-position-monitor system based on button pickups has been designed. Two different concepts for the monitor electronics have been developed obtaining a long-term stability better than ± 150 μm and a short-term resolution below ± 10 μm. There are no hybrids integrated in the electronic circuits as all four button signals should be amplified and digitized to provide redundancy. First, a concept using four separated electronic branches, one for each button, was tested. Then a concept with a multiplexer in front followed by only one amplifier was designed. This concept, the electronic circuits and the measurements are presented

  16. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  17. GROWTH AND PRODUCTION OF KIWANO IN THE OPEN FIELD IN THE SOUTH OF WESTERN SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Naumova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kiwano plants, or horned cucumber (Cucumis metuliferus E. Mey ex Naudin was grown in the open field in several experimental plots in the south of West Siberia (54,95025 N, 83,09763 E. Fruits production was correlated with night air temperature sum and soil organic matter content, reaching the maximum of 2.7 kg (fresh phytomass per plant. Fruit size and some basic juice characteristics were similar to those of kiwano fruits grown elsewhere in the world. The vegetative phytomass grown was correlated with day air temperature sum, being practically independent of soil chemical properties. Thus kiwano can be recommended as a crop to be grown in the open field in the south of West Siberia and other regions of Russia with similar soil and environmental conditions.

  18. Release and transport of artificial radionuclides from nuclear weapons related activities in the Ob River, Siberia over the course of the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayles, F.L.; Kenna, T.C.; Livingston, H.D.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of sediment cores from lakes on the flood plain of the Ob River, Siberia have been used to develop a history of the release, transport, and deposition of artificial radionuclides related to the development and testing of nuclear weapons over the duration of the nuclear age (∼1950 to the present) in this major Arctic river system. The Ob is of particular importance in this regard as two of the former Soviet Union's major weapons production plants, Mayak and Tomsk-7, and the Semipalatinsk test site are located within the Ob drainage basin. Accidents and intentional releases of radionuclides at both plants have been substantial, raising the issue of transport throughout this extensive river system as well as delivery to the Arctic Ocean. Our studies have included determining sediment profiles of 239,240 Pu, 137 Cs, and the natural nuclide 210 Pb and its parent 226 Ra in a number of cores from the Ob delta, as well as analysis of 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 237 Np. The latter provide sensitive measures of the presence of non-fallout materials derived from weapons production activities

  19. Chemical and dispersal characteristics of particulate emissions from forest fires in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. N. Samsonov; V. A. Ivanov; D. J. McRae; S. P. Baker

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 20 experimental fires were conducted on forest plots of 1-4 ha each in 2000-07 in two types of boreal forests in central Siberia, and 18 on 6 x 12-m plots in 2008-10. These experiments were designed to mimic wildfires under similar burning conditions. The fires were conducted in prescribed conditions including full documentation on pre-fire weather, pre-...

  20. Oil and Water Don't Mix: Risk on Tap in Western Siberia

    OpenAIRE

    Wernstedt, Kris

    1996-01-01

    In common with other areas throughout the Russian Federation, western Siberia faces formidable environmental pollution, a problem that in part is the legacy of the highly centralized Soviet era when meeting production quotas was the raison d'être for many managers of economic enterprises. In this region, over the last thirty years the near singular focus on short term oil production has led to severe contamination of the area's surface and groundwater supplies, threatening both human and ecol...

  1. THE INTERNET PRESENTATION OF DATABASES OF GLACIERS OF THE SOUTH OF EASTERN SIBERIA

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Kitov; V. M. Plyusnin; E. N. Ivanov; D. A. Batuev; S. N. Kovalenko

    2017-01-01

    The authors consider the technology for creating databases of glaciers in Southern Siberia and the presentation of these databases on the Internet. The technology consists in the recognition and vectorization of spatial, multi-temporal data using GIS techniques, followed by the formation of databases that reflect the spatial and temporal variation of nival-glacial formations. The results of GIS design are presented on the website IG SB RAS and with the help of Internet service ArcGISonline on...

  2. Potential change in forest types and stand heights in central Siberia in a warming climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchebakova, N M; Parfenova, E I; Korets, M A; Conard, S G

    2016-01-01

    Previous regional studies in Siberia have demonstrated climate warming and associated changes in distribution of vegetation and forest types, starting at the end of the 20th century. In this study we used two regional bioclimatic envelope models to simulate potential changes in forest types distribution and developed new regression models to simulate changes in stand height in tablelands and southern mountains of central Siberia under warming 21st century climate. Stand height models were based on forest inventory data (2850 plots). The forest type and stand height maps were superimposed to identify how heights would change in different forest types in future climates. Climate projections from the general circulation model Hadley HadCM3 for emission scenarios B1 and A2 for 2080s were paired with the regional bioclimatic models. Under the harsh A2 scenario, simulated changes included: a 80%–90% decrease in forest-tundra and tundra, a 30% decrease in forest area, a ∼400% increase in forest-steppe, and a 2200% increase in steppe, forest-steppe and steppe would cover 55% of central Siberia. Under sufficiently moist conditions, the southern and middle taiga were simulated to benefit from 21st century climate warming. Habitats suitable for highly-productive forests (≥30–40 m stand height) were simulated to increase at the expense of less productive forests (10–20 m). In response to the more extreme A2 climate the area of these highly-productive forests would increase 10%–25%. Stand height increases of 10 m were simulated over 35%–50% of the current forest area in central Siberia. In the extremely warm A2 climate scenario, the tall trees (25–30 m) would occur over 8%–12% of area in all forest types except forest-tundra by the end of the century. In forest-steppe, trees of 30–40 m may cover some 15% of the area under sufficient moisture. (letter)

  3. Ethnoarchaeology of Nenets campsites. Cases of Yangana Pe and Oktyaberskaya (Polar Ural Mts., Northwest Siberia)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Kosintsev, P. A.; Sázelová, S.; Jankovská, Vlasta

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 51 (2010), s. 33-55 ISSN 1211-7250 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA404/08/0045; GA ČR GAP209/10/0519 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80010507; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : ethnoarchaeology * Siberia * Polar Ural * natural resources * activities * settlement structure * settlement zonality Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology; EF - Botanics (BU-J)

  4. Potential Climate-driven Silvicultural and Agricultural Transformations in Siberia in the 21 Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchebakova, N. M.; Parfenova, E. I.; Shvetsov, E.; Soja, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Simulations of Siberian forests in a changing climate showed them to be changed in composition, decreased, and shifted northwards. Our goals were to evaluate the ecological consequences for the forests and agriculture in Siberia and to offer adaptive measures that may be undertaken to minimize negative consequences and maximize benefits from a rapidly changing environment in the socially important region of southern Siberia. We considered two strategies to estimate climate-change effects on potentially failing forests within an expanding forest-steppe ecotone. To support forestry, seed transfers from locations that are best suited to the genotypes in future climates may be applied to assist trees and forests in a changing climate. To support agriculture, in view of the growing world concerns on food safety, new farming lands may be established in a new forest-steppe ecotone with its favorable climatic and soil resources. We used our bioclimatic vegetation models of various levels: a forest type model to predict forest shifts and forest-failing lands, tree species range and their climatypes models to predict what tree species/climatype would be suitable and crop models to predict crops to introduce in potentially climate-disturbed areas in Siberia. Climate change data for the 2080s were calculated from the ensemble of 20 general circulation models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) and two scenarios to characterize the range of climate change: mild climate (RCP2.6 scenario) and sharp climate (RCP 8.5 scenario). By the 2080s, forest-steppe and steppe rather than forests would dominate up to half of Siberia in the warmer and dryer RCP 8.5 climate. Water stress tolerant and fire-resistant light-needled species Pinus sylvestris and Larix spp. would dominate the forest-steppe ecotone. Failing forests in a dryer climate may be maintained by moving and substituting proper climatypes from locations often hundreds of km away. Agriculture in Siberia

  5. in the Niger-Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Disciplinary Journal, Ethiopia. Vol. ... Asagba, R. B. - Department of Psychology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. Abstract. The Niger Delta Region of Nigeria has ..... Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 101, 234-. 245. Arnold, A; Cooper,C and Robertson, ...

  6. Research on Adaptive Delta Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    practical, and instead, other techni- ques are employed such as Transform Coding, Delta PCM ( DPCM ) or Adaptive Deltamodulation (ADM). One transform coding... DPCM system proposed for use on the space shuttle is contained in the IEEE Transactions on Communica- tions, Nov., 1978, p.1671. It is seen that the...delta modu- lator achieves comparable quality at a much lower cost, size, power consumption and at a much improved error sensi- tivity. 65) A DPCM system

  7. Preface to the Special Issue on Geodynamic and Climate-Change Processes over Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia (TibXS are regions with active plate tectonics. Evidence from satellite gravimetry and altimetry shows the hydrological evolutions over these regions are sensitive to global climate change. For example, inter-annual lake level changes over Tibet and Xinjiang from satellite altimetry are found to be connected to the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO. Lakes in central Asia, Xinjiang and Siberia show sharp changes in lake levels that can be explained by climate change. Recent terrestrial gravity, GRACE and GPS observations suggest that the crust over the Tibetan plateau is thickening, and the Himalayan glaciers appear to be thinning. Satellite altimetry is a potential tool to study vertical displacement and permafrost thawing and changes in the active layers in Siberia and Tibet.

  8. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  9. Effects of Repeated Fires in the Forest Ecosystems of the Zabaikalye Region, Southern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavskaya, E.; Buryak, L. V.; Conard, S. G.; Petkov, A.; Barrett, K.; Kalenskaya, O. P.; Ivanova, G.

    2014-12-01

    Fire is the main ecological disturbance controlling forest development in the boreal forests of Siberia and contributing substantially to the global carbon cycle. The warmer and dryer climate observed recently in the boreal forests is considered to be responsible for extreme fire weather, resulting in higher fire frequency, larger areas burned, and an increase of fire severity. Because of the increase of fire activity, boreal forests in some regions may not be able to reach maturity before they re-burn, which means less carbon will be stored in the ecosystem and more will remain in the atmosphere. Moreover, if one fire occurs within a few years of another, some stands will not re-grow at all, and even more carbon will accumulate in the atmosphere. Zabaikalye region located in the south of Siberia is characterized by the highest fire activity in Russia. With a use of the satellite-based fire product we found that there are about 7.0 million hectares in the region burned repeatedly during the last decade. We have investigated a number of sites in-situ in light-coniferous (Scots pine and larch) forests and evaluated the impacts of repeated fires on fuel loads, carbon emissions, and tree regeneration. Substantial decrease of carbon stocks, change of the vegetation structure and composition, and soil erosion were observed in many areas disturbed by repeated fires. At drier sites located in the southern regions repeated fires prohibited successful regeneration and resulted in forest conversion to grassland. Detection and monitoring of changes in the areas of Siberia where repeated fires have caused a major shift in ecosystem structure and function is required for the development of sustainable forest management strategies to mitigate climate change. The research was supported by NASA LCLUC Program.

  10. Simulation of long-term erosion on an abandoned mine site using the SIBERIA landscape evolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, G.; Willgoose, G.; Evans, K.

    1999-01-01

    The SIBERIA catchment evolution model can simulate the evolution of landforms over many years as a result of runoff and erosion. This study discusses testing of the reliability of the erosion predictions of the model in a field study. Using erosion parameters calibrated from field studies of rainfall and runoff from the waste rock dump batters, the SIBERIA landscape evolution model was calibrated and then used to simulate erosion over 50 years on the abandoned Scinto 6 mine site. Scinto 6 is a former uranium mine located in the Kakadu Region, Northern Territory, Australia. The SIBERIA runs simulated the geomorphic development of the gullies on the man-made batters of the waste rock dump. The waste rock of the mine had been dumped in the characteristic pattern of a flat top and steep sided batters typical of many former and current dumps and there had been significant degradation from both sheet and gully erosion. Traditional erosion models cannot model this type of degradation because their erosion model cannot change the landform, while SIBERIA does change the landform. The gully position, depth volume and morphology on the waste rock dump were compared with that of SIBERIA simulations. The geomorphic development of the waste rock dump indicated that SIBERIA can simulate features that arise from the long-term effect of erosion and also their rate of development on a man-made post-mining landscape over periods of up to 50 years. The detailed results of this specific study will be discussed with specific discussion of the type of data required and the implications of the uncertain erosion physics on the reliability of the predictions

  11. Ecosystem resilience to abrupt late Quaternary change in continental southern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Poppy; Mackay, Anson; Bezrukova, Elena; Shchetnikov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary climate variability is dominated by long term orbital forcing along with abrupt sub-Milankovitch events on the scales of millennia to centuries, driven by internal feedback mechanisms, volcanic forcing and fluctuating solar activity. Although these are well documented in the North Atlantic region, their expression is poorly understood in Siberia, particularly in relation to abrupt climatic events. Siberia has the world's highest level of continentality offering an opportunity to study changes remote from oceanic influences and improving understanding of interactions between the Siberian High and other atmospheric systems including the Aleutian Low, Arctic oscillation and Icelandic Low1 and ENSO2. Understanding of palaeoenvironmental change in Siberia is essential due to the region's high sensitivity to climatic change, with warming rates considerably higher than the global average over the past 50 years3, triggering significant environmental changes, including permafrost degradation, shifts in the forest-steppe biome, increases in forest fires and warming of seasonally ice-covered lakes. Additionally, the region provides essential palaeoenvironmental context for early hominins, for example at globally important sites such as Denisova cave4, and megafauna extinctions5. This presentation outlines ongoing work at Lake Baunt, SE Siberia including: key quaternary climate forcings, the site and its regional context, the key methods and preliminary results. These include a dated record back to ˜30ka BP (based on multiple 14C dates and Bayesian age modelling), multiproxy indicators of palaeoproductivity (e.g. biogenic silica and diatom analyses) and lake mixing regimes (inferred from diatom analyses). Together these highlight several key Quaternary fluctuations potentially correlated to events recorded in Greenland Ice Cores (GS2, GS2.1, GI1, GS1), and these are considered against key Quaternary records including those from nearby Lake Baikal and Hulu Cave in

  12. Long-Term Measurements of Carbon Monoxide and Aerosols at the ZOTTO tall tower, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Birmili, W.; Chi, X.; Heimann, M.; Heintzenberg, J.; Mikhailov, E.; Panov, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), operated by the Max Planck Institutes for Biogeochemistry and Chemistry and the Institute of Forest (Krasnoyarsk), is located at 89.35°E, 60.80°N, 114 m asl. at a very remote continental site in Siberia, Russia. It centers on a 300-m tower designed for scientific measurements of chemical (trace gases, aerosol) and physical (meteorological) properties. The instrumentation at the observatory includes a CO Monitor, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) for determining the aerosol absorption coefficient, a nephelometer for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient, and a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) to measure the aerosol number size distribution. We present measurements made from October 2006 until March 2011, with some interruptions due to technical reasons. An annual cycle of the background CO mixing rations was observed with summer minima around 90 ppb and winter maxima of about 175 ppb. Amplitude and phase of the annual cycle were generally similar to that reported by NOAA-ESRL for latitude 61°N, but showed an earlier onset of the elevated winter values. Episodes of elevated CO and aerosol concentrations, typically lasting for several days, are superimposed on the background seasonal cycle. During winter, these pollution episodes are usually associated with air masses that have passed over the central Siberian region around Omsk and Novosibirsk - a heavily industrialized area. During spring and summer, elevated levels of CO and aerosols are often caused by agricultural fires in southern Siberia and Kazakhstan or by forest fires in boreal Siberia. The optical properties of the aerosol showed more pronounced seasonal variability than the aerosol mass and number concentrations. Wintertime aerosols were highly absorbing, with single scattering albedos (SSA) around 0.85, consistent with a dominant fossil fuel combustion source. In contrast, summertime aerosols had very low absorption

  13. Inflorescence with tricolpate pollen grains from the Cenomanian of Tschulymo-Yenisey Basin, West Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassilov, V A.; Golovneva, L B.

    2001-05-01

    A new taxon Freyantha sibirica gen. et sp. nov. is erected for a delicate racemose inflorescence from the Cenomanian of the Tchulymo-Yenisey Basin, West Siberia. The inflorescence bears male flowers of partly connate stamens that produced tricolpate reticulate pollen grains. The flowers are subtended by calyptrate bracts. The taxonomically significant features of the general inflorescence morphology, prophylls, floral bracts, stamens and pollen grains are shared with different angiosperm groups, such as the Menispermaceae and Sargentodoxaceae. Prominent glands on the floral bracts indicate pollination by nectar-sucking insects.

  14. [Prospects for the development of health resort and recreational resources in southern Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabarova, N K; Iakovenko, E S; Levitskiĭ, E F; Lukovskaia, I A

    2010-01-01

    Long-term monitoring natural health remedial factors of southern Siberia provided materials for the comparative evaluation of bioclimatic characteristics of sanatorium-and-spa facilities in major health and recreational areas of this region. The most promising localities for climatic balneotherapy, tourist and recreational activities have been identified at the territory of the Altai-Sayan mountain system. The database of sanatorium-and-spa facilities, health and recreational sites located in this region is presented. The rational exploitation of mountainous landscapes including strict constraints on nature use activities is recommended as a basis for the further development of recreational industry.

  15. Change in the circulation regime in the stratified saline Lake Shira (Siberia, Republic of Khakassia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belolipetskii, V. M.; Degermendzhi, A. G.; Genova, S. N.; Rogozin, D. Y.

    2017-06-01

    The in-situ data on the vertical structure and stability of the vertical stratification of saline Lake Shira over the past decade (2007-2015) are analyzed. Simplified mathematical models have shown that strong wind in the autumn of 2014 together with rather thick ice in the winter of 2015 caused a change in the circulation regime of this water reservoir from meromictic (incomplete mixing) to holomictic (compete mixing). Based on the results obtained, a circulation regime for deep saline lakes located in the continental climate zone, in particular, in the arid zones of Southern Siberia (Khakassia, Transbaikal, and Altai) can be predicted under various climate scenarios of the future.

  16. Spatio-temporal variations of vegetation indicators in Eastern Siberia under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamova, Eugenia V.; Solovyev, Vladimir S.

    2017-11-01

    Study of spatio-temporal variations of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and phenological parameters of Eastern Siberia vegetation cover under global warming was carried out on AVHRR/NOAA data (1982-2014). Trend maps of NDVI and annual variations of phenological parameters and NDVI are analyzed. A method based on stable transition of air temperature through +5°C was used to estimate the beginning, end and the length of the growing season. Correlation between NDVI and phenological parameters, surface air temperature and precipitation are discussed.

  17. ECOTOURISM IN THE DANUBE DELTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina-Florina TĂTAR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Danube delta is a wetland of primordial importance for wildlife and humans alike. The former resources trigger a specific form of leisure for the latter, namely ecotourism whose manifestation is featured in the current research paper through an analysis of the foreign and domestic arrivals as well as a succinct presentation of its fauna resources. This primitive location, its seclusion and its unique resources invite the tourist to authenticity, immersion and self discovery, in other words a responsible type of tourism. The total tourist arrivals for the Danube delta amounted to 88000 in 2012, thus indicating its remoteness from mass tourism.

  18. A proto-Okavango Delta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, J. E.; Kgotlhang, L.; Ngwisanyi, T.; Ploug, C.; Auken, E.; Kinzelbach, W. K.; Green, A. G.

    2010-12-01

    The Okavango Delta within the Kalahari Desert of northwestern Botswana is one of the world's largest inland deltas and the largest wetland in southern Africa. An annual flood originating from the Okavango River in the northwest passes through the upper panhandle region of the delta before inundating the 150 km x 150 km fan where most water is lost to evapotranspiration. The fan occupies an active graben at the southwestern end of the East Africa rift zone. The focus of faulting is along the fan’s southeastern end where the Kunyere-Thamalakane faults show 200-300 m of dip-slip offset, forming a backstop to the movement of water and sediments. An airborne TEM survey was flown over the entire delta in 2007 with 2 km line spacing. A preliminary inversion of the entire data set has been undertaken using a quasi-2D inversion scheme that includes resistivity, layer thickness, and transmitter height as parameters. Tests with a many-layer model indicate that a four-layer model explains the data. Inversion results are corroborated by limited borehole data. The TEM model includes significant lateral and vertical variations in electrical resistivity. In the central region of the fan, a near-surface high resistivity layer is underlain sequentially by a more conductive layer (about 100 m depth) and a more resistive half-space (about 160 m depth), the latter of which could be a fresh water aquifer. This resistive feature has a fan-like form. A plausible evolutionary scenario that explains the TEM data includes a proto-Okavango Delta (highly resistive half-space ) and a lake (intermediate-depth conductive layer). During a climatic episode similar to today’s, a proto-Okavango Delta sequence would have been deposited against a fault, much as the Kunyere-Thamalakane faults today delineate the southeastern margin of the present Okavango Delta. This region would have then been flooded by a Pleistocene lake system that inundated much of northern Botswana and was the source of

  19. Delta Vegetation and Land Use [ds292

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Vegetation and land use are mapped for the approximately 725,000 acres constituting the Legal Delta portion of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta area....

  20. Delta Vegetation and Land Use [ds292

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — Vegetation and land use are mapped for the approximately 725,000 acres constituting the Legal Delta portion of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Delta area....

  1. Sphagnum peatland development at their southern climatic range in West Siberia: trends and peat accumulation patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregon, Anna; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    A region of western Siberia is vulnerable to the predicted climatic change which may induce an important modification to the carbon balance in wetland ecosystems. This study focuses on the evaluation of both the long-term and contemporary trends of peat (carbon) accumulation and its patterns at the southern climatic range of Sphagnum peatlands in western Siberia. Visible and physical features of peat and detailed reconstructions of successional change (or sediment stratigraphies) were analysed at two types of forest-peatland ecotones, which are situated close to each other but differ by topography and composition of their plant communities. Our results suggest that Siberian peatlands exhibit a general trend towards being a carbon sink rather than a source even at or near the southern limit of their distribution. Furthermore, two types of peat accumulation were detected in the study area, namely persistent and intermittent. As opposed to persistent peat accumulation, the intermittent one is characterized by the recurrent degradation of the upper peat layers at the marginal parts of raised bogs. Persistent peat accumulation is the case for the majority of Sphagnum peatlands under current climatic conditions. It might be assumed that more peat will accumulate under the 'increased precipitation' scenarios of global warming, although intermittent peat accumulation could result in the eventual drying that may change peatlands from carbon sinks to carbon sources

  2. EDUCATION FOR THE FUTURE: New Strategies of Distance Education For The Universities of Eastern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. KIRKO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the main trends of global education and educational problems in the Arctic and Siberian regions. The modern labor markets are changing in the Arctic. The modern labor market requires the creation of new jobs associated with the provision of the Arctic zone with food. Small food productions will be created. We will need a mobile change of professional competence of those workers who work in the Arctic zone. Global world creates global competition in education. The quality of education and research in the region is the main source of development of this region. Economic and social development of the Arctic zone is impossible without the development of modern universities in the Siberian Arctic. In the near future the number of universities in the area of the Arctic and Siberian Russia will be reduced by 2 times. In this situation a complete transition to distance learning technologies is necessary. Krasnoyarsk State Pedagogical University named after V.P. Astafijev (KSPU has established a network of Resource Centers in Krasnoyarsk Region (Eastern Siberia, Russia. Distance Education Resource Centers are connected into a single network, with the main center in KSPU (Krasnoyarsk, Russia. The Unified Network of Resource Centers, through distance education, will provide the required professional competence for people of the Arctic and the Northern zones of Eastern Siberia.

  3. Climate-Induced Mortality of Siberian Pine and Fir in the Lake Baikal Watershed, Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrova, IIya A.; Golyukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Yagunov, Mikhail N.

    2016-01-01

    Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and fir (Abies sibirica) (so called "dark needle conifers", DNC) showed decreased radial growth increment within the Lake Baikal watershed since the 1980s with increasing mortality recorded since the year 2000. Tree ring width was strongly correlated with vapor pressure deficit, aridity and root zone moisture. Water stress from droughts made trees more susceptible to insect attacks causing mortality in about 10% of DNC stands within the Lake Baikal watershed. Within Siberia DNC mortality increased in the southern part of the DNC range. Biogeographically, tree mortality was located within the DNC - forest-steppes transition. Tree mortality was significantly correlated with drought and soil moisture anomalies. Within the interior of the DNC range mortality occurred within relief features with high water stress risk (i.e., steep convex south facing slopes with shallow well-drained soils). In general, DNC mortality in Siberia was induced by increased aridity and severe drought (inciting factors) in synergy with biotic attacks (contributing factor). In future climate scenarios with predicted increase in aridity DNC could be eliminated from the southern part of its current range and will be replaced by drought-resistant conifers and broadleaf species (e.g., Larix sibirica, Pinus silvestris, and Betula pubescence).

  4. Lichens in the Urban Environment within South-East of Western Siberia, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Romanova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lichen species diversity and trend of their distribution were studied in two big cities and fi ve towns in south-east of Western Siberia. In total of 348 species from 46 families and 98 genera were found in all studied urban and suburban areas. All local checklists are characterized by high degree of the lichen species similarity between each other and smaller lists are included in bigger ones on to 64-100%. Epiphytic lichens were the largest group in all studied areas and almost half of them were occupied two and more substrates. Crustose life-form and mesophytes prevailed everywhere. Share of sensitive lichens exceeded percent of tolerant ones in big cities and was lower than tolerant ones in smaller towns. The sixteen species were the most tolerant, commonly present everywhere and have been recognized as the key species for urban lichen synusiae within south-east of Western Siberia. Five zones have been determined with IP-mapping (mapping on the base of index of air pollution tolerance in studied areas: IP=3-5 is a “normal zone”, IP=5-7 is a “moderate exposure zone”, IP=7-9 is a “mixed zone”, IP=9-10 is a “struggle zone”, and fi nally – lichen-free zone. The most studied urban areas had got quite extensive lichen-free zone (up to 35% of their areas.

  5. Investigation of ancient DNA from Western Siberia and the Sargat culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Casey C; Kaestle, Frederika A

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA from 14 archaeological samples at the Ural State University in Yekaterinburg, Russia, was extracted to test the feasibility of ancient DNA work on their collection. These samples come from a number of sites that fall into two groupings. Seven samples are from three sites, dating to the 8th-12th century AD, that belong to a northern group of what are thought to be Ugrians, who lived along the Ural Mountains in northwestern Siberia. The remaining seven samples are from two sites that belong to a southern group representing the Sargat culture, dating between roughly the 5th century BC and the 5th century AD, from southwestern Siberia near the Ural Mountains and the present-day Kazakhstan border. The samples are derived from several burial types, including kurgan burials. They also represent a number of different skeletal elements and a range of observed preservation. The northern sites repeatedly failed to amplify after multiple extraction and amplification attempts, but the samples from the southern sites were successfully extracted and amplified. The sequences obtained from the southern sites support the hypothesis that the Sargat culture was a potential zone of intermixture between native Ugrian and/or Siberian populations and steppe peoples from the south, possibly early Iranian or Indo-Iranian, which has been previously suggested by archaeological analysis.

  6. Ecologically Safe Geothermal Energy Resources in Western Siberia near high-rise construction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Alexandr; Shiganova, Olga

    2018-03-01

    The development of geothermal energy in combination with other renewable energy sources (the sun, the wind) will help to solve the problem of heat supply and electrification in near high-rise construction zones of the country, especially in sparsely populated parts, where centralized energy and heat supply is economically unacceptable, and will improve the ecological situation. The aim of the research is to analyze the geothermal resources of the main aquifers in Western Siberia and to develop recommendations for further study and use of heat and power resources of this territory. The article gives retrospective of state research programs and potential use of hydrothermal resources of administrative units geographically entering the territory under consideration. It is noted that by now such programs have been curtailed for various reasons, although there are examples of their successful and effective use in various fields of industry and agriculture. According to the decision of the Supreme Ecological Council of the State Duma Committee of the Russian Federation adopted in 2014 on the beginning of the development of federal targeted programs for the use of heat power water as a source of electricity and heat supply, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Ecology of the Russian Federation made proposals for further research and use of hydrothermal waters in Western Siberia. Implementation of the programs proposed by the authors, alongside with other positive aspects, will solve the problems of heat supply in remote territories and improve the environmental situation in the region.

  7. Delta Scuti variables. Lecture 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    The class of variables near or on the upper main sequence, the delta Scuti variables, are not only the usual ones about the masses, radii, and luminosities, but also the age, rotation, element diffusion to change the surface layer composition, the occurance of convection and the presence of radial and nonradial pulsation modes

  8. about the Dirac Delta Function(?)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mouse Games. As any child of ten will tell you, to write an article on the Dirac delta function (or on anything else, for that matter), one must first log into 'Google' or 'Yahoo' or a similar search engine. A judicious combination of click- ing, cutting and pasting - and voila, an article of any desired length is ready in an ...

  9. Variation in leaf water delta D and delta 18O values during the evapotranspiration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldo, P.R.; Foloni, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to evaluate leaf water delta D and delta 18 O variation in relation to: leaf temperature, relative humidity converted to leaf temperature and delta D and delta 18 O values of atmospheric water vapour and soil water. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Niger Delta Development Commission and Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is on Niger Delta Development Commission and sustainable development of Niger Delta region of Nigeria, the case of Rivers State. The main objective of the study is to examine the impact of the activities of Niger Delta Development Commission on sustainable development of Rivers State in particular, and Niger ...

  11. Delta Semantics Defined By Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kyng, Morten; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    and the possibility of using predicates to specify state changes. In this paper a formal semantics for Delta is defined and analysed using Petri nets. Petri nets was chosen because the ideas behind Petri nets and Delta concide on several points. A number of proposals for changes in Delta, which resulted from...

  12. Experience and Perspectives of Art History Development in Educational Space of Siberia at the Turn of XX-XXI ?enturies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhvyadovich, Larisa Ivanovna; Chernyaeva, Irina Valerievna

    2016-01-01

    The article has a program-analytical nature, contains an analysis and assessment of the scientific school of T. M. Stepanskaya, Doctor of Arts, professor, member of Russian Union of Artists. The goal of T. M. Stepanskaya's professional activity is incorporation of Art History in higher educational institutions in Siberia. The authors consider the…

  13. Problems of phytostratigraphy and the correlation of the Lower Jurassic continental sediments in West Siberia and Kuznetsk and Kansk-Achinsk basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogutcheva, N.K. [Siberian Research Institute of Geology, Geophysics & Mineral Resource, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Paleofloral and palynological records of Lower Jurassic sediments in West Siberia, Kuznetsk (Kuzbass), and Kansk-Achinsk basins and their correlation are discussed. In a number of recent papers dedicated to the Jurassic stratigraphy of Siberia this problem is ambiguously treated. The reference palynological scale has been developed for the Jurassic West Siberian sediments and an uninterrupted succession of floral assemblages associated with it and with regional stratigraphic units has been recognized. On this basis the scheme of the correlation between the Lower Jurassic sediments of the Kansk-Achinsk and Kuznetsk basins and West Siberia permitting a better age estimate of coal-bearing deposits, is proposed.

  14. The Impact of Increasing Fire Frequency on Forest Transformations in the Zabaikal Region, Southern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, S. G.; Kukavskaya, E. A.; Buryak, L. V.; Shvetsov, E.; Kalenskaya, O. P.; Zhila, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Zabaikal region of southern Siberia is characterized by some of the highest fire activity in Russia. There has been a significant increase of fire frequency and burned area in the region over the last two decades due to a combination of high anthropogenic pressure, decreased funding to the forestry sector, and increased fire danger, which was associated with higher frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Central and southern parts of the Zabaikal region where population density is higher and road network is relatively more developed are the most disturbed by fires. Larch stands cover the largest proportion of fire-disturbed lands in the region, while the less common pine and birch stands are characterized by higher fire frequency. About 13% (3.9 M ha) of the total forest area in the Zabaikal region was burned more than once in the 20 years from 1996 to 2015, with many sites burned multiple times. Repeat disturbances led to inadequate tree regeneration on all but the moistest sites. Pine stands on dry soils, which are common in the forest-steppe zone, were the most vulnerable. After repeat burns and over large burned sites we observed transformation of the forests to steppe ecosystems. The most likely causes of insufficient forest regeneration are soil overheating, dominance of tall grasses, and lack of nearby seed sources. Extensive tree plantations have potential to mitigate negative fire impacts; however, due to high fire hazard in the recent decade about half of the plantation area has been burned. Changes in the SWVI index were used to assess postfire reforestation based on a combination of satellite and field data. In the southwestern part of the Zabaikal region, we estimated that reforestation had been hampered over 11% of the forest land area. Regional climate models project increasing temperatures and decreasing precipitation across Siberia by the end of the 21st century, with changes in the Zabaikal region projected to be more than twice the

  15. Sociological Aspects of Rotational Employment in the Northern Territories of Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Nikolaevich Silin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes features of the lifestyle associated with rotational employment system in developing oil and gas resources of Northwestern Siberia. It shows the change in conceptual approaches to the organization of commuting, the dynamics of key parameters, the socio-cultural features of mobile and multilocal lifestyle of commuters. The consideration of the rotational method as complex and significant for the implementation of the tasks set for the Arctic and subarctic areas of Russia has allowed to reveal the interaction system of basic elements of commuting and offer more efficient tools and technologies as compared to traditional management. The author presents some results of the sociological research in the oil and gas companies located in Northwestern Siberia. The work discloses the factors of negative impact of commuting on health, physical and social well-being of people leading “double” and mobile lives. They are the following: need for long stay in closed space with strangers, differences in natural conditions of places of residence and work (pressure drops, oxygen deficiency in the North, light aperiodicity, food and water quality, cold and mosquitoes, separation from family, etc., increased physical and emotional stress. The surveys of employees on rotation, their families and management of the enterprises using this method in the oil and gas areas of the Western-Siberian North, conducted by the author for four decades, have given the opportunity to identify the causes of people’s dissatisfaction with conditions of their life, their attitude to authorities and different aspects of organization of production and life, transportation from place of residence to place of employment and back, etc. Geography of fly-in fly-out transportation and the level of satisfaction with various elements of such work have recently changed. The priority importance of payment for labor efforts has only preserved. Besides, if in the Soviet

  16. Climate-Driven Changes Within the Larch Forest of Northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V.

    2015-12-01

    Thanks to the support of NASA's Carbon Cycle and Ecosystem Focus Area programs, joint NASA/ Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences studies have been conducted throughout Siberia. The overall objective has been to obtain field and satellite measurements to examine carbon stocks and track changes in forests across this vast area. In this presentation, we discuss some of the finding from this 25+ year collaboration' i.e., observed climate-driven changes within larch communities in northern Siberia. Field measurements and satellite data, including Terra/MODIS, Landsat, GRACE and QuickBird were used for analysis of forest conditions. The following results will be discussed. (1). At the northern limit of larch (Larix gmelinii) range (i.e.,~72°N) tree mortality was observed during the cooling period from the 16th century to the beginning of the 19th century. Post- Little Ice Age (LIA) trees re-establishment followed warming temperatures by the middle of the19th century. The current tree line has recovered to the pre-LIA line location although tree heights and stand densities are comparatively lower. The mean rate of upward migration was found to be 0.35 m yr-1 (with a range of 0.21-0.58). (2) The migration of the "dark needle conifers" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica, Picea obovata) into the southern margin zone of larch dominated forest was documented. Meanwhile, within the traditional DNC range decline and mortality of both Siberian pine and fir were observed and attributed, primarily, due to an increased drought. (3) Within Central Siberia larch growth is limited by early summer temperatures and available water from thawing permafrost. Larch tree ring width (TRW) correlated with early summer temperatures and water vapor pressure (r = 0.73 and r = 0.69, respectively), drought (SPEI; r = 0.68-0.82), snow accumulation (r = 0.61), previous year precipitation (r = 0.63) and soil water anomalies (r = 0.79). Larch TRW growth and Gross Primary Productivity

  17. Astrometric Observation of Delta Cepheus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Naomi; Wilson, Betsie; Estrada, Chris; Crisafi, Kim; King, Jackie; Jones, Stephany; Salam, Akash; Warren, Glenn; Collins, S. Jananne; Genet, Russell

    2012-04-01

    Members of a Cuesta College astronomy research seminar used a manually-controlled 10-inch Newtonian Reflector telescope to determine the separation and position angle of the binary star Delta Cepheus. It was observed on the night of Saturday, October 29, 2011, at Star Hill in Santa Margarita, California. Their values of 40.2 arc seconds and 192.4 degrees were similar to those reported in the WDS (1910).

  18. Petroleum geology and resources of the Nepa-Botuoba High, Angara-Lena Terrace, and Cis-Patom Foredeep, southeastern Siberian Craton, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmishek, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    Three structural provinces of this report, the Nepa-Botuoba High, the Angara-Lena Terrace, and the Cis-Patom Foredeep, occupy the southeastern part of the Siberian craton northwest of the Baikal-Patom folded region (fig. 1). The provinces are similar in many aspects of their history of development, stratigraphic composition, and petroleum geology characteristics. The sedimentary cover of the provinces overlies the Archean?Lower Proterozoic basement of the Siberian craton. Over most of the area of the provinces, the basement is covered by Vendian (uppermost Proterozoic, 650?570 Ma) clastic and carbonate rocks. Unlike the case in the more northwestern areas of the craton, older Riphean sedimentary rocks here are largely absent and they appear in the stratigraphic sequence only in parts of the Cis-Patom Foredeep province. Most of the overlying sedimentary section consists of Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate and clastic rocks, and it includes a thick Lower Cambrian salt-bearing formation. Younger rocks are thin and are present only in marginal areas. 1 A single total petroleum system (TPS) embraces all three provinces. The TPS is unique in two aspects: (1) its rich hydro-carbon reserves are derived from Precambrian source rocks and (2) preservation of oil and gas fields is extremely long owing to the presence of the Lower Cambrian undeformed salt seal. Discovered reserves of the TPS are about 2 billion barrels of oil and more than 30 trillion cubic feet of gas. The stratigraphic distribution of oil and gas reserves is narrow; all fields are in Vendian to lowermost Cambrian clastic and carbonate reservoirs that occur below Lower Cambrian salt. Both structural and stratigraphic traps are known. Source rocks are absent in the sedimentary cover of the provinces, with the possible exception of a narrow zone on the margin of the Cis-Patom Foredeep province. Source rocks are interpreted here to be Riphean and Vendian organic-rich shales of the Baikal-Patom folded region

  19. Total Water-Vapor Distribution in the Summer Cloudless Atmosphere over the South of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshkin, D. N.; Bezuglova, N. N.; Kabanov, M. V.; Pavlov, V. E.; Sokolov, K. I.; Sukovatov, K. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the total water vapor in different climatic zones of the south of Western Siberia in summer of 2008-2011 is studied on the basis of Envisat data. The correlation analysis of the water-vapor time series from the Envisat data W and radiosonde observations w for the territory of Omsk aerological station show that the absolute values of W and w are linearly correlated with a coefficient of 0.77 (significance level p water vapor are calculated based on the number of its measurements by Envisat for a cloudless sky of three zones with different physical properties of the underlying surface, in particular, steppes to the south of the Vasyugan Swamp and forests to the northeast of the Swamp. The distribution functions are bimodal; each mode follows the lognormal law. The parameters of these functions are given.

  20. Net ecosystem exchange in a sedge-sphagnum fen at the South of West Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyukarev, Egor

    2017-04-01

    The model of net ecosystem exchange was used to study the influence of different environmental factors and to calculate daily and growing season carbon budget for minerotrophic fen at South of West Siberia, Russia. Minerotrophic sedge-sphagnum fen occupies the central part of the Bakcharskoe bog. The model uses air and soil temperature, incoming photosynthetically active radiation, and leaf area index as the explanatory factors for gross primary production, heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration. The model coefficients were calibrated using data collected by automated soil CO2 flux system with clear long-term chamber. The studied ecosystem is a sink of carbon according to modelling and observation results. This study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Researches (grant numbers 16-07-01205 and 16-45-700562.

  1. THE STRATEGY OF SIBERIA SOCIAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: INSTITUTIONAL CONDITIONS AND MECHANIZMS OF REALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuleshov

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Forming of new economic base of state building in Russia, appearance of new economic problems and new conditions of their solution – all this demands changes in state regional policy and system of its realization in the scale of the country as a whole and also country's regions. The necessary conditions for state regional policy effectiveness increasing in Russia are the development of the country's territorial development strategy as a main part of the state's social-economical development strategy. In turn, this strategy should be a synthesis of Russia macroregions development strategy on the base of federal districts development strategy. Here the "pioneer" is the Siberian federal district, where on behalf of the President of Russian Federation was developed Siberia economical development strategy, approved by the decision of Russian Federation Government. This strategies, in turn, should be coordinated with middle-term and long-term programmes of Federation subjects and most important cities development.

  2. Energy and Resource-Saving Sources of Energy in Small Power Engineering of Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranova Marina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable development of distant areas of Siberia is associated with the structures of energy demand and supply, the implementation and promotion of the process of environmentally safe restructuring of the energy supply system. It has been established that suspension coal fuels derived from brown coal, coal mining, coal processing wastes can be used as fuel. The results of experimental and industrial boilers on suspension water coal fuel are presented. The designs of vortex combustion chambers of various powers are developed and tested. The possibility of using coal-enrichment wastes and substandard coals for the production of manure-coal fuel briquettes was studied. It is shown that the strength and thermal power characteristics of briquettes depend on the moisture content and degree of metamorphism of the raw materials. The most effective percentage of the solid phase and manure, as a binder, was determined.

  3. Reforms of police department and the practician of their realization in Western Siberia (1905–1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Sungurov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Process of organizational and regular changes in police authority in the territory of Western Siberia in the conditions of social cataclysm, growth of criminalization, revolutionary promotion and strengthening influence of crime on all aspects of life of society in 1905–1917 is researched. Since 1908 in the provincial centers the Tobolsk and Tomsk provinces the detective police is founded, and also additional (supernumerary police positions at the expense of public institutions, private firms and persons were everywhere entered. The nedoukoplektovannost of staff of police officers was observed. Actually the problem of professional training of police personnel was not solved. Especially difficult situation was observed in the small cities and villages where absence or an insignificant staff of police caused alarm in inhabitants for their safety. Despite reforms, police authority in the region neither quantitatively, nor qualitatively did not correspond to realities of local life.

  4. Larch Forests of Middle Siberia: Long-Term Trends in Fire Return Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Dvinskaya, Mariya L.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Im, Sergei T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Fire history within the northern larch forests of Central Siberia was studied (65 + deg N). Fires within this area are predominantly caused by lightning strikes rather than human activity. Mean fire return intervals (FRIs) were found to be 112 ± 49 years (based on fire scars) and 106 ± 36 years (based on fire scars and tree natality dates). FRI were increased with latitude increase and observed to be about 80 years at 64 deg N, about 200 years near the Arctic Circle and about 300 years nearby the northern range limit of larch stands (approximately 71 deg + N). Northward FRI increase correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = -0.95). Post Little Ice Age (LIA) warming (after 1850) caused approximately a doubling of fire events (in comparison with a similar period during LIA). The data obtained support a hypothesis of climate-induced fire frequency increase.

  5. Energy and Resource-Saving Sources of Energy in Small Power Engineering of Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Marina

    2017-11-01

    The sustainable development of distant areas of Siberia is associated with the structures of energy demand and supply, the implementation and promotion of the process of environmentally safe restructuring of the energy supply system. It has been established that suspension coal fuels derived from brown coal, coal mining, coal processing wastes can be used as fuel. The results of experimental and industrial boilers on suspension water coal fuel are presented. The designs of vortex combustion chambers of various powers are developed and tested. The possibility of using coal-enrichment wastes and substandard coals for the production of manure-coal fuel briquettes was studied. It is shown that the strength and thermal power characteristics of briquettes depend on the moisture content and degree of metamorphism of the raw materials. The most effective percentage of the solid phase and manure, as a binder, was determined.

  6. Fallout traces of the Fukushima NPP accident in southern West Siberia (Novosibirsk, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgunov, M S; Pokhilenko, N P; Strakhovenko, V D; Sukhorukov, F V; Chuguevskii, A V

    2012-05-01

    The fallout of artificially produced radioactive isotopes has been recorded at a site in southern West Siberia (54°50'43.6″ N, 083°06'22.4″ E, Novosibirsk, Russia). The highest activities of (131)I, (134)Cs, and (136)Cs were found in fresh snow precipitated on 02 April 2011, at 0.83, 0.092, and 0.002 Bq L(-1) of meltwater, respectively. The (131)I/(134)Cs ratio decreased from 9.0 on 02 April to 1.2 on 27 April, which is consistent with the radioactive decay of (131)I. This fallout can only have originated from the accidental emission of Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, Japan, in March 2011.

  7. Dinosaur evolution. A Jurassic ornithischian dinosaur from Siberia with both feathers and scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Sinitsa, Sofia M; Dhouailly, Danielle; Bolotsky, Yuri L; Sizov, Alexander V; McNamara, Maria E; Benton, Michael J; Spagna, Paul

    2014-07-25

    Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous deposits from northeastern China have yielded varied theropod dinosaurs bearing feathers. Filamentous integumentary structures have also been described in ornithischian dinosaurs, but whether these filaments can be regarded as part of the evolutionary lineage toward feathers remains controversial. Here we describe a new basal neornithischian dinosaur from the Jurassic of Siberia with small scales around the distal hindlimb, larger imbricated scales around the tail, monofilaments around the head and the thorax, and more complex featherlike structures around the humerus, the femur, and the tibia. The discovery of these branched integumentary structures outside theropods suggests that featherlike structures coexisted with scales and were potentially widespread among the entire dinosaur clade; feathers may thus have been present in the earliest dinosaurs. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. The Development of Russian Far East and Eastern Siberia and the Future of Northeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Yong-Chool

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this short paper is to introduce a new concept and way of thinking about the future of Northeast Asia in conjunction with the development of Russian Far East and Eastern Siberia. The basic arguments of this paper are: first, the specialists should shed the conventional definition of geographical boundaries, especially in defining Northeast Asia; second, Russia’s Far Eastern development can make a significant contribution to the regional community building depending on how creatively and imaginatively the development proceeds; lastly, it is high time to start preparation for the future of Northeast Asia before it gets too late. In this regard, at the end of this paper the authors introduce their initial effort to establish a consortium, the purpose of which is to lay groundwork for the establishment of an institute for Northeast Asian community building

  9. International Permafrost Field Courses in Siberia: the Synthesis of Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablyazina, D.; Boitsov, A.; Grebenets, V.; Kaverin, D.; Klene, A.; Kurchatova, A.; Pfeiffer, E. M.; Zschocke, A.; Shiklomanov, N.; Streletskiy, D.

    2009-04-01

    During summers of 2007 and 2008 a series of International University Courses on Permafrost (IUCP) were conducted in West Siberia, Russia. Courses were organized as part of the International Permafrost Association (IPA) International Polar Year activities. The North of West Siberia region was selected to represent diverse permafrost, climatic and landscape conditions. The courses were jointly organized by the Moscow State University (MSU) and the Tumen' Oil and Gas University (TOGU) with the help from German and U.S. institutions. The program attracted undergraduate and graduate students with diverse interests and backgrounds from Germany, Russia and the U.S. and involved instructors specializing in different aspects of permafrost research. Courses were designed to address three major topics of permafrost-related research: a) permafrost environments characteristic of the discontinuous and continuous zones; b) field instrumentation and techniques; c) permafrost engineering and problems of development in permafrost regions. Methodologically, courses consisted of systematic permafrost investigations at long-term monitoring sites and survey-type expeditions. Systematic, process-based investigations were conducted at a network of sites which constitute the TEPO established by TOGU in collaboration with the gas company NadymGasProm. The observation complex includes an array of 30-m deep boreholes equipped with automatic data collection systems and representing characteristic permafrost landscapes of West Siberia. Boreholes are complemented by sites for snow cover, vegetation, soil, ground ice, and geomorphologic investigations. As part of student research activities, four new Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were established in proximity to boreholes for monitoring spatial distribution and long-term dynamic of the active layer. New sites represent diverse landscapes characteristic of the West Siberian previously underrepresented in the CALM network

  10. Thermal analysis of wood of the main tree species of Central Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Loskutov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal decomposition of wood from coniferous and deciduous species of Siberia has been studied using thermogravimetry (TG and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The tree species were larch Larix sibirica Ledeb., Scots pine Pinus sylvestris L., spruce Picea obovata Ledeb., fir Abies sibirica Ledeb., Siberian pine Pinus sibirica Du Tour., birch Betula pendula Roth., and aspen Populus tremula L. Thermal analysis of wood samples was carried out under oxidative (air and inert (argon atmospheres from 25 to 700 °С at heating rates 10, 20, 40 °С • min–1 (TG/DTG and from 25 to 590 °С at heating rates 10, 40 °С • min–1 (DSC. The stages of thermal decomposition, the temperature intervals, the mass loss, the mass loss rate, the temperature of DTG/DSC peaks, and heating effects were determined for each tree species. The kinetic thermal degradation parameters of wood were obtained by the Broido and Ozawa–Flynn–Wall models. The wood of coniferous and deciduous species of Siberia was characterized on the base of analysis of activation energy values at various stages of thermal decomposition and the relations of activation energy on conversion level of wood substance of different tree species, and also the comparison of mass loss at the same stages of thermal destruction, heating effects, residual mass and other parameters of TG/DTG, DSC. In our opinion, the results of this work present interest for researchers and specialists in the field of forest pyrology, wood science, dendrochemistry.

  11. Simulation of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia using the regional scale model REMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevillard, A.; Ciais, P.; Lafont, S.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the temporal variability of atmospheric CO 2 over Europe and western Siberia are investigated using the regional atmospheric model, REMO. The model, of typical horizontal resolution 50 km, is part of a nested modelling framework that has been established as a concerted action during the EUROSIBERIAN CARBONFLUX project. In REMO, the transport of CO 2 is simulated together with climate variables, which offers the possibility of calculating at each time step the land atmosphere CO 2 fluxes as driven by the modelled meteorology. The uptake of CO 2 by photosynthesis is calculated using a light use efficiency formulation, where the absorbed photosynthetically active solar radiation is inferred from satellite measurements. The release of CO 2 from plant and soil respiration is driven by the simulated climate and assumed to be in equilibrium with photosynthesis over the course of one year. Fossil CO 2 emissions and air-sea fluxes within the model domain are prescribed, whereas the influence of sources outside the model domain is computed from as a boundary condition CO 2 fields determined a global transport model. The modelling results are compared against pointwise eddy covariance fluxes, and against atmospheric CO 2 records. We show that a necessary condition to simulate realistically the variability of atmospheric CO 2 over continental Europe is to account for the diurnal cycle of biospheric exchange. Overall, for the study period of July 1998, REMO realistically simulates the short-term variability of fluxes and of atmospheric mixing ratios. However, the mean CO 2 gradients from western Europe to western Siberia are not correctly reproduced. This latter deficiency points out the key role of boundary conditions in a limited-area model, as well as the need for using more realistic geographic mean patterns of biospheric carbon fluxes

  12. Climate-Induced Change in South Central Siberia: Predictions Versus Current Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.; Tchebakova, N. M.; Parfenova, E. I.; Shishikin, A.; Kanzai, V.; Westberg, D. J.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Ivanova, G. A.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2007-12-01

    Atmosphere Ocean General Circulations Models (AOGCM) are in agreement that Siberia is expected to experience warming in excess of 40% above global mean temperature increases by 2100. Moreover, it is predicted temperature increases will be evident in both the summer and winter. In association with changes in climate, the extent of the fire season, the amount of area burned and fire severity are predicted to increase. Fire regime increases are predicted to be the catalyst for ecosystem change, which will force ecosystems to move more rapidly towards equilibrium with the climate. Bioclimatic model results predict expansive changes in ecosystems, from a landscape dominated by taiga to a landscape dominated by steppe and forest-steppe. The focus of this investigation is on south, central Siberia in the Sayan Mountains and the Tyvan Republic, where one would expect to find the initial signs of climate change. The Sayan mountain range offers relatively abrupt change in ecosystems that are often defined by altitude, temperature and precipitation. Tyva is located at a vulnerable southern border, south of the Sayan, and contains 9 Biospheric Reserves, each representing distinct ecosystems. Additionally, Tyva is the home of several relic Pinus sylvestris forests. In these regions, January temperature increases have exceeded those predicted by the Hadley Centre scenario for 2090, and July temperatures are well below predictions. Predicted increases in rainfall are not apparent, and generally, precipitation change has been negative. The growing season length has already increased by about 6 to 12 days. Consequently, several of the relic pine forests have burned (some repeatedly), and natural regeneration is not visible at several sites, even one that had been re-planted on several occasions. In the last decades, these regions have experienced changes in climate and, potentially, initial signs of ecosystem change. In this report, we present a concentrated view of one region that

  13. Climate-Induced Landslides within the Larch Dominant Permafrost Zone of Central Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I; Shushpanov, Alexandr S; Im, Sergei T; Ranson, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Climate impact on landslide occurrence and spatial patterns were analyzed within the larch-dominant communities associated with continuous permafrost areas of Central Siberia. We used high resolution satellite imagery (i.e. QuickBird, WorldView) to identify landslide scars over an area of 62000 km 2 . Landslide occurrence was analyzed with respect to climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, drought index SPEI), and GRACE satellite derived equivalent of water thickness anomalies (EWTA). Landslides were found only on southward facing slopes, and the occurrence of landslides increased exponentially with increasing slope steepness. Lengths of landslides correlated positively with slope steepness. The observed upper elevation limit of landslides tended to coincide with the tree line. Observations revealed landslides occurrence was also found to be strongly correlated with August precipitation (r = 0.81) and drought index (r = 0.7), with June-July-August soil water anomalies (i.e., EWTA, r = 0.68-0.7), and number of thawing days (i.e., a number of days with t max > 0°C; r = 0.67). A significant increase in the variance of soil water anomalies was observed, indicating that occurrence of landslides may increase even with a stable mean precipitation level. The key-findings of this study are (1) landslides occurrence increased within the permafrost zone of Central Siberia in the beginning of the 21st century; (2) the main cause of increased landslides occurrence are extremes in precipitation and soil water anomalies; and (3) landslides occurrence are strongly dependent on relief features such as southward facing steep slopes.

  14. Influence of topographic heterogeneity on the abandance of larch forest in eastern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Kobayashi, H.

    2016-12-01

    In eastern Siberia, larches (Larix spp.) often exist in pure stands, constructing the world's largest coniferous forest, of which changes can significantly affect the earth's albedo and the global carbon balance. We have conducted simulation studies for this vegetation, aiming to forecast its structures and functions under changing climate (1, 2). In previous studies of simulating vegetation at large geographical scales, the examining area is divided into coarse grid cells such as 0.5 * 0.5 degree resolution, and topographical heterogeneities within each grid cell are just ignored. However, in Siberian larch area, which is located on the environmental edge of existence of forest ecosystem, abundance of larch trees largely depends on topographic condition at the scale of tens to hundreds meters. We, therefore, analyzed patterns of within-grid-scale heterogeneity of larch LAI as a function of topographic condition, and examined its underlying reason. For this analysis, larch LAI was estimated for each 1/112 degree from the SPOT-VEGETATION data, and topographic properties such as angularity and aspect direction were estimated form the ASTER-GDEM data. Through this analysis, we found that, for example, sign of correlation between angularity and larch LAI depends on hydrological condition on the grid cell. We then refined the hydrological sub-model of our vegetation model SEIB-DGVM, and validated whether the modified model can reconstruct these patterns, and examined its impact on the estimation of biomass and vegetation productivity of entire larch region. -- References --1. Sato, H., et al. (2010). "Simulation study of the vegetation structure and function in eastern Siberian larch forests using the individual-based vegetation model SEIB-DGVM." Forest Ecology and Management 259(3): 301-311.2. Sato, H., et al. (2016). "Endurance of larch forest ecosystems in eastern Siberia under warming trends." Ecology and Evolution

  15. Tides Stabilize Deltas until Humans Interfere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoitink, T.; Zheng Bing, W.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kastner, K.

    2017-12-01

    Despite global concerns about river delta degradation caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs and sea-level rise, human activity in the world's largest deltas intensifies. In this review, we argue that tides tend to stabilize deltas until humans interfere. Under natural circumstances, delta channels subject to tides are more stable than their fluvial-dominated counterparts. The oscillatory tidal flow counteracts the processes responsible for bank erosion, which explains why unprotected tidal channels migrate only slowly. Peak river discharges attenuate the tides, which creates storage space to accommodate the extra river discharge during extreme events and as a consequence, reduce flood risk. With stronger tides, the river discharge is being distributed more evenly over the various branches in a delta, preventing silting up of smaller channels. Human interference in deltas is massive. Storm surge barriers are constructed, new land is being reclaimed and large-scale sand excavation takes place, to collect building material. Evidence from deltas around the globe shows that in human-controlled deltas the tidal motion often plays a destabilizing role. In channels of the Rhine-Meuse Delta, some 100 scour holes are identified, which relates to the altered tidal motion after completion of a storm surge barrier. Sand mining has led to widespread river bank failures in the tidally-influenced Mekong Delta. The catastrophic flood event in the Gauges-Brahmaputra Delta by Cyclone Aila, which caused the inundation of an embanked polder area for over two years, was preceded by river bank erosion at the mouths of formal tidal channels that were blocked by the embankment. Efforts to predict the developments of degrading deltas are few. Existing delta models are capable of reproducing expanding deltas, which is essentially a matter of simulating the transport of sediment from source in a catchment to the sink in a delta. Processes of soil

  16. Migration in Deltas: An Integrated Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Robert J.; Hutton, Craig W.; Lazar, Attila; Adger, W. Neil; Allan, Andrew; Arto, Inaki; Vincent, Katharine; Rahman, Munsur; Salehin, Mashfiqus; Sugata, Hazra; Ghosh, Tuhin; Codjoe, Sam; Appeaning-Addo, Kwasi

    2017-04-01

    Deltas and low-lying coastal regions have long been perceived as vulnerable to global sea-level rise, with the potential for mass displacement of exposed populations. The assumption of mass displacement of populations in deltas requires a comprehensive reassessment in the light of present and future migration in deltas, including the potential role of adaptation to influence these decisions. At present, deltas are subject to multiple drivers of environmental change and often have high population densities as they are accessible and productive ecosystems. Climate change, catchment management, subsidence and land cover change drive environmental change across all deltas. Populations in deltas are also highly mobile, with significant urbanization trends and the growth of large cities and mega-cities within or adjacent to deltas across Asia and Africa. Such migration is driven primarily by economic opportunity, yet environmental change in general, and climate change in particular, are likely to play an increasing direct and indirect role in future migration trends. The policy challenges centre on the role of migration within regional adaptation strategies to climate change; the protection of vulnerable populations; and the future of urban settlements within deltas. This paper reviews current knowledge on migration and adaptation to environmental change to discern specific issues pertinent to delta regions. It develops a new integrated methodology to assess present and future migration in deltas using the Volta delta in Ghana, Mahanadi delta in India and Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta across India and Bangladesh. The integrated method focuses on: biophysical changes and spatial distribution of vulnerability; demographic changes and migration decision-making using multiple methods and data; macro-economic trends and scenarios in the deltas; and the policies and governance structures that constrain and enable adaptation. The analysis is facilitated by a range of

  17. Future Deltas Utrecht University research focus area: towards sustainable management of sinking deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouthamer, E.; van Asselen, S.

    2015-11-01

    Deltas are increasingly under pressure from human impact and climate change. To deal with these pressures that threat future delta functioning, we need to understand interactions between physical, biological, chemical and social processes in deltas. This requires an integrated approach, in which knowledge on natural system functioning is combined with knowledge on spatial planning, land and water governance and legislative frameworks. In the research focus area Future Deltas of Utrecht University an interdisciplinary team from different research groups therefore works together. This allows developing integrated sustainable and resilient delta management strategies, which is urgently needed to prevent loss of vital delta services.

  18. Evolving deltas: Conceptualising coevolution with engineered interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Amy; Nicholls, Robert; Lazar, Attila

    2017-04-01

    Mid to low latitude deltas have been populated for thousands of years due to their fertile soil and coastal location. This has led to an alteration in the land cover of deltas to primary agriculture and dense rural settlements and more recently, major cities and megacities have developed on or adjacent to many deltas. Deltas may be prosperous in terms of their outputs and services; however, they are also susceptible to many hazards due to their location and low-lying nature. Hazards include storm surges, fluvial flooding and erosion of both coastal and riverine areas, as well as subsidence, relative sea-level rise and pollution. This can have severe impacts on the delta, its population and its services. Therefore engineered interventions have been used for some time to protect the population and the valuable land from the consequences of hazards. Coevolution can be described as a feedback loop between nature and humans: each has an effect on how the other behaves and hence this inter-dependence interaction continues. Therefore the natural evolution of the delta interacts with engineered interventions, such as promoting accelerated subsidence over time, necessitating further adaptation. The deltaic landscape and associated livelihoods are thus the result of this co-evolution process between natural delta processes and engineered interventions. This presentation will identify and discuss various drivers and consequences of large scale engineered interventions, comparing and contrasting the management approaches taken in five populated deltas (Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna, Yangtze, Rhine-Meuse-Scheldt, Mekong and Nile). The type of engineered intervention and management approaches had a direct effect on the coevolution of deltas, with each of the deltas being at different stages in terms of extent of coevolution. A qualitative timeline of the typical steps of coevolution between the human system and the delta system of the studied deltas was produced. The major

  19. Delta FosB regulates wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werme, Martin; Messer, Chad; Olson, Lars; Gilden, Lauren; Thorén, Peter; Nestler, Eric J; Brené, Stefan

    2002-09-15

    DeltaFosB is a transcription factor that accumulates in a region-specific manner in the brain after chronic perturbations. For example, repeated administration of drugs of abuse increases levels of DeltaFosB in the striatum. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of spontaneous wheel running, as a model for a natural rewarding behavior, on levels of DeltaFosB in striatal regions. Moreover, mice that inducibly overexpress DeltaFosB in specific subpopulations of striatal neurons were used to study the possible role of DeltaFosB on running behavior. Lewis rats given ad libitum access to running wheels for 30 d covered what would correspond to approximately 10 km/d and showed increased levels of DeltaFosB in the nucleus accumbens compared with rats exposed to locked running wheels. Mice that overexpress DeltaFosB selectively in striatal dynorphin-containing neurons increased their daily running compared with control littermates, whereas mice that overexpress DeltaFosB predominantly in striatal enkephalin-containing neurons ran considerably less than controls. Data from the present study demonstrate that like drugs of abuse, voluntary running increases levels of DeltaFosB in brain reward pathways. Furthermore, overexpression of DeltaFosB in a distinct striatal output neuronal population increases running behavior. Because previous work has shown that DeltaFosB overexpression within this same neuronal population increases the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, results of the present study suggest that DeltaFosB may play a key role in controlling both natural and drug-induced reward.

  20. The Niger Delta Amnesty Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Okonofua

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The armed conflict between militias and government forces in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region has spanned for more than two decades, defying all solutions. A disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR program was established in August 2015 in effort to end the violence and has remained in place. It is a radically different approach from past approaches that displayed zero tolerance to all political challenges to oil production or the allocation of oil profits. The approach appeared to be immediately successful in that it forced a ceasefire, engaged militants in planned programs to rehabilitate and reintegrate them into civilian society, and opened up the oil wells (many of which had been shut due to the crisis with the effect of increasing government revenue, which depends 85% on oil exports. Yet, few studies have attempted to understand the dynamics within the country that are responsible for the design and implementation of this broad policy shift or to understand whether and how the current initiative is able to end the conflict and institute peace beyond the short term. This study, therefore, is important because it provides a critical perspective that anticipates and explains emerging issues with the Niger Delta Amnesty Program, which have implications for DDR adaptation and implementation all over the world. Ultimately, the research demonstrates how the DDR program both transforms the Niger Delta conflict and becomes embroiled in intense contestations not only about the mechanism for transforming the targeted population but also whether and how the program incorporates women who are being deprioritized by the program.

  1. Ecogeomorphic Feedbacks that Grow Deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Larsen, L.; Wagner, W.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal river deltas are complex and dynamic ecosystems where vegetation plays an essential role in influencing (as well as being influenced by) physical processes, creating a strong potential for ecogeomorphic feedbacks. However, understanding of the relative strenghts of feedback between vegetation species and topography along different portions of the marsh elevation/zonation gradient is poorly developed, particularly for freshwater, deltaic marshes. In part, this knowledge gap is due to difficulties associated with adequate sampling within heterogeneous vegetation communities to delineate bi-directional feedback applicable at the delta scale.. Emerging technology (high resolution remote sensing and high resolution LiDAR) and data analysis techniques like transfer entropy have made it possible to overcome these difficulties. Here, results of the transfer entropy analysis were consistent with widespread understanding of marsh zonation, yet produced additional insight into which vegetation communities specifically had a dominant impact on topographic change. Ecogeomorphic feedback that has a substantial short-term impact on evolving topography was resolvable only within native vegetation communities (Nelumbo lutea and Polygonum spp.) that occur over low to moderate elevations within the Wax Lake Delta tidal prism. In contrast, nonnative vegetation communities (Colocasia esculenta and Eichhonia crasspies) are not as functional at accreting sediment as native communities. The transfer entropy analysis suggests that different vegetation communities play functionally different roles in landscape evolution that should be differentiated in a model. Within such a model, it would be most critical to resolve detailed flow characteristics at low to low-middle island elevations, where submerged aquatic vegetation and Nelumbo are abundant, as these communities exert the strongest influence on topographic change. Furthermore, within elevation zones, it is likely important to

  2. Climate Change and the Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dettinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss3art5Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR during the 20th century was about 22 cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict

  3. Climate change and the Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettinger, Michael; Anderson, Jamie; Anderson, Michael L.; Brown, Larry R.; Cayan, Daniel; Maurer, Edwin P.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change amounts to a rapidly approaching, “new” stressor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta system. In response to California’s extreme natural hydroclimatic variability, complex water-management systems have been developed, even as the Delta’s natural ecosystems have been largely devastated. Climate change is projected to challenge these management and ecological systems in different ways that are characterized by different levels of uncertainty. For example, there is high certainty that climate will warm by about 2°C more (than late-20th-century averages) by mid-century and about 4°C by end of century, if greenhouse-gas emissions continue their current rates of acceleration. Future precipitation changes are much less certain, with as many climate models projecting wetter conditions as drier. However, the same projections agree that precipitation will be more intense when storms do arrive, even as more dry days will separate storms. Warmer temperatures will likely enhance evaporative demands and raise water temperatures. Consequently, climate change is projected to yield both more extreme flood risks and greater drought risks. Sea level rise (SLR) during the 20th century was about 22cm, and is projected to increase by at least 3-fold this century. SLR together with land subsidence threatens the Delta with greater vulnerabilities to inundation and salinity intrusion. Effects on the Delta ecosystem that are traceable to warming include SLR, reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt and larger storm-driven streamflows, warmer and longer summers, warmer summer water temperatures, and water-quality changes. These changes and their uncertainties will challenge the operations of water projects and uses throughout the Delta’s watershed and delivery areas. Although the effects of climate change on Delta ecosystems may be profound, the end results are difficult to predict, except that native species will fare worse than invaders. Successful

  4. Deformed nucleon and double-delta coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Afsar (Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar (India))

    1991-11-01

    Although the coupling constant (f{sub {pi}{Delta}{Delta}} /f{sub {pi}NN}) {sup 2} is of much importance in the context of current research in the role of the double-delta in hadron physics, so far the naive quark model value has been used, which is shown to be poor. Here we obtain a better value for this coupling constant in a deformed nucleon model which would help us to rectify this defect and enable us to conduct a proper study of the exotic double-delta channel. (author).

  5. delta 9-THC metabolites in meconium: identification of 11-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC, and 11-nor-delta 9-THC-9-COOH as major metabolites of delta 9-THC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSohly, M A; Feng, S

    1998-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of meconium specimens screening positive for cannabinoids by the EMIT 20 Assay showed a low confirmation rate for 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). A study was designed to investigate the possible contribution of other delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolites, including glucuronides, to the overall response of the EIA. delta 9-THC-glucuronide was synthesized in order to develop the most efficient procedure for hydrolysis of glucuronides in meconium. Procedures were developed for the extraction and GC-MS analysis of delta 9-THC, 11-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 alpha- and 8 beta-OH-delta 9-THC, 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC, and THCCOOH, after enzymatic hydrolysis of meconium extracts. It is concluded that enzymatic hydrolysis of meconium extracts is necessary for efficient recovery of delta 9-THC metabolites; delta 9-THC and its 8-OH metabolite(s) are basically absent in meconium specimens; and 11-OH-delta 9-THC and 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC contribute significantly to the immunoassay response of meconium extracts. Analysis of several meconium specimens that screened positive for cannabinoids but failed to confirm for THCCOOH showed significant amounts of 11-OH-delta 9-THC and 8 beta,11-diOH-delta 9-THC. Therefore, GC-MS confirmation of cannabinoids in meconium should include analysis for these two metabolites in addition to THCCOOH.

  6. An Influence of 7.5 T Superconducting Wiggler on Beam Parameters of Siberia-2 Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, Vladimir; Valentinov, Alexander; Mezentsev, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    At present the dedicated synchrotron radiation source Siberia-2 in Kurchatov Institute operates with electron energy 2.5 GeV and current up to 200 mA. In order to expand spectral range of SR and to increase brightness an installation of 7.5 T 19-pole superconducting wiggler is planned at the end of 2006. Now the wiggler is under fabrication in BINP, Novosibirsk. Such high level of a magnetic field in the wiggler will have a great influence on electron beam parameters of Siberia-2. Changes of these parameters (betatron tunes, horizontal emittance of the electron beam, momentum compaction, energy spread etc.) are discussed in the report. Different methods of compensation (global and local) of betatron functions distortion are presented. Much attention is paid to dynamic aperture calculations using analytical approximation of magnetic field behavior in transverse horizontal direction

  7. The present-day level of long-living artificial radionuclides content in mosses, lichens and needles of Siberia areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strakhovenko, V.D.; Sukhorukov, F.V.; Shcherbov, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to estimate the present-day level of long-living artificial radionuclides activity in lichen-moss cover and needles in the Siberia region. During the expeditionary activities (1995-2004) the Lichen cover mosses and needles were sampled in the Ust'-Ordinsky and Aginsky Buryatsky autonomous regions, Altai area, Republic of Altai, Novosibirsk Region, the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous region. The identical species of lichen, mosses. needles were collected from Siberia (lichens - Cladonia, Evernia, Usnea, Parmeli; mosses - Polytrichum, Hylocomium, Pleurozium, Sphagnum; needles - Pinaceae). It was collected 6 and more lichen species from each of 18 sample sites, more than 3 Moss species from 7 sample sites, and in place of coniferous trees joint growth (a pine, a cedar, a fir, a fur-tree and a larch). The needles were selected from all trees and thus were divided into one-year-old and many-year old. The samples were analyzed in the Laboratory of Trace Elements Geochemistry and Ecogeochemistry of the UIGGM, Novosibirsk, using special sample preparation and analysis techniques. The content of 137 Cs were determined by gamma-spectrometry (analyst Stepin A.S.), 90 Sr by beta-radiometry with a radiochemical sample preparation (analyst Makeover I.V.). The data reported are evidence that a present-day level of radioactive contamination in moss-lichen cover and needles of Siberia areas corresponds to this of global background, expect for northern area of Siberia (YNAD) for which hyperactivity are determined for the each of three components. Radiocesium concentration in one-year old needles reflects a level of atmospheric intake only for accidents, for other cases the condition of current needles reflects basically radionuclide level established as the result of dynamic balance between root intake and annual biogenic abscission of needles. (author)

  8. Potential climate-induced distributions of Lophodermium needle cast across central Siberia in the 21 century

    OpenAIRE

    N. M. Tchebakova; N. A. Kuzmina; E. I. Parfenova; V. A. Senashova; S. R. Kuzmin

    2016-01-01

    Needle cast caused by fungi of the genus Lophodermium Chevall. is a common disease in pine trees in Siberia. Regression analyses relating needle cast events to climatic variables in 1997–2010 showed that the disease depended most on precipitation of two successive years. Temperature conditions were important to trigger the disease in wetter years. We used our regional bioclimatic envelope model and IPCC scenarios to model the needle cast distribution and its outbreaks in the...

  9. Vertical stratification of physical, chemical and biological components in two saline lakes Shira and Shunet (South Siberia, Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    Degermendzhy, A.G.; Zadereev, E.S.; Rogozin, D.Y.; Prokopkin, I.; Barkhatov, Y.V.; Tolomeev, A.; Khromechek, E.B.; Janse, J.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Gulati, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A feature of meromictic lakes is that several physicochemical and biological gradients affect the vertical distribution of different organisms. The vertical stratification of physical, chemical and biological components in saline, fishless meromictic lakes Shira and Shunet (Siberia, Russia) is quite different mainly because both mean depth and maximum depth of lakes differ as well as their salinity levels differ. The chemocline of the Lake Shira, as in many meromictic lakes, is inhabited by b...

  10. Fracture system influence on the reservoirs rock formation of Ordovician-Devonian carbonates in West Siberia tectonic depression

    OpenAIRE

    Koveshnikov, Aleksandr Evgenievich; Nesterova, A. C.; Dolgaya, Tatiana Fedorovna

    2016-01-01

    During the Paleozoic period from the beginning of the Cambrian to the end of the Carboniferous in the boundaries of the West Siberia tectonic depression there occurred the sea, where the carbonate platforms were formed by the limestones accumulation. All the area at the end of the Carboniferous period was turned to land. Resulting from Gertsynskaya folding in the times of Permian - Triassic the formed deposits were folded and denudated to a considerable extent. Besides, the reservoir rocks of...

  11. Neogene amphibians and reptiles (Caudata, Anura, Gekkota, Lacertilia, and Testudines) from the south of Western Siberia, Russia, and Northeastern Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilyan​, Davit; Zazhigin, Vladimir S.; Böhme, Madelaine

    2017-01-01

    The present-day amphibian and reptile fauna of Western Siberia are the least diverse of the Palaearctic Realm, as a consequence of the unfavourable climatic conditions that predominate in this region. The origin and emergence of these herpetofaunal groups are poorly understood. Aside from the better-explored European Neogene localities yielding amphibian and reptile fossil remains, the Neogene herpetofauna of Western Asia is understudied. The few available data need critical reviews and ...

  12. Colorectal cancer risk factors among the population of South-East Siberia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivotovskiy, Alexey S; Kutikhin, Anton G; Azanov, Artur Z; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E; Magarill, Yuri A; Brusina, Elena B

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the most widespread malignancies in the world. However, there is a lack of comprehensive studies considering colorectal cancer risk factors among Russian populations, particularly in Siberia. The aim of this investigation was to determine the impact of various lifestyle, dietary, family, and socioeconomical factors on colorectal cancer risk in South-East Siberia. We recruited 185 Russian colorectal cancer cases and 210 gender-, age-, and ethnicity-matched asymptomatic controls with no history of any malignant tumor, using a specially designed questionnaire to obtain relevant information. After the statistical analysis, we defined several significant factors affecting colorectal cancer risk. Among these were smoking (OR=2.13, 95%CI=1.4- 3.24, P=0.0004), being overweight (BMI between 25-30, OR=2.45, 95%CI=1.49-4.03, P=0.0004), alcohol drinking (OR=8.73, 95%CI=5.49-13.87, Pbread and both rye and wheat bread (OR=0.32, 95%CI=0.21-0.5, Pcancer risk. These results should be definitely applied for elaboration of programs of colorectal cancer prevention in Russia, particularly in Siberia.

  13. New paleomagnetic poles from Arctic Siberia support Indian Ocean option for the Neoproterozoic APWP of the Siberian craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasenko, A.; Malyshev, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Quantity and quality of paleomagnetic poles obtained so far for Neoproterozoic of Siberia are still insufficient even to outline the general trend of APWP of Siberia for this huge and very interesting time interval. Meanwhile, the solution of this problem is crucial for choice of polarity option for Siberian proterozoic paleomagnetic directions, for construction and testing of world paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. For example, whether or not the Siberian craton could be connected with Laurentia within the supercontinent Rodinia depends directly on paleomagnetic polarity option choice, which , in its turn, is determined by either we choose for neoproterozoic drift of Siberian paleomagnetic poles Pacific ocean trend [Smethurst et al., 1998] or Indian ocean [Pavlov et al., 2015] trend. To advance in solution of this problem we have carried out the paleomagnetic investigations of several sedimentary sections and sills of Arctic Siberia considered to be meso-neoproterozoic in age. In particular we have studied the terrigenous Udza and Unguohtah Formations and basic sills of the Udzha Uplift; the carbonate Khaipakh Formation of the Olenek Uplift; the carbonate Burovaya Formation of the Turukhansk Uplift; basic sills of the Kparaulakh Mountains.In this report we present the paleomagnetic poles obtained, discuss their bearing on construction of the adequate Siberian neoproterozoic APWP and show that our new data rather support the Indian ocean option.This research were supported by Grant from RF President #MK-739.2017.5

  14. Russia and Islam: state policy on formation of tolerance of Muslims in Western Siberia (1773–1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Bortnikova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Counteraction to Islamic extremism is the major problem in the modern world. The government of the Russian Empire solved this problem through purposeful education of confessional tolerance of Muslims in 1773–1917. Authors compare understanding of tolerance in Russia and in Western Siberia in 1773-1917, emphasizing that in the Tyumen region society understood this term the same as now. On the basis of earlier unknown archival documents of the Central historical archive of the Republic of Bashkortostan authors consider a state policy on formation of a certain option of Islam which provides religious tolerance in Russia. In article the main attention is paid to Western Siberia as exactly there the confessional state policy made the greatest success. The main directions of a state policy were: to unify Muslim culture according to orthodox samples; to keep the Siberian option of Islam; to create obstacles for distribution of standard Islam; to develop the state measures which would show respect for Muslims and care of them. Authors consider ways of deformation of Muslim culture in Western Siberia: change of architectural forms of mosques and necropolises, deformation of cult objects (existence of a religious sculpture, selection of literature in Muslim libraries, the facilitated conditions for examinations on the mullah's rank, appointment to positions of muftis without spiritual education in the Orenburg Mohammedan spiritual meeting, creation of obstacles for commission of a hajj to Mecca for mullahs.

  15. Database of Alluvial Radiocarbon Dates in European Russia and Siberia and its Palaeohydrological Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlakhova, Ekaterina; Panin, Andrei

    2017-04-01

    We collected and analyzed published radiocarbon dates from East European Plain (EEP) and Siberia to pick absolute dates on alluvial and associated deposits. After filtering unreliable dates, 1000 radiocarbon dates from EEP and 500 from Siberia were included into the database. Each date was supplied with information on geographic location and coordinates, catchment area, geomorphological position, characteristics of geological section and dated materials. Also the information about published sources was given. Documented sections refer to fluvial forms in a wide range of catchment sizes. To extract palaeohydrological signal we used two kinds of proxies: sedimentological and geomorphological. We used the following indicators of low activity: organic horizons (soil, peat) in overbank alluvium, balka bottoms and gully fans, small river palaeochannels; and the following indicators of high activity: active sedimentation on river floodplains (burial of organic horizons), balka bottoms and gully fans, erosion by flood flows on floodplains, in bottoms of balkas and gullies, river incision, big palaeochannels, channel avulsions and chute cutoffs. 
 Each date that received palaeohydrological interpretation was regarded as the indicator of a particular Local Palaeohydrological Event. Combined probability density functions of high- and low-activity dates were used to detect time intervals of different palaeohydrological status. For EEP after low fluvial activity during LGM two palaeohydrological epochs were designated: extremely high activity in the end of MIS 2 (ca. 18-11.7 ka b2k), and much lower activity in the Holocene. Within the Holocene two hierarchical levels of hydroclimatic variability were designated according to their duration and magnitude - regional palaeohydrological phases (centuries to few millennia) and regional palaeofluvial episodes (decades to few centuries). Tendency is rather clear of activity lowering in the first half and rise in the second half of

  16. The Yudomian of Siberia, Vendian and Ediacaran systems of the International stratigraphic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomentovsky, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    In Russia, the terminal Neoproterozoic formally includes the Vendian of western part of the East European platform and the concurrent Yudoma Group of Siberia. As is shown in this work, the designated subdivisions correspond in the stratotypes only to the upper, Yudomian Series of the Vendian. In the Siberian platform, the Ust-Yudoma and Aim horizons of the Yudomian are tightly interrelated. The lower of them, bearing remains of Ediacaran Fauna, represents the Ediacarian Stage, whereas the upper one containing small-shelled fossils (SSF) corresponds to the Nemakit-Daldynian Stage divided into the trisulcatus and antiqua superregional zones. In more complete sections of the platform periphery, sediments of these subdivisions conformably rest on siliciclastic succession that should be ranked as basal subdivision of the Yudomian. The succession is concurrent to the Laplandian Stage of the East European platform. According to geochronological dates obtained recently, the Yudomian Series spans interval of 600-540 Ma. In the East European platform, the Upper Vendian (Yudomian) begins with the Laplandian basal tillites of synonymous stage. In the west of the platform, tillites are dated at 600 Ma like the Upper Vendian base in Siberia. The next Ediacarian Stage of the East European platform is stratigraphic equivalent of the Redkino Horizon, while summary range of the Kotlin and Rovno horizons is concurrent to that of the Nemakit-Daldynian Stage. The Vendian of Russia is conformably overlain by the Tommotian Stage of the Lower Cambrian. Intense pre-Vendian events constrained distribution areas of the Lower Vendian sediments in Russia. The Lower Vendian deposits of the East European platform are most representative and well studied in the central Urals, where they are attributed to the Serebryanka Group. In Siberia, separate subdivisions representing the Lower Vendian are the Maastakh Formation of the Olenek Uplift, two lower members of the Ushakovka Formation in the Baikal

  17. A reconstruction of vegetation and paleohydrologycal changes from peatland in Kansk forest-steppe, Yenisei Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important natural archive for past climatic changes. Climatic changes throughout the Holocene have been reconstructed from peat using a wide array of biological and other proxies. Many different proxy indicators can be derived from peat cores allowing for a multi-proxy approach to climatic reconstructions. Peat-based climatic and environmental reconstructions are currently available from many sites in Yenisei Siberia, mainly for its northern territories. The purpose of this paper is to study some features of peatland development and environmental reconstructions from the Holocene period in the south part of Yenisei Siberia (Kansk forest-steppe zone). The main method used in this research is macrofossil analysis. It can be used to reconstruct the development of local vegetation and surface wetness on peatlands. The macrofossil analysis in the peat resulted from the study of the vegetation in a particular place over a period of time, and it allowed the reconstruction of environmental changes that have occurred since the Late Glacial. Then we used ecological scales of moisture and reconstructed surface wetness for the entire period of the bog formation. Radiocarbon dating was carried out at Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk . Peatland "Pinchinskoye" was selected for investigation in Kansk forest-steppe. It is located on the right bank of the Yenisei River in the floodplain of Esaulovka River. Peat cores of 350 cm were selected in the southern part of the peatbog, including 225 cm of peat (with loam layers in the range of 90 to 135 cm), 75 cm of organic and mineral sapropel with the inclusion of fossil shells of mollusks and different plant macrofossils and 50 cm of the loam below. The process of peat accumulation dated back 8400 ± 140 years, which is the oldest date for the forest-steppe zone of Yenisei Siberia. The climate of Boreal period of the Holocene was chilly. Under these conditions, in the

  18. SIB-ESS-C - A Spatial Data Infrastructure to Facilitate Earth System Science in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmullius, C. C.; Gerlach, R.; Hese, S.

    2006-12-01

    The potential of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) to share geoinformation and services over the Internet has been widely recognized and various initiatives (e.g. INSPIRE, GMES, GEOSS) are actively engaged to implement such systems on local, national or global level. Standards published by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) or the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) provide the basis for distributed yet interoperable SDI's. Following the available guidelines and standards the Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (SIB-ESS-C) is being developed as a spatial data infrastructure for remote sensing product generation, data dissemination and scientific data analysis. This paper describes the concept of the Siberian Earth System Science Cluster. SIB-ESS-C emerged from the EU funded SIBERIA-II project (EVG2-2001-00008, 2002-2005) which was a joint Russian-European remote sensing project focusing on a 300 Million ha area in the central Siberian region. This area represents a significant part of the Earth's boreal biome which plays a critical role in global climate change in Northern Eurasia. The overall objective of the SIBERIA-II project was to demonstrate the viability of full carbon accounting including greenhouse gases (GHG) on a regional basis using state-of-the-art environmental methods and advanced remote sensing technologies. The tools and systems which have been employed include a selected yet spectrally and temporally diverse set of 15 Earth observation instruments on 8 satellites, detailed GIS databases and Dynamic Global Vegetation Models to account for fluxes between land and atmosphere. The data sets and value-added products created within the SIBERIA-II project will form the basic set of products for SIB-ESS-C. These products include regional maps of land cover, fire induced disturbances, phenology, snow depth, snow melt date, onset and duration of freeze and thaw, LAI and others. Since these products

  19. THE INTERNET PRESENTATION OF DATABASES OF GLACIERS OF THE SOUTH OF EASTERN SIBERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kitov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the technology for creating databases of glaciers in Southern Siberia and the presentation of these databases on the Internet. The technology consists in the recognition and vectorization of spatial, multi-temporal data using GIS techniques, followed by the formation of databases that reflect the spatial and temporal variation of nival-glacial formations. The results of GIS design are presented on the website IG SB RAS and with the help of Internet service ArcGISonline on the public map. The mapping of databases shows the dynamic of nival-glacial formations for three time phases: the beginning of the 20th century (if you have data, its middle (the catalogs of glaciers and topographic maps and the beginning of the 21st century (according to satellite images and field research. Graphic objects are represented as point, line, and polygonal GIS-themes. Point-themes indicate parameters such as the center, lower and upper boundaries of the glacier. Line-themes determine the length and perimeter of the glacier. Polygonal-themes define the contour of the glacier and its area. The attributive table corresponds to the international standard World Glacier Inventory (WGI. The contours of the glaciers of northern Asia are represented conditionally (ellipses at international portals, and attribute characteristics correspond to the state that was displayed in catalogs of glaciers of the USSR, and they are inaccurate. Considered databases are devoid of these shortcomings. Coordinates of the center of glaciers have been refined. Glaciers contours have boundaries, appropriate to space images or topographic maps, in shp-file format. New glaciers of Baikalskiy and Barguzinskiy ridges are also presented. Existing catalogs and databases still do not include these glaciers. Features of the glaciers are examined in the context of the latitudinal transect of southern Siberia, from the Kodar ridge to the Eastern Sayan. GIS-analysis of the Databases

  20. Late Pleniglacial vegetation in eastern-central Europe: are there modern analogues in Siberia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, Enikő Katalin; Kuneš, Petr; Jakab, Gusztáv; Sümegi, Pál; Pelánková, Barbora; Schäbitz, Frank; Braun, Mihály; Chytrý, Milan

    2014-07-01

    To characterize Late Pleniglacial (LPG: 26.5-15 ka cal BP) and particularly Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: 21 ± 2 ka cal BP) vegetation and climate, fossil pollen assemblages are often compared with modern pollen assemblages. Given the non-analogue climate of the LPG, a key question is how glacial pollen assemblages and thereby vegetation compare with modern vegetation. In this paper we present three LPG pollen records from the Carpathian Basin and the adjoining Carpathian Mountains to address this question and provide a concise compositional characterization of the LPG vegetation. Fossil pollen assemblages were compared with surface pollen spectra from the Altai-Sayan Mountains in southern Siberia. This area shows many similarities with the LPG vegetation of eastern-central Europe, and has long been considered as its best modern analogue. Ordination and analogue matching were used to characterize vegetation composition and find the best analogues. Our results show that few LPG pollen assemblages have statistically significant analogues in southern Siberia. When analogue pairings occur they suggest the predominance of wet and mesic grasslands and dry steppe in the studied region. Wooded vegetation types (continental and suboceanic hemiboreal forest, continental taiga) appear as significant analogues only in a few cases during the LGM and more frequently after 16 ka cal BP. These results suggest that the LPG landscape of the Carpathian Basin was dominated by dry steppe that occurred outside the river floodplains, while wet and mesic grasslands occurred in the floodplains and on other sites influenced by ground water. Woody vegetation mainly occurred in river valleys, on wet north-facing hillsides, and scattered trees were likely also present on the loess plateaus. The dominant woody species were Larix, Pinus sylvestris, Pinus mugo, Pinus cembra, Picea abies, Betula pendula/pubescens, Betula nana, Juniperus, Hippophaë rhamnoides, Populus, Salix and Alnus. The pollen

  1. Paleomagnetism of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic volcanic rocks of Southern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyukin, I.; Shatsillo, A.

    2016-12-01

    The main objects of the present study are late Permian and Mesozoic volcanic rocks from Selengin-Vitim volcano-plutonic belt (South Siberia). The belt was formed in the back area of Siberian continent active margin. Volcanic rocks are presented by contrastive volcanites more than 5 km thick. The deposits are subdivided into three suits: Ungurkuy (basalts and andesites), Chernoyar (basalts, andesites and tuffs) and Hilok (basalts, pyroclastic flows and tuffs). The age of Ungurkuy suite is deemed to be between Late Carboniferous and Late Permian. The age of Chernoyar suite is Middle-late Triassic. The age og Hilok suite is Late Jurassic. Volcanic deposits of the three suits were studied to create APWP for the Siberian craton. 250 oriented samples from 40 sites were collected from the Chikoy river valley within South Siberia. All samples were characterized by interpretable paleomagnetic signal. The Ungurkuy suite has different dip and strike: from subhorizontal to 40 degrees inclination and NE course. Chernoyar rocks were collected from monoclinal structure with the dip and strike around NW declination and 5-10 degrees inclination. Hilok suite represents large subhorizontal eruptive bodies. Volcanic rocks of Ungurkuy suite show mostly monopolar (normal polarity) magnetization direction between Early Permian and Permian-Triassic Siberian poles, which indicates its Late Permian age. The normal polarity of the deposits indicates its formation in the period between Kiama superchron, characterized by reversal polarity, and Illavara hyperchron with mixed polarity - 265 Ma. Direction from Chernoyar suite is well-correlated with Late Triassic APWP of Europe, directions of magnetization are bipolar. From Hilok suite several sites show direction of magnetization similar to directions revealed from Early Cretaceous volcanites from nearby area. The magnetization is metachronous. In the other sites the directions of magnetization well-correlated with Late Jurassic APWP of Europe

  2. The Last Glacial Ecosystems of North Siberia: Permafrost-Sealed Evidence from Fossiliferous Cryolithic Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlachula, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Multi-proxy palaeoecology and geoarchaeology records released from degrading permafrost in the Yana River Basin and the tributary valleys (66-67°N) confirm the past existence of natural conditions for sustainment of the Pleistocene megafauna as well as the last glacial peopling of this sub-polar area. Well-preserved and taxonomically diverse large fossil fauna skeletal remains sealed in the Pleistocene colluvial and alluvial-plain formations in intact geological positions 10-20 m above the present river and scattered on gravelly river banks after their erosion from the primary geo-contexts attest to a high biotic potential of the Late Pleistocene (MIS 3-2) sub-Arctic forest-tundra. Pollen records from the ancient interstratified boggy sediments and megafauna coprolites (14C-dated to 41-38 ka BP) show a predominance of the Siberian larch, dwarf birch and willow in the local vegetation cover accompanied by grassy communities during the mid-Last Glacial stage not dissimilar from the present northern taiga forest. Articulated and humanly used/worked fauna bones (mammoth, rhinoceros, horse, bison and reindeer among other species) point to co-existence of the large animals with the Upper Palaeolithic people within the mosaic open riverine ecosystems of the late Last Ice Age. The time-trangressive macro-lithic stone industry produced from pre-selected river gravel cobbles document some specific ways of human environmental adjustment to past periglacial settings. Geomorphology and hydrogeology indices of field mappings in congruence with the long-term statistical meteorology data illustrate a steadily increasing annual temperature trend in the broader Yana-Adycha Basins (current MAT -14.5°C) that triggers accelerated permafrost thaw across the Verkhoyansk Region of NE Siberia, particularly the lowlands, similarly as in the Indigirka and Kolyma Basins further East. The regional fluvial discharge is most dynamic during late spring due to the cumulative effects of snow

  3. Asynchroneity of the Holocene Moisture Variations across the Mongolian Plateau and the adjacent Siberia and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    FENG, Zhaodong; WANG, Wei; RAN, Min

    2014-05-01

    Based on the review of high-standard Holocene climatic reconstructions from the Mongolian Plateau and the adjacent Siberia and China, temporal and spatial patterns of the Holocene moisture evolution are synthesized. The regionally-averaged moisture index (i.e., RAMI) for the winter monsoon-dominated southern Siberia exhibits a general declining trends since 10.6-9.6 cal. kyr BP, being consistent with the trends of the annual precipitation and the warm-season temperature in the Russian Plain. The consistency might be attributable to the Holocene declining trend of the warm-season temperature in North Atlantic region. The RAMI for the westerlies-affected northern Xinjiang had a persistent increasing trend since ~8 cal. kyr BP. The wetting trend of northern Xinjiang might be attributable to the increasing trend of winter insolation and to the associated increasing trend of cold-season temperature in northwestern Europe. The chronological correspondences between dry phases and warm intervals in the arid areas of the entire Mongolian Plateau lend a support to our earlier proposal that the mid-Holocene dry phase in the arid Mongolian Plateau was most likely the result of mid-Holocene high warm-season temperature. The RAMI for China is the delayed reflections of the East Asian summer monsoon strength to the solar radiation. That is, the peak insolation (14-6 cal. kyr BP) was responded by the Oceanic Thermal Optimum (12-5 cal. kyr BP) with some time lags and the Oceanic Thermal Optimum was then responded by the Holocene Moisture Optimum in southern China (10-5 cal. kyr BP) and then in northern China (9-6 cal. kyr BP). The RAMI for the Tibetan Plateau shows that the moisture has been persistently declining since ~11 cal. kyr BP and that the period between ~11.5 and 7.5 cal. kyr BP was the Holocene Moisture Optimum. The parallel trends between the moisture level in the Tibetan Plateau and the Indian summer monsoon strength retrieved from the Arabian Sea suggest that the

  4. Development of provisions for oil contaminated soil neutralizing in the conditions of Siberia and the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtripling, L. O.; Kholkin, E. G.

    2017-08-01

    Siberia and the Arctic zone of the Russian Federation occupy a large area of the country and they differ from other regions in special climatic conditions, in particular, a long period of freezing temperatures and relatively poor infrastructure. The main problem of neutralizing soils contaminated with oil products in conditions of negative ambient temperature is that the contaminated soil is in a frozen state, and it prevents the normal course of neutralization process, so additional energy is required for preparing the soil. There is proposed a technology adapted to the conditions of Siberia and the Arctic for the operational elimination of emergency situations consequences accompanied with oil spills. The technology for neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products is based on the encapsulation of a pollutant (reagent capsulation technology) using an alkaline calcium-based reagent. Powdered building quicklime is used as a reagent, and it is a product of roasting carbonate rocks or a mixture of this product with mineral additives (calcium oxide). The encapsulated material obtained as a result of neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products is resistant to natural and man-made factors such as moisture, temperature fluctuations, acid rain and high pressure. Energy use from the chemical detoxification exothermic process of soils contaminated with petroleum products in combination with the forced supply of carbon dioxide to the neutralization zone during the formation of a shell from calcium carbonate on the surface of the pollutant makes it possible to neutralize soils contaminated with oil products in the extreme climatic conditions of the Arctic using reagent Encapsulation. The principle of equipment operation that allows neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products in the natural and climatic conditions of the Arctic using reagent capsulation technology has been described. The results of experimental studies have been presented that

  5. Entropy and optimality in river deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Zaliapin, Ilya; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-10-01

    The form and function of river deltas is intricately linked to the evolving structure of their channel networks, which controls how effectively deltas are nourished with sediments and nutrients. Understanding the coevolution of deltaic channels and their flux organization is crucial for guiding maintenance strategies of these highly stressed systems from a range of anthropogenic activities. To date, however, a unified theory explaining how deltas self-organize to distribute water and sediment up to the shoreline remains elusive. Here, we provide evidence for an optimality principle underlying the self-organized partition of fluxes in delta channel networks. By introducing a suitable nonlocal entropy rate (nER) and by analyzing field and simulated deltas, we suggest that delta networks achieve configurations that maximize the diversity of water and sediment flux delivery to the shoreline. We thus suggest that prograding deltas attain dynamically accessible optima of flux distributions on their channel network topologies, thus effectively decoupling evolutionary time scales of geomorphology and hydrology. When interpreted in terms of delta resilience, high nER configurations reflect an increased ability to withstand perturbations. However, the distributive mechanism responsible for both diversifying flux delivery to the shoreline and dampening possible perturbations might lead to catastrophic events when those perturbations exceed certain intensity thresholds.

  6. Morphodynamics of ebb-tidal deltas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, W.

    2016-01-01

    Ebb-tidal deltas are bodies of sand that are located seaward of tidal inlets. The latter connect the open sea with a back-barrier basin and separate barrier islands. The morphology (e.g., sand volume, geometry, shoal formation) of ebb-tidal deltas evolves continuously, both due to natural processes

  7. Floating City IJmeer : Accelerator for Delta Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, R.; Fremouw, M.; Van Bueren, B.; Czapiewska, K.; Kuijper, M.

    2006-01-01

    Climate change, sea level rise, population growth and ongoing urbanization result in higher vulnerability of the Rhine delta because it will result in increased flooding frequency, increasing investments and increased use of water, energy and other resources. The Rhine Delta also faces strong

  8. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  9. [Establishment of delta block matching technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Qin-Feng; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Yan, Li-Xing

    2006-04-01

    To establish delta block HLA-matching technique, DNA was extracted from whole blood by salting-out method, delta block was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR product was detected by GeneScan. The results showed that delta block had polymorphism in 104 samples without sibship of the Han people from Zhejiang province. The range of DNA fragment length was 81-393 bp and could be divided into 4 groups: 81-118 bp, 140-175 bp, 217-301 bp, 340-393 bp. The numbers of DNA fragments were 6-32. It is concluded that the method of delta block matching is reliable and can be applied to select donors for the patients to be transplanted. It is the first time to get delta block data of the Han people in China.

  10. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  11. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  12. Lateral extension in Sphagnum mires along the southern margin of the boreal region, Western Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peregon, A; Uchida, M; Yamagata, Y, E-mail: anna.peregon@nies.go.j [Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    Although recent studies have recognized Northern Eurasian ecosystems as an important carbon reservoir, little is known about the forest-peatland interactions in a boreal environment induced by ongoing climatic changes. This study focuses on the evaluation of both the long-term and contemporary trends of land-cover changes and rates of lateral extension of peat-accumulating wetlands toward the adjacent forests, estimated at the southern climatic range of the Sphagnum-dominated mires in Western Siberia. We used the radiocarbon dates and stratigraphy of peat sediments from seven peat cores, analyzed at two types of forest-peatland ecotones, which are located close to each other but differ by topography and composition of their plant communities. The rate of lateral extension was found in a wide range varying from 2.3 to 791.7 cm yr{sup -1}. It was observed to be rapid during the initial stage of mire development, but to have slowed down over the last 2000-3000 yr. Our results, therefore, strongly contradict the concept of progressive peat accumulation throughout the late Holocene and contribute to our knowledge about ongoing land-cover change in the natural ecosystems of the Northern hemisphere.

  13. Lateral extension in Sphagnum mires along the southern margin of the boreal region, Western Siberia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregon, A; Uchida, M; Yamagata, Y

    2009-01-01

    Although recent studies have recognized Northern Eurasian ecosystems as an important carbon reservoir, little is known about the forest-peatland interactions in a boreal environment induced by ongoing climatic changes. This study focuses on the evaluation of both the long-term and contemporary trends of land-cover changes and rates of lateral extension of peat-accumulating wetlands toward the adjacent forests, estimated at the southern climatic range of the Sphagnum-dominated mires in Western Siberia. We used the radiocarbon dates and stratigraphy of peat sediments from seven peat cores, analyzed at two types of forest-peatland ecotones, which are located close to each other but differ by topography and composition of their plant communities. The rate of lateral extension was found in a wide range varying from 2.3 to 791.7 cm yr -1 . It was observed to be rapid during the initial stage of mire development, but to have slowed down over the last 2000-3000 yr. Our results, therefore, strongly contradict the concept of progressive peat accumulation throughout the late Holocene and contribute to our knowledge about ongoing land-cover change in the natural ecosystems of the Northern hemisphere.

  14. The surface energy balance of a polygonal tundra site in northern Siberia – Part 2: Winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Boike

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present the winter time surface energy balance at a polygonal tundra site in northern Siberia based on independent measurements of the net radiation, the sensible heat flux and the ground heat flux from two winter seasons. The latent heat flux is inferred from measurements of the atmospheric turbulence characteristics and a model approach. The long-wave radiation is found to be the dominant factor in the surface energy balance. The radiative losses are balanced to about 60 % by the ground heat flux and almost 40 % by the sensible heat fluxes, whereas the contribution of the latent heat flux is small. The main controlling factors of the surface energy budget are the snow cover, the cloudiness and the soil temperature gradient. Large spatial differences in the surface energy balance are observed between tundra soils and a small pond. The ground heat flux released at a freezing pond is by a factor of two higher compared to the freezing soil, whereas large differences in net radiation between the pond and soil are only observed at the end of the winter period. Differences in the surface energy balance between the two winter seasons are found to be related to differences in snow depth and cloud cover which strongly affect the temperature evolution and the freeze-up at the investigated pond.

  15. Bacterial community in ancient permafrost alluvium at the Mammoth Mountain (Eastern Siberia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouchkov, Anatoli; Kabilov, Marsel; Filippova, Svetlana; Baturina, Olga; Rogov, Victor; Galchenko, Valery; Mulyukin, Andrey; Fursova, Oksana; Pogorelko, Gennady

    2017-12-15

    Permanently frozen (approx. 3.5Ma) alluvial Neogene sediments exposed in the Aldan river valley at the Mammoth Mountain (Eastern Siberia) are unique, ancient, and poorly studied permafrost environments. So far, the structure of the indigenous bacterial community has remained unknown. Use of 16S metagenomic analysis with total DNA isolation using DNA Spin Kit for Soil (MO-Bio) and QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) has revealed the major and minor bacterial lineages in the permafrost alluvium sediments. In sum, 61 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) with 31,239 reads (Qiagen kit) and 15,404 reads (Mo-Bio kit) could be assigned to the known taxa. Only three phyla, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, comprised >5% of the OTUs abundance and accounted for 99% of the total reads. OTUs pertaining to the top families (Chitinophagaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae, Halomonadaceae) held >90% of reads. The abundance of Actinobacteria was less (0.7%), whereas members of other phyla (Deinococcus-Thermus, Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast, Fusobacteria, and Acidobacteria) constituted a minor fraction of reads. The bacterial community in the studied ancient alluvium differs from other permafrost sediments, mainly by predominance of Bacteroidetes (>52%). The diversity of this preserved bacterial community has the potential to cause effects unknown if prompted to thaw and spread with changing climate. Therefore, this study elicits further reason to study how reintroduction of these ancient bacteria could affect the surrounding ecosystem, including current bacterial species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pollutants transport and atmospheric variability of CO2 over Siberia: contribution of airborne measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paris, J.D.

    2008-12-01

    The work presented here intends to characterize the variations of atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 , CO, O 3 and ultrafine particles, over a large scale aircraft transect above Siberia, during three intensive YAK-AEROSIB campaigns in April 2006, September 2006 and August 2007, respectively. Pollutant and greenhouse gases distribution in this poorly studied region is needed to model atmospheric long range transport. I show here that CO concentrations at the time of the campaigns is broadly affected by (1) advection of Chinese pollutants through baro-clinic perturbations, (2) advection (diffuse or not) of European pollutants at various altitudes, (3) and of biomass burning from Central Asia. This set of factors is analyzed through a novel statistical technique based on clustering of backward transport simulated by the FLEXPART Lagrangian model. Large observed CO 2 gradients in summer are matched against vertical mixing in GCM simulated CO 2 . At last I present ultrafine particle measurements, and a possible nucleation summer maximum in the clean, continental mid-troposphere. (author)

  17. Music as knowledge in Shamanism and other healing traditions of Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marilyn

    2003-01-01

    Several presenters made the point that one cannot look at narrative alone, without taking into account the music, dance, and drumming that, in many settings, go along with it. One of these presenters was Marilyn Walker, who has had the good fortune to work with healers in Siberia. Although academic in approach, Marilyn’s paper also recognizes the importance of experiential ways of knowing. In her Quebec City presentation, she shared some of this experiential dimension by showing and commenting on videotaped segments featuring three Siberian healers. Walker’s paper discusses healing at several levels. In addition to several healing dimensions that she lists at the end of her paper, she mentions the physiological effects of music, dance, and drumming. Current research is leading to a better understanding of how trauma affects the brain and the body, and ways that various therapies, including new therapies focusing on sensorimotor effects, can promote healing. Along with these developments has come a greater appreciation and understanding among some mental health practitioners of some of the neuropsychological processes by which traditional practices such as narrative, singing, drumming, and dancing, may bring about healing.

  18. Paleo-channel type uranium deposits in western Siberia and Transbaikal regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, G.M.; Markov, S.N.; Rubinov, I.M.; Peshkov, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    The author systematically introduces the geologic background, characteristics of uranium mineralization and uranium metallogenic conditions of the three regions in Russia (Transural, western Siberia and Transbaikal regions) where important paleo-channel type uranium deposits have been discovered. Authors propose that those paleo-channel type uranium deposits that incise the basement may occur both in the periphery of trans-regional orogenic belt and activated young platform or ancient shield, may be formed both under arid and humid climate conditions. The ore-formation process of mineralization begins from the deposition of ore-hosting sediments and continues until the ore-hosting horizon is covered by impermeable clay or basalt layer. There are two types of paleo-channel epigenetic oxidation zonation: oxidation zone-uranium mineralized zone-primary grey sandstone; oxidation zone-zone of iron oxide reprecipitation-zone of bleached rocks-primary grey sandstone. Ores of paleo-channel type uranium deposits are enriched in a wide spectrum of associated elements which is related to the abundant content of organic matters in ore-hosting sandstone and the existence of various geochemical barriers at the pinch out sites of oxidation zone

  19. Atmospheric methane over Siberia: measurements from the 2014 YAK-AEROSIB aircraft campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Jean-Daniel; Pisso, Ignacio; Ancellet, Gérard; Law, Kathy; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Nédélec, Philippe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2017-04-01

    The YAK-AEROSIB program collects high-precision in-situ measurements of the vertical distribution of CO2, CH4, CO, O3, black carbon and ultrafine particles distribution in the Siberian troposphere, as well as other parameters including aerosol lidar profiles, on a pan-Siberian aircraft transect. Recent efforts aim at better understanding the respective role of CH4 emission processes in driving its large scale atmospheric variability over the region. The October 2014 YAK-AEROSIB/MOCA campaign from Novosibirsk to Salekhard and over the Kara sea and the Yamal peninsula sampled air masses affected by local, regional and remote pollution. We analyse the contribution of local anthropogenic sources to measured CH4 enhancements, in relation to atmospheric mixing and transport conditions. Our analysis also attempts to detect CH4 signal from sources of methane in the Siberian shelf and the Arctic ocean during low level flight legs over the Kara sea using the airborne measurements and a Lagrangian model coupled to potential CH4 hydrate and geological sources. The measured CH4 concentrations do not contradict a potential source upstream of our measurements, but the interpretation is challenging due to a very low CH4 signal. The challenging question of the methane budget and its evolution in Siberia leads to a need for new approaches. A new generation of airborne measurements, more flexible, is now needed.

  20. Using MODIS NDVI products for vegetation state monitoring on the oil production territory in Western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalev Anton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article describes the results of using remote sensing data for vegetation state monitoring on the oil field territories in Western Siberia. We used MODIS data product providing the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI values. Average NDVI values of each studied area were calculated for the period from 2010 to 2015 with one year interval for June, July and August. Analysis was carried out via an open tool of geographic information system QGIS used for spatial analysis and calculation of statistical parameters within chosen polygons. Results are presented in graphs showing the variation of NDVI for each study area and explaining the changes in trend lines for each field. It is shown that the majority of graphs are similar in shape which is caused by similar weather conditions. To confirm these results, we have conducted data analysis including temperature conditions and information about the accidents for each area. Abnormal changes in NDVI values revealed an emergency situation on the Priobskoe oil field caused by the flood in 2015. To sum up, the research results show that vegetation of studied areas is in a sufficiently stable state.

  1. Viliuisk encephalomyelitis in Eastern Siberia – analysis of 390 cases: In memory of D Carleton Gajdusek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Lev G; Vladimirtsev, Vsevolod A; Platonov, Fyodor A; Lee, Hee-Suk; McLean, Catriona A; Masters, Colin L

    2009-01-01

    Viliuisk encephalomyelitis (VE) is a unique disease occurring in the Yakut (Sakha) population of Eastern Siberia. VE is always fatal, with some patients dying during the acute encephalitic phase of illness; those surviving the acute phase develop progressive dementia, rigidity and spastic quadriparesis as part of a more prolonged pan-encephalitic syndrome. The disease is characterized neuropathologically by multiple widespread micronecrotic foci with marked inflammatory reactions and subsequent gliosis throughout the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brain stem. The acute febrile onset with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and increased protein and neuropathology showing inflammatory reactions suggest that VE is an infectious disease, but the causative agent has not been identified. Initially detected in a small mixed Yakut-Evenk population of the mid-Viliui region, the disease subsequently spread south to densely populated areas around the capital city of Yakutsk. The occurrence of secondary VE cases in households and the introduction of the disease by migrants into new populations indicate that the disease is horizontally transmitted in a setting of a long intra-household contact. Although there has been a recent decline in the number of cases, increasing travel may result in further spread of this fatal disease to susceptible individuals in other regions of the world. PMID:19618339

  2. The role of large arthropods in the development of halomorphic soils in the south of Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordkovich, V. G.; Lyubechanskii, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    Soil sequences along catenas crossing the peripheral parts of shallow-water drying lakes in the south of Siberia have been studied. They include the sulfidic and typical playa (sor) solonchaks (Gleyic Solonchaks), playa solonchak over the buried solonetz (Gleyic Solonchak Thapto-Solonetz)), shallow solonetz-solonchak (Salic Solonetz), and solonetzic and solonchakous chernozemic-meadow soil (Luvic Gleyic Chernozem (Sodic, Salic)). This spatial sequence also represents a series of historical stages of the development of halomorphic soils: the amphibian, hydromorphic, semihydromorphic, and automorphic-paleohydromorphic stages. During all of them, the biogenic component plays a significant role in the matter budget of halomorphic soils. The diversity, number, and functional activity of large insects and spiders are particularly important. Their total abundance in the course of transformation of the halomorphic soils decreases from several thousand to about 100 specimens/(m2 day), whereas their species diversity increases from 17 to 45 species. Changes in the functional structure of the soil zoocenosis and its impact on the character and intensity of pedogenetic processes can be considered driving forces of the transformation of hydromorphic soils. This is ensured by the sequential alteration of the groups of invertebrates with different types of cenotic strategy and different mechanisms of adaptation to biotic and abiotic components of the soil in the course of the development of the soil zoocenosis.

  3. Relationship between glacier melting and atmospheric circulation in the southeast Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipova, O. P.; Osipov, E. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between climate and cryosphere is a key issue in recent years. Changes in surface mass balance of mountain glaciers closely correspond to differential changes in atmospheric circulation. Mountain glaciers in southeast Siberia located on East Sayan, Baikalsky and Kodar ridges have been continuously shrinking since the end of the Little Ice Age. In this study we used daily synoptic weather maps (Irkutsk Center of Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring), 500 hPa, 700 hPa and 850 hPa geopotential height and air temperature data of NCEP/NCAR reanalysis to assess relationships between atmospheric circulation patterns and the sum of positive temperature (SPT), a predictor of summer ice/snow ablation. Results show that increased SPT (ablation) is generally associated with anticyclones and anticyclonic pressure fields (with cloudless weather conditions) and warm atmospheric fronts. Decreased SPT (ablation) is strongly correlated with cyclones and cyclonic type pressure fields, cold atmospheric fronts and air advections. Significant correlations have been found between ablation and cyclonic/anticyclonic activity. Revealed decreasing trends in the SPT in three glaciarized ridges at the beginning of the 21st century led to changes of air temperature and snow/ice melt climates.

  4. The Merensky Reef in the Chineisky Pluton (Siberia)? A myth or a reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitova, L.; Sharapov, V.; Zhukova, I.

    2006-12-01

    It is a dream of each geologist to find a `Merensky Reef' in each layered basic intrusion. Scientists have been trying many various techniques to come this dream to reality. The most perspective way to do so is probably a combination of physicochemical and computer modeling of layered basic intrusion crystallization together with fluid and melt inclusions studies in situ. This combination allows us to do the following: 1. To study boundary conditions for separation of low density gas phase and salt melt from the crystallizing primary basic melt in large magma chamber. 2. To determine correct quantitative parameters for formation of residual fluid-bearing brines extracting high metal concentrations. 3. To compute critical levels for substance differentiation at phase, geochemical and other `barriers' in those basic mantle-crust ore magmatic systems. 4. To model metal extraction, transportation and deposition at these `barriers' for systems of various `silicate melt - residual salt brines' ratios under the conditions of continental lithosphere. Comparison of real and modeled data allows us to conclude if a formation of a narrow zone of high metal concentration is possible at those critical levels (phase and geochemical `barriers'). The above-mentioned algorithm has been used for the Chineisky Pluton (the Transbaikal region, Siberia). Fortunately we have found our own `Merensky Reef', which happened to be a PGE enrichment marginal zone of the Chineisky Pluton due to specific fluid regime of crystallization! This work was supported by the Ministry for Russian Science and Education, Grant #DSP.2.1.1.702.

  5. Operational Forest Monitoring in Siberia Using Multi-source Earth Observation Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hüttich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Forest cover disturbance rates are increasing in the forests of Siberia due to intensification of human activities and climate change. In this paper two satellite data sources were used for automated forest cover change detection. Annual ALOS PALSAR backscatter mosaics (2007–2010 were used for yearly forest loss monitoring. Time series of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, 2000–2014 from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS were integrated in a web-based data middleware system to assess the capabilities of a near-real time detection of forest disturbances using the break point detection by additive season and trends (Bfast method. The SAR-based average accuracy of the forest loss detection was 70 %, whereas the MODIS-based change assessment using breakpoint detection achieved average accuracies of 50 % for trend-based breakpoints and 43.4 % for season-based breakpoints. It was demonstrated that SAR remote sensing is a highly accurate tool for up-to-date forest monitoring. Web-based data middleware systems like the Earth Observation Monitor, linked with MODIS time series, provide access and easy-to-use tools for on demand change monitoring in remote Siberian forests.

  6. The genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Moorjani, Priya; Jay, Flora; Slepchenko, Sergey M.; Bondarev, Aleksei A.; Johnson, Philip L.F.; Petri, Ayinuer A.; Prüfer, Kay; de Filippo, Cesare; Meyer, Matthias; Zwyns, Nicolas; Salazar-Garcia, Domingo C.; Kuzmin, Yaroslav V.; Keates, Susan G.; Kosintsev, Pavel A.; Razhev, Dmitry I.; Richards, Michael P.; Peristov, Nikolai V.; Lachmann, Michael; Douka, Katerina; Higham, Thomas F.G.; Slatkin, Montgomery; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-quality genome sequence of a ~45,000-year-old modern human male from Siberia. This individual derives from a population that lived prior to – or simultaneously with – the separation of the populations in western and eastern Eurasia and carries a similar amount of Neandertal ancestry as present-day Eurasians. However, the genomic segments of Neandertal ancestry are substantially longer than those observed in present-day individuals, indicating that Neandertal gene flow into the ancestors of this individual occurred 7,000–13,000 years before he lived. We estimate an autosomal mutation rate of 0.4–0.6×10−9/site/year and a Y chromosomal mutation rate of 0.7–0.9×10−9/site/year based on the additional substitutions that have occurred in present-day non-Africans compared to this genome, and a mitochondrial mutation rate of 1.8–3.2 × 10−8/site/year based on the age of the bone. PMID:25341783

  7. Hydrological and climate changes in southeast Siberia over the last 33 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Nagayoshi; Ikeda, Hisashi; Shibata, Kenji; Saito-Kokubu, Yoko; Murakami, Takuma; Tani, Yukinori; Takano, Masao; Nakamura, Toshio; Tanaka, Atsushi; Naito, Sayuri; Ochiai, Shinya; Shichi, Koji; Kawakami, Shin-ichi; Kawai, Takayoshi

    2018-05-01

    Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate changes in intracontinental Siberia were reconstructed by continuous, high-resolution records (biogenic silica, U, total organic carbon and N, total S, and grain size) from a sediment core retrieved from the Buguldeika Saddle, Lake Baikal, dating back to the last 33 cal. ka BP. The Holocene climate was wet relative to the last glacial period. The climate became gradually warm and wet from the early to middle Holocene, followed by a shift at ca. 6.5 cal. ka BP toward warm and dry, possibly because of evapotranspiration. This suggests that the climate system transition from the glacial to interglacial state occurred at that time. In the last glacial, the deposition of carbonate mud from the Primorsky Range was associated with Heinrich events (H3 and H1) and the Selenga River inflow during the Last Glacial Maximum was caused by meltwater of mountain glaciers in the Khamar-Daban Range. The anoxic bottom-water during the Allerød-Younger Dryas was probably a result of weakened ventilation associated with reduced Selenga River inflow and microbial decomposition of organic matters originating from moderate input of nutrients from the Primorsky Range. The rapid decline in precipitation during the early Holocene may have been a response to the 8.2 ka cooling event.

  8. Simulating Changes in Fires and Ecology of the 21st Century Eurasian Boreal Forests of Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Brazhnik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires release the greatest amount of carbon into the atmosphere compared to other forest disturbances. To understand how current and potential future fire regimes may affect the role of the Eurasian boreal forest in the global carbon cycle, we employed a new, spatially-explicit fire module DISTURB-F (DISTURBance-Fire in tandem with a spatially-explicit, individually-based gap dynamics model SIBBORK (SIBerian BOReal forest simulator calibrated to Krasnoyarsk Region. DISTURB-F simulates the effect of forest fire on the boreal ecosystem, namely the mortality of all or only the susceptible trees (loss of biomass, i.e., carbon within the forested landscape. The fire module captures some important feedbacks between climate, fire and vegetation structure. We investigated the potential climate-driven changes in the fire regime and vegetation in middle and south taiga in central Siberia, a region with extensive boreal forest and rapidly changing climate. The output from this coupled simulation can be used to estimate carbon losses from the ecosystem as a result of fires of different sizes and intensities over the course of secondary succession (decades to centuries. Furthermore, it may be used to assess the post-fire carbon storage capacity of potential future forests, the structure and composition of which may differ significantly from current Eurasian boreal forests due to regeneration under a different climate.

  9. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Rise and Fall of one of World's largest deltas; the Mekong delta in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minderhoud, P. S. J.; Eslami Arab, S.; Pham, H. V.; Erkens, G.; van der Vegt, M.; Oude Essink, G.; Stouthamer, E.; Hoekstra, P.

    2017-12-01

    The Mekong delta is the third's largest delta in the world. It is home to almost 20 million people and an important region for the food security in South East Asia. As most deltas, the Mekong delta is the dynamic result of a balance of sediment supply, sea level rise and subsidence, hosting a system of fresh and salt water dynamics. Ongoing urbanization, industrialization and intensification of agricultural practices in the delta, during the past decades, resulted in growing domestic, agricultural and industrial demands, and have led to a dramatic increase of fresh water use. Since the year 2000, the amount of fresh groundwater extracted from the subsurface increased by 500%. This accelerated delta subsidence as the groundwater system compacts, with current sinking rates exceeding global sea level rise up to an order of magnitude. These high sinking rates have greatly altered the sediment budget of the delta and, with over 50% of the Mekong delta surface elevated less than 1 meter above sea level, greatly increase vulnerability to flooding and storm surges and ultimately, permanent inundation. Furthermore, as the increasingly larger extractions rapidly reduce the fresh groundwater reserves, groundwater salinization subsequently increases. On top of that, dry season low-flows by the Mekong river cause record salt water intrusion in the delta's estuarine system, creating major problems for rice irrigation. We present the work of three years research by the Dutch-Vietnamese `Rise and Fall' project on land subsidence and salinization in both groundwater and surface water in the Vietnamese Mekong delta.

  11. Tidal controls on river delta morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoitink, A. J. F.; Wang, Z. B.; Vermeulen, B.; Huismans, Y.; Kästner, K.

    2017-09-01

    River delta degradation has been caused by extraction of natural resources, sediment retention by reservoirs, and sea-level rise. Despite global concerns about these issues, human activity in the world’s largest deltas intensifies. Harbour development, construction of flood defences, sand mining and land reclamation emerge as key contemporary factors that exert an impact on delta morphology. Tides interacting with river discharge can play a crucial role in the morphodynamic development of deltas under pressure. Emerging insights into tidal controls on river delta morphology suggest that--despite the active morphodynamics in tidal channels and mouth bar regions--tidal motion acts to stabilize delta morphology at the landscape scale under the condition that sediment import during low flows largely balances sediment export during high flows. Distributary channels subject to tides show lower migration rates and are less easily flooded by the river because of opposing non-linear interactions between river discharge and the tide. These interactions lead to flow changes within channels, and a more uniform distribution of discharge across channels. Sediment depletion and rigorous human interventions in deltas, including storm surge defence works, disrupt the dynamic morphological equilibrium and can lead to erosion and severe scour at the channel bed, even decades after an intervention.

  12. Reduced complexity modeling of Arctic delta dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliouras, A.; Lauzon, R.; Rowland, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    How water and sediment are routed through deltas has important implications for our understanding of nutrient and sediment fluxes to the coastal ocean. These fluxes may be especially important in Arctic environments, because the Arctic ocean receives a disproportionately large amount of river discharge and high latitude regions are expected to be particularly vulnerable to climate change. The Arctic has some of the world's largest but least studied deltas. This lack of data is due to remote and hazardous conditions, sparse human populations, and limited remote sensing resources. In the absence of data, complex models may be of limited scientific utility in understanding Arctic delta dynamics. To overcome this challenge, we adapt the reduced complexity delta-building model DeltaRCM for Arctic environments to explore the influence of sea ice and permafrost on delta morphology and dynamics. We represent permafrost by increasing the threshold for sediment erosion, as permafrost has been found to increase cohesion and reduce channel migration rates. The presence of permafrost in the model results in the creation of more elongate channels, fewer active channels, and a rougher shoreline. We consider several effects of sea ice, including introducing friction which increases flow resistance, constriction of flow by landfast ice, and changes in effective water surface elevation. Flow constriction and increased friction from ice results in a rougher shoreline, more frequent channel switching, decreased channel migration rates, and enhanced deposition offshore of channel mouths. The reduced complexity nature of the model is ideal for generating a basic understanding of which processes unique to Arctic environments may have important effects on delta evolution, and it allows us to explore a variety of rules for incorporating those processes into the model to inform future Arctic delta modelling efforts. Finally, we plan to use the modeling results to determine how the presence

  13. Delta Relaxation Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Jamu K.

    Generally speaking, targeted molecular imaging has always been difficult to perform with magnetic resonance. The difficulty does not arise with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique or equipment itself, but rather with the targeted contrast agents, which the method requires. Also referred to as activatable contrast agents, or MRI probes, targeted contrast agents are pharmaceuticals that will selectively bind to a particular biological (target) molecule. They are used to highlight a certain tissue or the difference between healthy and diseased tissue. Unfortunately, nearly all MRI probes are non-specific, causing localized increases in MR image intensity in both the unbound and target-bound states. Therefore, brightening in a conventional MRI image, following probe injection, does not positively indicate the presence of the target molecule. Herein, a novel method known as delta relaxation enhanced magnetic resonance (dreMR, pronounced "dreamer") is presented that utilizes variable magnetic field technology to produce image contrast related to the dependence of the sample's longitudinal relaxation rates upon the strength of the main magnetic field of the MRI scanner. Since only bound contrast agent shows significant magnetic field dependence, it is an indicator of the bound probe, which is in turn a marker for the target molecule. This work details the development of the dreMR method, focusing on the specialized hardware necessary to provide a clinical, static-field MRI the ability to modulate its main magnetic field throughout an MRI sequence. All modifications were performed in such a manner that the host MRI system was not degraded or permanently modified in any way. The three parts of this technology are: the insertable electromagnet, the power supply system and the control system. The insertable electromagnet modifies the magnetic field, the power system drives the electromagnet, and the control system generates the magnetic field waveform envelope and

  14. Possible climate warming effects on vegetation, forests, biotic (insect, pathogene) disturbances and agriculture in Central Siberia for 1960- 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchebakova, N. M.; Parfenova, E. I.; Soja, A. J.; Lysanova, G. I.; Baranchikov, Y. N.; Kuzmina, N. A.

    2012-04-01

    Regional Siberian studies have already registered climate warming over the last half a century (1960-2010). Our analysis showed that winters are already 2-3°C warmer in the north and 1-2°C warmer in the south by 2010. Summer temperatures increased by 1°C in the north and by 1-2°C in the south. Change in precipitation is more complicated, increasing on average 10% in middle latitudes and decreasing 10-20% in the south, promoting local drying in already dry landscapes. Our goal was to summarize results of research we have done for the last decade in the context of climate warming and its consequences for biosystems in Central Siberia. We modeled climate change effects on vegetation shifts, on forest composition and agriculture change, on the insect Siberian moth (Dendrolimus suprans sibiricus Tschetv) and pathogene (Lophodermium pinastri Chev) ranges in Central Siberia for a century (1960-2050) based on historical climate data and GCM-predicted data. Principal results are: In the warmer and drier climate projected by these scenarios, Siberian forests are predicted to decrease and shift northwards and forest-steppe and steppe ecosystems are predicted to dominate over 50% of central Siberia due to the dryer climate by 2080. Permafrost is not predicted to thaw deep enough to sustain dark (Pinus sibirica, Abies sibirica, and Picea obovata) taiga. Over eastern Siberia, larch (Larix dahurica) taiga is predicted to continue to be the dominant zonobiome because of its ability to withstand continuous permafrost. The model also predicts new temperate broadleaf forest and forest-steppe habitats; At least half of central Siberia is predicted to be climatically suitable for agriculture at the end of the century although potential croplands would be limited by the availability of suitable soils agriculture in central Siberia would likely benefit from climate warming Crop production may twofold increase as climate warms during the century; traditional crops (grain, potato

  15. [Molecular-biologic analysis of avian influenza virus isolates which caused epizootics on the south of West Siberia and in Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G; Berezhnov, S P; Shestopalov, A M; Alekseev, A Iu; Ternovoĭ, V A; Khaĭtovich, A B; Kroviakova, M T; Netesov, S V; Drozdov, I G

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine reasons of poultry deaths in Crimea Republic in December 2005 as well as isolation, identification, and comparative analysis of pathogens, which caused epizootics in Siberia and Crimea. During epizootic in poultry in North-East Crimea highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 was isolated. Phylogenetic analysis of RNA sequences revealed that they belong to one big cluster. Isolated strain was close to viruses, which caused epizootic in July-August 2005 in the south of West Siberia. Conclusion about the high importance of the south of West Siberia in spreading of highly pathogenic influenza viruses H5N1 in Eurasia was made.

  16. Decade-centenary resolution records of climate changes in East Siberia from elements in the bottom sediments of lake Baikal for the last 150 kyr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, E.L.; Phedorin, M.A.; Chebykin, E.P.; Zolotarev, K.B; Zhuchenko, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution scanning Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (SRXFA) was applied to investigate the downcore distribution of elements in the sediments from Lake Baikal (East Siberia). The obtained multi-element time series reveal the presence of abrupt climate shifts in East Siberia which were synchronous with the abrupt warming events in the North Atlantic and Greenland (Dansgaard-Oeschges events (D/O) during the last ice age 24-75 kyr BP. We show here the set of climatic indicators reveals all globally known climate changes from dry and cool or glacial climates to humid and warm ones, which were recorded in Northern Atlantic and East Siberia both on the orbital and millennial time scales during the last 150 kyr

  17. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLauchlan, Steven [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    The Δ-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the Δ mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the Δ. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the Δ resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4π acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the Δ mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the Δ-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the Δ.

  18. On the origin of delta spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, F.

    1983-01-01

    Mount Wilson sunspot drawings from 1966 through 1980 were used in conjunction with Hα filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory to examine the origin of delta spots, spots with bipolar umbrae within one penumbra. Of the six cases we studied, five were formed by the union of non-paired spots. They are either shoved into one another by two neighboring growing bipoles or by a new spot born piggy-back style on an existing spot of opposite polarity. Proper motions of the growing spots take on curvilinear paths around one another to avoid a collision. This is the shear motion observed in delta spots (Tanaka, 1979). In the remaining case, the delta spot was formed by spots that emerged as a pair. Our findings indicate no intrinsic differences in the formation or the behavior between delta spots of normal magnetic configuration. (orig.)

  19. Astrobee Periodic Technical Review (PTR) Delta 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Christopher; Smith, Marion F.; Smith, Ernest Everett; Bualat, Maria Gabriele; Barlow, Jonathan Spencer

    2017-01-01

    Astrobee is a free flying robot for the inside of the International Space Station (ISS). The Periodic Technical Review (PTR) delta 3 is the final design review of the system presented to stakeholders.

  20. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  1. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P. (eds.)

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  2. Propagator for the double delta potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The propagator for the double delta potential is calculated starting from the integral form of the Schroedinger equation. A compact expression of its Laplace transform is found, that can be explicitly inverted in some limiting cases

  3. California Black Rail - Central Delta [ds17

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Results of taped-call black rail surveys of in-stream habitat within certain waterways in the central Sacramento / San Joaquin Delta during 1992 and 1993. TIME...

  4. Simulating topographic controls on the abundance of larch forest in eastern Siberia, and its consequences under changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Kobayashi, H.

    2017-12-01

    In eastern Siberia, larches (Larix spp.) often exist in pure stands, constructing the world's largest coniferous forest, of which changes can significantly affect the earth's albedo and the global carbon balance. Our previous studies tried to reconstruct this vegetation, aiming to forecast its structures and functions under changing climate (1, 2). In previous studies of simulating vegetation at large geographical scales, the examining area is divided into coarse grid cells such as 0.5 × 0.5 degree resolution, and topographical heterogeneities within each grid cell are just ignored. However, in Siberian larch area, which is located on the environmental edge of existence of forest ecosystem, abundance of larch trees largely depends on topographic condition at the scale of tens to hundreds meters. In our preliminary analysis, we found a quantitative pattern that topographic properties controls the abundance of larch forest via both drought and flooding stresses in eastern Siberia. We, therefore, refined the hydrological sub-model of our dynamic vegetation model SEIB-DGVM, and validated whether the modified model can reconstruct the pattern, examined its impact on the estimation of biomass and vegetation productivity under the current and forecasted future climatic conditions. -- References --1. Sato, H., et al. (2010). "Simulation study of the vegetation structure and function in eastern Siberian larch forests using the individual-based vegetation model SEIB-DGVM." Forest Ecology and Management 259(3): 301-311. 2. Sato, H., et al. (2016). "Endurance of larch forest ecosystems in eastern Siberia under warming trends." Ecology and Evolution

  5. Climate impact on the tree growth, vigor and productivity in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Petrov, I.; Dvinskaya, M.

    2017-12-01

    Changing climate has an impact on the Siberian taiga forests. We analyzed GPP and NPP trends, growth index, and stands mortality within the Central Siberia (48°- 75°N/80°-115°E). Considered forests included larch-dominant (Larix sibirica, L. dahurica) and "dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica, Picea obovata) stands. GPP and NPP trends calculated based on the Terra/MODIS products. Growth index calculations based on dendrochronology data. Water stress analysis based on the gravimetric and microwave satellite data and MERRA-2 database. Analyzed variables included precipitation, air temperature, VPD, drought index SPEI, and root zone wetness. We found positive GPP trends within majority (>90%) of larch-dominant and DNC ranges, whereas NPP trends are positive on the +10C°) temperatures and vegetation period length. During recent years larch experience water stress in the beginning of vegetation period. Tree decline and mortality observed within DNC stands, and that phenomenon regularly coincided with zones of negative NPP trends. Mortality correlated with VPD, SPEI, and root zone moisture content. Bark beetles (including aggressive species Polygraphus proximus, similar to Dendroctonus ponderosae in American forests) attacked water-stressed trees. Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (e.g., within the forest-steppe ecotone) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Currently, Siberian pine and fir decline observed within southern range of these species. In addition, air temperature and aridity increase promotes Siberian silkmoth (Dendrolimus sibiricus) outbreak that occurred about one degree northward of formerly range. Observing and predicting aridity increase will lead to the replacement of Siberian pine and fir within southern range of these species with more tolerant species (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Larix spp.).

  6. Holocene carbon dynamics at the forest-steppe ecotone of southern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Anson William; Seddon, Alistair W R; Leng, Melanie J; Heumann, Georg; Morley, David W; Piotrowska, Natalia; Rioual, Patrick; Roberts, Sarah; Swann, George E A

    2017-05-01

    The forest-steppe ecotone in southern Siberia is highly sensitive to climate change; global warming is expected to push the ecotone northwards, at the same time resulting in degradation of the underlying permafrost. To gain a deeper understanding of long-term forest-steppe carbon dynamics, we use a highly resolved, multiproxy, palaeolimnological approach, based on sediment records from Lake Baikal. We reconstruct proxies that are relevant to understanding carbon dynamics including carbon mass accumulation rates (CMAR; g C m -2  yr -1 ) and isotope composition of organic matter (δ 13 C TOC ). Forest-steppe dynamics were reconstructed using pollen, and diatom records provided measures of primary production from near- and off-shore communities. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to identify significant change points in temporal series, and by applying generalized linear least-squares regression modelling to components of the multiproxy data, we address (1) What factors influence carbon dynamics during early Holocene warming and late Holocene cooling? (2) How did carbon dynamics respond to abrupt sub-Milankovitch scale events? and (3) What is the Holocene carbon storage budget for Lake Baikal. CMAR values range between 2.8 and 12.5 g C m -2  yr -1 . Peak burial rates (and greatest variability) occurred during the early Holocene, associated with melting permafrost and retreating glaciers, while lowest burial rates occurred during the neoglacial. Significant shifts in carbon dynamics at 10.3, 4.1 and 2.8 kyr bp provide compelling evidence for the sensitivity of the region to sub-Milankovitch drivers of climate change. We estimate that 1.03 Pg C was buried in Lake Baikal sediments during the Holocene, almost one-quarter of which was buried during the early Holocene alone. Combined, our results highlight the importance of understanding the close linkages between carbon cycling and hydrological processes, not just temperatures, in southern Siberian environments

  7. Influence of transport infrastructure on water permeability of soils of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, Dmitry; Eremina, Diana

    2017-10-01

    Correctly designed transport infrastructure should support the current economic relations. It should provide a reserve for development of economy of the region in the future. In Western Siberia, new highways are actively being built and major repairs of the operating roads are being conducted. Local materials are often used in the roadbed construction. In the Tyumen region, it is usually sandy silt and clayey sand. The soil has unfavourable physico-mechanical properties. The soil is prone to water and wind erosion. This type of ground gets on the adjacent to the road territory. Studies on the influence of highways on soil permeability were carried out on the basis of the federal highway Tyumen-Omsk. Three types of soils, which are actively used in the agricultural sector, were considered. It is found that the content of particles with the size less than 0.01 mm reaches 32% in the soil used in road construction. It is noted that a part of these particles accumulates on the adjacent to the road territory since it is being washed out from roadbed. The content of physical clay (soils increases by 34-62% relative to the initial values. The width of active accumulation of silt particles reaches 15-20 m along the roads. The soils at the distance up to 10 m from the highway are almost impermeable to water. Absence of a natural hydrological drain, results in the territory bogging. An inverse close correlation was established between the content of physical clay (<0.01 mm) and water permeability (r = 0.90).

  8. Waste management in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, Russia: An environmental assessment of alternative development scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Vlada; Damgaard, Anders; Eriksen, Marie K; Christensen, Thomas H

    2018-04-01

    The current waste management system, handling around 500,000 t of household, commercial, and institutional waste annually in the Irkutsk region, Siberia, is based on landfilling in an old landfill with no controls of leachate and gas. Life-cycle assessment modelling of the current system shows that it is a major load on the environment, while the simulation of seven alternative systems results in large savings in many impact categories. With respect to climate change, it is estimated that a saving of about 1200 kg CO 2 equivalents is possible per year, per inhabitant, which is a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The best alternatives involve efficient energy recovery from waste and recycling by source separation for commercial and institutional waste, the major waste type in the Irkutsk region. Recycling of household waste seems less attractive, and it is therefore recommended only to consider this option after experience has been gained with the commercial and institutional waste. Sensitivity analysis shows that recovery of energy - in particular electricity, heat, and steam - from waste is crucial to the environmental performance of the waste management system. This relates to the efficiencies of energy recovery as well as what the recovered energy substitutes, that is, the 'dirtier' the off-set energy, the higher the environmental savings for the waste management system. Since recovered energy may be utilised by only a few energy grids or industrial users, it is recommended to perform additional local assessments of the integration of the waste energy into existing systems and facilities.

  9. The relationship between needle sugar carbon isotope ratios and tree rings of larch in Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, K T; Saurer, M; Kirdyanov, A V; Loader, N J; Bryukhanova, M V; Werner, R A; Siegwolf, R T W

    2015-11-01

    Significant gaps still exist in our knowledge about post-photosynthetic leaf level and downstream metabolic processes and isotopic fractionations. This includes their impact on the isotopic climate signal stored in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of leaf assimilates and tree rings. For the first time, we compared the seasonal δ(13)C variability of leaf sucrose with intra-annual, high-resolution δ(13)C signature of tree rings from larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.). The trees were growing at two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with different growth conditions. Our results indicate very similar low-frequency intra-seasonal trends of the sucrose and tree ring δ(13)C records with little or no indication for the use of 'old' photosynthates formed during the previous year(s). The comparison of leaf sucrose δ(13)C values with that in other leaf sugars and in tree rings elucidates the cause for the reported (13)C-enrichment of sink organs compared with leaves. We observed that while the average δ(13)C of all needle sugars was 1.2‰ more negative than δ(13)C value of wood, the δ(13)C value of the transport sugar sucrose was on an average 1.0‰ more positive than that of wood. Our study shows a high potential of the combined use of compound-specific isotope analysis of sugars (leaf and phloem) with intra-annual tree ring δ(13)C measurements for deepening our understanding about the mechanisms controlling the isotope variability in tree rings under different environmental conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Communicating hydrocephalus following eosinophilic meningitis is pathogenic for chronic Viliuisk encephalomyelitis in Northeastern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Alexander; Kassubek, Jan; Tumani, Hayrettin; Vladimirtsev, Vsevolod A; Hermann, Andreas; Osakovsky, Vladimir L; Baranov, Vladimir A; Krivoshapkin, Vadim G; Ludolph, Albert C

    2014-01-01

    Viliuisk encephalomyelitis (VE) is an endemic neurological disease in Northeast Siberia and generally considered to be a chronic encephalomyelitis of unknown origin actually spreading in the Sakha (Yakutian) Republic. In search for the pathophysiology and causative agent of VE, we performed a cross-sectional study on clinical, serological and neuroimaging data on chronic VE patients during two medical expeditions to three villages within the Viliuiski river basin in the Republic of Sakha in 2000 and to the capital Yakutsk in 2006. The severity of the core clinical picture with predominant sensory ataxia, gait apraxia, lower limb spasticity, cognitive impairment and bladder dysfunction correlated with the degree of MRI findings showing enlargement of inner ventricular spaces as in communicating hydrocephalus. Laboratory studies revealed transient eosinophilia during the preceding acute meningitis-like phase, but no ongoing inflammatory process in the CSF. We found immune reactions against Toxocara canis in the majority of chronic VE patients but rarely in controls (P = 0.025; Fisher's exact test). Histological analysis of subacute to subchronic VE brain samples showed eosinophilic infiltrations with no signs of persistent Toxocara canis infection. Our data showed that pressure by the communicating hydrocephalus as a mechanical factor is the major pathogenic mechanism in chronic VE, most likely triggered by eosinophilic meningitis. There are no signs for an ongoing inflammatory process in chronic VE. The past eosinophilic reaction in VE might be caused by Toxocara ssp. infection and might therefore represent the first hint for an initial cause leading to the development of chronic VE. Our data provide a framework for future studies and potential therapeutic interventions for this enigmatic epidemic neurological disease potentially spreading in Sakha Republic.

  11. [The dynamics of the occupational morbidity rate in the Eastern Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, V A; Lakhman, O L; Perezhogin, A N; Tyutkina, G A; Kuleshova, M V; Smirnova, O V

    The dynamics and structure of the occupational morbidity rate in main branches of the industry in the Eastern Siberia for the 2000-2015 (on the example of the Irkutsk region) is presented in this paper. During the observation period there were noted the significant gain in the number of cases of occupational diseases registered in such different branches of industry as Coal and Lignite Mining, ship and aircraft building, and in some other branches (metallurgical production, air transport, pulp production, electric power distribution industry). In the structure of the occupational morbidity leading positions are occupied by diseases associated with the exposure to physical factors, industrial aerosols, physical overload and overexertion of certain organs and systems. The main reasons and factors contributing to the gain of the occupational morbidity rate are the imperfection of technological processes, working places, personal protective equipment and/or their lack, constructive defects of machines and equipment, the violation of safety regulations, regimen of the work and rest, insufficiently high level of medical and preventive maintenance, delayed making of decisions for the rational employment to the workers with the revealed early forms of occupational diseases. There pointed out priority directions of the prevention the implementation of which will allow to decline the level of the occupational morbidity rate. The main directions are the implementation of economically caused mechanisms of the interest in the preservation of workers ’ health; implementation of the regional aimed programs; the introduction of new processes, equipment and mechanisms meeting modern hygienic requirements; the assessment of occupational risk with the creation and implementation of the system of monitoring for the dynamics of working conditions and the state of the workers ’ health for the making corrective management solutions on the optimization and elevation of the efficacy

  12. Formation of specific geocryological complexes in Arctic during climate change and technogenic pressure (Igarka, Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenets, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The city of Igarkais located in Arctic Siberia, in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia. The city is located near the southern boundary of continuous permafrost in the forest tundra. Landscape conditions, a warming influence from the nearby Yenisei River and local climatic conditions through the Pleistocene-Holocene resulted in the formation of the underlying discontinuous permafrost. The discontinuous permafrost zone is characterized by the presence of tundraspaces with permafrost and forested areas without permafrost. The thermal regime under natural conditions outside city range from -0,5 to -1ºC in the forest-tundra, up to -1,5ºC tundra parts (peat mounds).Permafrost in this region can reach up to 300 m thick. In loamy deposits, according to our observations, small ice lenses thickness is 5-7 cm occur. The natural landscape is characterized by two main cryogenic processes: frostheaving of grounds and thermokarst. City was founded in 1929, different districts have distinctive planning, power and heat effect on permafrost. As a result of anthropogenic-technogenic influence today is possible to allocate 11 different complexes in terms of heat exchange on surface, a set of cryogenic and exogenous processes, changes in the temperature conditions at depth. . These changes have triggered thermokarst processes causing increases surface waterlogging in the old quarter in Igarka central parts, have resulted in increased of deformation of the remaining buildings. Succession of non-tundra vegetation does not promote the conservation and restoration of permafrost: the actively overgrown by parvifoliate shrubs, tundra landscapes and natural pine forests are not reversed. The remaining buildings have significant geotechnical problems. Under the changes in natural conditions, in view of observed in the last decade climate warming in the region and taking into account that the anthropogenic influence will increase, trends to degradation will continue.

  13. Present Permafrost Thaw in Central Yakutia, North-East Siberia: Surficial Geology and Hydrology Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniawska, Jolanta; Chlachula, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Current climate change in the high-latitudes of Eurasia is a generally accepted phenomenon characterized by increased annual temperature values and marked weather anomalies observed in the sub-polar and polar regions. In the northern and NE Siberia, this trend of the MAT rise, documented particularly over the last three decades, is believed to account for the territorial lowland as well as insular mountain frozen ground thaw that in turn has triggered ecosystem feedbacks on the local as well as regional scales. In the northern regions of Yakutia, this is principally witnessed by accelerated near-surface dynamics of seasonally activated de-freezing grounds and inter-linked geomorphic and hydrological actions affecting large-scale tundra landscape settings. In the southern and central taiga-forest areas with perennial alpine and continuous permafrost conditions, respectively, an increased depth of the seasonally melted top-soil layers has become evident accompanied by thermokarst lake expansion and ground surface collapsing. Some cryogenic depressions generated from small gullies over the past decades eloquently demonstrate the intensity and scales of the current permafrost degradation in the Siberian North. The fluvial discharge is most dynamic in late spring to mid-summer because of the cumulative effect of snow-melting because of a high solar radiation and short intervals of torrential rains. Yet, the climate-change-dependent and most active geomorphic agent is the accelerated permafrost thaw seen in landslides and tundra-forest cover decay due to a higher water table. Numerous preserved biotic fossiliferous records Pleistocene and early Holocene in age are being exposed in this process providing unique palaeoecology evidence at particular sites. These climate-generated processes have mostly highly negative effects to the natural habitats (migratory animal routes and riverine biota due to an earlier ice-melting) as well as the local settlement communities

  14. Prevalence of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Hard Ticks That Attacked Human Hosts in Eastern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim A. Khasnatinov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of tick-borne infections in humans. The prevalence of 4 tick-borne pathogens was studied in the population of Ixodid ticks attacking human hosts in Irkutsk city and neighbouring territories from 2007 to 2017. Methods and Results: In total, 46,357 tick specimens detached from bitten people were analyzed. The antigen of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV was detected in each tick individually by ELISA assay using a commercial kit for the envelope protein E of TBEV. Total RNA and DNA were extracted from ticks using a RiboPrep kit. Reverse transcription was performed using a Reverta-L kit and RNA\\DNA of TBEV; B. burgdorferi sensu lato, A. phagocytophylum and Ehrlichia muris\\E. chaffeensis were detected using a real-time multiplex PCR kit. In total, during 8 years of observations, I. persulcatus caused approximately 86% of bites, Dermacentor sp. 13.95 %, and H. concinna 0.05 %. The most prevalent tick-borne pathogen in I. persulcatus ticks was Lyme disease agent B. burgdorferi sensu lato, which was detected in 12±6.5% of specimens annually. A. phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia sp. were detected in 7.8±2.7% and 4.6±1.5% of specimens, respectively. TBEV was present in 1±0.7% of I. persulcatus. Conclusion: I. persulcatus remains the most important vector of tick-borne diseases to humans in Eastern Siberia. D. nuttalli and D. silvarum are much less aggressive to humans and are less infected with major tick-borne pathogens. H. concinna does not play any significant role as a disease vector. However, a rigorous analysis of TBEV spread in the Dermacentor sp. population is necessary.

  15. Radioisotope contaminations from releases of the Tomsk-Seversk nuclear facility (Siberia, Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Pourcelot, L.; Eikenberg, J.; Beer, H.; Le Roux, G.; Rhikvanov, L.P.; Stille, P.; Renaud, Ph.; Mezhibor, A.

    2008-01-01

    Soils have been sampled in the vicinity of the Tomsk-Seversk facility (Siberia, Russia) that allows us to measure radioactive contaminations due to atmospheric and aquatic releases. Indeed soils exhibit large inventories of man-made fission products including 137 Cs (ranging from 33,000 to 68,500 Bq m -2 ) and actinides such as plutonium (i.e. 239+240 Pu from 420 to 5900 Bq m -2 ) or 241 Am (160-1220 Bq m -2 ). Among all sampling sites, the bank of the Romashka channel exhibits the highest radioisotope concentrations. At this site, some short half-life gamma emitters were detected as well indicating recent aquatic discharge in the channel. In comparison, soils that underwent atmospheric depositions like peat and forest soils exhibit lower activities of actinides and 137 Cs. Soil activities are too high to be related solely to global fallout and thus the source of plutonium must be discharges from the Siberian Chemical Combine (SCC) plant. This is confirmed by plutonium isotopic ratios measured by ICP-MS; the low 241 Pu/ 239 Pu and 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atomic ratios with respect to global fallout ratio or civil nuclear fuel are consistent with weapons grade signatures. Up to now, the influence of Tomsk-Seversk plutonium discharges was speculated in the Ob River and its estuary. Isotopic data from the present study show that plutonium measured in SCC probably constitutes a significant source of plutonium in the aquatic environment, together with plutonium from global fallout and other contaminated sites including Tomsk, Mayak (Russia) and Semipalatinsk (Republic of Kazakhstan). It is estimated that the proportion of plutonium from SCC source can reach 45% for 239 Pu and 60% for 241 Pu in the sediments

  16. [Effects of smoking and alcohol consumptionon reproductive and metabolic indicators in young men in western siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, L V; Popova, A V; Erkovich, A A; Voroshilova, N A; Osadchuk, A V

    2017-09-01

    Smoking and alcohol consumption remain widespread throughout the world, including Russia. Recently, due to the increase in male infertility and subfertility, special attention has been paid to the effects of smoking and alcohol on the reproductive health of young men. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of smoking and moderate alcohol consumption on spermatogenesis, reproductive hormone levels and metabolic status in young men living in Western Siberia (Novosibirsk). One hundred thirty-three volunteers (mean age 21.1+/-0.3 years) were tested for the sperm concentration, the proportion of mobile and morphologically normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate, blood serum levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones, prolactin, testosterone, estradiol, inhibin B, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose and uric acid. and conclusions The studied lifestyle factors were found to have no effects on spermatogenesis. Smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day and a moderate frequency of alcohol consumption (up to 1 time per week) was associated with higher blood serum testosterone levels and engaging in more frequent sexual contacts compared to non-smoking and non-drinking men. Drinking alcohol more than once a week and smoking more than 8 cigarettes per day was associated, along with the increase in testosterone levels and the frequency of sexual contacts, with lower levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and higher serum triglyceride levels. Thus, in young men, frequent drinking and smoking can alter the hormonal and metabolic balance, which, as the duration of the exposure and the strength of the factors increase, will increase the risk of reproductive disorders.

  17. Stellar delta matter with delta-meson coupling constants constrained by QCD sum rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio Ferreira da [Secretaria de Educacao, Cultura e Desportos do Estado de Roraima (SECD/RR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Oliveira, Jose Carlos Teixeira de [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil); Rodrigues, Hilario [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, Sergio Barbosa [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Chiapparini, Marcelo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The considerable presence of delta-resonances (30% of baryonic population) in the dense phase of relativistic heavy ion collisions leads to a great interest in the study of the delta matter formation in the deep interior of compact stars. In the present work we determine the equation of state and the population of baryons and leptons and discuss the effects of the baryon-meson coupling constants to the formation of delta matter in the stellar medium. We use the non-linear Walecka model consisting of the octet of baryons of spin 1=2 (n, p, {Lambda}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}, {Xi}{sup 0}) and baryonic resonances of spin 3=2, represented by the delta resonances ({Delta}{sup -}, ({Delta}{sup 0}, ({Delta}{sup +}, ({Delta}{sup ++}) and {Omega}{sup -}, in the baryonic sector. In the leptonic sector we consider the electrons and muons. The coupling constants between the hyperons {Lambda}, {Sigma}, and {Xi} and the mesons {omega} and {rho} are fixed by using SU(6) symmetry, while the hyperons-{sigma} coupling constants are constrained by the consistence of the hypernuclear potential in the nuclear matter with hypernuclear data. In addition, we use the finite density QCD sum rule to determine the possible values of delta-meson coupling constants. (author)

  18. Beteigeuze (Alpha Orionis) und Mintaka (Delta Orionis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    Magnitude measures transformed to Johnson V of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) and Delta Orionis with a wide-angle lens and DSLR are presented and discussed. Alpha Orionis light changes are shown clearly. The primary and secondary eclipses of Delta Orionis with amplitudes of 0.12 and 0.05 mag respectively are clearly recorded. They occur near phase 0.00 and 0.50 respectively of current elements from VSX (2).

  19. Tracking Nile Delta Vulnerability to Holocene Change

    OpenAIRE

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Cl?ment; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with i...

  20. Migration in Vulnerable Deltas: A Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, C.; Nicholls, R. J.; Allan, A.

    2015-12-01

    C. Hutton1, & R. J. Nicholls1, , 1 University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO17 1BJ. cwh@geodata. soton.ac.ukAbstractGlobally, deltas contain 500 million people and with rising sea levels often linked to large number of forced migrants are expected in the coming century. However, migration is already a major process in deltas, such as the growth of major cities such as Dhaka and Kolkata. Climate and environmental change interacts with a range of catchment and delta level drivers, which encompass a nexus of sea-level rise, storms, freshwater and sediment supply from the catchment, land degradation, subsidence, agricultural loss and socio-economic stresses. DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation/CARRIA) is investigating migration in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM), Mahanadi and Volta Deltas, including the influence of climate change. The research will explore migration from a range of perspectives including governance and stakeholder analysis, demographic analysis, household surveys of sending and receiving areas, macro-economic analysis, and hazards and hotspot analysis both historically and into the future. Migration under climate change will depend on other adaptation in the deltas and this will be examined. Collectively, integrated analysis will be developed to examine migration, other adaptation and development pathways with a particular focus on the implications for the poorest. This will require the development of input scenarios, including expert-derived exogenous scenarios (e.g., climate change) and endogenous scenarios of the delta developed in a participatory manner. This applied research will facilitate decision support methods for the development of deltas under climate change, with a focus on migration and other adaptation strategies.

  1. The Okavango delta: The value of tourism

    OpenAIRE

    G Mopelwa; J Blignaut

    2014-01-01

    In Botswana, tourism is the second most important economic activity after diamond mining and trading. The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is the largest single tourist centre in the country. This study estimates the total economic value of tourism in the Okavango Delta and compares this value to that of other sectors in the economy of Botswana. The results are compared to results of similar studies for tourist destinations elsewhere in the world, and the policy implications of the finding...

  2. Neogene amphibians and reptiles (Caudata, Anura, Gekkota, Lacertilia, and Testudines from the south of Western Siberia, Russia, and Northeastern Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davit Vasilyan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The present-day amphibian and reptile fauna of Western Siberia are the least diverse of the Palaearctic Realm, as a consequence of the unfavourable climatic conditions that predominate in this region. The origin and emergence of these herpetofaunal groups are poorly understood. Aside from the better-explored European Neogene localities yielding amphibian and reptile fossil remains, the Neogene herpetofauna of Western Asia is understudied. The few available data need critical reviews and new interpretations, taking into account the more recent records of the European herpetofauna. The comparison of this previous data with that of European fossil records would provide data on palaeobiogeographic affiliations of the region as well as on the origin and emergence of the present-day fauna of Western Siberia. An overview of the earliest occurrences of certain amphibian lineages is still needed. In addition, studies that address such knowledge gaps can be useful for molecular biologists in their calibration of molecular clocks. Methods and Results In this study, we considered critically reviewed available data from amphibian and reptile fauna from over 40 Western Siberian, Russian and Northeastern Kazakhstan localities, ranging from the Middle Miocene to Early Pleistocene. Herein, we provided new interpretations that arose from our assessment of the previously published and new data. More than 50 amphibians and reptile taxa were identified belonging to families Hynobiidae, Cryptobranchidae, Salamandridae, Palaeobatrachidae, Bombinatoridae, Pelobatidae, Hylidae, Bufonidae, Ranidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, and Emydidae. Palaeobiogeographic analyses were performed for these groups and palaeoprecipitation values were estimated for 12 localities, using the bioclimatic analysis of herpetofaunal assemblages. Conclusion The Neogene assemblage of Western Siberia was found to be dominated by groups of European affinities, such as Palaeobatrachidae

  3. Neogene amphibians and reptiles (Caudata, Anura, Gekkota, Lacertilia, and Testudines) from the south of Western Siberia, Russia, and Northeastern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazhigin, Vladimir S.

    2017-01-01

    Background The present-day amphibian and reptile fauna of Western Siberia are the least diverse of the Palaearctic Realm, as a consequence of the unfavourable climatic conditions that predominate in this region. The origin and emergence of these herpetofaunal groups are poorly understood. Aside from the better-explored European Neogene localities yielding amphibian and reptile fossil remains, the Neogene herpetofauna of Western Asia is understudied. The few available data need critical reviews and new interpretations, taking into account the more recent records of the European herpetofauna. The comparison of this previous data with that of European fossil records would provide data on palaeobiogeographic affiliations of the region as well as on the origin and emergence of the present-day fauna of Western Siberia. An overview of the earliest occurrences of certain amphibian lineages is still needed. In addition, studies that address such knowledge gaps can be useful for molecular biologists in their calibration of molecular clocks. Methods and Results In this study, we considered critically reviewed available data from amphibian and reptile fauna from over 40 Western Siberian, Russian and Northeastern Kazakhstan localities, ranging from the Middle Miocene to Early Pleistocene. Herein, we provided new interpretations that arose from our assessment of the previously published and new data. More than 50 amphibians and reptile taxa were identified belonging to families Hynobiidae, Cryptobranchidae, Salamandridae, Palaeobatrachidae, Bombinatoridae, Pelobatidae, Hylidae, Bufonidae, Ranidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, and Emydidae. Palaeobiogeographic analyses were performed for these groups and palaeoprecipitation values were estimated for 12 localities, using the bioclimatic analysis of herpetofaunal assemblages. Conclusion The Neogene assemblage of Western Siberia was found to be dominated by groups of European affinities, such as Palaeobatrachidae, Bombina, Hyla, Bufo

  4. An assessment of the health and environmental situation in the mining community Krasnokamensk, East Siberia, Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehdwall, H.; Rising, A.; Hjalmar, A.; Lindholm, I.; Persson, Bertil; Wingren, H.

    1995-12-01

    A Swedish delegation has visited a uranium mining area, Krasnokamensk, in east Siberia to find facts concerning health and environment in the area. The impression of the delegation is that the uranium activities as such have not had any significant impact on the health and environmental situation in the area. However, there is a small village within the mining area, Octyabrskij, where indoor radon levels are increased. As the Russian authorities are aware of this matter, dwellings having radon levels above the limit will be evacuated and later demolished. 19 figs, 15 tabs

  5. An assessment of the health and environmental situation in the mining community Krasnokamensk, East Siberia, Russian Federation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehdwall, H.; Rising, A.; Hjalmar, A.; Lindholm, I.; Persson, Bertil; Wingren, H.

    1995-12-01

    A Swedish delegation has visited a uranium mining area, Krasnokamensk, in east Siberia to find facts concerning health and environment in the area. The impression of the delegation is that the uranium activities as such have not had any significant impact on the health and environmental situation in the area. However, there is a small village within the mining area, Octyabrskij, where indoor radon levels are increased. As the Russian authorities are aware of this matter, dwellings having radon levels above the limit will be evacuated and later demolished. 19 figs, 15 tabs.

  6. Applied geology in the research of Karol Bohdanowicz and his Polish graduates in Siberia at the turn of the 20th century (in Polish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej J. Wójcik

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of applied geology (geology of deposits, engineering geology, hydrogeology at the turn of the 20th century in Siberia, was conducted by the graduates of the Institute of Mining led by Karol Bohdanowicz. The team included, among others, Stefan Czarnocki and Stanisław Doktorowicz-Hrebnicki. Their activity in Siberia became a proof that the so-called “Bohdanowicz’s school” existed and the results of their research have earned their place in the science and have become the basis for developing the mining of mineral resources.

  7. Growth laws for sub-delta crevasses in the Mississippi River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocum, T. A.; Georgiou, I. Y.; Straub, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    River deltas are threatened by environmental change, including subsidence, global sea level rise, reduced sediment inputs and other local factors. In the Mississippi River Delta (MRD) these impacts are exemplified, and have led to proposed solutions to build land that include sediment diversions to reinitiate the delta cycle. Deltas were studied extensively using numerical models, theoretical and conceptual frameworks, empirical scaling relationships, laboratory models and field observations. But predicting the future of deltas relies on field observations where for most deltas data are still lacking. Moreover, empirical and theoretical scaling laws may be influenced by the data used to develop them, while laboratory deltas may be influenced by scaling issues. Anthropogenic crevasses in the MRD are large enough to overcome limitations of laboratory deltas, and small enough to allow for rapid channel and wetland development, providing an ideal setting to investigate delta development mechanics. Here we assessed growth laws of sub-delta crevasses (SDC) in the MRD, in two experimental laboratory deltas (LD - weakly and strongly cohesive) and compared them to river dominated deltas worldwide. Channel and delta geometry metrics for each system were obtained using geospatial tools, bathymetric datasets, sediment size, and hydrodynamic observations. Results show that SDC follow growth laws similar to large river dominated deltas, with the exception of some that exhibit anomalous behavior with respect to the frequency and distance to a bifurcation and the fraction of wetted delta shoreline (allometry metrics). Most SDC exhibit a systematic decrease of non-dimensional channel geometries with increased bifurcation order, indicating that channels are adjusting to decreased flow after bifurcations occur, and exhibit linear trends for land allometry and width-depth ratio, although geometries decrease more rapidly per bifurcation order. Measured distance to bifurcations in SDC

  8. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  9. Interdisciplinary and Distance Education in the Delta: The Delta Health Education Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorga, Phyllis

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Delta Health Education Partnership, an interdisciplinary distance education program intended to recruit, educate, and retain interdisciplinary groups of primary care health practitioners to increase access to health care in medically underserved and health professional shortage areas of the lower Mississippi Delta. It spans six…

  10. Houtman Abrolhos Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1795 to 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — DESCRIPTION: VARIABLES AND UNITS: Column #1: core depth in mm Column #2: delta C-13 vs V-PDB Column #3: delta O-18 vs V-PDB Column #4: assigned date in years A.D....

  11. The Enabling Delta Life Initiative - Global Programme of Action on Deltas - Programme description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, van W.F.; Skyllerstedt, S.; Wosten, J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Being ‘hotspots’ of human activity with generally high population densities, deltas are vulnerable to changes induced by a range of driving forces, both natural and anthropogenic. In addition to already existing challenges, uncertainty of the possible impacts of climate change, low lying deltas

  12. The Last Glacial Maximum climate over Europe and western Siberia: a PMIP comparison between models and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, M.; Pinot, S.; Joussaume, S.; Ramstein, G. [CNRS-CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. des Sci. du Climat et de l' Environnement; Peyron, O.; Guiot, J. [CNRS, Marseille (France). Faculte de Saint-Jerome; Tarasov, P. [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyi Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Geography

    2001-01-01

    Under the framework of the palaeoclimate modelling intercomparison project (PMIP), 17 climate models, 16 of which are atmospheric general circulation models, have been run to simulate the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (21 000 years ago) using the same set of boundary conditions. Parallel to these numerical experiments, new, consistent, data bases have been developed on a continental scale. The present work compares the range of the model responses to the large perturbation corresponding to the conditions of the Last Glacial Maximum with consistently derived climate reconstructions from pollen records over Europe and western Siberia. It accounts for the differences in the model results due to the models themselves and directly compares this ''error bar'' due to the models to the uncertainties in the climate reconstructions from the pollen records. Overall the Last Glacial Maximum climate simulated by the models over western Europe is warmer, especially in winter, and wetter than the one depicted by the reconstructions. This is the region where the reconstructed increase in temperature, precipitation and moisture index from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present conditions is largest. The same disagreement, but of smaller amplitude, is found over Central Europe and the eastern Mediterranean Basin, while models and data are in broad agreement over western Siberia. The numerous modelling results allow a study of the link between the changes in atmospheric circulation and those in temperature, and an interpretation of the discrepancies in precipitation in terms of those in temperature. (orig.)

  13. High-latitude regions of Siberia and Northeast Russia in the Paleogene: Stratigraphy, flora, climate, coal accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetiev, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    The geological structure and development history of superposed depressions on the Arctic coast of East Siberia and Bering Sea region (Chukotka, Koryakiya, northern Kamchatka) in the Early Paleogene are considered with the analysis of their flora and climatic parameters. The paleofloral analysis revealed thermophilic assemblages that reflect phases of maximum warming at the Paleocene-Eocene transition and in the Early Eocene. The appearance of thermophilic plants (Magnoliaceae, Myrtaceae, Lauraceae, Araliaceae, Loranthaceae, and others) in the Siberian segment of the Arctic region is explained by the stable atmospheric heat transfer from the Tethys to higher latitudes and absence of the latitudinal orographic barrier (Alpine-Himalayan belt). The plants migrated to high latitudes also along the meridional seaway that connected the Tethys with the Arctic Ocean via marine basins of the Eastern Paratethys, Turgai Strait, and West Siberia. The migration from the American continent was realized along the southern coast of Beringia under influence of a warm current flowing from low latitudes along the western coast of North America. The palm genus Sabal migrated to northern Kamchatka and Koryakiya precisely in this way via southern Alaska. In the Oligocene, shallow-water marine sediments in high-latitude regions were replaced by terrestrial facies. The Late Oligocene was marked by maximum cooling. Coal accumulation in Northeast Russia through the Paleogene is reviewed.

  14. PCBs and OCPs in human milk in Eastern Siberia, Russia: Levels, temporal trends and infant exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontova, Elena A; Tarasova, Eugenia N; Mamontov, Alexander A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the spatial distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and its metabolites, α- and γ-isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) in 155 samples of human milk (HM) from Eastern Siberia (six towns and seven villages in Irkutsk Region, one village of the Republic of Buryatia and one town in Zabaikal'sk Region, Russia), and to examine the dietary and social factors influencing the human exposure to the organochlorines. The median and range of the concentration of six indicator PCBs in HM in 14 localities in Eastern Siberia (114 (19-655) ng g -1 lipids respectively) are similar to levels in the majority of European countries. However, in one village, Onguren, the median and range of levels of six indicator PCBs (1390 (300-3725) ng g -1 lipids) were comparable to levels measured in highly contaminated populations. The Lake Baikal seals are highly exposed to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and could be a potential source of PCB and DDT exposure in the Onguren cohort via the consumption of the Lake Baikal seal tissue. The location of food production in areas exposed to the emissions of local POP sources can also significantly influence POP levels in HM samples from industrialized areas. Estimated daily intakes (EDI) of HCH and HCB for infants are considerably lower or close to acceptable daily intake (ADI). The EDI of total DDTs and total PCBs are higher than ADI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An empirical model of optical and radiative characteristics of the tropospheric aerosol over West Siberia in summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Panchenko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An empirical model of the vertical profiles of aerosol optical characteristics is described. This model was developed based on data acquired from multi-year airborne sensing of optical and microphysical characteristics of the tropospheric aerosol over West Siberia. The main initial characteristics for the creation of the model were measurement data of the vertical profiles of the aerosol angular scattering coefficients in the visible wavelength range, particle size distribution functions and mass concentrations of black carbon (BC. The proposed model allows us to retrieve the aerosol optical and radiative characteristics in the visible and near-IR wavelength range, using the season, air mass type and time of day as input parameters. The columnar single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor of the aerosol scattering phase function, calculated using the average vertical profiles, are in good agreement with data from the AERONET station located in Tomsk.

    For solar radiative flux calculations, this empirical model has been tested for typical summer conditions. The available experimental database obtained for the regional features of West Siberia and the model developed on this basis are shown to be sufficient for performing these calculations.

  16. Holocene evolution of a wave-dominated fan-delta: Godavari delta, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Nageswara Rao, K.; Nagakumar, K.; Demudu, G.; Rajawat, A.; Kubo, S.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Godavari delta is one of the world's largest wave-dominated deltas. The Godavari River arises in the Western Ghats near the west coast of India and drains an area of about 3.1x10^5 km^2, flowing about 1465 km southeast across the Indian peninsula to the Bay of Bengal. The Godavari delta consists of a gentle seaward slope from its apex (12 m elevation) at Rajahmundry and a coastal beach-ridge plain over a distance of about 75 km and covers ~5200 km^2 as a delta plain. The river splits into two major distributary channels, the Gautami and the Vasishta, at a barrage constructed in the mid-1800s. The coastal environment of the deltaic coast is microtidal (~1 m mean tidal range) and wave-dominated (~1.5 m mean wave height in the June-September SW monsoon season, ~0.8 m in the NE monsoon season). Models of the Holocene evolution of the Godavari delta have changed from a zonal progradation model (e.g. Nageswara Rao & Sadakata, 1993) to a truncated cuspate delta model (Nageswara Rao et al., 2005, 2012). Twelve borehole cores (340 m total length), taken in the coastal delta plain during 2010-2013, yielded more than 100 C-14 dates. Sediment facies and C-14 dates from these and previous cores and remote-sensing data support a new delta evolution model. The Holocene coastal delta plain is divided into two parts by a set of linear beach ridges 12-14 km landward from the present shoreline in the central part of the delta. The location of the main depocenter (lobe) has shifted during the Holocene from 1) the center to 2) the west, 3) east, 4) center, 5) west, and 6) east. The linear beach ridges separate the first three from the last three stages. These lobe shifts are controlled by river channel shifts near the apex. Just as the current linear shoreline of the central part of the delta and the concave-up nearshore topography are the result of coastal erosion of a cuspate delta, the linear beach ridges indicate a former eroded shoreline. An unconformity within the deltaic

  17. Relict gas hydrates as possible reason of gas emission from shallow permafrost at the northern part of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Istomin, Vladimir; Tipenko, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Intra-permafrost gas (mostly methane) is represent a serious geological hazards during exploration and development of oil and gas fields. Special danger is posed by large methane accumulations which usually confined to sandy and silty sand horizons and overlying in the frozen strata on the depth up to 200 meters. Such methane accumulations are widely spread in a number of gas fields in the northern part of Western Siberia. According to indirect indicators this accumulations can be relic gas hydrates, that formed earlier during favorable conditions for hydrate accumulation (1, 2). Until now, they could be preserved in the frozen sediments due to geological manifestation of the self-preservation effect of gas hydrates at temperatures below zero. These gas hydrate formations, which are lying above the gas hydrate stability zone today, are in a metastable state and are very sensitive to various anthropogenic impacts. During drilling and operation of production wells in the areas where the relic of gas hydrates can occur, there are active gas emission and gas explosion, that can lead to various technical complications up to the accident. Mathematical and experimental simulations were were conducted to evaluate the possibility of existence of relic gas hydrates in the northern part of West Siberia. The results of math simulations revealed stages of geological history when the gas hydrate stability zone began virtually from the ground surface and saturated in shallow permafrost horizons. Later permafrost is not completely thaw. Experimental simulations of porous gas hydrate dissociation in frozen soils and evaluation of self-preservation manifestation of gas hydrates at negative temperatures were carried out for identification conditions for relic gas hydrates existence in permafrost of northern part of West Siberia. Sandy and silty sand sediments were used in experimental investigations. These sediments are typical of most gas-seeping (above the gas hydrate stability

  18. Analysis of Climatic and Environmental Changes Using CLEARS Web-GIS Information-Computational System: Siberia Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, A. G.; Gordov, E. P.; Okladnikov, I.; Shulgina, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of recent climatic and environmental changes in Siberia performed on the basis of the CLEARS (CLimate and Environment Analysis and Research System) information-computational system is presented. The system was developed using the specialized software framework for rapid development of thematic information-computational systems based on Web-GIS technologies. It comprises structured environmental datasets, computational kernel, specialized web portal implementing web mapping application logic, and graphical user interface. Functional capabilities of the system include a number of procedures for mathematical and statistical analysis, data processing and visualization. At present a number of georeferenced datasets is available for processing including two editions of NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, JMA/CRIEPI JRA-25 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA-40 and ERA Interim Reanalysis, meteorological observation data for the territory of the former USSR, and others. Firstly, using functionality of the computational kernel employing approved statistical methods it was shown that the most reliable spatio-temporal characteristics of surface temperature and precipitation in Siberia in the second half of 20th and beginning of 21st centuries are provided by ERA-40/ERA Interim Reanalysis and APHRODITE JMA Reanalysis, respectively. Namely those Reanalyses are statistically consistent with reliable in situ meteorological observations. Analysis of surface temperature and precipitation dynamics for the territory of Siberia performed on the base of the developed information-computational system reveals fine spatial and temporal details in heterogeneous patterns obtained for the region earlier. Dynamics of bioclimatic indices determining climate change impact on structure and functioning of regional vegetation cover was investigated as well. Analysis shows significant positive trends of growing season length accompanied by statistically significant increase of sum of growing degree days and total

  19. Cycling of organic and mineral nitrogen along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Knoltsch, Anna; Takriti, Mounir; Mooshammer, Maria; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The availability of nitrogen in soils is constrained by the breakdown of N-rich organic polymers, in particular proteins. Oligo-peptides and amino acids derived from protein depolymerization are subsequently taken up by soil microorganisms, and, if nitrogen availability exceeds nitrogen demand, excess nitrogen will be released as ammonium ("nitrogen mineralization"), which then can be used as a substrate for nitrification. We here report on the dynamics of organic and mineral nitrogen along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia (67°-54°N), from the tundra (tree growth restricted by low temperature), over three sites of coniferous forest (taiga) and two sites of forest steppe (deciduous forest and meadow), to steppe (tree growth restricted by low precipitation). For each of the seven sites, we sampled three soil horizons, and applied 15N pool dilution assays to determine gross rates of protein depolymerization, nitrogen mineralization, and nitrification. All nitrogen transformation rates were significantly correlated with carbon and nitrogen content, as well as microbial biomass, and decreased with depth from organic topsoil over mineral topsoil to mineral subsoil. The decrease with depth was stronger for protein depolymerization than for nitrogen mineralization and nitrification, i.e., ratios of mineralization or nitrification over protein depolymerization increased with depth. As both mineralization and nitrification depend on the degree of microbial nitrogen limitation, our findings suggest that microbial nitrogen limitation decreased with soil depth, possibly due to increasing energy limitation of microorganisms. Within the organic topsoil, protein depolymerization rates showed large variability between ecosystems, reaching the highest values in middle (60°N) and southern taiga (58°N), representing the most productive forests along the transect. We discuss these results with respect to differences of the biomes in climatic conditions, vegetation

  20. Soil microbiological composition and its evolution along with forest succession in West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naplekova, Nadezhda N.; Malakhova, Nataliya A.; Maksyutov, Shamil

    2015-04-01

    Natural forest succession process in West Siberia is mostly initiated by fire disturbance and involves changing tree species composition from pioneer species to late succession trees. Along with forest aging, litter and forest biomass accumulate. Changes of the soil nitrogen cycle between succession stages, important for plant functioning, have been reported in a number of studies. To help understanding the mechanism of the changes in the soil nitrogen cycle we analyzed soil microbiological composition for soil profiles (0-160 cm) taken at sites corresponding to three forest succession stages: (1) young pine, age 18-20 years, (2) mid age, dark coniferous, age 50-70 years, (3) mature, fir-spruce, age 170-180 years. Soil samples were taken from each soil horizon and analyzed in the laboratory for quantity and species composition of algae and other microorganisms. Algae community at all stages of succession is dominated by species typical for forest (pp. Chlorhormidium, Chlamydomonas, Chloroccocum, Pleurochloris, Stichococcus). Algae species composition is summarized by formulas: young forest C14X10Ch9H2P4Cf1B2amph4, mid age X16C15Ch10H4P4Cf1B2amph4, mature X24C22Ch17H10P2amph5Cf1, with designations C -- Cyanophyta, X -- Xantophyta, Ch -- Chlorophyta, B -- Bacillariophyta. Diversity is highest in upper two horizons and declines with depth. Microorganism composition on upper 20 cm was analyzed in three types of forests separately for consumers of protein (ammonifiers) and mineral nitrogen, fungi, azotobacter, Clostridium pasteurianum, oligonitrophylic (eg diazotrophs), nitrifiers and denitrifiers. Nitrogen biologic fixation in the mature forest soils is done mostly by oligonitrophyls and microorganisms of the genus Clostridium as well as сyanobacteria of sp. Nostoc, but the production rate appears low. Concentrations (count in gram soil) of nitrogen consumers (eg ammonifiers), oligonitrophyls, Clostridium and denitrifiers increase several fold from young forest to mid

  1. Seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 emission in the boreal forests in Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnykina, A. V.; Prokishkin, A. S.; Zyryanov, V.; Verkhovets, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    A large amount of carbon in soil is released to the atmosphere through soil respiration, which is the main pathway of transferring carbon from terrestrial ecosystems (Comstedt et al., 2011). Considering that boreal forests is a large terrestrial sink (Tans et al., 1990) and represent approximately 11 % of the Earth's total land area (Gower et al., 2001), even a small change in soil respiration could significantly intensify - or mitigate - current atmospheric increases of CO2, with potential feedbacks to climate change. The objectives of the present study are: (a) to study the dynamic of CO2emission from the soil surface during summer season (from May to October); (b) to identify the reaction of soil respiration to different amount of precipitation as the main limiting factor in the region. The research was carried out in the pine forests in Central Siberia (60°N, 90°E), Russia. Sample plots were represented by the lichen pine forest, moss pine forest, mixed forest and anthropogenic destroyed area. We used the automated soil CO2 flux system based on the infrared gas analyzer LI-8100 for measuring the soil efflux. Soil temperature was measured with Soil Temperature Probe Type E in three depths 5, 10, 15 cm. Volumetric soil moisture was measured with Theta Probe Model ML2. The presence and type of ground cover substantially affects the value of soil respiration fluxes. The carbon dioxide emission from the soil surface averaged was 5.4 ±2.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The destroyed area without plant cover demonstrated the lowest soil respiration (0.1-5.6 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The lowest soil respiration among forested areas was observed in the feathermoss pine forest. The lichen pine forest soil respiration was characterized by averages values. The maximum soil respiration values and seasonal fluctuations were obtained in the mixed forest (2.3-29.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The analysis of relation between soil CO2 efflux and amount of precipitation showed that the site without any

  2. Substrate use efficiency of microbial communities along a latitudinal transect through Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takriti, Mounir; Wild, Birgit; Schnecker, Jörg; Mooshammer, Maria; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Mikutta, Robert; Wanek, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    As stable soil organic matter is largely derived from microbial compounds, the partitioning of C uptake by microorganisms into growth and respiration determines the C storage potential in soils. The proportion of substrate carbon (C) which is invested into new microbial biomass (i.e., microbial growth), compared to the fraction of substrate carbon C which is respired as as CO2,is often referred to as substrate use efficiency (SUE) or carbon use efficiency (CUE). According to stoichiometric theory, the CUE of microbes is strongly controlled by the availability of nutrients such as nitrogen (N), as microorganisms have to maintain their biomass stoichiometry within relatively narrow boundaries. Hence, when microorganisms are nitrogen limited, excess C is respired (low SUE), while conversely excess N is mineralized when C is limiting (high SUE). In this study we took advantage of the high variability in biotic and abiotic factors, such as C:N ratio and litter input quality, between samples taken from the top three soil horizons (organic topsoil, upper and lower mineral horizon) from six different ecosystems along a 1,500 km linear-distance latitudinal transect through Western Siberia. We hypothesized that SUE would increase with soil depth, as organic matter becomes successively enriched with N relative to C, and decrease with latitude, as ecosystem N availability decreases. To determine SUE we measured uptake and respiration of a mixture of 13C labeled substrate (consisting of monosaccharides, organic acids, amino acids and amino sugars), as well as C and N pools and extracellular enzyme activities. In contrast to our expectations, we found that microbial SUE in lower mineral horizons was significantly lower than in upper mineral horizons, while there was no significant difference to the organic horizons. This is contradictory to the theory of ecological stoichiometry, since microbial SUE did not increase with decreasing soil C:N. Potential oxidative enzyme activities

  3. Deciduous shrub growth and the greening of the Arctic in West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Macias Fauria, M.; Zetterberg, P.; Kumpula, T.

    2010-12-01

    Salix lanata and Alnus fruticosa are common and widespread shrub species in the low arctic tundra zone of West Siberia. They often occur in similar local habitats with the live portions of genets up to 100 years old. We have recently established that growth rings of S. lanata provide an excellent proxy for summer temperature. In that study our data were derived from shrubs growing on organic soils near the arctic coast of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO), west of the Ural Mountains. East of the Urals, in the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug (YNAO), climate is more continental and sandy soils provide a relatively nutrient-poor substrate for plant growth. By sampling two different species side by side on the Yamal Peninsula, we shed light on the relationship between deciduous shrubs and growing season temperatures in the last half century or so, a period of pronounced regional warming. We discern differences in the climate signal within a single species (S. lanata) as well as between it and a neighboring species with a strongly overlapping ecological amplitude (A. fruticosa). July is the main month for temperature correlation in Alnus, whereas Salix responds to June-July-August temperatures in both regions. The high correlations of shrub growth with summer temperature (r > 0.7 over the period 1956-2004) strongly suggest a link between increased shrub growth and recent decadal warming in both regions (~2°C). Both species showed significant correlation with the regional Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), although it was somewhat lower in YNAO compared to NAO, probably due to the relative land cover (10% vs. 20%, respectively) of erect shrubs in both areas, which affects their overall contribution to the NDVI. In both regions Salix lanata biomass peaks in the second half of July. Hand-held leaf area index data from Yamal indicate a significant difference between loamy/clayey and sandy sites. We hypothesized that this same variation would be evident at the

  4. Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi biomass distribution, fire regime and post-fire recovery in northeastern Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Mack

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and land-use activities are increasing fire activity across much of the Siberian boreal forest, yet the climate feedbacks from forest disturbances remain difficult to quantify due to limited information on forest biomass distribution, disturbance regimes and post-disturbance ecosystem recovery. Our primary objective here was to analyse post-fire accumulation of Cajander larch (Larix cajanderi Mayr. aboveground biomass for a 100 000 km2 area of open forest in far northeastern Siberia. In addition to examining effects of fire size and topography on post-fire larch aboveground biomass, we assessed regional fire rotation and density, as well as performance of burned area maps generated from MODIS satellite imagery. Using Landsat imagery, we mapped 116 fire scar perimeters that dated c. 1966–2007. We then mapped larch aboveground biomass by linking field biomass measurements to tree shadows mapped synergistically from WorldView-1 and Landsat 5 satellite imagery. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be low during early succession (≤ 25 yr, 271 ± 26 g m−2, n = 66 [mean ± SE] and decreased with increasing elevation and northwardly aspect. Larch aboveground biomass tended to be higher during mid-succession (33–38 yr, 746 ± 100 g m−2, n = 32, though was highly variable. The high variability was not associated with topography and potentially reflected differences in post-fire density of tree regrowth. Neither fire size nor latitude were significant predictors of post-fire larch aboveground biomass. Fire activity was considerably higher in the Kolyma Mountains (fire rotation = 110 yr, fire density = 1.0 ± 1.0 fires yr−1 × 104 km−2 than along the forest-tundra border (fire rotation = 792 yr, fire density = 0.3 ± 0.3 fires yr−1 × 104 km−2. The MODIS burned area maps underestimated the total area burned in this region from 2000–2007 by 40%. Tree shadows mapped jointly using high and medium resolution satellite imagery

  5. Permafrost Boundary Shift in Western Siberia May Not Modify Dissolved Nutrient Concentrations in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Vorobyev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the landscape and climate factors that control nutrient export by rivers in high latitude regions is one of the main challenges for understanding the Arctic Ocean response to ongoing climate change. This is especially true for Western Siberian rivers, which are responsible for a significant part of freshwater and solutes delivery to the Arctic Ocean and are draining vast permafrost-affected areas most vulnerable to thaw. Forty-nine small- and medium-sized rivers (10–100,000 km2 were sampled along a 1700 km long N–S transect including both permafrost-affected and permafrost-free zones of the Western Siberian Lowland (WSL in June and August 2015. The N, P, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively, particular organic carbon (POC, Si, Ca, K, Fe, and Mn were analyzed to assess the role of environmental parameters, such as temperature, runoff, latitude, permafrost, bogs, lake, and forest coverage on nutrient concentration. The size of the watershed had no influence on nutrient concentrations in the rivers. Bogs and lakes retained nutrients whereas forests supplied P, Si, K, Ca, DIC, and Mn to rivers. The river water temperature was negatively correlated with Si and positively correlated with Fe in permafrost-free rivers. In permafrost-bearing rivers, the decrease in T northward was coupled with significant increases in PO4, Ptot, NH4, pH, DIC, Si, Ca, and Mn. North of the permafrost boundary (61° N, there was no difference in nutrient concentrations among permafrost zones (isolated, sporadic, discontinuous, and continuous. The climate warming in Western Siberia may lead to a permafrost boundary shift northward. Using a substituting space for time scenario, this may decrease or maintain the current levels of N, P, Si, K, Ca, DIC, and DOC concentrations in rivers of continuous permafrost zones compared to the present state. As a result, the export flux of nutrients by the small- and medium-sized rivers of the

  6. Carbon and nitrogen pools in thermokarst-affected permafrost landscapes in Arctic Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Matthias; Grosse, Guido; Strauss, Jens; Günther, Frank; Grigoriev, Mikhail; Maximov, Georgy M.; Hugelius, Gustaf

    2018-02-01

    Ice-rich yedoma-dominated landscapes store considerable amounts of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and are vulnerable to degradation under climate warming. We investigate the C and N pools in two thermokarst-affected yedoma landscapes - on Sobo-Sise Island and on Bykovsky Peninsula in the north of eastern Siberia. Soil cores up to 3 m depth were collected along geomorphic gradients and analysed for organic C and N contents. A high vertical sampling density in the profiles allowed the calculation of C and N stocks for short soil column intervals and enhanced understanding of within-core parameter variability. Profile-level C and N stocks were scaled to the landscape level based on landform classifications from 5 m resolution, multispectral RapidEye satellite imagery. Mean landscape C and N storage in the first metre of soil for Sobo-Sise Island is estimated to be 20.2 kg C m-2 and 1.8 kg N m-2 and for Bykovsky Peninsula 25.9 kg C m-2 and 2.2 kg N m-2. Radiocarbon dating demonstrates the Holocene age of thermokarst basin deposits but also suggests the presence of thick Holocene-age cover layers which can reach up to 2 m on top of intact yedoma landforms. Reconstructed sedimentation rates of 0.10-0.57 mm yr-1 suggest sustained mineral soil accumulation across all investigated landforms. Both yedoma and thermokarst landforms are characterized by limited accumulation of organic soil layers (peat). We further estimate that an active layer deepening of about 100 cm will increase organic C availability in a seasonally thawed state in the two study areas by ˜ 5.8 Tg (13.2 kg C m-2). Our study demonstrates the importance of increasing the number of C and N storage inventories in ice-rich yedoma and thermokarst environments in order to account for high variability of permafrost and thermokarst environments in pan-permafrost soil C and N pool estimates.

  7. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Clément; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms) and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  8. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Marriner

    Full Text Available Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  9. Type specimens of taxa of Artemisia L. (Asteraceae from Siberia and the Far East kept in the Herbarium of V.L. Komarov Botanical Insitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Korobkov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Typification of 97 Artemisia (Asteraceae taxa from Siberia and the Far East kept in the Herbarium of V.L. Komarov Botanical Institute was carried out. Holotypes for 39 taxa, lectotypes for 48 taxa, 28 syntypes and 4 isotypes are given.

  10. The Okavango delta: The value of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mopelwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Botswana, tourism is the second most important economic activity after diamond mining and trading. The Okavango Delta in northern Botswana is the largest single tourist centre in the country. This study estimates the total economic value of tourism in the Okavango Delta and compares this value to that of other sectors in the economy of Botswana. The results are compared to results of similar studies for tourist destinations elsewhere in the world, and the policy implications of the findings are highlighted. The study uses secondary data to estimate the direct consumptive and non-consumptive use value, and a survey among tourists to determine the existence value of the Okavango Delta.

  11. El plan del delta - Holanda

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    Editorial, Equipo

    1963-09-01

    Full Text Available Holland is very poor in land resources. Hence its development has been directed towards intensive industrialization and maximum agricultural exploitation. The western part of the country is below sea level and is occupied by 65 percent of the population. Originally the coast consisted of a number of islands, estuaries and slight elevations. Man has transformed this coastline, first making a number of artificial lakes, or polders, and then converting these into fertile districts. These projects protect the soil by means of dykes, which require careful conservation, but even so violent floods are not infrequent. One of the difficult problems involved in this vast enterprise is the complex system of water supply, lines of communication and flow of the rivers into the sea along the estuary zone. This zone is on the south west, and to protect it a National Commission has been set up. After careful study, it was decided that the best defense against the violence of the sea would consist in closing off the inroads of the sea into the continental coastline. The set of hydraulic projects which constitutes this plan for the improvement of the sea defences will take 25 years to fulfil. The general project is highly ambitious and includes both maritime, road and structural works, in which there is a variety of stonework constructions. This paper describes, in brief outline, the main contents of the 11 headings into which the general construction project has been subdivided. In addition, this is supplemented with information on the projects which are already initiated and on the constructional procedure that is being adopted. Of these latter projects, the Nabla bridge is of particular interest. It is situated on the delta. It is made in prestressed concrete, and consists of 17 spans, of 60 length each. This enormous structure, in addition to its great length, and supporting a 22.8 ms wide roadway, is subjected to the tremendous forces 11» of the sea on one

  12. Liquefaction potential of Nile delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergany, Elsayed; Omar, Khaled

    2017-06-01

    Understanding how sedimentary basins respond to seismic-wave energy generated by earthquake events is a significant concern for seismic-hazard estimation and risk analysis. The main goal of this study is assessing the vulnerability index, Kg, as an indicator for liquefaction potential sites in the Nile delta basin based on the microtremor measurements. Horizontal to Vertical spectral ratio analyses (HVSR) of ambient noise data, which was conducted in 2006 at 120 sites covering the Nile delta from south to north were reprocessed using Geopsy software. HVSR factors of amplification, A, and fundamental frequency, F, were calculated and Kg was estimated for each measurement. The Kg value varies widely from south toward north delta and the potential liquefaction places were estimated. The higher vulnerability indices are associated with sites located in southern part of the Nile delta and close to the branches of Nile River. The HVSR factors were correlated with geologic setting of the Nile delta and show good correlations with the sediment thickness and subsurface stratigraphic boundaries. However, we note that sites located in areas that have greatest percentage of sand also yielded relatively high Kg values with respect to sites in areas where clay is abundant. We concluded that any earthquake with ground acceleration more than 50 gal at hard rock can cause a perceived deformation of sandy sediments and liquefaction can take place in the weak zones of Kg ≥ 20. The worst potential liquefaction zones (Kg > 30) are frequently joined to the Damietta and Rosetta Nile River branches and south Delta where relatively coarser sand exists. The HVSR technique is a very sensitive tool for lithological stratigraphy variations in two dimensions and varying liquefaction susceptibility.

  13. Abraham Reef Stable Isotope Data (delta 13C, delta 18O, delta 14C) for 1635-1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Abraham Reef, 22ó 06'S, 153ó 00'E, Porites australiensus, Radiocarbon (delta 14C) and Stable Isotope (del 18O and del 13C) results from bi-annual samples from...

  14. Deltas on the move. Making deltas cope with the effects of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reker, J.; Van Winden, A.; Braakhekke, W.; Vermaat, J.; Eleveld, M.; Janssen, R.; De Reus, N.; Omzigt, N.

    2006-01-01

    This scoping study is the first phase of a study aimed at: (a) providing knowledge on the potential of a system-based approach to deal with the effects of climate change as an alternative for the more traditional technical measures such as dams, dikes and surge barriers. This should be shown for both rich and poor countries and should address hydrological, ecological as well as socio-economic aspects; and (b) identifying the potential to market these results worldwide. To reach these objectives four research steps are defined: (1) to make an inventory of deltas: their vulnerability to the effects of climate change; (2) development of indicators for successful use of a system-based approach; (3) to provide an overview of the potential of soft measures for these deltas; (4) to select a number of deltas with potential for marketing system-based measures and the development of strategies to link economic and ecological objectives. This scoping study addresses step 1 only. The results from step 1 will be used as a starting point for steps 2 and 3. The outputs of this scoping study are threefold: a background report (this report); a flyer with a brief description of the findings; a website with information on delta's and how these may be affected by climate change. The scoping study will roughly outline which deltas are still functioning in a more or less natural manner - or could be (re)developed in that direction - and thus would be good candidates for a system-based approach. Chapter 2 gives a description of the geomorphological and ecological processes in a delta. In addition, those aspects of climate change that can have an effect on deltas are described. The third chapter deals with human interventions in deltas and whether or not they fit within a system-based approach. In a system-based approach, as presented in Chapter 4, natural processes are given free reign where possible. Chapter 5 shows how available data on deltas could be used in such a system

  15. Database of in-situ field measurements for estimates of fuel consumption and fire emissions in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukavskaya, Elena; Conard, Susan; Buryak, Ludmila; Ivanova, Galina; Soja, Amber; Kalenskaya, Olga; Zhila, Sergey; Zarubin, Denis; Groisman, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires show great variability in the amount of fuel consumed and carbon emitted to the atmosphere. Various types of models are used to calculate global or large scale regional fire emissions. However, in the databases used to estimate fuel consumptions, data for Russia are typically under-represented. Meanwhile, the differences in vegetation and fire regimes in the boreal forests in North America and Eurasia argue strongly for the need of regional ecosystem-specific data. For about 15 years we have been collecting field data on fuel loads and consumption in different ecosystem types of Siberia. We conducted a series of experimental burnings of varying fireline intensity in Scots pine and larch forests of central Siberia to obtain quantitative and qualitative data on fire behavior and carbon emissions. In addition, we examined wildfire behavior and effects in different vegetation types including Scots pine, Siberian pine, fir, birch, poplar, and larch-dominated forests; evergreen coniferous shrubs; grasslands, and peats. We investigated various ecosystem zones of Siberia (central and southern taiga, forest-steppe, steppe, mountains) in the different subjects of the Russian Federation (Krasnoyarsk Kray, Republic of Khakassia, Republic of Buryatia, Tuva Republic, Zabaikalsky Kray). To evaluate the impact of forest practices on fire emissions, burned and unburned logged sites and forest plantations were examined. We found large variations of fuel consumption and fire emission rates among different vegetation types depending on growing conditions, fire behavior characteristics and anthropogenic factors. Changes in the climate system result in an increase in fire frequency, area burned, the number of extreme fires, fire season length, fire season severity, and the number of ignitions from lightning. This leads to an increase of fire-related emissions of carbon to the atmosphere. The field measurement database we compiled is required for improving accuracy of existing

  16. Information-computational Infrastructure for Siberia Integrated Regional Study: Towards to Harmonization of National and International Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, E. P.; Fedotov, A. M.; Shokin, Yu. I.

    2009-04-01

    Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS, http://sirs.scert.ru) is a Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI, http://neespi.org) mega project co-ordinating national and international activity in the region in line with Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. It is aimed to understand dynamics of dynamics of regional environment under Global Change as well as to determine major feedbacks between regional and global system. That is why comprehensive information-computational infrastructure is required to support national and international monitoring, modeling and assessment activities in the region. In this paper the state of the art of the infrastructure aimed at support of multidisciplinary and "distributed" teams of specialists performing cooperative work with tools for exchange and sharing of data, models and knowledge optimizing the usage of information-computational resources, services and applications, which is developed in cooperation of Russian Academy of Science (Siberian Branch) specialists with their abroad partners/counterparts is presented. Also discussed are tentative roadmap of the infrastructure development and major challenges. Among those are management of multidisciplinary environmental data, which will come from SB RAS environmental observatories network under development in Siberia and harmonization of interaction between operating environmental web portals and SB RAS GIS and satellite data storage and processing centers under development. Surely such infrastructure is one of the key elements of each ESSP integrated regional study (IRS) and the SIRS infrastructure under development might be used as a prototype for those. That is why we suggest to initiate a large scale international project aimed at development, implementation and testing in Siberia of a prototype of such IRS infrastructure. A support of a number of national and international projects led and leading to development of infrastructure elements is

  17. Statistical Delta-V Tool for Pre-proposal Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For any space mission proposal it is essential to provide an accurate, defensible estimate of the total propellant ("Delta-V") budget, including the Delta-V required...

  18. Soil respiration dynamics in the middle taiga of Central Siberia region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnykina, Anastasia; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Polosukhina, Daria

    2017-04-01

    A large amount of carbon in soil is released to the atmosphere through soil respiration, which is the main pathway of transferring carbon from terrestrial ecosystems (Comstedt et al., 2011). Considering that boreal forests is a large terrestrial sink (Tans et al., 1990) and represent approximately 11 % of the Earth's total land area (Gower et al., 2001), even a small change in soil respiration could significantly intensify - or mitigate - current atmospheric increases of CO2, with potential feedbacks to climate change. The objectives of the present study are: (a) to study the dynamic of CO2 emission from the soil surface during summer season (from May to October); (b) to identify the reaction of soil respiration to different amount of precipitation as the main limiting factor in the region. The research was located in the pine forests in Central Siberia (60°N, 90°E), Russia. Sample plots were represented by the lichen pine forest, moss pine forest, mixed forest and anthropogenic destroyed area. We used the automated soil CO2 flux system based on the infrared gas analyzer -LI-8100 for measuring the soil efflux. Soil temperature was measured with Soil Temperature Probe Type E in three depths -5, 10, 15 cm. Volumetric soil moisture was measured with Theta Probe Model ML2. The presence and type of ground cover substantially affects the value of soil respiration fluxes. The carbon dioxide emission from the soil surface averaged 5.4 ±2.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The destroyed area without plant cover demonstrated the lowest soil respiration (0.1-5.6 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The lowest soil respiration among forested areas was observed in the feathermoss pine forest. The lichen pine forest was characterized by the intermediate values of soil respiration. The maximum soil respiration values and seasonal fluctuations were obtained in the mixed forest (2.3-29.3 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). The analysis of relation between soil CO2 efflux and climatic conditions identified the parameters with

  19. Middle-Late Holocene environmental history of Kulunda (Southwestern Siberia): vegetation, climate, humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudaya, N.; Nazarova, L.; Papin, D.; Nourgaliev, D.

    2012-04-01

    Environmental reconstruction of Mid-Late Holocene vegetation and climate was inferred from pollen records of Lake Big Yarovoe (Kulunda steppe, Southwestern Siberia). Reconstruction suggests generally prevalence of steppe during last 4.45 ka. Relatively warm and dry climate, open semi-desert and dry steppes with patchy birch forest spread between 4.45 and 3.80 ka BP. The largest development of conifers forest started in Kulunda after 3.80 ka BP. Constant presence of dark-coniferous trees Abies and especially Picea between 3.80 and 2.7 ka BP indicates the most humid period in the region during studied time. Onset of the Late Holocene is characterised by dominance of steppe with birch and pine forests in lowlands and river valleys. After AD 1860, open steppe and semi-desert vegetation with fragmentary birch forest have been dominated parallel to sharp reduction of conifers in Kulunda. These results are in agreement with general scheme of Holocene environmental history of surrounding areas including Baraba forest-steppe, Kazakh Upland and Altai Mountains. Territory of Kulunda consists many archaeological sites of Bronze, Iron and Middle Ages. Second half of Bronze Age (4.45-3.80 ka BP) was represented by local human cultures or migrants from the North Kazakhstan. The main archaeological culture of Kulunda alike in the whole Ob`-Irtysh interfluve in this period was Elunino culture. The economical activities of Elunino community were connected with animal breeding especially with sheep and goats. The most humid period (~1795-710 BC; 3.8-2.7 ka BP) in Kulunda corresponded to the end of early Bronze Age and to the onset of the Iron Age. In 18 century BC Andronovo culture, associated with the Indo-Iranians and migrants from Central Kazakhstan, spread in the region. Cattle breeding economy was distinctive features of Andronovo people, however, increase of sheep, goats and horses with transition to nomadic life style was characteristic of the late Bronze Age. This trend is in

  20. Mega fire emissions in Siberia: potential supply of bioavailable iron from forests to the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ito

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant amounts of carbon and nutrients are released to the atmosphere due to large fires in forests. Characterization of the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the intense fire emissions is crucial for assessing the atmospheric loadings of trace gases and aerosols. This paper discusses issues of the representation of forest fires in the estimation of emissions and the application to an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM. The potential contribution of forest fires to the deposition of bioavailable iron (Fe into the ocean is highlighted, with a focus on mega fires in eastern Siberia.

    Satellite products of burned area, active fire, and land cover are used to estimate biomass burning emissions in conjunction with a biogeochemical model. Satellite-derived plume height from MISR is used for the injection height of boreal forest fire emissions. This methodology is applied to quantify fire emission rates in each three-dimensional grid location in the high latitude Northern Hemisphere (>30° N latitude over a 5-yr period from 2001 to 2005. There is large interannual variation in forest burned area during 2001–2005 (13–49 × 103 km2 yr−1 which results in a corresponding variation in the annual emissions of carbon monoxide (CO (14–81 Tg CO y−1. Satellite observations of CO column from MOPITT are used to evaluate the model performance in simulating the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the fire emissions. The model results for CO enhancements due to eastern Siberian fires are in good agreement with MOPITT observations. These validation results suggest that the model using emission rates estimated in this work is able to describe the interannual changes in CO due to intense forest fires.

    Bioavailable iron is derived from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble iron from desert sources by anthropogenic pollutants (mainly sulfuric acid formed

  1. The Delta Team: Empowering Adolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Marian White

    1994-01-01

    In response to adolescent girls' concerns about teen violence, rumors, grooming, careers, and equity, four women teachers and a woman administrator at a Maryland middle school developed the Delta Program. The program provides positive learning experiences, teaches social skills and conflict management techniques, empowers girls through mentoring…

  2. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES OF THE NIGER DELTA FORESTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research aimed to appraise the Niger Delta forest ecosystem services. The. Millennium Ecosystem ... Despite the good knowledge of ecosystem services by the urban respondents, only 42.5% were aware of fresh .... and in planning for government and other interventions such as conservation actions (Isoun, 2006).

  3. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... Utilization of three petroleum hydrocarbons (Mobil SAE 40 Engine Oil, Diesel and Bonny light Crude. Oil) by four ... growth of hydrocarbonoclastic bioluminescent bacteria which could serve as a potential tool for the remediation of petroleum ... lized TNT. In the Niger Delta, increasing petroleum exploration.

  4. AMNESTY IN THE NIGER DELTA: VERTICAL MOVEMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLAWUYI

    opportunities, promises of infrastructure development in the region and direct payments of oil revenues ..... 38 See generally, the Petroleum Act, P10 Laws of the Federation of Nigeria (LFN), 2004; Territorial. Waters Act, Chapter T4 LFN ..... Grant amnesty to all Niger Delta militants willing and ready to participate in the DDR ...

  5. Solubility of hydrogen in delta iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, V.I.; Trofimenko, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in iron (less than 0.002 % impurities) at temperatures of 800-1510 deg C and a pressure of 100 atm was measured. The heat of solution of hydrogen in delta-Fe, equal to 73 kJ/g-atom, is by far greater than the corresponding values for α- and γ-Fe

  6. Kinematic Analysis 6dof Delta Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid PIETRALA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the solid and kinematic model of delta type parallel manipulator with six degrees of freedom is proposed. Method of determining the manipulator kinematics equations using the notation of Denavitt – Hartenberg is presented. For given movements of manipulator platform the trajectory of drives are illustrated. Also working space for various platform orientations are showed.

  7. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol produced discrimination in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, B G; Johansson, J O; Järbe, T U

    1975-01-01

    In an operant situation pigeons learned to peck one response key 90 min after an injection of 0.25mg/kg delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) and another key when trained nondrugged. When tested with doses of delta9-THC lwer than the training dose the birds disciminated 0.20 mg/kg of the drug from the nondrugged state but not 0.15 mg/kg or lower doses. The animals were able to discriminate the drug state from the nondrugged 180 min but not 360 min after the injection At a shorter interval (45 min) both drug and nondrug responding appeared. Cannabinol and cannabidiol (4.0 - 8.0 mg/kg) did not elicit any drug responses, nor did pentobarbital, ditran or amphetamine. Tests with LSD resulted in both drug and nondrug responding. When administering noncannabinoid drugs in combination with delta9-THC 0.15 mg/kg the birds responded at the key associated with the drug state, suggesting interactional effects.

  8. 2016 Rose Ojowhoh Delta State Polytechnic, Ozoro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OJOHWOH ROSE

    Staff training and development are reoccurring. Staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Information Impact: ... managers. A culture of group and individual learning is created through the use of critique, feedback and teaching at all levels of the training and development.

  9. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of three petroleum hydrocarbons (Mobil SAE 40 Engine Oil, Diesel and Bonny light Crude Oil) by four bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio harveyi, V. fisheri, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. Phosphoreum isolated from the Bonny estuary in the Niger Delta, Nigeria was investigated. Microbial utilization was monitored ...

  10. Error Minimization of Polynomial Approximation of Delta

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The difference between Universal time (UT) and Dynamical time (TD), known as Delta ( ) is tabulated for the first day of each year in the Astronomical Almanac. During the last four centuries it is found that there are large differences between its values for two consecutive years. Polynomial ...

  11. Strong decays of nucleon and delta resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijker, R.; Leviatan, A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the strong couplings of the nucleon and delta resonances in a collective model. In the ensuing algebraic treatment we derive closed expressions for decay widths which are used to analyze the experimental data for strong decays into the pion and eta channels. (Author)

  12. Water quality in the Okavango Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-12

    Mar 12, 2010 ... The Okavango Delta ecosystem sustains a large number of plant and animal species as well as providing resources for the livelihood of the riparian human population. Despite changes in flow patterns, rainfall and other climatic conditions over the past decades, the system has responded well to maintain ...

  13. Ethnic Minority Problems in the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a conceptual background typical types of minorities and typical sources of minority conflict are outlined. A historical overview is given of the problems. Niger Delta minorities have been experiencing. Their grievances and demands are highlighted, and the responses of different Nigerian governments are discussed.

  14. Short-term standard litter decomposition across three different ecosystems in middle taiga zone of West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Nina V.; Glagolev, Mikhail V.

    2018-03-01

    The method of standard litter (tea) decomposition was implemented to compare decomposition rate constants (k) between different peatland ecosystems and coniferous forests in the middle taiga zone of West Siberia (near Khanty-Mansiysk). The standard protocol of TeaComposition initiative was used to make the data usable for comparisons among different sites and zonobiomes worldwide. This article sums up the results of short-term decomposition (3 months) on the local scale. The values of decomposition rate constants differed significantly between three ecosystem types: it was higher in forest compared to bogs, and treed bogs had lower decomposition constant compared to Sphagnum lawns. In general, the decomposition rate constants were close to ones reported earlier for similar climatic conditions and habitats.

  15. Age and genesis of the Upper Cenozoic deposits of the Tyumen oblast (Western Siberia) enriched in biogenic silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, G. N.; Oreshkina, T. V.; Smirnov, P. V.; Konstantinov, A. O.; Kuzmina, O. B.

    2017-07-01

    An integrated micropaleontological study of deposits enriched in biogenic silica was conducted on material drilled in the Zyryanka and Uspenka fields of the southwestern Tyumen oblast (Western Siberia). The data obtained on palynology and diatoms allowed the assignment of the Zyryanka Field to the Turtas Formation (lower part of the Chattian Stage of the Oligocene) and the deposits of the Uspenka Field to be dated as Pleistocene. The absence in the Zyryanka Field diatom assemblage of in situ marine taxa and the mass occurrence of freshwater species, gemmuloscleres of freshwater sponges, and zygospores of Zygnematales algae suggest that a nonmarine basin existed in the early Turtas time. A considerable proportion of redeposited diatoms and dinocysts in the Quaternary deposits of the Uspenka Field suggest strong erosional processes during the time of deposition.

  16. Norm of Exploitation of Miners in Siberia in the Late 19th – Early 20th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy P. Zinov'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the question of the distribution of added value in the mining industry in Siberia in the late 19th – early 20th centuries. Relying on the analysis of financial reports from Siberian goldmines and coalmines, the author reveals the correlation between the means spent on workforce and the means spent on income and the companies’ non-production expenses. The calculated norm of added value – the most precise reflection of the measure of wage labour exploitation – turned out to be higher for Siberian mine workers in the late 19th – early 20th centuries than for workers in the European Russia and demonstrated the tendency to further growth. The author believes it to be a consequence of the modernization of production and the exploitation of the richest and most easily accessible Siberian deposits.

  17. [Organic substances in the artificial forest ecosystems created on overburden dumps of open-cut coal mines in Middle Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaleĭ, L S

    2010-01-01

    The stock and structure of organic substances in the pine tree plantations on the overburden dumps of open-cut coal mines in Middle Siberia have been determined. It has been shown that the forming forest biogeocenoses differ from the natural phytocenoses and soils of the forest landscapes in the structure of the carbon pool and its distribution between the vegetation and soil components. In artificial forest ecosystems, the bulk of the plant component is accumulated in the aboveground part of the forest stand (40-59%). The aboveground grass cover contains only 0.1-1.4% of the total phytomass stock of the ecosystem. The annual accumulation of organic substances in the initial soils amounts to 0.28-1.45 t/ha.

  18. Lithobius (Chinobius) yuchernovi, a new lithobiid species from northeastern Siberia and the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia (Chilopoda, Lithobiomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzalieva, Gyulli Sh; Nefediev, Pavel S; Tuf, Ivan H

    2017-01-01

    Lithobius yuchernovi sp. n. is described, based on type material from the Ola Plateau, Magadan Region, Russia. The new species is widely distributed in northeastern Siberia, ranging from the Magadan Region, until the eastern Chukot Autonomous Region and the Kamchatka Peninsula in the southeast, whence non-type material is documented. This species belongs to the subgenus Chinobius Matic, 1973 based on the structure of the female gonopodal claw (more than two denticles on the internal ridge). It differs from all Palearctic species of the genus Lithobius by the following apomorphy: distoventral tubercle supporting a cluster of long and curved setae situated on the last male tibia. In addition, it shows dorsal and ventral sulci on the last legs. New replacement names are introduced: Lithobius zachiui nom. n. for Lithobius (Chinobius) orientalis (Matic, 1973) and Lithobius carli nom. n. for Lithobius (Alokobius) orientalis Attems, 1953.

  19. Distribution and diversity of Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) in the natural populations of bumblebees (Bombus spp.) from West Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilova, Valeriya; Sormacheva, Irina; Woyciechowski, Michal; Eremeeva, Natalia; Fet, Victor; Strachecka, Aneta; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Blinov, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Nosema bombi is an obligate intracellular parasite of bumblebees (Hymenoptera, Bombus spp.), which has significant negative effect on individual bumblebees, colony fitness, and development. Recently, several new genetic variants of N. bombi without a defined taxonomic status were identified in natural bumblebee populations from Russia, China, and several European countries, as well as N. ceranae, originally isolated from honey bees, was described in bumblebee species. Thus, it is required to investigate more Nosema variability in bumblebee populations for identifying new genetic Nosema variants. In our study, we used several methods such as total DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, cloning, sequencing, and comparative and phylogenetic analysis to investigate a prevalence of N. bombi and its diversity in the natural populations of bumblebees across West Siberia. DNA was extracted from intestinal bumblebee tissues. Identification of the parasite was conducted, using PCR with primers specific for the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and methionine aminopeptidase 2 gene of N. bombi followed by sequencing. Seven hundred twenty-seven individual bumblebees belonging to 16 species were tested; 64 specimens revealed presence of the parasite. Prevalence of Nosema bombi infection was different in each region and varied from 4 to 20 %. No infection was found in Bombus agrorum (n = 194) and Bombus equestris (n = 132), both common bumblebees in West Siberia. Three different genetic variants of the same species, N. bombi, were identified. The first variant belonged to N. bombi (AY008373) identified by Fies et al. (J Apicult Res 40:91-96, 2001), second (N. bombi WS2) was identical to the West Siberian variant identified by Szentgyörgyi et al. (Polish Journal of Ecology 59:599-610, 2011), and the last variant, N. bombi WS3, was new. The results led us to suggest that the prevalence of the N. bombi is related to the population structure of bumblebees and

  20. Carbon exchange fluxes over peatlands in Western Siberia: Possible feedback between land-use change and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Elisa; Khashimov, Ilhom; Hölzel, Norbert; Klemm, Otto

    2016-03-01

    The growing demand for agricultural products has been leading to an expansion and intensification of agriculture around the world. More and more unused land is currently reclaimed in the regions of the former Soviet Union. Driven by climate change, the Western Siberian grain belt might, in a long-term, even expand into the drained peatland areas to the North. It is crucial to study the consequences of this land-use change with respect to the carbon cycling as this is still a major knowledge gap. We present for the first time data on the atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and methane of an arable field and a neighboring unused grassland on peat soil in Western Siberia. Eddy covariance measurements were performed over one vegetation period. No directed methane fluxes were found due to an effective drainage of the study sites. The carbon dioxide fluxes appeared to be of high relevance for the global carbon and greenhouse gas cycles. They showed very site-specific patterns resulting from the development of vegetation: the persistent plants of the grassland were able to start photosynthesizing soon after snow melt, while the absence of vegetation on the managed field lead to a phase of emissions until the oat plants started to grow in June. The uptake peak of the oat field is much later than that of the grassland, but larger due to a rapid plant growth. Budgeting the whole measurement period, the grassland served as a carbon sink, whereas the oat field was identified to be a carbon source. The conversion from non-used grasslands on peat soil to cultivated fields in Western Siberia is therefore considered to have a positive feedback on climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Revising the archaeological record of the Upper Pleistocene Arctic Siberia: Human dispersal and adaptations in MIS 3 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitulko, Vladimir; Pavlova, Elena; Nikolskiy, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    As the main external driver, environmental changes largely predetermine human population distribution, especially in the Arctic, where environmental conditions were often too extreme for human survival. Not that long ago the only evidence of human presence here was the Berelekh site in the lower reaches of the Indighirka River. This landmark dates to 13,000-12,000 years ago but it was widely accepted as documentation of the earliest stage of human dispersal in the Arctic. New research discussed here, shows that humans began colonizing the Siberian Arctic at least by the end of the early stage of MIS 3 at around 45,000 years ago. For now, this earliest known stage of human occupation in the arctic regions is documented by the evidence of human hunting. The archaeological record of continued human occupation is fragmentary; nevertheless, evidence exists for each significant phase including the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Siberian Arctic human populations were likely supported by the local mammoth population, which provided humans with food and raw material in the form of mammoth tusks. Processing of mammoth ivory is recognized widely as one of the most important peculiarities of the material culture of ancient humans. In fact, ivory tool manufacturing is one of the most important innovations of the Upper Palaeolithic in northern Eurasia. Technology that allowed manufacturing of long ivory shafts - long points and full-size spears - was critical in the tree-less open landscapes of Eurasian mammoth steppe belt. These technological skills reach their greatest extent and development shortly before the Last Glacial Maximum but are recognizable until the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary across Northern Eurasia in all areas populated by mammoths and humans. Loss of this stable source of raw material due to the late Pleistocene mammoth extinction may have provoked a shift in post-LGM Siberia to the Beringian microblade tradition. This paper reviews the most important

  2. Babesia genotypes in Haemaphysalis concinna collected from birds in Hungary reflect phylogeographic connections with Siberia and the Far East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaisz, Barbara; Sulyok, Kinga M; Kováts, Dávid; Kontschán, Jenő; Csörgő, Tibor; Csipak, Ármin; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Hornok, Sándor

    2017-06-01

    Haemaphysalis concinna is the second most common tick species attaching to birds in Hungary. Recently, Babesia genotypes, found in Siberia and the Far East, have been detected in this tick species collected from the vegetation in Hungary and Slovakia. The aim of this study was to molecularly investigate if these piroplasms also occur in H. concinna carried by migratory birds, which might explain their occurrence in the western Palaearctic. During a 2-year period, 321 H. concinna larvae and nymphs were collected from 121 passerine birds (of 19 species) in Hungary. These were molecularly investigated for the presence of piroplasm DNA with PCR and sequencing. The prevalence of PCR positive ticks was 15.9% (51 out of 321). Piroplasm PCR positivity of H. concinna ticks was significantly more frequent during the summer and autumn compared to spring, suggesting that migratory birds arriving in Hungary from the north or north east are the most important in the dispersal of H. concinna-associated piroplasms. Three genotypes, i.e. Babesia sp. "Irk-Hc133", "Irk-Hc130" (originally found in Irkutsk, Siberia) and "Kh-Hc222" (originally found in Khabarovsk, Far East) were detected. Phylogenetically all these belonged to the group formed by Babesia spp. of ruminants. Four bird species, which had 14-60% prevalence of PCR positive ticks, are known to be associated with northeast to southwest autumn migration. In conclusion, the presence of Central and East Asian Babesia genotypes in Central Europe are most likely related to bird species with known eastern migratory habit and/or phylogenetically substantiated connections between their eastern and western Eurasian populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Adaptation of primocane fruiting raspberry plants to environmental factors under the influence of Bacillus strains in Western Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Anatoly A; Shternshis, Margarita V; Chechenina, Nina S; Shpatova, Tatyana V; Lelyak, Anastasya A

    2017-03-01

    In geographical locations with a short vegetative season and continental climate that include Western Siberia, growing primocane fruiting raspberry varieties becomes very important. However, it is necessary to help the plants to overcome the environmental stress factors. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the pre-planting treatment of primocane fruiting raspberry root system with Bacillus strains on the following plant development under variable environmental conditions. In 2012, Bacillus subtilis RCAM В-10641, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RCAM В-10642, and Bacillus licheniformis RCAM В-10562 were used for inoculating the root system of primocane fruiting raspberry cultivar Nedosyagaemaya before planting. The test suspensions were 10 5  CFU/ml for each bacterial strains. The effects of this treatment on plant growth and crop productivity were estimated in 2012-2015 growing seasons differed by environmental conditions. The pre-planting treatment by the bacterial strains increased the number of new raspberry canes and the number of plant generative organs as well as crop productivity compared to control. In addition, these bacilli acted as the standard humic fertilizer. Variable environmental factors such as air temperature, relative humidity, and winter and spring frosts seriously influenced the plant biological parameters and crop productivity of control plants. At the same time, the pre-planting primocane fruiting root treatment by Bacillus strains decreased the negative effects of abiotic stresses on plants in all years of the research. Of the three strains studied, B. subtilis was shown to reveal the best results in adaptation of primocane fruiting raspberry plants to environmental factors in Western Siberia. For the first time, the role of Bacillus strains in enhancing frost resistance in primocane fruiting raspberry plants was shown. These bacilli are capable of being the basis of multifunctional biological formulations for effective plant and

  4. Morphodynamics of a cyclic prograding delta: the Red River, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maren, D.S. van

    2004-01-01

    River deltas are inhabited by over 60% of the world population, and are, consequently, of paramount agricultural and economical importance. They constitute unique wetland envi ronments which gives river deltas ecological importance as well. Additionally, many deltas contain large accumulations of

  5. Wastewater disposal at safari lodges in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    2004-01-01

    Jan 1, 2004 ... their wastewater via soak-aways, creating a potential risk of contamination of their water supply. Most islands in the Delta ... in the Okavango Delta. Key words: Okavango Delta; wastewater disposal; field bacteriological screening ... groundwater 183 m from a wastewater point source. Viruses in particular ...

  6. Surface water quality in the Okavango Delta panhandle, Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Okavango Delta, a Ramsar and a World Heritage Site, is an important source of food and water in the Kalahari Desert of southern Africa. Although the eastern delta fan is a protected area, the rest, including the upstream panhandle, is unprotected. Water quality in the Okavango Delta panhandle from Popa Falls, ...

  7. Amnesty to Niger Delta Militants: Challenges and Opportunities for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Niger Delta militants' disposition against the Federal government of Nigeria and the oil firms coupled with international pressures, compelled the Federal Government to grant amnesty to the Niger Delta Militants. The amnesty deal is a desperate effort by the Nigeria State to end the Niger Delta crisis, and thereby restore ...

  8. enhancing stakeholder participation in the niger delta region

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    Nigeria's indigenous people, found in the Niger Delta area, have for many years experienced developmental challenges associated with oil exploration. The region has been .... Delta Petroleum System: Niger Delta Province, Nigeria, Cameroon, and. Equatorial .... grant injunctions or provisional measures. Therefore, to ...

  9. Farmers' perception of extension services of the Delta Stat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper investigated farmers' perception of Extension Services Provided by Delta State Agricultural Development Programme (DTADP) in Delta North Agricultural Zone, Delta State, Nigeria. Data for the study was obtained with the aid of an interview schedule from 90 respondents in the study area. Findings from the study ...

  10. Environmental challenges in Nigeria's Delta Region and Agriculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discussed the environmental challenges in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria with emphasis on the impacts on agricultural production. It thus discussed the concepts of Niger-Delta, Environmental pollution, Niger-Delta crises and Agriculture. The paper posits that there are positive relationships between these ...

  11. EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    This is an editorial overview of the Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS), which is a large-scale investigation of ongoing and future environmental change in Siberia and its relationship to global processes, approaches, existing challenges and future direction. Introduction The SIRS is a mega-project within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), which coordinates interdisciplinary, national and international activities in Northern Eurasia that follow the Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. Under the direction of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), SIRS is one of the Integrated Regional Studies (IRS) that aims to investigate environmental change in Siberia under the current environment of global change, and the potential impact on Earth system dynamics [1]. The regions of interest are those that may function as 'choke or switch points' for the global Earth system, where changes in regional biophysical, biogeochemical and anthropogenic components may have significant consequences for the Earth system at the global scale. Siberia is a large and significant region that may compel change [2]. Regional consequences of global warming (e.g. anomalous increases in cold season temperatures) have already been documented for Siberia [3]. This result is also supported by climate modeling results for the 20th-22nd centuries [4]. Future climatic change threatens Siberia with the shift of permafrost boundaries northward, dramatic changes in land cover (redistribution among boreal forest, wetlands, tundra, and steppe zones often precipitated by fire regime change) and the entire hydrological regime of the territory [5-8]. These processes feed back to and influence climate dynamics through the exchange of energy, water, greenhouse gases and aerosols [9]. Even though there have been a handful of national and international projects focused on the Siberian environment, scientists have minimal knowledge about the processes

  12. Features structure of iron-bearing strata’s of the Bakchar deposit, Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asochakova, E. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ore-bearing strata’s of Bakchar deposit have complicated structural-textural heterogeneity and variable mineral composition. This deposit is one of the most promising areas of localization of sedimentary iron ore. The ore-bearing strata’s are composed mainly of sandstones (sometimes with ferruginous pebbles, less often conglomerates), siltstones and clays. The ironstones are classified according to their lithology and geochemistry into three types: goethite–hydrogoethitic oolitic, glauconite-chloritic and transitional (intermediate) type iron ores. The mineral composition includes many different minerals: terrigenous, authigenic and clayey. Ironstones are characterized by elevated concentrations of many rare and valuable metals present in them as trace elements, additionally alloying (Mn, V, Cr, Ti, Zr, Mo, etc.) and harmful impurities (S, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, P). There are prerequisites for the influence of numerous factors, such as prolonged transgression of the sea, swamping of paleo-river deltas, the appearance of a tectonic fracture zone associated with active bottom tectonics and unloading of catagenetic waters, regression and natural ore enrichment due to the re-washing of slightly-iron rocks. These factors are reflected in the structure of the ore-bearing strata in which rhythmic cycles of ore sedimentation with successive changes in them are distinguished by an association of different mineral composition.

  13. Isomerization of delta-9-THC to delta-8-THC when tested as trifluoroacetyl-, pentafluoropropionyl-, or heptafluorobutyryl- derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Justin M; Smith, Michael L; Paul, Shom N; Past, Marilyn R; Paul, Buddha D

    2008-05-01

    For GC-MS analysis of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), perfluoroacid anhydrides in combination with perfluoroalcohols are commonly used for derivatization. This reagent mixture is preferred because it allows simultaneous derivatization of delta-9-THC and its acid metabolite, 11-nor-delta-9-THC-9-carboxylic acid present in biological samples. When delta-9-THC was derivatized by trifluoroacetic anhydride/hexafluoroisopropanol (TFAA/HFIPOH) and analyzed by GC-MS using full scan mode (50-550 amu), two peaks (P1 and P2) with an identical molecular mass of 410 amu were observed. On the basis of the total ion chromatogram (TIC), P1 with a shorter retention time (RT) was the major peak (TIC 84%). To identify the peaks, delta-8-THC was also tested under the same conditions. The RT and spectra of the major peak (TIC 95%) were identical with that of P1 for delta-9-THC. A minor peak (5%) present also correlated well with the latter peak (P2) for the delta-9-THC derivative. The fragmentation pathway of P1 was primarily demethylation followed by retro Diels-Alder fragmentation (M - 15-68, base peak 100%) indicating P1 as a delta-8-THC-trifluoroacetyl compound. This indicated that delta-9-THC isomerized to delta-8-THC during derivatization with TFAA/HFIPOH. Similar results were also observed when delta-9-THC was derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride/pentafluoropropanol or heptafluorobutyric anhydride/heptafluorobutanol. No isomerization was observed when chloroform was used in derivatization with TFAA. In this reaction, the peaks of delta-8-THC-TFA and delta-9-THC-TFA had retention times and mass spectra matching with P1 and P2, respectively. Because of isomerization, perfluoroacid anhydrides/perfluoroalcohols are not suitable derivatizing agents for analysis of delta-9-THC; whereas the TFAA in chloroform is suitable for the analysis.

  14. Topography of inland deltas: Observations, modeling, and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, H. J.; Molnar, P.; Akca, D.; Doumi, M.; Cavalcanti Tavares, M.; Shinbrot, T.; Andrade, J. S.; Kinzelbach, W.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2010-04-01

    The topography of inland deltas is influenced by the water-sediment balance in distributary channels and local evaporation and seepage rates. In this letter a reduced complexity model is applied to simulate inland delta formation, and results are compared with the Okavango Delta, Botswana and with a laboratory experiment. We show that water loss in inland deltas produces fundamentally different dynamics of water and sediment transport than coastal deltas, especially deposition associated with expansion-contraction dynamics at the channel head. These dynamics lead to a systematic decrease in the mean topographic slope of the inland delta with distance from the apex following a power law with exponent α = -0.69 ± 0.02 where the data for both simulation and experiment can be collapsed onto a single curve. In coastal deltas, on the contrary, the slope increases toward the end of the deposition zone.

  15. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta Δ(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe Δ-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented

  16. Adaptive Delta Management: cultural aspects of dealing with uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Jos; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Hermans, Leon; Kwakkel, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Deltas are generally recognized as vulnerable to climate change and therefore a salient topic in adaptation science. Deltas are also highly dynamic systems viewed from physical (erosion, sedimentation, subsidence), social (demographic), economic (trade), infrastructures (transport, energy, metropolization) and cultural (multi-ethnic) perspectives. This multi-faceted dynamic character of delta areas warrants the emergence of a branch of applied adaptation science, Adaptive Delta Management, which explicitly focuses on climate adaptation of such highly dynamic and deeply uncertain systems. The application of Adaptive Delta Management in the Dutch Delta Program and its active international dissemination by Dutch professionals results in the rapid dissemination of Adaptive Delta Management to deltas worldwide. This global dissemination raises concerns among professionals in delta management on its applicability in deltas with cultural conditions and historical developments quite different from those found in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom where the practices now labelled as Adaptive Delta Management first emerged. This research develops an approach and gives a first analysis of the interaction between the characteristics of different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management and their alignment with the cultural conditions encountered in various delta's globally. In this analysis, first different management theories underlying approaches to Adaptive Delta Management as encountered in both scientific and professional publications are identified and characterized on three dimensions: The characteristics dimensions used are: orientation on today, orientation on the future, and decision making (Timmermans, 2015). The different underlying management theories encountered are policy analysis, strategic management, transition management, and adaptive management. These four management theories underlying different approaches in Adaptive Delta Management are connected to

  17. IN RESEARCHES OF SIBERIA IMPORTANT NAME: VLADIMIR GERMANOVICH BOGORAZ- TAN / SIBIRYA ARASTIRMALARINDA ÖNCÜ BIR ISIM: VLADIMIR GERMANOVIÇ BOGORAZ-TAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Muvaffak DURANLI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Germanovich Bogoraz, best knownunder literary pseudonym N.A. Tan (1865- 1936 was arevolutionary, writer and anthropologist, especiallyknown for his studies of the Chukchi people in Siberia. In1886, he moved to Saint Petersburg where he wasarrested and later exiled into North-Eastern Siberia, nearYakutsk (1889-1899, where he studied the Chukchipeople, their way of life, traditions, language, and beliefs.In his works and researches have important materialsabout Turcic people, who lived and live on this area.Except for that scientific studies, Bogoraz haspublished the book “Chukchi stories” (1899, “EightTribes” (1902, “The Victim of a Dragon” (1909, storiesand the novel “the Revived Tribe” (1935

  18. Central Delta languages: An overview1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    The Central. Delta languages on or about which linguistic research materials were available for this study are Abuan, Oḍual (Sạkạ), Ọgbi ̣ạ (Ọgbi ̣nyạ), Ogbrọnụagum (Ḅukuma), Obulom (Abuloma), and Ogbogolo (Obogolo). Due to a lack of research materials or adequate research materials at the time of writing this paper, ...

  19. Understanding delta-sigma data converters

    CERN Document Server

    Pavan, Shanti; Temes, Gabor C

    2017-01-01

    This new edition introduces novel analysis and design techniques for delta-sigma (ΔΣ) converters in physical and conceptual terms, and includes new chapters that explore developments in the field over the last decade. This book explains the principles and operation of delta-sigma analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) in physical and conceptual terms in accordance with the most recent developments in the field. The interest of ΔΣ converter designers has shifted significantly over the past decade, due to many new applications for data converters at the far ends of the frequency spectrum. Continuous-time delta-sigma A/D converters with GHz clocks, of both lowpass and bandpass types, are required for wireless applications. At the other extreme, multiplexed ADCs with very narrow (sometimes 10 Hz wide) signal bandwidths, but very high accuracy are needed in the interfaces of biomedical and environmental sensors. To reflect the changing eeds of designers, the second edition includes significant new material on bo...

  20. Delta: Data Reduction for Integrated Application Workflows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean-Baptiste, Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Oldfield, Ron A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Integrated Application Workflows (IAWs) run multiple simulation workflow components con- currently on an HPC resource connecting these components using compute area resources and compensating for any performance or data processing rate mismatches. These IAWs require high frequency and high volume data transfers between compute nodes and staging area nodes during the lifetime of a large parallel computation. The available network band- width between the two areas may not be enough to efficiently support the data movement. As the processing power available to compute resources increases, the requirements for this data transfer will become more difficult to satisfy and perhaps will not be satisfiable at all since network capabilities are not expanding at a comparable rate. Furthermore, energy consumption in HPC environments is expected to grow by an order of magnitude as exas- cale systems become a reality. The energy cost of moving large amounts of data frequently will contribute to this issue. It is necessary to reduce the volume of data without reducing the quality of data when it is being processed and analyzed. Delta resolves the issue by addressing the lifetime data transfer operations. Delta removes subsequent identical copies of already transmitted data during transfers and restores those copies once the data has reached the destination. Delta is able to identify duplicated information and determine the most space efficient way to represent it. Initial tests show about 50% reduction in data movement while maintaining the same data quality and transmission frequency.

  1. Delta count-rate monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Etten, D.; Olsen, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    A need for a more effective way to rapidly search for gamma-ray contamination over large areas led to the design and construction of a very sensitive gamma detection system. The delta count-rate monitoring system was installed in a four-wheel-drive van instrumented for environmental surveillance and accident response. The system consists of four main sections: (1) two scintillation detectors, (2) high-voltage power supply amplifier and single-channel analyzer, (3) delta count-rate monitor, and (4) count-rate meter and recorder. The van's 6.5-kW generator powers the standard nuclear instrument modular design system. The two detectors are mounted in the rear corners of the van and can be run singly or jointly. A solid-state bar-graph count-rate meter mounted on the dashboard can be read easily by both the driver and passenger. A solid-state strip chart recorder shows trends and provides a permanent record of the data. An audible alarm is sounded at the delta monitor and at the dashboard count-rate meter if a detected radiation level exceeds the set background level by a predetermined amount

  2. Expression and evolution of delta9 and delta11 desaturase genes in the moth Spodoptera littoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sergio; Hao, Guixia; Liu, Weitian; Piña, Benjamín; Rooney, Alejandro P; Camps, Francisco; Roelofs, Wendell L; Fabriàs, Gemma

    2004-12-01

    Desaturation of fatty acids is a key reaction in the biosynthesis of moth sex pheromones. The main component of Spodoptera littoralis sex pheromone blend is produced by the action of Delta11 and Delta9 desaturases. In this article, we report on the cloning of four desaturase-like genes in this species: one from the fat body (Sls-FL1) and three (Sls-FL2, Sls-FL3 and Sls-FL4) from the pheromone gland. By means of a computational/phylogenetic method, as well as functional assays, the desaturase gene products have been characterized. The fat body gene expressed a Delta9 desaturase that produced (Z)-9-hexadecenoic and (Z)-9-octadecenoic acids in a (1:4.5) ratio, whereas the pheromone gland Sls-FL2 expressed a Delta9 desaturase that produced (Z)-9-hexadecenoic and (Z)-9-octadecenoic acids in a (1.5:1) ratio. Although both Delta9 desaturases produced (Z)-9-tetradecenoic acid from myristic acid, transformed yeast grown in the presence of a mixture of myristic and (E)-11-tetradecenoic acids produced (Z,E)-9,11-tetradecadienoic acid, but not (Z)-9-tetradecenoic acid. The Sls-FL3 gene expressed a protein that produced a mixture of (E)-11-tetradecenoic, (Z)-11-tetradecenoic, (Z)-11-hexadecenoic and (Z)-11-octadecenoic acids in a 5:4:60:31 ratio. Despite having all the characteristics of a desaturase gene, no function could be found for Sls-FL4.

  3. Additions To The Lichen Biota Of SE Siberia: Records From The Stanovoye Nagor’e Highlands (Trans-Baikal Region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesnokov Sergey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports 120 species of lichens and one lichenicolous fungus from the Stanovoye Nagor’e Highlands in southeastern Siberia, including 64 species new for the area. Some of the newly recorded species are extremely rare in Russia [e.g., Bryonora curvescens (Mudd Poelt, Gyalideopsis alnicola Noble & Vězda and Pilophorus strumaticus Nyl. ex Cromb.]. The distribution and habitat preferences of several rare species are briefly discussed.

  4. The Ukrainian community of Western Siberia: specific features of formation and development in the 2nd half of the 19th – early 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Shaidurov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The agrarian crisis in the European part of the Russian Empire in the middle of the 20th century seriously impeded agricultural progress. Agrarian overpopulation and peasants deprived of land in the course of the peasant reform of 1861 further aggravated the negative situation in the governorates of Central Russia, Belarus, and left-bank Ukraine. These factors provided fertile soil for migratory sentiments among peasants. It was resettlement in vacant lands in the Asiatic Russia and North Caucasus, which allowed most of them to preserve their homesteads. In the 2nd half of the 19th – early 20th century, Ukrainian peasants were actively engaged in the migration movement which was supported by the state. One of the main placement areas became Western Siberia where a large Ukrainian peasant community was formed. The history of research on the Ukrainian community in Western Siberia is fragmentary, as many aspects remain unstudied. Hence, the article focuses on the following questions: causes of the Ukrainian migration to the border lands of the Russian Empire; stages in the migration; main areas where Ukrainians resided in Siberia; population dynamics of the Ukrainian community; adaptation patterns specific for Ukrainian migrants in their new places of residence; their role in the economic life of Siberia in the early 20th century. This article utilizes primary data from the All-Russian Agricultural and Land Census of 1917, which have been introduced for scientific use for the first time. As the methodological basis, the study draws on the system approach combining regional, neo-imperial and comparative principles.

  5. A comprehensive assessment of comparative effectiveness of projects for power export from East Siberia to China: A methodological approach and results of its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerev, Anatoly; Khanaeva, Valentina; Smirnov, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    The paper is concerned with a methodological approach to the assessment of comparative effectiveness of projects for the construction of export-oriented power plants and transmission lines under uncertainty of the power industry development in the region. The recommendations are given to select the most preferable project for the construction of an export-oriented power plant and transmission line for power export from East Siberia to China.

  6. Origin of elemental carbon in snow from western Siberia and northwestern European Russia during winter-spring 2014, 2015 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Shevchenko, Vladimir P.; Espen Yttri, Karl; Eckhardt, Sabine; Sollum, Espen; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Kobelev, Vasily O.; Korobov, Vladimir B.; Lobanov, Andrey A.; Starodymova, Dina P.; Vorobiev, Sergey N.; Thompson, Rona L.; Stohl, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Short-lived climate forcers have been proven important both for the climate and human health. In particular, black carbon (BC) is an important climate forcer both as an aerosol and when deposited on snow and ice surface because of its strong light absorption. This paper presents measurements of elemental carbon (EC; a measurement-based definition of BC) in snow collected from western Siberia and northwestern European Russia during 2014, 2015 and 2016. The Russian Arctic is of great interest to the scientific community due to the large uncertainty of emission sources there. We have determined the major contributing sources of BC in snow in western Siberia and northwestern European Russia using a Lagrangian atmospheric transport model. For the first time, we use a recently developed feature that calculates deposition in backward (so-called retroplume) simulations allowing estimation of the specific locations of sources that contribute to the deposited mass. EC concentrations in snow from western Siberia and northwestern European Russia were highly variable depending on the sampling location. Modelled BC and measured EC were moderately correlated (R = 0.53-0.83) and a systematic region-specific model underestimation was found. The model underestimated observations by 42 % (RMSE = 49 ng g-1) in 2014, 48 % (RMSE = 37 ng g-1) in 2015 and 27 % (RMSE = 43 ng g-1) in 2016. For EC sampled in northwestern European Russia the underestimation by the model was smaller (fractional bias, FB > -100 %). In this region, the major sources were transportation activities and domestic combustion in Finland. When sampling shifted to western Siberia, the model underestimation was more significant (FB model calculations was also evaluated using two independent datasets of BC measurements in snow covering the entire Arctic. The model underestimated BC concentrations in snow especially for samples collected in springtime.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain B9741 of Beijing B0/W lineage from HIV positive patient from Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Shur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain B9741 belonging to Beijing B0/W lineage isolated from a HIV patient from Siberia, Russia. This clinical isolate showed MDR phenotype and resistance to isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and pyrazinamide. We analyzed SNPs associated with virulence and resistance. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession NZ_LVJJ00000000.

  8. Paleomagnetic data for Siberia and Baltica in the context of testing some geodynamic models of the formation of the Central Asian Mobile Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatsillo, A. V.; Kuznetsov, N. B.; Dronov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The synthesis of the paleomagnetic data for the Siberian (Siberia) and East European (Baltica) platforms shows that since the Early Paleozoic they could have experienced coherent movements as a part of consolidated continental agglomeration (a composite continent), which also includes the Arctida continent. Based on the paleomagnetic data, the relative positions of the Siberia and Baltica during the Ordovician is reconstructed, and a series of paleogeographical reconstructions describing the drift of the composite continent is suggested. The results of the lithologic-facial analysis of the sedimentation settings within the Ordovician basins of the Siberian and East European platforms and paleoclimatic markers are consistent with the suggested configuration and paleogeographical position of the composite continent. The suggested reconstructions and the ages of detrital zircons from the Early Paleozoic complexes of the platform margins and some objects of the Central Asian Mobile Belt (CAMB) reasonably well agree with the hypothesis (Sengör et al., 1993) which interprets the formation of the structure of CAMB Paleozoides as a result of the evolution of the island arc stretching along the margins of Siberia and Baltica.

  9. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ{sup 13}C, Δ{sup 14}C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-15

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ{sup 13}C and Δ{sup 14}C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  10. Biomarker and carbon isotope constraints (δ13C, Δ14C) on sources and cycling of particulate organic matter discharged by large Siberian rivers draining permafrost areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterfeld, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Circumpolar permafrost soils store about half of the global soil organic carbon pool. These huge amounts of organic matter (OM) could accumulate due to low temperatures and water saturated soil conditions over the course of millennia. Currently most of this OM remains frozen and therefore does not take part in the active carbon cycle, making permafrost soils a globally important carbon sink. Over the last decades mean annual air temperatures in the Arctic increased stronger than the global mean and this trend is projected to continue. As a result the permafrost carbon pool is under climate pressure possibly creating a positive climate feedback due to the thaw-induced release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Arctic warming will lead to increased annual permafrost thaw depths and Arctic river runoff likely resulting in enhanced mobilization and export of old, previously frozen soil-derived OM. Consequently, the great arctic rivers play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles by connecting the large permafrost carbon pool of their hinterlands with the arctic shelf seas and the Arctic Ocean. The first part of this thesis deals with particulate organic matter (POM) from the Lena Delta and adjacent Buor Khaya Bay. The Lena River in central Siberia is one of the major pathways translocating terrestrial OM from its southernmost reaches near Lake Baikal to the coastal zone of the Laptev Sea. The permafrost soils from the Lena catchment area store huge amounts of pre-aged OM, which is expected to be remobilized due to climate warming. To characterize the composition and vegetation sources of OM discharged by the Lena River, the lignin phenol and carbon isotopic composition (δ 13 C and Δ 14 C) in total suspended matter (TSM) from surface waters, surface sediments from the Buor Khaya Bay along with soils from the Lena Delta's first (Holocene) and third terraces (Pleistocene ice complex) were analyzed. The lignin compositions of these samples are

  11. Distribution of late Pleistocene ice-rich syngenetic permafrost of the Yedoma Suite in east and central Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Guido; Robinson, Joel E.; Bryant, Robin; Taylor, Maxwell D.; Harper, William; DeMasi, Amy; Kyker-Snowman, Emily; Veremeeva, Alexandra; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Harden, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This digital database is the product of collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; the Los Altos Hills Foothill College GeoSpatial Technology Certificate Program; the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany; and the Institute of Physical Chemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The primary goal for creating this digital database is to enhance current estimates of soil organic carbon stored in deep permafrost, in particular the late Pleistocene syngenetic ice-rich permafrost deposits of the Yedoma Suite. Previous studies estimated that Yedoma deposits cover about 1 million square kilometers of a large region in central and eastern Siberia, but these estimates generally are based on maps with scales smaller than 1:10,000,000. Taking into account this large area, it was estimated that Yedoma may store as much as 500 petagrams of soil organic carbon, a large part of which is vulnerable to thaw and mobilization from thermokarst and erosion. To refine assessments of the spatial distribution of Yedoma deposits, we digitized 11 Russian Quaternary geologic maps. Our study focused on extracting geologic units interpreted by us as late Pleistocene ice-rich syngenetic Yedoma deposits based on lithology, ground ice conditions, stratigraphy, and geomorphological and spatial association. These Yedoma units then were merged into a single data layer across map tiles. The spatial database provides a useful update of the spatial distribution of this deposit for an approximately 2.32 million square kilometers land area in Siberia that will (1) serve as a core database for future refinements of Yedoma distribution in additional regions, and (2) provide a starting point to revise the size of deep but thaw-vulnerable permafrost carbon pools in the Arctic based on surface geology and the distribution of cryolithofacies types at high spatial

  12. Tree Line Structure and Dynamics at the Northern Limit of the Larch Forest: Anabar Plateau, Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.; Im, Sergey T.; Oskorbin, Pavel A.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitriy V.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was to provide an analysis of climate impact before, during, and after the Little Ice Age (LIA) on the larch (Larix gmelinii) tree line at the northern extreme of Siberian forests. Recent decadal climate change impacts on the tree line, regeneration abundance, and age structure were analyzed. The location of the study area was within the forest-tundra ecotone (elevation range 170-450 m) in the Anabar Plateau, northern Siberia. Field studies were conducted along elevational transects. Tree natality/mortality and radial increment were determined based on dendrochronology analyses. Tree morphology, number of living and subfossil trees, regeneration abundance, and age structure were studied. Locations of pre-LIA, LIA, and post-LIA tree lines and refugia boundaries were established. Long-term climate variables and drought index were included in the analysis. It was found that tree mortality from the 16th century through the beginning of the 19th century caused a downward tree line recession. Sparse larch stands experienced deforestation, transforming into tundra with isolated relict trees. The maximum tree mortality and radial growth decrease were observed to have occurred at the beginning of 18th century. Now larch, at its northern boundary in Siberia, is migrating into tundra areas. Upward tree migration was induced by warming in the middle of the 19th century. Refugia played an important role in repopulation of the forest-tundra ecotone by providing a seed source and shelter for recruitment of larch regeneration. Currently this ecotone is being repopulated mainly by tree cohorts that were established after the 1930s. The last two decades of warming did not result in an acceleration of regeneration recruitment because of increased drought conditions. The regeneration line reached (but did not exceed) the pre-LIA tree line location, although contemporary tree heights and stand densities are comparatively lower than in the pre-LIA period. The mean

  13. Carbon exchange fluxes over peatlands in Western Siberia: Possible feedback between land-use change and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.fleischer@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Landscape Ecology, Climatology Research Group, University of Münster, Münster (Germany); Khashimov, Ilhom, E-mail: nixonlp@mail.ru [Institute of Earth Science, Physical Geography and Geoecology Department, Tyumen State University, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Hölzel, Norbert, E-mail: nhoelzel@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Landscape Ecology, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Research Group, University of Münster, Münster (Germany); Klemm, Otto, E-mail: otto.klemm@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Landscape Ecology, Climatology Research Group, University of Münster, Münster (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    The growing demand for agricultural products has been leading to an expansion and intensification of agriculture around the world. More and more unused land is currently reclaimed in the regions of the former Soviet Union. Driven by climate change, the Western Siberian grain belt might, in a long-term, even expand into the drained peatland areas to the North. It is crucial to study the consequences of this land-use change with respect to the carbon cycling as this is still a major knowledge gap. We present for the first time data on the atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and methane of an arable field and a neighboring unused grassland on peat soil in Western Siberia. Eddy covariance measurements were performed over one vegetation period. No directed methane fluxes were found due to an effective drainage of the study sites. The carbon dioxide fluxes appeared to be of high relevance for the global carbon and greenhouse gas cycles. They showed very site-specific patterns resulting from the development of vegetation: the persistent plants of the grassland were able to start photosynthesizing soon after snow melt, while the absence of vegetation on the managed field lead to a phase of emissions until the oat plants started to grow in June. The uptake peak of the oat field is much later than that of the grassland, but larger due to a rapid plant growth. Budgeting the whole measurement period, the grassland served as a carbon sink, whereas the oat field was identified to be a carbon source. The conversion from non-used grasslands on peat soil to cultivated fields in Western Siberia is therefore considered to have a positive feedback on climate change. - Highlights: • Grasslands on drained peat soil can act as carbon sinks. • Arable fields on drained peat act as carbon sources due to long phases of bare soil. • CH{sub 4} emissions from drained peatlands seem to play a smaller role than CO{sub 2} fluxes. • Conversion from grassland to arable field has

  14. Virological evaluation of avian influenza virus persistence in natural and anthropic ecosystems of Western Siberia (Novosibirsk Region, summer 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A De Marco

    Full Text Available Wild aquatic birds, reservoir of low-pathogenicity (LP avian influenza viruses (AIVs, congregate in huge numbers in Western Siberia wetlands, where major intra- and inter-continental bird flyways overlap. In 2005 and 2006, highly pathogenic (HP AIV H5N1 epizootics affected wild and domestic birds in the Novosibirsk Region. In 2012, we evaluated AIV persistence in Siberian natural and anthropic ecosystems.In Novosibirsk Region, 166 wild birds ecologically linked to aquatic environments and 152 domestic waterfowl were examined for AIV isolation in embryonating chicken eggs. Biological samples were obtained by integrating the conventional cloacal swab collection with the harvesting of samples from birds' plumage. Haemagglutinating allantoic fluids were further characterized by serological and molecular methods. In August-September 2012, 17 AIVs, including three H3N8, eight H4N6, two H4N?, one H2N?, one H?N2, and two unsubtyped LPAIVs, were isolated from 15 wild ducks. Whereas comparable proportions of wild Anseriformes (n.118 tested virus isolation (VI-positive from cloaca and feathers (5.9% vs 8.5% were detected, the overall prevalence of virus isolation, obtained from both sampling methods, was 2.4 times higher than that calculated on results from cloacal swab examination only (14.4% vs 5.9%. Unlike previously described in this area, the H4N6 antigenic subtype was found to be the prevalent one in 2012. Both cloacal and feather samples collected from domestic waterfowl tested VI-negative.We found lack of evidence for the H5N1 HPAIV circulation, explainable by the poor environmental fitness of HPAIVs in natural ecosystems. Our LPAIV isolation data emphasise the importance of Siberia wetlands in influenza A virus ecology, providing evidence of changes in circulation dynamics of HN antigenic subtypes harboured in wild bird reservoirs. Further studies of isolates, based on bioinformatic approaches to virus molecular evolution and phylogenesis, will be

  15. The Major Factors of Consolidation and Islamization of the Turkic-Speaking Population of Western Siberia in the 16th–19th centuries »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Tataurov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the importance of archaeological materials, particularly of funerary complexes, for both analyzing the process of formation of the Siberian Tatars in the 16th–17th centuries and studying the features of the development of Islam in Siberia. The author examines the problem of consolidation of the Turkic-speaking population of the forest-steppe zone of Western Siberia in the second millennium AD, which was expressed in the formation of a common cultural, linguistic, and religious space. The author considers the reasons for duration of this process, analyzes the factors that impeded or facilitated the convergence of certain ethnic groups, the level of socio-economic relations, political developments in these regions. The article shows the importance of the Siberian Khanate as a state and ideological unification of the Turkic-speaking population of Western Siberia, as the main unifying factor in the formation of this ethnic group. The author emphasizes the role of the Russian administration, its action for the creation of new Siberian administrative-territorial system, for the spread of Orthodox Christianity, etc. Particular attention is paid to the process of Islamization of the population already living in the framework of the Russian State after the arrival of Russians, to role in this process of the patrimonial Tatar nobility. As a result, we can construct the situation as follows. Influenced primarily by political (but not economic developments, the Turkic-speaking population of Western Siberia was sufficient organized to the last third of the 16th century that is ready to the further rapprochement and transformation into single ethnic group. The weakness of social and economic relations did not allow to develop this convergence. Process of consolidation already began to develop in other conditions – after annexation of Western Siberia by the Russian State – in the 17th–19th centuries. The Tatar nobility and Muslim

  16. About some processes of replacement of PGM from the placers of Southern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedov, G. I.; Knyazev, V. N.; Nekos, V. V.

    2003-04-01

    .I. Sapin, N.I.Kiryukhina (1991) Trasformations of platinum-group minerals from Primor'ye placers. - Mineralogical Zhurnal, vol.13, No1, pp.31-40 (in Russian). 5. D.C.Harris, L.J.Cabri (1991) Nomenclature of platinum-group-element alloys: review and revision. - Canadian Mineralogist, vol.29, pp.231-237. 6. L.J.Cabri (ed.) (1978) Unnamed platinum-group minerals. In: Platinum-group elements: mineralogy, geology, recovery. - Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Montreal, pp.177-195. 7. G.I.Shvedov, V.N.Knyazev Unnamed PGE Phases from Gold Placer Deposits of South Siberia, Russia. - 9th International Platinum Symposium, July 21-25, Billings, Montana, USA, 2002 (http://www.duke.edu/˜boudreau/IPS_Abstracts.htm).

  17. Delta robots – robots for high speed manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Poppeová, Viera; Uríček, Juraj; Bulej, Vladimír; Šindler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper is oriented to parallel kinematic robots definition, description of their specific application, comparison of robots made by different producers and determination of velocity and acceleration parameters, kinematic analysis – inverse and forward kinematic. It brings information about development of Delta robots at Academia, including the University of Žilina and Delta robots in the market. Two models of Delta robots called M-1iA and M-3iA have been developed by FANUC Robotics during...

  18. THE RURAL TOURISM IN DANUBE DELTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionica SOARE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the rural areas has market size and forecast its development as an economic activity. The present paper aims at analyzing the rural areas has in Danube Delta. In an enviable BAs which have responsibility for their particular isolated, such as the Danube Delta and the Danube that used, fishing and rural areas has the main activities that provide jobs and income sources for local populations. Design/methodology/approach - A survey was administered to customers’ rural hostel accommodation in Danube Delta. Descriptive statistics method was mainly adopted to calculate the mean with standard deviation of entry assumes variable, and to examine the different levels of consumers' awareness. The index values of product familiarity, the ratio between entries assumes product's familiarity value and the average value. Findings - the research results show hash has rural consumers have different perception and accomplished through behaviour. The information channels of brand hash mainly from friends, relatives and neighbours, so word of mouth spreading is very important for a brand. Women show a higher sensitivity in health and are currently operating the propensity than referred to follow the recommendations for nutrition. Research limitations/implications - This item is intended to synthesize developments and challenges," on June 13th rural market growth has. The results of this paper should be considered tentatively until has also features replicated by larger has rural consumers. Originality/value - members of rural areas has consumer's behavior would improve marketing and the development of rural areas has products, in order to reduce consumer confusion.

  19. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in the waterlogged forests of south and middle taiga of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, M. V.; Ilyasov, D. V.; Terentieva, I. E.; Sabrekov, A. F.; Mochenov, S. Yu; Maksutov, S. S.

    2018-03-01

    Field measurements of methane and carbon dioxide flux were carried out using portable static chambers in south (ST) and middle taiga subzones (MT) of Western Siberia (WS) from 16 to 24 August 2015. Two sites were investigated: Bakchar bog in the Tomsk region (in typical ecosystems for this area: oligotrophic bog/forest border and waterlogged forest) and Shapsha in Khanty-Mansiysk region (in waterlogged forest). The highest values of methane fluxes (mgC·m-2·h-1) were obtained in burnt wet birch forest (median 6.96; first quartile 3.12; third quartile 8.95). The lowest values of methane fluxes (among the sites mentioned above) were obtained in seasonally waterlogged forests (median -0.08; first and third quartiles are -0.14 and -0.03 mgC·m-2·h-1 respectively). These data will help to estimate the regional methane flux from the waterlogged and periodically flooded forests and to improve its prediction.

  20. Uncertainty in solid precipitation and snow depth prediction for Siberia using the Noah and Noah-MP land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazuyoshi; Zupanski, Milija

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the uncertainties associated with land surface processes in an ensemble predication context. Specifically, we compare the uncertainties produced by a coupled atmosphere-land modeling system with two different land surface models, the Noah- MP land surface model (LSM) and the Noah LSM, by using the Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Filter (MLEF) data assimilation system as a platform for ensemble prediction. We carried out 24-hour prediction simulations in Siberia with 32 ensemble members beginning at 00:00 UTC on 5 March 2013. We then compared the model prediction uncertainty of snow depth and solid precipitation with observation-based research products and evaluated the standard deviation of the ensemble spread. The prediction skill and ensemble spread exhibited high positive correlation for both LSMs, indicating a realistic uncertainty estimation. The inclusion of a multiple snowlayer model in the Noah-MP LSM was beneficial for reducing the uncertainties of snow depth and snow depth change compared to the Noah LSM, but the uncertainty in daily solid precipitation showed minimal difference between the two LSMs. The impact of LSM choice in reducing temperature uncertainty was limited to surface layers of the atmosphere. In summary, we found that the more sophisticated Noah-MP LSM reduces uncertainties associated with land surface processes compared to the Noah LSM. Thus, using prediction models with improved skill implies improved predictability and greater certainty of prediction.

  1. Long-term forest resilience to climate change indicated by mortality, regeneration, and growth in semiarid southern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongyang; Liu, Hongyan; Anenkhonov, Oleg A; Korolyuk, Andrey Yu; Sandanov, Denis V; Balsanova, Larisa D; Naidanov, Bulat B; Wu, Xiuchen

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have documented that regional climate warming and the resulting increase in drought stress have triggered increased tree mortality in semiarid forests with unavoidable impacts on regional and global carbon sequestration. Although climate warming is projected to continue into the future, studies examining long-term resilience of semiarid forests against climate change are limited. In this study, long-term forest resilience was defined as the capacity of forest recruitment to compensate for losses from mortality. We observed an obvious change in long-term forest resilience along a local aridity gradient by reconstructing tree growth trend and disturbance history and investigating postdisturbance regeneration in semiarid forests in southern Siberia. In our study, with increased severity of local aridity, forests became vulnerable to drought stress, and regeneration first accelerated and then ceased. Radial growth of trees during 1900-2012 was also relatively stable on the moderately arid site. Furthermore, we found that smaller forest patches always have relatively weaker resilience under the same climatic conditions. Our results imply a relatively higher resilience in arid timberline forest patches than in continuous forests; however, further climate warming and increased drought could possibly cause the disappearance of small forest patches around the arid tree line. This study sheds light on climate change adaptation and provides insight into managing vulnerable semiarid forests. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Comparing forest measurements from tree rings and a space-based index of vegetation activity in Siberia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, Andrew G; Hughes, Malcolm K; Losleben, Mark; Kirdyanov, Alexander V; Shishov, Vladimir V; Vaganov, Eugene A; Berner, Logan T; Oltchev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for measuring carbon stocks and fluxes in the northern high latitudes, ranging from intensively measured small plots to space-based methods that use reflectance data to drive production efficiency models. The field of dendroecology has used samples of tree growth from radial increments to quantify long-term variability in ecosystem productivity, but these have very limited spatial domains. Since the cambium material in tree cores is itself a product of photosynthesis in the canopy, it would be ideal to link these two approaches. We examine the associations between the normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) and tree growth using 19 pairs of tree-ring widths (TRW) and maximum latewood density (MXD) across much of Siberia. We find consistent correlations between NDVI and both measures of tree growth and no systematic difference between MXD and TRW. At the regional level we note strong correspondence between the first principal component of tree growth and NDVI for MXD and TRW in a temperature-limited bioregion, indicating that canopy reflectance and cambial production are broadly linked. Using a network of 21 TRW chronologies from south of Lake Baikal, we find a similarly strong regional correspondence with NDVI in a markedly drier region. We show that tree growth is dominated by variation at decadal and multidecadal time periods, which the satellite record is incapable of recording given its relatively short record. (letter)

  3. Compositional variation of glauconites in Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentary iron-ore deposits in South-eastern Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmin, Maxim; Banerjee, Santanu; Mazurov, Aleksey

    2017-06-01

    Glauconite occurs either as unaltered greenish or as altered brownish variety in Upper Cretaceous-Palaeocene sediments in the southeastern corner of Western Siberia. Studied section within the Bakchar iron-ore deposit includes Ipatovo, Slavgorod, Gan'kino and Lyulinvor formations, which are represented by sandstones, siltstones, claystones and oolitic ironstones of coastal-marine facies. The origin of unaltered glauconite is explained by the ;verdissement theory;. Transgressions during Lower Coniacian, Santonian and Campanian favored the formation of unaltered glauconites in dysoxic to anoxic conditions. Subaerial exposure of glauconite resulted in leaching of potassium, oxidation of iron and formation of iron hydroxides in Upper Coniacian, Maastrichtian and Palaeocene. Glauconite ultimately converts to leptochlorite and hydrogoethite by this alteration. Abundant microscopic gold inclusions, besides sulphides, sulphates, oxides and silicates characterize this glauconite. Mineral inclusions include precious, rare metals and non-ferrous metals. The concentration of gold in glauconite may be as high as 42.9 ppb. Abundant inclusions of various compositions in glauconites indicate enrichment of marine sediments in precious and non-precious metals. While major element composition of glauconites is affected by subaerial exposure, the broadly similar micro-inclusions in both altered and unaltered varieties are possibly related to the comparatively immobile nature of REE and trace elements.

  4. The effect of impurities on the surface melt of a glacier in the Suntar Khayata Mountain Range, Russian Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozomu eTakeuchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated characteristics of impurities and their impact on the ablation of Glacier No.31 in the Suntar-Khayata Mountain Range in Russian Siberia during summer 2014. Positive degree-day factors (PDDFs obtained from 20 stake measurements distributed across the glacier’s ablation area varied from 3.00 to 8.55 mm w.e. K-1 day-1. The surface reflectivity measured with a spectrometer as a proxy for albedo, ranged from 0.09 to 0.62, and was negatively correlated with the PDDF, suggesting that glacier ablation is controlled by surface albedo on the studied glacier. Mass of total insoluble impurities on the ice surface varied from 0.1 to 45.2 g m-2 and was not correlated with surface reflectivity, suggesting that albedo is not directly conditioned by the mass of the impurities. Microscopy of impurities revealed that they comprised mineral particles, cryoconite granules, and ice algal cells filled with dark-reddish pigments (Ancylonema nordenskioldii. There was a significant negative correlation between surface reflectivity and algal biomass or organic matter, suggesting that the ice algae and their products are the most effective constituents in defining glacier surface albedo. Our results suggest that the melting of ice surface was enhanced by the growth of ice algae, which increased the melting rate 1.6 - 2.6 times greater than that of the impurity free bare-ice.

  5. Vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration in the troposphere over Siberia derived from airborne in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Machida, Toshinobu; Kozlov, Alexandr; Malyskin, Sergei; Simonenkov, Denis; Davydov, Denis; Fofonov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vertical distribution of aerosols particles is very important when estimating aerosol radiative effects. To date there are a lot of research programs aimed to study aerosol vertical distribution, but only a few ones exist in such insufficiently explored region as Siberia. Monthly research flights and several extensive airborne campaigns carried out in recent years in Siberian troposphere allowed the vertical distribution of aerosol number concentration to be summarized. In-situ aerosol measurements were performed in a wide range of particle sizes by means of improved version of the Novosibirsk-type diffusional particle sizer and GRIMM aerosol spectrometer Model 1.109. The data on aerosol vertical distribution enabled input parameters for the empirical equation of Jaenicke (1993) to be derived for Siberian troposphere up to 7 km. Vertical distributions of aerosol number concentration in different size ranges averaged for the main seasons of the year will be presented. This work was supported by Interdisciplinary integration projects of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science No. 35, No. 70 and No. 131; the Branch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00526). Jaenicke R. Tropospheric aerosols, in Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions, edited by P.V. Hobs. -Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 1993.- P. 1-31.

  6. Metal Adornments of Clothing and Headwear in the Bronze Age of Western Siberia (issues of research and reconstruction ..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umerenkova Olga V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers issues related to the principals of scientific approach, methods and procedure of costume reconstruction on the basis of archaeological materials dating back to the Bronze Age discovered in the territory of Western Siberia. The costume is considered by researchers as one of the brightest manifestations of material culture. Its decoration provides multidisciplinary information containing elements of ideology and aesthetic norms together with traditions and social relationships. Reconstruction of clothing and headwear adornments in archaeological literature related to the Bronze Age is one of the understudied topics. Researchers use various sources for its recreation: archaeological materials, written historical, literature and folklore sources, and fine art items. A significant amount of source items has accumulated over the last decades, although the analysis and principles of processing thereof have not been sufficiently covered in special literature. In order to increase the informative capabilities of adornments as sources for the reconstruction of the Bronze Age costume, the author suggested a scheme of accounting for the location of adornments with respect to the remains of the buried when the excavations are documented. The article features the results of the author's reconstruction of women's headwear decoration with metal articles executed on the basis of Bronze Age materials.

  7. VERSHINA – A POLISH VILLAGE IN SIBERIA. FACTORS INFLUENCING LANGUAGE MAINTENANCE UNDER CHANGING SOCIAL, CULTURAL, ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Głuszkowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses factors influencing language maintenance under changing social, cultural, economic and political conditions of Polish minority in Siberia. The village of Vershina was founded in 1910 by Polish voluntary settlers from Little Poland.During its first three decades Vershina preserved Polish language,traditions, farming methods and machines and also the Roman Catholic religion. The changes came to a village in taiga in the1930s. Vershina lost its ethnocultural homogeneity because of Russian and Buryat workers in the local kolkhoz. Nowadays the inhabitants of Vershina regained their minority rights: religious, educational and cultural. However, during the years of sovietization and ateization, their culture and customs became much more similar to other Siberian villages. Polish language in Vershina is under strong influence of Russian, which is the language of education,administration, and surrounding villages. Children from Polish-Russian families become monolingual and use Polish very rare, only asa school subject and in contacts with grandparents. The process of abandoning mother tongue in Vershina is growing rapidly. However,there are some factors which may hinder the actual changes:the activity of local Polish organisations and Roman Catholic parish as well as folk group “Jazhumbek”.

  8. Late Glacial and Early Holocene Climatic Changes Based on a Multiproxy Lacustrine Sediment Record from Northeast Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokorowski, H D; Anderson, P M; Sletten, R S; Lozhkin, A V; Brown, T A

    2008-05-20

    Palynological (species assemblage, pollen accumulation rate), geochemical (carbon to nitrogen ratios, organic carbon and biogenic silica content), and sedimentological (particle size, magnetic susceptibility) data combined with improved chronology and greater sampling resolution from a new core from Elikchan 4 Lake provide a stronger basis for defining paleoenvironmental changes than was previously possible. Persistence of herb-dominated tundra, slow expansion of Betula and Alnus shrubs, and low percentages of organic carbon and biogenic silica suggest that the Late-Glacial transition (ca. 16,000-11,000 cal. yr BP) was a period of gradual rather than abrupt vegetation and climatic change. Consistency of all Late-Glacial data indicates no Younger Dryas climatic oscillation. A dramatic peak in pollen accumulation rates (ca. 11,000-9800 cal. yr BP) suggests a possible summer temperature optimum, but finer grain-sizes, low magnetic susceptibility, and greater organic carbon and biogenic silica, while showing significant warming at ca. 11,000 cal. yr BP, offer no evidence of a Holocene thermal maximum. When compared to trends in other paleo-records, the new Elikchan data underscore the apparent spatial complexity of climatic responses in Northeast Siberia to global forcings between ca. 16,000-9000 cal. yr BP.

  9. The role of conodonts in the global stratigraphic correlation on example of southern Siberia (Russia and eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodygin Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conodonts are very precise tools for global stratigraphic correlation of Devonian deposits. They can be correlated at the level of standard conodont zones even for basins having very different geological structure. In this paper Devonian conodont correlations between north-western margin of the Kuznetsk Basin (Siberia and eastern Serbia are demonstrated. The geology of both regions is quite different. East Serbian zone is the southern tip of the Carpathian folded area (Carpatho-Balkanides. Middle Paleozoic carbonate and terrigenous deposits (Silurian, Devonian and Lower Carboniferous are replaced by Hercynian molasse, and sedimentation continued throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras. Rocks were exposed to repeatedly tectonic effects, olistoliths, olistostromes are widespread. Middle Paleozoic sediments, including Devonian, are localized within separate small tectonic blocks, often shifted from its place and form allochthons. In the western part of the Altai-Sayan folded area the Middle Paleozoic sediments have undergone folding and orogeny during the Hercynian phase of tectonic and magmatic activity, but since that time the continental conditions have been dominant in this region. The Devonian deposits are well represented in the marginal parts of the Kuznetsk Basin. In both regions the Devonian rocks have been well studied and the standard conodont zones varcus, gigas (rhenana - linguiformis, crepida, expansa and praesulcata were established.

  10. Features of seasonal temperature variations in peat soils of oligotrophic bogs in south taiga of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. V.; Dyukarev, E. A.; Voropay, N. N.

    2018-03-01

    The work presents the results of the study of the peculiarities of the temperature regime in the five basic ecosystems of oligotrophic bogs in the south taiga zone of Western Siberia in 2011-2016. The soil temperature regime was studied using the atmospheric-soil measuring complex at different depths from surface down to 240 cm. All sites were divided into two groups according to the bog water level: flooded sites (hollow and open fen) and drained sites (ridge, tall and low ryam). The waterlogged sites are better warmed in the summer period and slowly freeze in the winter period. The analysis of the annual cycle of temperature showed that the maximum surface temperature is in July. The minimum temperature on the surface is observed in February or January. The greatest temperature gradient was recorded in the upper 2 cm layer. The gradient at the open fen was -2 °C/cm in February and 1.1 °C/cm in October. The peak of formation of the seasonally frozen layer occurs at the end of autumn or in the beginning of winter. The degradation of the seasonally frozen layer was observed both from top and bottom, but the degradation rate from the top is faster.

  11. The peculiarities of food allergies in accordance with the level of injury of respiratory tract in children of Eastern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Irina V; Smirnova, Svetlana V

    2013-01-01

    To determine the course of food allergy in accordance with the level of respiratory tract injury in children of Eastern Siberia. We have examined 70 children aged 2-16 , who have food sensibilization. We divided them into 2 groups: group I (n = 32) with diseases of the upper and middle respiratory tract; and group II (n = 38) with diseases of the lower respiratory tract. Allergological medical history, clinical laboratory examination and immunological examination, including the determination of IgA, IgM, IgG and IgE in blood serum. In cases where causal allergens were found, elimination diets were recommended. Onset of upper respiratory tract injury in group I was more often registered in children aged 0-1; in group II, it was in the 3-7 age group. Isolated food sensibilization was more often marked in group I as compared to group II. Atopic mechanisms of respiratory tract injuries were more often registered in group II children. In the course of the elimination diet, we marked positive dynamics in 100% of group I and in 75% of group II. The most frequent allergens that cause respiratory forms of food allergy are hen eggs, cow milk, nutritive cereals, vegetables and fruit. Indices of a humoral link of immunity in the examined patients were more often registered as normal or their level is increased. Timely etiotropic therapy in the majority of cases allows for a stabilization of allergic inflammation.

  12. Tracks, spurs, blobs and delta-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.L.; Chatterjee, A.

    1983-01-01

    The track of a high-energy particle is the collection of all transient species created by the particle in the total degradation of its energy. Visible electron tracks are called delta rays. A microscopic description of the track with all its knocked-out electrons leads to spurs, blobs, and short tracks. Energy deposition criteria for these three track entities are 6 to 100 eV, 100 to 500 eV, and 500 eV to 5 keV, respectively

  13. The situation in the Niger Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitalis, E.

    2007-01-01

    An energy issue for the United States and a political challenge for Europe, Nigeria is experiencing growing instability and is on the verge of civil war; the ecosystem and the population of the Niger Delta are the main victims. The State, corrupt, is powerless to contain the rising violence and redistribute the proceeds of oil sales. It is high time for oil-consuming countries, starting with the United States, to concern themselves with stabilizing the region. Europe must contribute to the lasting development of this country. (author)

  14. Subsurface Miocene sequence stratigraphic framework in the Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, Sherif; Ziko, Abdelmohsen; Eweda, Shehtta A.; Said, Ali E.

    2014-03-01

    The Miocene depositional history of the Nile Delta is dominated by fluvial-deltaic, marginal marine and marine shelf sedimentation. It exhibits radical lateral facies changes due to its tectonic setting. Different attributions in age assignments characterise the Miocene Nile Delta due to the lack of large vertical facies changes, which consists mainly of siliciclastic with different environments. This study uses integrating lithologic, biostratigraphic, gamma-ray log and benthic foraminiferal biofacies, at four boreholes (Tanta-1, Rommana-1X, El-Fayrouz and Rosetta-7) in the Nile Delta, Egypt. Planktonic foraminifera allow subdivision of the Miocene Nile Delta succession into 12 planktonic biozones and benthic species are used in paleobathymetic estimates.

  15. Upper-division student difficulties with the Dirac delta function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany R. Wilcox

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool that appears repeatedly in the undergraduate physics curriculum in multiple topical areas including electrostatics, and quantum mechanics. While Dirac delta functions are often introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students still struggle to manipulate and interpret them. To characterize student difficulties with the delta function at the upper-division level, we examined students’ responses to traditional exam questions and a standardized conceptual assessment, and conducted think-aloud interviews. Our analysis was guided by an analytical framework that focuses on how students activate, construct, execute, and reflect on the Dirac delta function in the context of problem solving in physics. Here, we focus on student difficulties using the delta function to express charge distributions in the context of junior-level electrostatics. Common challenges included invoking the delta function spontaneously, translating a description of a charge distribution into a mathematical expression using delta functions, integrating 3D or non-Cartesian delta function expressions, and recognizing that the delta function can have units. We also briefly discuss implications of these difficulties for instruction.

  16. Optimality and self-organization in river deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, A.; Longjas, A.; Edmonds, D. A.; Zaliapin, I. V.; Georgiou, T. T.; Rinaldo, A.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2017-12-01

    Deltas are nourished by channel networks, whose connectivity constrains, if not drives, the evolution, functionality and resilience of these systems. Understanding the coevolution of deltaic channels and their flux organization is crucial for guiding maintenance strategies of these highly stressed systems from a range of anthropogenic activities. However, in contrast to tributary channel networks, to date, no theory has been proposed to explain how deltas self-organize to distribute water and sediment to the delta top and the shoreline. Here, we hypothesize the existence of an optimality principle underlying the self-organized partition of fluxes in delta channel networks. Specifically, we hypothesize that deltas distribute water and sediment fluxes on a given delta topology such as to maximize the diversity of flux delivery to the shoreline. By introducing the concept of nonlocal Entropy Rate (nER) and analyzing ten field deltas in diverse environments, we present evidence that supports our hypothesis, suggesting that delta networks achieve dynamically accessible maxima of their nER. Furthermore, by analyzing six simulated deltas using the Delf3D model and following their topologic and flux re-organization before and after major avulsions, we further study the evolution of nER and confirm our hypothesis. We discuss how optimal flux distributions in terms of nER, when interpreted in terms of resilience, are configurations that reflect an increased ability to withstand perturbations.

  17. CMS: Aboveground Biomass for Mangrove Forest, Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides several estimates of aboveground biomass from various regressions and allometries for mangrove forest in the Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique....

  18. Delta Alliance Young Professionals Award: Innovative solutions for delta challenges worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, I.; Miguel Ayala, L.; Driel, van W.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deltas are fragile, dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and ocean. They belong to the most valuable, but at the same time also to the most vulnerable areas in the world. With increasing pressure from population growth, industrialization and changing climate, it is more important than ever that

  19. Adaptive delta management: a comparison between the Netherlands and Bangladesh Delta Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zevenbergen, Chris; Khan, Shah Alam; Alphen, van Jos; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Catharien; Veerbeek, William

    2018-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the central government, water authorities, provinces and municipalities are working together on a new Delta Program on Flood Risk Management and Fresh Water Supply (DP). Its primary goal is to protect the Netherlands against floods and ensure the availability of fresh water, now

  20. Delta Plaza kohvik = The Delta Plaza Café / Margit Mutso

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mutso, Margit, 1966-

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Pärnu mnt. 141 asuva kohviku Delta Plaza sisekujundusest. Sisearhitektid Tiiu Truus ja Marja Viltrop (Stuudio Truus OÜ). Hoone arhitektid Jüri Okas ja Marika Lõoke (AB J. Okas & M. Lõoke). Žürii liikme Mait Summataveti arvamus kohvikust

  1. Experimental delta formation in crater lakes and implications for interpretation of martian deltas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villiers, G. de; Kleinhans, M.G.; Postma, G.

    2013-01-01

    The morphology of delta deposits in crater lakes on Mars is indicative of upstream (e.g., flow discharge and sediment properties) and downstream (e.g., basin characteristics) parameters, from which the hydrological conditions at the time of formation can be inferred. To investigate the influences of

  2. Vortex Breakdown over Slender Delta Wings (Eclatement tourbillonnaire sur les ailes delta effil es)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    taps See Fig. 1. Pressure taps Number of pressure taps and thermocouple 57 taps on 65° delta wing, 3 taps on canter body of 55° diamond and...Sedra Walton, Scott Thompson, Paul Olsen, Andrew Arena, Todd Graves, Thomas Quast, Kenneth Cheung, Deborah Grismer, David Williams, Alain Pelletier

  3. Tidal modulated flow and sediment flux through Wax Lake Delta distributary channels: Implications for delta development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hanegan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a Delft3D model of the Wax Lake Delta was developed to simulate flow and sediment flux through delta distributary channels. The model was calibrated for tidal constituents as well as velocity and sediment concentration across channel transects. The calibrated model was then used to simulate full spring–neap tidal cycles under constant low flow upstream boundary conditions, with grain size variation in suspended load represented using two sediment fractions. Flow and sediment flux results through distributary channel cross-sections were examined for spatial and temporal variability with the goal of characterizing the role of tides in sediment reworking and delta development. The Wax Lake Delta has prograded through channel extension, river mouth bar deposition, and channel bifurcation. Here we show that tidal modulation of currents influences suspended sand transport, and spatial acceleration through distributary channels at low tides is sufficient to suspend sand in distal reaches during lower flows. The basinward-increasing transport capacity in distributary channels indicates that erosive channel extension could be an important process, even during non-flood events.

  4. Catalyzing action towards the sustainability of deltas: deltas as integrated socio-ecological systems and sentinels of regional and global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Tessler, Z. D.; Brondizio, E.; Overeem, I.; Renaud, F.; Sebesvari, Z.; Nicholls, R. J.; Anthony, E.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas are highly dynamic and productive environments: they are food baskets of the world, home to biodiverse and rich ecosystems, and they play a central role in food and water security. However, they are becoming increasingly vulnerable to risks arising from human activities, land subsidence, regional water management, global sea-level rise, and climate extremes. Our Belmont Forum DELTAS project (BF-DELTAS: Catalyzing actions towards delta sustainability) encompasses an international network of interdisciplinary research collaborators with focal areas in the Mekong, Ganges Brahmaputra, and the Amazon deltas. The project is organized around five main modules: (1) developing an analytical framework for assessing delta vulnerability and scenarios of change (Delta-SRES), (2) developing an open-acess, science-based integrative modeling framework for risk assessment and decision support (Delta-RADS), (3) developing tools to support quantitative mapping of the bio-physical and socio-economic environments of deltas and consolidate bio-physical and social data within shared data repositories (Delta-DAT), (4) developing Global Delta Vulnerability Indices (Delta-GDVI) that capture current and projected scenarios for major deltas around the world , and (5) collaborating with regional stakeholders to put the science, modeling, and data into action (Delta-ACT). In this talk, a research summary will be presented on three research domains around which significant collaborative work was developed: advancing biophysical classification of deltas, understanding deltas as coupled socio-ecological systems, and analyzing and informing social and environmental vulnerabilities in delta regions.

  5. In vivo metabolism of the methyl homologues of delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and abn-delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, N K; Harvey, D J

    1988-04-01

    Methyl-delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (methyl-delta-8-THC), methyl-delta-9-THC and abn-methyl-delta-8-THC were synthesized by condensation of orcinol and (1S)-cis-verbenol and were administered to male Charles River CD-1 mice. Extracted hepatic metabolites were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as trimethylsilyl (TMS), (2H9)TMS and methyl ester/TMS derivatives. In addition, metabolic fractions were reduced with lithium aluminium deuteride to convert carboxylic acids to alcohols for structural correlation. Metabolites from methyl-delta-8-THC were similar with respect to the positions substituted to those produced by higher homologues; the major metabolite was methyl-delta-8-THC-11-oic acid. abn-Methyl-delta-8-THC was metabolized in a different manner. The location of the aromatic methyl group at the position adjacent to ring fusion appeared to inhibit metabolism at C(11) to a considerable extent and also to reduce the amount of the resulting alcohol from being oxidized to a carboxylic acid. This caused other metabolic pathways to become dominant, with the result that a compound containing a hydroxy group at the gem-methyl position was the major metabolite. Hydroxylation at this position has not been confirmed with any other cannabinoid, although it is thought to result in trace concentrations of hydroxy metabolites from some compounds. Metabolism of methyl-delta-9-THC was also similar to that of the higher homologues, with the exception that less metabolism occurred at C(8) and a higher percentage of the total metabolic fraction was accounted for by the 11-oic acid metabolite. Minor metabolites were mainly dihydroxy compounds and hydroxylated derivatives of delta-9-THC-11-oic acid.

  6. Spectral factorization using the delta operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Morten; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1994-01-01

    In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral-factorize i......In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral......-factorize in an efficient way. The discrete-time method of Kuccera will not be applied since numerical word-length characteristics will be poor for fast sampling rates. In this paper a new approach is considered. A new gamma-operator (Tustin operator) is introduced, in order to make an iterative and numerical stable...... solution to the spectral factorization problem. The key idea is to use the gamma-operator resembled by its behavior to the differential operator....

  7. Sediment and Vegetation Controls on Delta Channel Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, R.; Murray, A. B.; Piliouras, A.; Kim, W.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous factors control the patterns of distributary channels formed on a delta, including water and sediment discharge, grain size, sea level rise rates, and vegetation type. In turn, these channel networks influence the shape and evolution of a delta, including what types of plant and animal life - such as humans - it can support. Previous fluvial modeling and flume experiments, outside of the delta context, have addressed how interactions between sediment and vegetation, through their influence on lateral transport of sediment, determine what type of channel networks develops. Similar interactions likely also shape delta flow patterns. Vegetation introduces cohesion, tending to reduce channel migration rates and strengthen existing channel banks, reinforcing existing channels and resulting in localized, relatively stable flow patterns. On the other hand, sediment transport processes can result in lateral migration and frequent switching of active channels, resulting in flow resembling that of a braided stream. While previous studies of deltas have indirectly explored the effects of vegetation through the introduction of cohesive sediment, we directly incorporate key effects of vegetation on flow and sediment transport into the delta-building model DeltaRCM to explore how these effects influence delta channel network formation. Model development is informed by laboratory flume experiments at UT Austin. Here we present initial results of experiments exploring the effects of sea level rise rate, sediment grain size, vegetation type, and vegetation growth rate on delta channel network morphology. These results support the hypothesis that the ability for lateral transport of sediment to occur plays a key role in determining the evolution of delta channel networks and delta morphology.

  8. Il limite e l’altrove: il mito di Jean-Paul Belmondo nella Siberia di Andreï Makine The Bound and the Elsewhere: the Myth of Jean-Paul Belmondo in Andreï Makine’s Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Abignente

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The narrative work of Andreï Makine (1957, a French writer of Siberian origin, is situated on the border between two geographical and cultural spaces: on the one hand the wide, wild and snowy Siberia of his childhood; on the other hand France, a mythic place which the main characters, often teenagers, of his novels look at as a model. The contrast between these two worlds is described in a particularly forceful way in one of his early novels, Au temps du fleuve Amour (1994, in which the author tells the overwhelming effect of the screening of a popular French comedy with Jean-Paul Belmondo (Le Magnifique, 1973 in a small Siberian village. Looking closely at the entire sequence which is devoted to the film in the novel, the paper aims to reconstruct the process of mythicizing the Belmondo character by the three young protagonists and to investigate the functions that the episode covers in the novel. Focusing on the different narrative levels that characterize the film plot, we show how the “phenomenon Belmondo” embodies in the novel the idea of a triple border: a geographic one (Europe/Asia, an expressive one (writing/imagine and, above all, an imaginary one (reality/fiction. We also show how this phenomenon refers, in the novel, to one of the central themes of Makine’s work: literary vocation.The narrative work of Andreï Makine (1957, a French writer of Siberian origin, is situated on the border between two geographical and cultural spaces: on the one hand the wide, wild and snowy Siberia of his childhood; on the other hand France, a mythic place which the main characters, often teenagers, of his novels look at as a model. The contrast between these two worlds is described in a particularly forceful way in one of his early novels, Au temps du fleuve Amour (1994, in which the author tells the overwhelming effect of the screening of a popular French comedy with Jean-Paul Belmondo (Le Magnifique, 1973 in a small Siberian village. Looking

  9. Complex rearrangements within the human J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus and aberrant recombination between J alpha segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baer, R.; Boehm, T.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; Rabbitts, T. H.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined DNA rearrangements within a 120 kb cloned region of the human T cell receptor J delta-C delta/J alpha-C alpha locus. Three types of pattern emerge from an analysis of T cell lines and clones. Firstly, cells with two rearrangements within J delta-C delta; secondly, cells with one

  10. Spatio-temporal distributions of delta18O, delta D and salinity in the Arabian Sea: Identifying processes and controls

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deshpande, R.D; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Singh, R.L.; Kumar, B; Rao, M.S.; Dave, M.; Sivakumar, K.U.; Gupta, S.K.

    of these parameters. From the distributions of delta18O and salinity (S), and the relationships between delta18OdeltaD and delta18O–S, the following inferences have been drawn: (1) there is a broad correspondence between...

  11. The Concentration Dependence of the (Delta)s Term in the Gibbs Free Energy Function: Application to Reversible Reactions in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Ronald K.

    2004-01-01

    The concentration dependence of (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy function is described in relation to its application to reversible reactions in biochemistry. An intuitive and non-mathematical argument for the concentration dependence of the (delta)S term in the Gibbs free energy equation is derived and the applicability of the equation to…

  12. The evolution of a subaqueous delta in the Anthropocene: A stratigraphic investigation of the Brazos River delta, TX USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Joseph A.; Dellapenna, Timothy M.

    2015-12-01

    Globally, deltas are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic activities. As a result, deltas now evolve through the combined effects of natural and human-induced processes occurring throughout the fluvial-deltaic system. The Brazos River delta, located along the Texas coast in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and its watershed have been impacted by direct and indirect human activities since the late 19th century. This provides an opportunity to investigate how such alterations have shaped the evolution of a delta in the Anthropocene, a time when humans are drivers of geological change. Historic alteration to the delta and watershed include extensive agricultural activity, jetty construction at the mouth in the late 1890s, mouth diversion ~10 km to the southwest in 1929, and reservoir construction throughout the early and mid 20th Century. Three subaerial deltaic geometries provided the framework to connect subaerial deltaic responses, to the anthropogenic alterations, to the resulting stratigraphic characteristics observed in the subaqueous delta. This study utilized high-resolution geophysical data (swath bathymetry, side scan sonar, CHIRP subbottom profiling) on the subaqueous delta to investigate the subaqueous delta stratigraphy and infer the processes that shaped the deltaic record over time. The results showed distinct areas across the subaqueous delta that were dominated by erosion and deposition. Erosional areas corresponded to earlier growth phase depocenters being exposed at the surface, while the depositional areas corresponded to areas with the most recent growth phase depocenter overlying the earlier depocenters. These results highlight that the subaqueous depocenter has migrated westward over time, consistent with the observed changes to the subaerial delta. Additionally, the data showed that evidence for these past growth phases and depocenters may be preserved within the subaqueous delta, even after subaerial portions of the delta returned to pre

  13. Losing ground in mega-deltas: basin-scale response to existential threats to the Mekong Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M. E.; Kondolf, G. M.; Schmitt, R. J. P.; Carling, P. A.; Darby, S. E.; Bizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.; Cochrane, T. A.; Gibson, S.; Kummu, M.; Oeurng, C.; Rubin, Z.; Wild, T. B.

    2017-12-01

    The Mekong Delta is, in terms of the number of livelihoods it supports, its economic importance, and in its vulnerability to climate change and sinking lands, one of the world's critically threatened mega-deltas. Livelihoods depend on the mere existence of the delta, but also on ecosystem services provided by the delta's drainage basin spanning 795,000 km2 in six abutting countries. These ecosystem services include delivery of sand required to build delta land in the face of rising sea-levels and sediment bound nutrients, provision of spawning habitat for fish that are ultimately harvested in the delta, and hydrologic regulation driving the delta's unique flood-pulse regime. However, while the delta is mainly located in Vietnam, the basin of the Mekong River is shared among China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. In the context of the region's dynamic growth, individual countries are pushing their own development agendas, which include extensive dam building, in-channel sand mining, construction of dykes and canals, and groundwater pumping, all of which contribute to subsidence and erosion of the Delta. Our synthesis of recent research indicates that most of the Mekong's delta land will likely fall below sea-level by 2100 as result of these drivers, exacerbating the impacts of global climatic changes. In this context, local infrastructural projects and changes in land- and water-management may temporarily mitigate some negative effects, but do not address the existential threat to the delta as a whole. To prevent, or at least substantially postpone, the drowning of the Mekong Delta requires identification of the key drivers and immediate concerted management actions on the basin-scale to change the trajectory of subsidence and sediment deficit. A specific challenge is to find the institutional arrangements in this transnational context that could support the needed management changes and equitably distribute costs and impacts. The Mekong Delta is

  14. Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger delta: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim in this paper is to make a comparative analysis of Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger Delta of Nigeria. It will not be out of place to carry out such an analysis having seen, heard or read of the ongoing chaos, insecurity in the. Niger Delta Zone in Nigeria. We have to look at the past to find out such similar

  15. Population changes and food insecurity in the Niger Delta | Ajake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines the population trend and the prices of staple food in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria from 1991 to 2002. The survey reveals that population increase is the major factor for unsustainable production, unavailability and inaccessibility of vital food resources required by the people of the Niger Delta.

  16. NESG BOOK REVIEW: A Review of Niger Delta Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this thought-provoking review of the 2006 UNDP Niger Delta Human Development Report, the author examines the multidimensional nature of the problems of the Niger Delta and its effect on income, education, life expectancy of the host communities, and environmental sustainability, which has undermined the ...

  17. Oil politics and violence in postcolonial Niger Delta drama | Otu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However contributory issues of ethnicity and marginalization may be to the crises rocking the Niger Delta, the crux of the matter, this paper argues, is that by polluting Niger Delta communities (youth groups, chiefs, economic and political elite) with the viruses of greed, corruption and violence, the collective aspirations and ...

  18. Downstream hydraulic geometry of a tidally influenced river delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Brye, de B.; Deleersnijder, E.

    2012-01-01

    Channel geometry in tidally influenced river deltas can show a mixed scaling behavior between that of river and tidal channel networks, as the channel forming discharge is both of river and tidal origin. We present a method of analysis to quantify the tidal signature on delta morphology, by

  19. Delta's paradise: a challenge for lan[d]scape architects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, te J.K.M.; Toorn, van den M.W.M.

    1996-01-01

    Paradise as a metaphor has always played an important role in art. This is definitely true for the art of garden design, but paradise is also a metaphor that can be used for the landscape. Some of the most interesting landscapes are found in deltas. Deltas are rich in natural and economic potential.

  20. Wastewater disposal at safari lodges in the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wastewater disposal at safari lodges in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. TS McCarthy, T Gumbricht, RG Stewart, D Brandt, PJ Hancox, J McCarthy, AG Duse. Abstract. Many safari lodges in the Okavango Delta obtain their water supply from boreholes in near-surface aquifers while disposing of their wastewater via ...

  1. Occurrence of elevated nitrate in groundwaters of Krishna delta, India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate concentrations were measured in the groundwater samples of Krishna delta, India. The results indicate a large variation of nitrate from 10 - 135 mg/l. In 79 groundwater samples, about 39% shows high nitrate contents (>50 mg/l), which is more than the permissible limits in drinking water. In north Krishna delta 49% ...

  2. Pattern of Complicated Unsafe Abortions in Niger Delta University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    developing world. This study aims to determine the pattern of complicated unsafe abortions in Niger delta. University Teaching Hospital (NDUTH) Okolobiri. Methods: The study is a four-year retrospective analysis of cases of complicated unsafe abortion managed at the. Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri,.

  3. Central Delta languages: An overview | Kari | Stellenbosch Papers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an overview of the phonology, morphology and syntax of Central Delta languages. It also provides information on the geo-linguistic, demographic and sociolinguistic situation of these languages. It notes that Central Delta languages have a 20-vowel system, which divides into two sets of 10 vowels ...

  4. West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network (WIoDER) aims to support research, training, and pilot interventions in up to four Western Indian Ocean river deltas under pressure from human activity. Research will examine in particular the links between population mobility, agriculture, climate change, ...

  5. 78 FR 45592 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ..., Suite 160, Pittsford, NY 14534. The financing was contemplated for working capital. The financing is... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [License No. 02/02-0662] DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP; Notice Seeking... given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45 East Avenue, 6th Floor, Rochester, NY 14604, Federal...

  6. An annotated list of Fishes from the Niger Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1963-01-01

    At the end of November 1960, the Leiden Museum received an interesting collection of animals, mostly fishes, from the Niger delta. All specimens were collected by Mr. H. J. G. Beets, at the time employed by Shell B.P. — Delta Investigations, during the period May to August 1960, and in the region

  7. Remote stereocontrol by sulfinyl groups: reduction of delta-ketosulfoxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ruano, José L; Fernández-Ibáñez, M Angeles; Maestro, M Carmen; Rodríguez-Fernández, M Mercedes

    2005-03-04

    The reduction of delta-ketosulfoxides constitutes the first evidence of the efficiency of the sulfinyl group to control the stereoselectivity of 1,5-asymmetric induction processes. The use of DIBAL/Yb(OTf)3 or L-Selectride as the reducing agents provides delta-hydroxysulfoxides with the opposite configuration at the hydroxylic carbon in a highly stereoselective way.

  8. How to deal with subsidence in the Dutch delta?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthamer, E.; Erkens, G.

    2017-01-01

    In many deltas worldwide subsidence still is an underestimated problem, while the threat posed by land subsidence low-lying urbanizing and urbanized deltas exceeds the threat of sea-level rise induced by climate change. Human-induced subsidence is driven by the extraction of hydrocarbons and

  9. Dousing the tension in the Niger delta through administrative agency

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dousing the tension in the Niger delta through administrative agency: A programme evaluation of Niger delta development commission as an intervention regime. ... the study concludes that because of systemic constraints arising from the hegemonic interests of the dominant coalitions in the Nigerian Social formation, ...

  10. Estimation of Thermal Conductivity in the North- Western Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal conductivity estimates are computed from nineteen petroleum wells in the north-western Niger Delta, Nigeria, using a geometric mean model. Sonic and gamma-ray logs were digitised and used in the estimation of in situ conductivity. The Niger Delta is composed of three major diachronous lithostratigraphic units of ...

  11. Terahertz radiation from delta-doped GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Hansen, Ole; Sørensen, Claus Birger

    1994-01-01

    Terahertz pulse emission from four different delta-doped molecular beam epitaxially grown GaAs samples is studied. We observe a decrease of the emitted THz pulse amplitude as the distance of the delta-doped layer from the surface is increased, and a change in polarity of the THz pulses as compare...

  12. Gamma/delta T lymphocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikó, Z; Szereday, L; Szekeres-Bartho, J

    1997-04-01

    Data on the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis are few and contradictory. The percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and healthy controls was compared. Thirty six patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 11 healthy controls were studied. Lymphocytes were separated, cytocentrifuged onto glass microscope slides, and reacted with anti-gamma/delta monoclonal antibody. The percentage of gamma/delta positive cells was determined by microscopic counting of 300 lymphocytes. No difference was found in the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes between patients and controls. However, when the patients were divided into two groups according to reactivity or non-reactivity in the Mantoux skin reaction a higher percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes was found in the peripheral blood of patients with tuberculin anergy than in tuberculin positive patients or controls. Higher gamma/delta T cell counts are found in tuberculin negative patients with tuberculosis than in tuberculin positive patients or tuberculin positive controls. The high gamma/delta T cell counts in tuberculin anergic patients may reflect a shift in the immune response in a Th2 direction characterised by increased antibody production and decreased cell mediated responses.

  13. Ecosystem services of the Niger Delta Forests, Nigeria | Ezenwaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research aimed to appraise the Niger Delta forest ecosystem services. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment framework was used to categorize the potential benefits from the Niger Delta forests. Data was collected from 90 respondents drawn from selected rural and urban communities. While the urban respondents ...

  14. Niger Delta Crisis and Security Implications for the Nation State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Niger Delta is the nation's treasure base, the Niger Delta provides over 80 percent of government revenue, 95 percent of export receipts, and 90 percent of ... The government should tackle the fundamental issue of basic necessities – provision of good motorable roads, pipe borne water, electricity, good hospitals, good ...

  15. Conflict resolution among Niger delta communities: A historical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conflict related issues have assumed endemic proportion in the Niger Delta. A proper assessment of the critical factors in motion must take cognizance of their historical underpinnings. Peaceful co-existence, the hallmark of conflict resolution, can be feasible in the Niger Delta, through sustainable dialogue. These, among

  16. Deltas, Vulnerability, and Climate Change: Migration as an Adaptation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Deltas in Africa and South Asia have some of the highest population densities in the world. Many residents along the deltas live in poverty and depend on livelihoods that are sensitive to a changing climate. This research project will examine the issue. Specifically, it will assess migration as a climate change adaptation ...

  17. Delta: the first pion nucleon resonance - its discovery and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, D.E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described

  18. Drones on the delta | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    25 nov. 2016 ... Waves wash ashore at Fuvemeh, a town in Ghana's Volta River delta that's threatened by coastal erosion and flooding. Brian Owens, Canadian Geographic. Ghana's Volta River delta is an area vulnerable to climate change, with rising seas and increasingly powerful storms driving flooding and erosion, ...

  19. Towards a Comprehensive Framework for Adaptive Delta Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    Deltas are dynamic landforms at the boundary of land and sea, involving intricate mazes of rivers and small waterways, wetlands, estuaries and coastal barrier islands. They are home to over half a billion people. Deltas are also home to rich ecosystems, such as mangroves and marshes. They are

  20. Utilization Of Yam Minisett Technology Among Farmers In Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the utilization of minisett technology among farmers in Delta North Agricultural Zone of Delta State, Nigeria. Two local government areas were purposively sampled based on their outstanding involvement in yam production. Two communities were also purposively selected from the area from where 50 ...

  1. The Economic Dimensions of the Niger Delta Ethnic Conflicts (Pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Niger Delta in the sharing of the economic and political benefits of the oil and gas .... however a sense of shared deprivation have strengthened identification with .... economy. Another strategy to diffuse the ethnic tension in the Niger Delta is to grant the area limited autonomy. This is what some leaders called “resource.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta activation leads to increased transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.; van der Velde, Astrid E.; van den Oever, Karin; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Huet, Stephane; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR delta) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR delta markedly increases fecal neutral sterol secretion, the last step in reverse cholesterol transport. This phenomenon can neither be explained by increased

  3. Changes to subaqueous delta bathymetry following a high river flow event, Wax Lake Delta, LA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaling, A. R.; Shaw, J.

    2017-12-01

    Sediment transport capacity is increased during high river flow (flood) events which are characterized by discharges that exceed the 15 year median daily statistic. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) in coastal Louisiana has experienced 19 of these high flow events in the past 20 years, yet the depositional patterns of single floods are rarely measured in a field-scale deltaic setting. We characterize flood deposition and erosion patterns on the subaqueous portion of the WLD by differencing two Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) constructed from bathymetric surveys before and after the third largest flood in the WLD's recorded history. The total suspended sediment discharge for the 496 day inter-survey period was 2.14x107 cubic meters measured 21 km upstream of the delta apex. The difference map showed 1.06x107 cubic meters of sediment was deposited and 8.2x106 cubic meters was eroded, yielding 2.40x106 cubic meters of net deposition in the survey area ( 79.7 km2 ). Therefore the average deposition rate was 0.061 mm/day. Channel planform remained relatively unchanged for five out of six distributary passes however Gadwall Pass experienced a maximum channel displacement of 166 m ( 1 channel width) measured from the thalweg centerline. Channel tip extension was negligible. In addition, channel displacement was not concentrated at any portion along the channel centerline. Maximum erosion occurred within channel margins and increased upstream whereas maximum deposition occurred immediately outside the channel margins. Sediment eroded from the survey area was either subsequently re-deposited or transported out of the system. Our results show that up to 77.4% of deposition in the survey area originated from sediment eroded during the flood. Surprisingly, only 11.2% of the total suspended sediment discharge was retained in the subaqueous portion of the delta after the flood. We conclude that a high flow event does not produce channel progradation. Rather, high flow causes delta

  4. Studies on the metabolism of the Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol precursor Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (Delta9-THCA-A) in rat using LC-MS/MS, LC-QTOF MS and GC-MS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H; Neusüss, Christian; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Auwärter, Volker

    2009-10-01

    In Cannabis sativa, Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (Delta9-THCA-A) is the non-psychoactive precursor of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC). In fresh plant material, about 90% of the total Delta9-THC is available as Delta9-THCA-A. When heated (smoked or baked), Delta9-THCA-A is only partially converted to Delta9-THC and therefore, Delta9-THCA-A can be detected in serum and urine of cannabis consumers. The aim of the presented study was to identify the metabolites of Delta9-THCA-A and to examine particularly whether oral intake of Delta9-THCA-A leads to in vivo formation of Delta9-THC in a rat model. After oral application of pure Delta9-THCA-A to rats (15 mg/kg body mass), urine samples were collected and metabolites were isolated and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and high resolution LC-MS using time of flight-mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) for accurate mass measurement. For detection of Delta9-THC and its metabolites, urine extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identified metabolites show that Delta9-THCA-A undergoes a hydroxylation in position 11 to 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (11-OH-Delta9-THCA-A), which is further oxidized via the intermediate aldehyde 11-oxo-Delta9-THCA-A to 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A (Delta9-THCA-A-COOH). Glucuronides of the parent compound and both main metabolites were identified in the rat urine as well. Furthermore, Delta9-THCA-A undergoes hydroxylation in position 8 to 8-alpha- and 8-beta-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid-A, respectively, (8alpha-Hydroxy-Delta9-THCA-A and 8beta-Hydroxy-Delta9-THCA-A, respectively) followed by dehydration. Both monohydroxylated metabolites were further oxidized to their bishydroxylated forms. Several glucuronidation conjugates of these metabolites were identified. In vivo conversion of Delta9-THCA-A to Delta9-THC was

  5. Cystic fibrosis Delta F508 heterozygotes, smoking, and reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Wittrup, H H

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasian populations. It remains a puzzle how this disease is maintained at such a remarkably high incidence, however, it could be due to a reproductive advantage in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. We tested...... this hypothesis. An adult Danish general population sample of 9141 individuals was screened for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes; 250 carriers of this mutation were identified (2.7%). In the total sample DeltaF508 heterozygotes did not have more children than noncarriers; however, smoking interacted.......001). In conclusion, overall these results do not support a reproductive advantage for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes. However, the data cannot totally exclude the possibility that nonsmoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience a reproductive advantage while smoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience...

  6. Generalized delta functions and their use in quantum optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R. A.; Franson, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The Dirac delta function δ(x) is widely used in many areas of physics and mathematics. Here we consider the generalization of a Dirac delta function to allow the use of complex arguments. We show that the properties of a generalized delta function are very different from those of a Dirac delta function and that they behave more like a pole in the complex plane. We use the generalized delta function to derive the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function, P(α), for a Schrödinger cat state in a surprisingly simple form. Aside from their potential applications in classical electromagnetism and quantum optics, these results provide insight into the ability of the diagonal P-function to describe density operators with off-diagonal elements.

  7. Refactoring Delta-Oriented Product Lines to achieve Monotonicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio Damiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Delta-oriented programming (DOP is a flexible transformational approach to implement software product lines. In delta-oriented product lines, variants are generated by applying operations contained in delta modules to a (possibly empty base program. These operations can add, remove or modify named elements in a program (e.g., classes, methods and fields in a Java program. This paper presents algorithms for refactoring a delta-oriented product line into monotonic form, i.e., either to contain add and modify operations only (monotonic increasing or to contain remove and modify operations only (monotonic decreasing. Because of their simpler structure, monotonic delta-oriented product lines are easier to analyze. The algorithms are formalized by means of a core calculus for DOP of product lines of Java programs and their correctness and complexity are given.

  8. Interaction of rock, water, and plants in central Siberia (Russia) dominated by continuous permafrost: biotic versus abiotic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Prokushkin, A. S.; Beaulieu, E.; Dupre, B.

    2009-12-01

    Boreal forests mainly located between the latitudes 46°N and 66°N play a key role in regulating global carbon cycle and climate of the Earth. These forests store about 42 gigatons of carbon (Gt C) of above ground biomass and 200 Gt C of soil organic matter that represents about 8 and 13% of the global amounts (Jarvis et al., 2001 and references therein). The last technical paper on climate change and water of the IPCC reports abnormal thawing of permafrost, increase of the active period, increase of river runoff and changes in the distribution of plants and their productivity for artic and sub-arctic regions (www.ipcc.ch and references therein). Within the context of global warming, forested permafrost regions appear to be very sensitive and are likely to be deeply modified in a near future. In return, these modifications affecting the functioning of these ecosystems will influence the whole Earth system. Among forested boreal regions, Central Siberia (Russia), that spreads over more than 4,000,000 km2, is very interesting due to the presence of permafrost within the specific geological substratum. Indeed, this area offers large basaltic surface and chemical weathering of basaltic rocks is considered to be the main process removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere over geological time scale (Dessert et al., 2003). The sampling site is located in the drainage basin of the Nizhniya Tungunska River (eastern tributary of the Yenissey River) on the basaltic plateau of Putorana. Climate is cold with a mean annual air temperature of -9.5°C and annual precipitation of 350mm. 60% of rain is falling during the active period when the surface soil temperature is above zero degrees (end of May to September). At local scale, there are north-facing and south-facing slopes that receive equivalent precipitation but exhibit totally different heat input and consequently above-ground biomass and active layer thickness. Larches and mosses account for more than 85% of the above

  9. Ca²⁺ signal contributing to the synthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zenghui; Li, Tianjiao; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Kai; He, Xiangfeng; Leng, Pingsheng

    2015-06-01

    The floral scent is an important part of plant volatile compounds, and is influenced by environmental factors. The emission of monoterpenes of Lilium 'siberia' is regulated by light intensity, but the mechanism is large unknown. In this study, the expression of Li-mTPS, a monoterpene synthase gene in the tepals of Lilium 'siberia', and net Ca(2+) flux were investigated after exposure to different levels of light intensity (0, 100, 300, 600, 1000, and 1500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Moreover the effect of LaCl3 and ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on the Li-mTPS expression, monoterpene emission, and net Ca(2+) flux were examined at 600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that along with the enhancement of light intensity, the expression level of Li-mTPS increased gradually, and the net Ca(2+) influx was also enhanced showing a similar pattern. It was found that LaCl3 and EGTA effectively inhibited the increase in expression of Li-mTPS and the net Ca(2+) influx induced by light treatment. Moreover, the release amounts of monoterpenes decreased significantly after treatment with LaCl3 and EGTA. So it can be concluded that Ca(2+) signal contributed to the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia' tepals. The increased light intensity firstly triggered the Ca(2+) influx to cytoplasm, and then the gene expression of monoterpene synthases downstream was activated to regulate the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes. But in the signaling pathway other mechanisms were thought to be involved in the emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity, which need to be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Food and water security issues in Russia I: food security in the general population of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, Alexey A; Alloyarov, Pavel R; Chupakhin, Valery S; Dushkina, Eugenia V; Sladkova, Yuliya N; Dorofeyev, Vitaliy M; Kolesnikova, Tatijana A; Fridman, Kirill B; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Evengård, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Problems related to food security in Russian Arctic (dietary imbalance, predominance of carbohydrates, shortage of milk products, vegetables and fruits, deficit of vitamins and microelements, chemical, infectious and parasitic food contamination) have been defined in the literature. But no standard protocol of food security assessment has been used in the majority of studies. Our aim was to obtain food security indicators, identified within an Arctic collaboration, for selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, and to compare food safety in these territories. In 18 regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, the following indicators of food security were analyzed: food costs, food consumption, and chemical and biological food contamination for the period 2000-2011. Food costs in the regions are high, comprising 23-43% of household income. Only 4 out of 10 food groups (fish products, cereals, sugar, plant oil) are consumed in sufficient amounts. The consumption of milk products, eggs, vegetables, potatoes, fruits (and berries) is severely low in a majority of the selected regions. There are high levels of biological contamination of food in many regions. The biological and chemical contamination situation is alarming, especially in Chukotka. Only 7 food pollutants are under regular control; among pesticides, only DDT. Evenki AO and Magadan Oblast have reached peak values in food contaminants compared with other regions. Mercury in local fish has not been analyzed in the majority of the regions. In 3 regions, no monitoring of DDT occurs. Aflatoxins have not been analyzed in 5 regions. Nitrates had the highest percentage in excess of the hygienic threshold in all regions. Excesses of other pollutants in different regions were episodic and as a rule not high. Improvement of the food supply and food accessibility in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East is of utmost importance. Both quantitative and qualitative

  11. Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, Alexey A; Dorofeyev, Vitaliy M; Dushkina, Eugenia V; Alloyarov, Pavel R; Chupakhin, Valery S; Sladkova, Yuliya N; Kolesnikova, Tatjana A; Fridman, Kirill B; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Evengard, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories. The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000-2011), and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia. This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples) have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000-2011). Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis. Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000-2011) are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance (including gender-divided statistics), enhancement of laboratory diagnostics and the introduction of

  12. Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Dudarev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background . The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories. Objectives. The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000–2011, and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia. Study design and methods . This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000–2011. Results . Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis. Conclusion . Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000–2011 are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance

  13. Lymphocytes with multiple chromosomal damages in a large cohort of West Siberia residents: Results of long-term monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhinin, Vladimir [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Bakanova, Maria [Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Fucic, Aleksandra, E-mail: afucic@imi.hr [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia); Golovina, Tatiana [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Savchenko, Yana [Federal State Budget Scientific Institution «The Federal Research Center of Coal and Coal Chemistry of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences», Kemerovo (Russian Federation); Sinitsky, Maxim; Volobaev, Valentin [Kemerovo State University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Study reports RC frequency in lymphocytes in the group of 3242 subjects. • The highest RC frequency was present in children environmentally exposed to radon. • In 85% of RCs double minutes were observed. • Results suggests that radon may be the leading factors causing RC. • RC may be a candidate biomarker for exposure to α-emitters. - Abstract: Cells with specific multiple chromosome aberrations, defined as rogue cells (RC) have been described in different populations, predominantly those exposed to radiation. The frequency, etiology and related health risks have still not been elucidated due to their low frequency of occurrences and rarely performed studies. This study reports RC frequency using chromosome aberration (CA) assay in peripheral lymphocytes in the group of 3242 subjects, during a 30-year long follow-up study in a general rural and urban population, children environmentally exposed to radon, occupationally exposed population and lung cancer patients from the Kemerovo region (Siberia, Russian Federation). Results show that the highest RC frequency was present in children environmentally exposed to radon and the lowest in the general urban population. Total frequency of CA did not correlate with frequency of RC. Genotoxic analysis of air and water samples excluded anthropogenic pollution as a possible cause of genome damage and RC frequency. In 85% of RCs, double minutes, observed in a large number of human tumors, were present. Results of CA analysis suggested that radon and its decay products (alpha-emitters) were the leading factors causing RC in subjects exposed to high LET radiation. Thus, RC may be a candidate biomarker for exposure to this type of radiation.

  14. Transformation of ecofunctional parameters of soil microbial cenoses in clearings for power transmission lines in Central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogorodskaya, A. V.; Ponomareva, T. V.; Efimov, D. Yu.; Shishikin, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in soil microbial processes and phytocenotic parameters were studied in clearings made for power transmission lines in the subtaiga and southern taiga of Central Siberia. In these clearings, secondary meadow communities play the main environmental role. The substitution of meadow vegetation for forest vegetation, the increase in the phytomass by 40-120%, and the transformation of the hydrothermic regime in the clearings led to the intensification of the humus-accumulative process, growth of the humus content, reduction in acidity and oligotrophy of the upper horizons in the gray soils of the meadow communities, and more active microbial mineralization of organic matter. In the humus horizon of the soils under meadows, the microbial biomass (Cmicr) increased by 20-90%, and the intensity of basal respiration became higher by 60-90%. The values of the microbial metabolic quotient were also higher in these soils than in the soils under the native forests. In the 0- to 50-cm layer of the gray soils under the meadows, the total Cmicr reserves were 35-45% greater and amounted to 230-320 g/m3; the total microbial production of CO2 was 1.5-2 times higher than that in the soil of the adjacent forest and reached 770-840 mg CO2-C/m3 h. The predominance of mineralization processes in the soils under meadows in the clearings reflected changes in edaphic and trophic conditions of the soils and testified to an active inclusion of the herb falloff into the biological cycle.

  15. Genetic analysis of melanocortin 1 receptor red hair color variants in a Russian population of Eastern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motorina, Anna V; Palkina, Nadezhda V; Komina, Anna V; Ruksha, Tatiana G; Artyukhov, Ivan P; Kozlov, Vasily V

    2018-03-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor is a Gs protein-coupled receptor implicated in melanogenesis regulation. The receptor gene is highly polymorphic, which accounts for the association of several of its single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an increased risk of melanoma. The present study aimed to evaluate the distribution of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants R151C, R160W, and D294H within the Russian population of Eastern Siberia and its association with melanoma development. Melanoma patients (n=95) admitted to Krasnoyarsk Territorial Oncological Center and healthy controls (n=334) were enrolled in the study. A clinical examination of patients was performed to evaluate the phenotypic features of melanoma patients. SNPs were analyzed by real-time PCR. Clinical examination indicated a more frequent occurrence of fair skin type, blue eyes, blonde and red hair, and more frequent localization of freckles on the neck, trunk, and extremities in the melanoma group of patients. The R151C melanocortin 1 receptor gene variant was found in 18% of melanoma patients and associated with an increased likelihood of melanoma development (odds ratio=6.4; 95% confidence interval: 2.8-14.3; P=0.0001). The two remaining variant alleles of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene occurred with low frequency both in controls and in the melanoma group. The R160W SNP was identified neither in controls nor in melanoma patients. The D294H heterozygous variant was observed in 0.3% of individuals in the control group and in 1.1% of the patients in the melanoma group. Such an asymmetric distribution of the melanocortin 1 receptor within red hair color genotypes in the population under study compared with other populations may be because of Russian genetic homogeneity. Carriers of the mutant R151C allele should exercise caution in terms of exposure to the sun to avoid the risk of melanoma development.

  16. Radiocarbon ages of insects and plants frozen in the No. 31 Glacier, Suntar-Khayata Range, eastern Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, F., E-mail: nakazawa@nipr.ac.jp [National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8518 (Japan); Transdisciplinary Research Integration Center, Hulic Kamiyacho Bldg. 2F, 4-3-13 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Uchida, M.; Kondo, M. [Center for Environmental Measurement and Analysis, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0053 (Japan); Kadota, T. [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 2-15 Natsushima, Yokosuka 237-0061 (Japan); Shirakawa, T. [Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Enomoto, H. [National Institute of Polar Research, 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8518 (Japan); Department of Polar Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), 10-3 Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8518 (Japan); Fedorov, A.N. [Melnikov Permafrost Institute, SB RAN, Yakutsk 6770110 (Russian Federation); North-Eastern Federal University, Yakutsk 677010 (Russian Federation); Fujisawa, Y. [Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Konstantinov, P.Y. [Melnikov Permafrost Institute, SB RAN, Yakutsk 6770110 (Russian Federation); Kusaka, R. [Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Miyairi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ohata, T.; Yabuki, H. [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 2-15 Natsushima, Yokosuka 237-0061 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate the age of glacier ice in the No. 31 Glacier in the Suntar-Khayata Range of eastern Siberia by performing dating of insects thought to be long-legged fly species (Dolichopodidae) as well as plants (species unknown) fragments preserved in the ice. Ice samples containing organisms were collected at depths of 0.4–1.1 m at five points from the middle to lowest parts of the glacier in 2013. The age of an insect collected at the lowest point on the glacier was estimated as 2038 ± 32 yr B.P. Insects collected at higher points had a modern or near-modern radiocarbon age. The age of plant fragments collected at the uppermost and middle points was 1531 ± 44 and 1288 ± 26 yr B.P., respectively, and that of a mixture of plant and insect fragments collected at the lowest point was 9772 ± 42 yr B.P. When comparing specimens collected at the same point, the plant fragments were found to be older than the insects. In 2012–2014 observations, some living insects were found on the glacier, and thus the age of the insects appears to correspond to the age of the ice. On the other hand, the plant fragments might have already aged since detachment from the source plants. This study found an approximately 2000-year gap in the age of the ice between the lowest and higher points. Annual mass balance observations from 2012 to 2014 showed that in recent years, the glacier sometimes had no accumulation area. Therefore, the wide gap in the age of ice may be due to a difference in past melting processes between the lowest and higher points on the glacier.

  17. Greening of the Arctic: Partitioning Warming Versus Reindeer Herbivory for Willow Populations on Yamal Peninsula, Northwest Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, B. C.; Macias-Fauria, M.; Zetterberg, P.; Kumpula, T.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic warming has been linked to observed increases in tundra shrub cover and growth in recent decades on the basis of significant relationships between deciduous shrub growth/biomass and temperature. These vegetation trends have been linked to Arctic sea-ice decline and thus to the sea-ice/albedo feedback known as Arctic amplification. However, the interactions between climate, sea ice, tundra vegetation and herbivores remain poorly understood. Recently we revealed a 50-year growth response over a >100,000 km2 area to a rise in summer temperature for willow (Salix lanata), one the most abundant shrub genera at and north of the continental treeline and an important source of reindeer forage in spring, summer and autumn. We demonstrated that whereas plant productivity is related to sea ice in late spring, the growing season peak responds to persistent synoptic-scale air masses over West Siberia associated with Fennoscandian weather systems through the Rossby wave train. Substrate was important for biomass accumulation, yet a strong correlation between growth and temperature encompasses all observed soil types. Vegetation was especially responsive to temperature in early summer. However, the role of herbivory was not addressed. The present data set explores the relationship between long-term herbivory and growth trends of shrubs experiencing warming in recent decades. Semi-domestic reindeer managed by indigenous Nenets nomads occur at high densities in summer on exposed ridge tops and graze heavily on prostrate and low erect willows. A few meters away in moderately sloped landslides tall willows remain virtually ungrazed as their canopies have grown above the browse line of ca. 180 cm. Here we detail the responses of neighboring shrub populations with and without intensive herbivory yet subject to the same decadal warming trend.

  18. Burying dogs in ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: temporal trends and relationships with human diet and subsistence practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Losey

    Full Text Available The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region's dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (∼7-8000 B.P., and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica. Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region's human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia.

  19. Land cover and land use changes in the oil and gas regions of Northwestern Siberia under changing climatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qin; Engstrom, Ryan; Shiklomanov, Nikolay; Strelestskiy, Dmitry; Epstein, Howard E

    2015-01-01

    Northwestern Siberia has been undergoing a range of land cover and land use changes associated with climate change, animal husbandry and development of mineral resources, particularly oil and gas. The changes caused by climate and oil/gas development Southeast of the city of Nadym were investigated using multi-temporal and multi-spatial remotely sensed images. Comparison between high spatial resolution imagery acquired in 1968 and 2006 indicates that 8.9% of the study area experienced an increase in vegetation cover (e.g. establishment of new saplings, extent of vegetated cover) in response to climate warming while 10.8% of the area showed a decrease in vegetation cover due to oil and gas development and logging activities. Waterlogging along linear structures and vehicle tracks was found near the oil and gas development site, while in natural landscapes the drying of thermokarst lakes is evident due to warming caused permafrost degradation. A Landsat time series dataset was used to document the spatial and temporal dynamics of these ecosystems in response to climate change and disturbances. The impacts of land use on surface vegetation, radiative, and hydrological properties were evaluated using Landsat image-derived biophysical indices. The spatial and temporal analyses suggest that the direct impacts associated with infrastructure development were mostly within 100 m distance from the disturbance source. While these impacts are rather localized they persist for decades despite partial recovery of vegetation after the initial disturbance and can have significant implications for changes in permafrost dynamics and surface energy budgets at landscape and regional scales. (letter)

  20. Burying dogs in ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: temporal trends and relationships with human diet and subsistence practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losey, Robert J; Garvie-Lok, Sandra; Leonard, Jennifer A; Katzenberg, M Anne; Germonpré, Mietje; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail V; Goriunova, Olga I; Berdnikova, Natalia E; Savel'ev, Nikolai A

    2013-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region's dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (∼7-8000 B.P.), and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica). Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region's human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia.

  1. Synthesis of gamma,delta-unsaturated and delta,epsilon-unsaturated alpha-amino acids from fragmentation of gamma- and delta-lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, James E; Joullié, Madeleine M

    2004-02-06

    A noncoded amino acid of cyclomarin A (1) was synthesized in a racemic fashion. The method employs a six-membered ring template to control the relative stereochemistry and introduction of the functional groups. Ultimately, Pd-catalyzed fragmentation of the lactone provided gamma,delta-unsaturated and delta,epsilon-unsaturated alpha-amino acids. A Pd-catalyzed ring opening of a gamma-lactone is also reported.

  2. Perspectives on bay-delta science and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Michael; Dettinger, Michael; Norgaard, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The State of Bay–Delta Science 2008 highlighted seven emerging perspectives on science and management of the Delta. These perspectives had important effects on policy and legislation concerning management of the Delta ecosystem and water exports. From the collection of papers that make up the State of Bay–Delta Science 2016, we derive another seven perspectives that augment those published in 2008. The new perspectives address nutrient and contaminant concentrations in Delta waters, the failure of the Delta food web to support native species, the role of multiple stressors in driving species toward extinction, and the emerging importance of extreme events in driving change in the ecosystem and the water supply. The scientific advances that underpin these new perspectives were made possible by new measurement and analytic tools. We briefly discuss some of these, including miniaturized acoustic fish tags, sensors for monitoring of water quality, analytic techniques for disaggregating complex contaminant mixtures, remote sensing to assess levee vulnerability, and multidimensional hydrodynamic modeling. Despite these new tools and scientific insights, species conservation objectives for the Delta are not being met. We believe that this lack of progress stems in part from the fact that science and policy do not incorporate sufficiently long-term perspectives. Looking forward half a century was central to the Delta Visioning process, but science and policy have not embraced this conceptual breadth. We are also concerned that protection and enhancement of the unique cultural, recreational, natural resource, and agricultural values of the Delta as an evolving place, as required by the Delta Reform Act, has received no critical study and analysis. Adopting wider and longer science and policy perspectives immediately encourages recognition of the need for evaluation, analysis, and public discourse on novel conservation approaches. These longer and wider perspectives

  3. Potency of Mahakam Delta in East Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zairin Zain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE Mahakam Delta is not only utilized for fishery activities but also for several industrial purposes such as coal and oil mining, shipping and timber. The objective of this paper is to provide information in term of the potency of Mahakam Delta located in East Kalimantan province, Indonesia. The study was conducted in Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. Participatory rural appraisal is a group of methods to collect information in a participatory fashion from rural communities. The method employed in this research was descriptive analysis describing the environmental potency found in Mahakam Delta. Massive conversion of mangrove forest particularly Nypa (Nypa fruticans area into pond has driven conflict among related stakeholders on the utilization of natural resource and land which subsequently impacts on the fish and shrimp source regeneration, loss of ecological functions of mangrove forest for feeding, nursery and spawning ground of fish and other organisms. Besides of fisheries, oil and gas activity also exists in Mahakam Delta. Mahakam Delta is regarded as important area due to the largest producer of oil and gas mining. Thus, oil and gas industry is the most reliable sector that contributes to the economic development of Kutai Kartanegara district. As a resource provider, Mahakam Delta ecosystem provides various resources for livelihoods. As a life-support service provider, Mahakam Delta ecosystem provides habitat and ideal environment to support variety of living kinds. As a convenience provider, Mahakam Delta ecosystem provides unique and interesting recreation site. As a protector from natural disaster, Mahakam Delta ecosystem is able to protect human kinds from natural disaster threatening coastal area.

  4. Sediment Transport and Vegetative Controls on Delta Channel Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, R.; Murray, A. B.; Piliouras, A.; Kim, W.

    2016-02-01

    As they are governed by complex interactions between coastal, wetland, and fluvial processes, many of the controls on delta evolution are not well understood. The interactions between sediment transport processes and vegetative controls which shape the flow of water on a delta is one such poorly understood process. On deltas dominated by sediment transport, flow is characterized by rapid lateral migration and frequent switching of active channels and resembles a braided stream system. On the other hand, vegetation can reduce channel migration rates and strengthen existing channel banks, resulting in well-developed, localized flow patterns like dendritic or distributary channel networks. Previous work has shown through modeling (i.e. Murray and Paola 1994, 1997) and flume experiments (i.e. Gran and Paola 2001) that interactions between vegetation and sediment which allow or prohibit lateral transport of sediment is fundamental in explaining the morphology of fluvial systems, but many delta modeling efforts assume conditions like those of a vegetated delta. In fact, deltas introduce additional variables like sea level rise, subsidence, the creation of new land, and variable deposition rates, all of which will influence vegetation growth and sediment transport. Here we present a new numerical model designed to generate basic understanding of the processes controlling delta channel formation by examining the factors influencing whether sediment transport or vegetative controls dominate. Model development is informed by laboratory flume experiment at U T Austin. A novel synthesis building on past approaches to modeling braided-stream systems (the Murray and Paola model) and vegetated deltas (DeltaRCM; Liang et al 2015), the new model explores the effects of sea level rise, subsidence, sediment and water discharge, vegetation growth, and sediment properties (including here effects of vegetation) on delta channel morphology.

  5. Small-scale stratigraphy in a large ramp delta: recent and Holocene sedimentation in de the Volga delta, Caspian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, I.; Kroonenberg, S.B.; Veldkamp, A.; Groenesteijn, K.; Rusakov, G.V.; Svitoch, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Volga delta differs from all other major deltas in the world by its extremely gentle onshore and offshore gradient (similar to 5 cm/km) and by being affected by the rapid sea-level changes of the Caspian Sea, at rates up to a hundred times the global sea-level rise. This paper reports (1) the

  6. Sustainable Growth in Urbanised Delta Areas : The Opportunities of a Geographical Approach to the Pearl River Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rens, G.; Nillisen, A.L.; Schamhart, C.; Lugt, N.

    2006-01-01

    The attractions of delta areas have boomed economies and founded major cities, but the threats of the adjacent water have persisted and natural resources have declined. The objective to facilitate sustainable urban growth in delta areas can only be met by a simultaneous approach of all the

  7. Fish trypanosomes from the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Nico J; Van As, Jo G; Davies, Angela J

    2004-12-01

    During 2001 and 2002, blood smears from 37 of 120 fishes belonging to 10 species captured in the Okavango Delta region of Botswana, were found to harbour trypanosomes. These trypanosomes displayed differing staining properties, were morphometrically variable, and ranged in total length from 29.5 to 80.8 microm. Mixed populations of the smaller and larger trypanosomes were found in most fish examined. Despite variations in size and appearance, these specimens are tentatively identified as Trypanosoma mukasai Hoare, 1932, likely adding another 9 new hosts to those known for this parasite. It is possible that Trypanosoma clariense Pienaar, 1962, described from Clarias gariepinus in South Africa, is also a junior synonym of T. mukasai.

  8. $\\delta N$ formalism from superpotential and holography

    CERN Document Server

    Garriga, Jaume; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2016-02-16

    We consider the superpotential formalism to describe the evolution of scalar fields during inflation, generalizing it to include the case with non-canonical kinetic terms. We provide a characterization of the attractor behaviour of the background evolution in terms of first and second slow-roll parameters (which need not be small). We find that the superpotential is useful in justifying the separate universe approximation from the gradient expansion, and also in computing the spectra of primordial perturbations around attractor solutions in the $\\delta N$ formalism. As an application, we consider a class of models where the background trajectories for the inflaton fields are derived from a product separable superpotential. In the perspective of the holographic inflation scenario, such models are dual to a deformed CFT boundary theory, with $D$ mutually uncorrelated deformation operators. We compute the bulk power spectra of primordial adiabatic and entropy cosmological perturbations, and show that the results...

  9. Characterization of a non-pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus isolated from a migratory duck flying from Siberia in Hokkaido, Japan, in October 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamatsu Masatoshi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs of domestic poultry and wild birds has spread to more than 60 countries in Eurasia and Africa. It is concerned that HPAIVs may be perpetuated in the lakes in Siberia where migratory water birds nest in summer. To monitor whether HPAIVs circulate in migratory water birds, intensive surveillance of avian influenza has been performed in Mongolia and Japan in autumn each year. Until 2008, there had not been any H5N1 viruses isolated from migratory water birds that flew from their nesting lakes in Siberia. In autumn 2009, A/mallard/Hokkaido/24/09 (H5N1 (Mal/Hok/24/09 was isolated from a fecal sample of a mallard (Anas platyrhynchos that flew from Siberia to Hokkaido, Japan. The isolate was assessed for pathogenicity in chickens, domestic ducks, and quails and analyzed antigenically and phylogenetically. Results No clinical signs were observed in chickens inoculated intravenously with Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1. There was no viral replication in chickens inoculated intranasally with the isolate. None of the domestic ducks and quails inoculated intranasally with the isolate showed any clinical signs. There were no multiple basic amino acid residues at the cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA of the isolate. Each gene of Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1 is phylogenetically closely related to that of influenza viruses isolated from migratory water birds that flew from their nesting lakes in autumn. Additionally, the antigenicity of the HA of the isolate was similar to that of the viruses isolated from migratory water birds in Hokkaido that flew from their northern territory in autumn and different from those of HPAIVs isolated from birds found dead in China, Mongolia, and Japan on the way back to their northern territory in spring. Conclusion Mal/Hok/24/09 (H5N1 is a non-pathogenic avian influenza virus for chickens, domestic ducks, and quails, and is antigenically and genetically

  10. Nuclear energy: technology, safety, ecology, economy, management. The I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists of Siberia. Collection of scientific papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Collection of research papers I All-Russian scientific-practical conference of young nuclear scientists in Siberia, held 19-25 September 2010 in Tomsk, is presented. The edition contains material on a wide range of research scientists-economists, professors, graduate students and young scientists, and school children of Tomsk, Seversk, and several other Russian cities on the technology, security, ecology, economics, management in the nuclear power industry. Discussion of the presented research was conducted on sections: 1. Technological support for the nuclear fuel cycle, 2. Nuclear non-proliferation and environmental safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, 3. Energy: Present and Future 4. It all starts with an idea [ru

  11. Preface to the Special Issue on "Geophysical and Climate Change Studies in Tibet, Xinjiang, and Siberia (TibXS from Satellite Geodesy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheinway Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue publishes papers on recent results in geophysical and climate change studies over Tibet, Xinjiang and Siberia (TibXS based upon some of the key sensors used in satellite geodesy, including satellite gravimetric sensors (GRACE and GOCE, satellite altimeters (TOPEX, Jason-1 and -2, and ENVISAT, and Global Positioning System satellites. Results from ground- and airborne-based geodetic observations, notably those based on airborne gravimeter, superconducting gravimeter (SG and seismometers are also included in the special issue. In all, 22 papers were submitted for this special issue; 17 papers were accepted.

  12. An evaluation of health and environment in the mining community of Krasnokamensk, East Siberia, Russia; En bedoemning av haelso- och miljoesituationen i gruvsamhaellet Krasnokamensk, oestra Sibirien, Ryssland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehdwall, H.; Rising, A.; Hjalmar, A.; Lindholm, I.; Persson, Bertil; Wingren, H.

    1995-10-01

    A Swedish delegation has visited a uranium mining area, Krasnokamensk, in east Siberia to find facts concerning health and environment in the area. The impression of the delegation is that the Uranium activities as such has not had any significant impact on the health and environmental situation in the area. However, there is a small village within the mining area, Octyabrskij, where indoor Radon levels are increased. As the Russian authorities are aware of this matter, dwellings having radon levels above the limit will be evacuated and later demolished. 19 figs, 20 tabs.

  13. Potential exposure of larval and juvenile delta smelt to dissolved pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivila, K.M.; Moon, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    The San Francisco Estuary is critical habitat for delta smelt Hypomesus transpacificus, a fish whose abundance has declined greatly since 1983 and is now listed as threatened. In addition, the estuary receives drainage from the Central Valley, an urban and agricultural region with intense and diverse pesticide usage. One possible factor of the delta smelt population decline is pesticide toxicity during vulnerable larval and juvenile stages, but pesticide concentrations are not well characterized in delta smelt spawning and nursery habitat. The objective of this study was to estimate the potential exposure of delta smelt during their early life stages to dissolved pesticides. For 3 years (1998-2000), water samples from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta were collected during April-June in coordination with the California Department of Fish and Game's delta smelt early life stage monitoring program. Samples were analyzed for pesticides using solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Water samples contained multiple pesticides, ranging from 2 to 14 pesticides in each sample. In both 1999 and 2000, elevated concentrations of pesticides overlapped in time and space with peak densities of larval and juvenile delta smelt. In contrast, high spring outflows in 1998 transported delta smelt away from the pesticide sampling sites so that exposure could not be estimated. During 2 years, larval and juvenile delta smelt were potentially exposed to a complex mixture of pesticides for a minimum of 2-3 weeks. Although the measured concentrations were well below short-term (96-h) LC50 values for individual pesticides, the combination of multiple pesticides and lengthy exposure duration could potentially have lethal or sublethal effects on delta smelt, especially during early larval development.

  14. The fluvial evolution of the Holocene Nile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, B. T.; Sturt, F.; Wilson, P.; Rowland, J.; Brown, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The evolution of the Nile Delta, the largest delta system in the Mediterranean Sea, has both high palaeoenvironmental and archaeological significance. A dynamic model of the landscape evolution of this delta system is presented for the period c.8000-4500 cal BP. Analysis of sedimentary data and chronostratigraphic information contained within 1640 borehole records has allowed for a redefinition of the internal stratigraphy of the Holocene delta, and the construction of a four-dimensional landscape model for the delta's evolution through time. The mid-Holocene environmental evolution is characterised by a transition from an earlier set of spatially varied landscapes dominated by swampy marshland, to better-drained, more uniform floodplain environments. Archaeologically important Pleistocene inliers in the form of sandy hills protruding above the delta plain surface (known as "turtlebacks"), also became smaller as the delta plain continued to aggrade, while the shoreline and coastal zone prograded north. These changes were forced by a decrease in the rate of relative sea-level rise under high rates of sediment-supply. This dynamic environmental evolution needs to be integrated within any discussion of the contemporary developments in the social sphere, which culminated in the emergence of the Ancient Egyptian State c.5050 cal BP.

  15. Tracing the Anthropocene in the Rhine-Meuse delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelkoop, Hans; van der Perk, Marcel; Cohen, Kim M.; Stouthamer, Esther; Hoek, Wim Z.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.; Erkens, Gilles; Jansma, Esther

    2014-05-01

    The Holocene Rhine-Meuse delta developed during the past ~8000 yr under a first rapid and later decreasing sea level rise in a back-barrier area along the North Sea. After about 3500 yr BP, natural delta evolution became increasingly influenced by humans, with different types of imprints: increased discharge and sediment load associated with deforestation in the hinterland affecting channel geometry and deposition; artificial avulsion; large-scale peat excavation; reclamation and drainage of flood basins resulting in compaction and oxidation of peat; river embankment preventing delta-wide overbank deposition and finalizing avulsion; channelization, changing channel belt geometry and causing shifts in sediment deposition within the delta. After the onset of the industrial revolution, contaminants have been deposited along with the river sediment on the embanked floodplains and in the estuary. The extremely well-documented human-affected evolution of the delta provides a unique opportunity to demonstrate how the Anthropocene can manifest itself in such an environment. We give an overview of human-affected processes in the Rhine-Meuse delta and discuss their effect on fluvial architecture, morphology and sediment composition, and how these may remain preserved within the delta sedimentary record.

  16. Primary Production in the Delta: Then and Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Cloern

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.15447/sfews.2016v14iss3art1To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850. Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1 produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2 convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3 use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  17. Primary production in the Delta: Then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Robinson, April; Richey, Amy; Grenier, Letitia; Grossinger, Robin; Boyer, Katharyn E.; Burau, Jon; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; DeGeorge, John F.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Enright, Chris; Howe, Emily R.; Kneib, Ronald; Mueller-Solger, Anke; Naiman, Robert J.; Pinckney, James L.; Safran, Samuel M.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Simenstad, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the role of restoration in the recovery of the Delta ecosystem, we need to have clear targets and performance measures that directly assess ecosystem function. Primary production is a crucial ecosystem process, which directly limits the quality and quantity of food available for secondary consumers such as invertebrates and fish. The Delta has a low rate of primary production, but it is unclear whether this was always the case. Recent analyses from the Historical Ecology Team and Delta Landscapes Project provide quantitative comparisons of the areal extent of 14 habitat types in the modern Delta versus the historical Delta (pre-1850). Here we describe an approach for using these metrics of land use change to: (1) produce the first quantitative estimates of how Delta primary production and the relative contributions from five different producer groups have been altered by large-scale drainage and conversion to agriculture; (2) convert these production estimates into a common currency so the contributions of each producer group reflect their food quality and efficiency of transfer to consumers; and (3) use simple models to discover how tidal exchange between marshes and open water influences primary production and its consumption. Application of this approach could inform Delta management in two ways. First, it would provide a quantitative estimate of how large-scale conversion to agriculture has altered the Delta's capacity to produce food for native biota. Second, it would provide restoration practitioners with a new approach—based on ecosystem function—to evaluate the success of restoration projects and gauge the trajectory of ecological recovery in the Delta region.

  18. How Rapid Change Affects Deltas in the Arctic Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Bendixen, M.

    2017-12-01

    Deltas form where the river drains into the ocean. Consequently, delta depositional processes are impacted by either changes in the respective river drainage basin or by changes in the regional marine environment. In a warming Arctic region rapid change has occurred over the last few decades in both the terrestrial domain as well as in the marine domain. Important terrestrial controls include 1) change in permafrost possibly destabilizing river banks, 2) strong seasonality of river discharge due to a short melting season, 3) high sediment supply if basins are extensively glaciated, 4) lake outbursts and ice jams favoring river flooding. Whereas in the Arctic marine domain sea ice loss promotes wave and storm surge impact, and increased longshore transport. We here ask which of these factors dominate any morphological change in Arctic deltas. First, we analyze hydrological data to assess change in Arctic-wide river discharge characteristics and timing, and sea ice concentration data to map changes in sea ice regime. Based on this observational analysis we set up a number of scenarios of change. We then model hypothetical small-scale delta formation considering change in these primary controls by setting up a numerical delta model, and combining it dynamically with a permafrost model. We find that for typical Greenlandic deltas changes in river forcing due to ice sheet melt dominate the morphological change, which is corroborated by mapping of delta progradation from aerial photos and satellite imagery. Whereas in other areas, along the North Slope and the Canadian Arctic small deltas are more stable or experienced retreat. Our preliminary coupled model allows us to further disentangle the impact of major forcing factors on delta evolution in high-latitude systems.

  19. Hepatitis B virus and delta infection in male homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, G; Bienzle, U; Slusarczyk, J; Hansson, B G; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1986-02-01

    Six hundred and sixty-six homosexuals were analysed in respect of hepatitis B virus and delta infections. Evidence of ongoing or recent hepatitis B virus infection was found in 450/666 (67.6%) homosexuals; 44 were HBsAg positive. Anti-delta was found in two HBsAg-positive homosexuals. Both individuals had a non-replicative form of HBV infection and biochemical evidence of liver disease. The study confirms that HBV infection is frequent in homosexuals and indicates that delta-infection is rare in male homosexuals.

  20. Late quaternary evolution of the Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.; Aslan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The modern Orinoco Delta is the latest of a series of stacked deltas that have infilled the Eastern Venezuelan Basin (EVB) since the Oligocene. During the late Pleistocene sea-level lowstand (20,000 to 16,000 yrs BP), bedrock control points at the position of the present delta apex prevented the river channel from incising as deeply as many other major river systems. Shallow seismic data indicate that the late Pleistocene Orinoco incised into the present continental shelf, where it formed a braided-river complex that transported sediment to a series of shelf-edge deltas. As sea level rose from 16,000 to 9,500 yrs BP, the Orinoco shoreline shifted rapidly landward, causing shallow-marine waves and currents to form a widespread transgressive sand unit. Decelerating sea-level rise and a warmer, wetter climate during the early Holocene (9,500 to 6,000 yrs BP) induced delta development within the relatively quiet-water environment of the EVB embayment. Sea level approached its present stand in the middle Holocene (6,000 to 3,000 yrs BP), and the Orinoco coast prograded, broadening the delta plain and infilling the EVB embayment. Significant quantities of Amazon sediment began to be transported to the Orinoco coast by littoral currents. Continued progradation in the late Holocene caused the constriction at Boca de Serpientes to alter nearshore and shelf hydrodynamics and subdivide the submarine delta into two distinct areas: the Atlantic shelf and the Gulf of Paria. The increased influence of littoral currents along the coast promoted mudcape development. Because most of the water and sediment were transported across the delta plain through the Rio Grande distributary in the southern delta, much of the central and northwestern delta plain became sediment starved, promoting widespread accumulation of peat deposits. Human impacts on the delta are mostly associated with the Volca??n Dam on Can??o Manamo. However, human activities have had relatively little effect on the

  1. Holocene evolution of the western Orinoco Delta, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, A.; White, W.A.; Warne, A.G.; Guevara, E.H.

    2003-01-01

    The pristine nature of the Orinoco Delta of eastern Venezuela provides unique opportunities to study the geologic processes and environments of a major tropical delta. Remote-sensing images, shallow cores, and radiocarbon-dating of organic remains form the basis for describing deltaic environments and interpreting the Holocene history of the delta. The Orinoco Delta can be subdivided into two major sectors. The southeast sector is dominated by the Rio Grande-the principal distributary-and complex networks of anastomosing fluvial and tidal channels. The abundance of siliciclastic deposits suggests that fluvial processes such as over-bank flooding strongly influence this part of the delta. In contrast, the northwest sector is represented by few major distributaries, and overbank sedimentation is less widespread relative to the southeast sector. Peat is abundant and occurs in herbaceous and forested swamps that are individually up to 200 km2 in area. Northwest-directed littoral currents transport large volumes of suspended sediment and produce prominent mudcapes along the northwest coast. Mapping of surface sediments, vegetation, and major landforms identified four principal geomorphic systems within the western delta plain: (1) distributary channels, (2) interdistributary flood basins, (3) fluvial-marine transitional environments, and (4) marine-influenced coastal environments. Coring and radiocarbon dating of deltaic deposits show that the northern delta shoreline has prograded 20-30 km during the late Holocene sea-level highstand. Progradation has been accomplished by a combination of distributary avulsion and mudcape progradation. This style of deltaic progradation differs markedly from other deltas such as the Mississippi where distributary avulsion leads to coastal land loss, rather than shoreline progradation. The key difference is that the Orinoco Delta coastal zone receives prodigious amounts of sediment from northwest-moving littoral currents that transport

  2. The subaqueous delta of the modern Huanghe (Yellow River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, D. B.; Yang, Z.-S.; Bornhold, B. D.; Keller, G. H.; Lin, Z. H.; Wiseman, W. J.; Wright, L. D.; Lin, T. C.

    1986-06-01

    The subaqueous delta of the Huanghe (Yellow River) has been studied using high-resolution acoustic systems. There are many subtle variations in sea floor morphology and sediment geometries; smooth, featureless areas are rare. The main components of the subaqueous delta include broad, shallow channels; moderately disturbed areas with near-surface cut and fill structures; heavily disturbed areas with sea floor depressions, pits, and gullies; and a smooth, gently sloping distal delta apron or “rise.” These features are not directly related to sediment settling from dilute surface plumes but are due to gravity-driven hyperpycnal underflows, submarine mass movements, and silt flows.

  3. Delta Evolution at Røde Elv, Disko Island, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, A.; Arngrimson, J.; Bendixen, M.; Sigsgaard, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ice, snow and freezing temperatures have a large impact on coastal morphodynamics in Arctic polar environments. A recent warming of the Arctic climate induces many changes along the arctic shorelines. Sea-levels are rising due to thermal expansion and due to an increased fresh water flux from the glaciers and land ice masses. At the same time, the ice coverage of the coastal waters reduces and the open water periods in summer extend. There is a strong seasonal variation with open waters and active rivers in summer and ice-covered coastal waters and inactive rivers in winter. Coastal processes by waves and tides are thus limited to the summer and early fall. Besides, there is also a strong daily variation in fluvial discharges due to the daily variations in glacier melt with maximum melt in the afternoon and minimum values at night. At the same time, the actual flux of the river to the coastal bay is influenced by the tidal phase. Low tides will enhance the transport to the delta front, while high tides will create stagnant waters over the delta plain. The delta of the Røde Elv is located in southwestern Disko Island in west Greenland. It has a relatively small (ca. 101 km2) and partly glaciated drainage basin (ca. 20%) and its sediments consist of a mixture of basaltic sands and gravels. The Røde Elv delta is located at the end of a pro-glacial and fluvial valley at about 20 km from the glacier. The shores of the delta are reworked by waves, predominantly from southwestern, southern (largest fetch, over 50 km), and southeastern directions. The environment has a micro- to meso- tidal range with a spring tidal range of 2.7 m. The morphologic changes on the delta over the last decades clearly showed a seaward extension of the delta and a periodic shift in the location of the main delta channel. In this presentation, we focus on quantification of water discharges and suspended sediment fluxes to the Røde Elv delta in western Greenland, and on the morphological

  4. Verification of Software Product Lines with Delta-Oriented Slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Daniel; Klebanov, Vladimir; Schaefer, Ina

    Software product line (SPL) engineering is a well-known approach to develop industry-size adaptable software systems. SPL are often used in domains where high-quality software is desirable; the overwhelming product diversity, however, remains a challenge for assuring correctness. In this paper, we present delta-oriented slicing, an approach to reduce the deductive verification effort across an SPL where individual products are Java programs and their relations are described by deltas. On the specification side, we extend the delta language to deal with formal specifications. On the verification side, we combine proof slicing and similarity-guided proof reuse to ease the verification process.

  5. Dynamics of forest ecosystems regenerated on burned and harvested areas in mountain regions of Siberia: characteristics of biological diversity, structure and productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Danilin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex estimation of forest ecosystems dynamics based on detailing characteristics of structure, growth and productivity of the stands and describing general geographical and biological management options for preserving their biodiversity and sustaining stability are discussed in the paper by describing examples of tree stands restored on burned and logged areas in mountain regions of Siberia. On vast areas in Siberia, characterized as sub-boreal, subarid and with a strongly continental climate, forests grow on seasonally frozen soils and in many cases are surrounded by vast steppe and forest-steppe areas and uplands. Developing criteria for sustainability of mountain forest ecosystems is necessary for forest resource management and conservation. It is therefore important to obtain complex biometric characteristics on forest stands and landscapes and to thoroughly study their structure, biological diversity and productivity. Morphometric methods, Weibull simulation and allometric equations were used to determine the dimensional hierarchies of coenopopulation individuals. Structure and productivity of the aboveground stand components were also studied.

  6. Future vegetation-climate interactions in Eastern Siberia: an assessment of the competing effects of CO2 and secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneth, Almut; Makkonen, Risto; Olin, Stefan; Paasonen, Pauli; Holst, Thomas; Kajos, Maija K.; Kulmala, Markku; Maximov, Trofim; Miller, Paul A.; Schurgers, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Disproportional warming in the northern high latitudes and large carbon stocks in boreal and (sub)arctic ecosystems have raised concerns as to whether substantial positive climate feedbacks from biogeochemical process responses should be expected. Such feedbacks occur when increasing temperatures lead, for example, to a net release of CO2 or CH4. However, temperature-enhanced emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have been shown to contribute to the growth of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which is known to have a negative radiative climate effect. Combining measurements in Eastern Siberia with model-based estimates of vegetation and permafrost dynamics, BVOC emissions, and aerosol growth, we assess here possible future changes in ecosystem CO2 balance and BVOC-SOA interactions and discuss these changes in terms of possible climate effects. Globally, the effects of changes in Siberian ecosystem CO2 balance and SOA formation are small, but when concentrating on Siberia and the Northern Hemisphere the negative forcing from changed aerosol direct and indirect effects become notable - even though the associated temperature response would not necessarily follow a similar spatial pattern. While our analysis does not include other important processes that are of relevance for the climate system, the CO2 and BVOC-SOA interplay serves as an example for the complexity of the interactions between emissions and vegetation dynamics that underlie individual terrestrial processes and highlights the importance of addressing ecosystem-climate feedbacks in consistent, process-based model frameworks.

  7. Using the CAESAR-Lisflood and SIBERIA landform evolution models to assess the evolution of a post-mining landscape at millennial time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, John; Hancock, Greg; Coulthard, Tom

    2014-05-01

    A significant goal of mine closure is the development of an erosionally stable landform that functionally merges with the surrounding landscape. Poor landform design may result in severe erosion and gullying which may deliver excess sediment to the surrounding undisturbed landscape. In addition, erosion may result in the exposure of hazardous material that was intended to be contained within the landform over geological time, thereby posing an environmental risk. These risks mean that it is important that the erosional stability of a landform be carefully assessed. In this study, a conceptual rehabilitated landform of the ERA Ranger Uranium Mine is assessed over a 1000-year period using both the SIBERIA and CAESAR-Lisflood computer-based landscape evolution models. Utilising two models enables both an independent evaluation of likely landscape evolution processes and the relative performance and output of each model. Overall findings show that SIBERIA and CAESAR-Lisflood produce erosion rates and patterns that are broadly similar. At millennial time scales, short-term processes such as gullying appear to be the dominant erosion features on the proposed landform, resulting in substantial erosion features in terms of size and amount of hillslope material eroded and transported downslope. Overall both models produce very similar results providing confidence in the models themselves, parameterisation and predictions. The results highlight the usefulness of such modelling in terms of design assessment.

  8. Influence of long-distance climate teleconnection on seasonality of water temperature in the world's largest lake--Lake Baikal, Siberia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L Katz

    Full Text Available Large-scale climate change is superimposed on interacting patterns of climate variability that fluctuate on numerous temporal and spatial scales--elements of which, such as seasonal timing, may have important impacts on local and regional ecosystem forcing. Lake Baikal in Siberia is not only the world's largest and most biologically diverse lake, but it has exceptionally strong seasonal structure in ecosystem dynamics that may be dramatically affected by fluctuations in seasonal timing. We applied time-frequency analysis to a near-continuous, 58-year record of water temperature from Lake Baikal to examine how seasonality in the lake has fluctuated over the past half century and to infer underlying mechanisms. On decadal scales, the timing of seasonal onset strongly corresponds with deviation in the zonal wind intensity as described by length of day (LOD; on shorter scales, these temperature patterns shift in concert with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO. Importantly, the connection between ENSO and Lake Baikal is gated by the cool and warm periods of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO. Large-scale climatic phenomena affecting Siberia are apparent in Lake Baikal surface water temperature data, dynamics resulting from jet stream and storm track variability in central Asia and across the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Paleomagnetism of trap intrusions, East Siberia: Implications to flood basalt emplacement and the Permo-Triassic crisis of biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Konstantin M.; Bazhenov, Mikhail L.; Fetisova, Anna M.; Khutorskoy, Mikhail D.

    2014-05-01

    Despite decades of concentrated studies, large igneous provinces (LIPs) are still among the most enigmatic phenomena of the Earth evolution. Among the myriad questions facing researchers, the duration of eruptive magmatic activity and its distribution through time are probably the most mysterious ones. Although the accuracy of modern dating techniques offers relatively high resolution, it is impossible to discriminate whether magmatic activity was more or less uniform or concentrated in few powerful outbursts. Consequently, many "trap-related" questions, from their origin to possible impact on the biosphere, still cannot be answered. Some of the above questions can be addressed with paleomagnetic data as have been effectively done in the case of the end-Cretaceous Deccan traps. The Siberian traps are one of the largest LIPs in the Phanerozoic and are thought, by some, to be the triggering event for the end-Permian mass extinction. We conducted a paleomagnetic study of trap intrusions along two long profiles in the eastern part of the province and found that most site-mean directions are grouped several times tighter than is common for the data on thick lava series and dyke swarms; similar over-grouping is found in other parts of the Siberian trap province too. We argue that this phenomenon is the most likely related to nearly simultaneous emplacement of trap intrusions over areas of several ten to few hundred kilometers in dimension for few millenniums or even faster. Moreover, such brief events account for all, or nearly all, magmatism in each area; how such events correlate over the entire Siberian LIP, however, remains an open question. Still, our data together with paleomagnetic results on thick lava series in Siberia strongly indicate that magmatic activity consisted of a number of brief pulses. In comparison to the other LIPs, the Siberian one is underlain by the thickest succession of carbonates, evaporites and coal-bearing clastics that are capable of

  10. Effect of permafrost thawing on organic carbon and trace element colloidal speciation in the thermokarst lakes of western Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Pokrovsky

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To examine the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and biodegradation during permafrost thawing and to establish a link between organic carbon (OC and other chemical and microbiological parameters in forming thermokarst (thaw lakes, we studied the biogeochemistry of OC and trace elements (TEs in a chronosequence of small lakes that are being formed due to permafrost thawing in the northern part of western Siberia. Twenty lakes and small ponds of various sizes and ages were sampled for dissolved and colloidal organic carbon, metals and culturable heterotrophic bacterial cell number. We observed a sequence of ecosystems from peat thawing and palsa degradation due to permafrost subsidence in small ponds to large, km-size lakes that are subject to drainage to, finally, the khasyrey (drained lake formation. There is a systematic evolution of both total dissolved and colloidal concentration of OC and TEs in the lake water along with the chronosequence of lake development that may be directly linked to the microbial mineralization of dissolved organic matter and the liberation of the inorganic components (Fe, Al, and TEs from the organo-mineral colloids.

    In this chronosequence of lake development, we observed an apparent decrease in the relative proportion of low molecular weight <1 kDa (1 kDa ~ 1 nm OC concentration along with a decrease in the concentration of total dissolved (<0.45 μm OC. This decrease was accompanied by an increase in the small size organic ligands (probably autochthonous exometabolites produced by the phytoplankton and a simultaneous decrease in the proportion of large-size organic (humic complexes of allochthonous (soil origin. This evolution may be due to the activity of heterotrophic bacterioplankton that use allochthonous organic matter and dissolved nutrients originating from peat lixiviation. Most insoluble TEs demonstrate a systematic decrease in concentration during filtration (5 μm, 0.45 μm exhibiting a similar

  11. AMS 14C and 230Th/U dating on stalagmites from North Altai Mountain, Siberia, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. C.; Yin, J. J.; Blyakharchuk, T.; Shen, C. C.

    2017-12-01

    Three stalagmites, two from Lunnaya Cave (LUN-1 and LUN-2, 52º40.729'N, 88º43.854' E, 481 m a.s.l.), one from Nadezhda Cave (HOP-1, 52º38.872'N, 88º39.194'E, 550 m a.s.l.) located along Mrassy River in the northern Altai Mountains, Siberia, Russia were collected in the summer of 2016 for paleoclimate reconstruction. HOP-1 is a 21-cm long stalagmite which contains very low U content (238U = 70 ppb) and relatively high Th content (232Th = 2 9.3 ppb), resulting in unsuccessful 230Th/U dating (-262 ± 284 yr BP in the top and -19,935 ± 22,246 yr BP). Thirty one AMS 14C dates from 27 horizons of the stalagmite provide a detailed chronology, showing that the stalagmite grew from 6,350 ± 45 yr BP to 490 ± 10 Calib. yr BP. Both LUN-1 and LUN-2 are about 20-cm long. The growth feature of LUN-2 is similar to that of HOP-1 with continuous growth, clear bands of depositional cycles in white non-transparent calcite, whereas LUN-1 has light yellow transparent calcite in the center part with multiple growth hiatuses. The 230Th/U dates show that LUN-1 from 2725 ± 775 yr BP at 193 mm depth to 823 ± 28 yr BP at 12 mm depth with very fast growth rate during 900 1500 yr BP. The AMS 14C dates of LUN-1 provide similar growth pattern with very fast growth between the first hiatus at 12 mm depth and the second hiatus at 155 cm depth. Six 14C dates from this fast growth period are all around 1500 Calib. yr BP without a correct age sequence. Two 14C dates from the top 12 mm exhibit "nuclear bomb signal" (percentage of modern carbon >100%). Similar ages of AMS 14C and 230Th/U dating results in the lower part indicate that dead carbon influence in radiocarbon ages are negligible. 230Th/U dating is not successful for LUN-2. The preliminary AMS 14C dating on LUN-2 shows that the stalagmite continuously deposited from 13335 ± 150 Calib. yr BP. All three stalagmites do not have growth deposition during the Little Ice Age due to cold and dry climates. Further work on stable isotope

  12. INTERBLOCK ZONES IN THE CRUST OF THE SOUTHERN REGIONS OF EAST SIBERIA: TECTONOPHYSICAL INTERPRETATION OF GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The zone-block structure of the lithosphere is represented by a hierarchically organized pattern of stable blocks and mobile zones which border such blocks and contain highly dislocated geological medium (Fig. 1. Today, different specialists adhere to different concepts of blocks and zones, which are two main elements of the lithosphere structure. Differences are most significant in determinations of ‘interblock zones’ that are named as deformation / destructive / contact / mobile / fracture zones etc. due to their diversity in different conditions of deformation. One of the most effective approaches to studying the zone-block structure of the lithosphere is a combination of geological and geophysical studies of interblock zones tectonic features on various scales, which can make it possible to reveal the most common patterns of the interblock zones, general regularities of their development and relationships between the interblock zones.The main objectives of our study were (1 to identify the zone-block structure of the crust in the southern regions of East Siberia from tectonophysical analysis of geological and geophysical surveys conducted on four different scales along the 500 km long Shertoy-Krasny Chikoy transect crossing the marginal segment of the Siberian block, the Baikal rift and the Transbaikalian block (Fig. 2; (2 to clarify structural features of the central part of the Baikal rift (representing the tectonic type of interblock extension zone by applying new research methods, such as radon emanation survey, to the Shertoy-Krasny Chikoy transect and using the previously applied methods, such as magnetotelluric sounding, on a smaller scale; and (3 to study manifestation of interblock zones of various ranks in different geological and geophysical fields, to reveal common specific features of their structural patterns for the upper crust, and to establish regularities of hierarchic and spatial relationships between the interblock

  13. Delta Morphodynamics Matters! Ecosystem Services, Poverty and Morphodynamic Change in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Mega-Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, R. J.; Adger, N.; Allan, A.; Darby, S. E.; Hutton, C.; Matthews, Z.; Rahman, M.; Whitehead, P. G.; Wolf, J.

    2013-12-01

    The world's deltas are probably the most vulnerable type of coastal environment, and they face multiple stresses in the coming decades. These stresses include, amongst others, local drivers due to land subsidence, population growth and urbanisation within the deltas, regional drivers due to changes in catchment management (e.g. upstream land use and dam construction), as well as global climate change impacts such as sea-level rise. At the same time, the ecosystem services of river deltas support high population densities, with around 14% of the global population inhabiting deltas. A large proportion of these people experience extremes of poverty and they are therefore severely exposed to vulnerability from environmental and ecological stress and degradation. In areas close to or below the poverty boundary, both subsistence and cash elements of the economy tend to rely disproportionately heavily on ecosystem services which underpin livelihoods. Therefore, to sustainably manage delta environments they must be viewed as complex social-environmental systems where change is only partially driven by physical drivers such as sea level rise and climate change, and human-induced development activities are also critical. Here we outline a new conceptual framework for the development of methods to understand and characterise the key drivers of change in ecosystem services that affect the environment and economic status of populous deltas, focusing specifically on the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) mega-delta. The GBM delta is characterised by densely populated coastal lowlands with significant poverty, with livelihoods supported to a large extent by natural ecosystems such as the Sunderbahns (the largest mangrove forest in the world). However, the GBM delta is under severe development pressure due to many growing cities. At present the importance of ecosystems services to poverty and livelihoods is poorly understood. This is due to due to the complexity of interactions

  14. The DELTA 181 lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ralph M.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Leigh, A. P.

    In 1986, the Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) undertook the development of a sensor module for the DELTA 181 spacecraft, a low earth orbit (LEO) mission of less than two months duration. A large lithium thionyl chloride battery was developed as the spacecraft's primary power source, the first known such use for this technology. The exceptionally high energy density of the lithium thionyl chloride cell was the primary driver for its use, resulting in a completed battery with a specific energy density of 120 Wh/lb. Safety requirements became the primary driver shaping all aspects of the power system design and development due to concerns about the potential hazards of this relatively new, high-energy technology. However, the program was completed without incident. The spacecraft was launched on February 8, 1988, from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) with over 60,000 Wh of battery energy. It reentered on April 2, 1988, still operating after 55 days, providing a successful, practical, and visible demonstration of the use of this technology for spacecraft applications.

  15. Environmental Risk Profiling of the Volta Delta, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, B. K.; Appeaning-Addo, K.; Amisigo, B.

    2017-12-01

    Volta Delta communities find it difficult to absorb or bear risk at different levels, because of the physical and economic impacts of environmental hazards. In this regards various agencies and organizations have in recent years launched initiatives to measure and identify risk areas with a set of indicators and indices. The theory underpinning this study is concepts of Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT). The Cox proportional hazards regression model will be used as the model for the risk profile. Finding the optimal level of environmental risk for activities in the Volta Delta considering the risk required, risk capacity and risk tolerance. Using data from different sources, an environmental risk profile was developed for the Volta Delta. The result indicates that risks are distributed across the Delta. However, areas that have government interventions, such as sea defense system and irrigation facilities have less threat. In addition wealthy areas do effectively reduce the threat of any form of disaster.

  16. New research centre supports adaptation efforts in Egypt's Nile Delta

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... Dr Mohamed Abdrabo is the Executive Director of the Alexandria Research Centre for Adaptation to Climate Change, a new research centre that supports Egypt´s adaptation policies for the Nile Delta.

  17. Delta progradation in Greenland driven by increasing glacial mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Iversen, Lars Lonsmann; Bjork, Anders Anker

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes are pronounced in Arctic regions and increase the vulnerability of the Arctic coastal zone(1). For example, increases in melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and reductions in sea ice and permafrost distribution are likely to alter coastal morphodynamics. The deltas of Greenland...... of erosion and accretion along the large deltas of the main rivers in the Arctic5-7. Our results improve the understanding of Arctic coastal evolution in a changing climate, and reveal the impacts on coastal areas of increasing ice mass loss and the associated freshwater runoff and lengthening of open...... are largely unaffected by human activity, but increased freshwater runoff and sediment fluxes may increase the size of the deltas, whereas increased wave activity in ice-free periods could reduce their size, with the net impact being unclear until now. Here we show that southwestern Greenland deltas were...

  18. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  19. LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — LiDAR data for the Delta Area of California from the California Department of Water Resources. Bare earth grids from LiDAR.This data is in ESRI Grid format with 2...

  20. Analysis and design for delta operator systems with actuator saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongjiu; Shi, Peng; Li, Zhiwei; Hua, Changchun

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the problem of estimating the domain of attraction for delta operator systems under a pre-designed saturated linear feedback. Ellipsoids are used as the estimates of domain of attraction for delta operator systems. A condition is derived in terms of an auxiliary feedback matrix for determining if a given ellipsoid is contractive invariant. Moreover, some necessary and sufficient conditions are given for single input delta operator systems. The results are also further extended to determine the invariant sets for delta operator systems with persistent disturbances. Linear matrix inequalities based on the methods are developed for constructing feedback laws that achieve disturbance rejection with guaranteed stability requirements. Some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the developed techniques.